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Sample records for adiabatic elastic moduli

  1. Elastic moduli and instability in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpakov, V. P.; Tse, J. S.; Belosludov, V. R.; Belosludov, R. V.

    1997-07-01

    The phenomenon of instability in pressurized molecular crystals is studied using the lattice-dynamics approach. General expressions for the elastic moduli are obtained taking into account both short-range and long-range (electrostatic) interactions within the framework of the quasi-harmonic approximation. The behaviour of a system under changing pressure and temperature conditions and the Born stability criteria are investigated. Two types of instabilities, dynamical and thermodynamical, associated with the elastic moduli are presented. The dynamical instability occurs when the instability of acoustic modes of the phonon Hamiltonian occurs in the q = 0 region. The nature of thermodynamical stability implies that the equilibrium state of the crystal becomes thermodynamically unstable with respect to a small homogeneous deformation of the crystal lattice when the Born stability criteria are violated for isothermal or adiabatic moduli. These types of instabilities are illustrated in a series of calculations for ice Ic using the SPC potential for water's interactions. The results show that one of the stability conditions for the isothermal (adiabatic) moduli 0953-8984/9/27/015/img7 is violated at 0953-8984/9/27/015/img8 kbar and, as a consequence, thermodynamical instability occurs. In contrast, the dynamical instability of the phonon spectrum occurs at a significantly higher pressure, about 20 kbar.

  2. Measuring Moduli Of Elasticity At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenden, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Shorter, squatter specimens and higher frequencies used in ultrasonic measurement technique. Improved version of piezo-electric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique used to measure moduli of elasticity of solid materials at high temperatures.

  3. Elastic moduli of pyrope rich garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Singh, C. K.

    2013-06-01

    The elastic properties of minerals depend on its composition, crystal structure, temperature and level of defects. The elastic parameters are important for the interpretation of the structure and composition of the garnet rich family. In present work we have calculated the elastic moduli such as isothermal bulk modulus, Young's modulus and Shear modulus over a wide range of temperature from 300 K to 1000 K by using Birch EOS and Poirrier Tarantola equation of state. The obtained results are compared with the experimental results obtained by measuring the elastic moduli of single crystal. The calculated results show that the logarithmic isothermal EOS does not cooperate well with experimental results.

  4. Polycrystalline gamma plutonium's elastic moduli versus temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy was used to measure the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline {sup 239}Pu in the {gamma} phase. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli were measured simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth, linear, and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. They calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519 K to 0.252 at 571 K. These measurements on extremely well characterized pure Pu are in agreement with other reported results where overlap occurs.

  5. Elastic Moduli of Lungs. Revision,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    dodecahedron . The analysis is based on a variational statement of non-linear structural mechanics, and the results show how the moduli depend on the... dodecahedron . In this analysis, each face of the dodecahedron will be subjected to a traction consistent with the prescribed uniform stress but, at the same...Lbility Codes nA or . . .4 . .. . . . . . . -4- the average mean curvature of each face vanishes.* By virtue of its symmetry, the isolated dodecahedron

  6. Resonant Acoustic Determination of Complex Elastic Moduli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, yet accurate method for measuring the dynamic complex modulus of elasticity is described. Using a 'free-free' bar selectively excited in three independent vibrational modes, the shear modulus is obtained by measuring the frequency of the torsional resonant mode and the Young's modulus is determined from measurement of either the longitudinal or flexural mode. The damping properties are obtained by measuring the quality factor (Q) for each mode. The Q is inversely proportional to the loss tangent. The viscoelastic behavior of the sample can be obtained by tracking a particular resonant mode (and thus a particular modulus) using a phase locked loop (PLL) and by changing the temperature of the sample. The change in the damping properties is obtained by measuring the in-phase amplitude of the PLL which is proportional to the Q of the material. The real and imaginary parts or the complex modulus can be obtained continuously as a function of parameters such as temperature, pressure, or humidity. For homogeneous and isotropic samples only two independent moduli are needed in order to characterize the complete set of elastic constants, thus, values can be obtained for the dynamic Poisson's ratio, bulk modulus, Lame constants, etc.

  7. Acoustic oscillations and elastic moduli of single gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Peter; Tchebotareva, Anna L; Chon, James W M; Gu, Min; Orrit, Michel

    2008-10-01

    We present the first acoustic vibration measurements of single gold nanorods with well-characterized dimensions and crystal structure. The nanorods have an average size of 90 nm x 30 nm and display two vibration modes, the breathing mode and the extensional mode. Correlation between the dimensions obtained from electron microscope images and the vibrational frequencies of the same particle allows us to determine the elastic moduli for each individual nanorod. Contrary to previous reports on ensembles of gold nanorods, we find that the single particle elastic moduli agree well with bulk values.

  8. Computation of graphene elastic moduli at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zubko, I. Yu. Kochurov, V. I.

    2015-10-27

    Finding the values of parameters for the simplest Mie’s family potentials is performed in order to estimate elastic moduli of graphene monolayers using lattice statics approach. The coincidence criterion of the experimentally determined Poisson’s ratio with the estimated value is taken in order to select dimensionless power parameters of the Mie-type potential. It allowed obtaining more precise estimation of elastic properties in comparison with variety of other potentials for carbon atoms in graphene monolayer.

  9. Elastic moduli of precompressed pyrophyllite used in ultrahigh pressure research. [propagation of ultrasonic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, W.; Ruoff, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic pulses in pyrophyllite specimens was studied to determine the effect of specimen precompression on the measured elastic moduli. Measurements were made at room pressure and, for the precompressed specimens, to pressures of 3 kbar. Pyrophyllite was found to be elastically anisotropic, apparently the result of the fabric present in our material. The room pressure adiabatic bulk modulus as measured on specimens made of isostatically compacted powered pyrophyllite was determined to be 96.1 kbar. The wave speeds of ultrasonic pulses in pyrophyllite were found to decrease with increasing specimen precompression. A limiting value of precompression was found, above which no further decrease in wave speed was observed. For the shear wave speeds this occurs at 10 kbar while for the longitudinal wave at 25 kbar. In the limit, the shear waves propagate 20% slower than in the unprecompressed samples; for the longitudinal wave the difference is 30%.

  10. The Development of Fibrous Glasses Having High Elastic Moduli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-11-01

    MACHLAN OWENS - CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION NEWARK, OHIO D-TICEl EUTE n NOVEMBER15 LIP4Ry 1rP9 .~n 4MAY 311956 ITWAs document bas boon approved for...ELASTIC MODULI GEORGE R. MACHLAN OWENS - CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION NEWARIM OHIO Accesion For NTIS CRA&I " - DTIC TAB U-iann~ou -cd :" Justification...Laboratories, Owens - Corning Fiberglas Corporation, Newark, Ohio under USAF Contract No. AF 33(616)-2422. This contract was initiated under Project No

  11. Elastic moduli of MoSi sub 2 -based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, S.R.; Schwarz, R.B. )

    1992-07-01

    We prepared MoSi{sub 2}, two-phase MoSi{sub 2}/Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, and (Mo,W)Si{sub 2} solid-solution alloy powders by mechanically alloying mixtures of elemental molybdenum, silicon, and tungsten. These powders were consolidated by hot-pressing them at 1500 {degree}C in graphite dies. We measured the elastic moduli of these alloys by a recently developed technique for non-contact ultrasonic spectroscopy. Second-phase Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} additions to MoSi{sub 2} result in decreased values for {ital G} and {ital E}, whereas alloying MoSi{sub 2} with WSi{sub 2} results in increased values for {ital G} and {ital E}. An analysis of these Young's moduli and of data from the literature for various intermetallic alloys suggests that for any given alloy system, the Young's moduli for its various intermetallics as a function of density fall on a straight line. Further, the lines for the different alloy systems are approximately parallel.

  12. Thermodynamics and elastic moduli of fluids with steeply repulsive potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.

    1997-08-01

    Analytic expressions for the thermodynamic properties and elastic moduli of molecular fluids interacting with steeply repulsive potentials are derived using Rowlinson's hard-sphere perturbation treatment which employs a softness parameter, λ specifying the deviation from the hard-sphere potential. Generic potentials of this form might be used to represent the interactions between near-hard-sphere stabilized colloids. Analytic expressions for the equivalent hard-sphere diameter of inverse power [ɛ(σ/r)n where ɛ sets the energy scale and σ the distance scale] exponential and logarithmic potential forms are derived using the Barker-Henderson formula. The internal energies in the hard-sphere limit are predicted essentially exactly by the perturbation approach when compared against molecular dynamics simulation data using the same potentials. The elastic moduli are similarly accurately predicted in the hard-sphere limit, as they are trivially related to the internal energy. The compressibility factors from the perturbation expansion do not compare as favorably with simulation data, and in this case the Carnahan-Starling equation of state prediction using the analytic effective hard-sphere diameter would appear to be a preferable route for this thermodynamic property. A more refined state point dependent definition for the effective hard-sphere diameter is probably required for this property.

  13. On the isotropic moduli of 2D strain-gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, the simplest model of strain-gradient elasticity will be considered, that is, the isotropy in a bidimensional space. Paralleling the definition of the classic elastic moduli, our aim is to introduce second-order isotropic moduli having a mechanical interpretation. A general construction process of these moduli will be proposed. As a result, it appears that many sets can be defined, each of them constituted of 4 moduli: 3 associated with 2 distinct mechanisms and the last one coupling these mechanisms. We hope that these moduli (and the construction process) might be useful for forthcoming investigations on generalized continuum mechanics.

  14. An ultrasonic method for studying elastic moduli as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. G.

    1969-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to determine the elastic moduli of materials used in components of high-temperature nuclear reactors. An ultrasonic, pulse-echo technique determines the velocity of sound waves propogating in a heated region of rod-shaped specimens. From these velocities, the elastic moduli are calculated.

  15. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E.

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M , it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus MA, but also the nonaffine modulus MN that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M =K ) and shear (M =G ) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ . The affine MA is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine MN is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine MN through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φc, the vibrational density of states g (ω ) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω*. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g (ω ) is reflected in the behavior of MN: As φ →φc , where ω*→0 , those modes for ω <ω* contribute less and less, while contributions from those for ω >ω* approach a constant value which results in MN to approach a critical value MN c, as MN-MN c˜ω* . At φc itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value Kc=KA c-KN c>0 , such that KN c has a value that remains below KA c. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus Gc, GN c and GA c approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, Gc=GA c-GN c=0 . We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G , allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values.

