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Sample records for adiabatic density perturbations

  1. Degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory: Foundations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigolin, Gustavo; Ortiz, Gerardo

    2014-08-01

    We present details and expand on the framework leading to the recently introduced degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 170406 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.170406], and on the formulation of the degenerate adiabatic theorem, along with its necessary and sufficient conditions [given in Phys. Rev. A 85, 062111 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.062111]. We start with the adiabatic approximation for degenerate Hamiltonians that paves the way to a clear and rigorous statement of the associated degenerate adiabatic theorem, where the non-Abelian geometric phase (Wilczek-Zee phase) plays a central role to its quantitative formulation. We then describe the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory, whose zeroth-order term is the degenerate adiabatic approximation, in its full generality. The parameter in the perturbative power-series expansion of the time-dependent wave function is directly associated to the inverse of the time it takes to drive the system from its initial to its final state. With the aid of the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory we obtain rigorous necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. Finally, to illustrate the power and wide scope of the methodology, we apply the framework to a degenerate Hamiltonian, whose closed-form time-dependent wave function is derived exactly, and also to other nonexactly solvable Hamiltonians whose solutions are numerically computed.

  2. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  3. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  4. Adiabaticity and gravity theory independent conservation laws for cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Mooij, Sander; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-04-01

    We carefully study the implications of adiabaticity for the behavior of cosmological perturbations. There are essentially three similar but different definitions of non-adiabaticity: one is appropriate for a thermodynamic fluid δPnad, another is for a general matter field δPc,nad, and the last one is valid only on superhorizon scales. The first two definitions coincide if cs2 = cw2 where cs is the propagation speed of the perturbation, while cw2 = P ˙ / ρ ˙ . Assuming the adiabaticity in the general sense, δPc,nad = 0, we derive a relation between the lapse function in the comoving slicing Ac and δPnad valid for arbitrary matter field in any theory of gravity, by using only momentum conservation. The relation implies that as long as cs ≠cw, the uniform density, comoving and the proper-time slicings coincide approximately for any gravity theory and for any matter field if δPnad = 0 approximately. In the case of general relativity this gives the equivalence between the comoving curvature perturbation Rc and the uniform density curvature perturbation ζ on superhorizon scales, and their conservation. This is realized on superhorizon scales in standard slow-roll inflation. We then consider an example in which cw =cs, where δPnad = δPc,nad = 0 exactly, but the equivalence between Rc and ζ no longer holds. Namely we consider the so-called ultra slow-roll inflation. In this case both Rc and ζ are not conserved. In particular, as for ζ, we find that it is crucial to take into account the next-to-leading order term in ζ's spatial gradient expansion to show its non-conservation, even on superhorizon scales. This is an example of the fact that adiabaticity (in the thermodynamic sense) is not always enough to ensure the conservation of Rc or ζ.

  5. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  6. Model for fluctuating inflaton coupling: sneutrino induced adiabatic perturbations and nonthermal leptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Anupam

    2004-06-18

    We discuss a unique possibility of generating adiabatic density perturbations and leptogenesis from the spatial fluctuations of the inflaton decay rate. The key assumption is that the initial isocurvature perturbations are created in the right-handed sneutrino sector during inflation which is then converted into adiabatic perturbations when the inflaton decays. We discuss distinct imprints on the cosmic microwave background radiation, which can distinguish nonthermal versus thermal leptogenesis. PMID:15245073

  7. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Chris; Saffin, Paul M.

    2013-08-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit.

  8. Adiabatic approximation for the density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.

    1992-05-01

    An adiabatic approximation for the Liouville density-matrix equation which includes decay terms is developed. The adiabatic approximation employs the eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator. The approximation is valid when there exists a complete set of eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator (i.e., the eigenvectors span the density-matrix space), the time rate of change of the Liouville operator is small, and an auxiliary matrix is nonsingular. Numerical examples are presented involving efficient population transfer in a molecule by stimulated Raman scattering, with the intermediate level of the molecule decaying on a time scale that is fast compared with the pulse durations of the pump and Stokes fields. The adiabatic density-matrix approximation can be simply used to determine the density matrix for atomic or molecular systems interacting with cw electromagnetic fields when spontaneous emission or other decay mechanisms prevail.

  9. Adiabatic perturbation theory of electronic stopping in insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Andrew P.; Lim, Anthony; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Correa, Alfredo A.

    2016-06-01

    A model able to explain the complicated structure of electronic stopping at low velocities in insulating materials is presented. It is shown to be in good agreement with results obtained from time-dependent density-functional theory for the stopping of a channeling Si atom in a Si crystal. If we define the repeat frequency f =v /λ , where λ is the periodic repeat length of the crystal along the direction the channeling atom is traveling, and v is the velocity of the channeling atom, we find that electrons experience a perturbing force that varies in time at integer multiples l of f . This enables electronic excitations at low atom velocity, but their contributions diminish rapidly with increasing values of l . The expressions for stopping power are derived using adiabatic perturbation theory for many-electron systems, and they are then specialized to the case of independent electrons. A simple model for the nonadiabatic matrix elements is described, along with the procedure for determining its parameters.

  10. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  11. Quantum corrections during inflation and conservation of adiabatic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, David

    2010-02-15

    The possibility that quantum corrections break the conservation of superhorizon adiabatic perturbations in single field inflation is examined. I consider the lowest order corrections from massless matter fields in the Hamiltonian formalism. Particular emphasis is therefore laid on the renormalization. The counterterms are the same as in the Lagrangian formalism. The renormalized value of the tadpole is zero. I find a possible secular dependence of the power spectrum at one loop due to the trace anomaly, but this result depends on the approximation of the modes and is inconclusive. The symmetry (not) violated by the quantum corrections is the invariance by dilatation. Perspectives on the backreaction problem are briefly discussed.

  12. The density temperature and the dry and wet virtual adiabats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlo, J.; Betts, Alan K.

    1991-01-01

    A density temperature is introduced to represent virtual temperature and potential temperature on thermodynamic diagrams. This study reviews how the dry and wet virtual adiabats can be used to represent stability and air parcel density for unsaturated and cloudy air, and present formula and tabulations.

  13. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs. PMID:26916031

  14. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov- Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs. PMID:26916031

  15. Perturbation to Mei Symmetry and Adiabatic Invariants for Disturbed El-Nabulsi's Fractional Birkhoff System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chuan-Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    For El-Nabulsi's fractional Birkhoff system, Mei symmetry perturbation, the corresponding Mei-type adiabatic invariants and Noether-type adiabatic invariants are investigated in this paper. Firstly, based on El-Nabulsi-Birkhoff fractional equations, Mei symmetry and the corresponding Mei conserved quantity, Noether conserved quantity deduced indirectly by Mei symmetry are studied. Secondly, Mei-type exact invariants and Noether-type exact invariants are given on the basis of the definition of adiabatic invatiant. Thirdly, Mei symmetry perturbation, Mei-type adiabatic invariants and Noether-type adiabatic invariants for the disturbed El-Nabulsi's fractional Birkhoff system are studied. Finally, two examples, Hojman-Urrutia problem for Mei-type adiabatic invariants and another for the Noether-type adiabatic invariants, are given to illustrate the application of the results. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 10972151 and 11272227, and the Innovation Program for Scientific Research of Nanjing University of Science and Technology

  16. Adiabatic corrections to density functional theory energies and wave functions.

    PubMed

    Mohallem, José R; Coura, Thiago de O; Diniz, Leonardo G; de Castro, Gustavo; Assafrão, Denise; Heine, Thomas

    2008-09-25

    The adiabatic finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC) to the electronic energies and wave functions of atoms and molecules is formulated for density-functional theory and implemented in the deMon code. The approach is tested for a series of local and gradient corrected density functionals, using MP2 results and diagonal-Born-Oppenheimer corrections from the literature for comparison. In the evaluation of absolute energy corrections of nonorganic molecules the LDA PZ81 functional works surprisingly better than the others. For organic molecules the GGA BLYP functional has the best performance. FNMC with GGA functionals, mainly BLYP, show a good performance in the evaluation of relative corrections, except for nonorganic molecules containing H atoms. The PW86 functional stands out with the best evaluation of the barrier of linearity of H2O and the isotopic dipole moment of HDO. In general, DFT functionals display an accuracy superior than the common belief and because the corrections are based on a change of the electronic kinetic energy they are here ranked in a new appropriate way. The approach is applied to obtain the adiabatic correction for full atomization of alcanes C(n)H(2n+2), n = 4-10. The barrier of 1 mHartree is approached for adiabatic corrections, justifying its insertion into DFT. PMID:18537228

  17. Degenerate Open Shell Density Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Mark; Dunlap, Brett

    The density perturbation theory (DPT) methodology we have developed applies the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem to perturbations in density functional theory. At each order, the energy is directly minimized with respect to the density at all lower orders. The difference between the perturbed and unperturbed densities is expanded in terms of a finite number of basis functions, and a single matrix inversion in this space reduces the complexity of the problem to that of non-interacting perturbation theory. For open-shell systems with symmetry, however, the situation becomes more complex. Typically, the perturbation will break the symmetry leading to a zeroth-order shift in the Kohn-Sham potential. Because the symmetry breaking is independent of the strength of the perturbation, the mapping from the initial to the perturbed KS potential is discontinuous and techniques from perturbation theory for noninteracting particles fail. We describe a rigorous formulation of DPT for use in systems that display an initial degeneracy, such as atoms and Fe55Cp*12 clusters and present initial calculations on these systems.

  18. Turbulent Density Variations in Non-Adiabatic Interstellar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, J. C.; Conley, Alex

    1998-05-01

    Analyses of radio scintillation measurements have demonstrated (e.g., Rickett, ARAA, 28, 561, 1990) the existence of ubiquitous turbulent density fluctuations in the interstellar medium. Higdon (ApJ, 309, 342, 1986) and Goldreich and Sridhar (ApJ, 438, 763 1995) have modeled successfully these density variations as entropy structures distorted by convection in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows. However, the interstellar medium is a heterogeneous non-adiabatic fluid whose thermal properties result ( Field, ApJ, 142, 531 1965) from a balance of heating and cooling rates. The effect of the non-adiabatic nature of interstellar fluids on the properties of turbulent cascades to small scales has not been considered previously. We find that in thermally stable fluids that the required balance of heating and cooling decreases the amplitudes of entropy structures independently of their spatial scale. Consequently, we show that if the time scale for turbulent flows to cascade to small scales is significantly greater than the cooling time of an interstellar fluid, the generation of turbulent denisty density variations at large wave numbers is greatly suppressed. Such results constrain possible values for the turbulent outer scale in models of interstellar turbulent flows.

  19. Adiabatic perturbations in pre-big bang models: Matching conditions and scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2002-10-01

    At low energy, the four-dimensional effective action of the ekpyrotic model of the universe is equivalent to a slightly modified version of the pre-big bang model. We discuss cosmological perturbations in these models. In particular we address the issue of matching the perturbations from a collapsing to an expanding phase. We show that, under certain physically motivated and quite generic assumptions on the high energy corrections, one obtains n=0 for the spectrum of scalar perturbations in the original pre-big bang model (with a vanishing potential). With the same assumptions, when an exponential potential for the dilaton is included, a scale invariant spectrum (n=1) of adiabatic scalar perturbations is produced under very generic matching conditions, both in a modified pre-big bang and ekpyrotic scenario. We also derive the resulting spectrum for arbitrary power law scale factors matched to a radiation-dominated era.

  20. Perturbation calculation of thermodynamic density of states

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Greg; Schulthess, Thomas C; Nicholson, Don M; Eisenbach, Markus; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    The density of states g( ) is frequently used to calculate the temperature-dependent properties of a thermodynamic system. Here a derivation is given for calculating the warped density of states g ( ) resulting from the addition of a perturbation. The method is validated for a classical Heisenberg model of bcc Fe and the errors in the free energy are shown to be second order in the perturbation. Taking the perturbation to be the difference between a first-principles quantum-mechanical energy and a corresponding classical energy, this method can significantly reduce the computational effort required to calculate g( ) for quantum systems using the Wang-Landau approach.

  1. Cosmological density perturbations in a conformal scalar field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libanov, M. V.; Rubakov, V. A.

    2012-02-01

    We consider a scenario in which primordial scalar perturbations are generated when a complex conformal scalar field rolls down its negative quartic potential. Initially, these are perturbations of the phase of this field, which are then converted into adiabatic perturbations of the density. The existence of perturbations in the radial field direction, which have a red power spectrum, is a potentially dangerous feature of this scenario. But we show that in the linear order in the small parameter, the self-coupling, the infrared effects are completely nullified by an appropriate field redefinition. We evaluate the statistical anisotropy inherent in the model because of the presence of the long-wave perturbations of the radial field component. In the linear order in the self-coupling, the infrared effects do not affect the statistical anisotropy. They are manifested only at the quadratic order in the self-coupling, weakly (logarithmically) enhancing the corresponding contribution to the statistical anisotropy. The resulting statistical anisotropy is a combination of a large term, which decreases as the momentum increases, and a momentum-independent nonamplified term.

  2. The correlation function for density perturbations in an expanding universe. I - Linear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclelland, J.; Silk, J.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of the two-point correlation function for adiabatic density perturbations in the early universe is studied. Analytical solutions are obtained for the evolution of linearized spherically symmetric adiabatic density perturbations and the two-point correlation function for these perturbations in the radiation-dominated portion of the early universe. The results are then extended to the regime after decoupling. It is found that: (1) adiabatic spherically symmetric perturbations comparable in scale with the maximum Jeans length would survive the radiation-dominated regime; (2) irregular fluctuations are smoothed out up to the scale of the maximum Jeans length in the radiation era, but regular fluctuations might survive on smaller scales; (3) in general, the only surviving structures for irregularly shaped adiabatic density perturbations of arbitrary but finite scale in the radiation regime are the size of or larger than the maximum Jeans length in that regime; (4) infinite plane waves with a wavelength smaller than the maximum Jeans length but larger than the critical dissipative damping scale could survive the radiation regime; and (5) black holes would also survive the radiation regime and might accrete sufficient mass after decoupling to nucleate the formation of galaxies.

  3. Tent-induced perturbations on areal density of implosions at the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, R.; Field, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Landen, O. L.; Haan, S. W.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. A.; Ma, T.; Meezan, N. B.; Nagel, S. R.; Rygg, J. R.; Segraves, K. S.; Stadermann, M.; Strauser, R. J.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-05-01

    Areal density non-uniformities seeded by time-dependent drive variations and target imperfections in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets can grow in time as the capsule implodes, with growth rates that are amplified by instabilities. Here, we report on the first measurements of the perturbations on the density and areal density profiles induced by the membranes used to hold the capsule within the hohlraum in indirect drive ICF targets. The measurements are based on the reconstruction of the ablator density profiles from 2D radiographs obtained using pinhole imaging coupled to area backlighting, as close as 150 ps to peak compression. Our study shows a clear correlation between the modulations imposed on the areal density and measured neutron yield, and a 3× reduction in the areal density perturbations comparing a high-adiabat vs. low-adiabat pulse shape.

  4. Tent-induced perturbations on areal density of implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R. Field, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Landen, O. L.; Haan, S. W.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. A.; Ma, T.; Meezan, N. B.; Nagel, S. R.; Rygg, J. R.; Stadermann, M.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Areal density non-uniformities seeded by time-dependent drive variations and target imperfections in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets can grow in time as the capsule implodes, with growth rates that are amplified by instabilities. Here, we report on the first measurements of the perturbations on the density and areal density profiles induced by the membranes used to hold the capsule within the hohlraum in indirect drive ICF targets. The measurements are based on the reconstruction of the ablator density profiles from 2D radiographs obtained using pinhole imaging coupled to area backlighting, as close as 150 ps to peak compression. Our study shows a clear correlation between the modulations imposed on the areal density and measured neutron yield, and a 3× reduction in the areal density perturbations comparing a high-adiabat vs. low-adiabat pulse shape.

  5. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Discussion on Perturbation to Weak Noether Symmetry and Adiabatic Invariants for Lagrange Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Fang, Jian-Hui; Wang, Xian-Ming

    2009-03-01

    We study a new symmetric perturbation, i.e. weakly Noether symmetric perturbation (WNSP). The criterion and definition of WNSP and Noether symmetric perturbation (NSP) are given. A theorem between WNSP and adiabatic invariants is established. It is concluded that WNSP is different from NSP, the sufficient condition when WNSP is NSP can be presented, and the former is broader. We apply our results to the planar Kepler problem.

  6. Silk damping at a redshift of a billion: new limit on small-scale adiabatic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Donghui; Pradler, Josef; Chluba, Jens; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We study the dissipation of small-scale adiabatic perturbations at early times when the Universe is hotter than T≃0.5  keV. When the wavelength falls below the damping scale k(D)(-1), the acoustic modes diffuse and thermalize, causing entropy production. Before neutrino decoupling, k(D) is primarily set by the neutrino shear viscosity, and we study the effect of acoustic damping on the relic neutrino number, primordial nucleosynthesis, dark-matter freeze-out, and baryogenesis. This sets a new limit on the amplitude of primordial fluctuations of Δ(R)(2)<0.007 at 10(4)  Mpc(-1)≲k≲10(5)  Mpc(-1) and a model-dependent limit of Δ(R)(2)≲0.3 at k≲10(20-25)  Mpc(-1). PMID:25148313

  7. Thermospheric density perturbations in response to substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Milan, S. E.; Grocott, A.

    2014-06-01

    We use 5 years (2001-2005) of CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) satellite data to study average spatial and temporal mass density perturbations caused by magnetospheric substorms in the thermosphere. Using statistics from 2306 substorms to construct superposed epoch time series, we find that the largest average increase in mass density of about 6% occurs about 90 min after substorm expansion phase onset about 3 h of magnetic local time east of the onset region. Averaged over the entire polar auroral region, a mass density increase of about 4% is observed. Using a simple model to estimate the mass density increase at the satellite altitude, we find that an energy deposition rate of 30 GW applied for half an hour predominantly at an altitude of 110 km is able to produce mass density enhancements of the same magnitude. When taking into account previous work that has shown that 80% of the total energy input is due to Joule heating, i.e., enhanced electric fields, whereas 20% is due to precipitation of mainly electrons, our results suggest that the average substorm deposits about 6 GW in the polar thermosphere through particle precipitation. Our result is in good agreement with simultaneous measurements of the NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) Hemispheric Power Index; however, it is about 1 order of magnitude less than reported previously.

  8. Density perturbations in general modified gravitational theories

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2010-07-15

    We derive the equations of linear cosmological perturbations for the general Lagrangian density f(R,{phi},X)/2+L{sub c}, where R is a Ricci scalar, {phi} is a scalar field, and X=-{partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}/}2 is a field kinetic energy. We take into account a nonlinear self-interaction term L{sub c}={xi}({phi}) {open_square}{phi}({partial_derivative}{sup {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}}{sub {mu}{phi}}) recently studied in the context of ''Galileon'' cosmology, which keeps the field equations at second order. Taking into account a scalar-field mass explicitly, the equations of matter density perturbations and gravitational potentials are obtained under a quasistatic approximation on subhorizon scales. We also derive conditions for the avoidance of ghosts and Laplacian instabilities associated with propagation speeds. Our analysis includes most of modified gravity models of dark energy proposed in literature; and thus it is convenient to test the viability of such models from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  9. Planck constraints on neutrino isocurvature density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    The recent cosmic microwave background data from the Planck satellite experiment, when combined with Hubble Space Telescope determinations of the Hubble constant, are compatible with a larger, nonstandard number of relativistic degrees of freedom at recombination, parametrized by the neutrino effective number Neff . In the curvaton scenario, a larger value for Neff could arise from a nonzero neutrino chemical potential connected to residual neutrino isocurvature density (NID) perturbations after the decay of the curvaton field, the component of which is parametrized by the amplitude αNID . Here we present new constraints on Neff and αNID from an analysis of recent cosmological data. We find that the Planck+WMAP polarization data set does not show any indication of a NID component (severely constraining its amplitude), and that current indications for a nonstandard Neff are further relaxed.

  10. Red density perturbations and inflationary gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, Luca; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha; Kamionkowski, Marc E-mail: acooray@uci.edu E-mail: kamion@tapir.caltech.edu

    2008-04-15

    We study the implications of recent indications from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and other cosmological data for a red spectrum of primordial density perturbations for the detection of inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs) with forthcoming cosmic microwave background experiments. We consider a variety of single-field power-law, chaotic, spontaneous symmetry-breaking and Coleman-Weinberg inflationary potentials which are expected to provide a sizable tensor component and quantify the expected tensor-to-scalar ratio given existing constraints from WMAP on the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the power spectrum tilt. We discuss the ability of the near-future Planck satellite to detect the IGW background in the framework of those models. We find that the proposed satellite missions of the Cosmic Vision and Inflation Probe programs will be able to detect IGWs from all the models we have surveyed at better than 5{sigma} confidence level. We also provide an example of what is required if the IGW background is to remain undetected even by these latter experiments.

  11. Constraints on primordial density perturbations from induced gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Wands, David

    2010-01-15

    We consider the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced during the radiation-dominated hot big bang as a constraint on the primordial density perturbation on comoving length scales much smaller than those directly probed by the cosmic microwave background or large-scale structure. We place weak upper bounds on the primordial density perturbation from current data. Future detectors such as BBO and DECIGO will place much stronger constraints on the primordial density perturbation on small scales.

  12. Flexoelectricity from density-functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stengel, Massimiliano

    2013-11-01

    We derive the complete flexoelectric tensor, including electronic and lattice-mediated effects, of an arbitrary insulator in terms of the microscopic linear response of the crystal to atomic displacements. The basic ingredient, which can be readily calculated from first principles in the framework of density-functional perturbation theory, is the quantum-mechanical probability current response to a long-wavelength acoustic phonon. Its second-order Taylor expansion in the wave vector q around the Γ (q=0) point in the Brillouin zone naturally yields the flexoelectric tensor. At order one in q we recover Martin's theory of piezoelectricity [Martin, Phys. Rev. B 5, 1607 (1972)], thus providing an alternative derivation thereof. To put our derivations on firm theoretical grounds, we perform a thorough analysis of the nonanalytic behavior of the dynamical matrix and other response functions in a vicinity of Γ. Based on this analysis, we find that there is an ambiguity in the specification of the “zero macroscopic field” condition in the flexoelectric case; such arbitrariness can be related to an analytic band-structure term, in close analogy to the theory of deformation potentials. As a by-product, we derive a rigorous generalization of the Cochran-Cowley formula [Cochran and Cowley, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 23, 447 (1962)] to higher orders in q. This can be of great utility in building reliable atomistic models of electromechanical phenomena, as well as for improving the accuracy of the calculation of phonon dispersion curves. Finally, we discuss the physical interpretation of the various contributions to the flexoelectric response, either in the static or dynamic regime, and we relate our findings to earlier theoretical works on the subject.

  13. Current Density and Plasma Displacement Near Perturbed Rational Surface

    SciTech Connect

    A.H. Boozer and N. Pomphrey

    2010-10-10

    The current density in the vicinity of a rational surface of a force-free magnetic field subjected to an ideal perturbation is shown to be the sum of both a smooth and a delta-function distribution, which give comparable currents. The maximum perturbation to the smooth current density is comparable to a typical equilibrium current density and the width of the layer in which the current flows is shown to be proportional to the perturbation amplitude. In the standard linearized theory, the plasma displacement has an unphysical jump across the rational surface, but the full theory gives a continuous displacement.

  14. Current density and plasma displacement near perturbed rational surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.; Pomphrey, Neil

    2010-11-15

    The current density in the vicinity of a rational surface of a force-free magnetic field subjected to an ideal perturbation is shown to be the sum of both a smooth and a delta-function distribution, which give comparable currents. The maximum perturbation to the smooth current density is comparable to a typical equilibrium current density and the width of the layer in which the current flows is shown to be proportional to the perturbation amplitude. In the standard linearized theory, the plasma displacement has an unphysical jump across the rational surface, but the full theory gives a continuous displacement. A resolution of the paradox of a jump in the displacement is required for interpreting perturbed tokamak equilibria.

  15. Scale invariant density perturbations from cyclic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul Howard

    2016-04-01

    It is shown how quantum fluctuations of the radiation during the contraction era of a comes back empty (CBE) cyclic cosmology can provide density fluctuations which re-enter the horizon during the subsequent expansion era and at lowest order are scale invariant, in a Harrison-Zel’dovich-Peebles sense. It is necessary to be consistent with observations of large scale structure.

  16. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Lee, Frank M.; Morrison, Philip J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2016-05-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field J =p u , which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields p and u , respectively. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous J (x ,z ,t ) from density perturbations alone: A Green's function-based calculation yields p ; u is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: The Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations and the result for J is found to agree typically to within 1% with J computed directly using p and u from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to density perturbation data from laboratory schlieren measurements of internal waves in a stratified fluid and the result for J agrees to within 6 % with results from Navier-Stokes simulations. Our method for determining the instantaneous velocity, pressure, and energy flux fields applies to any system described by a linear approximation of the density perturbation field, e.g., to small-amplitude lee waves and propagating vertical modes. The method can be applied using our matlab graphical user interface EnergyFlux.

  17. Right-handed neutrinos as the source of density perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Creminelli, Paolo

    2006-05-15

    We study the possibility that cosmological density perturbations are generated by the inhomogeneous decay of right-handed neutrinos. This will occur if a scalar field whose fluctuations are created during inflation is coupled to the neutrino sector. Robust predictions of the model are a detectable level of non-Gaussianity and, if standard leptogenesis is the source of the baryon asymmetry, a baryon isocurvature perturbations at the level of the present experimental constraints.

  18. Accurate calculation and modeling of the adiabatic connection in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, A. M.; Coriani, S.; Helgaker, T.

    2010-04-01

    Using a recently implemented technique for the calculation of the adiabatic connection (AC) of density functional theory (DFT) based on Lieb maximization with respect to the external potential, the AC is studied for atoms and molecules containing up to ten electrons: the helium isoelectronic series, the hydrogen molecule, the beryllium isoelectronic series, the neon atom, and the water molecule. The calculation of AC curves by Lieb maximization at various levels of electronic-structure theory is discussed. For each system, the AC curve is calculated using Hartree-Fock (HF) theory, second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) theory, coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) theory, and coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, expanding the molecular orbitals and the effective external potential in large Gaussian basis sets. The HF AC curve includes a small correlation-energy contribution in the context of DFT, arising from orbital relaxation as the electron-electron interaction is switched on under the constraint that the wave function is always a single determinant. The MP2 and CCSD AC curves recover the bulk of the dynamical correlation energy and their shapes can be understood in terms of a simple energy model constructed from a consideration of the doubles-energy expression at different interaction strengths. Differentiation of this energy expression with respect to the interaction strength leads to a simple two-parameter doubles model (AC-D) for the AC integrand (and hence the correlation energy of DFT) as a function of the interaction strength. The structure of the triples-energy contribution is considered in a similar fashion, leading to a quadratic model for the triples correction to the AC curve (AC-T). From a consideration of the structure of a two-level configuration-interaction (CI) energy expression of the hydrogen molecule, a simple two-parameter CI model (AC-CI) is proposed to account for the effects of static correlation on the

  19. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+). PMID:22103768

  20. Adiabatic and nonadiabatic perturbation theory for coherence vector description of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenberg, Sebastian; Päs, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    The standard wave function approach for the treatment of neutrino oscillations fails in situations where quantum ensembles at a finite temperature with or without an interacting background plasma are encountered. As a first step to treat such phenomena in a novel way, we propose a unified approach to both adiabatic and nonadiabatic two-flavor oscillations in neutrino ensembles with finite temperature and generic (e.g., matter) potentials. Neglecting effects of ensemble decoherence for now, we study the evolution of a neutrino ensemble governed by the associated quantum kinetic equations, which apply to systems with finite temperature. The quantum kinetic equations are solved formally using the Magnus expansion and it is shown that a convenient choice of the quantum mechanical picture (e.g., the interaction picture) reveals suitable parameters to characterize the physics of the underlying system (e.g., an effective oscillation length). It is understood that this method also provides a promising starting point for the treatment of the more general case in which decoherence is taken into account.

  1. Proton Radiography as an electromagnetic field and density perturbation diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Patel, P; Town, R; Edwards, M; Phillips, T; Lerner, S; Price, D; Hicks, D; Key, M; Hatchett, S; Wilks, S; King, J; Snavely, R; Freeman, R; Boehlly, T; Koenig, M; Martinolli, E; Lepape, S; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Audebert, P; Gauthier, J; Borghesi, M; Romagnani, L; Toncian, T; Pretzler, G; Willi, O

    2004-04-15

    Laser driven proton beams have been used to diagnose transient fields and density perturbations in laser produced plasmas. Grid deflectometry techniques have been applied to proton radiography to obtain precise measurements of proton beam angles caused by electromagnetic fields in laser produced plasmas. Application of proton radiography to laser driven implosions has demonstrated that density conditions in compressed media can be diagnosed with MeV protons. This data has shown that proton radiography can provide unique insight into transient electromagnetic fields in super critical density plasmas and provide a density perturbation diagnostics in compressed matter . PACS numbers: 52.50.Jm, 52.40.Nk, 52.40.Mj, 52.70.Kz

  2. Adiabatic Approximation of the Correlation Function in the Density-Functional Treatment of Ionization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilken, F.; Bauer, D.

    2006-11-17

    The ionization of a one-dimensional model helium atom in short laser pulses using time-dependent density-functional theory is investigated. We calculate ionization probabilities as a function of laser intensity by approximating the correlation function of the system adiabatically with an explicit dependence on the fractional number of bound electrons. For the correlation potential we take the derivative discontinuity at integer numbers of bound electrons explicitly into account. This approach reproduces ionization probabilities from the solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, in particular, the so-called knee due to nonsequential ionization.

  3. Density perturbations from modulated decay of the curvaton

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, David; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2013-04-01

    We study density perturbations, including their non-Gaussianity, in models in which the decay rate of the curvaton depends on another light scalar field, denoted the modulaton. Although this model shares some similarities with the standard curvaton and modulated reheating scenarios, it exhibits interesting predictions for f{sub NL} and g{sub NL} that are specific to this model. We also discuss the possibility that both modulaton and curvaton fluctuations contribute to the final curvature perturbation. Our results naturally include the standard curvaton and modulated reheating scenarios as specific limits and are thus useful to present a unified treatment of these models and their variants.

  4. Statistics of primordial density perturbations from discrete seed masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1991-01-01

    The statistics of density perturbations for general distributions of seed masses with arbitrary matter accretion is examined. Formal expressions for the power spectrum, the N-point correlation functions, and the density distribution function are derived. These results are applied to the case of uncorrelated seed masses, and power spectra are derived for accretion of both hot and cold dark matter plus baryons. The reduced moments (cumulants) of the density distribution are computed and used to obtain a series expansion for the density distribution function. Analytic results are obtained for the density distribution function in the case of a distribution of seed masses with a spherical top-hat accretion pattern. More generally, the formalism makes it possible to give a complete characterization of the statistical properties of any random field generated from a discrete linear superposition of kernels. In particular, the results can be applied to density fields derived by smoothing a discrete set of points with a window function.

  5. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  6. Adiabatic approximation in time-dependent reduced-density-matrix functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Requist, Ryan; Pankratov, Oleg

    2010-04-15

    With the aim of describing real-time electron dynamics, we introduce an adiabatic approximation for the equation of motion of the one-body reduced density matrix (one-matrix). The eigenvalues of the one-matrix, which represent the occupation numbers of single-particle orbitals, are obtained from the constrained minimization of the instantaneous ground-state energy functional rather than from their dynamical equations. The performance of the approximation vis-a-vis nonadiabatic effects is assessed in real-time simulations of a two-site Hubbard model. Due to Landau-Zener-type transitions, the system evolves into a nonstationary state with persistent oscillations in the observables. The amplitude of the oscillations displays a strongly nonmonotonic dependence on the strength of the electron-electron interaction and the rate of variation of the external potential. We interpret an associated resonance behavior in the phase of the oscillations in terms of 'scattering' with spectator energy levels. To clarify the motivation for the minimization condition, we derive a sequence of energy functionals E{sub v}{sup (n)}, for which the corresponding sequence of minimizing one-matrices is asymptotic to the exact one-matrix in the adiabatic limit.

  7. Quantum Lattice Fluctuations in the Charge Density Wave State beyond the Adiabatic Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shida, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yuko; Gomi, Hiroki; Takahashi, Akira; Tomita, Norikazu

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a tractable numerical method in which large-amplitude quantum lattice fluctuations can be described beyond the adiabatic approximation using the coherent state representation of phonons. A many-body wave function is constructed by the superposition of direct products of non-orthogonal Slater determinants for electrons and coherent states of phonons. Both orbitals in all the Slater determinants and the amplitudes of all the coherent states are simultaneously optimized. We apply the method to the one-dimensional Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model with the on-site and nearest-neighbor-site Coulomb interactions. It is shown the lattice fluctuations in doped charge density wave (CDW) systems are described by the translational and vibrational motion of lattice solitons. Such lattice solitons induce bond alternation in the doped CDW system while the lattice becomes equidistant in the half-filled CDW system.

  8. Simulations of Electron Density Perturbations in a Gas Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinger, James; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Beginning with the idealized case of the Pierce diode, a series of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are conducted in order to characterize density perturbations in a laboratory gas discharge. This work is conducted to support future experimental investigations into electromagnetic scattering off of electron density perturbations excited by plasma flows. As a first step, 2D PIC simulations were conducted for the Pierce diode case, which is a simple model that exploits instabilities of a monochromatic electron beam between two grounded electrodes. These results were compared to the standard analytical solution. Departing from this idealized case we will include in the simulations electron-neutral collisions, particle creation from ionization, as well as an electric field generated by biased electrodes. A parameter study of electric field strength and collision frequency will be performed for values approaching the Pierce diode as well as extending to cases of expected laboratory parameters. If we can extract physical density spectra from simulations with parameters approaching experimental values, it may be possible to analyze electromagnetic scattering characteristics.

  9. Non-scale-invariant density perturbations from chaotic extended inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerach, S. ); Matarrese, S. )

    1992-03-15

    Chaotic inflation is analyzed in the frame of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Fluctuations in the energy density arise from quantum fluctuations of the Brans-Dicke field and of the inflaton field. The spectrum of perturbations is studied for a class of models: it is non-scale-invariant and, for certain values of the parameters, it has a peak. If the peak appears at astrophysically interesting scales it may help to reconcile the cold-dark-matter scenario for structure formation with large-scale observations.

  10. Non scale-invariant density perturbations from chaotic extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollerach, Silvia; Matarrese, Sabino

    1991-01-01

    Chaotic inflation is analyzed in the frame of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Fluctuations in the energy density arise from quantum fluctuations of the Brans-Dicke field and of the inflation field. The spectrum of perturbations is studied for a class of models: it is non scale-invarient and, for certain values of the parameters, it has a peak. If the peak appears at astrophysically interesting scales, it may help to reconcile the Cold Dark Matter scenario for structure formation with large scale observations.

  11. Path integral density matrix dynamics: A method for calculating time-dependent properties in thermal adiabatic and non-adiabatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Habershon, Scott

    2013-09-14

    We introduce a new approach for calculating quantum time-correlation functions and time-dependent expectation values in many-body thermal systems; both electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic cases can be treated. Our approach uses a path integral simulation to sample an initial thermal density matrix; subsequent evolution of this density matrix is equivalent to solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, which we perform using a linear expansion of Gaussian wavepacket basis functions which evolve according to simple classical-like trajectories. Overall, this methodology represents a formally exact approach for calculating time-dependent quantum properties; by introducing approximations into both the imaginary-time and real-time propagations, this approach can be adapted for complex many-particle systems interacting through arbitrary potentials. We demonstrate this method for the spin Boson model, where we find good agreement with numerically exact calculations. We also discuss future directions of improvement for our approach with a view to improving accuracy and efficiency.

  12. Density perturbations and the cosmological constant from inflationary landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Feldstein, Brian; Hall, Lawrence J.; Watari, Taizan

    2005-12-15

    An anthropic understanding of the cosmological constant requires that the vacuum energy at late time scans from one patch of the universe to another. If the vacuum energy during inflation also scans, the various patches of the universe acquire exponentially differing volumes. In a generic landscape with slow-roll inflation, we find that this gives a steeply varying probability distribution for the normalization of the primordial density perturbations, resulting in an exponentially small fraction of observers measuring the Cosmic Background Explorer value of 10{sup -5}. Inflationary landscapes should avoid this ''{sigma} problem,'' and we explore features that can allow them to do that. One possibility is that, prior to slow-roll inflation, the probability distribution for vacua is extremely sharply peaked, selecting essentially a single anthropically allowed vacuum. Such a selection could occur in theories of eternal inflation. A second possibility is that the inflationary landscape has a special property: although scanning leads to patches with volumes that differ exponentially, the value of the density perturbation does not vary under this scanning. This second case is preferred over the first, partly because a flat inflaton potential can result from anthropic selection, and partly because the anthropic selection of a small cosmological constant is more successful.

  13. Precise effective masses from density functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gillet, Y.; Poncé, S.; Martin, A.; Torrent, M.; Gonze, X.

    2016-05-01

    The knowledge of effective masses is a key ingredient to analyze numerous properties of semiconductors, like carrier mobilities, (magneto)transport properties, or band extrema characteristics yielding carrier densities and density of states. Currently, these masses are usually calculated using finite-difference estimation of density functional theory (DFT) electronic band curvatures. However, finite differences require an additional convergence study and are prone to numerical noise. Moreover, the concept of effective mass breaks down at degenerate band extrema. We assess the former limitation by developing a method that allows to obtain the Hessian of DFT bands directly, using density functional perturbation theory. Then, we solve the latter issue by adapting the concept of "transport equivalent effective mass" to the k .p ̂ framework. The numerical noise inherent to finite-difference methods is thus eliminated, along with the associated convergence study. The resulting method is therefore more general, more robust, and simpler to use, which makes it especially appropriate for high-throughput computing. After validating the developed techniques, we apply them to the study of silicon, graphane, and arsenic. The formalism is implemented into the abinit software and supports the norm-conserving pseudopotential approach, the projector augmented-wave method, and the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The derived expressions also apply to the ultrasoft pseudopotential method.

  14. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  15. Statistical mechanics of Roskilde liquids: Configurational adiabats, specific heat contours, and density dependence of the scaling exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicholas P.; Bøhling, Lasse; Veldhorst, Arno A.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2013-11-14

    We derive exact results for the rate of change of thermodynamic quantities, in particular, the configurational specific heat at constant volume, C{sub V}, along configurational adiabats (curves of constant excess entropy S{sub ex}). Such curves are designated isomorphs for so-called Roskilde liquids, in view of the invariance of various structural and dynamical quantities along them. The slope of the isomorphs in a double logarithmic representation of the density-temperature phase diagram, γ, can be interpreted as one third of an effective inverse power-law potential exponent. We show that in liquids where γ increases (decreases) with density, the contours of C{sub V} have smaller (larger) slope than configurational adiabats. We clarify also the connection between γ and the pair potential. A fluctuation formula for the slope of the C{sub V}-contours is derived. The theoretical results are supported with data from computer simulations of two systems, the Lennard-Jones fluid, and the Girifalco fluid. The sign of dγ/dρ is thus a third key parameter in characterizing Roskilde liquids, after γ and the virial-potential energy correlation coefficient R. To go beyond isomorph theory we compare invariance of a dynamical quantity, the self-diffusion coefficient, along adiabats and C{sub V}-contours, finding it more invariant along adiabats.

  16. Ionospheric density perturbations recorded by DEMETER above intense thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrot, M.; Sauvaud, J.; Soula, S.; Pincon, J.; Van Der Velde, O. A.

    2013-12-01

    DEMETER was a 3-axis stabilized Earth-pointing spacecraft launched on June 29, 2004 into a low altitude (710 km) polar and circular orbit that was subsequently lowered to 650 km till the end of the mission in December 2010. DEMETER measured electromagnetic waves all around the Earth except in the auroral zones (invariant latitude > 65°). The frequency range for the electric field was from DC up to 3.5 MHz, and for the magnetic field from a few Hz up to 20 kHz. At its altitude, the phenomena observed on the E-field and B-field spectrograms recorded during night time by the satellite in the VLF range are mainly dominated by whistlers. In a first step, the more intense whistlers have been searched. They correspond to the most powerful lightning strokes occurring below DEMETER. Then, it is shown that this intense lightning activity is able to perturb the electron and ion densities at the satellite altitude (up to 133 %) during night time. These intense lightning strokes are generally associated with TLEs (Transient Luminous Events), and one event with many sprites recorded on November 17, 2006 above Europe is reported. Checking the particle precipitation, it is shown that this density enhancement in the high ionosphere can be related to the energetic particle precipitation induced by the strong whistlers emitted during a long duration thunderstorm activity at the same location.

  17. Ionospheric density perturbations recorded by DEMETER above intense thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrot, M.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Soula, S.; PinçOn, J. L.; Velde, O.

    2013-08-01

    (Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted From Earthquake Regions) was a three-axis stabilized Earth-pointing spacecraft launched on 29 June 2004 into a low-altitude (710 km) polar and circular orbit that was subsequently lowered to 650 km until the end of the mission in December 2010. DEMETER measured electromagnetic waves all around the Earth, except in the auroral zones (invariant latitude >65°). The frequency range for the electric field was from DC up to 3.5 MHz, and for the magnetic field, it was from a few hertz up to 20 kHz. At its altitude, the phenomena observed on the E field and B field spectrograms recorded during nighttime by the satellite in the very low frequency range are mainly dominated by whistlers. In a first step, the more intense whistlers have been searched. They correspond to the most powerful lightning strokes occurring below DEMETER. Then, it is shown that this intense lightning activity is able to perturb the electron and ion densities at the satellite altitude (up to 133%) during nighttime. These intense lightning strokes are generally associated with transient luminous events, and one event with many sprites recorded on 17 November 2006 above Europe is reported. Examining the charged particle precipitation, it is shown that this density enhancement in the high ionosphere can be related to the energetic particle precipitation induced by the strong whistlers emitted during a long-duration thunderstorm activity at the same location.

  18. Perturbation method to calculate the density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.

    2012-12-01

    Monte Carlo switching moves (“perturbations”) are defined between two or more classical Hamiltonians sharing a common ground-state energy. The ratio of the density of states (DOS) of one system to that of another is related to the ensemble averages of the microcanonical acceptance probabilities of switching between these Hamiltonians, analogously to the case of Bennett's acceptance ratio method for the canonical ensemble [C. H. Bennett, J. Comput. Phys.JCTPAH0021-999110.1016/0021-9991(76)90078-4 22, 245 (1976)]. Thus, if the DOS of one of the systems is known, one obtains those of the others and, hence, the partition functions. As a simple test case, the vapor pressure of an anharmonic Einstein crystal is computed, using the harmonic Einstein crystal as the reference system in one dimension; an auxiliary calculation is also performed in three dimensions. As a further example of the algorithm, the energy dependence of the ratio of the DOS of the square-well and hard-sphere tetradecamers is determined, from which the temperature dependence of the constant-volume heat capacity of the square-well system is calculated and compared with canonical Metropolis Monte Carlo estimates. For these cases and reference systems, the perturbation calculations exhibit a higher degree of convergence per Monte Carlo cycle than Wang-Landau (WL) sampling, although for the one-dimensional oscillator the WL sampling is ultimately more efficient for long runs. Last, we calculate the vapor pressure of liquid gold using an empirical Sutton-Chen many-body potential and the ideal gas as the reference state. Although this proves the general applicability of the method, by its inherent perturbation approach the algorithm is suitable for those particular cases where the properties of a related system are well known.

  19. Electronic non-adiabatic states: towards a density functional theory beyond the Born–Oppenheimer approximation

    PubMed Central

    Gidopoulos, Nikitas I.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-01-01

    A novel treatment of non-adiabatic couplings is proposed. The derivation is based on a theorem by Hunter stating that the wave function of the complete system of electrons and nuclei can be written, without approximation, as a Born–Oppenheimer (BO)-type product of a nuclear wave function, X(R), and an electronic one, ΦR(r), which depends parametrically on the nuclear configuration R. From the variational principle, we deduce formally exact equations for ΦR(r) and X(R). The algebraic structure of the exact nuclear equation coincides with the corresponding one in the adiabatic approximation. The electronic equation, however, contains terms not appearing in the adiabatic case, which couple the electronic and the nuclear wave functions and account for the electron–nuclear correlation beyond the BO level. It is proposed that these terms can be incorporated using an optimized local effective potential. PMID:24516183

  20. Constraining turbulence and conduction in the hot ICM through density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Churazov, E.