  16. Universal behavior of changes in elastic moduli of hot compressed oxide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Guerette, Michael; Huang, Liping; Lönnroth, Nadja; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2016-05-01

    The elastic moduli of glasses are important for numerous applications, but predicting them based on their chemical composition and forming history remains a great challenge. In this study, we investigate the relationship between densification and changes in elastic moduli as a result of isostatic compression up to 1 GPa of various oxide compositions at elevated temperature (so-called hot compression). An approximately linear relationship is observed between the relative changes in density and elastic moduli across a variety of glass families, although these glasses exhibit a diverse range of structural responses during compression owing to their dramatically different chemistries.

  17. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M, it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus M_{A}, but also the nonaffine modulus M_{N} that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M=K) and shear (M=G) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ. The affine M_{A} is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine M_{N} is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine M_{N} through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φ_{c}, the vibrational density of states g(ω) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω^{*}. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g(ω) is reflected in the behavior of M_{N}: As φ→φ_{c}, where ω^{*}→0, those modes for ω<ω^{*} contribute less and less, while contributions from those for ω>ω^{*} approach a constant value which results in M_{N} to approach a critical value M_{Nc}, as M_{N}-M_{Nc}∼ω^{*}. At φ_{c} itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value K_{c}=K_{Ac}-K_{Nc}>0, such that K_{Nc} has a value that remains below K_{Ac}. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus G_{c}, G_{Nc} and G_{Ac} approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, G_{c}=G_{Ac}-G_{Nc}=0. We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G, allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values.

  18. Strongly anisotropic elastic moduli of nematic elastomers: analytical expressions and nonlinear temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Z; Jin, L; Huo, Y

    2010-05-01

    Exact formulae for the elastic moduli of the nematic elastomers are obtained by the implicit function method based on somewhat general energy functions. The formulae indicate that both the moduli parallel and perpendicular to the director of the nematic elastomers are smaller than the modulus of the classical elastomers because of the mechanical-nematic coupling. Moreover, the moduli are generally anisotropic due to the biaxiality induced by stretching the nematic elastomers perpendicular to the director. Then we get the explicit analytical expressions of the parallel and perpendicular moduli by making use of the Landau-de Gennes free energy and the neo-classical elastic energy. Very different from the classical elastomers, they are both strongly nonlinear functions of the temperature in the nematic phase. Furthermore, their ratio, the degree of anisotropy, changes with the temperature as well. The results agree qualitatively with some experiments. Better quantitative agreement is obtained by some modifications of the constitutive relation of the elastic energy.

  19. Micromechanics Solution for the Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Yu Jia; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yu; Guang, Jia Lian; Ming, Liu

    2014-09-01

    The overall elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials are investigated by employing the theory of micromechanics. A method based on the Mori-Tanaka theory and triple inhomogeneities is found to provide a sufficiently accurate evaluation of the average elastic properties of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials. The inhomogeneities of the materials are divided into three groups: a fine aggregate, a coarse aggregate, and fibers (steel or polymer). The elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials are determined as functions of the physical properties and volume fraction of sand, gravel, fibers (steel or polymer), and cement paste as a matrix. The theoretical results obtained are compared with published experimental data. The parameters affecting the elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete are discussed in detail.

  20. Real time studies of Elastic Moduli Pu Aging using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, Boris

    Elastic moduli are fundamental thermodynamic susceptibilities that connect directly to thermodynamics, electronic structure and give important information about mechanical properties. To determine the time evolution of the elastic properties in 239Pu and it Ga alloys, is imperative to study its phase stability and self-irradiation damage process. The most-likely sources of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products like He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) δ-phase instabilities towards α-Pu or to Pu3Ga. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, we measured the time dependence of the mechanical resonance frequencies of fine-grained polycrystalline δ-phase 239Pu, from 300K up to 480K. At room temperature, the shear modulus shows an increase in time (stiffening), but the bulk modulus decreases (softening). These are the first real-time measurements of room temperature aging of the elastic moduli, and the changes are consistent with elastic moduli measurements performed on 44 year old δ-Pu. As the temperature is increased, the rate of change increases exponentially, with both moduli becoming stiffer with time. For T>420K an abrupt change in the time dependence is observed indicating that the bulk and shear moduli have opposite rates of change. Our measurements provide a basis for ruling out the decomposition of δ-Pu towards α-Pu or Pu3Ga, and indicate a complex defect-related scenario from which we are gathering important clues.

  1. Elasticity theory equations and fracture condition for materials of varying moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Oleinikov, A.I.

    1986-11-01

    Many massive rocks and composite materials belong to the class of materials of varying moduli with definite distinct deformation and strength properties under tension and compression. The results of experiments indicate that the difference between the properties of materials of different moduli is not limited to tension and compression cases but can also appear clearly for any change in the form of the state of stress. Elasticity theory equations are constructed here to describe the strain of materials of varying moduli as well as the dependence of the strength properties on the form of the state of strain. Tests were done on coal, limestone, diabase and cement and results are shown. Using the dependencies obtained, Poisson's ratio and the elastic modulus can be calculated for these rocks. The equations and conditions of fracture proposed, are written in a simple invariant form.

  2. Imperfection sensitivity due to the elastic moduli in the Roorda-Koiter frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac; Starnes, J. H., Jr.; Li, Y. W.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, it is demonstrated through a simple example of the Roorda-Koiter frame that the unavoidable dissimilarity in the distribution of elastic moduli may further reduce the load-carrying capacity in addition to the well-recognized effect of initial geometric imperfections.

  3. Theoretical elastic moduli of ferromagnetic bcc Fe alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hualei; Punkkinen, Marko P J; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2010-07-14

    The polycrystalline elastic parameters of ferromagnetic Fe(1-x)M(x) (M = Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Rh; 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) random alloys in the body centered cubic (bcc) crystallographic phase have been calculated using first-principles alloy theory in combination with statistical averaging methods. With a few exceptions, the agreement between the calculated and the available experimental data for the polycrystalline aggregates is satisfactory. All additions considered here decrease the bulk modulus (B) and Poisson's ratio (ν) of bcc Fe. The complex composition dependence of the C(44) single-crystal elastic constant is reflected in the polycrystalline shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (E), and Debye temperature (Θ). The polycrystalline anisotropy of bcc Fe is increased by all additions, and Al, Si, Ni, and Rh yield the largest alloying effects.

  4. A modified direct method for the calculation of elastic moduli of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.; Lubliner, J.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    1996-02-01

    The modified direct method is a scheme for the estimation of elastic moduli of composite materials and is based on micromechanical theory and classical elasticity. Using the statistical homogeneous assumption and the two-phase composite approach, one takes the average field of the composite. Due to the complexity of composite materials, the modeling parameters for the exact analytical theory are not always available and then the effective bounds are usually too wide for practical application. For engineering purposes a more practical and general model is desired. The modified direct method was developed to approach the above requirements. In this work the modified direct method is compared with different available experiment data and methods, for example, Kuster-Toksoez, Christensen-Lo. The comparison results show that the modified direct method provides a very good estimation of the elastic moduli in different kinds of problems, such as the soft and hard inclusion cases, porous materials, at various concentrations and/or various porosities.

  5. Determination of Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Resin Composites Using an Impulse Excitation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.; Johnson, Jeffrey J.

    1996-01-01

    The elastic moduli of graphite/epoxy and graphite/cyanate ester composite specimens with various laminate lay-ups was determined using an impulse excitation/acoustic resonance technique and compared to those determined using traditional strain gauge and extensometer techniques. The stiffness results were also compared to those predicted from laminate theory using uniaxial properties. The specimen stiffnesses interrogated ranged from 12 to 30 Msi. The impulse excitation technique was found to be a relatively quick and accurate method for determining elastic moduli with minimal specimen preparation and no requirement for mechanical loading frames. The results of this investigation showed good correlation between the elastic modulus determined using the impulse excitation technique, strain gauge and extensometer techniques, and modulus predicted from laminate theory. The flexural stiffness determined using the impulse excitation was in good agreement with that predicted from laminate theory. The impulse excitation/acoustic resonance interrogation technique has potential as a quality control test.

  6. Molecular Modeling of the Axial and Circumferential Elastic Moduli of Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, A. S.; Layton, B. E.

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules play a number of important mechanical roles in almost all cell types in nearly all major phylogenetic trees. We have used a molecular mechanics approach to perform tensile tests on individual tubulin monomers and determined values for the axial and circumferential moduli for all currently known complete sequences. The axial elastic moduli, in vacuo, were found to be 1.25 GPa and 1.34 GPa for α- and β-bovine tubulin monomers. In the circumferential direction, these moduli were 378 MPa for α- and 460 MPa for β-structures. Using bovine tubulin as a template, 269 homologous tubulin structures were also subjected to simulated tensile loads yielding an average axial elastic modulus of 1.10 ± 0.14 GPa for α-tubulin structures and 1.39 ± 0.68 GPa for β-tubulin. Circumferentially the α- and β-moduli were 936 ± 216 MPa and 658 ± 134 MPa, respectively. Our primary finding is that that the axial elastic modulus of tubulin diminishes as the length of the monomer increases. However, in the circumferential direction, no correlation exists. These predicted anisotropies and scale dependencies may assist in interpreting the macroscale behavior of microtubules during mitosis or cell growth. Additionally, an intergenomic approach to investigating the mechanical properties of proteins may provide a way to elucidate the evolutionary mechanical constraints imposed by nature upon individual subcellular components. PMID:18621829

  7. Pressure derivatives of elastic moduli of fused quartz to 10 kb

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.; Wilson, W.H.

    1967-01-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal and shear moduli were made on fused quartz to 10 kb at 24??5??C. The anomalous behavior of the bulk modulus K at low pressure, ???K ???P 0, at higher pressures. The pressure derivative of the rigidity modulus ???G ???P remains constant and negative for the pressure range covered. A 15-kb hydrostatic pressure vessel is described for use with ultrasonic pulse instrumentation for precise measurements of elastic moduli and density changes with pressure. The placing of the transducer outside the pressure medium, and the use of C-ring pressure seals result in ease of operation and simplicity of design. ?? 1967.