    2013-11-01

    Turbulence and conduction can dramatically affect the evolution of baryons in the universe; current constraints are however rare and uncertain. Using 3D high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations, tracking both electrons and ions, we study the effects of turbulence and conduction in the hot intracluster medium. We show how the power spectrum of the gas density perturbations (δ = δρ/ρ) can accurately constrain both processes. The characteristic amplitude of density perturbations is linearly related to the strength of turbulence, i.e. the 3D Mach number, as A(k)δ,max = c M, where c ≃ 0.25 for injection scale of 500 kpc. The slope of Aδ(k) in turn reflects the level of diffusion, dominated by conduction. In a non-conductive medium, subsonic stirring motions advect density with a similar nearly Kolmogorov cascade, Eδ(k) ∝ k- 5/3. Increasing conduction (parametrized via the magnetic suppression f = 10-3 → 1) progressively steepens the spectrum towards the Burgers-like regime, Eδ(k) ∝ k-2. The slope is only weakly dependent on M. The turbulent Prandtl number defines the dynamic similarity of the flow; at scales where Pt ≡ tcond/tturb < 100, the power spectrum develops a significant decay, i.e. conduction stifles turbulent regeneration. The transition is gentle for highly suppressed conduction, f ≤ 10-3, while sharp in the opposite regime. For strong conductivity (f ≥ 0.1), Pt ~ 100 occurs on spatial scales larger than the injection scale, globally damping density perturbations by a factor of 2-4, from large to small scales. The velocity spectrum is instead not much affected by conduction. The f ≥ 0.1 regime should also affect the appearance of X-ray images, in which Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor rolls and filaments are washed out. In a stratified system, perturbations are characterized by a mixture of modes: weak/strong turbulence induces higher isobaric/adiabatic fluctuations, while conduction forces both modes towards the intermediate

  1. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  2. Density Perturbations in Nonisentropic Models of Inflation with Viscous Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Rudnei O.; Andrade, Silvio D. C.

    2015-01-01

    It is shown how viscosities affect the dynamics of the perturbations at linear order for a two-fluid system composed by the inflaton and a radiation bath. These two-fluid systems are typical of nonisentropic models, like warm inflation. It is shown that viscosities effects must be considered to proper control the backreaction of the radiation fluctuations on the inflaton fluctuations and to give a proper value for the amplitude of the power spectrum.

  3. Proton radiography as an electromagnetic field and density perturbation diagnostic (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A.J.; Patel, P.K.; Town, R.P.; Edwards, M.J.; Phillips, T.; Lerner, S.C.; Price, D.W.; Hicks, D.; Key, M.H.; Hatchett, S.; Wilks, S.C.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Kar, S.; Toncian, T.; Pretzler, G.; Willi, O.; Koenig, M.; Martinolli, E.; Lepape, S.

    2004-10-01

    Laser driven proton beams have been used to diagnose transient fields and density perturbations in laser produced plasmas. Grid deflectometry techniques have been applied to proton radiography to obtain precise measurements of proton beam angles caused by electromagnetic fields in laser produced plasmas. Application of proton radiography to laser driven implosions has demonstrated that density conditions in compressed media can be diagnosed with million electron volt protons. This data has shown that proton radiography can provide unique insight into transient electromagnetic fields in super critical density plasmas and provide a density perturbation diagnostics in compressed matter.

  4. Entropy density of an adiabatic relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate star

    SciTech Connect

    Khaidir, Ahmad Firdaus; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Yusof, Norhasliza

    2015-04-24

    Inspired by recent works, we investigate how the thermodynamics parameters (entropy, temperature, number density, energy density, etc) of Bose-Einstein Condensate star scale with the structure of the star. Below the critical temperature in which the condensation starts to occur, we study how the entropy behaves with varying temperature till it reaches its own stability against gravitational collapse and singularity. Compared to photon gases (pressure is described by radiation) where the chemical potential, μ is zero, entropy of photon gases obeys the Stefan-Boltzmann Law for a small values of T while forming a spiral structure for a large values of T due to general relativity. The entropy density of Bose-Einstein Condensate is obtained following the similar sequence but limited under critical temperature condition. We adopt the scalar field equation of state in Thomas-Fermi limit to study the characteristics of relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate under varying temperature and entropy. Finally, we obtain the entropy density proportional to (σT{sup 3}-3T) which obeys the Stefan-Boltzmann Law in ultra-relativistic condition.

  5. The correlation function for density perturbations in an expanding universe. II - Nonlinear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclelland, J.; Silk, J.

    1977-01-01

    A formalism is developed to find the two-point and higher-order correlation functions for a given distribution of sizes and shapes of perturbations which are randomly placed in three-dimensional space. The perturbations are described by two parameters such as central density and size, and the two-point correlation function is explicitly related to the luminosity function of groups and clusters of galaxies

  6. Simple preconditioning for time-dependent density functional perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, Lauri; Marques, Miguel A L

    2011-07-01

    By far, the most common use of time-dependent density functional theory is in the linear-reponse regime, where it provides information about electronic excitations. Ideally, the linear-response equations should be solved by a method that avoids the use of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham states--such as the Sternheimer method--as this reduces the complexity and increases the precision of the calculation. However, the Sternheimer equation becomes ill-conditioned near and indefinite above the first resonant frequency, seriously hindering the use of efficient iterative solution methods. To overcome this serious limitation, and to improve the general convergence properties of the iterative techniques, we propose a simple preconditioning strategy. In our method, the Sternheimer equation is solved directly as a linear equation using an iterative Krylov subspace method, i.e., no self-consistent cycle is required. Furthermore, the preconditioner uses the information of just a few unoccupied states and requires simple and minimal modifications to existing implementations. In this way, convergence can be reached faster and in a considerably wider frequency range than the traditional approach. PMID:21744884

  7. Kohn-Sham density-functional theory and renormalization of many-body perturbation expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, Marat

    1998-03-01

    Numerous practical applications provide strong evidence that despite its simplicity and crude approximations, density-functional theory leads to a rather accurate description of ground state properties of various condensed matter systems. Although well documented numerically, to our knowledge a theoretical explanation of the accuracy of density-functional theory has not been given. This issue is clarified in this work by demonstrating that density-functional theory represents a particular renormalization procedure of a many-body perturbation expansion. In other words, it is shown that density-functional theory is a many-body perturbation theory whose convergence properties have been optimized. The realization of this fact brings new meaning into density-functional theory and explains the success of density-functional based calculations. For more information go to http://alchemy.ucsd.edu/marat/ .

  8. Quantum-to-classical transition for ekpyrotic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarra, Lorenzo; Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-01

    We examine the processes of quantum squeezing and decoherence of density perturbations produced during a slowly contracting ekpyrotic phase in which entropic perturbations are converted to curvature perturbations before the bounce to an expanding phase. During the generation phase, the entropic fluctuations evolve into a highly squeezed quantum state, analogous to the evolution of inflationary perturbations. Subsequently, during the conversion phase, quantum coherence is lost very efficiently due to the interactions of entropy and adiabatic modes. Moreover, while decoherence occurs, the adiabatic curvature perturbations inherit their semiclassicality from the entropic perturbations. Our results confirm that, just as for inflation, an ekpyrotic phase can generate nearly scale-invariant curvature perturbations which may be treated as a statistical ensemble of classical density perturbations, in agreement with observations of the cosmic background radiation.

  9. Spectroscopic and thermal properties of minerals from density-functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refson, K.

    2003-12-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on density-functional theory have provento give a highly accurate description of structural and elastic properties of minerals under pressure. To evaluate spectroscopic, dielectric and thermal properties it is necessary to compute the second derivatives of the energy with respect to a displacement or electric field perturbation. While the Hellman-Feynmann theorem makes the computation of forces (first derivatives of the energy) straightforward, second derivatives depend on the linear response of the orbitals and density to the perturbation. I will sketch the variational formulation of density-function perturbation theory, and it's implementation in the CASTEP plane-wave code. The capabilities will be illustrated with calculation of the full phonon dispersion spectra and dielectric properties of a-quartz, ZrO2 and NaHF2.

  10. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  11. On the reach of perturbative methods for dark matter density fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Schaan, Emmanuel; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2016-03-01

    We study the mapping from Lagrangian to Eulerian space in the context of the Effective Field Theory (EFT) of Large Scale Structure. We compute Lagrangian displacements with Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (LPT) and perform the full non-perturbative transformation from displacement to density. When expanded up to a given order, this transformation reproduces the standard Eulerian Perturbation Theory (SPT) at the same order. However, the full transformation from displacement to density also includes higher order terms. These terms explicitly resum long wavelength motions, thus making the resulting density field better correlated with the true non-linear density field. As a result, the regime of validity of this approach is expected to extend that of the Eulerian EFT, and match that of the IR-resummed Eulerian EFT. This approach thus effectively enables a test of the IR-resummed EFT at the field level. We estimate the size of stochastic, non-perturbative contributions to the matter density power spectrum. We find that in our highest order calculation, at redshift z = 0 the power spectrum of the density field is reproduced with an accuracy of 1% (10%) up to k = 0.25 hMpc-1 (k = 0.46 hMpc-1). We believe that the dominant source of the remaining error is the stochastic contribution. Unfortunately, on these scales the stochastic term does not yet scale as k4 as it does in the very low k regime. Thus, modeling this contribution might be challenging.

  12. Adiabatic fluctuations from cosmic strings in a contracting universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Robert H.; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2009-07-01

    We show that adiabatic, super-Hubble, and almost scale invariant density fluctuations are produced by cosmic strings in a contracting universe. An essential point is that isocurvature perturbations produced by topological defects such as cosmic strings on super-Hubble scales lead to a source term which seeds the growth of curvature fluctuations on these scales. Once the symmetry has been restored at high temperatures, the isocurvature seeds disappear, and the fluctuations evolve as adiabatic ones in the expanding phase. Thus, cosmic strings may be resurrected as a mechanism for generating the primordial density fluctuations observed today.

  13. Non-linear isocurvature perturbations and non-Gaussianities

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, David; Vernizzi, Filippo; Wands, David E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2008-12-15

    We study non-linear primordial adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations and their non-Gaussianity. After giving a general formulation in the context of an extended {delta}N formalism, we analyse in detail two illustrative examples. The first is a mixed curvaton-inflaton scenario in which fluctuations of both the inflaton and a curvaton (a light isocurvature field during inflation) contribute to the primordial density perturbation. The second example is that of double inflation involving two decoupled massive scalar fields during inflation. In the mixed curvaton-inflaton scenario we find that the bispectrum of primordial isocurvature perturbations may be large and comparable to the bispectrum of adiabatic curvature perturbations.

  14. Reduction of early-time perturbation growth in ablatively driven laser targets using tailored density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Nathan; Velikovich, Alexander L.; Gardner, John H.

    1999-08-01

    The effects of tailoring the density profile in a laser target in order to decrease imprinting of mass perturbations due to the long-wavelength modes are investigated analytically and numerically. Inverting the acceleration of the ablation front during the shock transit time could reduce the early-time mass perturbation amplitudes developed in the target after the shock transit. This principle was first suggested for mitigating the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability of imploding Z-pinches [Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996); Phys. Plasmas 5, 3377 (1998)]. As the shock wave slows down propagating into higher density layers, the effective gravity near the ablation front has the same direction as the density gradient. This makes the mass perturbations near it oscillate at a higher frequency and at a lower amplitude than they normally would due to the "rocket effect" caused by mass ablation [Sanz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 2700 (1994); Piriz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1117 (1997)]. So, tailoring density profiles instead of using flat densities is demonstrated to reduce the "seed" mass perturbation amplitude at the onset of the exponential RT growth.

  15. Projector Augmented-Wave formulation of response to strain and electric field perturbation within the density-functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Torrent, Marc; Caracas, Razvan

    2015-03-01

    A formulation of the response of a system to strain and electric field perturbations in the pseudopotential-based density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) has been proposed by D.R Hamman and co-workers. It uses an elegant formalism based on the expression of DFT total energy in reduced coordinates, the key quantity being the metric tensor and its first and second derivatives. We propose to extend this formulation to the Projector Augmented-Wave approach (PAW). In this context, we express the full elastic tensor including the clamped-atom tensor, the atomic-relaxation contributions (internal stresses) and the response to electric field change (piezoelectric tensor and effective charges). With this we are able to compute the elastic tensor for all materials (metals and insulators) within a fully analytical formulation. The comparison with finite differences calculations on simple systems shows an excellent agreement. This formalism has been implemented in the plane-wave based DFT ABINIT code. We apply it to the computation of elastic properties and seismic-wave velocities of iron with impurity elements. By analogy with the materials contained in meteorites, tested impurities are light elements (H, O, C, S, Si).

  16. A non-perturbative approach to freezing of superfuid 4He in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoguchi, T.; Galli, De; Rossi, M.; Yoshimori, A.

    2012-12-01

    Freezing of various classical liquids is successfully described by density functional theory (DFT). On the other hand, so far no report has been published that DFT describes the freezing of superfuid 4He correctly. In fact, DFT gives too stable solid phase and the superfuid phase does not exist at finite positive pressures within a second order perturbation. In this paper we try a non-perturbative version of DFT, that is modified weighted density approximation (MWDA) to go beyond second order perturbation for the freezing of superfuid 4He. Via an exact zero temperature quantum Monte-Carlo (QMC) method we have computed the equation of state and the compressibility of superfuid 4He. By utilizing a recently introduced analytic continuation method (the GIFT method), we have obtained also density response functions at different densities from QMC imaginary time correlation functions. Contrary to second order perturbation, by employing these QMC data as DFT input we find a too stable superfuid phase, preventing freezing around the experimentally observed freezing pressure. We find the same pathological behavior by using another model energy functional of superfuid 4He (Orsay-Trento model). We conclude that the straightforward MWDA calculation gives such a poor result when liquid-gas transition is present.

  17. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G0W0 and G0W0+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G0W0+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G0W0 quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies. PMID:25134572

  18. Thermodynamics of technetium: Reconciling theory and experiment using density functional perturbation analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja

    2015-06-11

    The structure, lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of bulk technetium were investigated within the framework of density functional theory. The phonon density of states spectrum computed with density functional perturbation theory closely matches inelastic coherent neutron scattering measurements. The thermal properties of technetium were derived from phonon frequencies calculated within the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA), which introduces a volume dependence of phonon frequencies as a part of the anharmonic effect. As a result, the predicted thermal expansion and isobaric heat capacity of technetium are in excellent agreement with available experimental data for temperatures up to ~1600 K.

  19. Non-Gaussian density fluctuations from entropically generated curvature perturbations in ekpyrotic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2008-03-15

    We analyze the non-Gaussian density perturbations generated in ekpyrotic/cyclic models based on heterotic M theory. In this picture, two scalar fields produce nearly scale-invariant entropic perturbations during an ekpyrotic phase that are converted into curvature modes after the ekpyrotic phase is complete and just before the big bang. Both intrinsic nonlinearity in the entropy perturbation and the conversion process contribute to non-Gaussianity. The range of the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} depends on how gradual the conversion process is and the steepness of the scalar field potential during the ekpyrotic phase. Although a wider range is possible, in principle, natural values of the ekpyrotic parameters combined with a gradual conversion process lead to values of -50 < or approx. f{sub NL} < or approx. +200, typically much greater than slow-roll inflation but within the current observational bounds.

  20. Shuttle derived atmospheric density model. Part 2: STS atmospheric implications for AOTV trajectory analysis, a proposed GRAM perturbation density model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Findlay, J. T.; Kelly, G. M.; Troutman, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    A perturbation model to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) was developed for use in the Aeroassist Orbital Transfer Vehicle (AOTV) trajectory and analysis. The model reflects NASA Space Shuttle experience over the first twelve entry flights. The GRAM was selected over the Air Force 1978 Reference Model because of its more general formulation and wider use throughout NASA. The add-on model, a simple scaling with altitude to reflect density structure encountered by the Shuttle Orbiter was selected principally to simplify implementation. Perturbations, by season, can be utilized to minimize the number of required simulations, however, exact Shuttle flight history can be exercised using the same model if desired. Such a perturbation model, though not meteorologically motivated, enables inclusion of High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) results in the thermosphere. Provision is made to incorporate differing perturbations during the AOTV entry and exit phases of the aero-asist maneuver to account for trajectory displacement (geographic) along the ground track.

  1. Collapse of small-scale density perturbations during preheating in single field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Jedamzik, Karsten; Lemoine, Martin; Martin, Jérôme E-mail: lemoine@iap.fr

    2010-09-01

    After cosmic inflation and before the transition to radiation domination, the cosmic energy density may have been dominated during an extended period by an oscillating massive scalar condensate. We show that during this period, sub-Hubble scale perturbations are subject to a metric preheating instability in the narrow resonance regime. We analyze in detail both, quadratic and quartic potentials. The instability leads to the growth of density perturbations which in many cases become non-linear already before the beginning of a radiation dominated Universe. This is particularly the case when requiring a phenomenologically preferred low reheat temperature. These early structures may lead to the emission of gravitational waves and the production of primordial black holes.

  2. Matter density perturbations in modified gravity models with arbitrary coupling between matter and geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nesseris, Savvas

    2009-02-15

    We consider theories with an arbitrary coupling between matter and gravity and obtain the perturbation equation of matter on subhorizon scales. Also, we derive the effective gravitational constant G{sub eff} and two parameters {sigma} and {eta}, which along with the perturbation equation of the matter density are useful to constrain the theory from growth factor and weak lensing observations. Finally, we use a completely solvable toy model which exhibits nontrivial phenomenology to investigate specific features of the theory. We obtain the analytic solution of the modified Friedmann equation for the scale factor a in terms of time t and use the age of the oldest star clusters and the primordial nucleosynthesis bounds in order to constrain the parameters of our toy model.

  3. Development of a low-adiabat drive for material science experiments on NIF using release and recompression of low density organic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, Christopher; Prisbrey, Shon T.; Park, Hye-Sook; Benedetti, L. Robin; Huntington, Channing; McNaney, James; Smith, Ray; Panas, Cynthia; Cook, Angela; Remington, Bruce; Arsenlis, Tom; Graham, Peter

    2015-11-01

    A series of experiments were performed on NIF to develop a planar, 3-shock, low-adiabat drive for material science experiments. Physics samples (Ta, Pb, etc.) are loaded to 3-4 Mbar while staying well below the melt temperature. X-ray ablation from an indirect drive launches a strong (~ 50 Mbar), decaying shock through a precision fabricated ``reservoir,'' consisting of a CH ablator, followed by layers of Al, CH(18.75%I), ~ 375 mg/cc carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde foam, and a final layer of low density (10-35) mg/cc foam. As the releasing reservoir stagnates on a Ta drive plate, VISAR is used to measures the resulting compression waves. The lowest density reservoir layer is responsible for the leading shock and induces the most entropy during the drive. LLNL has developed a new, low-density foam called JX6 (C20H30) for the purpose of controlling the leading shock. We will describe a series of experiments done on NIF to test the combined release and recompression properties of JX6 and to develop a new, lower-adiabat drive. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Validation and application of auxiliary density perturbation theory and non-iterative approximation to coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham approach for calculation of dipole-quadrupole polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedge, Sapana V.; Pal, Sourav; Köster, Andreas M.

    2011-07-01

    Recently, two non-iterative approaches have been proposed to calculate response properties within density functional theory (DFT). These approaches are auxiliary density perturbation theory (ADPT) and the non-iterative approach to the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (NIA-CPKS) method. Though both methods are non-iterative, they use different techniques to obtain the perturbed Kohn-Sham matrix. In this Letter, for the first time, both of these two independent methods have been used for the calculation of dipole-quadrupole polarizabilities. To validate these methods, three tetrahedral molecules viz., P4,CH4 and adamantane (C10H16) have been used as examples. The comparison with MP2 and CCSD proves the reliability of the methodology.

  5. Intermolecular interactions in photodamaged DNA from density functional theory symmetry-adapted perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Sadeghian, Keyarash; Bocola, Marco; Schütz, Martin

    2011-05-01

    The intermolecular interactions of the photodamaged cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion with adjacent nucleobases in the native intrahelical DNA double strand are investigated at the level of density functional theory symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (DFT-SAPT) and compared to the original (or repaired) case with pyrimidines (TpT) instead of CPD. The CPD aggregation is on average destabilized by about 6 kcal mol(-1) relative to that involving TpT. The effect of destabilization is asymmetric, that is, it involves a single H-bonding (Watson-Crick (WC) type) base-pair interaction. PMID:21452189

  6. Electronic and optical properties of pure and modified diamondoids studied by many-body perturbation theory and time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Demján, Tamás; Vörös, Márton; Palummo, Maurizia; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-14

    Diamondoids are small diamond nanoparticles (NPs) that are built up from diamond cages. Unlike usual semiconductor NPs, their atomic structure is exactly known, thus they are ideal test-beds for benchmarking quantum chemical calculations. Their usage in spintronics and bioimaging applications requires a detailed knowledge of their electronic structure and optical properties. In this paper, we apply density functional theory (DFT) based methods to understand the electronic and optical properties of a few selected pure and modified diamondoids for which accurate experimental data exist. In particular, we use many-body perturbation theory methods, in the G{sub 0}W{sub 0} and G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE approximations, and time-dependent DFT in the adiabatic local density approximation. We find large quasiparticle gap corrections that can exceed thrice the DFT gap. The electron-hole binding energy can be as large as 4 eV but it is considerably smaller than the GW corrections and thus G{sub 0}W{sub 0}+BSE optical gaps are about 50% larger than the Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT gaps. We find significant differences between KS time-dependent DFT and GW+BSE optical spectra on the selected diamondoids. The calculated G{sub 0}W{sub 0} quasiparticle levels agree well with the corresponding experimental vertical ionization energies. We show that nuclei dynamics in the ionization process can be significant and its contribution may reach about 0.5 eV in the adiabatic ionization energies.

  7. Remote sensing of mesospheric and thermospheric density perturbations induced by subtropical heavy rainfalls for spacecraft environment study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Johnson, D. L.; Chen, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The simultaneous measurements of VHF radar and HF Doppler array systems are used to observe three-dimensional wind speeds and gravity waves with the purpose of determining the density perturbations at different heights of mesosphere and thermosphere induced by the convective motions associated with subtropical heavy rainfall during the time period of the raining season. Frequency, horizontal wavelength, vertical wavelength, and phase velocity of the gravity waves are determined from the Fourier power spectral analysis of horizontal and vertical wind velocities. The results are compared with those of density perturbations caused by typhoons, tropical storms, and winter-time drizzles associated with convective motions. It is shown that the maximum amplitude of the density perturbations caused by the gravity waves is +/- 10 pct which is greater than that of density perturbations caused by gravity waves associated with weak convective motions in winter time and is smaller than that caused by the gravity waves associated with tropical storms.

  8. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  9. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-02-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as tq and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rhoE varies as r-omega are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  10. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blastwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1990-05-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  11. van der Waals forces in density functional theory: Perturbational long-range electron-interaction corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Angyan, Janos G.; Gerber, Iann C.; Savin, Andreas; Toulouse, Julien

    2005-07-15

    Long-range exchange and correlation effects, responsible for the failure of currently used approximate density functionals in describing van der Waals forces, are taken into account explicitly after a separation of the electron-electron interaction in the Hamiltonian into short- and long-range components. We propose a 'range-separated hybrid' functional based on a local density approximation for the short-range exchange-correlation energy, combined with a long-range exact exchange energy. Long-range correlation effects are added by a second-order perturbational treatment. The resulting scheme is general and is particularly well adapted to describe van der Waals complexes, such as rare gas dimers.

  12. Sneutrino condensate source for density perturbations, leptogenesis, and low reheat temperature.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Pérez-Lorenzana, Abdel

    2004-06-25

    We bring together some known ingredients beyond the standard model physics that can explain the hot big bang model with the observed baryon asymmetry and also the fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation with a minimal set of assumptions. We propose an interesting scenario where the inflaton energy density is dumped into an infinitely large extra dimension. Instead of the inflaton it is the right handed sneutrino condensate, which is acquiring a nonzero vacuum expectation value during inflation, whose fluctuations are responsible for the density perturbations seen in the cosmic microwave background radiation with a spectral index n(s) approximately 1. The decay of the condensate is explaining the reheating of the Universe with a temperature, T(rh)< or =10(9) GeV, and the baryon asymmetry of order one part in 10(10) with no baryon-isocurvature fluctuations. PMID:15244992

  13. The cold mode: a phenomenological model for the evolution of density perturbations in the intracluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashmeet; Sharma, Prateek

    2015-01-01

    Cool cluster cores are in global thermal equilibrium but are locally thermally unstable. We study a non-linear phenomenological model for the evolution of density perturbations in the intracluster medium (ICM) due to local thermal instability and gravity. We have analysed and extended a model for the evolution of an overdense blob in the ICM. We find two regimes in which the overdense blobs can cool to thermally stable low temperatures. One for large tcool/tff (tcool is the cooling time and tff is the free-fall time), where a large initial overdensity is required for thermal runaway to occur; this is the regime which was previously analysed in detail. We discover a second regime for tcool/tff ≲ 1 (in agreement with Cartesian simulations of local thermal instability in an external gravitational field), where runaway cooling happens for arbitrarily small amplitudes. Numerical simulations have shown that cold gas condenses out more easily in a spherical geometry. We extend the analysis to include geometrical compression in weakly stratified atmospheres such as the ICM. With a single parameter, analogous to the mixing length, we are able to reproduce the results from numerical simulations; namely, small density perturbations lead to the condensation of extended cold filaments only if tcool/tff ≲ 10.

  14. The correlation function for density perturbations in an expanding universe. IV - The evolution of the correlation function. [galaxy distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclelland, J.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the two-point correlation function for the large-scale distribution of galaxies in an expanding universe is studied on the assumption that the perturbation densities lie in a Gaussian distribution centered on any given mass scale. The perturbations are evolved according to the Friedmann equation, and the correlation function for the resulting distribution of perturbations at the present epoch is calculated. It is found that: (1) the computed correlation function gives a satisfactory fit to the observed function in cosmological models with a density parameter (Omega) of approximately unity, provided that a certain free parameter is suitably adjusted; (2) the power-law slope in the nonlinear regime reflects the initial fluctuation spectrum, provided that the density profile of individual perturbations declines more rapidly than the -2.4 power of distance; and (3) both positive and negative contributions to the correlation function are predicted for cosmological models with Omega less than unity.

  15. Statistics of initial density perturbations in heavy ion collisions and their fluid dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2014-08-01

    An interesting opportunity to determine thermodynamic and transport properties in more detail is to identify generic statistical properties of initial density perturbations. Here we study event-by-event fluctuations in terms of correlation functions for two models that can be solved analytically. The first assumes Gaussian fluctuations around a distribution that is fixed by the collision geometry but leads to non-Gaussian features after averaging over the reaction plane orientation at non-zero impact parameter. In this context, we derive a three-parameter extension of the commonly used Bessel-Gaussian event-by-event distribution of harmonic flow coefficients. Secondly, we study a model of N independent point sources for which connected n-point correlation functions of initial perturbations scale like 1 /N n-1. This scaling is violated for non-central collisions in a way that can be characterized by its impact parameter dependence. We discuss to what extent these are generic properties that can be expected to hold for any model of initial conditions, and how this can improve the fluid dynamical analysis of heavy ion collisions.

  16. X-ray energy flow and radiography measurements of evolving density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. S.; Graham, P.; Taylor, M. J.; Foster, J. M.; Sorce, C.; Reighard, A.; MacLaren, S.; Young, P.; Glendinning, G.; Blue, B. E.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.

    2008-11-01

    X-radiation transport through plasma density gradients, such as N-waves, form a closely coupled system that is challenging to simulate. Such situations are a key component of the physics of laser-heated hohlraums occurring in the laser-heated cavity and also in the laser-entry and any diagnostic holes. In addition the similarity to some astrophysical conditions may mean that such experiments can be used as a laboratory-scale analogue for their investigation. To better understand these phenomena, we present results from a series of experiments performed at the Omega laser facility. Using a laser-heated hohlraum drive, a tantalum aerogel with an initial seed perturbation is heated, and x-rays initially free-stream through the perturbation before they fill with plasma and radiation transport becomes diffuse. We present energy flux measurements diagnosed using two different methods, and complementary radiography results that achieve sufficient contrast, despite the high background of the hohlraum, to enable the complex shock interactions and stagnation to be directly observed. These results are compared with simulations performed using a 2-D Eulerian hydrocode, which are able to reproduce the overall energetics, and much of the details of the deceleration shock and axial stagnation region at the centre of the slit.

  17. Nonlinear evolution of an arbitrary density perturbation in a cold homogeneous unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Prabal Singh; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman K.

    2011-01-15

    An exact and general analytical solution describing the nonlinear evolution of a large amplitude plasma oscillation initiated by an arbitrary density perturbation which can be expressed as a Fourier series in x is found. This general solution is first used to reproduce the earlier results of R. C. Davidson and P. P. Schram [Nucl. Fusion 8, 183 (1968)] and J. M. Dawson [Phys. Rev. 113, 383 (1959)] using appropriate initial conditions and later applied to derive the space time evolution for a square wave and a triangular wave. It is found that the addition of a second harmonic increases the wave breaking limit of the fundamental mode. Analytical results pertaining to this two mode case have been verified using one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation.

  18. Towards Sparse-Direct Interaction Perturbation (SDIP) for Variable-Density Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, David; Pantano, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    A numerical method has been developed to solve the set of integro-differential equations which result from applying the Sparse Direct-Interaction Perturbation (SDIP) technique to the low-speed, variable-density Navier-Stokes equations. This type of turbulence is at the heart of mixing and combustion applications. SDIP is a second-order moment closure theory that has particular relevance to the modeling of fluid turbulence. The strongly nonlinear numerical problem has been formulated as a system of equations using finite differences in time decorrelation, interpolation, variable-order quadratures, and mesh adaptation. The solution to this system has been made practicable by the construction of the full Jacobian of the numerical method using the Automatic Differentiation by OverLoading in C++ (ADOL-C) library. Special coordinate transformations were found to be essential for robust calculations of integrals that are not absolutely convergent; cancellations of singularities must be treated accurately. Progress towards the determination of the turbulence kinetic energy spectrum and velocity-scalar cospectra of the low-speed, variable-density Navier-Stokes equations derived from the SDIP solver will be discussed. The authors would like to thank the grant support for this research provided by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Department of Energy.

  19. Construction of nonsingular pre-big-bang and ekpyrotic cosmologies and the resulting density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujikawa, Shinji; Brandenberger, Robert; Finelli, Fabio

    2002-10-01

    We consider the construction of nonsingular pre-big-bang and ekpyrotic type cosmological models realized by the addition to the action of specific higher-order terms stemming from quantum corrections. We study models involving general relativity coupled to a single scalar field with a potential motivated by the ekpyrotic scenario. We find that the inclusion of the string loop and quantum correction terms in the string frame makes it possible to obtain solutions of the variational equations which are nonsingular and bouncing in the Einstein frame, even when a negative exponential potential is present, as is the case in the ekpyrotic scenario. This allows us to discuss the evolution of cosmological perturbations without the need to invoke matching conditions between two Einstein universes, one representing the contracting branch, the second the expanding branch. We analyze the spectra of perturbations produced during the bouncing phase and find that the spectrum of curvature fluctuations in the model proposed originally to implement the ekpyrotic scenario has a large blue tilt (nR=3). Except for instabilities introduced on small scales, the result agrees with what is obtained by imposing continuity of the induced metric and of the extrinsic curvature across a constant scalar field (up to k2 corrections equal to the constant energy density) matching surface between the contracting and the expanding Einstein universes. We also discuss nonsingular cosmological solutions obtained when a Gauss-Bonnet term with a coefficient suitably dependent on the scalar matter field is added to the action in the Einstein frame with a potential for the scalar field present. In this scenario, nonsingular solutions are found which start in an asymptotically flat state, undergo a period of superexponential inflation, and end with a graceful exit. The spectrum of fluctuations is also calculated in this case.

  20. Multifield cosmological perturbations at third order and the ekpyrotic trispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Renaux-Petel, Sebastien

    2009-09-15

    Using the covariant formalism, we derive the equations of motion for adiabatic and entropy perturbations at third order in perturbation theory for cosmological models involving two scalar fields. We use these equations to calculate the trispectrum of ekpyrotic and cyclic models in which the density perturbations are generated via the entropic mechanism. In these models, the conversion of entropy into curvature perturbations occurs just before the big bang, either during the ekpyrotic phase or during the subsequent kinetic energy dominated phase. In both cases, we find that the nonlinearity parameters f{sub NL} and g{sub NL} combine to leave a very distinct observational imprint.

  1. Theoretical and lidar studies of the density response of the mesospheric sodium layer to gravity wave perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, J. D.; Gardner, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The density response of atmospheric layers to gravity waves is developed in two forms, an exact solution and a perturbation series solution. The degree of nonlinearity in the layer density response is described by the series solution whereas the exact solution gives insight into the nature of the responses. Density perturbation in an atmospheric layer are shown to be substantially greater than the atmospheric density perturbation associated with the propagation of a gravity wave. Because of the density gradients present in atmospheric layers, interesting effects were observed such as a phase reversal in the linear layer response which occurs near the layer peak. Once the layer response is understood, the sodium layer can be used as a tracer of atmospheric wave motions. A two dimensional digital signal processing technique was developed. Both spatial and temporal filtering are utilized to enhance the resolution by decreasing shot noise by more han 10 dB. Many of the features associated with a layer density response to gravity waves were observed in high resolution density profiles of the mesospheric sodium layer. These include nonlinearities as well as the phase reversal in the linear layer response.

  2. Mechanical properties of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides predicted from density functional perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Tikare, Veena; Mitchell, John A.

    2015-10-13

    Here, the elastic properties and mechanical stability of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides have been investigated within the framework of density functional perturbation theory. Results show that the lowest-energy cubic Pn-3m with combining macron]m polymorph of δ-ZrH1.5 does not satisfy all the Born requirements for mechanical stability, unlike its nearly degenerate tetragonal P42/mcm polymorph. Elastic moduli predicted with the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximations suggest that mechanical stability of α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates is limited by the shear modulus. According to both Pugh's and Poisson's ratios, α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates can be considered ductile. The Debye temperatures predicted for γ-ZrH, δ-ZrH1.5 and ε-ZrH2 are θD = 299.7, 415.6 and 356.9 K, respectively, while θD = 273.6, 284.2, 264.1 and 257.1 K for the α-Zr, Zry-4, ZIRLO and M5 matrices, i.e. suggesting that Zry-4 possesses the highest micro-hardness among Zr matrices.

  3. Mechanical properties of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides predicted from density functional perturbation theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Tikare, Veena; Mitchell, John A.

    2015-10-13

    Here, the elastic properties and mechanical stability of zirconium alloys and zirconium hydrides have been investigated within the framework of density functional perturbation theory. Results show that the lowest-energy cubic Pn-3m with combining macron]m polymorph of δ-ZrH1.5 does not satisfy all the Born requirements for mechanical stability, unlike its nearly degenerate tetragonal P42/mcm polymorph. Elastic moduli predicted with the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximations suggest that mechanical stability of α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates is limited by the shear modulus. According to both Pugh's and Poisson's ratios, α-Zr, Zr-alloy and Zr-hydride polycrystalline aggregates can be considered ductile. The Debye temperatures predicted formore » γ-ZrH, δ-ZrH1.5 and ε-ZrH2 are θD = 299.7, 415.6 and 356.9 K, respectively, while θD = 273.6, 284.2, 264.1 and 257.1 K for the α-Zr, Zry-4, ZIRLO and M5 matrices, i.e. suggesting that Zry-4 possesses the highest micro-hardness among Zr matrices.« less

  4. Tension between the power spectrum of density perturbations measured on large and small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Charnock, Tom; Moss, Adam

    2015-05-01

    There is a tension between measurements of the amplitude of the power spectrum of density perturbations inferred using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and directly measured by large-scale structure (LSS) on smaller scales. We show that this tension exists, and is robust, for a range of LSS indicators including clusters, lensing and redshift space distortions and using CMB data from either Planck or WMAP +SPT /ACT . One obvious way to try to reconcile this is the inclusion of a massive neutrino which could be either active or sterile. Using Planck and a combination of all the LSS data we find that (i) for an active neutrino ∑mν=(0.357 ±0.099 ) eV and (ii) for a sterile neutrino msterileeff=(0.67 ±0.18 ) eV and Δ Neff=0.32 ±0.20 . This is, however, at the expense of a degraded fit to Planck temperature data, and we quantify the residual tension at 2.5 σ and 1.6 σ for massive and sterile neutrinos, respectively. We also consider alternative explanations including a lower redshift for reionization that would be in conflict with polarization measurements made by WMAP and ad hoc modifications to the primordial power spectrum.

  5. Introducing constricted variational density functional theory in its relaxed self-consistent formulation (RSCF-CV-DFT) as an alternative to adiabatic time dependent density functional theory for studies of charge transfer transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Seth, Mike; Ziegler, Tom

    2014-05-14

    We have applied the relaxed and self-consistent extension of constricted variational density functional theory (RSCF-CV-DFT) for the calculation of the lowest charge transfer transitions in the molecular complex X-TCNE between X = benzene and TCNE = tetracyanoethylene. Use was made of functionals with a fixed fraction (α) of Hartree-Fock exchange ranging from α = 0 to α = 0.5 as well as functionals with a long range correction (LC) that introduces Hartree-Fock exchange for longer inter-electronic distances. A detailed comparison and analysis is given for each functional between the performance of RSCF-CV-DFT and adiabatic time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. It is shown that in this particular case, all functionals afford the same reasonable agreement with experiment for RSCF-CV-DFT whereas only the LC-functionals afford a fair agreement with experiment using TDDFT. We have in addition calculated the CT transition energy for X-TCNE with X = toluene, o-xylene, and naphthalene employing the same functionals as for X = benzene. It is shown that the calculated charge transfer excitation energies are in as good agreement with experiment as those obtained from highly optimized LC-functionals using adiabatic TDDFT. We finally discuss the relation between the optimization of length separation parameters and orbital relaxation in the RSCF-CV-DFT scheme.

  6. Time-dependent density-functional-theory studies of collisions involving He atoms: Extension of an adiabatic correlation-integral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Matthew; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A recent model to describe electron correlations in time-dependent density-functional-theory (TDDFT) studies of antiproton-helium collisions is extended to deal with positively charged projectiles. The main complication is that a positively charged projectile can capture electrons in addition to ionizing them to the continuum. As a consequence, within the TDDFT framework one needs to consider three, instead of just one, correlation integrals (Ic's) when formally expressing the probabilities for the one- and two-electron processes in terms of the density. We discuss an extension of an adiabatic model for Ic to a two-centered system. Total cross sections for single ionization, double ionization, single capture, transfer ionization, and double capture are presented for both proton-helium and He2+-He collisions for impact energies in the approximate range 10-1000 keV/amu. One- and two-electron removal cross sections are also presented for the p -He system, with a comparison to updated antiproton-helium results. Our results, while mixed, demonstrate the relative importance of dynamic and functional correlations in a TDDFT description of collision processes.

  7. Band alignment of semiconductors from density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinuma, Yoyo; Grüneis, Andreas; Kresse, Georg; Oba, Fumiyasu

    2014-10-01

    The band lineup, or alignment, of semiconductors is investigated via first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). Twenty-one semiconductors including C, Si, and Ge in the diamond structure, BN, AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, InSb, ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe in the zinc-blende structure, and GaN and ZnO in the wurtzite structure are considered in view of their fundamental and technological importance. Band alignments are determined using the valence and conduction band offsets from heterointerface calculations, the ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) from surface calculations, and the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum relative to the branch point energy, or charge neutrality level, from bulk calculations. The performance of various approximations to DFT and MBPT, namely the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) semilocal functional, the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional, and the GW approximation with and without vertex corrections in the screened Coulomb interaction, is assessed using the GWΓ1 approximation as a reference, where first-order vertex corrections are included in the self-energy. The experimental IPs, EAs, and band offsets are well reproduced by GWΓ1 for most of the semiconductor surfaces and heterointerfaces considered in this study. The PBE and HSE functionals show sizable errors in the IPs and EAs, in particular for group II-VI semiconductors with wide band gaps, but are much better in the prediction of relative band positions or band offsets due to error cancellation. The performance of the GW approximation is almost on par with GWΓ1 as far as relative band positions are concerned. The band alignments based on average interfacial band offsets for all pairs of 17 semiconductors and branch point energies agree with explicitly calculated interfacial band offsets with small mean absolute errors of both ˜0.1eV, indicating a

  8. Measurement of inflight shell areal density perturbations in NIF capsule implosions near peak velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, B. A.; Pickworth, L.; Smalyuk, V.; Macphee, A.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H.; Barrios, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative measurements of shell-RhoR perturbations in capsules near peak implosion velocity (PV) are challenging. An external backlighter samples both sides of the shell, unless a re-entrant cone is used (potentially perturbing implosion). Emission from the hot core, after shock-stagnation and prior to PV, has been used as a self-backlighter, providing a means to sample one side of the capsule. Adding high-Z gas (~ 1% Ar) to the capsule fill in Symcaps (4He), has produced a continuum backlighter with significant increase in emission at photon energies ~ 8 keV over nominal fills. From images of the transmitted self-emission, above and below the K-edge of an internally doped Cu layer, we infer the growth at PV of imposed perturbations (100 nm amplitude, mode 40). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. An Investigation of How a Meteor Light Curve is Modified by Meteor Shape and Atmospheric Density Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary investigation of how perturbations to meteoroid shape or atmospheric density affect a meteor light curve. A simple equation of motion and ablation are simultaneously solved numerically to give emitted light intensity as a function of height. It is found that changing the meteoroid shape, by changing the relationship between the cross-section area and the mass, changes the curvature and symmetry of the light curve, while making a periodic oscillation in atmospheric density gives a small periodic oscillation in the light curve.

  10. Experimental breaking of an adiabatic invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notte, J.; Fajans, J.; Chu, R.; Wurtele, J. S.

    1993-06-01

    When a cylindrical pure electron plasma is displaced from the center of the trap, it performs a bulk circular orbital motion known as the l=1 diocotron mode. The slow application of a perturbing potential to a patch on the trap wall distorts the orbit into a noncircular closed path. Experiments and a simple theoretical model indicate that the area by the loop is an adiabatic invariant. Detailed studies are made of the breaking of the invariant when perturbations are rapidly applied. When the perturbation is applied with discontinuous time derivatives, the invariant breaking greatly exceeds the predictions of the standard theory for smooth perturbations.

  11. Spectral function of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: A density matrix renormalization group plus cluster perturbation theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun; Feiguin, Adrian E.

    2016-02-01

    We study the spectral function of the two-dimensional Hubbard model using cluster perturbation theory, and a density matrix renormalization group as a cluster solver. We reconstruct the two-dimensional dispersion at and away from half-filling using 2 ×L ladders, with L up to 80 sites, yielding results with unprecedented resolution in excellent agreement with quantum Monte Carlo. The main features of the spectrum can be described with a mean-field dispersion, with kinks and pseudogap traced back to scattering between spin and charge degrees of freedom.

  12. Self-advection of density perturbations on a sloping continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ping-Tung Shaw; Csanady, G.T.

    1983-05-01

    Bottom water movement on the continental shelf is modeled by the nonlinear interaction between longshore bottom geostrophic flow and the density field. Bottom geostrophic velocity, subject to linear steady momentum equations with linear bottom friction, can be generated by along-isobath density variations over a sloping bottom. At the same time, the density field is slowly advected by the velocity field. Away from boundary layers, the interplay is governed by Burgers' equation, which shows the formation and self-propulsion of strong density gradients along an isobath. The direction of propagation of a dense water blob is to have shallow water on the right- (left-) hand side facing downstream in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. The propagation of a light water blob is opposite to that of a dense water blob.