  8. Multi-scale modelling of elastic moduli of trabecular bone

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Elham; Jasiuk, Iwona; Yoo, Andrew; Lee, YikHan; Liszka, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    We model trabecular bone as a nanocomposite material with hierarchical structure and predict its elastic properties at different structural scales. The analysis involves a bottom-up multi-scale approach, starting with nanoscale (mineralized collagen fibril) and moving up the scales to sub-microscale (single lamella), microscale (single trabecula) and mesoscale (trabecular bone) levels. Continuum micromechanics methods, composite materials laminate theory and finite-element methods are used in the analysis. Good agreement is found between theoretical and experimental results. PMID:22279160

  9. Application of a modified method of ultrasonic measurements for determination of elastic moduli of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zel, I. Yu.; Ivankina, T. I.; Levin, D. M.; Lokajicek, T.

    2015-07-15

    The velocities of elastic waves with quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse polarizations in a spherical rock sample have been measured. The experimental values of velocities are used to calculate 21 elastic moduli of the sample. For comparison, the effective elastic properties of the sample are simulated based on the data on the crystallographic textures of rock-forming minerals obtained by neutron diffraction. It is shown that the largest discrepancy between the model predictions and experimental velocity values is observed for transversely polarized waves.

  10. Proposed moduli of dry rock and their application to predicting elastic velocities of sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2005-01-01

    Velocities of water-saturated isotropic sandstones under low frequency can be modeled using the Biot-Gassmann theory if the moduli of dry rocks are known. On the basis of effective medium theory by Kuster and Toksoz, bulk and shear moduli of dry sandstone are proposed. These moduli are related to each other through a consolidation parameter and provide a new way to calculate elastic velocities. Because this parameter depends on differential pressure and the degree of consolidation, the proposed moduli can be used to calculate elastic velocities of sedimentary rocks under different in-place conditions by varying the consolidation parameter. This theory predicts that the ratio of P-wave to S-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) of a dry rock decreases as differential pressure increases and porosity decreases. This pattern of behavior is similar to that of water-saturated sedimentary rocks. If microcracks are present in sandstones, the velocity ratio usually increases as differential pressure increases. This implies that this theory is optimal for sandstones having intergranular porosities. Even though the accurate behavior of the consolidation parameter with respect to differential pressure or the degree of consolidation is not known, this theory presents a new way to predict S-wave velocity from P-wave velocity and porosity and to calculate elastic velocities of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. For given properties of sandstones such as bulk and shear moduli of matrix, only the consolidation parameter affects velocities, and this parameter can be estimated directly from the measurements; thus, the prediction of S-wave velocity is accurate, reflecting in-place conditions.

  11. Elastic Moduli and Damping of Vibrational Modes of Aluminum/Silicon Carbide Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning

    1996-01-01

    Elastic and shear moduli were determined for two aluminum matrix composites containing 20 and 40 volume percent discontinuous silicon carbide, respectively, using transverse, longitudinal, and torsional vibrational modes of specimens prepared as thin beams. These moduli are consistent with those determined from stress-strain measurements. The damping factors for these modes were also determined. Thermal properties are used to show that part of the damping of transverse modes is caused by the transverse thermal currents discussed by C. Zener (thermo-elastic damping); this damping is frequency-dependent with a maximum damping factor of approximately 0.002. The remaining damping is frequency-independent, and has roughly similar values in transverse, longitudinal, and torsional modes: approximately 0.0001.

  12. Simultaneous moduli measurement of elastic materials at elevated temperatures using an ultrasonic waveguide method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periyannan, Suresh; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-11-01

    A novel technique for simultaneously measuring the moduli of elastic isotropic material, as a function of temperature, using two ultrasonic guided wave modes that are co-generated using a single probe is presented here. This technique can be used for simultaneously measuring Young's modulus (E) and shear modulus (G) of different materials over a wide range of temperatures (35 °C-1200 °C). The specimens used in the experiments have special embodiments (for instance, a bend) at one end of the waveguide and an ultrasonic guided wave generator/detector (transducer) at the other end for obtaining reflected signals in a pulse-echo mode. The orientation of the transducer can be used for simultaneously generating/receiving the L(0,1) and/or T(0,1) using a single transducer in a waveguide on one end. The far end of the waveguides with the embodiment is kept inside a heating device such as a temperature-controlled furnace. The time of flight difference, as a function of uniform temperature distribution region (horizontal portion) of bend waveguides was measured and used to determine the material properties. Several materials were tested and the comparison between values reported in the literature and measured values were found to be in agreement, for both elastic moduli (E and G) measurements, as a function of temperature. This technique provides significant reduction in time and effort over conventional means of measurement of temperature dependence of elastic moduli.

  13. Experimentally-based multiscale model of the elastic moduli of bovine trabecular bone and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Elham; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Li, Jun; Jasiuk, Iwona; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    The elastic moduli of trabecular bone were modeled using an analytical multiscale approach. Trabecular bone was represented as a porous nanocomposite material with a hierarchical structure spanning from the collagen-mineral level to the trabecular architecture level. In parallel, compression testing was done on bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in two anatomical directions, parallel to the femoral neck axis and perpendicular to it, and the measured elastic moduli were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. To gain insights on the interaction of collagen and minerals at the nanoscale, bone samples were deproteinized or demineralized. After such processing, the treated samples remained as self-standing structures and were tested in compression. Micro-computed tomography was used to characterize the hierarchical structure of these three bone types and to quantify the amount of bone porosity. The obtained experimental data served as inputs to the multiscale model and guided us to represent bone as an interpenetrating composite material. Good agreement was found between the theory and experiments for the elastic moduli of the untreated, deproteinized, and demineralized trabecular bone.

  14. Elastic moduli of nanocrystalline binary Al alloys with Fe, Co, Ti, Mg and Pb alloying elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babicheva, Rita I.; Bachurin, Dmitry V.; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Zhang, Ying; Kok, Shaw Wei; Bai, Lichun; Zhou, Kun

    2016-05-01

    The paper studies the elastic moduli of nanocrystalline (NC) Al and NC binary Al-X alloys (X is Fe, Co, Ti, Mg or Pb) by using molecular dynamics simulations. X atoms in the alloys are either segregated to grain boundaries (GBs) or distributed randomly as in disordered solid solution. At 0 K, the rigidity of the alloys increases with decrease in atomic radii of the alloying elements. An addition of Fe, Co or Ti to the NC Al leads to increase in the Young's E and shear μ moduli, while an alloying with Pb decreases them. The elastic moduli of the alloys depend on a distribution of the alloying elements. The alloys with the random distribution of Fe or Ti demonstrate larger E and μ than those for the corresponding alloys with GB segregations, while the rigidity of the Al-Co alloy is higher for the case of the GB segregations. The moduli E and μ for polycrystalline aggregates of Al and Al-X alloys with randomly distributed X atoms are estimated based on the elastic constants of corresponding single-crystals according to the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximation, which neglects the contribution of GBs to the rigidity. The results show that GBs in NC materials noticeably reduce their rigidity. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of μ for the NC Al-X alloys is analyzed. Only the Al-Co alloy with GB segregations shows the decrease in μ to the lowest extent in the temperature range of 0-600 K in comparison with the NC pure Al.

  15. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-09-01

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  16. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts (M3C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr2FeC and CrFe2C) having the crystal structure of Fe3C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, Cij, of above M3Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young's and shear moduli, and Poisson's ratio based on calculated Cijs, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio) of M3Cs by homogenization of calculated Cijs; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θD, of M3Cs based on calculated Cijs. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  17. Electrostatic and electrokinetic contributions to the elastic moduli of a driven membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, D.; Menon, G. I.; Bazant, M. Z.; Joanny, J. F.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the electrostatic contribution to the elastic moduli of a cell or artificial membrane placed in an electrolyte and driven by a DC electric field. The field drives ion currents across the membrane, through specific channels, pumps or natural pores. In steady state, charges accumulate in the Debye layers close to the membrane, modifying the membrane elastic moduli. We first study a model of a membrane of zero thickness, later generalizing this treatment to allow for a finite thickness and finite dielectric constant. Our results clarify and extend the results presented by D. Lacoste, M. Cosentino Lagomarsino, and J.F. Joanny (EPL 77, 18006 (2007)), by providing a physical explanation for a destabilizing term proportional to k ⊥ 3 in the fluctuation spectrum, which we relate to a nonlinear (E2) electrokinetic effect called induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO). Recent studies of ICEO have focused on electrodes and polarizable particles, where an applied bulk field is perturbed by capacitive charging of the double layer and drives the flow along the field axis toward surface protrusions; in contrast, we predict “reverse” ICEO flows around driven membranes, due to curvature-induced tangential fields within a nonequilibrium double layer, which hydrodynamically enhance protrusions. We also consider the effect of incorporating the dynamics of a spatially dependent concentration field for the ion channels.

  18. Effect of TeO 2 on the elastic moduli of sodium borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddeek, Yasser B.; Latif, Lamia. Abd El

    2004-05-01

    Sodium borate glass containing tellurite as Te xNa 2-2 xB 4-4 xO 7-5 x with x=0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25 and 0.35 have been prepared by rapid quenching. Ultrasonic velocity (both longitudinal and shear) measurements have been made using a transducer operated at the fundamental frequency of 4 MHz at room temperature. The density was measured by the conventional Archimedes method. The elastic moduli, the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and the parameters derived from the Makishima-Mackenzie model and the bond compression model have been obtained as a function of TeO 2 content. The monotonic decrease in the velocities and the elastic moduli, and the increase in the ring diameter and the ratio Kbc/ Ke as a function of TeO 2 modifier content reveals the loose packing structure, which is attributed to the increase in the molar volume and the reduction in the vibrations of the borate lattice. The observed results confirm that the addition of TeO 2 changes the rigid character of Na 2B 4O 7 to a matrix of ionic behaviour bonds (NBOs). This is due to the creation of more and more discontinuities and defects in the glasses, thus breaking down the borax structure.

  19. [Compliance of brain--Part 2 Approach from the local elastic and viscous moduli (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, N; Masuzawa, H; Sano, K; Kihira, M; Kobayashi, S

    1982-05-01

    It is important to have information about physical property of the brain in order to elucidate both the physical changes of the morbid brain and the physical mechanism of the traumatic brain injury. Under the hypothesis that reaction of the active brain to the dynamic load can be compared to the Maxwell-Voigt three dimensional model, elastic property of the brain was obtained as the Young's modulus (E: 10(-2) Kgf/cm2) of which error was less than 10%, and viscous property of the brain as the Viscous modulus (eta: 10(-2) Kgf.sec/cm2). And it was confirmed that the reactive pressure of the brain to dynamic load came from the surface to about 15 mm depth of the brain. In this report, experiments were done on the alive normal brains, the edematous ones nd necrotic ones which were produced by the cold injury (dry ice-aceton) in dogs (9.0--16.0 Kg). In the normal brain, E = 3.24 +/- 0.25, eta = 1.10 +/- 0.37 and these moduli were also stable when the physical conditions of the brain were stable. Under the dehydration by 20% mannitol, E increased in its value (p less than 0.01). But under the hydration by 5% glucose, E did not change at all. In the edematous brain, E = 3.28 +/- 0.44, eta = 1.74 +/- 0.06 and E of the edematous brain was almost same as that of normal ones, but under the dehydration, E of the edematous brain decreased (p less than 0.10), on the other hand it increased in its value under the hydration (p less than 0.05). In the necrotic brain, E = 1.60 +/- 0.14, eta = 0.82 +/- 0.28. Both moduli were of lower values and moreover they did not change its values at all under dehydration and hydration. As Young's modulus is the elastic index of the brain, the converse (1/E) should be compliance of the brain, that is to say, buffer effect of the brain. As for the compliance, the necrotic brain has maximum buffer effect and the over-hydrated edematous brain and the dehydrated normal ones have minimum buffer effect. From analysing the changes of the viscous moduli

  20. Elastic moduli of δ-Pu 239 reveal aging in real time

    DOE PAGES

    Maiorov, Boris; Betts, Jonathan B.; Söderlind, Per; ...

    2017-03-28

    We study the time evolution (aging) of the elastic moduli of an eight-year-old polycrystalline δ- Pu 2.0 at % Ga alloy (δ-Pu:Ga ) from 295K to nearly 500K in real time using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). After 8 years of aging at 295K, the bulk and shear moduli increase at a normalized rate of 0.2%/year and 0.6%/year respectively. As the temperature is raised, two time dependences are observed, an exponential one of about a week, followed by a linear one (constant rate). The linear rate is thermally activated with an activation energy of 0.33+0.06 eV. Above 420K a qualitative changemore » in the time evolution is observed; the bulk modulus decreases with time while the shear modulus continues to stiffen. No change is observed as the α-β transition temperature is crossed as would be expected if a decomposition of δ-Pu:Ga to α-Pu and Pu3Ga occurred over the temperature range studied. Our results indicate that the main mechanism of aging is creation of defects that are partially annealed starting at T = 420 K.« less

  1. Role of cytoskeleton and elastic moduli in cellular response to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary L.; Roth, Caleb; Tolstykh, Gleb; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are known to increase cell membrane permeability to small molecules in accordance with dosages. As previous work has focused on nsPEF exposures in whole cells, electrodeformation may contribute to this induced-permeabilization in addition to other biological mechanisms. Here, we hypothesize that cellular elasticity, based upon the cytoskeleton, affects nsPEF-induced decrease in cellular viability. Young's moduli of various types of cells have been calculated from atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve data, showing that CHO cells are stiffer than non-adherent U937 and Jurkat cells, which are more susceptible to nsPEF exposure. To distinguish any cytoskeletal foundation for these observations, various cytoskeletal reagents were applied. Inhibiting actin polymerization significantly decreased membrane integrity, as determined by relative propidium uptake and phosphatidylserine externalization, upon exposure at 150 kV/cm with 100 pulses of 10 ns pulse width. Exposure in the presence of other drugs resulted in insignificant changes in membrane integrity and 24-hour viability. However, Jurkat cells showed greater lethality than latrunculin-treated CHO cells of comparable elasticity. From these results, it is postulated that cellular elasticity rooted in actin-membrane interaction is only a minor contributor to the differing responses of adherent and non-adherent cells to nsPEF insults.

  2. Linearity, resolution, and covariance in GRT inversions for anisotropic elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Carl; de Hoop, Maarten V.; Burridge, Robert

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the linearized inversion of elastic wave data using the Generalized Radon Transformation to give anisotropic medium parameters. Assumptions of linearity are examined by comparing linearized reflection coefficients calculated using the Born approximation with full plane-wave reflection coefficients. In typical sand/shale models we have found that the linearity assumption is valid only to approximately 60 degrees from the normal. Linear dependencies between the scattering patterns produced by individual moduli result in an ill-posed inverse problem. Utilizing P-wave data, we find that for the Transversely Isotropic case similarities in the C55 and C13 scattering directivity mean that they cannot be distinguished. C11 is best observed at wide-angle and hence estimates made using limited aperture data are subject to large error. Quasi-Monte Carlo techniques are adapted to carry out the 4D inversion integral.

  3. Frequency moments and elastic moduli of liquid rubidium at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.; Thakore, B. Y.; Jani, A. R.

    2013-06-01

    To shed light on structural and vibrational dynamics of liquid rubidium (Rb) at different temperatures; a treatment of pseudopotential theory has been performed. The temperature dependence of structure factor and pair correlation functions has been determined using Percus-Yevick approximation consistent to the model potential used. In the present study, a modified empty core potential is employed to explain an electron-ion interaction. It consists of the full electron-ion interaction and a delta function which represents the orthogonalisation effect due to the s-core states in such sp-bonded metals. The temperature dependence of pair potential is achieved by using the damping factor exp(-αkBTr/2kF) in the pair potential. Expressions for phonon dispersions are derived using different frequency moments. Results for longitudinal phonon frequencies and various elastic moduli are obtained.

  4. Mapping elasticity moduli of atherosclerotic plaque in situ via atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tracqui, Philippe; Broisat, Alexis; Toczek, Jackub; Mesnier, Nicolas; Ohayon, Jacques; Riou, Laurent

    2011-04-01

    Several studies have suggested that evolving mechanical stresses and strains drive atherosclerotic plaque development and vulnerability. Especially, stress distribution in the plaque fibrous capsule is an important determinant for the risk of vulnerable plaque rupture. Knowledge of the stiffness of atherosclerotic plaque components is therefore of critical importance. In this work, force mapping experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) were conducted in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse, which represents the most widely used experimental model for studying mechanisms underlying the development of atherosclerotic lesions. To obtain the elastic material properties of fibrous caps and lipidic cores of atherosclerotic plaques, serial cross-sections of aortic arch lesions were probed at different sites. Atherosclerotic plaque sub-structures were subdivided into cellular fibrotic, hypocellular fibrotic and lipidic rich areas according to histological staining. Hertz's contact mechanics were used to determine elasticity (Young's) moduli that were related to the underlying histological plaque structure. Cellular fibrotic regions exhibit a mean Young modulus of 10.4±5.7kPa. Hypocellular fibrous caps were almost six-times stiffer, with average modulus value of 59.4±47.4kPa, locally rising up to ∼250kPa. Lipid rich areas exhibit a rather large range of Young's moduli, with average value of 5.5±3.5kPa. Such precise quantification of plaque stiffness heterogeneity will allow investigators to have prospectively a better monitoring of atherosclerotic disease evolution, including arterial wall remodeling and plaque rupture, in response to mechanical constraints imposed by vascular shear stress and blood pressure.

  5. Computing elastic moduli on 3-D X-ray computed tomography image stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Kushch, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical task of current interest is to compute the effective elastic properties of a random composite material by operating on a 3D digital image of its microstructure obtained via X-ray computed tomography (CT). The 3-D image is usually sub-sampled since an X-ray CT image is typically of order 10003 voxels or larger, which is considered to be a very large finite element problem. Two main questions for the validity of any such study are then: can the sub-sample size be made sufficiently large to capture enough of the important details of the random microstructure so that the computed moduli can be thought of as accurate, and what boundary conditions should be chosen for these sub-samples? This paper contributes to the answer of both questions by studying a simulated X-ray CT cylindrical microstructure with three phases, cut from a random model system with known elastic properties. A new hybrid numerical method is introduced, which makes use of finite element solutions coupled with exact solutions for elastic moduli of square arrays of parallel cylindrical fibers. The new method allows, in principle, all of the microstructural data to be used when the X-ray CT image is in the form of a cylinder, which is often the case. Appendix A describes a similar algorithm for spherical sub-samples, which may be of use when examining the mechanical properties of particles. Cubic sub-samples are also taken from this simulated X-ray CT structure to investigate the effect of two different kinds of boundary conditions: forced periodic and fixed displacements. It is found that using forced periodic displacements on the non-geometrically periodic cubic sub-samples always gave more accurate results than using fixed displacements, although with about the same precision. The larger the cubic sub-sample, the more accurate and precise was the elastic computation, and using the complete cylindrical sample with the new method gave still more accurate and precise results. Fortran 90

  6. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, G.