  13. Sensitivity of the solution of the Elder problem to density, velocity and numerical perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Hee; Aral, Mustafa M.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper the Elder problem is studied with the purpose of evaluating the inherent instabilities associated with the numerical solution of this problem. Our focus is first on the question of the existence of a unique numerical solution for this problem, and second on the grid density and fluid density requirements necessary for a unique numerical solution. In particular we have investigated the instability issues associated with the numerical solution of the Elder problem from the following perspectives: (i) physical instability issues associated with density differences; (ii) sensitivity of the numerical solution to idealization irregularities; and, (iii) the importance of a precise velocity field calculation and the association of this process with the grid density levels that is necessary to solve the Elder problem accurately. In the study discussed here we have used a finite element Galerkin model we have developed for solving density-dependent flow and transport problems, which will be identified as TechFlow. In our study, the numerical results of Frolkovič and de Schepper [Frolkovič, P. and H. de Schepper, 2001. Numerical modeling of convection dominated transport coupled with density-driven flow in porous media, Adv. Water Resour., 24, 63-72.] were replicated using the grid density employed in their work. We were also successful in duplicating the same result with a less dense grid but with more computational effort based on a global velocity estimation process we have adopted. Our results indicate that the global velocity estimation approach recommended by Yeh [Yeh, G.-T., 1981. On the computation of Darcian velocity and mass balance in finite element modelling of groundwater flow, Water Resour. Res., 17(5), 1529-1534.] allows the use of less dense grids while obtaining the same accuracy that can be achieved with denser grids. We have also observed that the regularity of the elements in the discretization of the solution domain does make a difference

  14. Plasma expansion and evolution of density perturbations in the polar wind - Comparison of semikinetic and transport models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. W.; Horwitz, J. L.; Singh, N.; Wilson, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Comparisons are made between transport and semikinetic models in a study of the time evolution of plasma density perturbations in the polar wind. The situations modeled include plasma expansion into a low-density region and time evolution of localized density enhancements and cavities. The results show that the semikinetic model generally yields smoother profiles in density, drift velocity, and ion temperature than the transport model, principally because of ion velocity dispersion. While shocks frequently develop in the results of the transport model, they do not occur in the semikinetic results. In addition, in the semikinetic results, two ion streams, or double-humped distributions, frequently develop. In the transport model results the bulk parameters, at a given time, often have a one-to-one correspondence in the locations of their local minima or maxima. This is a consequence of the coupling of the fluid equations. There is, however, no such relationship among the moments produced by the semikinetic model where the local moment maxima and minima are often shifted in altitude. In general, incorporation of enhanced heat fluxes in the transport model leads to somewhat improved agreement with the semikinetic results.

  15. Density response of the mesospheric sodium layer to gravity wave perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, J. D.; Gardner, C. S.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Lidar observations of the mesospheric sodium layer often reveal wavelike features moving through the layer. It is often assumed that these features are a layer density response to gravity waves. Chiu and Ching (1978) described the approximate form of the linear response of atmospheric layers to gravity waves. In this paper, their results are used to predict the response of the sodium layer to gravity waves. These simulations are compared with experimental observations and a good correlation is found between the two. Because of the thickness of the sodium layer and the density gradients found in it, a linear model of the layer response is not always adequate to describe gravity wave-sodium layer interactions. Inclusion of nonlinearities in the layer response is briefly discussed. Experimental data is seen to contain features consistent with the predicted nonlinearities.

  16. Can we derive the current density from three point LEO measurements of the magnetic field perturbations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, J. W.; Potter, M.; Muhleisen, M.; Friel, M. M.; Martin, P.; Le, G.; Stolle, C.; Luhr, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we perform critical test of the well-known curlometer technique. The curlometer technique allows a derivation of the current density using measurements of the magnetic field at spatially separated points. At LEO altitudes this generally three dimensionally problem is simplified to a two dimensions by the fact that the current is almost solely flowing along the magnetic field lines. Strictly speaking the current density is derived from integration around a closed loop but in the curlometer technique this integration is simplified to a summation over just three points. In this paper we present a critical analysis of when and to what extend this approximation is valid. We show some simple theoretical considerations, results from a series of simulations, and finally apply the knowledge to ESA SWARM measurements.

  17. On the Contribution of Density Perturbations and Gravitational Waves to the Lower Order Multipoles of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, A.; Grishchuk, L. P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    The important studies of Peebles, and Bond and Efstathiou have led to the formula Cl=const./[l(l+1)] aimed at describing the lower order multipoles of the CMBR temperature variations caused by density perturbations with the flat spectrum. Clearly, this formula requires amendments, as it predicts an infinitely large monopole C0, and a dipole moment C1 only 6/2 times larger than the quadrupole C2, both predictions in conflict with observations. We restore the terms omitted in the course of the derivation of this formula, and arrive at a new expression. According to the corrected formula, the monopole moment is finite and small, while the dipole moment is sensitive to short-wavelength perturbations, and numerically much larger than the quadrupole, as one would expect on physical grounds. At the same time, the function l(l+1)Cl deviates from a horizontal line and grows with l, for l>=2. We show that the inclusion of the modulating (transfer) function terminates the growth and forms the first peak, recently observed. We fit the theoretical curves to the position and height of the first peak, as well as to the observed dipole, varying three parameters: red-shift at decoupling, red-shift at matter-radiation equality, and slope of the primordial spectrum. It appears that there is always a deficit, as compared with the COBE observations, at small multipoles, l~10. We demonstrate that a reasonable and theoretically expected amount of gravitational waves bridges this gap at small multipoles, leaving the other fits as good as before. We show that the observationally acceptable models permit somewhat ``blue'' primordial spectra. This allows one to avoid the infrared divergence of cosmological perturbations, which is otherwise present.

  18. Tensor hypercontraction density fitting. I. Quartic scaling second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenstein, Edward G.; Parrish, Robert M.; Martínez, Todd J.

    2012-07-01

    Many approximations have been developed to help deal with the O(N4) growth of the electron repulsion integral (ERI) tensor, where N is the number of one-electron basis functions used to represent the electronic wavefunction. Of these, the density fitting (DF) approximation is currently the most widely used despite the fact that it is often incapable of altering the underlying scaling of computational effort with respect to molecular size. We present a method for exploiting sparsity in three-center overlap integrals through tensor decomposition to obtain a low-rank approximation to density fitting (tensor hypercontraction density fitting or THC-DF). This new approximation reduces the 4th-order ERI tensor to a product of five matrices, simultaneously reducing the storage requirement as well as increasing the flexibility to regroup terms and reduce scaling behavior. As an example, we demonstrate such a scaling reduction for second- and third-order perturbation theory (MP2 and MP3), showing that both can be carried out in O(N4) operations. This should be compared to the usual scaling behavior of O(N5) and O(N6) for MP2 and MP3, respectively. The THC-DF technique can also be applied to other methods in electronic structure theory, such as coupled-cluster and configuration interaction, promising significant gains in computational efficiency and storage reduction.

  19. Brillouin-zone integration scheme for many-body density of states: Tetrahedron method combined with cluster perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, K.; Yunoki, S.

    2016-06-01

    By combining the tetrahedron method with the cluster perturbation theory (CPT), we present an accurate method to numerically calculate the density of states of interacting fermions without introducing the Lorentzian broadening parameter η or the numerical extrapolation of η →0 . The method is conceptually based on the notion of the effective single-particle Hamiltonian which can be subtracted in the Lehmann representation of the single-particle Green's function within the CPT. Indeed, we show the general correspondence between the self-energy and the effective single-particle Hamiltonian which describes exactly the single-particle excitation energies of interacting fermions. The detailed formalism is provided for two-dimensional multiorbital systems and a benchmark calculation is performed for the two-dimensional single-band Hubbard model. The method can be adapted straightforwardly to symmetry-broken states, three-dimensional systems, and finite-temperature calculations.

  20. Are both symmetric and buckled dimers on Si(100) minima? Density functional and multireference perturbation theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yousung; Shao, Yihan; Gordon, Mark S.; Doren, Douglas J.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2003-08-29

    We report a spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) solution at the symmetric dimer structure for cluster models of Si(100). With this solution, it is shown that the symmetric structure is a minimum on the DFT potential energy surface, although higher in energy than the buckled structure. In restricted DFT calculations the symmetric structure is a saddle point connecting the two buckled minima. To further assess the effects of electron correlation on the relative energies of symmetric versus buckled dimers on Si(100), multireference second order perturbation theory (MRMP2) calculations are performed on these DFT optimized minima. The symmetric structure is predicted to be lower in energy than the buckled structure via MRMP2, while the reverse order is found by DFT. The implications for recent experimental interpretations are discussed.

  1. Wigner phase space distribution via classical adiabatic switching.

    PubMed

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2015-09-21

    Evaluation of the Wigner phase space density for systems of many degrees of freedom presents an extremely demanding task because of the oscillatory nature of the Fourier-type integral. We propose a simple and efficient, approximate procedure for generating the Wigner distribution that avoids the computational difficulties associated with the Wigner transform. Starting from a suitable zeroth-order Hamiltonian, for which the Wigner density is available (either analytically or numerically), the phase space distribution is propagated in time via classical trajectories, while the perturbation is gradually switched on. According to the classical adiabatic theorem, each trajectory maintains a constant action if the perturbation is switched on infinitely slowly. We show that the adiabatic switching procedure produces the exact Wigner density for harmonic oscillator eigenstates and also for eigenstates of anharmonic Hamiltonians within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. We generalize the approach to finite temperature by introducing a density rescaling factor that depends on the energy of each trajectory. Time-dependent properties are obtained simply by continuing the integration of each trajectory under the full target Hamiltonian. Further, by construction, the generated approximate Wigner distribution is invariant under classical propagation, and thus, thermodynamic properties are strictly preserved. Numerical tests on one-dimensional and dissipative systems indicate that the method produces results in very good agreement with those obtained by full quantum mechanical methods over a wide temperature range. The method is simple and efficient, as it requires no input besides the force fields required for classical trajectory integration, and is ideal for use in quasiclassical trajectory calculations. PMID:26395694

  2. Wigner phase space distribution via classical adiabatic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2015-09-21

    Evaluation of the Wigner phase space density for systems of many degrees of freedom presents an extremely demanding task because of the oscillatory nature of the Fourier-type integral. We propose a simple and efficient, approximate procedure for generating the Wigner distribution that avoids the computational difficulties associated with the Wigner transform. Starting from a suitable zeroth-order Hamiltonian, for which the Wigner density is available (either analytically or numerically), the phase space distribution is propagated in time via classical trajectories, while the perturbation is gradually switched on. According to the classical adiabatic theorem, each trajectory maintains a constant action if the perturbation is switched on infinitely slowly. We show that the adiabatic switching procedure produces the exact Wigner density for harmonic oscillator eigenstates and also for eigenstates of anharmonic Hamiltonians within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. We generalize the approach to finite temperature by introducing a density rescaling factor that depends on the energy of each trajectory. Time-dependent properties are obtained simply by continuing the integration of each trajectory under the full target Hamiltonian. Further, by construction, the generated approximate Wigner distribution is invariant under classical propagation, and thus, thermodynamic properties are strictly preserved. Numerical tests on one-dimensional and dissipative systems indicate that the method produces results in very good agreement with those obtained by full quantum mechanical methods over a wide temperature range. The method is simple and efficient, as it requires no input besides the force fields required for classical trajectory integration, and is ideal for use in quasiclassical trajectory calculations.

  3. Wigner phase space distribution via classical adiabatic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation of the Wigner phase space density for systems of many degrees of freedom presents an extremely demanding task because of the oscillatory nature of the Fourier-type integral. We propose a simple and efficient, approximate procedure for generating the Wigner distribution that avoids the computational difficulties associated with the Wigner transform. Starting from a suitable zeroth-order Hamiltonian, for which the Wigner density is available (either analytically or numerically), the phase space distribution is propagated in time via classical trajectories, while the perturbation is gradually switched on. According to the classical adiabatic theorem, each trajectory maintains a constant action if the perturbation is switched on infinitely slowly. We show that the adiabatic switching procedure produces the exact Wigner density for harmonic oscillator eigenstates and also for eigenstates of anharmonic Hamiltonians within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. We generalize the approach to finite temperature by introducing a density rescaling factor that depends on the energy of each trajectory. Time-dependent properties are obtained simply by continuing the integration of each trajectory under the full target Hamiltonian. Further, by construction, the generated approximate Wigner distribution is invariant under classical propagation, and thus, thermodynamic properties are strictly preserved. Numerical tests on one-dimensional and dissipative systems indicate that the method produces results in very good agreement with those obtained by full quantum mechanical methods over a wide temperature range. The method is simple and efficient, as it requires no input besides the force fields required for classical trajectory integration, and is ideal for use in quasiclassical trajectory calculations.

  4. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Extensive Adiabatic Invariants for Nonlinear Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgilli, Antonio; Paleari, Simone; Penati, Tiziano

    2012-09-01

    We look for extensive adiabatic invariants in nonlinear chains in the thermodynamic limit. Considering the quadratic part of the Klein-Gordon Hamiltonian, by a linear change of variables we transform it into a sum of two parts in involution. At variance with the usual method of introducing normal modes, our constructive procedure allows us to exploit the complete resonance, while keeping the extensive nature of the system. Next we construct a nonlinear approximation of an extensive adiabatic invariant for a perturbation of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model. The fluctuations of this quantity are controlled via Gibbs measure estimates independent of the system size, for a large set of initial data at low specific energy. Finally, by numerical calculations we show that our adiabatic invariant is well conserved for times much longer than predicted by our first order theory, with fluctuation much smaller than expected according to standard statistical estimates.

  6. Evaluation of Coupled Perturbed and Density Functional Methods of Computing the Parity-Violating Energy Difference between Enantiomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermott, A. J.; Hyde, G. O.; Cohen, A. J.

    2009-03-01

    We present new coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock (CPHF) and density functional theory (DFT) computations of the parity-violating energy difference (PVED) between enantiomers for H2O2 and H2S2. Our DFT PVED computations are the first for H2S2 and the first with the new HCTH and OLYP functionals. Like other “second generation” PVED computations, our results are an order of magnitude larger than the original “first generation” uncoupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock computations of Mason and Tranter. We offer an explanation for the dramatically larger size in terms of cancellation of contributions of opposing signs, which also explains the basis set sensitivity of the PVED, and its conformational hypersensitivity (addressed in the following paper). This paper also serves as a review of the different types of “second generation” PVED computations: we set our work in context, comparing our results with those of four other groups, and noting the good agreement between results obtained by very different methods. DFT PVEDs tend to be somewhat inflated compared to the CPHF values, but this is not a problem when only sign and order of magnitude are required. Our results with the new OLYP functional are less inflated than those with other functionals, and OLYP is also more efficient computationally. We therefore conclude that DFT computation offers a promising approach for low-cost extension to larger biosystems, especially polymers. The following two papers extend to terrestrial and extra-terrestrial amino acids respectively, and later work will extend to polymers.

  7. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  8. Adiabatically driven Brownian pumps.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Shapochkina, Irina V; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2013-07-01

    We investigate a Brownian pump which, being powered by a flashing ratchet mechanism, produces net particle transport through a membrane. The extension of the Parrondo's approach developed for reversible Brownian motors [Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998)] to adiabatically driven pumps is given. We demonstrate that the pumping mechanism becomes especially efficient when the time variation of the potential occurs adiabatically fast or adiabatically slow, in perfect analogy with adiabatically driven Brownian motors which exhibit high efficiency [Rozenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 041116 (2012)]. At the same time, the efficiency of the pumping mechanism is shown to be less than that of Brownian motors due to fluctuations of the number of particles in the membrane. PMID:23944411

  9. Benchmarking density functional perturbation theory to enable high-throughput screening of materials for dielectric constant and refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petousis, Ioannis; Chen, Wei; Hautier, Geoffroy; Graf, Tanja; Schladt, Thomas D.; Persson, Kristin A.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a high-throughput density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methodology capable of screening compounds for their dielectric properties. The electronic and ionic dielectric tensors are calculated for 88 compounds, where the eigenvalues of the total dielectric tensors are compared with single crystal and polycrystalline experimental values reported in the literature. We find that GGA/PBE has a smaller mean average deviation from experiments (MARD=16.2 %) when compared to LDA. The prediction accuracy of DFPT is lowest for compounds that exhibit complex structural relaxation effects (e.g., octahedra rotation in perovskites) and/or strong anharmonicity. Despite some discrepancies between DFPT results and reported experimental values, the high-throughput methodology is found to be useful in identifying interesting compounds by ranking. This is demonstrated by the high Spearman correlation factor (ρ =0.92 ). Finally, we demonstrate that DFPT provides a good estimate for the refractive index of a compound without calculating the frequency dependence of the dielectric matrix (MARD=5.7 %).

  10. Relativistic Density Functional Calculations of Hyperfine Coupling with Variational versus Perturbational Treatment of Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prakash; Autschbach, Jochen

    2013-04-01

    Different approaches are compared for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations of electron-nucleus hyperfine coupling (HFC) in molecules with light atoms, in transition metal complexes, and in selected actinide halide complexes with a formal metal 5f(1) configuration. The comparison includes hybrid density functionals with range-separated exchange. Within the variationally stable zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) relativistic framework, the HFC is obtained (i) with a linear response (LR) method where spin-orbit (SO) coupling is treated as a linear perturbation, (ii) with a spin-polarized approach closely related to a DFT method for calculating magnetic anisotropy (MA) previously devised by van Wüllen et al. where SO coupling is included variationally, (iii) with a quasi-restricted variational SO method previously devised by van Lenthe, van der Avoird, and Wormer (LWA). The MA and LWA approaches for HFC calculations were implemented in the open-source NWChem quantum chemistry package as part of this study. The methodology extends recent implementations for calculations of electronic g-factors (J. Chem. Theor. Comput.2013, 9, 1052). The impact of electron correlation (DFT vs HF) and DFT delocalization errors, the effects of spin-polarization, the importance of treating spin-orbit coupling beyond first-order, and the magnitude of finite-nucleus effects, are investigated. Similar to calculations of g-factors, the MA approach in conjunction with hybrid functionals performs reasonably well for theoretical predictions of HFC in a wide range of scenarios. PMID:26583544

  11. LINEAR INVERSION OF TRANSMITTED ACOUSTIC WAVE FIELDS FOR THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODULUS AND DENSITY PERTURBATIONS USING A BORN-TYPE APPROXIMATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stauber, Douglas A.

    1985-01-01

    A Born approximation is used to linearize the relationship, in the horizontal-wavenumber and frequency domains, between lateral perturbations of modulus and density in a layered half-space and the acoustic wave field observed at the surface when a plane wave is incident from below. The resulting equations can be used to perform a linear inversion of observed acoustic wave fields to obtain lateral perturbations in modulus and density. Since modulus and density effects are separated, gravity observations can be included in the inversion procedure without any assumptions about the relationship between density and acoustic velocity. Tests with synthetic data sets reveal that the inversion method gives useful results when the spatial scales of the inhomogeneities are smaller than several acoustic wavelengths. Refs.

  12. Nonadiabatic transitions in finite-time adiabatic rapid passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2007-06-01

    To apply the adiabatic rapid passage process repetitively [T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 71, 061405(R) (2005)], the nonadiabatic transition probability of a two-level atom subject to chirped light pulses over a finite period of time needs to be calculated. Using a unitary first-order perturbation method in the rotating adiabatic frame, an approximate formula has been derived for such transition probabilities in the entire parameter space of the pulses.

  13. Density functional theory calculations on rhodamine B and pinacyanol chloride. Optimized ground state, dipole moment, vertical ionization potential, adiabatic electron affinity and lowest excited triplet state.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Juan C; Selsby, Ronald G

    2013-01-01

    The ground state configuration of the gas phase cationic dyes pinacyanol chloride and rhodamine B are optimized with HF/6-311 + G(2d,2p) method and basis set. B3PW91/6-311 + G(2df,2p) functional and basis set is used to calculate the Mulliken atom charge distribution, total molecular energy, the dipole moment, the vertical ionization potential, the adiabatic electron affinity and the lowest excited triplet state, the last three as an energy difference between separately calculated open shell and ground states. The triplet and extra electron states are optimized to find the relaxation energy. In the ground state optimization of both dyes the chloride anion migrates to a position near the center of the chromophore. For rhodamine B the benzoidal group turns perpendicular to the chromophore plane. For both dyes, the LUMO is mostly of π character associated with the aromatic part of the molecule containing the chromophore. The highest occupied MOs consist of three almost degenerate eigenvectors involving the chloride anion coordinated with σ electrons in the molecular framework. The fourth highest MO is of π character. For both molecules in the gas phase ionization process the chloride anion loses the significant fraction of electric charge. In electron capture, the excess charge goes mainly on the dye cation. PMID:22891949

  14. Demographic response to perturbations: the role of compensatory density dependence in a North American duck under variable harvest regulations and changing habitat.

    PubMed

    Péron, Guillaume; Nicolai, Christopher A; Koons, David N

    2012-09-01

    1. Most wild animal populations are subjected to many perturbations, including environmental forcing and anthropogenic mortality. How population size varies in response to these perturbations largely depends on life-history strategy and density regulation. 2. Using the mid-continent population of redhead Aythya americana (a North American diving duck), we investigated the population response to two major perturbations, changes in breeding habitat availability (number of ponds in the study landscape) and changes in harvest regulations directed at managing mortality patterns (bag limit). We used three types of data collected at the continental scale (capture-recovery, population surveys and age- and sex ratios in the harvest) and combined them into integrated population models to assess the interaction between density dependence and the effect of perturbations. 3. We observed a two-way interaction between the effects on fecundity of pond number and population density. Hatch-year female survival was also density dependent. Matrix modelling showed that population booms could occur after especially wet years. However, the effect of moderate variation in pond number was generally offset by density dependence the following year. 4. Mortality patterns were insensitive to changes in harvest regulations and, in males at least, insensitive to density dependence as well. We discuss potential mechanisms for compensation of hunting mortality as well as possible confounding factors. 5. Our results illustrate the interplay of density dependence and environmental variation both shaping population dynamics in a harvested species, which could be generalized to help guide the dual management of habitat and harvest regulations. PMID:22433018

  15. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  16. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  17. Improved Performance of High Areal Density Indirect Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility using a Four-Shock Adiabat Shaped Drive.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Milovich, J L; Smalyuk, V A; Clark, D S; Robey, H F; Pak, A; MacPhee, A G; Baker, K L; Weber, C R; Ma, T; Park, H-S; Döppner, T; Callahan, D A; Haan, S W; Patel, P K; Peterson, J L; Hoover, D; Nikroo, A; Yeamans, C B; Merrill, F E; Volegov, P L; Fittinghoff, D N; Grim, G P; Edwards, M J; Landen, O L; Lafortune, K N; MacGowan, B J; Widmayer, C C; Sayre, D B; Hatarik, R; Bond, E J; Nagel, S R; Benedetti, L R; Izumi, N; Khan, S; Bachmann, B; Spears, B K; Cerjan, C J; Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A

    2015-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities can cause capsule defects and other perturbations to grow and degrade implosion performance in ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here, we show the first experimental demonstration that a strong unsupported first shock in indirect drive implosions at the NIF reduces ablation front instability growth leading to a 3 to 10 times higher yield with fuel ρR>1  g/cm(2). This work shows the importance of ablation front instability growth during the National Ignition Campaign and may provide a path to improved performance at the high compression necessary for ignition. PMID:26382681

  18. Improved Performance of High Areal Density Indirect Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility using a Four-Shock Adiabat Shaped Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Milovich, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Pak, A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Baker, K. L.; Weber, C. R.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Haan, S. W.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Hoover, D.; Nikroo, A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P. L.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Edwards, M. J.; Landen, O. L.; Lafortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Widmayer, C. C.; Sayre, D. B.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E. J.; Nagel, S. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Bachmann, B.; Spears, B. K.; Cerjan, C. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities can cause capsule defects and other perturbations to grow and degrade implosion performance in ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here, we show the first experimental demonstration that a strong unsupported first shock in indirect drive implosions at the NIF reduces ablation front instability growth leading to a 3 to 10 times higher yield with fuel ρR > 1 g=cm2. This work shows the importance of ablation front instability growth during the National Ignition Campaign and may provide a path to improved performance at the high compression necessary for ignition.

  19. Improved Performance of High Areal Density Indirect Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility using a Four-Shock Adiabat Shaped Drive

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Casey, D. T.; Milovich, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Pak, A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Baker, K. L.; Weber, C. R.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities can cause capsule defects and other perturbations to grow and degrade implosion performance in ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here, we show the first experimental demonstration that a strong unsupported first shock in indirect drive implosions at the NIF reduces ablation front instability growth leading to a 3 to 10 times higher yield with fuel ρR > 1 g=cm2. This work shows the importance of ablation front instability growth during the National Ignition Campaign and may provide a path to improved performance at the high compression necessary for ignition.

  20. Gauge-invariant perturbation theory for trans-Planckian inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaranarayanan, S.; Lubo, Musongela

    2005-12-15

    The possibility that the scale-invariant inflationary spectrum may be modified due to the hidden assumptions about the Planck scale physics--dubbed as trans-Planckian inflation--has received considerable attention. To mimic the possible trans-Planckian effects, among various models, modified dispersion relations have been popular in the literature. In almost all the earlier analyses, unlike the canonical scalar field driven inflation, the trans-Planckian effects are introduced to the scalar/tensor perturbation equations in an ad hoc manner--without calculating the stress tensor of the cosmological perturbations from the covariant Lagrangian. In this work, we perform the gauge-invariant cosmological perturbations for the single scalar-field inflation with the Jacobson-Corley dispersion relation by computing the fluctuations of all the fields including the unit-timelike vector field which defines a preferred rest frame. We show that: (i) The nonlinear effects introduce corrections only to the perturbed energy density. The corrections to the energy density vanish in the super-Hubble scales. (ii) The scalar perturbations, in general, are not purely adiabatic. (iii) The equation of motion of the Mukhanov-Sasaki variable corresponding to the inflaton field is different from those presumed in the earlier analyses. (iv) The tensor perturbation equation remains unchanged. We perform the classical analysis for the resultant system of equations and also compute the power spectrum of the scalar perturbations in a particular limit. We discuss the implications of our results and compare with the earlier results.

  1. Plasma Density and Electro-Magnetic Field Perturbations Hf-Induced in the Outer Ionosphere: Review of Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Vladimir; Rauch, Jean-Louis; Parrot, Michel; Rapoport, Victor; Shorokhova, Elena

    In the report we consider features of plasma density and electro-magnetic field perturbations induced in the Earth’s outer ionosphere by modification of F _{2} region by O-mode powerful HF radio waves radiated by the SURA heating facility. Experiments presented were carried out in 2005 - 2010. Plasma density perturbations were detected at altitudes of about of 700 km by instruments onboard the French DEMETER satellite when it intersected the disturbed magnetic flux tube. The formation of artificial HF-induced plasma density ducts in the outer ionosphere is a central discovery, which was made during the SURA-DEMETER experiments [1,2]. Analysis of experimental data available makes it possible to formulate ducts features and point out the conditions under which the formation of such ducts takes place. 1. Under night conditions ducts are characterized by the increased plasma density in the range from 20% to 80% relatively to its background value. As this takes place, the excess in the plasma ion component is due to O (+) ions dominating at altitudes of about 700 km, whereas the densities of lower mass H (+) and He ({+) } ions typically decrease by a percentage amount that is much more the relative increase in the density of O (+) ions. The duct formation was never observed under daytime conditions. According to [3] the HF-induced ducts were observed by ionosphere pumping in morning and evening hours but in these cases their intensity was no more than a few percentages. 2. The size of the ducts along the satellite orbits is of about 80 - 100 km. It is a reason why such ducts can be observed only if the minimal distance between the satellite and the center of the heated flux tube is less than 50 km. 3. The formation of ducts is observed only if the effective radiated power is more than 40 MW. For the SURA facility, to heat the ionosphere at higher efficiency due to the “magnetic-zenith effect”, the HF beam is often inclined by 12 - 16(°) southward. 4. The pump

  2. Exciting: a full-potential all-electron package implementing density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Gulans, Andris; Kontur, Stefan; Meisenbichler, Christian; Nabok, Dmitrii; Pavone, Pasquale; Rigamonti, Santiago; Sagmeister, Stephan; Werner, Ute; Draxl, Claudia

    2014-09-10

    Linearized augmented planewave methods are known as the most precise numerical schemes for solving the Kohn-Sham equations of density-functional theory (DFT). In this review, we describe how this method is realized in the all-electron full-potential computer package, exciting. We emphasize the variety of different related basis sets, subsumed as (linearized) augmented planewave plus local orbital methods, discussing their pros and cons and we show that extremely high accuracy (microhartrees) can be achieved if the basis is chosen carefully. As the name of the code suggests, exciting is not restricted to ground-state calculations, but has a major focus on excited-state properties. It includes time-dependent DFT in the linear-response regime with various static and dynamical exchange-correlation kernels. These are preferably used to compute optical and electron-loss spectra for metals, molecules and semiconductors with weak electron-hole interactions. exciting makes use of many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral excitations. To obtain the quasi-particle band structure, the GW approach is implemented in the single-shot approximation, known as G(0)W(0). Optical absorption spectra for valence and core excitations are handled by the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, which allows for the description of strongly bound excitons. Besides these aspects concerning methodology, we demonstrate the broad range of possible applications by prototypical examples, comprising elastic properties, phonons, thermal-expansion coefficients, dielectric tensors and loss functions, magneto-optical Kerr effect, core-level spectra and more. PMID:25135665

  3. Electron correlation and dimerization in trans-polyacetylene: Many-body perturbation theory versus density-functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhai, Sándor

    1995-06-01

    Structural and energetic aspects of the Peierls-type lattice dimerization were investigated in infinite, one-dimensional, periodic trans-polyacetylene (t-PA) using many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) and density-functional theory (DFT). Cohesive properties and dimerization parameters were obtained first for the classical Coulomb potential in the Hartree approximation and then by gradually turning on exchange and correlation potentials. Besides the nonlocal Hartree-Fock exchange, several other exchange functionals were used incorporating gradient corrections as well. For MBPT, electron correlation was included up to the fourth order of the Mo/ller-Plesset scheme and the behavior of lattice sums for different PT terms was analyzed in detail. The electrostatic part of the infinite lattice sums was computed by the multipole expansion technique. In solving the polymer Kohn-Sham equations, the performance of several different correlation potentials was studied again including different gradient corrections. Atomic basis sets of systematically increasing size, in the range of double-zeta to triple-zeta (TZ) up to TZ (3df,3p2d), were used in all calculations to construct the symmetry-adapted (Bloch-type) polymer wave functions, to fully optimize the structures, and to extrapolate different physical quantities to the limit of a hypothetical infinite basis set. Comparison of the different DFT results with MBPT and with experiments demonstrated the importance of gradient terms both for exchange and correlation. On the other hand, the best DFT functional, using a medium-size atomic basis set, excellently reproduced the cohesive and dimerization energies obtained for infinite t-PA at the MP4/TZ(3d2f,3p2d) level and provided dimerization parameters close to experiment. The experimentally observed lattice spacing of 2.46+/-0.01 Å will be correctly predicted both at the MBPT and DFT levels with 2.48 and 2.44 Å, respectively.

  4. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Simonucci, Stefano; Beccara, Silvio a; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco; Verucchi, Roberto; Iannotta, Salvatore; Dapor, Maurizio; and others

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C{sub 60} collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C{sub 60} impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  5. Joint Inversion of Geoid Anomaly and Teleseismic P-Wave Delay Times: Modeling Density and Velocity Perturbations Beneath the Parana Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, C. A. M.; Ussami, N.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Parana Magmatic Province (PMP) is one of the largest continental igneous provinces (LIP) on Earth. It is well dated at 133 Ma preceding the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, but the causative geodynamic processes are still poorly understood. Although a low-velocity anomaly has been imaged by seismic tomography in the northeast region of the PMP and interpreted as a fossil conduct of a mantle plume that is related to the flood basalt eruptions, geochemical data indicate that such magmatism is caused by the melting of a heterogeneous and enriched lithospheric mantle with no deep plume participation. Models of density perturbations in the upper mantle estimated from joint inversion of geoid anomalies and P-wave delay times will offer important constraints on mantle dynamics. A new generation of accurate global geopotential models derived from satellite-missions (e.g. GRACE, GOCE) allows us to estimate density distribution within the Earth from geoid inversion. In order to obtain the residual geoid anomaly related to the density structure of the mantle, we use the EGM2008 model removing estimated geoid perturbations owing to variations in crustal structure (i.e., topographical masses, Moho depth, thickness of sediments and basalts). Using a spherical-Earth approximation, the density model space is represented by a set of tesseroids and the velocity model is parameterized in nodes of a spherical grid where cubic B-splines are utilized as an interpolation function. To constrain the density inversion, we add more than 10,000 manually picked teleseismic P-wave delay times. During the inversion procedure, density and P-wave velocity are linked through the optimization of a constant linear factor correlating density and velocity perturbation. Such optimization will be performed using a probability density function (PDF) [Tarantola, 2005]. We will present the preliminary results of this joint inversion scheme and hypothesize on the geodynamic processes responsible for

  6. Adiabatic cooling of antiprotons.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J

    2011-02-18

    Adiabatic cooling is shown to be a simple and effective method to cool many charged particles in a trap to very low temperatures. Up to 3×10(6) p are cooled to 3.5 K-10(3) times more cold p and a 3 times lower p temperature than previously reported. A second cooling method cools p plasmas via the synchrotron radiation of embedded e(-) (with many fewer e(-) than p in preparation for adiabatic cooling. No p are lost during either process-a significant advantage for rare particles. PMID:21405511

  7. Adiabatic Cooling of Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Kalra, R.; Novitski, E.; Oelert, W.; Grzonka, D.; Sefzick, T.; Zielinski, M.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Muellers, A.; Walz, J.

    2011-02-18

    Adiabatic cooling is shown to be a simple and effective method to cool many charged particles in a trap to very low temperatures. Up to 3x10{sup 6} p are cooled to 3.5 K--10{sup 3} times more cold p and a 3 times lower p temperature than previously reported. A second cooling method cools p plasmas via the synchrotron radiation of embedded e{sup -} (with many fewer e{sup -} than p) in preparation for adiabatic cooling. No p are lost during either process--a significant advantage for rare particles.

  8. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  9. Aspects of adiabatic population transfer and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirplak, Mustafa

    This thesis explores two different questions. The first question we answer is how to restore a given population transfer scenario given that it works efficiently in the adiabatic limit but fails because of lack of intensity and/or short duration. We derive a very simple algorithm to do this and apply it to both toy and realistic models. Two results emerge from this study. While the mathematical existence of the programme is certain it might not always be physically desirable. The restoration of adiabaticity is phase sensitive. The second question that is answered in this thesis is not how to invent new control paradigms, but rather what would happen to them in the presence of stochastic perturbers. We first use a phenomenological model to study the effect of stochastic dephasing on population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. The results of this Monte Carlo calculation are qualitatively explained with a perturbation theoretical result in the dressed state basis. The reliability of our phenomenological model is questioned through a more rigorous hybrid quantal-classical simulation of controlled population transfer in HCl in Ar.

  10. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  11. Entanglement and adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrensmeier, D.

    2006-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation provides an alternative approach to quantum computation using a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The time evolution of entanglement during the adiabatic quantum search algorithm is studied, and its relevance as a resource is discussed.

  12. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Thiago V; Bonança, Marcus V S; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. With the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found-quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. Finally, we propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times. PMID:26565209

  13. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. With the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. Finally, we propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  14. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  15. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  16. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions. PMID:25308187

  17. Impact of anisotropic stress of free-streaming particles on gravitational waves induced by cosmological density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are inevitably induced at second order in cosmological perturbations through nonlinear couplings with first-order scalar perturbations, the existence of which is well established by recent cosmological observations. So far, the evolution and the spectrum of the secondary induced GWs have been derived by taking into account the sources of GWs only from the product of first-order scalar perturbations. Here we newly investigate the effects of purely second-order anisotropic stresses of photons and neutrinos on the evolution of GWs, which have been omitted in the literature. We present a full treatment of the Einstein-Boltzmann system to calculate the spectrum of GWs with anisotropic stress based on the formalism of the cosmological perturbation theory. We find that photon anisotropic stress amplifies the amplitude of GWs by about 150%, whereas neutrino anisotropic stress suppresses that of GWs by about 30% on small scales k ≳1.0 h Mpc-1 compared to the case without anisotropic stress. The second-order anisotropic stress does not affect GWs with wave numbers k ≲1.0 h Mpc-1 . The result is in marked contrast with the case at linear order, where the effect of anisotropic stress is damping in the amplitude of GWs.

  18. On the adiabatic stability of solitons and the matching of conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochak, Pierre

    1984-08-01

    We derive a series of identities which generalize and simplify the results obtained for adiabatically modulated solitons in the case of perturbed specific integrable equations. It stresses the importance of the variational properties of the solitons, which make an adiabatic theorem plausible. A precise conjecture is made and its validity discussed from different points of view.

  19. THE FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE ADIABATIC INDEX IN THE SOLAR CORONA USING TIME-DEPENDENT SPECTROSCOPY OF HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Wardle, Nick; Jansari, Kishan; Verwichte, Erwin; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Del Zanna, Giulio

    2011-02-01

    We use observations of a slow magnetohydrodynamic wave in the corona to determine for the first time the value of the effective adiabatic index, using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode. We detect oscillations in the electron density, using the CHIANTI atomic database to perform spectroscopy. From the time-dependent wave signals from multiple spectral lines the relationship between relative density and temperature perturbations is determined, which allows in turn to measure the effective adiabatic index to be {gamma}{sub eff} = 1.10 {+-} 0.02. This confirms that the thermal conduction along the magnetic field is very efficient in the solar corona. The thermal conduction coefficient is measured from the phase lag between the temperature and density, and is shown to be compatible with Spitzer conductivity.

  20. Observational tests of non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C. E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br

    2014-10-01

    In a previous paper [1] it was shown that any dark sector model can be mapped into a non-adiabatic fluid formed by two interacting components, one with zero pressure and the other with equation-of-state parameter ω = -1. It was also shown that the latter does not cluster and, hence, the former is identified as the observed clustering matter. This guarantees that the dark matter power spectrum does not suffer from oscillations or instabilities. It applies in particular to the generalised Chaplygin gas, which was shown to be equivalent to interacting models at both background and perturbation levels. In the present paper we test the non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas against the Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae, the position of the first acoustic peak in the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and the linear power spectrum of large scale structures. We consider two different compilations of SNe Ia, namely the Constitution and SDSS samples, both calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and for the power spectrum we use the 2dFGRS catalogue. The model parameters to be adjusted are the present Hubble parameter, the present matter density and the Chaplygin gas parameter α. The joint analysis best fit gives α ≈ - 0.5, which corresponds to a constant-rate energy flux from dark energy to dark matter, with the dark energy density decaying linearly with the Hubble parameter. The ΛCDM model, equivalent to α = 0, stands outside the 3σ confidence interval.

  1. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Neels, Alice

    2015-07-01

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  2. Study of the spectrum of inflaton perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Glenz, Matthew M.; Parker, Leonard

    2009-09-15

    We examine the spectrum of inflaton fluctuations resulting from any given long period of exponential inflation. Infrared and ultraviolet divergences in the inflaton dispersion summed over all modes do not appear in our approach. We show how the scale invariance of the perturbation spectrum arises. We also examine the spectrum of scalar perturbations of the metric that is created by the inflaton fluctuations that have left the Hubble sphere during inflation and the spectrum of density perturbations that they produce at reentry after inflation has ended. When the inflaton dispersion spectrum is renormalized during the expansion, we show (for the case of the quadratic inflaton potential) that the density perturbation spectrum approaches a mass-independent limit as the inflaton mass approaches zero, and remains near that limiting value for masses less than about 1/4 of the inflationary Hubble constant. We show that this limiting behavior does not occur if one only makes the Minkowski space subtraction, without the further adiabatic subtractions that involve time derivatives of the expansion scale factor a(t). We also find a parametrized expression for the energy density produced by the change in a(t) as inflation ends. If the end of inflation were sufficiently abrupt, then the temperature corresponding to this energy density could be very significant. We also show that fluctuations of the inflaton field that are present before inflation starts are not dissipated during inflation and could have a significant observational effect today. The mechanism for this is caused by the initial fluctuations through stimulated emission from the vacuum.

  3. Local entanglement generation in the adiabatic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cliche, M.; Veitia, Andrzej

    2010-09-15

    We study entanglement generation in a pair of qubits interacting with an initially correlated system. Using time-independent perturbation theory and the adiabatic theorem, we show conditions under which the qubits become entangled as the joint system evolves into the ground state of the interacting theory. We then apply these results to the case of qubits interacting with a scalar quantum field. We study three different variations of this setup; a quantum field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions, a quantum field interacting with a classical potential, and a quantum field that starts in a thermal state.

  4. Derivation of the RPA (Random Phase Approximation) Equation of ATDDFT (Adiabatic Time Dependent Density Functional Ground State Response Theory) from an Excited State Variational Approach Based on the Ground State Functional.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Tom; Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    The random phase approximation (RPA) equation of adiabatic time dependent density functional ground state response theory (ATDDFT) has been used extensively in studies of excited states. It extracts information about excited states from frequency dependent ground state response properties and avoids, thus, in an elegant way, direct Kohn-Sham calculations on excited states in accordance with the status of DFT as a ground state theory. Thus, excitation energies can be found as resonance poles of frequency dependent ground state polarizability from the eigenvalues of the RPA equation. ATDDFT is approximate in that it makes use of a frequency independent energy kernel derived from the ground state functional. It is shown in this study that one can derive the RPA equation of ATDDFT from a purely variational approach in which stationary states above the ground state are located using our constricted variational DFT (CV-DFT) method and the ground state functional. Thus, locating stationary states above the ground state due to one-electron excitations with a ground state functional is completely equivalent to solving the RPA equation of TDDFT employing the same functional. The present study is an extension of a previous work in which we demonstrated the equivalence between ATDDFT and CV-DFT within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. PMID:26588541

  5. Cosmological perturbations and the Weinberg theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Jazayeri, Sadra

    2015-12-01

    The celebrated Weinberg theorem in cosmological perturbation theory states that there always exist two adiabatic scalar modes in which the comoving curvature perturbation is conserved on super-horizon scales. In particular, when the perturbations are generated from a single source, such as in single field models of inflation, both of the two allowed independent solutions are adiabatic and conserved on super-horizon scales. There are few known examples in literature which violate this theorem. We revisit the theorem and specify the loopholes in some technical assumptions which violate the theorem in models of non-attractor inflation, fluid inflation, solid inflation and in the model of pseudo conformal universe.

  6. Influence of Critical Current Density on Guidance Force Decay of HTS Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field Perturbation in a Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcai, Zhang; Jianguo, Kong

    2012-07-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to AC external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. In our previous work, we studied the guidance force decay of the YBCO bulk over the NdFdB guideway used in the High-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and calculated the guidance force decay as a function of time based on an analytic model. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the critical current density on the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system and try to adopt a method to suppress the decay. From the results, it was found that the guidance force decay rate was higher for the bulk with lower critical current density. Therefore, we could suppress the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC external magnetic field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system by improving critical current density of the bulk.