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts (M{sub 3}C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr{sub 2}FeC and CrFe{sub 2}C) having the crystal structure of Fe{sub 3}C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, C{sub ij}, of above M{sub 3}Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young’s and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio based on calculated C{sub ij}s, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young’s moduli and Poisson’s ratio) of M{sub 3}Cs by homogenization of calculated C{sub ij}s; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θ{sub D}, of M{sub 3}Cs based on calculated C{sub ij}s. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  7. Preparation and Elastic Moduli of Germanate Glass Containing Lead and Bismuth

    PubMed Central

    Sidek, Hj A. A.; Bahari, Hamid R.; Halimah, Mohamed K.; Yunus, Wan M. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the rapid melt quenching technique preparation for the new family of bismuth-lead germanate glass (BPG) systems in the form of (GeO2)60–(PbO)40−x–(½Bi2O3)x where x = 0 to 40 mol%. Their densities with respect of Bi2O3 concentration were determined using Archimedes’ method with acetone as a floatation medium. The current experimental data are compared with those of bismuth lead borate (B2O3)20–(PbO)80−x–(Bi2O3)x. The elastic properties of BPG were studied using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique where both longitudinal and transverse sound wave velocities have been measured in each glass samples at a frequency of 15 MHz and at room temperature. Experimental data shows that all the physical parameters of BPG including density and molar volume, both longitudinal and transverse velocities increase linearly with increasing of Bi2O3 content in the germanate glass network. Their elastic moduli such as longitudinal, shear and Young’s also increase linearly with addition of Bi2O3 but the bulk modulus did not. The Poisson’s ratio and fractal dimensionality are also found to vary linearly with the Bi2O3 concentration. PMID:22606000

  8. Temperature- and thickness-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymer ultrathin films are usually different from those of their counterparts in bulk. Understanding the effect of thickness on the mechanical properties of these films is crucial for their applications. However, it is a great challenge to measure their elastic modulus experimentally with in situ heating. In this study, a thermodynamic model for temperature- (T) and thickness (h)-dependent elastic moduli of polymer thin films Ef(T,h) is developed with verification by the reported experimental data on polystyrene (PS) thin films. For the PS thin films on a passivated substrate, Ef(T,h) decreases with the decreasing film thickness, when h is less than 60 nm at ambient temperature. However, the onset thickness (h*), at which thickness Ef(T,h) deviates from the bulk value, can be modulated by T. h* becomes larger at higher T because of the depression of the quenching depth, which determines the thickness of the surface layer δ. PMID:21711747

  9. Preparation and elastic moduli of germanate glass containing lead and bismuth.

    PubMed

    Sidek, Hj A A; Bahari, Hamid R; Halimah, Mohamed K; Yunus, Wan M M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the rapid melt quenching technique preparation for the new family of bismuth-lead germanate glass (BPG) systems in the form of (GeO(2))(60)-(PbO)(40-) (x)-(½Bi(2)O(3))(x) where x = 0 to 40 mol%. Their densities with respect of Bi(2)O(3) concentration were determined using Archimedes' method with acetone as a floatation medium. The current experimental data are compared with those of bismuth lead borate (B(2)O(3))(20)-(PbO)(80-) (x)-(Bi(2)O(3))(x). The elastic properties of BPG were studied using the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique where both longitudinal and transverse sound wave velocities have been measured in each glass samples at a frequency of 15 MHz and at room temperature. Experimental data shows that all the physical parameters of BPG including density and molar volume, both longitudinal and transverse velocities increase linearly with increasing of Bi(2)O(3) content in the germanate glass network. Their elastic moduli such as longitudinal, shear and Young's also increase linearly with addition of Bi(2)O(3) but the bulk modulus did not. The Poisson's ratio and fractal dimensionality are also found to vary linearly with the Bi(2)O(3) concentration.

  10. Determination of the elastic moduli of a machinable ceramic over the range from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H.; Nagai, S.; Imai, H.

    1987-07-01

    The ultrasonic velocities of a machinable ceramic were measured using the pulse echo overlap technique. The machinable ceramic consists of 5- to 10-..mu..m crystallite blocks of mica in a boroaluminosilicate glass matrix. The elastic moduli are deduced from the sound velocities over the temperature range from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C. Their temperature change is well described by a fourth-degree polynomial. Although the moduli decrease with increasing temperature, a plateau region appears at about 450/sup 0/C. This anomalous behavior is explained by applying the simple rule of mixtures to cnstitutent materials, the mica crystallites, and the glass matrix.

  11. On the origins of anomalous elastic moduli and failure strains of GaP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yashinski, M S; Gutiérrez, H R; Muhlstein, C L

    2017-02-10

    Previous reports suggest that Raman peaks in uniaxially loaded nanowires with diamond cubic and zinc blende crystal structures shift at rates that are significantly different from bulk specimens. We have investigated the first order Raman scattering from individual, free-standing, [111] oriented GaP nanowires ranging from 75 to 180 nm in diameter at uniaxial tensile stresses up to 5 GPa. All of the phonon modes were shifted to frequencies lower than previously reported for bulk GaP, and significant splitting of the degenerate transverse optical mode was observed. A general analysis method using single and double Lorentzian fits of the Raman peaks is presented and used to report more accurate values of the phonon deformation potentials (PDPs) that relate uniaxial strains to Raman peak shifts in GaP. A new set of PDPs determined from the nanowires revealed that the they have elastic moduli and failure strains that are consistent with bulk GaP. The analysis method eliminated the anomalous, inconsistent deformation behavior commonly reported in Raman-based strain measurements of nanowires, and can be extended to other materials systems with degenerate phonons.

  12. On the origins of anomalous elastic moduli and failure strains of GaP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashinski, M. S.; Gutiérrez, H. R.; Muhlstein, C. L.

    2017-02-01

    Previous reports suggest that Raman peaks in uniaxially loaded nanowires with diamond cubic and zinc blende crystal structures shift at rates that are significantly different from bulk specimens. We have investigated the first order Raman scattering from individual, free-standing, [111] oriented GaP nanowires ranging from 75 to 180 nm in diameter at uniaxial tensile stresses up to 5 GPa. All of the phonon modes were shifted to frequencies lower than previously reported for bulk GaP, and significant splitting of the degenerate transverse optical mode was observed. A general analysis method using single and double Lorentzian fits of the Raman peaks is presented and used to report more accurate values of the phonon deformation potentials (PDPs) that relate uniaxial strains to Raman peak shifts in GaP. A new set of PDPs determined from the nanowires revealed that the they have elastic moduli and failure strains that are consistent with bulk GaP. The analysis method eliminated the anomalous, inconsistent deformation behavior commonly reported in Raman-based strain measurements of nanowires, and can be extended to other materials systems with degenerate phonons.

  13. Elastic moduli of rock glasses under pressure to 8 kilobars and geophysical implications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meister, R.; Robertson, E.C.; Werke, R.W.; Raspet, R.

    1980-01-01

    Shear and longitudinal velocities were measured by the ultrasonic phase comparison method as a function of pressure to 8 kbar on synthetic glasses of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, and quartz composition and on natural obsidian. Velocities of most of the glasses decrease anomalously with pressure, but increasingly more-normal behavior occurs with decrease in SiO2 content. The pressure derivatives of rigidity and bulk modulus increase linearly, from -3.39 to -0.26 and from -5.91 to +2.09, respectively, with decrease in SiO2 content from 100 to 49%. The change from negative to positive in the pressure derivatives of both moduli and observed at Poisson's ratio of about 0.25 is consitent with the Smyth model for the anomalous elastic behavior of glass. If the temperature in the upper mantle is about 1500oC, tholeiitic basalt would be molten in accordance with the partial melt explanation for the low-velocity zone; at 1300oC and below, basalt would be in the glassy state, especially if more felsic than tholeiite. -Authors

  14. Laser ultrasonic assessment of the effects of porosity and microcracking on the elastic moduli of nuclear graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, James B.; Olasov, Lauren R.; Zeng, Fan W.; Han, Karen; Gallego, Nidia C.; Contescu, Cristian I.

    2016-04-01

    Laser ultrasonic methods have been used to measure the elastic moduli of various nuclear graphites. Measurements were made to assess wavespeeds for longitudinal and shear waves in different propagation directions and these were used along with density measurements to compute the longitudinal and shear moduli as well as Young's modulus. All moduli decreased with increasing graphite porosity and these variations could be interpreted using models describing the effect of porosity on material stiffness. Extrapolations for these models to zero porosity were used to infer the moduli for theoretically dense graphite; the results were far below predicted values reported in the literature for fully dense, polycrystalline, isotropic graphite. Differences can be attributed to microcracking in the graphite microstructure. Using models for the effects of microcracking on modulus, estimates for microcrack populations indicate that the number of cracks per unit volume must be much greater than the number of pores per unit volume. Experimental results reported in the literature for irradiated graphites as well as for the stress dependence of graphite modulus are consistent with the influence of microcracking on elastic behavior and could be interpreted using concepts developed here. Results in this work for graphite structure-property relationships should allow for more sophisticated characterization of nuclear graphites using ultrasonic methods.

  15. Silicate perovskite analogue ScAlO 3: temperature dependence of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Jennifer; Rigden, Sally M.; Jackson, Ian

    2000-08-01

    The elastic moduli of ScAlO 3 perovskite, a very close structural analogue for MgSiO 3 perovskite, have been measured between 300 and 600 K using high precision ultrasonic interferometry in an internally heated gas-charged pressure vessel. This new capability for high temperature measurement of elastic wave speeds has been demonstrated on polycrystalline alumina. The temperature derivatives of elastic moduli of Al 2O 3 measured in this study agree within 15% with expectations based on published single-crystal data. For ScAlO 3 perovskite, the value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P is -0.033 GPa K -1 and (∂ G/∂ T) P is -0.015 GPa K -1. The relative magnitudes of these derivatives agree with the observation in Duffy and Anderson [Duffy, T.S., Anderson, D.L., 1989. Seismic velocities in mantle minerals and the mineralogy of the upper mantle. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 1895-1912.] that |(∂ KS/∂ T) P| is typically about twice |(∂ G/∂ T) P|. The value of (∂ KS/∂ T) P for ScAlO 3 is intermediate between those inferred less directly from V( P, T) studies of Fe-free and Fe- and Al-bearing MgSiO 3 perovskites [Wang, Y., Weidner, D.J., Liebermann, R.C., Zhao, Y., 1994. P- V- T equation of state of (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 perovskite: constraints on composition of the lower mantle. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 83, 13-40; Mao, H.K., Hemley, R.J., Shu, J., Chen, L., Jephcoat, A.P., Wu, Y., Bassett, W.A., 1991. Effect of pressure, temperature and composition on the lattice parameters and density of (Mg,Fe) SiO 3 perovskite to 30 GPa. J. Geophys. Res. 91, 8069-8079; Zhang, Weidner, D., 1999. Thermal equation of state of aluminum-enriched silicate perovskite. Science 284, 782-784]. The value of |(∂ G/∂ T)| P for ScAlO 3 is similar to those of most other mantle silicate phases but lower than the recent determination for MgSiO 3 perovskite [Sinelnikov, Y., Chen, G., Neuville, D.R., Vaughan, M.T., Liebermann, R.C., 1998. Ultrasonic shear wave velocities of MgSiO 3 perovskite at 8 GPa and 800K and

  16. Clarification of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds on the effective elastic moduli of polycrystals with hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal symmetries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, J.P.; Peselnick, L.

    1980-01-01

    Bounds on the effective elastic moduli of randomly oriented aggregates of hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal crystals are derived using the variational principles of Hashin and Shtrikman. The bounds are considerably narrower than the widely used Voigt and Reuss bounds. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average lies within the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds in nearly all cases. Previous bounds of Peselnick and Meister are shown to be special cases of the present results.

  17. Direct micromechanics derivation and DEM confirmation of the elastic moduli of isotropic particulate materials:. Part II Particle rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, J. A.; Drugan, W. J.; Plesha, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    In Part I, Fleischmann et al. (2013), we performed theoretical analyses of three cubic packings of uniform spheres (simple, body-centered, and face-centered) assuming no particle rotation, employed these results to derive the effective elastic moduli for a statistically isotropic particulate material, and assessed these results by performing numerical discrete element method (DEM) simulations with particle rotations prohibited. In this second part, we explore the effect that particle rotation has on the overall elastic moduli of a statistically isotropic particulate material. We do this both theoretically, by re-analyzing the elementary cells of the three cubic packings with particle rotation allowed, which leads to the introduction of an internal parameter to measure zero-energy rotations at the local level, and numerically via DEM simulations in which particle rotation is unrestrained. We find that the effects of particle rotation cannot be neglected. For unrestrained particle rotation, we find that the self-consistent homogenization assumption applied to the locally body-centered cubic packing incorporating particle rotation effects most accurately predicts the measured values of the overall elastic moduli obtained from the DEM simulations, in particular Poisson's ratio. Our new self-consistent results and theoretical modeling of particle rotation effects together lead to significantly better theoretical predictions of Poisson's ratio than all prior published results. Moreover, our results are based on a direct micromechanics analysis of specific geometrical packings of uniform spheres, in contrast to prior theoretical analyses based on hypotheses involving overall inter-particle contact distributions. Thus, our results permit a direct assessment of the reasons for the theory-experiment discrepancies noted in the literature with regard to previous theoretical derivations of the macroscopic elastic moduli for particulate materials, and our new theoretical results

  18. A Statistical Learning Framework for Materials Science: Application to Elastic Moduli of k-nary Inorganic Polycrystalline Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Maarten; Chen, Wei; Notestine, Randy; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand; Jain, Anubhav; Asta, Mark; Gamst, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Materials scientists increasingly employ machine or statistical learning (SL) techniques to accelerate materials discovery and design. Such pursuits benefit from pooling training data across, and thus being able to generalize predictions over, k-nary compounds of diverse chemistries and structures. This work presents a SL framework that addresses challenges in materials science applications, where datasets are diverse but of modest size, and extreme values are often of interest. Our advances include the application of power or Hölder means to construct descriptors that generalize over chemistry and crystal structure, and the incorporation of multivariate local regression within a gradient boosting framework. The approach is demonstrated by developing SL models to predict bulk and shear moduli (K and G, respectively) for polycrystalline inorganic compounds, using 1,940 compounds from a growing database of calculated elastic moduli for metals, semiconductors and insulators. The usefulness of the models is illustrated by screening for superhard materials.

  19. A Statistical Learning Framework for Materials Science: Application to Elastic Moduli of k-nary Inorganic Polycrystalline Compounds

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Maarten; Chen, Wei; Notestine, Randy; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand; Jain, Anubhav; Asta, Mark; Gamst, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Materials scientists increasingly employ machine or statistical learning (SL) techniques to accelerate materials discovery and design. Such pursuits benefit from pooling training data across, and thus being able to generalize predictions over, k-nary compounds of diverse chemistries and structures. This work presents a SL framework that addresses challenges in materials science applications, where datasets are diverse but of modest size, and extreme values are often of interest. Our advances include the application of power or Hölder means to construct descriptors that generalize over chemistry and crystal structure, and the incorporation of multivariate local regression within a gradient boosting framework. The approach is demonstrated by developing SL models to predict bulk and shear moduli (K and G, respectively) for polycrystalline inorganic compounds, using 1,940 compounds from a growing database of calculated elastic moduli for metals, semiconductors and insulators. The usefulness of the models is illustrated by screening for superhard materials. PMID:27694824

  20. Elastic Moduli of Wadsleyite (and#64258;-Mg2SiO4) 7 GPa and 873 Kelvin

    SciTech Connect

    Li,B.; Liebermann, R.; Weidner, D.

    1998-01-01

    Simultaneous sound velocity measurements and x-ray diffraction studies were made on wadsleyite ({beta}-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) to 7 gigapascals and 873 kelvin. The calculated adiabatic bulk (K) and shear (G) moduli yield K (at room conditions) = 172(2) gigapascals, dK/dP = 4.2(1), and dK/dT = 0.012(1) gigapascals per kelvin, and G (at room conditions) = 113(1) gigapascals, dG/dP = 1.5(1), and dG/dT = 0.017(1) gigapascals per kelvin, respectively. The data imply that the P and S wave velocity contrasts between olivine and wadsleyite require an olivine amount of 38 to 39 percent in the upper mantle to satisfy the observed 410-kilometer discontinuity, but 55 to 60 percent to account for the velocity increase through the transition zone.

  1. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    determining the complex moduli is an application of a new medical imaging technology called elastography . The methods described by Greenleaf (Chen et al, 2002...Vibration, Acoustics, Stress, and Reliability in Design, 109, 55-59. (1987) Fink M, et al, “Transient Elastography and Supersonic Shear Imaging

  2. Semiempirical formulae for elastic moduli and brittleness of diamondlike and zinc-blende covalent crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamran, Sami; Chen, Liang; Chen, Kuiying

    2008-03-01

    In the present work, semiempirical formulae for both bulk B and shear G moduli of diamondlike and zinc-blende covalent crystals are elaborated in terms of bond length and ionicity fraction of the bonding. The resulting expressions can be applied to a broad selection of covalent materials and their modulus predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data and those from ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the correlation between the ratio G/B and the aforementioned bonding parameters was investigated. The analysis of this relationship demonstrates that compared to the ionicity fraction, the bond length is the predominant parameter responsible for the brittle features of covalent materials.

  3. Measurements of elastic moduli of pharmaceutical compacts: a new methodology using double compaction on a compaction simulator.

    PubMed

    Mazel, Vincent; Busignies, Virginie; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    The elastic properties of pharmaceutical powders play an important role during the compaction process. The elastic behavior can be represented by Young's modulus (E) and Poisson's ratio (v). However, during the compaction, the density of the powder bed changes and the moduli must be determined as a function of the porosity. This study proposes a new methodology to determine E and v as a function of the porosity using double compaction in an instrumented compaction simulator. Precompression is used to form the compact, and the elastic properties are measured during the beginning of the main compaction. By measuring the axial and radial pressure and the powder bed thickness, E and v can be determined as a function of the porosity. Two excipients were studied, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and anhydrous calcium phosphate (aCP). The values of E measured are comparable to those obtained using the classical three-point bending test. Poisson's ratio was found to be close to 0.24 for aCP with only small variations with the porosity, and to increase with a decreasing porosity for MCC (0.23-0.38). The classical approximation of a value of 0.3 for ν of pharmaceutical powders should therefore be taken with caution.

  4. Improved rigorous bounds on the effective elastic moduli of a composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, Y.; Bergman, D. J.

    A NEW METHOD for deriving rigorous bounds on the effective elastic constants of a composite material is presented and used to derive a number of known as well as some new bounds. The new approach is based on a presentation of those constants as a sum of simple poles. The locations and strengths of the poles are treated as variational parameters, while different kinds of available information are translated into constraints on these parameters. Our new results include an extension of the range of validity of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds to the case of composites made of isotropic materials but with an arbitrary microgeometry. We also use information on the effective elastic constants of one composite in order to obtain improved bounds on the effective elastic constants of another composite with the same or a similar microgeometry.

  5. Non-invasive determination of the complete elastic moduli of spider silks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Akhenblit, Paul; McKiernan, Keri; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2013-03-01

    Spider silks possess nature’s most exceptional mechanical properties, with unrivalled extensibility and high tensile strength. Unfortunately, our understanding of silks is limited because the complete elastic response has never been measured—leaving a stark lack of essential fundamental information. Using non-invasive, non-destructive Brillouin light scattering, we obtain the entire stiffness tensors (revealing negative Poisson’s ratios), refractive indices, and longitudinal and transverse sound velocities for major and minor ampullate spider silks: Argiope aurantia, Latrodectus hesperus, Nephila clavipes, Peucetia viridans. These results completely quantify the linear elastic response for all possible deformation modes, information unobtainable with traditional stress-strain tests. For completeness, we apply the principles of Brillouin imaging to spatially map the elastic stiffnesses on a spider web without deforming or disrupting the web in a non-invasive, non-contact measurement, finding variation among discrete fibres, junctions and glue spots. Finally, we provide the stiffness changes that occur with supercontraction.

  6. An in situ estimation of anisotropic elastic moduli for a submarine shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas E.; Leaney, Scott; Borland, William H.

    1994-11-01

    Direct arrival times and slownesses from wide-aperture walkaway vertical seismic profile data acquired in a layered anisotropic medium can be processed to give direct estimate of the phase slowness surface associated with the medium at the depth of the receivers. This slowness surface can, in turn, be fit by an estimated transversely isotropic medium with a vertical symmetry axis (a 'TIV' medium). While the method requires that the medium between the receivers and the surface be horizontally stratified, no further measurement or knowledge of that medium is required. When applied to data acquired in a compacting shale sequence (here termed the 'Petronas shale') encountered by a well in the South China Sea, the method yields an estimated TIV medium that fits the data extremely well over 180 deg of propagation angles sampled by 201 source positions. The medium is strongly anisotropic. The anisotropy is significantly anelliptic and implies that the quasi-shear mode should be triplicated for off-axis propagation. Estimated density-normalized moduli (in units of sq km/sq s) for the Petronas shale are A(sub 11) = 6.99 +/- 0.21, A(sub 33) = 5.53 +/- 0.17, A(sub 55) = 0.91 +/- 0.05, and A(sub 13) = 2.64 +/- 0.26. Densities in the logged zone just below the survey lie in the range between 2200 and 2400 kg/cu m with an average value close to 2300 kg/cu m.