  7. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  8. Van der Waals interactions between hydrocarbon molecules and zeolites: periodic calculations at different levels of theory, from density functional theory to the random phase approximation and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Göltl, Florian; Grüneis, Andreas; Bučko, Tomas; Hafner, Jürgen

    2012-09-21

    The adsorption of small alkane molecules in purely siliceous and protonated chabazite has been investigated at different levels of theory: (i) density-functional (DFT) calculations with a gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functional; DFT calculations using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional with corrections for the missing dispersion forces in the form of C(6)∕R(6) pair potentials with (ii) C(6) parameters and vdW radii determined by fitting accurate energies for a large molecular data base (PBE-d) or (iii) derived from "atoms in a solid" calculations; (iv) DFT calculations using a non-local correlation functional constructed such as to account for dispersion forces (vdW-DF); (v) calculations based on the random phase approximation (RPA) combined with the adiabatic-coupling fluctuation-dissipation theorem; and (vi) using Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations together with correlation energies calculated using second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory. All calculations have been performed for periodic models of the zeolite and using a plane-wave basis and the projector-augmented wave method. The simpler and computationally less demanding approaches (i)-(iv) permit a calculation of the forces acting on the atoms using the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and further a structural optimization of the adsorbate-zeolite complex, while RPA and MP2 calculations can be performed only for a fixed geometry optimized at a lower level of theory. The influence of elevated temperature has been taken into account by averaging the adsorption energies calculated for purely siliceous and protonated chabazite, with weighting factors determined by molecular dynamics calculations with dispersion-corrected forces from DFT. Compared to experiment, the RPA underestimates the adsorption energies by about 5 kJ/mol while MP2 leads to an overestimation by about 6 kJ/Mol (averaged over methane, ethane, and propane). The most accurate results have been found for the "hybrid" RPA

  9. Van der Waals interactions between hydrocarbon molecules and zeolites: Periodic calculations at different levels of theory, from density functional theory to the random phase approximation and Møller-Plesset perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göltl, Florian; Grüneis, Andreas; Bučko, Tomas; Hafner, Jürgen

    2012-09-01

    The adsorption of small alkane molecules in purely siliceous and protonated chabazite has been investigated at different levels of theory: (i) density-functional (DFT) calculations with a gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functional; DFT calculations using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional with corrections for the missing dispersion forces in the form of C6/R6 pair potentials with (ii) C6 parameters and vdW radii determined by fitting accurate energies for a large molecular data base (PBE-d) or (iii) derived from "atoms in a solid" calculations; (iv) DFT calculations using a non-local correlation functional constructed such as to account for dispersion forces (vdW-DF); (v) calculations based on the random phase approximation (RPA) combined with the adiabatic-coupling fluctuation-dissipation theorem; and (vi) using Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations together with correlation energies calculated using second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory. All calculations have been performed for periodic models of the zeolite and using a plane-wave basis and the projector-augmented wave method. The simpler and computationally less demanding approaches (i)-(iv) permit a calculation of the forces acting on the atoms using the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and further a structural optimization of the adsorbate-zeolite complex, while RPA and MP2 calculations can be performed only for a fixed geometry optimized at a lower level of theory. The influence of elevated temperature has been taken into account by averaging the adsorption energies calculated for purely siliceous and protonated chabazite, with weighting factors determined by molecular dynamics calculations with dispersion-corrected forces from DFT. Compared to experiment, the RPA underestimates the adsorption energies by about 5 kJ/mol while MP2 leads to an overestimation by about 6 kJ/Mol (averaged over methane, ethane, and propane). The most accurate results have been found for the "hybrid" RPA-HF method

  10. Cholesky-decomposed densities in Laplace-based second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zienau, Jan; Clin, Lucien; Doser, Bernd; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Based on our linear-scaling atomic orbital second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (AO-MP2) method [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 064107 (2009)], we explore the use of Cholesky-decomposed pseudodensity (CDD) matrices within the Laplace formulation. Numerically significant contributions are preselected using our multipole-based integral estimates as upper bounds to two-electron integrals so that the 1/R6 decay behavior of transformed Coulomb-type products is exploited. In addition, we combine our new CDD-MP2 method with the resolution of the identity (RI) approach. Even though the use of RI results in a method that shows a quadratic scaling behavior in the dominant steps, gains of up to one or two orders of magnitude vs. our original AO-MP2 method are observed in particular for larger basis sets.

  11. High Density of Aligned Nanowire Treated with Polydopamine for Efficient Gene Silencing by siRNA According to Cell Membrane Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Baiju G; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ueda, Motoki; Yu, Hsiao-Hua; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-27

    High aspect ratio nanomaterials, such as vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) substrates, are three-dimensional topological features for cell manipulations. A high density of SiNWs significantly affects not only cell adhesion and proliferation but also the delivery of biomolecules to cells. Here, we used polydopamine (PD) that simply formed a thin coating on various material surfaces by the action of dopamine as a bioinspired approach. The PD coating not only enhanced cell adhesion, spreading, and growth but also anchored more siRNA by adsorption and provided more surface concentration for substrate-mediated delivery. By comparing plain and SiNW surfaces with the same amount of loaded siRNA, we quantitatively found that PD coating efficiently anchored siRNA on the surface, which knocked down the expression of a specific gene by RNA interference. It was also found that the interaction of SiNWs with the cell membrane perturbed the lateral diffusion of lipids in the membrane by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The perturbation was considered to induce the effective delivery of siRNA into cells and allow the cells to carry out their biological functions. These results suggest promising applications of PD-coated, high-density SiNWs as simple, fast, and versatile platforms for transmembrane delivery of biomolecules. PMID:27420034

  12. Adiabatic Betatron deceleration of ionospheric charged particles: a new explanation for (i) the rapid outflow of ionospheric O ions, and for (ii) the increase of plasma mass density observed in magnetospheric flux tubes during main phases of geomagnetic s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Joseph; Pierrard, Viviane; Darrouzet, Fabien

    2013-04-01

    Using European arrays of magnetometers and the cross-phase analysis to determine magnetic field line resonance frequencies, it has been found by Kale et al. (2009) that the plasma mass density within plasmaspheric flux tubes increased rapidly after the SSC of the Hallowe'en 2003 geomagnetic storms. These observations tend to confirm other independent experimental results, suggesting that heavy ion up-flow from the ionosphere is responsible for the observed plasma density increases during main phases of geomagnetic storms. The aim of our contribution is to point out that, during main phases, reversible Betatron effect induced by the increase of the southward Dst-magnetic field component (|Δ Bz|), diminishes slightly the perpendicular kinetic energy (W?) of charged particles spiraling along field lines. Furthermore, due to the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant (μ = Wm/ Bm) the mirror points of all ionospheric ions and electrons are lifted up to higher altitudes i.e. where the mirror point magnetic field (Bm) is slightly smaller. Note that the change of the mirror point altitude is given by: Δ hm = -1/3 (RE + hm) Δ Bm / Bm. It is independent of the ion species and it does not depend of their kinetic energy. The change of kinetic energy is determined by: Δ Wm = Wm Δ Bm / Bm. Both of these equations have been verified numerically by Lemaire et al. (2005; doi: 10.1016/S0273-1177(03)00099-1) using trajectory calculations in a simple time-dependant B-field model: i.e. the Earth's magnetic dipole, plus an increasing southward B-field component: i.e. the Dst magnetic field whose intensity becomes more and more negative during the main phase of magnetic storms. They showed that a variation of Bz (or Dst) by more than - 50 nT significantly increases the mirror point altitudes by more than 100 km which is about equal to scale height of the plasma density in the topside ionosphere where particles are almost collisionless (see Fig. 2 in Lemaire et al., 2005

  13. Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landahl, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Quantum computers promise to exploit counterintuitive quantum physics principles like superposition, entanglement, and uncertainty to solve problems using fundamentally fewer steps than any conventional computer ever could. The mere possibility of such a device has sharpened our understanding of quantum coherent information, just as lasers did for our understanding of coherent light. The chief obstacle to developing quantum computer technology is decoherence--one of the fastest phenomena in all of physics. In principle, decoherence can be overcome by using clever entangled redundancies in a process called fault-tolerant quantum error correction. However, the quality and scale of technology required to realize this solution appears distant. An exciting alternative is a proposal called ``adiabatic'' quantum computing (AQC), in which adiabatic quantum physics keeps the computer in its lowest-energy configuration throughout its operation, rendering it immune to many decoherence sources. The Adiabatic Quantum Architectures In Ultracold Systems (AQUARIUS) Grand Challenge Project at Sandia seeks to demonstrate this robustness in the laboratory and point a path forward for future hardware development. We are building devices in AQUARIUS that realize the AQC architecture on up to three quantum bits (``qubits'') in two platforms: Cs atoms laser-cooled to below 5 microkelvin and Si quantum dots cryo-cooled to below 100 millikelvin. We are also expanding theoretical frontiers by developing methods for scalable universal AQC in these platforms. We have successfully demonstrated operational qubits in both platforms and have even run modest one-qubit calculations using our Cs device. In the course of reaching our primary proof-of-principle demonstrations, we have developed multiple spinoff technologies including nanofabricated diffractive optical elements that define optical-tweezer trap arrays and atomic-scale Si lithography commensurate with placing individual donor atoms with

  14. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  15. Extended analysis of CMB constraints on non-gaussianity in isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Hikage, Chiaki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2013-03-01

    We study CMB constraints on non-Gaussianity from isocurvature perturbations of general types. Specifically, we study CDM/neutrino isocurvature perturbations which are uncorrelated or totally correlated with adiabatic ones. Using the data from the WMAP 7-year observation at V and W bands, we obtained optimal constraints on the nonlinearity parameters of adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. Our result shows that primordial perturbations are consistent with Gaussian ones at around 2σ level for above mentioned isocurvature modes.

  16. The Sensitivity of the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size Experiment to Gravity Wave Density Perturbations near the Stratopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, J. N.; Bailey, S. M.; Alexander, M. J.; Randall, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Nadir images of Rayleigh scattered UV sunlight (265 nm) from the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite contain many periodic structures. These structures are believed to be the result of Gravity Waves (GW). In this work, we investigate the theoretical impact of GWs on the albedo imagery. We show that GWs are indeed capable of producing the observed structures. The sensitivity to GW perturbations peaks at an altitude of ~50 km with a FWHM of ~15 km with images taken at mid to polar latitudes. For vertical wavelengths greater than 15 km, this corresponds to GWs with momentum fluxes greater than ~0.1-0.01 mPa. Vertical wavelengths less than ~10 km require amplitudes larger than static stability considerations allow, so these GWs are not observable. Observable horizontal wavelengths range from approximately 20 to 300 km. These wavelength ranges correspond to a sensitivity to GWs with an intrinsic period shorter than ~2.5 hrs. Existing satellite GW studies in this altitude region use limb scanners or microwave nadir imagers, which are sensitive to much longer horizontal wavelengths. This tends to limit the sensitivity to longer period waves. Therefore, the addition of CIPS imagery to the existing coverage of GW measurements is complimentary - significantly expanding the spectral coverage of GWs near the stratopause. Short period GWs observed by CIPS carry significantly larger momentum flux than the climatological averages seen for longer period GWs, so important differences may exist. GWs are critically important to middle atmosphere dynamics, and their representation in global climate models is not well constrained by observations.

  17. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory with Kohn-Sham orbitals using non-empirically tuned, long-range-corrected density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M.

    2014-01-28

    The performance of second-order symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) calculations using Kohn-Sham (KS) orbitals is evaluated against benchmark results for intermolecular interactions. Unlike previous studies of this “SAPT(KS)” methodology, the present study uses non-empirically tuned long-range corrected (LRC) functionals for the monomers. The proper v{sub xc} (r)→0 asymptotic limit is achieved by tuning the range separation parameter in order to satisfy the condition that the highest occupied KS energy level equals minus the molecule's ionization energy, for each monomer unit. Tests for He{sub 2}, Ne{sub 2}, and the S22 and S66 data sets reveal that this condition is important for accurate prediction of the non-dispersion components of the energy, although errors in SAPT(KS) dispersion energies remain unacceptably large. In conjunction with an empirical dispersion potential, however, the SAPT(KS) method affords good results for S22 and S66, and also accurately predicts the whole potential energy curve for the sandwich isomer of the benzene dimer. Tuned LRC functionals represent an attractive alternative to other asymptotic corrections that have been employed in density-functional-based SAPT calculations, and we recommend the use of tuned LRC functionals in both coupled-perturbed SAPT(DFT) calculations and dispersion-corrected SAPT(KS) calculations.

  18. Between-day reliability of triceps surae responses to standing perturbations in people post-stroke and healthy controls: A high-density surface EMG investigation.

    PubMed

    Gallina, A; Pollock, C L; Vieira, T M; Ivanova, T D; Garland, S J

    2016-02-01

    The reliability of triceps surae electromyographic responses to standing perturbations in people after stroke and healthy controls is unknown. High-Density surface Electromyography (HDsEMG) is a technique that records electromyographic signals from different locations over a muscle, overcoming limitations of traditional surface EMG such as between-day differences in electrode placement. In this study, HDsEMG was used to measure responses from soleus (SOL, 18 channels) and medial and lateral gastrocnemius (MG and LG, 16 channels each) in 10 people after stroke and 10 controls. Timing and amplitude of the response were estimated for each channel of the grids. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and normalized Standard Error of Measurement (SEM%) were calculated for each channel individually (single-channel configuration) and on the median of each grid (all-channels configuration). Both timing (single-channel: ICC=0.75-0.96, SEM%=5.0-9.1; all-channels: ICC=0.85-0.97; SEM%=3.5-6.2%) and amplitude (single-channel: ICC=0.60-0.91, SEM%=25.1-46.6; ICC=0.73-0.95, SEM%=19.3-42.1) showed good-to-excellent reliability. HDsEMG provides reliable estimates of EMG responses to perturbations both in individuals after stroke and in healthy controls; reliability was marginally better for the all-channels compared to the single-channel configuration. PMID:27004641

  19. Calculation of infrared and Raman vibration modes of magnesite at high pressure by density-functional perturbation theory and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stewart J.; Jouanna, Paul; Haines, Julien; Mainprice, David

    2011-03-01

    We predict the IR-TO, IR-LO and Raman modes (wave numbers and intensities) of magnesite (MgCO3) up to 50 GPa, at T = 0 K, using the density-functional perturbation theory up to a third order perturbation, under the harmonic assumption. The predicted IR-TO and Raman mode wave numbers, the mode Grüneisen parameters and the Davydov splittings are systematically compared with experimental data for all modes up to the pressures of 10-30 GPa and for some modes up to 50 GPa. Existing experiments allow extending this comparison only to IR-LO wave numbers of the E u (ν3) asymmetric-stretch mode, confirming the odd experimental behavior of this mode at very high pressures. Predicted IR-TO, IR-LO and Raman intensities up to 50 GPa are just tabulated, but data are missing for their comparison with precise experiments. However, the generally good agreement observed between numerical results and experimental data, when their comparison is possible, suggests that first-principles methods are a major help to predict the entire spectrum up to very high pressures.

  20. Non-adiabatic and adiabatic transitions at level crossing with decay: two- and three-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmoe, M. B.; Mkam Tchouobiap, S. E.; Kenfack Sadem, C.; Tchapda, A. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the Landau-Zener (LZ) like dynamics of decaying two- and three-level systems with decay rates {{Γ }1} and {{Γ }2} for levels with minimum and maximum spin projection. Non-adiabatic and adiabatic transition probabilities are calculated from diabatic and adiabatic bases for two- and three-level systems. We extend the familiar two-level model of atoms with decay from the excited state out of the system into the hierarchy of three-level models which can be solved analytically or computationally in a non-perturbative manner. Exact analytical solutions are obtained within the framework of an extended form of the proposed procedure which enables to take into account all possible initial moments rather than large negative time {{t}0}=-∞ as in standard LZ problems. We elucidate the applications of our results from a unified theoretical basis that numerically analyzes the dynamics of a system as probed by experiments.

  1. Rotation dependence of a phase delay between plasma edge electron density and temperature fields due to a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Stoschus, H.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Unterberg, B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Kruezi, U.; Schega, D.; Samm, U.; Jakubowski, M. W.

    2010-06-15

    Measurements of the plasma edge electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub e} fields during application of a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field show a characteristic modulation of both, n{sub e} and T{sub e} coherent to the rotation frequency of the RMP field. A phase delay PHI between the n{sub e}(t) and T{sub e}(t) waveforms is observed and it is demonstrated that this phase delay PHI is a function of the radius with PHI(r) depending on the relative rotation of the RMP field and the toroidal plasma rotation. This provides for the first time direct experimental evidence for a rotation dependent damping of the external RMP field in the edge layer of a resistive high-temperature plasma which breaks down at low rotation and high resonant field amplitudes.

  2. Areal density evolution of isolated surface perturbations at the onset of x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, E. N.; Braun, D.; Batha, S. H.; Sorce, C.; Landen, O. L.

    2011-09-01

    Isolated defects on inertial confinement fusion ignition capsules are a concern as defects taller than a few hundred nanometers are calculated to form jets of high-Z material, which enter the main fuel. If this mixing of high-Z material is not controlled, a serious degradation in thermonuclear burn can occur. A path towards controlling the growth of defects on the outer surface of plastic capsules is currently under development, but requires accurate predictions of defect evolution driven by the early time ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) effect. The chief uncertainty is the Equation of State (EOS) for polystyrene and its effect on ablative RM. We report on measurements of the growth of isolated defects made at the onset of ablative RM oscillations driven by x-ray ablation to differentiate between EOS models used in design calculations. Experiments at the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] used on-axis area backlighting radiography and x-ray framing cameras to determine bump areal densities at discrete times. Bumps 12 and 14 μm tall and 33 μm FWHM were found to grow to 2 × their initial areal density by 3 ns after the start of the drive laser pulse. Shock speed measurements established target conditions resulting from the ablation process. The tabular LEOS 5310 [D. Young and E. Corey, J. Appl. Phys. 78, 3748 (1995)] model shows good agreement with measured shock speeds and bump growth whereas the QEOS model [R. More et al., Phys. Fluids 31, 3059 (1988)] over predicts shock speed and under predicts bump growth by 6×. Differences in ablative RM behavior were also found for x-ray ablation compared to laser ablation, which result in an overestimation (or non-existence) of oscillation frequency for x-ray ablation as predicted by theory.

  3. Areal density evolution of isolated surface perturbations at the onset of x-ray ablation Richtmyer-Meshkov growth

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, E. N.; Batha, S. H.; Braun, D.; Sorce, C.; Landen, O. L.

    2011-09-15

    Isolated defects on inertial confinement fusion ignition capsules are a concern as defects taller than a few hundred nanometers are calculated to form jets of high-Z material, which enter the main fuel. If this mixing of high-Z material is not controlled, a serious degradation in thermonuclear burn can occur. A path towards controlling the growth of defects on the outer surface of plastic capsules is currently under development, but requires accurate predictions of defect evolution driven by the early time ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) effect. The chief uncertainty is the Equation of State (EOS) for polystyrene and its effect on ablative RM. We report on measurements of the growth of isolated defects made at the onset of ablative RM oscillations driven by x-ray ablation to differentiate between EOS models used in design calculations. Experiments at the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] used on-axis area backlighting radiography and x-ray framing cameras to determine bump areal densities at discrete times. Bumps 12 and 14 {mu}m tall and 33 {mu}m FWHM were found to grow to 2 x their initial areal density by 3 ns after the start of the drive laser pulse. Shock speed measurements established target conditions resulting from the ablation process. The tabular LEOS 5310 [D. Young and E. Corey, J. Appl. Phys. 78, 3748 (1995)] model shows good agreement with measured shock speeds and bump growth whereas the QEOS model [R. More et al., Phys. Fluids 31, 3059 (1988)] over predicts shock speed and under predicts bump growth by 6x. Differences in ablative RM behavior were also found for x-ray ablation compared to laser ablation, which result in an overestimation (or non-existence) of oscillation frequency for x-ray ablation as predicted by theory.

  4. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  5. Non-adiabatic effect on quantum pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Chikako

    2014-03-01

    We study quantum pumping for an anharmonic junction model which interacts with two kinds of bosonic environments. We provide an expression for the quantum pumping under a piecewise modulation of environmental temperatures with including non-adiabatic effect under Markovian approximation. The obtained formula is an extension of the one expressed with the geometrical phase(Phys. Rev. Lett. 104,170601 (2010)). This extension shows that the quantum pumping depends on the initial condition of the anharmonic junction just before the modulation, as well as the characteristic environmental parameters such as interaction strength and cut-off frequencies of spectral density other than the conditions of modulation. We clarify that the pumping current including non-adiabatic effect can be larger than that under the adiabatic condition. This means that we can find the optimal condition of the current by adjusting these parameters. (The article has been submitted as http://arxiv.org/submit/848201 and will be appeared soon.) This work is supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) (KAKENHI 25287098).

  6. Role of plasma response in determining density pump-out with Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordijck, S.; Smith, S. P.

    2014-10-01

    We are studying the effect of RMPs on the density pump-out threshold in order to determine whether the transport changes are the result of change in turbulence or rotation. Applying RMPs strongly reduces the core rotation and increases the edge rotation, which reduces the ExB shear thus increasing turbulent transport. The toroidal rotation measurements made at two different toroidal location show no phase lag during rotating n = 2 RMP experiment, which is an indication that there is a strong n = 0 response. This n = 0 response could be the result of MHD effects, or due to changes in turbulence characteristics. New low ν* experiments at lower RMP strength allow us to test, whether this change in the toroidal rotation is the main drive behind the increase in particle transport in low collisionality H-mode plasmas on DIII-D as well as examine what is causing the n = 0 response to the toroidal rotation. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-SC0007880 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  7. Cumulant Approximated Second-Order Perturbation Theory Based on the Density Matrix Renormalization Group for Transition Metal Complexes: A Benchmark Study.

    PubMed

    Phung, Quan Manh; Wouters, Sebastian; Pierloot, Kristine

    2016-09-13

    The complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) can be extended to larger active spaces by using the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) as solver. Two variants are commonly used: the costly DMRG-CASPT2 with exact 4-particle reduced density matrix (4-RDM) and the cheaper DMRG-cu(4)-CASPT2 in which the 4-cumulant is discarded. To assess the accuracy and limitations of the latter variant DMRG-cu(4)-CASPT2 we study the spin state energetics of iron porphyrin Fe(P) and its model compound FeL2, a model for the active center of NiFe hydrogenase, and manganese-oxo porphyrin MnO(P)(+); a series of excited states of chromium hexacarbonyl Cr(CO)6; and the interconversion of two Cu2O2(2+) isomers. Our results clearly show that PT2 on top of DMRG is essential in order to obtain quantitative results for transition metal complexes. Good results were obtained with DMRG-cu(4)-CASPT2 as compared to full CASPT2 and DMRG-CASPT2 in calculations with small- and medium-sized active spaces. In calculations with large-sized active spaces (∼30 active orbitals), the performance of DMRG-cu(4)-CASPT2 is less impressive due to the errors originating from both the finite number of renormalized states m and the 4-RDM approximation. PMID:27547847

  8. Stochasticity, superadiabaticity, and the theory of adiabatic invariants and guiding center motion

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, D.H.E.; Krommes, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    The theory of adiabatic invariants is discussed within the modern framework of symplectic Hamiltonian dynamics. The distinctions between exact, adiabatic, and superadiabatic invariants are clarified. The intimate connection between adiabatic (as opposed to exact) invariance and resonant interactions between motions on disparate time scales is elucidated. For the important case of charged particle motion in a strong magnetic field, resonances between gyration, bounce motion, and an external sinusoidal perturbation are described explicitly by introducing a time-dependent symplectic formulation of the guiding center motion. Destruction of invariance is discussed for quite general situations of physical interest, including the case of a trapped particle in a tokamak.

  9. Correlation Energy of the Homogeneous Electron Gas from Adiabatic Connection Fluctuation-Dissipation Theory including Exact Exchange kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, Nicola; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    We have developed an expression for the electronic correlation energy via the Adiabatic Connection Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem (ACFDT) going beyond the Random-Phase Approximation (RPA) by including exact exchange contribution to the kernel (RPAx). Our derivation is valid and efficient for general systems. It is based on an eigenvalue decomposition of the time dependent response function of the Many Body system in the limit of vanishing coupling constant, evaluated by Density Functional Perturbation Theory. We tested the accuracy of this approximation on the homogeneous electron gas. Within RPAx, the correlation energy of the homogeneous electron gas improves significantly with respect to the RPA results up to densities of the order of rs ~ 10 . However, beyond this value, the RPAx response function becomes pathological and the approximation breaks down. We have also evaluated the dependence of the correlation energy on the spin magnetization of the system. Both RPA an RPAx are in excellent agreement with accurate Quantum Monte Carlo results.

  10. Lattice dynamical properties of superconducting SrPt3P studied via inelastic x-ray scattering and density functional perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocco, D. A.; Krannich, S.; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K.-P.; Wolf, T.; Forrest, T.; Bosak, A.; Weber, F.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of the lattice dynamical properties of superconducting SrPt3P (Tc=8.4 K) via high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) and ab initio calculations. Density functional perturbation theory including spin-orbit coupling results in enhanced electron-phonon coupling (EPC) for the optic phonon modes originating from the Pt(I) atoms, with energies ˜5 meV, resulting in a large EPC constant λ ˜2 . An overall softening of the IXS powder spectra occurs from room to low temperatures, consistent with the predicted strong EPC and with recent specific-heat experiments (2 Δ0/kBTc˜5 ). The low-lying phonon modes observed in the experiments are approximately 1.5 meV harder than the corresponding calculated phonon branch. Moreover, we do not find any changes in the spectra upon entering the superconducting phase. We conclude that current theoretical calculations underestimate the energy of the lowest band of phonon modes indicating that the coupling of these modes to the electronic subsystem is overestimated.

  11. Parametric Excitation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) Electromagnetic Whistler Waves by Transformation of Lower Oblique Resonance Waves on Density Perturbations in the Vicinity of a Loop VLF Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Sotnikov, V.; Main, D.; Mishin, E.; Gershenzon, N.

    2015-11-01

    Concept of a parametric antenna in the ionospheric plasma is analyzed. Such antennas are capable of exciting electromagnetic radiation fields, specifically the creation of whistler waves generated at the very low frequency (VLF) range, which are also capable of propagating large distances away from the source region. The mechanism of whistler wave generation is considered a parametric interaction of quasi-electrostatic low oblique resonance (LOR) oscillations excited by conventional loop antenna. The transformation of LOR waves on quasi-neutral density perturbations generated by a dipole antenna gives rise to electromagnetic whistler waves on combination frequencies. In this approach extended plasma volume around a loop antenna represents a parametric antenna. Simulation to demonstrate excitation and spatial structure of VLF waves excited by a loop antenna using a PIC code LSP will be presented as well. Possible applications including the wave-particle interactions to mitigate performance anomalies of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, active space experiments, communication via VLF waves, and modification experiments in the ionosphere will be discussed.

  12. Variational versus Perturbational Treatment of Spin-Orbit Coupling in Relativistic Density Functional Calculations of Electronic g Factors: Effects from Spin-Polarization and Exact Exchange.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prakash; Autschbach, Jochen

    2013-02-12

    Different approaches are compared for relativistic calculations of electronic g factors of molecules with light atoms, transition metal complexes, and selected complexes with actinides, using density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) theory. The comparison includes functionals with range-separated exchange. Within the variationally stable zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) relativistic framework, g factors are obtained with a linear response (LR) method where spin-orbit (SO) coupling is treated as a linear perturbation, a spin-polarized approach based on magnetic anisotropy (MA) that includes SO coupling variationally, and a quasi-restricted variational SO method previously devised by van Lenthe, van der Avoird, and Wormer (LWA). The MA and LWA approaches were implemented in the open-source NWChem quantum chemistry package. We address the importance of electron correlation (DFT vs HF), the importance of including spin polarization in the g tensor methodology, the question of whether the use of nonrelativistic spin density functionals is adequate for such calculations, and the importance of treating spin-orbit coupling beyond first-order. For selected systems, the extent of the DFT delocalization error is explicitly investigated via calculations of the energy as a function of fractional electron numbers. For a test set of small molecules with light main group atoms, all levels of calculation perform adequately as long as there is no energetic near-degeneracy among occupied and unoccupied orbitals. The interplay between different factors determining the accuracy of calculated g factors becomes more complex for systems with heavy elements such as third row transition metals and actinides. The MA approach is shown to perform acceptably well for a wide range of scenarios. PMID:26588748

  13. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  14. Out-of-equilibrium density dynamics of a quenched fermionic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porta, S.; Gambetta, F. M.; Cavaliere, F.; Traverso Ziani, N.; Sassetti, M.

    2016-08-01

    Using a Luttinger liquid theory we investigate the time evolution of the particle density of a one-dimensional fermionic system with open boundaries and subject to a finite duration quench of the interparticle interaction. We provide analytical and asymptotic solutions to the unitary time evolution of the system, showing that both switching on and switching off the quench ramp create light-cone perturbations in the density. The post-quench dynamics is strongly affected by the interference between these two perturbations. In particular, we find that the discrepancy between the time-dependent density and the one obtained by a generalized Gibbs ensemble picture vanishes with an oscillatory behavior as a function of the quench duration, with local minima corresponding to a perfect overlap of the two light-cone perturbations. For adiabatic quenches, we also obtain a similar behavior in the approach of the generalized Gibbs ensemble density towards the one associated with the ground state of the final Hamiltonian.

  15. Axion inflation with cross-correlated axion isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadota, Kenji; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Otsuka, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We study the inflation scenarios, in the framework of superstring theory, where the inflaton is an axion producing the adiabatic curvature perturbations while there exists another light axion producing the isocurvature perturbations. We discuss how the non-trivial couplings among string axions can generically arise, and calculate the consequent cross-correlations between the adiabatic and isocurvature modes through concrete examples. Based on the Planck analysis on the generally correlated isocurvature perturbations, we show that there is a preference for the existence of the correlated isocurvature modes for the axion monodromy inflation while the natural inflation disfavors such isocurvature modes.

  16. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  17. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  18. Adiabatic dynamics of magnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N.

    1994-03-01

    We formulate a reasonably detailed adiabatic conjecture concerning the dynamics of skew deflection of magnetic vortices in a field gradient, which is expected to be valid at sufficiently large values of the winding number. The conjecture is consistent with the golden rule used to describe the dynamics of realistic magnetic bubbles and is verified here numerically within the 2-D isotropic Heisenberg model.

  19. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  20. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  1. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics. PMID:25494733

  2. Studies in Chaotic adiabatic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzynski, C.

    1994-01-01

    Chaotic adiabatic dynamics refers to the study of systems exhibiting chaotic evolution under slowly time-dependent equations of motion. In this dissertation the author restricts his attention to Hamiltonian chaotic adiabatic systems. The results presented are organized around a central theme, namely, that the energies of such systems evolve diffusively. He begins with a general analysis, in which he motivates and derives a Fokker-Planck equation governing this process of energy diffusion. He applies this equation to study the {open_quotes}goodness{close_quotes} of an adiabatic invariant associated with chaotic motion. This formalism is then applied to two specific examples. The first is that of a gas of noninteracting point particles inside a hard container that deforms slowly with time. Both the two- and three-dimensional cases are considered. The results are discussed in the context of the Wall Formula for one-body dissipation in nuclear physics, and it is shown that such a gas approaches, asymptotically with time, an exponential velocity distribution. The second example involves the Fermi mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays. Explicit evolution equations are obtained for the distribution of cosmic ray energies within this model, and the steady-state energy distribution that arises when this equation is modified to account for the injection and removal of cosmic rays is discussed. Finally, the author re-examines the multiple-time-scale approach as applied to the study of phase space evolution under a chaotic adiabatic Hamiltonian. This leads to a more rigorous derivation of the above-mentioned Fokker-Planck equation, and also to a new term which has relevance to the problem of chaotic adiabatic reaction forces (the forces acting on slow, heavy degrees of freedom due to their coupling to light, fast chaotic degrees).

  3. Non Adiabatic Evolution of Elliptical Galaxies by Dynamical Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, S. E.; Bertin, G.; Liseikina, T.; Pegoraro, F.

    2007-05-01

    Many astrophysical problems, ranging from structure formation in cosmology to dynamics of elliptical galaxies, refer to slow processes of evolution of essentially collisionless self-gravitating systems. In order to determine the relevant quasi-equilibrium configuration at time t from given initial conditions, it is often argued that such slow evolution may be approximated in terms of adiabatic evolution, for the calculation of which efficient semi--analytical techniques are available. Here we focus on the slow process of evolution, induced by dynamical friction of a host stellar system on a minority component of "satellites", to determine to what extent an adiabatic description might be applied. The study is realized by means of N--body simulations of the evolution of the total system (the stellar system plus the minority component), in a controlled numerical environment. In particular, we compare the evolution from initial to final configurations of the system subject to dynamical friction with that of the same system evolved adiabatically (in the absence of dynamical friction). We consider two classes of galaxy models characterized by significantly different density and pressure anisotropy profiles. We demonstrate that, for the examined process, the evolution driven by dynamical friction is significantly different from the adiabatic case, not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively. The two classes of galaxy models considered in this investigation exhibit generally similar trends in evolution, with one exception: concentrated models reach a final total density profile, in the internal region, shallower than the initial one, while galaxy models with a broad core show the opposite behaviour. The evolution of elliptical galaxies induced by dynamical friction is a slow process but it is not adiabatic. The results of our investigation should be taken as a warning against the indiscriminate use of adiabatic growth prescriptions in studies of the structure of

  4. Merging multireference perturbation and density-functional theories by means of range separation: Potential curves for Be{sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}, and Ca{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Fromager, Emmanuel; Jensen, Hans Joergen Aa.

    2010-02-15

    A rigorous combination of multireference perturbation theory and density functional theory (DFT) is proposed. Based on a range separation of the regular two-electron Coulomb interaction, it combines a short-range density functional with second-order strongly contracted n-electron valence state perturbation theory (sc-NEVPT2). The huge advantage of the sc-NEVPT2 approach is that the density is unchanged through first order due to a generalized-Brillouin-type theorem so that the computationally cumbersome self-consistency contribution of short-range DFT to the second-order energy correction equals zero. The method yields very promising results for the van der Waals systems Be{sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}, and Ca{sub 2}; including the multireference system Be{sub 2}.

  5. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  6. General mechanism for producing scale-invariant perturbations and small non-Gaussianity in ekpyrotic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2014-06-01

    We explore a new type of entropic mechanism for generating density perturbations in a contracting phase in which there are two scalar fields but only one has a steep negative potential. This first field dominates the energy density and is the source of the ekpyrotic equation of state. The second field has a negligible potential, but its kinetic energy density is coupled to the first field with a nonlinear sigma-model type interaction. We show that for any ekpyrotic equation of state it is possible to choose the potential and the kinetic coupling such that exactly scale-invariant (or nearly scale-invariant) entropy perturbations are produced. The corresponding background solutions are stable, and the bispectrum of the entropy perturbations vanishes as no non-Gaussianity is produced during the ekpyrotic phase. Hence, the only contribution to non-Gaussianity comes from the nonlinearity of the conversion process during which entropic perturbations are turned into adiabatic ones, resulting in a local non-Gaussianity parameter, fNL˜5.

  7. Microscopic expression for heat in the adiabatic basis.

    PubMed

    Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2008-11-28

    We derive a microscopic expression for the instantaneous diagonal elements of the density matrix rho(nn)(t) in the adiabatic basis for an arbitrary time-dependent process in a closed Hamiltonian system. If the initial density matrix is stationary (diagonal) then this expression contains only squares of absolute values of matrix elements of the evolution operator, which can be interpreted as transition probabilities. We then derive the microscopic expression for the heat defined as the energy generated due to transitions between instantaneous energy levels. If the initial density matrix is passive [diagonal with rho(nn)(0) monotonically decreasing with energy] then the heat is non-negative in agreement with basic expectations of thermodynamics. Our findings also can be used for systematic expansion of various observables around the adiabatic limit. PMID:19113464

  8. Robust adiabatic sum frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Suchowski, Haim; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav; Oron, Dan; Arie, Ady; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-07-20

    We discuss theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the robustness of the adiabatic sum frequency conversion method. This technique, borrowed from an analogous scheme of robust population transfer in atomic physics and nuclear magnetic resonance, enables the achievement of nearly full frequency conversion in a sum frequency generation process for a bandwidth up to two orders of magnitude wider than in conventional conversion schemes. We show that this scheme is robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and of the incoming light. These include the crystal temperature, the frequency of the incoming field, the pump intensity, the crystal length and the angle of incidence. Also, we show that this extremely broad bandwidth can be tuned to higher or lower central wavelengths by changing either the pump frequency or the crystal temperature. The detailed study of the properties of this converter is done using the Landau-Zener theory dealing with the adiabatic transitions in two level systems. PMID:19654679

  9. Nonadiabatic quantum Liouville and master equations in the adiabatic basis

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seogjoo

    2012-12-14

    A compact form of nonadiabatic molecular Hamiltonian in the basis of adiabatic electronic states and nuclear position states is presented. The Hamiltonian, which includes both the first and the second derivative couplings, is Hermitian and thus leads to a standard expression for the quantum Liouville equation for the density operator. With the application of a projection operator technique, a quantum master equation for the diagonal components of the density operator is derived. Under the assumption that nuclear states are much more short ranged compared to electronic states and assuming no singularity, a semi-adiabatic approximation is invoked, which results in expressions for the nonadiabatic molecular Hamiltonian and the quantum Liouville equation that are much more amenable to advanced quantum dynamics calculation. The semi-adiabatic approximation is also applied to a resonance energy transfer system consisting of a donor and an acceptor interacting via Coulomb terms, and explicit detailed expressions for exciton-bath Hamiltonian including all the non-adiabatic terms are derived.

  10. Equations for Adiabatic but Rotational Steady Gas Flows without Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Manfred

    1947-01-01

    This paper makes the following assumptions: 1) The flowing gases are assumed to have uniform energy distribution. ("Isoenergetic gas flows," that is valid with the same constants for the the energy equation entire flow.) This is correct, for example, for gas flows issuing from a region of constant pressure, density, temperature, end velocity. This property is not destroyed by compression shocks because of the universal validity of the energy law. 2) The gas behaves adiabatically, not during the compression shock itself but both before and after the shock. However, the adiabatic equation (p/rho(sup kappa) = C) is not valid for the entire gas flow with the same constant C but rather with an appropriate individual constant for each portion of the gas. For steady flows, this means that the constant C of the adiabatic equation is a function of the stream function. Consequently, a gas that has been flowing "isentropically",that is, with the same constant C of the adiabatic equation throughout (for example, in origination from a region of constant density, temperature, and velocity) no longer remains isentropic after a compression shock if the compression shock is not extremely simple (wedge shaped in a two-dimensional flow or cone shaped in a rotationally symmetrical flow). The solution of nonisentropic flows is therefore an urgent necessity.

  11. Statistical mechanics of light elements at high pressure. VII - A perturbative free energy for arbitrary mixtures of H and He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Dewitt, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    A model free energy is presented which accurately represents results from 45 high-precision Monte Carlo calculations of the thermodynamics of hydrogen-helium mixtures at pressures of astrophysical and planetophysical interest. The free energy is calculated using free-electron perturbation theory (dielectric function theory), and is an extension of the expression given in an earlier paper in this series. However, it fits the Monte Carlo results more accurately, and is valid for the full range of compositions from pure hydrogen to pure helium. Using the new free energy, the phase diagram of mixtures of liquid metallic hydrogen and helium is calculated and compared with earlier results. Sample results for mixing volumes are also presented, and the new free energy expression is used to compute a theoretical Jovian adiabat and compare the adiabat with results from three-dimensional Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. The present theory gives slightly higher densities at pressures of about 10 megabars.

  12. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL FRICTION OF A CIRCULAR-ORBIT PERTURBER IN A GASEOUS MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2010-12-10

    We use three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the nonlinear gravitational responses of gas to, and the resulting drag forces on, very massive perturbers moving in circular orbits. This work extends our previous studies that explored the cases of low-mass perturbers in circular orbits and massive perturbers on straight-line trajectories. The background medium is assumed to be non-rotating, adiabatic with index 5/3, and uniform with density {rho}{sub 0} and sound speed a{sub 0}. We model the gravitating perturber using a Plummer sphere with mass M{sub p} and softening radius r{sub s} in a uniform circular motion at speed V{sub p} and orbital radius R{sub p} , and run various models with differing R{identical_to}r{sub s}/R{sub p}, M{identical_to}V{sub p}/a{sub 0}, and B{identical_to}GM{sub p}/(a{sub 0}{sup 2}R{sub p}). A quasi-steady density wake of a supersonic model consists of a hydrostatic envelope surrounding the perturber, an upstream bow shock, and a trailing low-density region. The continuous change in the direction of the perturber motion reduces the detached shock distance compared to the linear-trajectory cases, while the orbit-averaged gravity of the perturber gathers the gas toward the center of the orbit, modifying the background preshock density to {rho}{sub 1}{approx}(1+0.46B{sup 1.1}){rho}{sub 0} depending weakly on M. For sufficiently massive perturbers, the presence of a hydrostatic envelope makes the drag force smaller than the prediction of the linear perturbation theory, resulting in F=4{pi}{rho}{sub 1}(GM{sub p})?2/V{sub p}?2 x (0.7{eta}{sub B}?-?1) for {eta}{sub B{identical_to}}B/(M?2-1)>0.1; the drag force for low-mass perturbers with {eta}{sub B}<0.1 agrees well with the linear prediction. The nonlinear drag force becomes independent of R as long as R<{eta}{sub B}/2, which places an upper limit on the perturber size for accurate evaluation of the drag force in numerical simulations.

  13. Adiabaticity in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    We provide a rigorous generalization of the quantum adiabatic theorem for open systems described by a Markovian master equation with time-dependent Liouvillian L (t ) . We focus on the finite system case relevant for adiabatic quantum computing and quantum annealing. Adiabaticity is defined in terms of closeness to the instantaneous steady state. While the general result is conceptually similar to the closed-system case, there are important differences. Namely, a system initialized in the zero-eigenvalue eigenspace of L (t ) will remain in this eigenspace with a deviation that is inversely proportional to the total evolution time T . In the case of a finite number of level crossings, the scaling becomes T-η with an exponent η that we relate to the rate of the gap closing. For master equations that describe relaxation to thermal equilibrium, we show that the evolution time T should be long compared to the corresponding minimum inverse gap squared of L (t ) . Our results are illustrated with several examples.

  14. Derivation of general analytic gradient expressions for density-fitted post-Hartree-Fock methods: An efficient implementation for the density-fitted second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bozkaya, Uğur

    2014-09-28

    General analytic gradient expressions (with the frozen-core approximation) are presented for density-fitted post-HF methods. An efficient implementation of frozen-core analytic gradients for the second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the density-fitting (DF) approximation (applying to both reference and correlation energies), which is denoted as DF-MP2, is reported. The DF-MP2 method is applied to a set of alkanes, conjugated dienes, and noncovalent interaction complexes to compare the computational cost of single point analytic gradients with MP2 with the resolution of the identity approach (RI-MP2) [F. Weigend and M. Häser, Theor. Chem. Acc. 97, 331 (1997); R. A. Distasio, R. P. Steele, Y. M. Rhee, Y. Shao, and M. Head-Gordon, J. Comput. Chem. 28, 839 (2007)]. In the RI-MP2 method, the DF approach is used only for the correlation energy. Our results demonstrate that the DF-MP2 method substantially accelerate the RI-MP2 method for analytic gradient computations due to the reduced input/output (I/O) time. Because in the DF-MP2 method the DF approach is used for both reference and correlation energies, the storage of 4-index electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) are avoided, 3-index ERI tensors are employed instead. Further, as in case of integrals, our gradient equation is completely avoid construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), instead we use 2- and 3-index TPDMs. Hence, the I/O bottleneck of a gradient computation is significantly overcome. Therefore, the cost of the generalized-Fock matrix (GFM), TPDM, solution of Z-vector equations, the back transformation of TPDM, and integral derivatives are substantially reduced when the DF approach is used for the entire energy expression. Further application results show that the DF approach introduce negligible errors for closed-shell reaction energies and equilibrium bond lengths.