  7. Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Materials Using A Free- Free Bar Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Lifshitz, E. M., Theory of Elasticity, Pergamon, )Tew York, 1970. 16. Strutt , J. W. (Lord Rayleigh ), Tho Theory of Sound, Vol I, 2" ed., Dover, New...MASTER CURVES: PRTATION OF DATA AS A FUNCTION OF REDUCED FREQUENCY . 28 1. Introduction ...... ...... . . 28 2. Williams -Landel-Ferry Equation...the temperature and frequency into one variable. The shift factor is a monotonically decreasing function of temperature. [Ref. 8] 2. Williams -Landel

  8. Elastic moduli inheritance and the weakest link in bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Ma, D; Stoica, A D; Wang, X-L; Lu, Z P; Clausen, B; Brown, D W

    2012-02-24

    We show that a variety of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) inherit their Young's modulus and shear modulus from the solvent components. This is attributed to preferential straining of locally solvent-rich configurations among tightly bonded atomic clusters, which constitute the weakest link in an amorphous structure. This aspect of inhomogeneous deformation, also revealed by our in situ neutron diffraction studies of an elastically deformed BMG, suggests a rubberlike viscoelastic behavior due to a hierarchy of atomic bonds in BMGs.

  9. On the determination of elastic moduli of cells by AFM based indentation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yue; Xu, Guang-Kui; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to measure the mechanical properties of biological cells through indentations. In most of existing studies, the cell is supposed to be linear elastic within the small strain regime when analyzing the AFM indentation data. However, in experimental situations, the roles of large deformation and surface tension of cells should be taken into consideration. Here, we use the neo-Hookean model to describe the hyperelastic behavior of cells and investigate the influence of surface tension through finite element simulations. At large deformation, a correction factor, depending on the geometric ratio of indenter radius to cell radius, is introduced to modify the force-indent depth relation of classical Hertzian model. Moreover, when the indent depth is comparable with an intrinsic length defined as the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus, the surface tension evidently affects the indentation response, indicating an overestimation of elastic modulus by the Hertzian model. The dimensionless-analysis-based theoretical predictions, which include both large deformation and surface tension, are in good agreement with our finite element simulation data. This study provides a novel method to more accurately measure the mechanical properties of biological cells and soft materials in AFM indentation experiments. PMID:28368053

  10. On the determination of elastic moduli of cells by AFM based indentation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue; Xu, Guang-Kui; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2017-04-03

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to measure the mechanical properties of biological cells through indentations. In most of existing studies, the cell is supposed to be linear elastic within the small strain regime when analyzing the AFM indentation data. However, in experimental situations, the roles of large deformation and surface tension of cells should be taken into consideration. Here, we use the neo-Hookean model to describe the hyperelastic behavior of cells and investigate the influence of surface tension through finite element simulations. At large deformation, a correction factor, depending on the geometric ratio of indenter radius to cell radius, is introduced to modify the force-indent depth relation of classical Hertzian model. Moreover, when the indent depth is comparable with an intrinsic length defined as the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus, the surface tension evidently affects the indentation response, indicating an overestimation of elastic modulus by the Hertzian model. The dimensionless-analysis-based theoretical predictions, which include both large deformation and surface tension, are in good agreement with our finite element simulation data. This study provides a novel method to more accurately measure the mechanical properties of biological cells and soft materials in AFM indentation experiments.

  11. Landslide characterization using P- and S-wave seismic refraction tomography - The importance of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Hagedorn, S.; Dashwood, B.; Maurer, H.; Gunn, D.; Dijkstra, T.; Chambers, J.

    2016-11-01

    In the broad spectrum of natural hazards, landslides in particular are capable of changing the landscape and causing significant human and economic losses. Detailed site investigations form an important component in the landslide risk mitigation and disaster risk reduction process. These investigations usually rely on surface observations, discrete sampling of the subsurface, and laboratory testing to examine properties that are deemed representative of entire slopes. Often this requires extensive interpolations and results in large uncertainties. To compliment and extend these approaches, we present a study from an active landslide in a Lias Group clay slope, North Yorkshire, UK, examining combined P- and S-wave seismic refraction tomography (SRT) as a means of providing subsurface volumetric imaging of geotechnical proxies. The distributions of seismic wave velocities determined from SRT at the study site indicated zones with higher porosity and fissure density that are interpreted to represent the extent and depth of mass movements and weathered bedrock zones. Distinguishing the lithological units was facilitated by deriving the Poisson's ratio from the SRT data as saturated clay and partially saturated sandy silts showed distinctively different Poisson's ratios. Shear and Young's moduli derived from the SRT data revealed the weak nature of the materials in active parts of the landslide (i.e. 25 kPa and 100 kPa respectively). The SRT results are consistent with intrusive (i.e. cone penetration tests), laboratory, and additional geoelectrical data from this site. This study shows that SRT forms a cost-effective method that can significantly reduce uncertainties in the conceptual ground model of geotechnical and hydrological conditions that govern landslide dynamics.

  12. Elastic moduli of collagen gels can be predicted from two-dimensional confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Li; Leone, Lindsay M; Kaufman, Laura J

    2009-10-07

    We quantitatively compare data obtained from imaging two-dimensional slices of three-dimensional unlabeled and fluorescently labeled collagen gels with confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) and/or confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM). Different network structures are obtained by assembling the gels over a range of concentrations at various temperatures. Comparison between CRM and CFM shows that the techniques are not equally sensitive to details of network structure, with CFM displaying higher fidelity in imaging fibers parallel to the optical axis. Comparison of CRM of plain and labeled collagen gels shows that labeling itself induces changes in gel structure, chiefly through inhibition of fibril bundling. Despite these differences, image analyses carried out on two-dimensional CFM and CRM slices of collagen gels reveal identical trends in structural parameters as a function of collagen concentration and gelation temperature. Fibril diameter approximated from either CRM or CFM is in good accord with that determined via electron microscopy. Two-dimensional CRM images are used to show that semiflexible polymer theory can relate network structural properties to elastic modulus successfully. For networks containing bundled fibrils, it is shown that average structural diameter, rather than fibril diameter, is the length scale that sets the magnitude of the gel elastic modulus.

  13. Elastic Moduli of Pyrolytic Boron Nitride Measured Using 3-Point Bending and Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaforey, M. L.; Deeb, C. W.; Matthiesen, D. H.; Roth, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Three-point bending and ultrasonic testing were performed on a flat plate of PBN. In the bending experiment, the deformation mechanism was believed to be shear between the pyrolytic layers, which yielded a shear modulus, c (sub 44), of 2.60 plus or minus .31 GPa. Calculations based on the longitudinal and shear wave velocity measurements yielded values of 0.341 plus or minus 0.006 for Poisson's ratio, 10.34 plus or minus .30 GPa for the elastic modulus (c (sub 33)), and 3.85 plus or minus 0.02 GPa for the shear modulus (c (sub 44)). Since free basal dislocations have been reported to affect the value of c (sub 44) found using ultrasonic methods, the value from the bending experiment was assumed to be the more accurate value.

  14. Cell model and elastic moduli of disordered solids - Low temperature limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.; Moacanin, J.; Simha, Robert; Papazoglou, Elisabeth

    1987-01-01

    The cell theory has been previously employed to compute the equation of state of a disordered condensed system. It is now generalized to include anisotropic stresses. The condition of affine deformation is adopted, transforming an orginally spherical into an ellipsoidal cell. With a Lennard-Jones n-m potential between nonbonded centers, the formal expression for the deformational free energy is derived. It is to be evaluated in the limit of the linear elastic range. Since the bulk modulus in this limit is already known, it is convenient to consider a uniaxial deformation. To begin with, restrictions are made to the low-temperature limit in the absence of entropy contributions. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio then follow.

  15. Polycrystalline elastic moduli of a high-entropy alloy at cryogenic temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Haglund, A.; Koehler, M.; Catoor, D.; ...

    2014-12-05

    A FCC high-entropy alloy (HEA) that exhibits strong temperature dependence of strength at low homologous temperatures in sharp contrast to pure FCC metals like Ni that show weak temperature dependence is CrMnCoFeNi. In order to understand this behavior, elastic constants were determined as a function of temperature. From 300 K down to 55 K, the shear modulus (G) of the HEA changes by only 8%, increasing from 80 to 86 GPa. Moreover, this temperature dependence is weaker than that of FCC Ni, whose G increases by 12% (81–91 GPa). Therefore, the uncharacteristic temperature-dependence of the strength of the HEA ismore » not due to the temperature dependence of its shear modulus.« less

  16. Polycrystalline elastic moduli of a high-entropy alloy at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Haglund, A.; Koehler, M.; Catoor, D.; George, E. P.; Keppens, V.

    2014-12-05

    A FCC high-entropy alloy (HEA) that exhibits strong temperature dependence of strength at low homologous temperatures in sharp contrast to pure FCC metals like Ni that show weak temperature dependence is CrMnCoFeNi. In order to understand this behavior, elastic constants were determined as a function of temperature. From 300 K down to 55 K, the shear modulus (G) of the HEA changes by only 8%, increasing from 80 to 86 GPa. Moreover, this temperature dependence is weaker than that of FCC Ni, whose G increases by 12% (81–91 GPa). Therefore, the uncharacteristic temperature-dependence of the strength of the HEA is not due to the temperature dependence of its shear modulus.

  17. Ultracold Three-body Elastic Scattering in the Adiabatic Hyperspherical Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, Victor; D'Incao, Jose; Greene, Chris; Holland, Murray

    2016-05-01

    In the past few years, advances in ultracold quantum gases together with the ability to control interatomic interactions have opened up important questions related to three-body contributions to collective phenomena observables. In order to theoretically understand such contributions one needs to explore the three-body elastic scattering problem, which is fundamentally different than its two-body counterpart. The main difficulty is in the necessity to determine contributions to three-body scattering that originate from multiple scattering events where two atoms interact while the third spectates. These contributions must be subtracted out in order to determine scattering events that are truly of a three-body nature, i.e., collision events in which all three atoms participate. Here, we study this problem in the adiabatic hyperspherical representation and identify how unwanted two-body scattering events manifest in this picture. This opens up ways to develop a simple procedure capable of extracting truly three-body contributions to elastic scattering. This work was supported by the U. S. National Science Foundation.