  15. Derivation of general analytic gradient expressions for density-fitted post-Hartree-Fock methods: An efficient implementation for the density-fitted second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Uǧur

    2014-09-01

    General analytic gradient expressions (with the frozen-core approximation) are presented for density-fitted post-HF methods. An efficient implementation of frozen-core analytic gradients for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the density-fitting (DF) approximation (applying to both reference and correlation energies), which is denoted as DF-MP2, is reported. The DF-MP2 method is applied to a set of alkanes, conjugated dienes, and noncovalent interaction complexes to compare the computational cost of single point analytic gradients with MP2 with the resolution of the identity approach (RI-MP2) [F. Weigend and M. Häser, Theor. Chem. Acc. 97, 331 (1997); R. A. Distasio, R. P. Steele, Y. M. Rhee, Y. Shao, and M. Head-Gordon, J. Comput. Chem. 28, 839 (2007)]. In the RI-MP2 method, the DF approach is used only for the correlation energy. Our results demonstrate that the DF-MP2 method substantially accelerate the RI-MP2 method for analytic gradient computations due to the reduced input/output (I/O) time. Because in the DF-MP2 method the DF approach is used for both reference and correlation energies, the storage of 4-index electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) are avoided, 3-index ERI tensors are employed instead. Further, as in case of integrals, our gradient equation is completely avoid construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), instead we use 2- and 3-index TPDMs. Hence, the I/O bottleneck of a gradient computation is significantly overcome. Therefore, the cost of the generalized-Fock matrix (GFM), TPDM, solution of Z-vector equations, the back transformation of TPDM, and integral derivatives are substantially reduced when the DF approach is used for the entire energy expression. Further application results show that the DF approach introduce negligible errors for closed-shell reaction energies and equilibrium bond lengths.

  16. Derivation of general analytic gradient expressions for density-fitted post-Hartree-Fock methods: an efficient implementation for the density-fitted second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, Uğur

    2014-09-28

    General analytic gradient expressions (with the frozen-core approximation) are presented for density-fitted post-HF methods. An efficient implementation of frozen-core analytic gradients for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the density-fitting (DF) approximation (applying to both reference and correlation energies), which is denoted as DF-MP2, is reported. The DF-MP2 method is applied to a set of alkanes, conjugated dienes, and noncovalent interaction complexes to compare the computational cost of single point analytic gradients with MP2 with the resolution of the identity approach (RI-MP2) [F. Weigend and M. Häser, Theor. Chem. Acc. 97, 331 (1997); R. A. Distasio, R. P. Steele, Y. M. Rhee, Y. Shao, and M. Head-Gordon, J. Comput. Chem. 28, 839 (2007)]. In the RI-MP2 method, the DF approach is used only for the correlation energy. Our results demonstrate that the DF-MP2 method substantially accelerate the RI-MP2 method for analytic gradient computations due to the reduced input/output (I/O) time. Because in the DF-MP2 method the DF approach is used for both reference and correlation energies, the storage of 4-index electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) are avoided, 3-index ERI tensors are employed instead. Further, as in case of integrals, our gradient equation is completely avoid construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), instead we use 2- and 3-index TPDMs. Hence, the I/O bottleneck of a gradient computation is significantly overcome. Therefore, the cost of the generalized-Fock matrix (GFM), TPDM, solution of Z-vector equations, the back transformation of TPDM, and integral derivatives are substantially reduced when the DF approach is used for the entire energy expression. Further application results show that the DF approach introduce negligible errors for closed-shell reaction energies and equilibrium bond lengths. PMID:25273413

  17. Entropy perturbations in N-flation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Hu Bin; Piao Yunsong

    2009-12-15

    In this paper we study the entropy perturbations in N-flation by using the {delta}N formalism. We calculate the entropy corrections to the power spectrum of the overall curvature perturbation P{sub {zeta}}. We obtain an analytic form of the transfer coefficient T{sub RS}{sup 2}, which describes the correlation between the curvature and entropy perturbations, and investigate its behavior numerically. It turns out that the entropy perturbations cannot be neglected in N-flation because the amplitude of entropy components is approximately in the same order as the adiabatic one at the end of inflation T{sub RS}{sup 2}{approx}O(1). The spectral index n{sub S} is calculated and it becomes smaller after the entropy modes are taken into account, i.e., the spectrum becomes redder, compared to the pure adiabatic case. Finally we study the modified consistency relation of N-flation, and find that the tensor-to-scalar ratio (r{approx_equal}0.006) is greatly suppressed by the entropy modes, compared to the pure adiabatic one (r{approx_equal}0.017) at the end of inflation.

  18. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  19. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  20. Merging Features from Green's Functions and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory: A Route to the Description of Correlated Materials out of Equilibrium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopjan, M.; Karlsson, D.; Ydman, S.; Verdozzi, C.; Almbladh, C.-O.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a description of nonequilibrium systems via a simple protocol that combines exchange-correlation potentials from density functional theory with self-energies of many-body perturbation theory. The approach, aimed to avoid double counting of interactions, is tested against exact results in Hubbard-type systems, with respect to interaction strength, perturbation speed and inhomogeneity, and system dimensionality and size. In many regimes, we find significant improvement over adiabatic time dependent density functional theory or second Born nonequilibrium Green's function approximations. We briefly discuss the reasons for the residual discrepancies, and directions for future work.

  1. Merging Features from Green's Functions and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory: A Route to the Description of Correlated Materials out of Equilibrium?

    PubMed

    Hopjan, M; Karlsson, D; Ydman, S; Verdozzi, C; Almbladh, C-O

    2016-06-10

    We propose a description of nonequilibrium systems via a simple protocol that combines exchange-correlation potentials from density functional theory with self-energies of many-body perturbation theory. The approach, aimed to avoid double counting of interactions, is tested against exact results in Hubbard-type systems, with respect to interaction strength, perturbation speed and inhomogeneity, and system dimensionality and size. In many regimes, we find significant improvement over adiabatic time dependent density functional theory or second Born nonequilibrium Green's function approximations. We briefly discuss the reasons for the residual discrepancies, and directions for future work. PMID:27341247

  2. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  3. Stability of stationary solutions to the outflow problem for full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with large initial perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ling; Wang, Tao; Zou, Qingyang

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the large-time behavior of solutions to an outflow problem of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for viscous and heat-conducting ideal polytropic gases in the half line. The non-degenerate stationary solution is shown to be asymptotically stable under large initial perturbation with no restriction on the adiabatic exponent, provided that the boundary strength is sufficiently small. The proofs are based on the nonlinear energy estimates and the crucial step is to obtain positive lower and upper bounds of the density and the temperature uniformly in time and space.

  4. Vector perturbations of galaxy number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Tansella, Vittorio

    2016-07-01

    We derive the contribution to relativistic galaxy number count fluctuations from vector and tensor perturbations within linear perturbation theory. Our result is consistent with the the relativistic corrections to number counts due to scalar perturbation, where the Bardeen potentials are replaced with line-of-sight projection of vector and tensor quantities. Since vector and tensor perturbations do not lead to density fluctuations the standard density term in the number counts is absent. We apply our results to vector perturbations which are induced from scalar perturbations at second order and give numerical estimates of their contributions to the power spectrum of relativistic galaxy number counts.

  5. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  6. Nonlinear perturbations of cosmological scalar fields with non-standard kinetic terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaux-Petel, Sébastien; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2009-01-01

    We adopt a covariant formalism to derive exact evolution equations for nonlinear perturbations, in a universe dominated by two scalar fields. These scalar fields are characterized by non-canonical kinetic terms and an arbitrary field space metric, a situation typically encountered in inflationary models inspired by string theory. We decompose the nonlinear scalar perturbations into adiabatic and entropy modes, generalizing the definition adopted in the linear theory, and we derive the corresponding exact evolution equations. We also obtain a nonlinear generalization of the curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces, showing that on large scales it is sourced only by the nonlinear version of the entropy perturbation. We then expand these equations to second order in the perturbations, using a coordinate based formalism. Our results are relatively compact and elegant and enable one to identify the new effects coming from the non-canonical structure of the scalar fields Lagrangian. We also explain how to analyze, in our formalism, the interesting scenario of multi-field Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation.

  7. PERTURBING LIGNIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perturbing lignification is possible in multiple and diverse ways. Without obvious growth/development phenotypes, transgenic angiosperms can have lignin levels reduced to half the normal level, can have compositions ranging from very high-guaiacyl/low-syringyl to almost totally syringyl, and can eve...

  8. Adiabatic invariants in stellar dynamics. 1: Basic concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    The adiabatic criterion, widely used in astronomical dynamics, is based on the harmonic oscillator. It asserts that the change in action under a slowly varying perturbation is exponentially small. Recent mathematical results that precisely define the conditions for invariance show that this model does not apply in general. In particular, a slowly varying perturbation may cause significant evolution stellar dynamical systems even if its time scale is longer than any internal orbital time scale. This additional 'heating' may have serious implications for the evolution of star clusters and dwarf galaxies which are subject to long-term environmental forces. The mathematical developments leading to these results are reviewed, and the conditions for applicability to and further implications for stellar systems are discussed. Companion papers present a computational method for a general time-dependent disturbance and detailed example.

  9. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  10. Contribution from cosmological scalar perturbations to the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Marakulin, A. O. Sazhina, O. S.; Sazhin, M. V.

    2012-07-15

    The possibility of the influence of adiabatic scalar perturbations on the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources is considered. The multipole expansion coefficients of the angular velocity field in terms of vector spherical harmonics are calculated. We show that there is no contribution from adiabatic perturbations to the angular spectrum for a spatially flat Universe at the dusty stage, while there is a contribution only to the electric multiple coefficients at the stage of {Lambda}-term domination. The cases of long-wavelength and short-wavelength perturbations are considered separately. The relationship between the multipole angular velocity spectrum and the primordial scalar perturbation spectrum is discussed.

  11. Contribution from cosmological scalar perturbations to the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakulin, A. O.; Sazhina, O. S.; Sazhin, M. V.

    2012-07-01

    The possibility of the influence of adiabatic scalar perturbations on the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources is considered. The multipole expansion coefficients of the angular velocity field in terms of vector spherical harmonics are calculated. We show that there is no contribution from adiabatic perturbations to the angular spectrum for a spatially flat Universe at the dusty stage, while there is a contribution only to the electric multiple coefficients at the stage of Λ-term domination. The cases of long-wavelength and short-wavelength perturbations are considered separately. The relationship between the multipole angular velocity spectrum and the primordial scalar perturbation spectrum is discussed.

  12. Conserved Quantities and Adiabatic Invariants for El-Nabulsi's Fractional Birkhoff System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chuan-Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Based on El-Nabulsi-Birkhoff fractional equations, Lie symmetry and the Hojman conserved quantity, the Noether conserved quantity deduced indirectly by the Lie symmetry and adiabatic invariants of Lie symmetrical perturbation are studied under the framework of El-Nabulsi's fractional model. Firstly, Lie symmetry and the Hojman conserved quantity are obtained, including the equations of motion of EI-Nabulsi's fractional Birkhoff system, the determining equations of Lie symmetry for the system and the generalization of the Hojman theorem. Secondly, the Noether conserved quantity deduced indirectly by the Lie symmetry is obtained. Thirdly, the adiabatic invariants of Lie symmetrical perturbation for disturbed EI-Nabulsi's fractional Birkhoff system is achieved, including the disturbed El-Nabulsi-Birkhoff fractional equations, the determining equations of Lie symmetrical perturbation and adiabatic invariants for disturbed El-Nabulsi's fractional Birkhoff system. Fourthly, adiabatic invariants and exact invariants under the special ifinitesimal transformations are presented. Finally, the Hojman-Urrutia problem is discussed to illustrate the application of these methods and results.

  13. Cosmological Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourges, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present a self-contained summary of the theory of linear cosmological perturbations. We emphasize the effect of the six parameters of the minimal cosmological model, first, on the spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies, and second, on the linear matter power spectrum. We briefly review at the end the possible impact of a few non-minimal dark matter and dark energy models.

  14. Improved WKB analysis of cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Roberto; Luzzi, Mattia; Venturi, Giovanni; Finelli, Fabio

    2005-02-15

    Improved Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB)-type approximations are presented in order to study cosmological perturbations beyond the lowest order. Our methods are based on functions which approximate the true perturbation modes over the complete range of the independent (Langer) variable, from subhorizon to superhorizon scales, and include the region near the turning point. We employ both a perturbative Green's function technique and an adiabatic (or semiclassical) expansion (for a linear turning point) in order to compute higher order corrections. Improved general expressions for the WKB scalar and tensor power spectra are derived for both techniques. We test our methods on the benchmark of power-law inflation, which allows comparison with exact expressions for the perturbations, and find that the next-to-leading order adiabatic expansion yields the amplitude of the power spectra with excellent accuracy, whereas the next-to-leading order with the perturbative Green's function method does not improve the leading order result significantly. However, in more general cases, either or both methods may be useful.

  15. Shortcut to adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Alan C.; Silva, Raphael D.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a shortcut to the adiabatic gate teleportation model of quantum computation. More specifically, we determine fast local counterdiabatic Hamiltonians able to implement teleportation as a universal computational primitive. In this scenario, we provide the counterdiabatic driving for arbitrary n -qubit gates, which allows to achieve universality through a variety of gate sets. Remarkably, our approach maps the superadiabatic Hamiltonian HSA for an arbitrary n -qubit gate teleportation into the implementation of a rotated superadiabatic dynamics of an n -qubit state teleportation. This result is rather general, with the speed of the evolution only dictated by the quantum speed limit. In particular, we analyze the energetic cost for different Hamiltonian interpolations in the context of the energy-time complementarity.

  16. Quantum gates with controlled adiabatic evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hen, Itay

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a class of quantum adiabatic evolutions that we claim may be interpreted as the equivalents of the unitary gates of the quantum gate model. We argue that these gates form a universal set and may therefore be used as building blocks in the construction of arbitrary "adiabatic circuits," analogously to the manner in which gates are used in the circuit model. One implication of the above construction is that arbitrary classical boolean circuits as well as gate model circuits may be directly translated to adiabatic algorithms with no additional resources or complexities. We show that while these adiabatic algorithms fail to exhibit certain aspects of the inherent fault tolerance of traditional quantum adiabatic algorithms, they may have certain other experimental advantages acting as quantum gates.

  17. On a Nonlinear Model in Adiabatic Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Song-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study a kind of nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution in quantum search problem. As will be seen here, for this problem, there always exists a possibility that this nonlinear model can successfully solve the problem, while the linear model can not. Also in the same setting, when the overlap between the initial state and the final stare is sufficiently large, a simple linear adiabatic evolution can achieve O(1) time efficiency, but infinite time complexity for the nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution is needed. This tells us, it is not always a wise choice to use nonlinear interpolations in adiabatic algorithms. Sometimes, simple linear adiabatic evolutions may be sufficient for using. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61402188 and 61173050. The first author also gratefully acknowledges the support from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2014M552041

  18. Non-Gaussianity from the second-order cosmological perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyth, David H.; Rodríguez, Yeinzon

    2005-06-01

    Several conserved and/or gauge-invariant quantities described as the second-order curvature perturbation have been given in the literature. We revisit various scenarios for the generation of second-order non-Gaussianity in the primordial curvature perturbation ζ, employing for the first time a unified notation and focusing on the normalization fNL of the bispectrum. When ζ first appears a few Hubble times after horizon exit, |fNL| is much less than 1 and is, therefore, negligible. Thereafter ζ (and hence fNL) is conserved as long as the pressure is a unique function of energy density (adiabatic pressure). Nonadiabatic pressure comes presumably only from the effect of fields, other than the one pointing along the inflationary trajectory, which are light during inflation (“light noninflaton fields”). During single-component inflation fNL is constant, but multicomponent inflation might generate |fNL|˜1 or bigger. Preheating can affect fNL only in atypical scenarios where it involves light noninflaton fields. The simplest curvaton scenario typically gives fNL≪-1 or fNL=+5/4. The inhomogeneous reheating scenario can give a wide range of values for fNL. Unless there is a detection, observation can eventually provide a limit |fNL|≲1, at which level it will be crucial to calculate the precise observational limit using second-order theory.

  19. Fluctuations of work in nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Suomela, S; Salmilehto, J; Savenko, I G; Ala-Nissila, T; Möttönen, M

    2015-02-01

    We extend the quantum jump method to nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems in a way that allows for an accurate account of the external driving in the system-environment interaction. Using this framework, we construct the corresponding trajectory-dependent work performed on the system and derive the integral fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality for nearly adiabatic driving. We show that such identities hold as long as the stochastic dynamics and work variable are consistently defined. We numerically study the emerging work statistics for a two-level quantum system and find that the conventional diabatic approximation is unable to capture some prominent features arising from driving, such as the continuity of the probability density of work. Our results reveal the necessity of using accurate expressions for the drive-dressed heat exchange in future experiments probing jump time distributions. PMID:25768477

  20. Coherent tunnelling adiabatic passage in optical fibres using superimposed long-period fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, K.; Gupta, Ruchi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present the optical analogue of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique for three level atomic system in optical fibre geometry. Considering linearly polarized modes of an optical fibre, it is shown that using a pair of superimposed long-period gratings with peak refractive index perturbation varying spatially along the propagation axis, light can be transferred adiabatically from one core mode to another core mode via an intermediate cladding mode which itself does not get appreciably excited; thus acting like a dark mode. We compare the transmission spectrum of superimposed long-period gratings involved in adiabatic transfer with the transmission spectrum of conventional long-period grating. The analogue output is further analysed for its tolerance to the changes in the ambient refractive index, temperature and other fabrication parameters.

  1. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a four-component adiabatic magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, T. Mannan, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-07-15

    Theoretical investigation has been made on obliquely propagating dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves (SWs) in a magnetized dusty plasma which consists of non-inertial adiabatic electron and ion fluids, and inertial negatively as well as positively charged adiabatic dust fluids. The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries equation which admits a solitary wave solution for small but finite amplitude limit. It has been shown that the basic features (speed, height, thickness, etc.) of such DA solitary structures are significantly modified by adiabaticity of plasma fluids, opposite polarity dust components, and the obliqueness of external magnetic field. The SWs have been changed from compressive to rarefactive depending on the value of {mu} (a parameter determining the number of positive dust present in this plasma model). The present investigation can be of relevance to the electrostatic solitary structures observed in various dusty plasma environments (viz. cometary tails, upper mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, etc.)

  2. CMB constraint on non-Gaussianity in isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Hikage, Chiaki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2013-07-01

    We study the CMB constraints on non-Gaussianity in CDM isocurvature perturbations. Non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations can be produced in various models at the very early stage of the Universe. Since the isocurvature perturbations little affect the structure formation at late times, CMB is the best probe of isocurvature non-Gaussianity at least in the near future. In this paper, we focus on non-Gaussian curvature and isocurvature perturbations of the local-type, which are uncorrelated and in the form ζ = ζ{sub G}+(3/5)f{sub NL}(ζ{sub G}{sup 2}−(ζ{sub G}{sup 2})) and S = S{sub G}+f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}(S{sub G}−(S{sub G}{sup 2})), and constrain the non-linearity parameter of isocurvature perturbations, f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}, as well as the curvature one f{sub NL}. For this purpose, we employ several state-of-art techniques for the analysis of CMB data and simulation. Assuming that isocurvature perturbations are subdominant, we apply our method to the WMAP 7-year data of temperature anisotropy and obtain constraints on a combination α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)}, where α is the ratio of the power spectrum of isocurvature perturbations to that of the adiabatic ones. When the adiabatic perturbations are assumed to be Gaussian, we obtained a constraint α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)} = 40±66 assuming the power spectrum of isocurvature perturbations is scale-invariant. When we assume that the adiabatic perturbations can also be non-Gaussian, we obtain f{sub NL} = 38±24 and α{sup 2}f{sub NL}{sup (ISO)} = −8±72. We also discuss implications of our results for the axion CDM isocurvature model.

  3. On the relation between adiabatic time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and the ΔSCF-DFT method. Introducing a numerically stable ΔSCF-DFT scheme for local functionals based on constricted variational DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Choon; Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Ziegler, Tom

    2015-07-01

    In ΔSCF density functional theory studies of a i → a transition one performs separate fully self-consistent field calculations on the ground state configuration (i)n (n = 1,2) and the excited state configuration (i)n - 1a. The excitation energy for the transition i → a is subsequently determined as the Kohn-Sham energy difference ΔEi → a = E[in - 1a] - E[in] between the ground state (i)n and the excited state configuration (i)n - 1a. The ΔSCF scheme has been applied extensively and works well for lower energy excitations provided that they can be represented by a single orbital replacement or transition i → a. However, for excitations of higher energy ΔSCF tends to become numerically unstable with a variational collapse to transitions of lower energy. We demonstrate here a numerically stable ΔSCF scheme for local functionals that is guaranteed not to collapse on excited configurations of lower energy as well as the ground state. The new scheme is based on constricted variational density functional theory in which the canonical ground state orbitals are allowed to relax (R-CV(∞)-DFT). Since it is restricted to a single orbital replacement i → a it is termed SOR-R-CV(∞)-DFT.

  4. Non-Gaussianities in multifield inflation: Superhorizon evolution, adiabaticity, and the fate of f{sub NL}

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Joel; Sivanandam, Navin

    2011-05-15

    We explore the superhorizon generation of large f{sub NL} of the local form in two-field inflation. We calculate the two- and three-point observables in a general class of potentials which allow for an analytic treatment using the {delta}N formalism. Motivated by the conservation of the curvature perturbation outside the horizon in the adiabatic mode and also by the observed adiabaticity of the power spectrum, we follow the evolution of f{sub NL}{sup local} until it is driven into the adiabatic solution by passing through a phase of effectively single-field inflation. We find that, although large f{sub NL}{sup local} may be generated during inflation, such nongaussianities are transitory and will be exponentially damped as the cosmological fluctuations approach adiabaticity.

  5. Adiabatic Compression of Oxygen: Real Fluid Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    The adiabatic compression of oxygen has been identified as an ignition source for systems operating in enriched oxygen atmospheres. Current practice is to evaluate the temperature rise on compression by treating oxygen as an ideal gas with constant heat capacity. This paper establishes the appropriate thermodynamic analysis for the common occurrence of adiabatic compression of oxygen and in the process defines a satisfactory equation of state (EOS) for oxygen. It uses that EOS to model adiabatic compression as isentropic compression and calculates final temperatures for this system using current approaches for comparison.

  6. Heating and cooling in adiabatic mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Cai, Zi; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2010-12-01

    We study the effect of interaction on the temperature change in the process of adiabatic mixing of two components of Fermi gases using the real-space Bogoliubov-de Gennes method. We find that in the process of adiabatic mixing, the competition between the adiabatic expansion and the attractive interaction makes it possible to cool or heat the system depending on the strength of the interaction and the initial temperature of the system. The changes of the temperature in a bulk system and in a trapped system are investigated.

  7. Multisurface Adiabatic Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Tibor; Yosa Reyes, Juvenal; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Adiabatic reactive molecular dynamics (ARMD) simulation method is a surface-crossing algorithm for modeling chemical reactions in classical molecular dynamics simulations using empirical force fields. As the ARMD Hamiltonian is time dependent during crossing, it allows only approximate energy conservation. In the current work, the range of applicability of conventional ARMD is explored, and a new multisurface ARMD (MS-ARMD) method is presented, implemented in CHARMM and applied to the vibrationally induced photodissociation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the gas phase. For this, an accurate global potential energy surface (PES) involving 12 H2SO4 and 4 H2O + SO3 force fields fitted to MP2/6-311G++(2d,2p) reference energies is employed. The MS-ARMD simulations conserve total energy and feature both intramolecular H-transfer reactions and water elimination. An analytical treatment of the dynamics in the crossing region finds that conventional ARMD can approximately conserve total energy for limiting cases. In one of them, the reduced mass of the system is large, which often occurs for simulations of solvated biomolecular systems. On the other hand, MS-ARMD is a general approach for modeling chemical reactions including gas-phase, homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic catalytic reactions while conserving total energy in atomistic simulations. PMID:26580356

  8. Quantum cosmological perturbations of multiple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Patrick; Pinto-Neto, N.; Vitenti, Sandro D. P.

    2016-01-01

    The formalism to treat quantization and evolution of cosmological perturbations of multiple fluids is described. We first construct the Lagrangian for both the gravitational and matter parts, providing the necessary relevant variables and momenta leading to the quadratic Hamiltonian describing linear perturbations. The final Hamiltonian is obtained without assuming any equations of motions for the background variables. This general formalism is applied to the special case of two fluids, having in mind the usual radiation and matter mix which made most of our current Universe history. Quantization is achieved using an adiabatic expansion of the basis functions. This allows for an unambiguous definition of a vacuum state up to the given adiabatic order. Using this basis, we show that particle creation is well defined for a suitable choice of vacuum and canonical variables, so that the time evolution of the corresponding quantum fields is unitary. This provides constraints for setting initial conditions for an arbitrary number of fluids and background time evolution. We also show that the common choice of variables for quantization can lead to an ill-defined vacuum definition. Our formalism is not restricted to the case where the coupling between fields is small, but is only required to vary adiabatically with respect to the ultraviolet modes, thus paving the way to consistent descriptions of general models not restricted to single-field (or fluid).

  9. Some properties of adiabatic blast waves in preexisting cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.; Franco, J.

    1981-01-01

    Cox and Anderson (1982) have conducted an investigation regarding an adiabatic blast wave in a region of uniform density and finite external pressure. In connection with an application of the results of the investigation to a study of interstellar blast waves in the very hot, low-density matrix, it was found that it would be desirable to examine situations with a positive radial density gradient in the ambient medium. Information concerning such situations is needed to learn about the behavior of blast waves occurring within preexisting, presumably supernova-induced cavities in the interstellar mass distribution. The present investigation is concerned with the first steps of a study conducted to obtain the required information. A review is conducted of Sedov's (1959) similarity solutions for the dynamical structure of any explosion in a medium with negligible pressure and power law density dependence on radius.

  10. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  11. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  12. An Adiabatic Architecture for Linear Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.; Götze, J.

    2005-05-01

    Using adiabatic CMOS logic instead of the more traditional static CMOS logic can lower the power consumption of a hardware design. However, the characteristic differences between adiabatic and static logic, such as a four-phase clock, have a far reaching influence on the design itself. These influences are investigated in this paper by adapting a systolic array of CORDIC devices to be implemented adiabatically. We present a means to describe adiabatic logic in VHDL and use it to define the systolic array with precise timing and bit-true calculations. The large pipeline bubbles that occur in a naive version of this array are identified and removed to a large degree. As an example, we demonstrate a parameterization of the CORDIC array that carries out adaptive RLS filtering.

  13. General conditions for quantum adiabatic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Comparat, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Adiabaticity occurs when, during its evolution, a physical system remains in the instantaneous eigenstate of the Hamiltonian. Unfortunately, existing results, such as the quantum adiabatic theorem based on a slow down evolution [H({epsilon}t),{epsilon}{yields}0], are insufficient to describe an evolution driven by the Hamiltonian H(t) itself. Here we derive general criteria and exact bounds, for the state and its phase, ensuring an adiabatic evolution for any Hamiltonian H(t). As a corollary, we demonstrate that the commonly used condition of a slow Hamiltonian variation rate, compared to the spectral gap, is indeed sufficient to ensure adiabaticity but only when the Hamiltonian is real and nonoscillating (for instance, containing exponential or polynomial but no sinusoidal functions)

  14. Adiabatic invariance of oscillons/I -balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takeda, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    Real scalar fields are known to fragment into spatially localized and long-lived solitons called oscillons or I -balls. We prove the adiabatic invariance of the oscillons/I -balls for a potential that allows periodic motion even in the presence of non-negligible spatial gradient energy. We show that such a potential is uniquely determined to be the quadratic one with a logarithmic correction, for which the oscillons/I -balls are absolutely stable. For slightly different forms of the scalar potential dominated by the quadratic one, the oscillons/I -balls are only quasistable, because the adiabatic charge is only approximately conserved. We check the conservation of the adiabatic charge of the I -balls in numerical simulation by slowly varying the coefficient of logarithmic corrections. This unambiguously shows that the longevity of oscillons/I -balls is due to the adiabatic invariance.

  15. Elementary theorems regarding blue isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Yoo, Hojin

    2015-04-01

    Blue CDM-photon isocurvature perturbations are attractive in terms of observability and may be typical from the perspective of generic mass relations in supergravity. We present and apply three theorems useful for blue isocurvature perturbations arising from linear spectator scalar fields. In the process, we give a more precise formula for the blue spectrum associated with the axion model of Kasuya and Kawasaki [Axion Isocurvature Fluctuations with Extremely Blue Spectrum, Phys. Rev. D 80, 023516 (2009).], which can in a parametric corner give a factor of O (10 ) correction. We explain how a conserved current associated with Peccei-Quinn symmetry plays a crucial role and explicitly plot several example spectra including the breaks in the spectra. We also resolve a little puzzle arising from a naive multiplication of isocurvature expression that sheds light on the gravitational imprint of the adiabatic perturbations on the fields responsible for blue isocurvature fluctuations.

  16. Perturbative fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Pirner, H.-J.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Tarasov, A. V.

    2008-03-01

    The Berger model of perturbative fragmentation of quarks to pions is improved by providing an absolute normalization and keeping all terms in a (1-z) expansion, which makes the calculation valid at all values of fractional pion momentum z. We also replace the nonrelativistic wave function of a loosely bound pion by the more realistic procedure of projecting to the light-cone pion wave function, which in turn is taken from well known models. The full calculation does not confirm the (1-z){sup 2} behavior of the fragmentation function (FF) predicted in [E. L. Berger, Z. Phys. C 4, 289 (1980); Phys. Lett. 89B, 241 (1980] for z>0.5, and only works at very large z>0.95, where it is in reasonable agreement with phenomenological FFs. Otherwise, we observe quite a different z-dependence which grossly underestimates data at smaller z. The disagreement is reduced after the addition of pions from decays of light vector mesons, but still remains considerable. The process dependent higher twist terms are also calculated exactly and found to be important at large z and/or p{sub T}.

  17. Robust entanglement via optomechanical dark mode: adiabatic scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin; Wang, Ying-Dan; Huang, Sumei; Clerk, Aashish

    2013-03-01

    Entanglement is a powerful resource for studying quantum effects in macroscopic objects and for quantum information processing. Here, we show that robust entanglement between cavity modes with distinct frequencies can be generated via a mechanical dark mode in an optomechanical quantum interface. Due to quantum interference, the effect of the mechanical noise is cancelled in a way that is similar to the electromagnetically induced transparency. We derive the entanglement in the strong coupling regime by solving the quantum Langevin equation using a perturbation theory approach. The entanglement in the adiabatic scheme is then compared with the entanglement in the stationary state scheme. Given the robust entanglement schemes and our previous schemes on quantum wave length conversion, the optomechanical interface hence forms an effective building block for a quantum network. This work is supported by DARPA-ORCHID program, NSF-DMR-0956064, NSF-CCF-0916303, and NSF-COINS.

  18. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  19. Perturbative analysis of multiple-field cosmological inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Joydev . E-mail: gautam@theory.saha.ernet.in

    2006-04-15

    We develop a general formalism for analyzing linear perturbations in multiple-field cosmological inflation based on the gauge-ready approach. Our inflationary model consists of an arbitrary number of scalar fields with non-minimal kinetic terms. We solve the equations for scalar- and tensor-type perturbations during inflation to the first order in slow roll, and then obtain the super-horizon solutions for adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations after inflation. Analytic expressions for power-spectra and spectral indices arising from multiple-field inflation are presented.

  20. A general analysis of non-gaussianity from isocurvature perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Suyama, Teruaki; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: nakayama@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: teruaki.suyama@uclouvain.be

    2009-01-15

    Light scalars may be ubiquitous in nature, and their quantum fluctuations can produce large non-Gaussianity in the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy. The non-Gaussianity may be accompanied with a small admixture of isocurvature perturbations, which often have correlations with the curvature perturbations. We present a general method to calculate the non-Gaussianity in the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations with and without correlations, and see how it works in several explicit examples. We also show that they leave distinct signatures on the bispectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations.

  1. Relativistic blast waves in two dimensions. I - The adiabatic case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate solutions are presented for the dynamical evolution of strong adiabatic relativistic blast waves which result from a point explosion in an ambient gas in which the density varies both with distance from the explosion center and with polar angle in axisymmetry. Solutions are analytical or quasi-analytical for the extreme relativistic case and numerical for the arbitrarily relativistic case. Some general properties of nonplanar relativistic shocks are also discussed, including the incoherence of spherical ultrarelativistic blast-wave fronts on angular scales greater than the reciprocal of the shock Lorentz factor, as well as the conditions for producing blast-wave acceleration.

  2. First-principles study of HgTe/CdTe heterostructures under perturbations preserving time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anversa, Jonas; Piquini, Paulo; Fazzio, Adalberto; Schmidt, Tome M.

    2014-11-01

    The observation of the quantum spin Hall effect without the need of an external magnetic field in HgTe/CdTe heterostructures triggered the study of materials exhibiting persistent spin-polarized electronic currents at their interfaces. These Dirac-like spin states are predicted to be topologically protected against perturbations preserving time-reversal symmetry. However, nonmagnetic (time-reversal preserving) perturbations will certainly affect these interface states. In this work, the density functional theory is used to characterize the topologically protected states of the (001) HgTe/CdTe heterostructure as well as to understand the influence of external adiabatic parameters as pressure and electric fields on these states. The intrasite Hubbard U term is seen to be important to correctly describe the HgTe bulk band structure. It is shown that, differently from the three-dimensional topological insulators, the HgTe/CdTe interface states present fully in-plane Rashba-like spin texture. Further, biaxial external pressures and electric fields perpendicular to the interfaces are seen to change the energetics and dispersion of the protected states, modifying the energy ordering of the crossing of the polarized interface states inside the band structure, and altering their Fermi velocities while not changing the topological quantum phase. These adiabatic variables can then be used to tune the topologically protected states with respect to the Fermi level.

  3. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-02-01

    In the graph isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and transforms G →G'. If yes, then G and G' are said to be isomorphic; otherwise they are nonisomorphic. The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. In this paper we present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI and which also provides an approach to determining all automorphisms of a given graph. We show how the GI problem can be converted to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate the algorithm's quantum dynamics and show that it correctly (i) distinguishes nonisomorphic graphs; (ii) recognizes isomorphic graphs and determines the permutation(s) that connect them; and (iii) finds the automorphism group of a given graph G. We then discuss the GI quantum algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing how it can be leveraged to give a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of the NP-complete subgraph isomorphism problem. The computational complexity of an adiabatic quantum algorithm is largely determined by the minimum energy gap Δ (N) separating the ground and first-excited states in the limit of large problem size N ≫1. Calculating Δ (N) in this limit is a fundamental open problem in adiabatic quantum computing, and so it is not possible to determine the computational complexity of adiabatic quantum algorithms in general, nor consequently, of the specific adiabatic quantum algorithms presented here. Adiabatic quantum computing has been shown to be equivalent to the circuit model of quantum computing, and so development of adiabatic quantum algorithms continues to be of great interest.

  4. Causal compensated perturbations in cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeraraghavan, Shoba; Stebbins, Albert

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to calculate linear perturbations in the gravitational and matter fields which arise causally in response to the presence of stiff matter sources in a FRW cosmology. It is shown that, in order to satisfy energy and momentum conservation, the gravitational fields of the source must be compensated by perturbations in the matter and gravitational fields, and the role of such compensation in containing the initial inhomogeneities in their subsequent evolution is discussed. A complete formal solution is derived in terms of Green functions for the perturbations produced by an arbitrary source in a flat universe containing cold dark matter. Approximate Green function solutions are derived for the late-time density perturbations and late-time gravitational waves in a universe containing a radiation fluid. A cosmological energy-momentum pseudotensor is defined to clarify the nature of energy and momentum conservation in the expanding universe.

  5. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory, and Madelung potential analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3, both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axis directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. The spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed.

  6. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir(4+) ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory, and Madelung potential analyses.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elijah E; Xiang, Hongjun; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-03-21

    The spins of the low-spin Ir(4+) (S = 1/2, d(5)) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3, both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir(4+) spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axis directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir(4+) ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir(4+) ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. The spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir(4+) is not as strong as has been assumed. PMID:27004892

  7. Normal co-ordinate analysis, molecular structural, non-linear optical, second order perturbation studies of Tizanidine by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheela, N. R.; Muthu, S.; Sampathkrishnan, S.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-03-01

    The spectroscopic techniques and semi-empirical molecular calculations have been utilized to analyze the drug Tizanidine (5CDIBTA). The solid phase Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Fourier Transform Raman (FTR) spectral analysis of 5CDIBTA is carried out along with density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP) with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of the compound has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The individual atomic charges by NPA using B3LYP method is studied. A study on the Mulliken atomic charges, frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. The electric dipole moment (μ) and the first hyperpolarizability (α) values of the investigated molecule were also computed.

  8. Changes in the High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density Profiles in Response to Solar-Wind Perturbations During Large Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Arbacher, Becca

    2011-01-01

    The latest results from an investigation to establish links between solar-wind and topside-ionospheric parameters will be presented including a case where high-latitude topside electron-density Ne(h) profiles indicated dramatic rapid changes in the scale height during the main phase of a large magnetic storm (Dst < -200 nT). These scale-height changes suggest a large heat input to the topside ionosphere at this time. The topside profiles were derived from ISIS-1 digital ionograms obtained from the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDA Web). Solar-wind data obtained from the NASA OMNIWeb database indicated that the magnetic storm was due to a magnetic cloud. This event is one of several large magnetic storms being investigated during the interval from 1965 to 1984 when both solar-wind and digital topside ionograms, from either Alouette-2, ISIS-1, or ISIS-2, are potentially available.

  9. Changes in the High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density Profiles in Response to Solar-Wind Perturbations During Large Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.; Osherovich, V. A.; Truhlik, V.; Wang, Y.; Arbacher, R. T.

    2011-12-01

    The latest results from an investigation to establish links between solar-wind and topside-ionospheric parameters will be presented including a case where high-latitude topside electron-density Ne(h) profiles indicated dramatic rapid changes in the scale height during the main phase of a large magnetic storm (Dst < -200 nT). These scale-height changes suggest a large heat input to the topside ionosphere at this time. The topside profiles were derived from ISIS-1 digital ionograms obtained from the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb). Solar-wind data obtained from the NASA OMNIWeb database indicated that the magnetic storm was due to a magnetic cloud. This event is one of several large magnetic storms being investigated during the interval from 1965 to 1984 when both solar-wind and digital topside ionograms, from either Alouette-2, ISIS-1, or ISIS-2, are potentially available.

  10. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  11. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  12. Symmetry-Protected Quantum Adiabatic Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Dominic J.; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2014-03-01

    An essential development in the history of computing was the invention of the transistor as it allowed logic circuits to be implemented in a robust and modular way. The physical characteristics of semiconductor materials were the key to building these devices. We aim to present an analogous development for quantum computing by showing that quantum adiabatic transistors (as defined by Flammia et al.) are built upon the essential qualities of symmetry-protected (SP) quantum ordered phases in one dimension. Flammia et al. and Renes et al. have demonstrated schemes for universal adiabatic quantum computation using quantum adiabatic transistors described by interacting spin chain models with specifically chosen Hamiltonian terms. We show that these models can be understood as specific examples of the generic situation in which all SP phases lead to quantum computation on encoded edge degrees of freedom by adiabatically traversing a symmetric phase transition into a trivial symmetric phase. This point of view is advantageous as it allows us to readily see that the computational properties of a quantum adiabatic transistor arise from a phase of matter rather than due to carefully tuned interactions.

  13. Anisotropic perturbations due to dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Moss, Adam

    2006-08-01

    A variety of observational tests seem to suggest that the Universe is anisotropic. This is incompatible with the standard dogma based on adiabatic, rotationally invariant perturbations. We point out that this is a consequence of the standard decomposition of the stress-energy tensor for the cosmological fluids, and that rotational invariance need not be assumed, if there is elastic rigidity in the dark energy. The dark energy required to achieve this might be provided by point symmetric domain wall network with P/ρ=-2/3, although the concept is more general. We illustrate this with reference to a model with cubic symmetry and discuss various aspects of the model.

  14. Cosmological perturbations: Vorticity, isocurvature and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, I review some recent, interlinked, work undertaken using cosmological perturbation theory — a powerful technique for modeling inhomogeneities in the universe. The common theme which underpins these pieces of work is the presence of nonadiabatic pressure, or entropy, perturbations. After a brief introduction covering the standard techniques of describing inhomogeneities in both Newtonian and relativistic cosmology, I discuss the generation of vorticity. As in classical fluid mechanics, vorticity is not present in linearized perturbation theory (unless included as an initial condition). Allowing for entropy perturbations, and working to second order in perturbation theory, I show that vorticity is generated, even in the absence of vector perturbations, by purely scalar perturbations, the source term being quadratic in the gradients of first order energy density and isocurvature, or nonadiabatic pressure perturbations. This generalizes Crocco's theorem to a cosmological setting. I then introduce isocurvature perturbations in different models, focusing on the entropy perturbation in standard, concordance cosmology, and in inflationary models involving two scalar fields. As the final topic, I investigate magnetic fields, which are a potential observational consequence of vorticity in the early universe. I briefly review some recent work on including magnetic fields in perturbation theory in a consistent way. I show, using solely analytical techniques, that magnetic fields can be generated by higher order perturbations, albeit too small to provide the entire primordial seed field, in agreement with some numerical studies. I close this paper with a summary and some potential extensions of this work.

  15. Anderson localization makes adiabatic quantum optimization fail

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, Boris; Krovi, Hari; Roland, Jérémie

    2010-01-01

    Understanding NP-complete problems is a central topic in computer science (NP stands for nondeterministic polynomial time). This is why adiabatic quantum optimization has attracted so much attention, as it provided a new approach to tackle NP-complete problems using a quantum computer. The efficiency of this approach is limited by small spectral gaps between the ground and excited states of the quantum computer’s Hamiltonian. We show that the statistics of the gaps can be analyzed in a novel way, borrowed from the study of quantum disordered systems in statistical mechanics. It turns out that due to a phenomenon similar to Anderson localization, exponentially small gaps appear close to the end of the adiabatic algorithm for large random instances of NP-complete problems. This implies that unfortunately, adiabatic quantum optimization fails: The system gets trapped in one of the numerous local minima. PMID:20616043

  16. FRW-type cosmologies with adiabatic matter creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Germano, A. S. M.; Abramo, L. R. W.

    1996-04-01

    Some properties of cosmological models with matter creation are investigated in the framework of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker line element. For adiabatic matter creation, as developed by Prigogine and co-workers, we derive a simple expression relating the particle number density n and energy density ρ which holds regardless of the matter creation rate. The conditions to generate inflation are discussed and by considering the natural phenomenological matter creation rate ψ=3βnH, where β is a pure number of the order of unity and H is the Hubble parameter, a minimally modified hot big-bang model is proposed. The dynamic properties of such models can be deduced from the standard ones simply by replacing the adiabatic index γ of the equation of state by an effective parameter γ*=γ(1-β). The thermodynamic behavior is determined and it is also shown that ages large enough to agree with observations are obtained even given the high values of H suggested by recent measurements.

  17. Post-synaptic density perturbs insulin-induced Kv1.3 channel modulation via a clustering mechanism involving the SH3 domain

    PubMed Central

    Marks, D. R.; Fadool, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) contains the highest concentration of the insulin receptor (IR) kinase in the central nervous system; however, its functional role and modulation in this region remains poorly understood. IR kinase contains a number of proline-rich motifs, making it an excellent candidate for modulation by SH3 domain-containing adaptor proteins. Kv1.3, a voltage-gated Shaker potassium channel and tyrosine phosphorylation substrate of IR kinase, contains several prolinerich sequences and a canonical post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95)/discs large/zO-1 domain (PDZ) recognition motif common to most Shaker family members. We sought to determine if a functional relationship existed between Kv1.3, IR kinase, and the SH3/PDZ adaptor protein PSD-95. Through patch-clamp electrophysiology, immunochemistry, and co-immunoprecipitation, we found that while Kv1.3 and PSD-95 alone interact via the canonical C-terminal PDZ recognition motif of the channel, this molecular site of interaction acts to cluster the channels but the PSD-95 SH3-guanylate kinase domain functionally modulates Kv1.3 activity via two prolinerich domains in its N- and C-terminal. Therefore, these data suggest that adaptor domains responsible for ion-channel clustering and functional modulation are not necessarily coupled. Moreover, IR kinase and Kv1.3 can only be co-immunoprecipitated in the presence of PSD-95 as the adapting linker. Functionally, insulin-dependent Kv1.3 phosphorylation that causes channel current suppression is blocked via interaction with the PSD-95 SH3-guanylate kinase domain. Because all the three proteins co-localize in multiple lamina of the OB that are known to be rich in synaptic connections, membrane excitability and synaptic transmission at critical locations in the OB have the capacity to be finely regulated. PMID:17854350

  18. On reaching the adiabatic limit in multi-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaux-Petel, Sébastien; Turzyński, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    We calculate the scalar spectral index ns and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in a class of recently proposed two-field no-scale inflationary models in supergravity. We show that, in order to obtain correct predictions, it is crucial to take into account the coupling between the curvature and the isocurvature perturbations induced by the noncanonical form of the kinetic terms. This coupling enhances the curvature perturbation and suppresses the resulting tensor-to-scalar ratio to the per mille level even for values of the slow-roll parameter epsilon ~ 0.01. Beyond these particular models, we emphasise that multifield models of inflation are a priori not predictive, unless one supplies a prescription for the post-inflationary era, or an adiabatic limit is reached before the end of inflation. We examine the conditions that enabled us to actually derive predictions in the models under study, by analysing the various contributions to the effective isocurvature mass in general two-field inflationary models. In particular, we point out a universal geometrical contribution that is important at the end of inflation, and which can be directly extracted from the inflationary Lagrangian, independently of a specific trajectory. Eventually, we point out that spectator fields can lead to oscillatory features in the time-dependent power spectra at the end of inflation. We demonstrate how these features can be model semi-analytically as well as the theoretical uncertainties they can entail.

  19. Baryons do trace dark matter 380,000 years after the big bang: Search for compensated isocurvature perturbations with WMAP 9-year data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grin, Daniel; Hanson, Duncan; Holder, Gilbert P.; Doré, Olivier; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Primordial isocurvature fluctuations between photons and either neutrinos or nonrelativistic species such as baryons or dark matter are known to be subdominant to adiabatic fluctuations. Perturbations in the relative densities of baryons and dark matter (known as compensated isocurvature perturbations or CIPs), however, are surprisingly poorly constrained. CIPs leave no imprint in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on observable scales, at least at linear order in their amplitude and zeroth order in the amplitude of adiabatic perturbations. It is thus not yet empirically known if baryons trace dark matter at the surface of last scattering. If CIPs exist, they would spatially modulate the Silk damping scale and acoustic horizon, causing distinct fluctuations in the CMB temperature/polarization power spectra across the sky: this effect is first order in both the CIP and adiabatic mode amplitudes. Here, temperature data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) are used to conduct the first CMB-based observational search for CIPs, using off-diagonal correlations and the CMB trispectrum. Reconstruction noise from weak lensing and point sources is shown to be negligible for this data set. No evidence for CIPs is observed, and a 95% confidence upper limit of 1.1×10-2 is imposed to the amplitude of a scale-invariant CIP power spectrum. This limit agrees with CIP sensitivity forecasts for WMAP and is competitive with smaller-scale constraints from measurements of the baryon fraction in galaxy clusters. It is shown that the root-mean-squared CIP amplitude on 5-100° scales is smaller than ˜0.07-0.17 (depending on the scale) at the 95% confidence level. Temperature data from the Planck satellite will provide an even more sensitive probe for the existence of CIPs, as will the upcoming ACTPol and SPTPol experiments on smaller angular scales.

  20. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  1. On black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Han, Yan

    2012-12-01

    In this Letter, we obtain the black hole spectroscopy by combining the black hole property of adiabaticity and the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. This velocity is obtained in the tunneling framework. In particular, we declare, if requiring canonical invariance, the adiabatic invariant quantity should be of the covariant form Iadia = ∮pi dqi. Using it, the horizon area of a Schwarzschild black hole is quantized independently of the choice of coordinates, with an equally spaced spectroscopy always given by ΔA = 8 π lp2 in the Schwarzschild and Painlevé coordinates.

  2. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  3. Adiabatic approximation for nucleus-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.

    2005-10-14

    Adiabatic approximations to few-body models of nuclear scattering are described with emphasis on reactions with deuterons and halo nuclei (frozen halo approximation) as projectiles. The different ways the approximation should be implemented in a consistent theory of elastic scattering, stripping and break-up are explained and the conditions for the theory's validity are briefly discussed. A formalism which links few-body models and the underlying many-body system is outlined and the connection between the adiabatic and CDCC methods is reviewed.

  4. Covariant generalization of cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Hoegdahl, Janne; Nurmi, Sami; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2007-01-15

    We present an approach to cosmological perturbations based on a covariant perturbative expansion between two worldlines in the real inhomogeneous universe. As an application, at an arbitrary order we define an exact scalar quantity which describes the inhomogeneities in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and which is conserved on all scales for a barotropic ideal fluid. We derive a compact form for its conservation equation at all orders and assign it a simple physical interpretation. To make a comparison with the standard perturbation theory, we develop a method to construct gauge-invariant quantities in a coordinate system at arbitrary order, which we apply to derive the form of the nth order perturbation in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and its exact evolution equation. On large scales, this provides the gauge-invariant expression for the curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces and its evolution equation at any order.

  5. Local perturbations perturb—exponentially–locally

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, W. Schütz, M.

    2015-06-15

    We elaborate on the principle that for gapped quantum spin systems with local interaction, “local perturbations [in the Hamiltonian] perturb locally [the groundstate].” This principle was established by Bachmann et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 309, 835–871 (2012)], relying on the “spectral flow technique” or “quasi-adiabatic continuation” [M. B. Hastings, Phys. Rev. B 69, 104431 (2004)] to obtain locality estimates with sub-exponential decay in the distance to the spatial support of the perturbation. We use ideas of Hamza et al. [J. Math. Phys. 50, 095213 (2009)] to obtain similarly a transformation between gapped eigenvectors and their perturbations that is local with exponential decay. This allows to improve locality bounds on the effect of perturbations on the low lying states in certain gapped models with a unique “bulk ground state” or “topological quantum order.” We also give some estimate on the exponential decay of correlations in models with impurities where some relevant correlations decay faster than one would naively infer from the global gap of the system, as one also expects in disordered systems with a localized groundstate.

  6. Gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory with seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Durrer, R. )

    1990-10-15

    Gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory is extended to handle perturbations induced by seeds. A calculation of the Sachs-Wolfe effect is presented. A second-order differential equation for the growth of density perturbations is derived and the perturbation of Liouville's equation for collisionless particles is also given. The results are illustrated by a simple analytic example of a single texture knot, where we calculate the induced perturbations of the energy of microwave photons, of baryonic matter, and of collisionless particles.

  7. Non-equilibrium scale invariance and shortcuts to adiabaticity in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    PubMed Central

    Rohringer, W.; Fischer, D.; Steiner, F.; Mazets, I. E.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Trupke, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for scale invariant behaviour of the excitation spectrum in phase-fluctuating quasi-1d Bose gases after a rapid change of the external trapping potential. Probing density correlations in free expansion, we find that the temperature of an initial thermal state scales with the spatial extension of the cloud as predicted by a model based on adiabatic rescaling of initial eigenmodes with conserved quasiparticle occupation numbers. Based on this result, we demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity for the rapid expansion or compression of the gas do not induce additional heating. PMID:25867640

  8. Non-equilibrium scale invariance and shortcuts to adiabaticity in a one-dimensional Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Rohringer, W; Fischer, D; Steiner, F; Mazets, I E; Schmiedmayer, J; Trupke, M

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for scale invariant behaviour of the excitation spectrum in phase-fluctuating quasi-1d Bose gases after a rapid change of the external trapping potential. Probing density correlations in free expansion, we find that the temperature of an initial thermal state scales with the spatial extension of the cloud as predicted by a model based on adiabatic rescaling of initial eigenmodes with conserved quasiparticle occupation numbers. Based on this result, we demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity for the rapid expansion or compression of the gas do not induce additional heating. PMID:25867640

  9. Adiabatic and diabatic invariants in ion-molecule reactions.

    PubMed

    Lorquet, J C

    2009-12-28

    A point charge interacting with a dipole (either induced or permanent) constitutes a completely integrable dynamical subsystem characterized by three first integrals of the motion (E, p(phi), and either l(2) or a Hamilton-Jacobi separation constant beta). An ion-molecule reaction (capture or fragmentation) can be seen as an interaction between such a subsystem and a bath of oscillators. This interaction is a perturbation that destroys some of the first integrals. However, the perturbation depends on the separation between the fragments and the destruction is gradual. The mathematical simplicity of the long-range electrostatic interaction potential leads to useful simplifications. A first-order perturbation treatment based on the structured and regular nature of the multipole expansion is presented. The separating integrals valid in the asymptotic limit are found to subsist at intermediate distances, although in a weaker form. As the reaction coordinate decreases, i.e., as the fragments approach, the asymptotic range is followed by an outer region where (i) the azimuthal momentum p(phi) remains a constant of the motion; (ii) the square angular momentum l(2) or the separation constant beta transform into a diabatic invariant in regions of phase space characterized by a high value of the translational momentum p(r); (iii) for low values of p(r), it is advantageous to use the action integral contour integral(p(theta)d theta), which is an adiabatic invariant. The conditions under which an effective potential obtained by adding centrifugal repulsion to an electrostatic attractive term can be validly constructed are specified. In short, the dynamics of ion-molecule interactions is still regular in parts of phase space corresponding to a range of the reaction coordinate where the interaction potential deviates from its asymptotic shape. PMID:20059072

  10. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  11. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  12. Dark energy with non-adiabatic sound speed: initial conditions and detectability

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2010-10-01

    Assuming that the universe contains a dark energy fluid with a constant linear equation of state and a constant sound speed, we study the prospects of detecting dark energy perturbations using CMB data from Planck, cross-correlated with galaxy distribution maps from a survey like LSST. We update previous estimates by carrying a full exploration of the mock data likelihood for key fiducial models. We find that it will only be possible to exclude values of the sound speed very close to zero, while Planck data alone is not powerful enough for achieving any detection, even with lensing extraction. We also discuss the issue of initial conditions for dark energy perturbations in the radiation and matter epochs, generalizing the usual adiabatic conditions to include the sound speed effect. However, for most purposes, the existence of attractor solutions renders the perturbation evolution nearly independent of these initial conditions.

  13. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  14. Adiabatic circuits: converter for static CMOS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Amirante, E.; Bargagli-Stoffi, A.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2003-05-01

    Ultra low power applications can take great advantages from adiabatic circuitry. In this technique a multiphase system is used which consists ideally of trapezoidal voltage signals. The input signals to be processed will often come from a function block realized in static CMOS. The static rectangular signals must be converted for the oscillating multiphase system of the adiabatic circuitry. This work shows how to convert the input signals to the proposed pulse form which is synchronized to the appropriate supply voltage. By means of adder structures designed for a 0.13µm technology in a 4-phase system there will be demonstrated, which additional circuits are necessary for the conversion. It must be taken into account whether the data arrive in parallel or serial form. Parallel data are all in one phase and therefore it is advantageous to use an adder structure with a proper input stage, e.g. a Carry Lookahead Adder (CLA). With a serial input stage it is possible to read and to process four signals during one cycle due to the adiabatic 4-phase system. Therefore input signals with a frequency four times higher than the adiabatic clock frequency can be used. This reduces the disadvantage of the slow clock period typical for adiabatic circuits. By means of an 8 bit Ripple Carry Adder (8 bit RCA) the serial reading will be introduced. If the word width is larger than 4 bits the word can be divided in 4 bit words which are processed in parallel. This is the most efficient way to minimize the number of input lines and pads. At the same time a high throughput is achieved.

  15. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  16. Adiabatic evolution of an irreversible two level system

    SciTech Connect

    Kvitsinsky, A.; Putterman, S. )

    1991-05-01

    The adiabatic dynamics of a two level atom with spontaneous decay is studied. The existence of a complex adiabatic phase shift is established: The real part being the usual Berry's phase. A closed-form expression for this phase and the adiabatic transition amplitudes is obtained. Incorporation of a finite preparation time for the initial state yields a new asymptotic form for the adiabatic transition amplitudes which is significantly different from the standard Landau--Zener--Dykhne formula.

  17. Adiabatic corrections to the potential energy curves of the X 1∑ + state of the isotopic lithium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadinger, G.; Tergiman, Y. S.

    1986-12-01

    From isotopic spectroscopic data, the internuclear distance dependence of the adiabatic corrections to the potential energy curve has been determined for the ∑ state of a diatomic molecule. Starting from an analytic inversion procedure previously described, the adiabatic corrections can be found in a straightforward way, provided that they can be considered as perturbing terms of the vibration-rotation wave equation. Application to the case of the X 1∑+ state of the lithium hydrides 6LiH, 7LiH, 6LiD, and 7LiD is carried out. The adiabatic corrections ΔUH(R) and ΔULi(R) are obtained and compared with recent results.

  18. Flatbands under Correlated Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D.; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy EFB, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ξ ˜1 /ln (E -EFB) , (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at EFB . Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions.

  19. Flatbands under correlated perturbations.

    PubMed

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy E_{FB}, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ξ∼1/ln(E-E_{FB}), (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at E_{FB}. Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions. PMID:25526142

  20. Geometric Phases, Noise and Non-adiabatic Effects in Multi-level Superconducting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, S.; Pechal, M.; Abdumalikov, A. A.; Steffen, L.; Fedorov, A.; Wallraff, A.; Filipp, S.

    2012-02-01

    Geometric phases depend neither on time nor on energy, but only on the trajectory of the quantum system in state space. In previous studies [1], we have observed them in a Cooper pair box qubit, a system with large anharmonicity. We now make use of a superconducting transmon-type qubit with low anharmonicity to study geometric phases in a multi-level system. We measure the contribution of the second excited state to the geometric phase and find very good agreement with theory treating higher levels perturbatively. Furthermore, we quantify non-adiabatic corrections by decreasing the manipulation time in order to optimize our geometric gate. Geometric phases have also been shown to be resilient against adiabatic field fluctuations [2]. Here, we analyze the effect of artificially added noise on the geometric phase for different system trajectories. [1] P. J. Leek et al., Science 318, 1889 (2007) [2] S. Filipp et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 030404 (2009)

  1. Adiabatic cooling of the artificial Porcupine plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruizhin, Iu. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.; Bauer, O. H.; Moskalenko, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the plasma density obtained during the interaction of the artificial plasma jet, fired into the ionosphere with the body of the Porcupine main payload, have been analyzed for times when there was a well-developed wake effect. Using wake theory, the maximum temperature of the quasi-neutral xenon ion beam has been determined for an intermediate distance from the ion beam source when the beam has left the diamagnetic region but is still much denser than the ionospheric background plasma. The beam temperature is found to be about 4 times less than the temperature at injection. This observation is very well explained by adiabatic cooling of the beam during its initial diamagnetic and current-buildup phases at distances r smaller than 10 m. Outside this region, the beam conserves the temperature achieved. The observation proves that the artificial plasma jet passes through an initial gas-like diamagnetic phase restricted to the vicinity of the beam source, where it expands adiabatically. Partial cooling also takes place outside the diamagnetic region where the beam current still builds up. The observations also support a recently developed current-closure model of the quasi-neutral ion beam.

  2. The effect of adiabaticity on strongly quenched Bose Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Kain, Ben

    2015-05-01

    We study the properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate following a deep quench to a large scattering length during which the condensate fraction nc changes with time. We construct a closed set of equations that highlight the role of the adiabaticity or equivalently, dnc/dt, the rate change of nc, which is to induce an (imaginary) effective interaction between quasiparticles. We show analytically that such a system supports a steady state characterized by a constant condensate density and a steady but periodically changing momentum distribution, whose time average is described exactly by the generalized Gibbs ensemble. We discuss how the nc -induced effective interaction, which cannot be ignored on the grounds of the adiabatic approximation for modes near the gapless Goldstone mode, can significantly affect condensate populations and Tan's contact for a Bose gas that has undergone a deep quench. In particular, we find that even when the Bose gas is quenched to unitarity, nc(t) does not completely deplete, approaching, instead, to a steady state with a finite condensate fraction. ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; KITP, University of Santa Barbara.

  3. Highly parallel implementation of non-adiabatic Ehrenfest molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Yosuke; Schleife, Andre; Draeger, Erik; Anisimov, Victor; Correa, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    While the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation tremendously lowers computational effort, many questions in modern physics, chemistry, and materials science require an explicit description of coupled non-adiabatic electron-ion dynamics. Electronic stopping, i.e. the energy transfer of a fast projectile atom to the electronic system of the target material, is a notorious example. We recently implemented real-time time-dependent density functional theory based on the plane-wave pseudopotential formalism in the Qbox/qb@ll codes. We demonstrate that explicit integration using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme is very suitable for modern highly parallelized supercomputers. Applying the new implementation to systems with hundreds of atoms and thousands of electrons, we achieved excellent performance and scalability on a large number of nodes both on the BlueGene based ``Sequoia'' system at LLNL as well as the Cray architecture of ``Blue Waters'' at NCSA. As an example, we discuss our work on computing the electronic stopping power of aluminum and gold for hydrogen projectiles, showing an excellent agreement with experiment. These first-principles calculations allow us to gain important insight into the the fundamental physics of electronic stopping.

  4. Finite-temperature second-order many-body perturbation and Hartree–Fock theories for one-dimensional solids: An application to Peierls and charge-density-wave transitions in conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiao; Ryu, Shinsei; Hirata, So

    2014-01-14

    Finite-temperature extensions of ab initio Gaussian-basis-set spin-restricted Hartree–Fock (HF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories are implemented for infinitely extended, periodic, one-dimensional solids and applied to the Peierls and charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene. The HF theory predicts insulating CDW ground states for both systems in their equidistant structures at low temperatures. In the same structures, they turn metallic at high temperatures. Starting from the “dimerized” low-temperature equilibrium structures, the systems need even higher temperatures to undergo a Peierls transition, which is accompanied by geometric as well as electronic distortions from dimerized to non-dimerized forms. The conventional finite-temperature MP2 theory shows a sign of divergence in any phase at any nonzero temperature and is useless. The renormalized finite-temperature MP2 (MP2R) theory is divergent only near metallic electronic structures, but is well behaved elsewhere. MP2R also predicts CDW and Peierls transitions occurring at two different temperatures. The effect of electron correlation is primarily to lower the Peierls transition temperature.

  5. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree-Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2015-09-14

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard-Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga-Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids. PMID:26374011

  6. Finite-temperature coupled-cluster, many-body perturbation, and restricted and unrestricted Hartree–Fock study on one-dimensional solids: Luttinger liquids, Peierls transitions, and spin- and charge-density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

    2015-09-14

    One-dimensional (1D) solids exhibit a number of striking electronic structures including charge-density wave (CDW) and spin-density wave (SDW). Also, the Peierls theorem states that at zero temperature, a 1D system predicted by simple band theory to be a metal will spontaneously dimerize and open a finite fundamental bandgap, while at higher temperatures, it will assume the equidistant geometry with zero bandgap (a Peierls transition). We computationally study these unique electronic structures and transition in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene using finite-temperature generalizations of ab initio spin-unrestricted Hartree–Fock (UHF) and spin-restricted coupled-cluster doubles (CCD) theories, extending upon previous work [He et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 024702 (2014)] that is based on spin-restricted Hartree–Fock (RHF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories. Unlike RHF, UHF can predict SDW as well as CDW and metallic states, and unlike MP2, CCD does not diverge even if the underlying RHF reference wave function is metallic. UHF predicts a gapped SDW state with no dimerization at low temperatures, which gradually becomes metallic as the temperature is raised. CCD, meanwhile, confirms that electron correlation lowers the Peierls transition temperature. Furthermore, we show that the results from all theories for both polymers are subject to a unified interpretation in terms of the UHF solutions to the Hubbard–Peierls model using different values of the electron-electron interaction strength, U/t, in its Hamiltonian. The CCD wave function is shown to encompass the form of the exact solution of the Tomonaga–Luttinger model and is thus expected to describe accurately the electronic structure of Luttinger liquids.

  7. Perturbation theory for a resistivity shunted Josephson element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    We present a systematic perturbation theory, extendable in principle to all orders of magnitude, for the solution of the equations of motion of an ideal Josephson element shunted by a resistance and driven by a dc current source and a small time-dependent source. We present second-order results for the case in which the time dependence is that of a single sinusoid, and these results are compared with other numerical and analytical calculations. Near, but not on, the first constant voltage step where the perturbation theory appears divergent, the current-voltage characteristic is calculated by means of a nonperturbative adiabatic procedure. The impedance and responsivity agree with earlier results.

  8. Alfven soliton and multisoliton dynamics perturbed by nonlinear Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Arriaga, G.

    2010-08-15

    The evolution of weakly dispersive nonlinear Alfven waves propagating either parallel or oblique to the ambient magnetic field is investigated through the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation (DNLS) perturbed by nonlinear Landau damping. The dynamics is analyzed with the aid of a numeric algorithm based on the inverse scattering transform (IST) and an adiabatic model that takes advantages of the perturbed DNLS invariants. Both techniques are applied to five types of DNLS soliton and multisoliton solutions: (i) the parallel Alfven soliton, (ii) the bright and dark one-parameter oblique, (iii) the breather two-parameter oblique, (iv) two parallel Alfven solitons, and (v) the combination of a dark and a bright oblique solitons. For the parallel solitons, the adiabatic model describes correctly the dynamics and it also recovers the well-known result given by the perturbed IST. Due to the radiation emission and the formation of dark solitons, the behavior of oblique solitons is more complicated and multisoliton solutions are required in the adiabatic model. The analysis shows that parallel solitons develop into the normal regime, whereas the oblique waves leads to the formation of dark solitons and breathers with a wavepacket form.

  9. Primordial perturbations in Einstein-Aether and BPSH theories

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Sierra, Noela Fariña; Garriga, Jaume E-mail: noela@ffn.ub.es

    2010-07-01

    We study the primordial perturbations generated during a stage of single-field inflation in Einstein-aether theories. Quantum fluctuations of the inflaton and aether fields seed long wavelength adiabatic and isocurvature scalar perturbations, as well as transverse vector perturbations. Geometrically, the isocurvature mode is the potential for the velocity field of the aether with respect to matter. For a certain range of parameters, this mode may lead to a sizable random velocity of the aether within the observable universe. The adiabatic mode corresponds to curvature perturbations of co-moving slices (where matter is at rest). In contrast with the standard case, it has a non-vanishing anisotropic stress on large scales. Scalar and vector perturbations may leave significant imprints on the cosmic microwave background. We calculate their primordial spectra, analyze their contributions to the temperature anisotropies, and formulate some of the phenomenological constraints that follow from observations. These may be used to further tighten the existing limits on the parameters for this class of theories. The results for the scalar sector also apply to the extension of Hořava gravity recently proposed by Blas, Pujolàs and Sibiryakov.

  10. Adiabatic Far Field Sub-Diffraction Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cang, Hu; Salandrino, Alessandro; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The limited resolution of a conventional optical imaging system stems from the fact that the fine feature information of an object is carried by evanescent waves, which exponentially decay in space thus cannot reach the imaging plane. We introduce here a new concept of adiabatic lens, which utilizes a geometrically conformal surface to mediate the interference of slowly decompressed electromagnetic waves at far field to form images. The decompression is satisfying an adiabatic condition, and by bridging the gap between far field and near field, it allows far field optical systems to project an image of the near field features directly. Using these designs, we demonstrated the magnification can be up to 20 times and it is possible to achieve sub-50nm imaging resolution in visible. Our approach provides a means to extend the domain of geometrical optics to a deep sub-wavelength scale. PMID:26258769

  11. Arbitrary qudit gates by adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseaux, B.; Guérin, S.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2013-03-01

    We derive an adiabatic technique that implements the most general SU(d) transformation in a quantum system of d degenerate states, featuring a qudit. This technique is based on the factorization of the SU(d) transformation into d generalized quantum Householder reflections, each of which is implemented by a two-shot stimulated Raman adiabatic passage with appropriate static phases. The energy of the lasers needed to synthesize a single Householder reflection is shown to be remarkably constant as a function of d. This technique is directly applicable to a linear trapped ion system with d+1 ions. We implement the quantum Fourier transform numerically in a qudit with d=4 (defined as a quartit) as an example.

  12. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  13. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis

    2014-12-01

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  14. Quantum adiabatic evolution with energy degeneracy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    A classical-kind phase-space formalism is developed to address the tiny intrinsic dynamical deviation from what is predicted by Wilczek-Zee theorem during quantum adiabatic evolution on degeneracy levels. In this formalism, the Hilbert space and the aggregate of degenerate eigenstates become the classical-kind phase space and a high-dimensional subspace in the phase space, respectively. Compared with the previous analogous study by a different method, the current result is qualitatively different in that the first-order deviation derived here is always perpendicular to the degeneracy subspace. A tripod-scheme Hamiltonian with two degenerate dark states is employed to illustrate the adiabatic deviation with degeneracy levels.

  15. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  16. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  17. Adiabatic Quantization of Andreev Quantum Billiard Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestrov, P. G.; Goorden, M. C.; Beenakker, C. W.

    2003-03-01

    We identify the time T between Andreev reflections as a classical adiabatic invariant in a ballistic chaotic cavity (Lyapunov exponent λ), coupled to a superconductor by an N-mode constriction. Quantization of the adiabatically invariant torus in phase space gives a discrete set of periods Tn, which in turn generate a ladder of excited states ɛnm=(m+1/2)πℏ/Tn. The largest quantized period is the Ehrenfest time T0=λ-1ln(N. Projection of the invariant torus onto the coordinate plane shows that the wave functions inside the cavity are squeezed to a transverse dimension W/(N), much below the width W of the constriction.

  18. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Libor Pittner, Jiří

    2014-06-07

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  19. Pulse sequences in photoassociation via adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Dupre, William; Parker, Gregory A.

    2012-07-01

    We perform a detailed study of pulse sequences in a photoassociation via adiabatic passage (PAP) process to transfer population from an ensemble of ultracold atomic clouds to a vibrationally cold molecular state. We show that an appreciable final population of ultracold NaCs molecules can be achieved with optimized pulses in either the ‘counter-intuitive’ (tP > tS) or ‘intuitive’ (tP < tS) PAP pulse sequences, with tP and tS denoting the temporal centers of the pump and Stokes pulses, respectively. By investigating the dependence of the reactive yield on pulse sequences, in a wide range of tP-tS, we show that there is not a fundamental preference to either pulse sequence in a PAP process. We explain this no-sequence-preference phenomenon by analyzing a multi-bound model so that an analogy can be drawn to the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage.

  20. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  1. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  2. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-01-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  3. Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Paul C. W.

    2004-01-01

    The research at Houston was focused on optimizing the design of superconducting magnets for advanced adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs), assessing the feasibility of using high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets in ADRs in the future, and developing techniques to deposit HTS thin and thick films on high strength, low thermal conductivity substrates for HTS magnet leads. Several approaches have been tested for the suggested superconducting magnets.

  4. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  5. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II - Adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point.

  6. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  7. An adiabatic approximation for grain alignment theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, W. G.

    1997-10-01

    The alignment of interstellar dust grains is described by the joint distribution function for certain `internal' and `external' variables, where the former describe the orientation of the axes of a grain with respect to its angular momentum, J, and the latter describe the orientation of J relative to the interstellar magnetic field. I show how the large disparity between the dynamical time-scales of the internal and external variables - which is typically 2-3 orders of magnitude - can be exploited to simplify calculations of the required distribution greatly. The method is based on an `adiabatic approximation' which closely resembles the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in quantum mechanics. The adiabatic approximation prescribes an analytic distribution function for the `fast' dynamical variables and a simplified Fokker-Planck equation for the `slow' variables which can be solved straightforwardly using various techniques. These solutions are accurate to O(epsilon), where epsilon is the ratio of the fast and slow dynamical time-scales. As a simple illustration of the method, I derive an analytic solution for the joint distribution established when Barnett relaxation acts in concert with gas damping. The statistics of the analytic solution agree with the results of laborious numerical calculations which do not exploit the adiabatic approximation.

  8. An Adiabatic Approximation for Grain Alignment Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, W. G.

    1997-12-01

    The alignment of interstellar dust grains is described by the joint distribution function for certain ``internal'' and ``external'' variables, where the former describe the orientation of a grain's axes with respect to its angular momentum, J, and the latter describe the orientation of J relative to the interstellar magnetic field. I show how the large disparity between the dynamical timescales of the internal and external variables--- which is typically 2--3 orders of magnitude--- can be exploited to greatly simplify calculations of the required distribution. The method is based on an ``adiabatic approximation'' which closely resembles the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in quantum mechanics. The adiabatic approximation prescribes an analytic distribution function for the ``fast'' dynamical variables and a simplified Fokker-Planck equation for the ``slow'' variables which can be solved straightforwardly using various techniques. These solutions are accurate to cal {O}(epsilon ), where epsilon is the ratio of the fast and slow dynamical timescales. As a simple illustration of the method, I derive an analytic solution for the joint distribution established when Barnett relaxation acts in concert with gas damping. The statistics of the analytic solution agree with the results of laborious numerical calculations which do not exploit the adiabatic approximation.

  9. Spatial adiabatic passage via interaction-induced band separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benseny, Albert; Gillet, Jérémie; Busch, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The development of advanced quantum technologies and the quest for a deeper understanding of many-particle quantum mechanics requires control over the quantum state of interacting particles to a high degree of fidelity. However, the quickly increasing density of the spectrum, together with the appearance of crossings in time-dependent processes, makes any effort to control the system hard and resource intensive. Here we show that in trapped systems regimes can exist in which isolated energy bands appear that allow one to easily generalize known single-particle techniques. We demonstrate this for the well-known spatial adiabatic passage effect, which can control the center-of-mass state of atoms with high fidelity.

  10. Evolution of f{sub NL} to the adiabatic limit

    SciTech Connect

    Elliston, Joseph; Mulryne, David J.; Tavakol, Reza; Seery, David E-mail: D.Mulryne@qmul.ac.uk E-mail: R.Tavakol@qmul.ac.uk

    2011-11-01

    We study inflationary perturbations in multiple-field models, for which ζ typically evolves until all isocurvature modes decay — the {sup a}diabatic limit{sup .} We use numerical methods to explore the sensitivity of the local-shape bispectrum to the process by which this limit is achieved, finding an appreciable dependence on model-specific data such as the time at which slow-roll breaks down or the timescale of reheating. In models with a sum-separable potential where the isocurvature modes decay before the end of the slow-roll phase we give an analytic criterion for the asymptotic value of f{sub NL} to be large. Other examples can be constructed using a waterfall field to terminate inflation while f{sub NL} is transiently large, caused by descent from a ridge or convergence into a valley. We show that these two types of evolution are distinguished by the sign of the bispectrum, and give approximate expressions for the peak f{sub NL}.

  11. The role of adiabaticity in alkali atom-fine structure mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshel, Ben; Weeks, David E.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-02-01

    Fine-structure mixing cross-sections for the alkalis in collisions with the rare gases are reviewed. Included in the review are all the rare gases in collisions with all of the first excited state of the alkalis, the second excited state for K, Rb and Cs and the third excited state for Rb and Cs. The cross-sections are converted to probabilities for energy transfer using a quantum-defect calculated cross-section and are then presented as a function of adiabaticity. The data shows a clear decreasing trend with adiabaticity but secondary factors prevent the probabilities from decreasing as quickly as expected. Polarizability is introduced as a proxy for the secondary influences on the data as it increases with both rare gas partner and alkali excited state. The polarizability is shown to cause the probability of fine structure transition to be higher than expected. An empirical model is introduced and fit to the data. Future work will develop a model using time-independent perturbation theory in order to further develop a physical rational for the dependence of fine structure cross sections on adiabaticity and to further understand the secondary influences on the probability for fine structure transition.

  12. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  13. Slow evolution of elliptical galaxies induced by dynamical friction. II. Non-adiabatic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, S. E.; Bertin, G.; Liseikina, T.; Pegoraro, F.

    2006-07-01

    Context: .Many astrophysical problems, ranging from structure formation in cosmology to dynamics of elliptical galaxies, refer to slow processes of evolution of essentially collisionless self-gravitating systems. In order to determine the relevant quasi-equilibrium configuration at time t from given initial conditions, it is often argued that such slow evolution may be approximated in terms of adiabatic evolution, for the calculation of which efficient semi-analytical techniques are available. Aims: .Here we focus on the slow process of evolution, induced by dynamical friction of a host stellar system on a minority component of "satellites", that we have investigated in a previous paper, to determine to what extent an adiabatic description might be applied. Methods: .The study is realized by comparing directly N-body simulations of the stellar system evolution (in two significantly different models) from initial to final conditions in a controlled numerical environment. Results: .We demonstrate that for the examined process the adiabatic description is going to provide incorrect answers, not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively. The two classes of models considered exhibit generally similar trends in evolution, with one exception noted in relation to the evolution of the total density profile. Conclusions: .This simple conclusion should be taken as a warning against the indiscriminate use of adiabatic growth prescriptions in studies of structure of galaxies.

  14. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  15. Adiabatic chaos in the spin orbit problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettin, Giancarlo; Guzzo, Massimiliano; Marini, Valerio

    2008-05-01

    We provide evidences that the angular momentum of a symmetric rigid body in a spin orbit resonance can perform large scale chaotic motions on time scales which increase polynomially with the inverse of the oblateness of the body. This kind of irregular precession appears as soon as the orbit of the center of mass is non-circular and the angular momentum of the body is far from the principal directions with minimum (maximum) moment of inertia. We also provide a quantitative explanation of these facts by using the theory of adiabatic invariants, and we provide numerical applications to the cases of the 1:1 and 1:2 spin orbit resonances.

  16. [Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-02-28

    The adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface approximation is not valid for reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between electronic states of reacting species plays a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. This research program initially studies this coupling in (1) selective C-Br bond fission in 1,3- bromoiodopropane, (2) C-S:S-H bond fission branching in CH[sub 3]SH, and (3) competition between bond fission channels and H[sub 2] elimination in CH[sub 3]NH[sub 2].

  17. Adiabatic passage in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, T.; Dietrich, M. R.; Kurz, N.; Shu, G.; Wright, J.; Blinov, B. B.

    2012-02-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) in a trapped barium ion system. RAP is implemented on the transition from the 6S1/2 ground state to the metastable 5D5/2 level by applying a laser at 1.76 μm. We focus on the interplay of laser frequency noise and laser power in shaping the effectiveness of RAP, which is commonly assumed to be a robust tool for high-efficiency population transfer. However, we note that reaching high state transfer fidelity requires a combination of small laser linewidth and large Rabi frequency.

  18. Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for space use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Warner, B. A.; Castles, S.; Breon, S. R.; San Sebastian, M.; Hait, T.

    1990-01-01

    An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) for space use is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The breadboard ADR operated at 100 mK for 400 minutes. Some significant changes to that ADR, designed to eliminate shortcomings revealed during tests, are reported. To increase thermal contact, the ferric ammonium sulfate crystals were grown directly on gold-plated copper wires which serve as the thermal bus. The thermal link to the X-ray sensors was also markedly improved. To speed up the testing required to determine the best design parameters for the gas gap heat switch, the new heat switch has a modular design and is easy to disassemble.

  19. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, R. D.; Richards, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators have been built and installed in small portable liquid helium cryostats to test the feasibility of this method of cooling infrared bolometric detectors to temperatures below 0.3 K. Performance has been achieved which suggests that bolometer temperatures of 0.2 K can be maintained for periods of approximately 60 hours. Applications to sensitive infrared detection from ground-based telescopes and space satellites are discussed. Design data are given which permit the evaluation of refrigerator performance for a variety of design parameters.

  20. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r(G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8 , most of which were previously unknown.

  1. Decoherence in a scalable adiabatic quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-15

    We consider the effects of decoherence on Landau-Zener crossings encountered in a large-scale adiabatic-quantum-computing setup. We analyze the dependence of the success probability--i.e., the probability for the system to end up in its new ground state--on the noise amplitude and correlation time. We determine the optimal sweep rate that is required to maximize the success probability. We then discuss the scaling of decoherence effects with increasing system size. We find that those effects can be important for large systems, even if they are small for each of the small building blocks.

  2. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  3. Evolution of non-spherical perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschan, P.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper I investigate the evolution of primordial non-spherical positive and negative fluctuations. They can be calculated by second order of perturbation theory. I solved analytically the second order equation for arbitrary density parameter {OMEGA}_M0_ and cosmological constant {LAMBDA} using the approximation introduced by Martell & Freundling (???). The second order solution is compared with the exact one in the spherical case. I find that the initial deformation grows rapidly for positive perturbations, while the negative perturbations (voids) are stable against deformations.

  4. Phase relations and adiabats in boiling seafloor geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, James L.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1985-11-01

    Observations of large salinity variations and vent temperatures in the range of 380-400°C suggest that boiling or two-phase separation may be occurring in some seafloor geothermal systems. Consideration of flow rates and the relatively small differences in density between vapors and liquids at the supercritical pressures at depth in these systems suggests that boiling is occurring under closed-system conditions. Salinity and temperature of boiling vents can be used to estimate the pressure-temperature point in the subsurface at which liquid seawater first reached the two-phase boundary. Data are reviewed to construct phase diagrams of coexisting brines and vapors in the two-phase region at pressures corresponding to those of the seafloor geothermal systems. A method is developed for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of the coexisting mixtures, and results are used to construct adiabats from the seafloor to the P-T two-phase boundary. Results for seafloor vents discharging at 2300 m below sea level indicate that a 385°C vent is composed of a brine (7% NaCl equivalent) in equilibrium with a vapor (0.1% NaCl). Brine constitutes 45% by weight of the mixture, and the fluid first boiled at approximately 1 km below the seafloor at 415°C, 330 bar. A 400°C vent is primarily vapor (88 wt.%, 0.044% NaCl) with a small amount of brine (26% NaCl) and first boiled at 2.9 km below the seafloor at 500°C, 520 bar. These results show that adiabatic decompression in the two-phase region results in dramatic cooling of the fluid mixture when there is a large fraction of vapor.

  5. Geometry of an adiabatic passage at a level crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Cholascinski, Mateusz

    2005-06-15

    We discuss adiabatic quantum phenomena at a level crossing. Given a path in the parameter space which passes through a degeneracy point, we find a criterion which determines whether the adiabaticity condition can be satisfied. For paths that can be traversed adiabatically we also derive a differential equation which specifies the time dependence of the system parameters, for which transitions between distinct energy levels can be neglected. We also generalize the well-known geometric connections to the case of adiabatic paths containing arbitrarily many level-crossing points and degenerate levels.

  6. Geometrical representation of sum frequency generation and adiabatic frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowski, Haim; Oron, Dan; Arie, Ady; Silberberg, Yaron

    2008-12-01

    We present a geometrical representation of the process of sum frequency generation in the undepleted pump approximation, in analogy with the known optical Bloch equations. We use this analogy to propose a technique for achieving both high efficiency and large bandwidth in sum frequency conversion using the adiabatic inversion scheme. The process is analogous with rapid adiabatic passage in NMR, and adiabatic constraints are derived in this context. This adiabatic frequency conversion scheme is realized experimentally using an aperiodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) device, where we achieved high efficiency signal-to-idler conversion over a bandwidth of 140nm .

  7. On the Role of Prior Probability in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Yang, Liping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the role of prior probability on the efficiency of quantum local adiabatic search algorithm. The following aspects for prior probability are found here: firstly, only the probabilities of marked states affect the running time of the adiabatic evolution; secondly, the prior probability can be used for improving the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm; thirdly, like the usual quantum adiabatic evolution, the running time for the case of multiple solution states where the number of marked elements are smaller enough than the size of the set assigned that contains them can be significantly bigger than that of the case where the assigned set only contains all the marked states.

  8. Exchange–Correlation Functionals via Local Interpolation along the Adiabatic Connection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The construction of density-functional approximations is explored by modeling the adiabatic connection locally, using energy densities defined in terms of the electrostatic potential of the exchange–correlation hole. These local models are more amenable to the construction of size-consistent approximations than their global counterparts. In this work we use accurate input local ingredients to assess the accuracy of a range of local interpolation models against accurate exchange–correlation energy densities. The importance of the strictly correlated electrons (SCE) functional describing the strong coupling limit is emphasized, enabling the corresponding interpolated functionals to treat strong correlation effects. In addition to exploring the performance of such models numerically for the helium and beryllium isoelectronic series and the dissociation of the hydrogen molecule, an approximate analytic model is presented for the initial slope of the local adiabatic connection. Comparisons are made with approaches based on global models, and prospects for future approximations based on the local adiabatic connection are discussed. PMID:27116427

  9. Exchange-Correlation Functionals via Local Interpolation along the Adiabatic Connection.

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Irons, Tom J P; Savin, Andreas; Teale, Andrew M; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2016-06-14

    The construction of density-functional approximations is explored by modeling the adiabatic connection locally, using energy densities defined in terms of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole. These local models are more amenable to the construction of size-consistent approximations than their global counterparts. In this work we use accurate input local ingredients to assess the accuracy of a range of local interpolation models against accurate exchange-correlation energy densities. The importance of the strictly correlated electrons (SCE) functional describing the strong coupling limit is emphasized, enabling the corresponding interpolated functionals to treat strong correlation effects. In addition to exploring the performance of such models numerically for the helium and beryllium isoelectronic series and the dissociation of the hydrogen molecule, an approximate analytic model is presented for the initial slope of the local adiabatic connection. Comparisons are made with approaches based on global models, and prospects for future approximations based on the local adiabatic connection are discussed. PMID:27116427

  10. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  11. Nonadiabatic Transitions in Adiabatic Rapid Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Optical forces much larger than the ordinary radiative force can be achieved on a two-level atom by multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage sweeps with counterpropagating light beams. Chirped light pulses drive the atom-laser system up a ladder of dressed state energy sheets on sequential trajectories, thereby decreasing the atomic kinetic energy. Nonadiabatic transitions between the energy sheets must be avoided for this process to be effective. We have calculated the nonadiabatic transition probability for various chirped light pulses numerically. These results were compared to the first Demkov-Kunike model and the well-known Landau-Zener model. In addition, an analytical form of the nonadiabatic transition probability has been found for linearly chirped pulses and an approximate form for generic symmetric finite-time pulses has been found for the entire parameter space using the technique of unitary integration. From this, the asymptotic transition probability in the adiabatic limit was derived. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005). Yu. Demkov and M. Kunike, Vestn. Leningr. Univ. Fis. Khim., 16, 39 (1969); K.-A. Suominen and B. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A45, 374 (1992)

  12. Effect of the Heat Pipe Adiabatic Region.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Taoufik; Jemni, Abdelmajid

    2014-04-01

    The main motivation of conducting this work is to present a rigorous analysis and investigation of the potential effect of the heat pipe adiabatic region on the flow and heat transfer performance of a heat pipe under varying evaporator and condenser conditions. A two-dimensional steady-state model for a cylindrical heat pipe coupling, for both regions, is presented, where the flow of the fluid in the porous structure is described by Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model which accounts for the boundary and inertial effects. The model is solved numerically by using the finite volumes method, and a fortran code was developed to solve the system of equations obtained. The results show that a phase change can occur in the adiabatic region due to temperature gradient created in the porous structure as the heat input increases and the heat pipe boundary conditions change. A recirculation zone may be created at the condenser end section. The effect of the heat transfer rate on the vapor radial velocities and the performance of the heat pipe are discussed. PMID:24895467

  13. Inertial effects in adiabatically driven flashing ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Makhnovskii, Yurii A.; Shapochkina, Irina V.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-05-01

    We study analytically the effect of a small inertial correction on the properties of adiabatically driven flashing ratchets. Parrondo's lemma [J. M. R. Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevE.57.7297] is generalized to include the inertial term so as to establish the symmetry conditions allowing directed motion (other than in the overdamped massless case) and to obtain a high-temperature expansion of the motion velocity for arbitrary potential profiles. The inertial correction is thus shown to enhance the ratchet effect at all temperatures for sawtooth potentials and at high temperatures for simple potentials described by the first two harmonics. With the special choice of potentials represented by at least the first three harmonics, the correction gives rise to the motion reversal in the high-temperature region. In the low-temperature region, inertia weakens the ratchet effect, with the exception of the on-off model, where diffusion is important. The directed motion adiabatically driven by potential sign fluctuations, though forbidden in the overdamped limit, becomes possible due to purely inertial effects in neither symmetric nor antisymmetric potentials, i.e., not for commonly used sawtooth and two-sinusoid profiles.

  14. Universal fault-tolerant adiabatic quantum computing with quantum dots or donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landahl, Andrew

    I will present a conceptual design for an adiabatic quantum computer that can achieve arbitrarily accurate universal fault-tolerant quantum computations with a constant energy gap and nearest-neighbor interactions. This machine can run any quantum algorithm known today or discovered in the future, in principle. The key theoretical idea is adiabatic deformation of degenerate ground spaces formed by topological quantum error-correcting codes. An open problem with the design is making the four-body interactions and measurements it uses more technologically accessible. I will present some partial solutions, including one in which interactions between quantum dots or donors in a two-dimensional array can emulate the desired interactions in second-order perturbation theory. I will conclude with some open problems, including the challenge of reformulating Kitaev's gadget perturbation theory technique so that it preserves fault tolerance. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Adiabatic Mass Loss Model in Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, H. W.

    2012-07-01

    Rapid mass transfer process in the interacting binary systems is very complicated. It relates to two basic problems in the binary star evolution, i.e., the dynamically unstable Roche-lobe overflow and the common envelope evolution. Both of the problems are very important and difficult to be modeled. In this PhD thesis, we focus on the rapid mass loss process of the donor in interacting binary systems. The application to the criterion of dynamically unstable mass transfer and the common envelope evolution are also included. Our results based on the adiabatic mass loss model could be used to improve the binary evolution theory, the binary population synthetic method, and other related aspects. We build up the adiabatic mass loss model. In this model, two approximations are included. The first one is that the energy generation and heat flow through the stellar interior can be neglected, hence the restructuring is adiabatic. The second one is that he stellar interior remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We model this response by constructing model sequences, beginning with a donor star filling its Roche lobe at an arbitrary point in its evolution, holding its specific entropy and composition profiles fixed. These approximations are validated by the comparison with the time-dependent binary mass transfer calculations and the polytropic model for low mass zero-age main-sequence stars. In the dynamical time scale mass transfer, the adiabatic response of the donor star drives it to expand beyond its Roche lobe, leading to runaway mass transfer and the formation of a common envelope with its companion star. For donor stars with surface convection zones of any significant depth, this runaway condition is encountered early in mass transfer, if at all; but for main sequence stars with radiative envelopes, it may be encountered after a prolonged phase of thermal time scale mass transfer, so-called delayed dynamical instability. We identify the critical binary mass ratio for the

  16. Primordial power spectra for scalar perturbations in loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de Blas, Daniel; Olmedo, Javier

    2016-06-01

    We provide the power spectrum of small scalar perturbations propagating in an inflationary scenario within loop quantum cosmology. We consider the hybrid quantization approach applied to a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime with flat spatial sections coupled to a massive scalar field. We study the quantum dynamics of scalar perturbations on an effective background within this hybrid approach. We consider in our study adiabatic states of different orders. For them, we find that the hybrid quantization is in good agreement with the predictions of the dressed metric approach. We also propose an initial vacuum state for the perturbations, and compute the primordial and the anisotropy power spectrum in order to qualitatively compare with the current observations of Planck mission. We find that our vacuum state is in good agreement with them, showing a suppression of the power spectrum for large scale anisotropies. We compare with other choices already studied in the literature.

  17. Frame independent cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl

    2013-09-01

    We compute the third order gauge invariant action for scalar-graviton interactions in the Jordan frame. We demonstrate that the gauge invariant action for scalar and tensor perturbations on one physical hypersurface only differs from that on another physical hypersurface via terms proportional to the equation of motion and boundary terms, such that the evolution of non-Gaussianity may be called unique. Moreover, we demonstrate that the gauge invariant curvature perturbation and graviton on uniform field hypersurfaces in the Jordan frame are equal to their counterparts in the Einstein frame. These frame independent perturbations are therefore particularly useful in relating results in different frames at the perturbative level. On the other hand, the field perturbation and graviton on uniform curvature hypersurfaces in the Jordan and Einstein frame are non-linearly related, as are their corresponding actions and n-point functions.

  18. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2MHz and 28.411MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins (1)H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins (19)F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal. PMID:26705906

  19. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  20. Evolution of perturbations in an inflationary universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, J. A.; Will, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of inhomogeneous density perturbations in a model of the very early universe that is dominated for a time by a constant energy density of a false quantum-mechanical vacuum is analyzed. During this period, the universe inflates exponentially and supercools exponentially, until a phase transition back to the true vacuum reheats the matter and radiation. Focus is on the physically measurable, coordinate-independent modes of inhomogeneous perturbations of this model and it is found that all modes either are constant or are exponentially damped during the inflationary era.

  1. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Giraldez, E.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moody, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Widmayer, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  2. Quantum adiabatic algorithm for factorization and its experimental implementation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinhua; Liao, Zeyang; Xu, Nanyang; Qin, Gan; Zhou, Xianyi; Suter, Dieter; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-11-28

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm capable of factorizing numbers, using fewer qubits than Shor's algorithm. We implement the algorithm in a NMR quantum information processor and experimentally factorize the number 21. In the range that our classical computer could simulate, the quantum adiabatic algorithm works well, providing evidence that the running time of this algorithm scales polynomially with the problem size. PMID:19113467

  3. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  4. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  5. The Adiabatic Invariance of the Action Variable in Classical Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Clive G.; Siklos, Stephen T. C.

    2007-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional classical time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with quasi-periodic orbits. It is well known that such systems possess an adiabatic invariant which coincides with the action variable of the Hamiltonian formalism. We present a new proof of the adiabatic invariance of this quantity and illustrate our arguments by means of…

  6. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  7. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  8. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  9. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    1992-01-01

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  10. Differential topology of adiabatically controlled quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, Edmond A.; Rezakhani, Ali T.; Ahmad, Farooq

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that in a controlled adiabatic homotopy between two Hamiltonians, H 0 and H 1, the gap or "anti-crossing" phenomenon can be viewed as the development of cusps and swallow tails in the region of the complex plane where two critical value curves of the quadratic map associated with the numerical range of H 0 + i H 1 come close. The "near crossing" in the energy level plots happens to be a generic situation, in the sense that a crossing is a manifestation of the quadratic numerical range map being unstable in the sense of differential topology. The stable singularities that can develop are identified and it is shown that they could occur near the gap, making those singularities of paramount importance. Various applications, including the quantum random walk, are provided to illustrate this theory.

  11. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage. PMID:25220698

  12. Entropy in Adiabatic Regions of Convection Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    One of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models is caused by the treatment of convection in stellar envelopes. One-dimensional stellar models often make use of the mixing length or equivalent approximations to describe convection, all of which depend on various free parameters. There have been attempts to rectify this by using 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of stellar convection, and in trying to extract an equivalent mixing length from the simulations. In this Letter, we show that the entropy of the deeper, adiabatic layers in these simulations can be expressed as a simple function of {log}g and {log}{T}{{eff}}, which holds potential for calibrating stellar models in a simple and more general manner.

  13. Symmetry-protected adiabatic quantum transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Dominic J.; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2015-05-01

    Adiabatic quantum transistors (AQT) allow quantum logic gates to be performed by applying a large field to a quantum many-body system prepared in its ground state, without the need for local control. The basic operation of such a device can be viewed as driving a spin chain from a symmetry-protected (SP) phase to a trivial phase. This perspective offers an avenue to generalize the AQT and to design several improvements. The performance of quantum logic gates is shown to depend only on universal symmetry properties of a SP phase rather than any fine tuning of the Hamiltonian, and it is possible to implement a universal set of logic gates in this way by combining several different types of SP matter. Such SP AQTs are argued to be robust to a range of relevant noise processes.

  14. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  15. Geometric Adiabatic Transport in Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevtsov, S.; Wiegmann, P.

    2015-08-01

    We argue that in addition to the Hall conductance and the nondissipative component of the viscous tensor, there exists a third independent transport coefficient, which is precisely quantized. It takes constant values along quantum Hall plateaus. We show that the new coefficient is the Chern number of a vector bundle over moduli space of surfaces of genus 2 or higher and therefore cannot change continuously along the plateau. As such, it does not transpire on a sphere or a torus. In the linear response theory, this coefficient determines intensive forces exerted on electronic fluid by adiabatic deformations of geometry and represents the effect of the gravitational anomaly. We also present the method of computing the transport coefficients for quantum Hall states.

  16. Geometric Adiabatic Transport in Quantum Hall States.

    PubMed

    Klevtsov, S; Wiegmann, P

    2015-08-21

    We argue that in addition to the Hall conductance and the nondissipative component of the viscous tensor, there exists a third independent transport coefficient, which is precisely quantized. It takes constant values along quantum Hall plateaus. We show that the new coefficient is the Chern number of a vector bundle over moduli space of surfaces of genus 2 or higher and therefore cannot change continuously along the plateau. As such, it does not transpire on a sphere or a torus. In the linear response theory, this coefficient determines intensive forces exerted on electronic fluid by adiabatic deformations of geometry and represents the effect of the gravitational anomaly. We also present the method of computing the transport coefficients for quantum Hall states. PMID:26340197

  17. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment (4)He(1s2s (3)S) + HD(1s(2)) → (4)He(1s(2)) + HD(+)(1s) + e(-) [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings. PMID:26298122

  18. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  19. Adiabatically-tapered fiber mode multiplexers.

    PubMed

    Yerolatsitis, S; Gris-Sánchez, I; Birks, T A

    2014-01-13

    Simple all-fiber three-mode multiplexers were made by adiabatically merging three dissimilar single-mode cores into one multimode core. This was achieved by collapsing air holes in a photonic crystal fiber and (in a separate device) by fusing and tapering separate telecom fibers in a fluorine-doped silica capillary. In each case the LP01 mode and both LP11 modes were individually excited from three separate input cores, with losses below 0.3 and 0.7 dB respectively and mode purities exceeding 10 dB. Scaling to more modes is challenging, but would be assisted by using single-mode fibers with a smaller ratio of cladding to core diameter. PMID:24515021

  20. The HAWC and SAFIRE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; Behr, Jason; Kunes, Evan; Hait, Tom; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High-Resolution Airborne Wide-band Camera (HAWC) and Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) are far-infrared experiments which will fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. HAWC's detectors will operate at 0.2 Kelvin, while those of SAFIRE will be at 0.1 Kelvin. Each instrument will include an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to cool its detector stage from the liquid helium bath temperature (HAWC's at 4.2 Kelvin and SAFIRE's pumped to about 1.3 Kelvin) to its operating temperature. Except for the magnets used to achieve the cooling and a slight difference in the heat switch design, the two ADRs are nearly identical. We describe the ADR design and present the results of performance testing.

  1. An integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, T. S.; McCaskey, A. J.; Bennink, R. S.; Billings, J. J.; DʼAzevedo, E. F.; Sullivan, B. D.; Klymko, C. F.; Seddiqi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for AQO called Jade Adiabatic Development Environment (JADE) that provides control over all the steps taken during program synthesis. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously specify the AQO algorithm while allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its potential use for benchmarking AQO programs by the quantum computer science community.

  2. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; McCaskey, Alex; Bennink, Ryan S; Billings, Jay Jay; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Sullivan, Blair D; Klymko, Christine F; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  3. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4739845. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], 10.1063/1.459170, and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  4. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  5. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  6. The Perturbed Puma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2012-04-01

    The puma model on the basis of the Lorentz and CPT violation may bring an economical interpretation to the conventional neutrinos oscillation and part of the anomalous oscillations. We study the effect of the perturbation to the puma model. In the case of the first-order perturbation which keeps the (23) interchange symmetry, the mixing matrix element Ue3 is always zero. The nonzero mixing matrix element Ue3 is obtained in the second-order perturbation that breaks the (23) interchange symmetry.

  7. Adiabatic nanofocusing: spectroscopy, transport and imaging investigation of the nano world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giugni, A.; Allione, M.; Torre, B.; Das, G.; Francardi, M.; Moretti, M.; Malerba, M.; Perozziello, G.; Candeloro, P.; Di Fabrizio, E.

    2014-11-01

    Adiabatic compression plays a fundamental role in the realization of localized enhanced electromagnetic field hot spots, it provides the possibility to focus at nanoscale optical excitation. It differs from the well-known lightning rod effect since it is based on the lossless propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) up to a nano-sized metal tip where the energy density is largely enhanced. Here we discuss two important applications of adiabatic compression: Raman and hot electron spectroscopy at nanometric resolution. The underlying phenomena are the conversion of SPPs into photons or hot electrons. New scanning probe spectroscopy techniques along with experimental results are discussed. We foresee that these techniques will play a key role in relating the functional and structural properties of matter at the nanoscale.

  8. Adiabatic path to fractional quantum Hall states of a few bosonic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, M.; Paredes, B.; Cirac, J.I.

    2004-11-01

    We propose a realistic scheme to create motionally entangled states of a few bosonic atoms. It can experimentally be realized with a gas of ultracold bosonic atoms trapped in a deep optical lattice potential. By simultaneously deforming and rotating the trapping potential on each lattice site it is feasible to adiabatically create a variety of entangled states on each lattice well. We fully address the case of N=2 and 4 atoms per well and identify a sequence of fractional quantum Hall states: the Pfaffian state, the 1/2-Laughlin quasiparticle, and the 1/2-Laughlin state. Exact knowledge of the spectrum has allowed us to design adiabatic paths to these states, with all times and parameters well within the reach of current experimental setups. We further discuss the detection of these states by measuring different properties as their density profile, angular momentum, or correlation functions.

  9. Non-adiabatic exchange-correlation kernel for the non-equilibrium response of three-dimensional Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Shree Ram; Baral, Nisha; Turkowski, Volodymyr; Rahman, Talat S.

    2015-03-01

    We apply Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT) to calculate the non-adiabatic (frequency-dependent) exchange-correlation kernel for the three-dimensional Hubbard model. We analyze the dependence of the kernel on the electron doping, local Coulomb repulsion and frequency by using three different impurity solvers: Hubbard-I, Iterative Perturbation Theory (IPT) and Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CT-QMC). From the calculated data, we obtain approximate analytical expressions for the kernel. We apply the exact numerical and analytical kernels to study the non-equilibrium response of the system for applied ultrafast laser pulse. We demonstrate that the non-adiabaticity of the kernel plays an important role in the system response; in particular, leading to new excited-states involved in the system dynamics. Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354.

  10. Matter perturbations in scaling cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuño, A. Romero; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2016-04-01

    A suitable nonlinear interaction between dark matter with an energy density ρM and dark energy with an energy density ρX is known to give rise to a non-canonical scaling ρM ∝ ρXa-ξ, where ξ is a parameter which generally deviates from ξ = 3. Here, we present a covariant generalization of this class of models and investigate the corresponding perturbation dynamics. The resulting matter power spectrum for the special case of a time-varying Lambda model is compared with data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 catalogue (Ahn et al.). We find a best-fitting value of ξ = 3.25 which corresponds to a decay of dark matter into the cosmological term. Our results are compatible with the Lambda Cold Dark Matter model at the 2σ confidence level.

  11. Gradient expansion, curvature perturbations, and magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo; Rezaei, Zahra

    2011-04-15

    The properties of magnetized plasmas are always investigated under the hypothesis that the relativistic inhomogeneities stemming from the fluid sources and from the geometry itself are sufficiently small to allow for a perturbative description prior to photon decoupling. The latter assumption is hereby relaxed and predecoupling plasmas are described within a suitable expansion where the inhomogeneities are treated to a given order in the spatial gradients. It is argued that the (general relativistic) gradient expansion shares the same features of the drift approximation, customarily employed in the description of cold plasmas, so that the two schemes are physically complementary in the large-scale limit and for the low-frequency branch of the spectrum of plasma modes. The two-fluid description, as well as the magnetohydrodynamical reduction, is derived and studied in the presence of the spatial gradients of the geometry. Various solutions of the coupled system of evolution equations in the anti-Newtonian regime and in the quasi-isotropic approximation are presented. The relation of this analysis to the so-called separate universe paradigm is outlined. The evolution of the magnetized curvature perturbations in the nonlinear regime is addressed for the magnetized adiabatic mode in the plasma frame.

  12. Perturbative Lagrangian approach to gravitational instability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, F. R.; Colombi, S.; Hivon, E.; Juszkiewicz, R.

    1995-04-01

    This paper deals with the time evolution in the matter era of perturbations in Friedman-Lemaitre models with arbitrary density parameter {OMEGA}, with either a zero cosmological constant, {LAMBDA}=0, or with a non-zero cosmological constant in a spatially flat Universe. Unlike the classical Eulerian approach where the density contrast is expanded in a perturbative series, this analysis relies instead on a perturbative expansion of particles trajectories in Lagrangian coordinates. This brings a number of advantages over the classical analysis. In particular, it enables the description of stronger density contrasts. Indeed the linear term in the Lagrangian perturbative series is the famous Zeldovich approximate solution (1970). The idea to consider the higher order terms was introduced by Moutarde et al. (1991), generalized by Bouchet et al. (1992), and further developed by many others. We present here a systematic and detailed account of this approach. We give analytical results (or fits to numerical results) up to the third order (which is necessary to compute, for instance, the four point spatial correlation function or the corrections to the linear evolution of the two-point correlation function, as well as the secondary temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background). We then proceed to explore the link between the Lagrangian description and statistical measures. We show in particular that Lagrangian perturbation theory provides a natural framework to compute the effect of redshift distortions, using the skewness of the density distribution function as an example. Finally, we show how well the second order theory does as compared to other approximations in the case of spherically symmetric perturbations. We also compare this second order approximation and Zeldovich solution to N-body simulations with scale-free (n=-2) Gaussian initial conditions. We find that second order theory is both simple and powerful.

  13. Primordial trispectrum from entropy perturbations in multifield DBI model

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xian; Hu, Bin E-mail: hubin@itp.ac.cn

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the primordial trispectra of the general multifield DBI inflationary model. In contrast with the single field model, the entropic modes can source the curvature perturbations on the super horizon scales, so we calculate the contributions from the interaction of four entropic modes mediating one adiabatic mode to the trispectra, at the large transfer limit (T{sub RS} >> 1). We obtained the general form of the 4-point correlation functions, plotted the shape diagrams in two specific momenta configurations, ''equilateral configuration'' and ''specialized configuration''. Our figures showed that we can easily distinguish the two different momenta configurations.

  14. Non-Gaussianity from isocurvature perturbations: analysis of trispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Etsuko; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: fuminobu.takahashi@ipmu.jp

    2009-09-01

    Non-Gaussianity may exist in the CDM isocurvature perturbation. We provide general expressions for the bispectrum and trispectrum of both adiabatic and isocurvature pertubations. We apply our result to the QCD axion case, and found a consistency relation between the coefficients of the bispectrum and trispectrum: τ{sub NL}{sup (iso)} ≅ 10{sup 3}[f{sub NL}{sup (iso)}]{sup 4/3}, if the axion is dominantly produced by quantum fluctuation. Thus future observations of the trispectrum, as well as the bispectrum, will be important for understanding the origin of the CDM and baryon asymmetry.

  15. Kinetic theory of plasma adiabatic major radius compression in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Azizov, E. A.; Romannikov, A. N.; Herrmann, H. W.

    1998-05-01

    In order to understand the individual charged particle behavior as well as plasma macroparameters (temperature, density, etc.) during the adiabatic major radius compression (R-compression) in a tokamak, a kinetic approach is used. The perpendicular electric field from the Ohm's law at zero resistivity is made use of in order to describe particle motion during the R-compression. Expressions for both passing and trapped particle energy and pitch angle change are derived for a plasma with high aspect ratio and circular magnetic surfaces. The particle behavior near the passing trapped boundary during the compression is studied to simulate the compression-induced collisional losses of alpha particles. Qualitative agreement is obtained with the alphas loss measurements in deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [World Survey of Activities in Controlled Fusion Research [Nucl. Fusion special supplement (1991)] (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991)]. The plasma macroparameters evolution at the R-compression is calculated by solving the gyroaveraged drift kinetic equation.

  16. Shock compression and adiabatic release of a titaniferous mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Jackson, I.; Jeanloz, R.

    1977-01-01

    A report is presented regarding the dynamic properties of a rock indigenous to the mare basins of the moon. The reported data were obtained in a study of sample 70215, a very titanium-rich basalt (58% pyroxene, 18% ilmenite, 15% plagioclase, 6% olivine, and 3% quartz by weight). This rock is probably representative of a class of the earliest mare-filling extrusive rocks which are exposed on the present lunar surface. Two series of experiments were performed. One set of experiments involved the measuring of Hugoniot and release adiabats to 15.7 GPa with a propellant gun apparatus. In the second set of experiments, a light-gas gun was employed to yield Hugoniot data at about 120 GPa and release states at about 90 GPa. Lunar basalt 70215 appears to be among the densest rocks in the present lunar sample collection, having a crystal density of 3.38 g/cu cm and a porosity of about 1.3%. The results of the experiments have important implications for both the degree of shock metamorphism expected for impact processes and the extent of ejecta transport on mare surfaces with high-titanium basalt composition.

  17. Cosmological consequences of an adiabatic matter creation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.; Pan, Supriya

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the cosmological consequences of a continuous matter creation associated with the production of particles by the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum. To illustrate this, three phenomenological models are considered. An equivalent scalar field description is presented for each models. The effects on the cosmic microwave background power spectrum are analysed for the first time in the context of adiabatic matter creation cosmology. Further, we introduce a model independent treatment, Om, which depends only on the Hubble expansion rate and the cosmological redshift to distinguish any cosmological model from Λ cold dark matter by providing a null test for the cosmological constant, meaning that, for any two redshifts z1, z2, Om(z) is same, i.e. Om(z1) - Om(z2) = 0. Also, this diagnostic can differentiate between several cosmological models by indicating their quintessential/phantom behaviour without knowing the accurate value of the matter density, and the present value of the Hubble parameter. For our models, we find that particle production rate is inversely proportional to Om. Finally, the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics bounded by the apparent horizon has been examined.

  18. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  19. Complete population inversion of Bose particles by an adiabatic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Atushi; Cheon, Taksu

    2016-04-01

    We show that an adiabatic cycle excites Bose particles confined in a one-dimensional box. During the adiabatic cycle, a wall described by a δ-shaped potential is applied and its strength and position are slowly varied. When the system is initially prepared in the ground state, namely, in the zero-temperature equilibrium state, the adiabatic cycle brings all Bosons into the first excited one-particle state, leaving the system in a nonequilibrium state. The absorbed energy during the cycle is proportional to the number of Bosons.

  20. Dephasing effects on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in tripod configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarou, C.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2010-09-15

    We present an analytic description of the effects of dephasing processes on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a tripod quantum system. To this end, we develop an effective two-level model. Our analysis makes use of the adiabatic approximation in the weak dephasing regime. An effective master equation for a two-level system formed by two dark states is derived, where analytic solutions are obtained by utilizing the Demkov-Kunike model. From these, it is found that the fidelity for the final coherent superposition state decreases exponentially for increasing dephasing rates. Depending on the pulse ordering and for adiabatic evolution, the pulse delay can have an inverse effect.

  1. Investigations of Probe Induced Perturbations in a Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    D. Staack; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-08-12

    An electrostatic probe used to measure spatial plasma parameters in a Hall thruster generates perturbations of the plasma. These perturbations are examined by varying the probe material, penetration distance, residence time, and the nominal thruster conditions. The study leads us to recommendations for probe design and thruster operating conditions to reduce discharge perturbations, including metal shielding of the probe insulator and operation of the thruster at lower densities.

  2. Vector and tensor contributions to the curvature perturbation at second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrilho, Pedro; Malik, Karim A.

    2016-02-01

    We derive the evolution equation for the second order curvature perturbation using standard techniques of cosmological perturbation theory. We do this for different definitions of the gauge invariant curvature perturbation, arising from different splits of the spatial metric, and compare the expressions. The results are valid at all scales and include all contributions from scalar, vector and tensor perturbations, as well as anisotropic stress, with all our results written purely in terms of gauge invariant quantities. Taking the large-scale approximation, we find that a conserved quantity exists only if, in addition to the non-adiabatic pressure, the transverse traceless part of the anisotropic stress tensor is also negligible. We also find that the version of the gauge invariant curvature perturbation which is exactly conserved is the one defined with the determinant of the spatial part of the inverse metric.

  3. Design of the PIXIE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark Oliver; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a teslescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: 1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and 2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 millwatts, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 milliwatts. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 microwatts. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  4. Design of the PIXIE adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a telescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: (1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and (2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 mW, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 mW. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 μW. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  5. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-03-01

    In the Graph Isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and maps G --> G'. If yes (no), then G and G' are said to be isomorphic (non-isomorphic). The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. We present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI, and which provides a novel approach to determining all automorphisms of a graph. The algorithm converts a GI instance to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. Numerical simulation of the algorithm's quantum dynamics shows that it correctly distinguishes non-isomorphic graphs; recognizes isomorphic graphs; and finds the automorphism group of a graph. We also discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation and show how it can be leveraged to solve arbitrary instances of the NP-Complete Sub-Graph Isomorphism problem.

  6. Adiabatic Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant

    2013-03-01

    We are implementing a new platform for adiabatic quantum computation (AQC)[2] based on trapped neutral atoms whose coupling is mediated by the dipole-dipole interactions of Rydberg states. Ground state cesium atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism,[3,4] thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. In collaboration with Lambert Parazzoli, Sandia National Laboratories; Aaron Hankin, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; James Chin-Wen Chou, Yuan-Yu Jau, Peter Schwindt, Cort Johnson, and George Burns, Sandia National Laboratories; Tyler Keating, Krittika Goyal, and Ivan Deutsch, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; and Andrew Landahl, Sandia National Laboratories. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  7. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  8. Chiral Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiburzi, Brian C.

    The era of high-precision lattice QCD has led to synergy between lattice computations and phenomenological input from chiral perturbation theory. We provide an introduction to chiral perturbation theory with a bent towards understanding properties of the nucleon and other low-lying baryons. Four main topics are the basis for this chapter. We begin with a discussion of broken symmetries and the procedure to construct the chiral Lagrangian. The second topic concerns specialized applications of chiral perturbation theory tailored to lattice QCD, such as partial quenching, lattice discretization, and finite-volume effects. We describe inclusion of the nucleon in chiral perturbation theory using a heavy-fermion Euclidean action. Issues of convergence are taken up as our final topic. We consider expansions in powers of the strange-quark mass, and the appearance of unphysical singularities in the heavy-particle formulation. Our aim is to guide lattice practitioners in understanding the predictions chiral perturbation theory makes for baryons, and show how the lattice will play a role in testing the rigor of the chiral expansion at physical values of the quark masses.

  9. Coverage dependent non-adiabaticity of CO on a copper surface

    SciTech Connect

    Omiya, Takuma; Arnolds, Heike

    2014-12-07

    We have studied the coverage-dependent energy transfer dynamics between hot electrons and CO on Cu(110) with femtosecond visible pump, sum frequency probe spectroscopy. We find that transients of the C–O stretch frequency display a red shift, which increases from 3 cm{sup −1} at 0.1 ML to 9 cm{sup −1} at 0.77 ML. Analysis of the transients reveals that the non-adiabatic coupling between the adsorbate vibrational motion and the electrons becomes stronger with increasing coverage. This trend requires the frustrated rotational mode to be the cause of the non-adiabatic behavior, even for relatively weak laser excitation of the adsorbate. We attribute the coverage dependence to both an increase in the adsorbate electronic density of states and an increasingly anharmonic potential energy surface caused by repulsive interactions between neighboring CO adsorbates. This work thus reveals adsorbate-adsorbate interactions as a new way to control adsorbate non-adiabaticity.

  10. Quasi-adiabatic dynamics of ions in a bifurcated current sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Kartsev, Yu. I.; Artemyev, A. V.; Malova, H. V. Zelenyi, L. M.

    2013-04-15

    The study is devoted to ion dynamics in bifurcated current sheets with a two-peak current-density distribution observed in the Earth's magnetotail and solar wind. The ion motion is described by a Hamiltonian system with two degrees of freedom. The presence of a small parameter {kappa} characterizing the ratio between the amplitudes of the normal and tangential magnetic field components allows one to separate variables into fast and slow ones and introduce the quasi-adiabatic invariant of motion I{sub z}. Conservation of this invariant makes it possible to analytically describe the dynamics of charged particles. Deviations of the particle dynamics from the quasi-adiabatic one, which are caused by the nonconservation of the quasi-adiabatic invariant, are investigated. The jump of the invariant {Delta}I{sub z} is shown to depend on the small parameter according to the power-law {Delta}I{sub z} {approx} {kappa}{sup h}, where the exponent h varies between unity and 3/4, depending on the level of current sheet bifurcation. The obtained dependence of {Delta}I{sub z} on {kappa} coincides with analytic expressions in the limiting cases of nonbifurcated and completely bifurcated current sheets.

  11. Adiabatic and Hamiltonian computing on a 2D lattice with simple two-qubit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Terhal, Barbara M.

    2016-02-01

    We show how to perform universal Hamiltonian and adiabatic computing using a time-independent Hamiltonian on a 2D grid describing a system of hopping particles which string together and interact to perform the computation. In this construction, the movement of one particle is controlled by the presence or absence of other particles, an effective quantum field effect transistor that allows the construction of controlled-NOT and controlled-rotation gates. The construction translates into a model for universal quantum computation with time-independent two-qubit ZZ and XX+YY interactions on an (almost) planar grid. The effective Hamiltonian is arrived at by a single use of first-order perturbation theory avoiding the use of perturbation gadgets. The dynamics and spectral properties of the effective Hamiltonian can be fully determined as it corresponds to a particular realization of a mapping between a quantum circuit and a Hamiltonian called the space-time circuit-to-Hamiltonian construction. Because of the simple interactions required, and because no higher-order perturbation gadgets are employed, our construction is potentially realizable using superconducting or other solid-state qubits.

  12. Ion thermal effects on slow mode solitary waves in plasmas with two adiabatic ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Nsengiyumva, F. Hellberg, M. A. Mace, R. L.

    2015-09-15

    Using both the Sagdeev and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) methods, ion thermal effects on slow mode ion acoustic solitons and double layers are investigated in a plasma with two adiabatic positive ion species. It is found that reducing the gap between the two ion thermal speeds by increasing the relative temperature of the cool ions increases the typical soliton/double layer speeds for all values of the ion-ion density ratio and reduces the range in the density ratio that supports double layers. The effect of increasing the relative cool ion temperature on the soliton/double layer amplitudes depends on the relative densities. For lower values of the ion density ratio, an increase in cool ion temperature leads to a significant decrease in soliton/double layer amplitude, so one may find that solitons of all permissible speeds lie within the range of KdV theory.

  13. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  14. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  15. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-10-15

    We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.

  16. Startup of the RFP in a quasi-adiabatic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Caramana, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    The equations describing the purely adiabatic formation of the reversed-field pinch are solved. This method of formation in principle remedies the problem of flux consumption during the startup phase of this device.

  17. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of tunneling in quantum adiabatic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas T.; van Dam, Wim

    2016-03-01

    We explore to what extent path-integral quantum Monte Carlo methods can efficiently simulate quantum adiabatic optimization algorithms during a quantum tunneling process. Specifically we look at symmetric cost functions defined over n bits with a single potential barrier that a successful quantum adiabatic optimization algorithm will have to tunnel through. The height and width of this barrier depend on n , and by tuning these dependencies, we can make the optimization algorithm succeed or fail in polynomial time. In this article we compare the strength of quantum adiabatic tunneling with that of path-integral quantum Monte Carlo methods. We find numerical evidence that quantum Monte Carlo algorithms will succeed in the same regimes where quantum adiabatic optimization succeeds.

  19. Computation of the free energy due to electron density fluctuation of a solute in solution: A QM/MM method with perturbation approach combined with a theory of solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuoka, Daiki; Takahashi, Hideaki; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-04-01

    We developed a perturbation approach to compute solvation free energy Δμ within the framework of QM (quantum mechanical)/MM (molecular mechanical) method combined with a theory of energy representation (QM/MM-ER). The energy shift η of the whole system due to the electronic polarization of the solute is evaluated using the second-order perturbation theory (PT2), where the electric field formed by surrounding solvent molecules is treated as the perturbation to the electronic Hamiltonian of the isolated solute. The point of our approach is that the energy shift η, thus obtained, is to be adopted for a novel energy coordinate of the distribution functions which serve as fundamental variables in the free energy functional developed in our previous work. The most time-consuming part in the QM/MM-ER simulation can be, thus, avoided without serious loss of accuracy. For our benchmark set of molecules, it is demonstrated that the PT2 approach coupled with QM/MM-ER gives hydration free energies in excellent agreements with those given by the conventional method utilizing the Kohn-Sham SCF procedure except for a few molecules in the benchmark set. A variant of the approach is also proposed to deal with such difficulties associated with the problematic systems. The present approach is also advantageous to parallel implementations. We examined the parallel efficiency of our PT2 code on multi-core processors and found that the speedup increases almost linearly with respect to the number of cores. Thus, it was demonstrated that QM/MM-ER coupled with PT2 deserves practical applications to systems of interest.

  20. Realization of adiabatic Aharonov-Bohm scattering with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Almquist, Martin; Mattsson, Ken; Gürkan, Zeynep Nilhan; Hessmo, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect is a manifestation of the Berry phase acquired when some slow variables take a planar spin around a loop. While the effect has been observed in molecular spectroscopy, direct measurement of the topological phase shift in a scattering experiment has been elusive in the past. Here, we demonstrate an adiabatic AB effect by explicit simulation of the dynamics of unpolarized very slow neutrons that scatter on a long straight current-carrying wire.

  1. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for non-Hermitian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, S.; Martinez-Garaot, S.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Chen Xi

    2011-08-15

    Adiabatic processes driven by non-Hermitian, time-dependent Hamiltonians may be sped up by generalizing inverse engineering techniques based on counter-diabatic (transitionless driving) algorithms or on dynamical invariants. We work out the basic theory and examples described by two-level Hamiltonians: the acceleration of rapid adiabatic passage with a decaying excited level and of the dynamics of a classical particle on an expanding harmonic oscillator.

  2. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory and Madelung potential analyses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Koehler, Jurgen; Whangbo, Myung -Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of DFT calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3,more » both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axes directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. As a result, the spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed lately.« less

  3. Polarization and adiabatic pumping in inhomogeneous crystals.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; Shi, Junren; Clougherty, Dennis P; Niu, Qian

    2009-02-27

    We develop a general theory of electric polarization in crystals with inhomogeneous order. We show that the inhomogeneity-induced polarization can be classified into two parts: a perturbative contribution stemming from a correction to the basis functions and a topological contribution described in terms of the Chern-Simons form of the Berry gauge fields. The latter is determined up to an uncertainty quantum, which is the second Chern number in appropriate units. Our theory provides an exhaustive link between microscopic models and the macroscopic polarization. PMID:19257787

  4. Polarization and Adiabatic Pumping in Inhomogeneous Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Shi, Junren; Clougherty, Dennis P.; Niu, Qian

    2009-02-01

    We develop a general theory of electric polarization in crystals with inhomogeneous order. We show that the inhomogeneity-induced polarization can be classified into two parts: a perturbative contribution stemming from a correction to the basis functions and a topological contribution described in terms of the Chern-Simons form of the Berry gauge fields. The latter is determined up to an uncertainty quantum, which is the second Chern number in appropriate units. Our theory provides an exhaustive link between microscopic models and the macroscopic polarization.

  5. Perturbations of the Robertson-Walker space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai Chan

    This dissertation contains three parts consisting of thirteen chapters. Each chapter is self-contained, and can be read independently. In chapter 1, we have presented a complete set of cosmological perturbation equations using the covariant equations. We also present an explicit solution for the evolution of large scale cosmological density perturbations assuming a perfect fluid. In chapter 2, two independent gauge-invariant variables are derived which are continuous at any transition where there is a discontinuous change in pressure. In chapter 3, we present a Newtonian counterpart to the general relativistic covariant approach to cosmological perturbations. In chapter 4, we present a simple way of deriving cosmological perturbation equations in generalized gravity theories which accounts for metric perturbations in gauge-invariant way. We apply this approach to the f(phi,R)-omega(phi)phi, cphi;c Lagrangian. In chapter 5, we have derived second order differential equations for cosmological perturbations in a Robertson-Walker space, for each of the following gravity theories: f(R) gravity, generalized scalar-tensor gravity, gravity with non-minimally coupled scalar field, and induced gravity. Asymptotic solutions are derived for the large and small scale limits. In chapter 6, classical evolution of density perturbations in the large scale limit is clarified in the generalized gravity theories. In chapter 7, we apply our method to a theory with the Lagrangian L approximately f(R) + gamma RR;c;c. In chapter 8, T(M)ab;b equals 0 is shown in a general ground. In chapter 9, the origin of the Friedmann-like behavior of the perturbed model in the large scale limit is clarified in a comoving gauge. Thus, when the imperfect fluid contributions are negligible, the large scale perturbations in a nearly flat background evolve like separate Friedmann models. In chapter 10, we generalize the perturbation equations applicable to a class of generalized gravity theories with multi

  6. Irreversible adiabatic decoherence of dipole-interacting nuclear-spin pairs coupled with a phonon bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, F. D.; González, C. E.; Segnorile, H. H.; Zamar, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    We study the quantum adiabatic decoherence of a multispin array, coupled with an environment of harmonic phonons, in the framework of the theory of open quantum systems. We follow the basic formal guidelines of the well-known spin-boson model, since in this framework it is possible to derive the time dependence of the reduced density matrix in the adiabatic time scale, without resorting to coarse-graining procedures. However, instead of considering a set of uncoupled spins interacting individually with the boson field, the observed system in our model is a network of weakly interacting spin pairs; the bath corresponds to lattice phonons, and the system-environment interaction is generated by the variation of the dipole-dipole energy due to correlated shifts of the spin positions, produced by the phonons. We discuss the conditions that the model must meet in order to fit within the adiabatic regime. By identifying the coupling of the dipole-dipole spin interaction with the low-frequency acoustic modes as the source of decoherence, we calculate the decoherence function of the reduced spin density matrix in closed way, and estimate the decoherence rate of a typical element of the reduced density matrix in one- and three-dimensional models of the spin array. Using realistic values for the various parameters of the model we conclude that the dipole-phonon mechanism can be particularly efficient to degrade multispin coherences, when the number of active spins involved in a given coherence is high. The model provides insight into the microscopic irreversible spin dynamics involved in the buildup of quasiequilibrium states and in the coherence leakage during refocusing experiments in nuclear magnetic resonance of crystalline solids.

  7. Cosmological perturbations in antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Brandenberger, Robert

    2014-10-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the standard model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity," during each successive transition from a big crunch to a big bang. For simplicity, we consider scalar perturbations in the absence of anisotropies, with potential set to zero and without any radiation. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, these perturbations are neither ghostlike nor tachyonic in the limit of strongly repulsive gravity. On this basis, we argue—pending a future analysis of vector and tensor perturbations—that, with respect to perturbative stability, the cosmological solutions of this theory are viable.

  8. Adiabatic Formation of a Matched-beam Distribution for an Alternating-gradient Quadrupole Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.; Qin, Hong

    2010-02-02

    The formation of a quasiequilibrium beam distribution matched to an alternating-gradient quadrupole focusing lattice by means of the adiabatic turn-on of the oscillating focusing field is studied numerically using particle-in-cell simulations. Quiescent beam propagation over several hundred lattice periods is demonstrated for a broad range of beam intensities and vacuum phase advances describing the strength of the oscillating focusing field. Properties of the matched-beam distribution are investigated. In particular, self-similar evolution of the beam density profile is observed over a wide range of system parameters. The numerical simulations are performed using the WARP particle-in-cell code.

  9. Lagrangian formalism for adiabatic fluids on five-dimensional space-time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzle, H. P.

    1986-02-01

    The recently developed Lagrangian formalism on extended five-dimensional space-time that permits a unified description of general relativistic and gravitating nonrelativistic classical fields is applied to a model of an adiabatic perfect fluid described in terms of Lagrangian coordinates. The Lagrangian density is chosen as an arbitrary Lorentz- (or Galilei-) invariant function of the 5-current vector and leads, by variation with respect to frame fields, to a 5-stress-energy tensor, whose additional components are naturally interpreted as an entropy-flux vector.

  10. Calculation of nonadiabatic couplings with restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Salomon R; Egli, Daniel

    2006-12-14

    This paper generalizes the recently proposed approaches for calculating the derivative couplings between adiabatic states in density-functional theory (DFT) based on a Slater transition-state density to transitions such as singlet-singlet excitations, where a single-determinant ansatz is insufficient. The proposed approach is based on restricted open-shell Frank et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 4060 (1998)] theory used to describe a spin-adapted Slater transition state. To treat the dependence of electron-electron interactions on the nuclear positions, variational linear-response density-functional perturbation theory is generalized to reference states with an orbital-dependent Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian and nontrivial occupation patterns. The methods proposed in this paper are not limited to the calculation of derivative coupling vectors, but can also be used for the calculation of other transition matrix elements. Moreover, they can be used to calculate the linear response of open-shell systems to arbitrary external perturbations in DFT. PMID:17176130

  11. Liouvillian perturbations of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. E.; Holder, C. L.

    2007-10-01

    We apply the well-known Kovacic algorithm to find closed form, i.e., Liouvillian solutions, to the differential equations governing perturbations of black holes. Our analysis includes the full gravitational perturbations of Schwarzschild and Kerr, the full gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of Reissner-Nordstrom, and specialized perturbations of the Kerr-Newman geometry. We also include the extreme geometries. We find all frequencies ω, in terms of black hole parameters and an integer n, which allow Liouvillian perturbations. We display many classes of black hole parameter values and their corresponding Liouvillian perturbations, including new closed-form perturbations of Kerr and Reissner-Nordstrom. We also prove that the only type 1 Liouvillian perturbations of Schwarzschild are the known algebraically special ones and that type 2 Liouvillian solutions do not exist for extreme geometries. In cases where we do not prove the existence or nonexistence of Liouvillian perturbations we obtain sequences of Diophantine equations on which decidability rests.

  12. Nonorthogonal orbital based n-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. III. Second-order perturbation theory using valence bond self-consistent field function as reference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Ying, Fuming; Gu, Junjing; Zhang, Huaiyu; Wu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Using the formulas and techniques developed in Papers I and II of this series, the recently developed second-order perturbation theory based on a valence bond self-consistent field reference function (VBPT2) has been extended by using the internally contracted correction wave function. This ansatz strongly reduces the size of the interaction space compared to the uncontracted wave function and thus improves the capability of the VBPT2 method dramatically. Test calculations show that internally contracted VBPT2 using only a small number of reference valence bond functions, can give results as accuracy as the VBPT2 method and other more sophisticated methods such as full configuration interaction and multireference configuration interaction. PMID:25296795

  13. Non-Gaussian isocurvature perturbations in dark radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Etsuko; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Koichi; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu E-mail: kawasaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We study non-Gaussian properties of the isocurvature perturbations in the dark radiation, which consists of the active neutrinos and extra light species, if exist. We first derive expressions for the bispectra of primordial perturbations which are mixtures of curvature and dark radiation isocurvature perturbations. We also discuss CMB bispectra produced in our model and forecast CMB constraints on the non-linearity parameters based on the Fisher matrix analysis. Some concrete particle physics motivated models are presented in which large isocurvature perturbations in extra light species and/or the neutrino density isocurvature perturbations as well as their non-Gaussianities may be generated. Thus detections of non-Gaussianity in the dark radiation isocurvature perturbation will give us an opportunity to identify the origin of extra light species and lepton asymmetry.

  14. Extended adiabatic blast waves and a model of the soft X-ray background. [interstellar matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.; Anderson, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical approximation is generated which follows the development of an adiabatic spherical blast wave in a homogeneous ambient medium of finite pressure. An analytical approximation is also presented for the electron temperature distribution resulting from coulomb collisional heating. The dynamical, thermal, ionization, and spectral structures are calculated for blast waves of energy E sub 0 = 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs in a hot low-density interstellar environment. A formula is presented for estimating the luminosity evolution of such explosions. The B and C bands of the soft X-ray background, it is shown, are reproduced by such a model explosion if the ambient density is about .000004 cm, the blast radius is roughly 100 pc, and the solar system is located inside the shocked region. Evolution in a pre-existing cavity with a strong density gradient may, it is suggested, remove both the M band and OVI discrepancies.

  15. Cosmological perturbations on the phantom brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Satadru; Viznyuk, Alexander; Shtanov, Yuri; Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations in a multi-component braneworld. Our braneworld possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, weff < ‑1, but no big-rip future singularity. In addition to matter and radiation, the braneworld possesses a new effective degree of freedom—the `Weyl fluid' or `dark radiation'. Setting initial conditions on super-Hubble spatial scales at the epoch of radiation domination, we evolve perturbations of radiation, pressureless matter and the Weyl fluid until the present epoch. We observe a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the Weyl-fluid perturbations after Hubble-radius crossing, which results in a negligible effect of the Weyl fluid on the evolution of matter perturbations on spatial scales relevant for structure formation. Consequently, the quasi-static approximation of Koyama and Maartens provides a good fit to the exact results during the matter-dominated epoch. We find that the late-time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials Φ and Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which Φ = Ψ. On the brane, by contrast, the ratio Φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter-dominated epoch (z lesssim 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large-scale structure.

  16. Aspects of perturbative unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2016-07-01

    We reconsider perturbative unitarity in quantum field theory and upgrade several arguments and results. The minimum assumptions that lead to the largest time equation, the cutting equations and the unitarity equation are identified. Using this knowledge and a special gauge, we give a new, simpler proof of perturbative unitarity in gauge theories and generalize it to quantum gravity, in four and higher dimensions. The special gauge interpolates between the Feynman gauge and the Coulomb gauge without double poles. When the Coulomb limit is approached, the unphysical particles drop out of the cuts and the cutting equations are consistently projected onto the physical subspace. The proof does not extend to nonlocal quantum field theories of gauge fields and gravity, whose unitarity remains uncertain.

  17. Topology and perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavidze, J.

    2000-08-01

    This paper contains description of the fields nonlinear modes successive quantization scheme. It is shown that the path integrals for absorption part of amplitudes are defined on the Dirac (δ-like) functional measure. This permits arbitrary transformation of the functional integral variables. New form of the perturbation theory achieved by mapping the quantum dynamics in the space WG of the (action, angle)-type collective variables. It is shown that the transformed perturbation theory contributions are accumulated exactly on the boundary ∂WG. Abilities of the developed formalism are illustrated by the Coulomb problem. This model is solved in the WC=(angle, angular momentum, Runge-Lentz vector) space and the reason of its exact integrability is emptiness of ∂WC.

  18. Renormalized Lie perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengaus, E.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    A Lie operator method for constructing action-angle transformations continuously connected to the identity is developed for area preserving mappings. By a simple change of variable from action to angular frequency a perturbation expansion is obtained in which the small denominators have been renormalized. The method is shown to lead to the same series as the Lagrangian perturbation method of Greene and Percival, which converges on KAM surfaces. The method is not superconvergent, but yields simple recursion relations which allow automatic algebraic manipulation techniques to be used to develop the series to high order. It is argued that the operator method can be justified by analytically continuing from the complex angular frequency plane onto the real line. The resulting picture is one where preserved primary KAM surfaces are continuously connected to one another.

  19. Intermolecular perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, I. C.; Hurst, G. J. B.; Stone, A. J.

    The new intermolecular perturbation theory described in the preceding papers is applied to some van der Waals molecules. HeBe is used as a test case, and the perturbation method converges well at interatomic distances down to about 4 a0, giving results in excellent agreement with supermolecule calculations. ArHF and ArHCl have been studied using large basis sets, and the results agree well with experimental data. The ArHX configuration is favoured over the ArXH configuration mainly because of larger polarization and charge-transfer contributions. In NeH2 the equilibrium geometry is determined by a delicate balance between opposing effects; with a double-zeta-polarization basis the correct configuration is predicted.

  20. Particle conservation in dynamical density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Brader, Joseph M.; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We present the exact adiabatic theory for the dynamics of the inhomogeneous density distribution of a classical fluid. Erroneous particle number fluctuations of dynamical density functional theory are absent, both for canonical and grand canonical initial conditions. We obtain the canonical free energy functional, which yields the adiabatic interparticle forces of overdamped Brownian motion. Using an exact and one of the most advanced approximate hard core free energy functionals, we obtain excellent agreement with simulations. The theory applies to finite systems in and out of equilibrium.

  1. Particle conservation in dynamical density functional theory.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Daniel; Brader, Joseph M; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-06-22

    We present the exact adiabatic theory for the dynamics of the inhomogeneous density distribution of a classical fluid. Erroneous particle number fluctuations of dynamical density functional theory are absent, both for canonical and grand canonical initial conditions. We obtain the canonical free energy functional, which yields the adiabatic interparticle forces of overdamped Brownian motion. Using an exact and one of the most advanced approximate hard core free energy functionals, we obtain excellent agreement with simulations. The theory applies to finite systems in and out of equilibrium. PMID:27115673

  2. Corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation by means of perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, F.M. )

    1994-10-01

    We develop an efficient method for the calculation of corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation by means of perturbation theory. The perturbation terms through sixth order in the small parameter [kappa]=([ital m]/[ital M])[sup 1/4], where [ital m] and [ital M] are, respectively, electronic and nuclear masses, allow the construction of an effective vibrational Hamiltonian that takes into account adiabatic and nonadiabatic effects. The latter is negative and linearly dependent on the vibrational quantum numbers. We illustrate the application of the main equations and verify the general results by means of an exactly solvable model of two coupled harmonic oscillators.

  3. Adiabatic condition and the quantum hitting time of Markov chains

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Ozols, Maris; Roland, Jeremie

    2010-08-15

    We present an adiabatic quantum algorithm for the abstract problem of searching marked vertices in a graph, or spatial search. Given a random walk (or Markov chain) P on a graph with a set of unknown marked vertices, one can define a related absorbing walk P{sup '} where outgoing transitions from marked vertices are replaced by self-loops. We build a Hamiltonian H(s) from the interpolated Markov chain P(s)=(1-s)P+sP{sup '} and use it in an adiabatic quantum algorithm to drive an initial superposition over all vertices to a superposition over marked vertices. The adiabatic condition implies that, for any reversible Markov chain and any set of marked vertices, the running time of the adiabatic algorithm is given by the square root of the classical hitting time. This algorithm therefore demonstrates a novel connection between the adiabatic condition and the classical notion of hitting time of a random walk. It also significantly extends the scope of previous quantum algorithms for this problem, which could only obtain a full quadratic speedup for state-transitive reversible Markov chains with a unique marked vertex.

  4. Dynamics of free surface perturbations along an annular viscous film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Linda B.; North, Justin; Guerra, Bree K.

    2008-03-01

    It is known that the free surface of an axisymmetric viscous film flowing down the outside of a thin vertical fiber under the influence of gravity becomes unstable to interfacial perturbations. We present an experimental study using fluids with different densities, surface tensions, and viscosities to investigate the growth and dynamics of these interfacial perturbations and to test the assumptions made by previous authors. We find that the initial perturbation growth is exponential, followed by a slower phase as the amplitude and wavelength saturate in size. Measurements of the perturbation growth for experiments conducted at low and moderate Reynolds numbers are compared to theoretical predictions developed from linear stability theory. Excellent agreement is found between predictions from a long-wave Stokes flow model [Craster and Matar, J. Fluid Mech. 553, 85 (2006)] and data, while fair to excellent agreement (depending on fiber size) is found between predictions from a moderate-Reynolds-number model [Sisoev , Chem. Eng. Sci. 61, 7279 (2006)] and data. Furthermore, we find that a known transition in the longer-time perturbation dynamics from unsteady to steady behavior at a critical flow rate Qc is correlated with a transition in the rate at which perturbations naturally form along the fiber. For Qperturbation formation is constant. As a result, the position along the fiber where perturbations form is nearly fixed, and the spacing between consecutive perturbations remains constant as they travel 2 m down the fiber. For Q>Qc (unsteady case), the rate of perturbation formation is modulated. As a result, the position along the fiber where perturbations form oscillates irregularly, and the initial speed and spacing between perturbations varies, resulting in the coalescence of neighboring perturbations further down the fiber.

  5. Integrated polarization rotator/converter by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao; Zou, Chang-Ling; Ren, Xi-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-07-15

    We proposed a polarization rotator inspired by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage model from quantum optics, which is composed of a signal waveguide and an ancillary waveguide. The two orthogonal modes in signal waveguide and the oblique mode in ancillary waveguide form a Λ-type three-level system. By controlling the width of signal waveguide and the gap between two waveguides, adiabatic conversion between two orthogonal modes can be realized in the signal waveguide. With such adiabatic passage, polarization conversion is completed within 150 μm length, with the efficiencies over 99% for both conversions between horizontal polarization and vertical polarization. In addition, such a polarization rotator is quite robust against fabrication error, allowing a wide range of tolerances for the rotator geometric parameters. Our work is not only significative to photonic simulations of coherent quantum phenomena with engineered photonic waveguides, but also enlightens the practical applications of these phenomena in optical device designs. PMID:23938558

  6. Adiabatic compressibility of myoglobin. Effect of axial ligand and denaturation.

    PubMed

    Leung, W P; Cho, K C; Lo, Y M; Choy, C L

    1986-03-01

    An ultrasonic technique has been employed to study the adiabatic compressibility of three metmyoglobin derivatives (aquomet-, fluoromet- and azidometmyoglobin) at neutral pH, and aquometmyoglobin as a function of pH in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz at 20 degrees C. No difference was observed in the adiabatic compressibility of the various derivatives. This indicates that the binding of different axial ligands to myoglobin does not affect significantly the conformational fluctuations of the protein. The finding is consistent with the results of the hydrogen exchange rate experiment, indicating that both types of measurements are useful for the study of protein dynamics. Upon acid-induced denaturation, the adiabatic compressibility of myoglobin drops from 5.3 X 10(-12) cm2/dyn to 0.5 X 10(-12) cm2/dyn. Plausible reasons for such a decrease are discussed. PMID:3947645

  7. Effect of dephasing on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.A.; Vitanov, N.V.; Bergmann, K.

    2004-12-01

    This work explores the effect of phase relaxation on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The study is based on the Liouville equation, which is solved analytically in the adiabatic limit. The transfer efficiency of STIRAP is found to decrease exponentially with the dephasing rate; this effect is stronger for shorter pulse delays and weaker for larger delays, since the transition time is found to be inversely proportional to the pulse delay. Moreover, it is found that the transfer efficiency of STIRAP in the presence of dephasing does not depend on the peak Rabi frequencies at all, as long as they are sufficiently large to enforce adiabatic evolution; hence increasing the field intensity cannot reduce the dephasing losses. It is shown also that for any dephasing rate, the final populations of the initial state and the intermediate state are equal. For strong dephasing all three populations tend to (1/3)

  8. Interaction-induced adiabatic cooling for antiferromagnetism in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dare, A.-M.; Raymond, L.; Albinet, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2007-08-01

    In the experimental context of cold-fermion optical lattices, we discuss the possibilities to approach the pseudogap or ordered phases by manipulating the scattering length or the strength of the laser-induced lattice potential. Using the two-particle self-consistent approach, as well as quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we provide isentropic curves for the two- and three-dimensional Hubbard models at half-filling. These quantitative results are important for practical attempts to reach the ordered antiferromagnetic phase in experiments on optical lattices of two-component fermions. We find that adiabatically turning on the interaction in two dimensions to cool the system is not very effective. In three dimensions, adiabatic cooling to the antiferromagnetic phase can be achieved in such a manner, although the cooling efficiency is not as high as initially suggested by dynamical mean-field theory. Adiabatic cooling by turning off the repulsion beginning at strong coupling is possible in certain cases.

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Programming: Minor Embedding With Hard Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Klymko, Christine F; Sullivan, Blair D; Humble, Travis S

    2013-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into the hardware or logical fabric. An essential programming step is the embedding of problem-specific information into the logical fabric to define the quantum computational transformation. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. Our methods are shown to be extensible in fabric growth, linear in time, and quadratic in logical footprint. In addition, we provide methods for accommodating hard faults in the logical fabric without invoking approximations to the original problem. These hard fault-tolerant embedding algorithms are expected to prove useful for benchmarking the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm on existing quantum logical hardware. We illustrate this versatility through numerical studies of embeddabilty versus hard fault rates in square lattices of complete bipartite unit cells.

  10. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential. PMID:22970340

  11. Pressure sensitivity of adiabatic shear banding in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanina, E.; Rittel, D.; Rosenberg, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a dynamic failure mode characterized by large plastic strains in a narrow localized band. ASB occurs at high strain rates (ɛ˙⩾103s-1), under adiabatic conditions leading to a significant temperature rise inside the band [H. Tresca, Annales du Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers 4, (1879); Y. L. Bai and B. Dodd, Adiabatic Shear Localization-Occurrence, Theories, and Applications (Pergamon, Oxford, 1992); M. A. Meyers, Dynamic Behavior of Materials (Wiley, New York, 1994).; and J. J. Lewandowski and L. M. Greer, Nat. Mater. 5, 15 (2006)]. Large hydrostatic pressures are experienced in many dynamic applications involving ASB formation (e.g., ballistic penetration, impact, and machining). The relationship between hydrostatic pressure and ASB development remains an open question, although its importance has been often noted. This letter reports original experimental results indicating a linear relationship between the (normalized) dynamic deformation energy and the (normalized) hydrostatic pressure.

  12. Adiabatic quantum programming: minor embedding with hard faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymko, Christine; Sullivan, Blair D.; Humble, Travis S.

    2013-11-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into an underlying hardware or logical fabric. An essential step is embedding problem-specific information into the quantum logical fabric. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. These methods extend with fabric growth while scaling linearly in time and quadratically in footprint. We also provide methods for handling hard faults in the logical fabric without invoking approximations to the original problem and illustrate their versatility through numerical studies of embeddability versus fault rates in square lattices of complete bipartite unit cells. The studies show that these algorithms are more resilient to faulty fabrics than naive embedding approaches, a feature which should prove useful in benchmarking the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm on existing faulty hardware.

  13. Perturbation Theory for Superfluid in Nonuniform Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshida, Shinji; Kato, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    Perturbation theory of superfluid fraction in terms of nonuniform potential is constructed. We find that the coefficient of the leading term is determined by the dynamical structure factor or density fluctuation of the system. The results for the ideal Bose gas and the interacting Bose system with linear dispersion are consistent to implications from Landau's criterion. We also find that the superfluidity of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with K>2 is shown to be stable against nonuniform potential.

  14. A shape optimisation method of a body located in adiabatic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Hikino, Yoichi; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to derive an optimal shape of a body located in adiabatic flow. In this study, we use the equation of motion, the equation of continuity and the pressure-density relation derived from the Poisson's law as the governing equation. The formulation is based on an optimal control theory in which a performance function of fluid force is taken into consideration. The performance function should be minimised satisfying the governing equations. This problem can be solved without constraints by using the adjoint equation with adjoint variables corresponding to the state equation. The performance function is defined by the drag and lift forces acting on the body. The weighted gradient method is applied as a minimisation technique, the Galerkin finite element method is used as a spatial discretisation and the implicit scheme is used as a temporal discretisation to solve the state equations. The mixed interpolation, the bubble function for velocity and the linear function for density, is employed as the interpolation. The optimal shape is obtained for a body in adiabatic flows.

  15. Adiabatic invariants in stellar dynamics, 3: Application to globular cluster evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    The previous two companion papers demonstrate that slowly varying perturbations may not result in adiabatic cutoffs and provide a formalism for computing the long-term effects of time-dependent perturbations on stellar systems. Here, the theory is implemented in a Fokker-Planck code and a suite of runs illustrating the effects of shock heating on globular cluster evolution are described. Shock heating alone results in considerable mass loss for clusters with R(sub g) less than or approximately 8 kpc: a concentration c = 1.5 cluster with R(sub g) kpc loses up to 95% of its initial mass in 15 Gyr. Only those with concentration c greater than or approximately 1.3 survive disk shocks inside of this radius. Other effects, such as mass loss by stellar evolution, will decrease this survival bound. Loss of the initial halo together with mass segregation leads to mass spectral indices, x, which may be considerably larger than their initial values.

  16. Adiabatic invariants, diffusion and acceleration in rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alexey V.; Mamaev, Ivan S.

    2016-03-01

    The onset of adiabatic chaos in rigid body dynamics is considered. A comparison of the analytically calculated diffusion coefficient describing probabilistic effects in the zone of chaos with a numerical experiment is made. An analysis of the splitting of asymptotic surfaces is performed and uncertainty curves are constructed in the Poincaré-Zhukovsky problem. The application of Hamiltonian methods to nonholonomic systems is discussed. New problem statements are given which are related to the destruction of an adiabatic invariant and to the acceleration of the system (Fermi's acceleration).

  17. Adiabatic Rosen-Zener interferometry with ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Libin; Ye Defa; Lee Chaohong; Zhang Weiping; Liu Jie

    2009-07-15

    We propose a time-domain 'interferometer' based on double-well ultracold atoms through a so-called adiabatic Rosen-Zener process, that is, the barrier between two wells is ramped down slowly, held for a while, and then ramped back. After the adiabatic Rosen-Zener process, we count the particle population in each well. We find that the final occupation probability shows nice interference fringes. The fringe pattern is sensitive to the initial state as well as the intrinsic parameters of the system such as interatomic interaction or energy bias between two wells. The underlying mechanism is revealed and possible applications are discussed.

  18. Quantum dynamics by the constrained adiabatic trajectory method

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, A.; Jolicard, G.; Guerin, S.; Killingbeck, J. P.

    2011-03-15

    We develop the constrained adiabatic trajectory method (CATM), which allows one to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation constraining the dynamics to a single Floquet eigenstate, as if it were adiabatic. This constrained Floquet state (CFS) is determined from the Hamiltonian modified by an artificial time-dependent absorbing potential whose forms are derived according to the initial conditions. The main advantage of this technique for practical implementation is that the CFS is easy to determine even for large systems since its corresponding eigenvalue is well isolated from the others through its imaginary part. The properties and limitations of the CATM are explored through simple examples.

  19. Speeding up Adiabatic Quantum State Transfer by Using Dressed States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksic, Alexandre; Ribeiro, Hugo; Clerk, Aashish A.

    2016-06-01

    We develop new pulse schemes to significantly speed up adiabatic state transfer protocols. Our general strategy involves adding corrections to an initial control Hamiltonian that harness nonadiabatic transitions. These corrections define a set of dressed states that the system follows exactly during the state transfer. We apply this approach to stimulated Raman adiabatic passage protocols and show that a suitable choice of dressed states allows one to design fast protocols that do not require additional couplings, while simultaneously minimizing the occupancy of the "intermediate" level.

  20. Gravitational Chern-Simons and the adiabatic limit

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Brendan

    2010-12-15

    We compute the gravitational Chern-Simons term explicitly for an adiabatic family of metrics using standard methods in general relativity. We use the fact that our base three-manifold is a quasiregular K-contact manifold heavily in this computation. Our key observation is that this geometric assumption corresponds exactly to a Kaluza-Klein Ansatz for the metric tensor on our three-manifold, which allows us to translate our problem into the language of general relativity. Similar computations have been performed by Guralnik et al.[Ann. Phys. 308, 222 (2008)], although not in the adiabatic context.

  1. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchon-Enrich, R.; Benseny, A.; Ahufinger, V.; Greentree, A. D.; Busch, Th; Mompart, J.

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound.

  2. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Menchon-Enrich, R; Benseny, A; Ahufinger, V; Greentree, A D; Busch, Th; Mompart, J

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound. PMID:27245462

  3. Quantum Adiabatic Pumping by Modulating Tunnel Phase in Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    In a mesoscopic system, under zero bias voltage, a finite charge is transferred by quantum adiabatic pumping by adiabatically and periodically changing two or more control parameters. We obtained expressions for the pumped charge for a ring of three quantum dots (QDs) by choosing the magnetic flux penetrating the ring as one of the control parameters. We found that the pumped charge shows a steplike behavior with respect to the variance of the flux. The value of the step heights is not universal but depends on the trajectory of the control parameters. We discuss the physical origin of this behavior on the basis of the Fano resonant condition of the ring.

  4. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we have recently proposed a mixed quantum-classical scheme [A. Abedi, F. Agostini, and E. K. U. Gross, Europhys. Lett. 106, 33001 (2014)] to deal with non-adiabatic processes. Here we present a comprehensive description of the formalism, including the full derivation of the equations of motion. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations.

  5. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-12-07

    Based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we have recently proposed a mixed quantum-classical scheme [A. Abedi, F. Agostini, and E. K. U. Gross, Europhys. Lett. 106, 33001 (2014)] to deal with non-adiabatic processes. Here we present a comprehensive description of the formalism, including the full derivation of the equations of motion. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations.

  6. NOVAE EJECTA AS DISCRETE ADIABATICALLY EXPANDING GLOBULES

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Robert

    2013-09-15

    Available data for novae show that the X-ray and visible spectral regions correlate with each other as they evolve. Large differences in ionization exist simultaneously in the two wavelength regimes, and a straightforward model is proposed that explains the characteristics observed in both spectral regimes. Its key features are (1) ejected blobs of very high density gas from the white dwarf (WD) that expand to create within each clump a wide range of emitting density, ionization, and velocity, and (2) a more homogeneous circumbinary envelope of gas that is produced by secondary star mass loss. The relative mass loss rates from the two stars determine whether the He/N or the Fe II visible spectrum predominates during decline, when hard X-rays are detected, and when the WD can be detected as a super soft X-ray source.

  7. No large scale curvature perturbations during the waterfall phase transition of hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2011-03-15

    In this paper the possibility of generating large scale curvature perturbations induced from the entropic perturbations during the waterfall phase transition of the standard hybrid inflation model is studied. We show that whether or not appreciable amounts of large scale curvature perturbations are produced during the waterfall phase transition depends crucially on the competition between the classical and the quantum mechanical backreactions to terminate inflation. If one considers only the classical evolution of the system, we show that the highly blue-tilted entropy perturbations induce highly blue-tilted large scale curvature perturbations during the waterfall phase transition which dominate over the original adiabatic curvature perturbations. However, we show that the quantum backreactions of the waterfall field inhomogeneities produced during the phase transition dominate completely over the classical backreactions. The cumulative quantum backreactions of very small scale tachyonic modes terminate inflation very efficiently and shut off the curvature perturbation evolution during the waterfall phase transition. This indicates that the standard hybrid inflation model is safe under large scale curvature perturbations during the waterfall phase transition.

  8. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  9. Baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.

    2012-03-01

    We provide a short introduction to the one-nucleon sector of chiral perturbation theory and address the issue of power counting and renormalization. We discuss the infrared regularization and the extended on-mass-shell scheme. Both allow for the inclusion of further degrees of freedom beyond pions and nucleons and the application to higher-loop calculations. As applications we consider the chiral expansion of the nucleon mass to order Script O(q6) and the inclusion of vector and axial-vector mesons in the calculation of nucleon form factors. Finally, we address the complex-mass scheme for describing unstable particles in effective field theory.

  10. Trace element mass balance in hydrous adiabatic mantle melting: The Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    numerical mass balance calculation model for the adiabatic melting of a dry to hydrous peridotite has been programmed in order to simulate the trace element compositions of basalts from mid-ocean ridges, back-arc basins, ocean islands, and large igneous provinces. The Excel spreadsheet-based calculator, Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1) uses (1) a thermodynamic model of fractional adiabatic melting of mantle peridotite, with (2) the parameterized experimental melting relationships of primitive to depleted mantle sources in terms of pressure, temperature, water content, and degree of partial melting. The trace element composition of the model basalt is calculated from the accumulated incremental melts within the adiabatic melting regime, with consideration for source depletion. The mineralogic mode in the primitive to depleted source mantle in adiabat is calculated using parameterized experimental results. Partition coefficients of the trace elements of mantle minerals are parameterized to melt temperature mostly from a lattice strain model and are tested using the latest compilations of experimental results. The parameters that control the composition of trace elements in the model are as follows: (1) mantle potential temperature, (2) water content in the source mantle, (3) depth of termination of adiabatic melting, and (4) source mantle depletion. HAMMS1 enables us to obtain the above controlling parameters using Monte Carlo fitting calculations and by comparing the calculated basalt compositions to primary basalt compositions. Additionally, HAMMS1 compares melting parameters with a major element model, which uses petrogenetic grids formulated from experimental results, thus providing better constraints on the source conditions.

  11. Canonical floquet perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlen, David J.

    1992-12-01

    Classical Floquet theory is examined in order to generate a canonical transformation to modal variables for periodic system. This transformation is considered canonical if the periodic matrix of eigenvectors is symplectic at the initial time. Approaches for symplectic normalization of the eigenvectors had to be examined for each of the different Poincare eigenvalue cases. Particular attention was required in the degenerate case, which depended on the solution of a generalized eigenvector. Transformation techniques to ensure real modal variables and real periodic eigenvectors were also needed. Periodic trajectories in the restricted three-body case were then evaluated using the canonical Floquet solution. The system used for analyses is the Sun-Jupiter system. This system was especially useful since it contained two of the more difficult Poincare eigenvalue cases, the degenerate case and the imaginary eigenvalue case. The perturbation solution to the canonical modal variables was examined using both an expansion of the Hamiltonian and using a representation that was considered exact. Both methods compared quite well for small perturbations to the initial condition. As expected, the expansion solution failed first due to truncation after the third order term of the expansion.

  12. In-Flight Measurements of Capsule Adiabats in Laser Driven Spherical Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Fortman, C; Ma, T; Landen, O L; Wallace, R; Glenzer, S H

    2011-03-07

    We present the first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of temperature and density from spherically imploding matter. The shape of the Compton downscattered spectrum provides a first-principles measurement of the electron velocity distribution function, dependent on T{sub e} and the Fermi temperature T{sub F} {approx} n{sub e}{sup 2/3}. In flight compressions of Be and CH targets reach 6-13 times solid density, with T{sub e}/T{sub F} {approx} 0.4-0.7, resulting in minimum adiabats of {approx}1.6-2. These measurements are consistent with low-entropy implosions and predictions by simulations using radiation-hydrodynamic modeling.

  13. Performance of Indirectly-Driven Capsule Implosions on NIF Using Adiabat-Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry

    2015-11-01

    Indirectly-driven capsule implosions are being conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Early experiments conducted during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) were driven by a laser pulse with a relatively low-power initial foot (``low-foot''), which was designed to keep the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel on a low adiabat to achieve a high fuel areal density (ρR). These implosions were successful in achieving high ρR, but fell significantly short of the predicted neutron yield. A leading candidate to explain this degraded performance was ablation front instability growth, which can lead to the mixing of ablator material with the DT fuel layer and in extreme cases into the central DT hot spot. A subsequent campaign employing a modified laser pulse with increased power in the foot (``high-foot'') was designed to reduce the adverse effects of ablation front instability growth. These implosions have been very successful, increasing neutron yields by more than an order of magnitude, but at the expense of reduced fuel compression. To bridge these two regimes, a series of implosions have been designed to simultaneously achieve both high stability and high ρR. These implosions employ adiabat-shaping, where the driving laser pulse is high in the initial picket similar to the high-foot to retain the favorable stability properties at the ablation front. The remainder of the foot is similar to that of the low-foot, driving a lower velocity shock into the DT fuel to keep the adiabat low and compression high. This talk will present results and analysis of these implosions and will discuss implications for improved implosion performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Adiabatic quantum computing with phase modulated laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of quantum logical gates for multilevel systems is demonstrated through decoherence control under the quantum adiabatic method using simple phase modulated laser pulses. We make use of selective population inversion and Hamiltonian evolution with time to achieve such goals robustly instead of the standard unitary transformation language. PMID:17195865

  15. Does temperature increase or decrease in adiabatic decompression of magma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilinc, A. I.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Khan, T.

    2011-12-01

    We have modeled adiabatic decompression of an andesitic and a basaltic magma as an isentropic process using the Melts algorithm. Our modeling shows that during adiabatic decompression temperature of andesitic magma increases but temperature of basaltic magma decreases. In an isentropic process entropy is constant so change of temperature with pressure can be written as dT/dP=T (dV/dT)/Cp where T (dV/dT)/Cp is generally positive. If delta P is negative so is delta T. In general, in the absence of phase change, we expect the temperature to decrease with adiabatic decompression. The effect of crystallization is to turn a more entropic phase (liquid) into a less entropic phase (solid), which must be compensated by raising the temperature. If during adiabatic decompression there is small amount or no crystallization, T (dV/dT)/Cp effect which lowers the temperature overwhelms the small amount of crystallization, which raises the temperature, and overall system temperature decreases.

  16. A Kinetic Study of the Adiabatic Polymerization of Acrylamide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, R. A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory, procedures, and results for an experiment which demonstrates the application of basic physics to chemical problems. The experiment involves the adiabatic process, in which polymerization carried out in a vacuum flask is compared to the theoretical prediction of the model with the temperature-time curve obtained in practice. (JN)

  17. The flat Grothendieck-Riemann-Roch theorem without adiabatic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Man-Ho

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we give a simplified proof of the flat Grothendieck-Riemann-Roch theorem. The proof makes use of the local family index theorem and basic computations of the Chern-Simons form. In particular, it does not involve any adiabatic limit computation of the reduced eta-invariant.

  18. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  19. Failure of geometric electromagnetism in the adiabatic vector Kepler problem

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, J.R.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2004-02-01

    The magnetic moment of a particle orbiting a straight current-carrying wire may precess rapidly enough in the wire's magnetic field to justify an adiabatic approximation, eliminating the rapid time dependence of the magnetic moment and leaving only the particle position as a slow degree of freedom. To zeroth order in the adiabatic expansion, the orbits of the particle in the plane perpendicular to the wire are Keplerian ellipses. Higher-order postadiabatic corrections make the orbits precess, but recent analysis of this 'vector Kepler problem' has shown that the effective Hamiltonian incorporating a postadiabatic scalar potential ('geometric electromagnetism') fails to predict the precession correctly, while a heuristic alternative succeeds. In this paper we resolve the apparent failure of the postadiabatic approximation, by pointing out that the correct second-order analysis produces a third Hamiltonian, in which geometric electromagnetism is supplemented by a tensor potential. The heuristic Hamiltonian of Schmiedmayer and Scrinzi is then shown to be a canonical transformation of the correct adiabatic Hamiltonian, to second order. The transformation has the important advantage of removing a 1/r{sup 3} singularity which is an artifact of the adiabatic approximation.

  20. When an Adiabatic Irreversible Expansion or Compression Becomes Reversible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.; Soares, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concepts of a "reversible process" and "entropy". For this purpose, an adiabatic irreversible expansion or compression is analysed, by considering that an ideal gas is expanded (compressed), from an initial pressure P[subscript i] to a final pressure P[subscript f], by being placed in…

  1. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable. PMID:27279216

  2. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O’Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  3. Adiabatic single scan two-dimensional NMR spectrocopy.

    PubMed

    Pelupessy, Philippe

    2003-10-01

    New excitation schemes, based on the use adiabatic pulses, for single scan two-dimensional NMR experiments (Frydman et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 2002, 99, 15 858-15 862) are introduced. The advantages are discussed. Applications in homo- and heteronuclear experiments are presented. PMID:14519020

  4. SIMULATION OF CONTINUOUS-CONTACT SEPARATION PROCESSES: MULTICOMPONENT, ADIABATIC ABSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new algorithm has been developed for the steady-state simulation of multicomponent, adiabatic absorption in packed columns. The system of differential model equations that describe the physical absorption process is reduced to algebraic equations by using a finite difference me...

  5. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  6. Quasilinear perturbed equilibria of resistively unstable current carrying plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Di; Zakharov, Leonid E.

    2015-12-01

    > A formalism for consideration of island formation is presented using a model of a cylindrical resistively unstable plasma. Both current and pressure driven island formation at resonant surfaces are considered. The proposed formalism of perturbed equilibria avoids problems typical for linear analysis of resistive magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities related to extraction of the so-called small solution near the resonant surfaces. The matching technique of this paper is not sensitive to configuration parameters near the resonant surfaces. The comparison of the perturbed equilibrium method with the frequently used quasilinear mode analysis based on a perturbed averaged current density profile shows that the latter is limited in its applicability and underestimates the stability. Presented here for a cylindrical case, the perturbed equilibrium technique can be used in toroidal perturbed equilibrium codes with minor modifications.

  7. A new model for realistic random perturbations of stochastic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieci, Luca; Li, Wuchen; Zhou, Haomin

    2016-08-01

    Classical theories predict that solutions of differential equations will leave any neighborhood of a stable limit cycle, if white noise is added to the system. In reality, many engineering systems modeled by second order differential equations, like the van der Pol oscillator, show incredible robustness against noise perturbations, and the perturbed trajectories remain in the neighborhood of a stable limit cycle for all times of practical interest. In this paper, we propose a new model of noise to bridge this apparent discrepancy between theory and practice. Restricting to perturbations from within this new class of noise, we consider stochastic perturbations of second order differential systems that -in the unperturbed case- admit asymptotically stable limit cycles. We show that the perturbed solutions are globally bounded and remain in a tubular neighborhood of the underlying deterministic periodic orbit. We also define stochastic Poincaré map(s), and further derive partial differential equations for the transition density function.

  8. Non-adiabatic response of relativistic radiation belt electrons to GEM magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, K. L.; Reeves, G. D.

    The importance of fully adiabatic effects in the relativistic radiation belt electron response to magnetic storms is poorly characterized due to many difficulties in calculating adiabatic flux response. Using the adiabatic flux model of Kim and Chan [1997a] and Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous satellite data, we examine the relative timing of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic flux responses. In the three storms identified by the GEM community for in depth study, the non-adiabatic energization occurs hours earlier than the adiabatic re-energization. The adiabatic energization can account for only 10-20% of the flux increases in the first recovery stages, and only 1% of the flux increase if there is continuing activity.

  9. Neutron Yield Study of Direct-Drive, Low-Adiabat Cryogenic D2 Implosions on OMEGA Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.X.; Radha, P.B.; Marozas, J.A.; Betti, R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V.N.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Marshall, F.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Elbaz, Y.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-11-17

    Neutron yields of direct-drive, low-adiabat (alpha ~~ 2 to 3) cryogenic D2 target implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have been systematically investigated using the two-dimensional (2D) radiation hydrodynamics code DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)]. Low-mode (ell <- 12) perturbations, including initial target offset, ice-layer roughness, and laser-beam power imbalance, were found to be the primary source of yield reduction for thin-shell (5 um), low-alpha, cryogenic targets. The 2D simulations of thin-shell implosions track experimental measurements for different target conditions and peak laser intensities ranging from 2.5 x 10^14–6 x 10^14 W/cm^2. Simulations indicate that the fusion yield is sensitive to the relative phases between the target offset and the ice-layer perturbations. The results provide a reasonable good guide to understanding the yield degradation in direct-drive, low-adiabat, cryogenic, thin-shell-target implosions. Thick-shell (10 um) implosions generally give lower yield over clean than low-ell-mode DRACO simulation predictions. Simulations including the effect of laser-beam nonuniformities indicate that high-ell-mode perturbations caused by laser imprinting further degrade the neutron yield of thick-shell implosions. To study ICF compression physics, these results suggest a target specification with a <-30 um offset and ice-roughness of sigma_rms < 3 um are required.

  10. Neutron yield study of direct-drive, low-adiabat cryogenic D{sub 2} implosions on OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Elbaz, Y.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-11-15

    Neutron yields of direct-drive, low-adiabat ({alpha}{approx_equal}2 to 3) cryogenic D{sub 2} target implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have been systematically investigated using the two-dimensional (2D) radiation hydrodynamics code DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)]. Low-mode (l{<=}12) perturbations, including initial target offset, ice-layer roughness, and laser-beam power imbalance, were found to be the primary source of yield reduction for thin-shell (5 {mu}m), low-{alpha}, cryogenic targets. The 2D simulations of thin-shell implosions track experimental measurements for different target conditions and peak laser intensities ranging from 2.5x10{sup 14}-6x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Simulations indicate that the fusion yield is sensitive to the relative phases between the target offset and the ice-layer perturbations. The results provide a reasonable good guide to understanding the yield degradation in direct-drive, low-adiabat, cryogenic, thin-shell-target implosions. Thick-shell (10 {mu}m) implosions generally give lower yield over clean than low-l-mode DRACO simulation predictions. Simulations including the effect of laser-beam nonuniformities indicate that high-l-mode perturbations caused by laser imprinting further degrade the neutron yield of thick-shell implosions. To study ICF compression physics, these results suggest a target specification with a {<=}30 {mu}m offset and ice-roughness of {sigma}{sub rms}<3 {mu}m are required.

  11. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  12. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  13. Comparative numerical-experimental analysis of the universal impact of arbitrary perturbations on transport in three-dimensional unsteady flows.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Speetjens, M F M; Vainchtein, D L; Trieling, R R; Clercx, H J H

    2014-12-01

    Numerical studies of three-dimensional (3D) time-periodic flow inside a lid-driven cylinder revealed that a weak perturbation of the noninertial state (Reynolds number Re=0) has a strong impact on the Lagrangian flow structure by inducing transition of a global family of nested spheroidal invariant surfaces into intricate coherent structures consisting of adiabatic invariant surfaces connected by tubes. These tubes provide paths for passive tracers to escape from one invariant surface to another. Perturbation is introduced in two ways: (i) weak fluid inertia by nonzero Re∼O(10(-3)); (ii) small disturbance of the external flow forcing. Both induce essentially the same dynamics, implying a universal response in the limit of a weak perturbation. Moreover, we show that the motion inside tubes possesses an adiabatic invariant. Long-term experiments were conducted using 3D particle-tracking velocimetry and relied on experimental imperfections as natural weak perturbations. This provided first experimental evidence of the tube formation and revealed close agreement with numerical simulations. We experimentally validated the universality of the perturbation response and, given the inevitability of imperfections, exposed the weakly perturbed state as the true "unperturbed state" in realistic systems. PMID:25615182

  14. Post-inflation increase of the cosmological tensor-to-scalar perturbation ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, N.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, A.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2005-07-01

    We investigate the possibility that the amplitude of scalar density perturbations may be damped after inflation. This would imply that CMB anisotropies do not uniquely fix the amplitude of the perturbations generated during inflation and that the present tensor-to-scalar ratio might be larger than produced in inflation, increasing the prospects of detection of primordial gravitational radiation. It turns out, however, that the damping of density perturbations is hard to achieve.

  15. Perturbations from strings don't look like strings!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas; Stebbins, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A systematic analysis is challenging popular ideas about perturbation from cosmic strings. One way in which the picture has changed is reviewed. It is concluded that, while the scaling properties of cosmic strings figure significantly in the analysis, care must be taken when thinking in terms of single time snapshots. The process of seeding density perturbations is not fundamentally localized in time, and this fact can wash out many of the details which appear in a single snapshot.

  16. Non-adiabatic resonant conversion of solar neutrinos in three generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. W.; Nussinov, S.; Sze, W. K.

    1987-02-01

    The survival probability of solar electron neutrinos after non-adiabatic passage through the resonance-oscillation region in the Sun is discussed for the case of three generations. A method to calculate three-generation Landau-Zener transition probabilities between adiabatic states is described. We also discuss how the Landua-Zener probability is modified in the extreme non-adiabatic case.

  17. Spherical dust fluctuations: The exact versus the perturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Roberto A.; Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Dunsby, Peter K. S.; German, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We examine the relation between the dynamics of Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models (with and without Λ ) and the dynamics of dust perturbations in two of the more familiar formalisms used in cosmology: the metric based cosmological perturbation theory (CPT) and the covariant gauge invariant (GIC) perturbations. For this purpose we recast the evolution of LTB models in terms of a covariant and gauge invariant formalism of local and nonlocal "exact fluctuations" on a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) background defined by suitable averages of covariant scalars. We examine the properties of these fluctuations, which can be defined for a confined comoving domain or for an asymptotic domain extending to whole time slices. In particular, the nonlocal density fluctuation provides a covariant and precise definition for the notion of the "density contrast." We show that in their linear regime these LTB exact fluctuations (local and nonlocal) are fully equivalent to the conventional cosmological perturbations in the synchronous-comoving gauge of CPT and to GIC perturbations. As an immediate consequence, we show the time-invariance of the spatial curvature perturbation in a simple form. The present work may provide important theoretical connections between the exact and perturbative (linear or nonlinear) approach to the dynamics of dust sources in general relativity.

  18. Energy density of standing sound waves at the radiation-dominated phase of the universe expansion (hydrodynamic derivation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, N. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the early Universe up to hydrogen recombination in the Universe, the radiation pressure was much greater than the pressure of baryons and electrons. Moreover, the energy density of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons was greater than or close to the energy density contained in the rest mass of baryonic matter, i.e., the primordial plasma was a radiated-dominated one and the adiabatic index was close to 4/3. The small density perturbations from which the observed galaxies have grown grew as long as the characteristic perturbation scales exceeded the horizon of the Universe сt at that time. On smaller scales, the density perturbations were standing sound waves. Radiative viscosity and heat conduction must have led to the damping of sound waves on very small scales. After the discovery of the cosmic microwave background, J. Silk calculated the scales of this damping, which is now called Silk damping, knowing the CMBtemperature and assuming the density of baryons and electrons. Observations with the South Pole Telescope, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, and the Planck satellite have revealed the predicted damping of acoustic peaks in the CMB power spectrum and confirmed one important prediction of the theory. In 1970, R.A. Sunyaev and Ya.B. Zeldovich showed that such energy release in the early Universe should lead to characteristic deviations of the CMB spectrum from the Planck one. The development of the technology of cryogenic detectors of submillimeter and millimeter wavelength radiation has made it possible to measure the CMB spectral distortions at 10-8 of its total intensity (PIXIE). This has sharply increased the interest of theoretical cosmologists in the problem of energy release when smallscale sound waves are damped. We have derived a relativistic formula for the energy of a standing sound wave in a photon-baryon-electron plasma from simple hydrodynamic and thermodynamic relations. This formula is applicable for an arbitrary relation between the

  19. Adiabatic compressibility of myosin subfragment-1 and heavy meromyosin with or without nucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Y; Suzuki, N; Mihashi, K

    1993-01-01

    The partial specific adiabatic compressibilities of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) and heavy meromyosin (HMM) of skeletal muscle in solution were determined by measuring the density and the sound velocity of the solution. The partial specific volumes of S1 and HMM were 0.713 and 0.711 cm3/g, respectively. The partial specific adiabatic compressibilities of S1 and HMM were 4.2 x 10(-12) and 2.9 x 10(-12) cm2/dyn, respectively. These values are in the same range as the most of globular proteins so far studied. The result indicates that the flexibility of S1 region almost equals to that of HMM. After binding to ADP.orthovanadate, S1 and HMM became softer than their complexes with ADP. The bulk moduli of S1 and HMM were of the order of (4-6) x 10(10) dyn/cm2, which are very comparable with the bulk modulus of muscle fiber. PMID:8298019

  20. Characterization of adiabatic shear bands in AM60B magnesium alloy under ballistic impact

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D.L.; Zhen, L. Xu, C.Y.; Shao, W.Z.

    2011-05-15

    Adiabatic shear bands in Mg alloy under ballistic impact at a velocity of 0.5 km.s{sup -1} were characterized by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and indenter technique. The results show that adiabatic shear bands were formed around the impacted crater, and the deformed and transformed bands were distinguished by etching colors in metallographic observation. TEM observation shows that the deformed bands were composed of the elongated grains and high density dislocations, while the transformed bands composed of the ultrafine and equiaxed grains were confirmed. In initial stage, the severe localized plastic deformation led to the formation of elongated grains in the deformed bands. With localized strain increasing, the severe localized deformation assisted with the plastic temperature rising led to the severe deformation grains evolved into the ultrafine and equiaxed grains, while the deformed bands were developed into transformed bands. The formation of the ultrafine and equiaxed grains in the transformed bands should be attributed to the twinning-induced rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism. High microhardness in the bands was obtained because of the strain hardening, grain refining and content concentration. - Research Highlights: {yields} Deformed and transformed bands are found in Mg alloy under ballistic impact. {yields} The microstructures in the deformed and transformed bands are characterized. {yields} The evolution process of the microstructure in the bands is discussed.