  18. Temperature dependencies of the elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficient of an equiatomic, single-phase CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Laplanche, G.; Gadaud, P.; Horst, O.; ...

    2014-11-15

    The equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi alloy is now regarded as a model face-centered cubic single-phase high-entropy alloy. Consequently, determination of its intrinsic properties such as the temperature dependencies of elastic moduli and thermal expansion coefficient are important to improve understanding of this new class of material. Lastly, these temperature dependencies were measured over a large temperature range (200–1270 K) in this study.

  19. Temperature dependence of the elastic moduli and damping for polycrystalline LiF-22 pct CaF2 eutectic salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenden, A.; Lastrapes, G.; Duggan, M. B.; Raj, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    Young's and shear moduli and damping were measured for as-cast polycrystalline LiF-(22 mol pct)CaF2 eutectic specimens as a function of temperature using the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique. The shear modulus decreased with increasing temperature from about 40 GPa at 295 K to about 30 GPa at 1000 K, while the Young modulus decreased from about 115 GPa at 295 K to about 35 GPa at 900 K. These values are compared with those derived from the rule of mixtures using elastic moduli data for LiF and CaF2 single crystals. It is shown that, while the shear modulus data agree reasonably well with the predicted trend, there is a large discrepancy between the theoretical calculations and the Young modulus values, where this disagreement increases with increasing temperature.

  20. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-15

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young's modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using (27)Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta(5+) ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5.

  1. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A.; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young’s modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta5+ ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5. PMID:26468639

  2. High Elastic Moduli of a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 Glass Fabricated via Containerless Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Sosa, Gustavo A.; Masuno, Atsunobu; Higo, Yuji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Yanaba, Yutaka; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Umada, Takumi; Okamura, Kohei; Kato, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Glasses with high elastic moduli have been in demand for many years because the thickness of such glasses can be reduced while maintaining its strength. Moreover, thinner and lighter glasses are desired for the fabrication of windows in buildings and cars, cover glasses for smart-phones and substrates in Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) displays. In this work, we report a 54Al2O3-46Ta2O5 glass fabricated by aerodynamic levitation which possesses one of the highest elastic moduli and hardness for oxide glasses also displaying excellent optical properties. The glass was colorless and transparent in the visible region, and its refractive index nd was as high as 1.94. The measured Young’s modulus and Vickers hardness were 158.3 GPa and 9.1 GPa, respectively, which are comparable to the previously reported highest values for oxide glasses. Analysis made using 27Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of a significantly large fraction of high-coordinated Al in addition to four-coordinated Al in the glass. The high elastic modulus and hardness are attributed to both the large cationic field strength of Ta5+ ions and the large dissociation energies per unit volume of Al2O3 and Ta2O5.

  3. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium’s elastic moduli to temperature

    PubMed Central

    Migliori, Albert; Söderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; Freibert, Franz J.; Maiorov, Boris; Ramshaw, B. J.; Betts, Jon B.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevant measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. We show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations. PMID:27647904

  4. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium's elastic moduli to temperature.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Albert; Söderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; Freibert, Franz J; Maiorov, Boris; Ramshaw, B J; Betts, Jon B

    2016-10-04

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevant measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. We show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations.

  5. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium's elastic moduli to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Albert; Söderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; Freibert, Franz J.; Maiorov, Boris; Ramshaw, B. J.; Betts, Jon B.

    2016-10-01

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevant measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. We show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations.

  6. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium’s elastic moduli to temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Soderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; Freibert, Franz Joseph; Maiorov, Boris Alfredo; Ramshaw, Brad J.; Betts, Jon Bobby

    2016-09-19

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevant measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. Lastly, we show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations.

  7. Determination of the full elastic moduli of single crystals using shear-wave velocities by Brillouin spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, D.; Mao, Z.; Lin, J.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) is the inelastic scattering of monochromatic laser light by phonons in the GHz frequency range [1]. BLS spectroscopy can be used to measure sound velocities traveling along certain directions of a single crystal through the frequency shifts of the scattered light from the acoustic phonons [1]. Over the past few decades, BLS spectroscopy has been widely used to measure the velocities of acoustic waves for a wide range of Earth's materials, in which the full elastic constants were derived from the measured compressional (VP) and shear wave (VS) velocities. However, the VP velocities of minerals normally overlap with the shear-wave velocities of diamonds in Brillouin measurements approximately above 25 GPa [2-5] such that only VS of minerals can be measured experimentally. Theoretical models have showed that the shear-wave velocities of minerals also carry necessary information to invert the full elastic tensors [2], although previous studies at high pressures have focused on measuring velocities within the principle planes of the crystals. This leads to a strong trade-off among individual Cij, preventing the derivation of the full elastic tensors from the VS velocities alone [3-5]. In this study, we have come up with an elastic model to overcome this problem by finding a suitable crystallographic plane that has optimized VS-VP interactions in the elastic tensors. Using MgO, spinel and zoisite as test samples, we have used measured VP/VS or VS velocities of these crystals using BLS spectroscopy to derive their full elastic tensors. This new approach sheds lights on future high-pressure elasticity studies relevant to materials the Earth's deep interior. 1. Sinogeikin, S.V., Bass, J.D., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 120, 43 (2000). 2. Every, A. G., Phys. Rev. B., 22, 1746, (1980) 3. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S., Reichmann, H.J., Frost, D.J., and Schilling, F.R., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 287, 345 (2009). 4. Marquardt, H., Speziale, S

  8. Crystallization kinetic of Sb-V2O5-TeO2 glasses investigated by DSC and their elastic moduli and Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souri, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Ternary tellurate glasses of the form xSb-(60-x)V2O5-40TeO2 (0≤x≤15 in mol%) were prepared by using the usual melt quenching method. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at different heating rates (φ) was used to thermal analyze and to gain more insight in to the thermal stability, glass forming tendency and so calorimetric behavior of the present glasses. The glass transition temperature (Tg), the temperature corresponding to the onset of crystallization (Tx) and also the crystallization temperature (TCr) were obtained at different heating rates, to estimate the key kinetic parameter of activation energy of crystallization (ΔE) by using different empirical formulas. Also some other thermal parameters such as thermal stability and glass forming tendency were determined. It was found that Tg, Tx and TCr increase with increase in Sb content and also with increase in heating rate. Moreover, Makishima-Makenzie's theory was employed to evaluate the Poisson's ratio and elastic moduli, indicating a strong relation between elastic properties and the structure of glass. From the mechanical and thermal data and also the values of oxygen molar volume ( V O *), it was founded that the glass systems can be divided in to "two compositional regions"; so, results indicate that glasses with 10≤x≤15 (especially for x=12) are more thermal stable and strong glasses, which make them as more useful and promising materials in technological advantages and device manufacturing.

  9. Origin of the multiple configurations that drive the response of δ-plutonium’s elastic moduli to temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Migliori, Albert; Soderlind, Per; Landa, Alexander; ...

    2016-09-19

    The electronic and thermodynamic complexity of plutonium has resisted a fundamental understanding for this important elemental metal. A critical test of any theory is the unusual softening of the bulk modulus with increasing temperature, a result that is counterintuitive because no or very little change in the atomic volume is observed upon heating. This unexpected behavior has in the past been attributed to competing but never-observed electronic states with different bonding properties similar to the scenario with magnetic states in Invar alloys. Using the recent observation of plutonium dynamic magnetism, we construct a theory for plutonium that agrees with relevantmore » measurements by using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations with no free parameters to compute the effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations on the temperature dependence of the bulk moduli in δ-Pu. Lastly, we show that the softening with temperature can be understood in terms of a continuous distribution of thermally activated spin fluctuations.« less

  10. Elastic wave speeds and moduli in polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used ultrasonic pulse transmission to measure compressional, P, and shear, S, wave speeds in laboratory-formed polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate. From the wave speed's linear dependence on temperature and pressure and from the sample's calculated density, we derived expressions for bulk, shear, and compressional wave moduli and Poisson's ratio from -20 to 15??C and 22.4 to 32.8 MPa for ice Ih, -20 to 15??C and 30.5 to 97.7 MPa for si methane hydrate, and -20 to 10??C and 30.5 to 91.6 MPa for sll methane-ethane hydrate. All three materials had comparable P and S wave speeds and decreasing shear wave speeds with increasing applied pressure. Each material also showed evidence of rapid intergranular bonding, with a corresponding increase in wave speed, in response to pauses in sample deformation. There were also key differences. Resistance to uniaxial compaction, indicated by the pressure required to compact initially porous samples, was significantly lower for ice Ih than for either hydrate. The ice Ih shear modulus decreased with increasing pressure, in contrast to the increase measured in both hydrates ?? 2009.

  11. On the measurement of shear elastic moduli and viscosities of erythrocyte plasma membranes by transient deformation in high frequency electric fields.

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, H; Sackmann, E

    1988-01-01

    We present a new method to measure the shear elastic moduli and viscosities of erythrocyte membranes which is based on the fixation and transient deformation of cells in a high-frequency electric field. A frequency domain of constant force (arising by Maxwell Wagner polarization) is selected to minimize dissipative effects. The electric force is thus calculated by electrostatic principles by considering the cell as a conducting body in a dielectric fluid and neglecting membrane polarization effects. The elongation A of the cells perpendicular to their rotational axis exhibits a linear regime (A proportional to Maxwell tension or to square of the electric field E2) at small, and a nonlinear regime (A proportional to square root of Maxwell tension or to the electric field E) at large extensions with a cross-over at A approximately 0.5 micron. The nonlinearity leads to amplitude-dependent response times and to differences of the viscoelastic response and relaxation functions. The cells exhibit pronounced yet completely reversible tip formations at large extensions. Absolute values of the shear elastic modulus, mu, and membrane viscosity, eta, are determined by assuming that field-induced stretching of the biconcave cell may be approximately described in terms of a sphere to ellipsoid deformation. The (nonlinear) elongation-vs.-force relationship calculated by the elastic theory of shells agress well with the experimentally observed curves and the values of mu = 6.1 x 10(-6) N/m and eta = 3.4 x 10(-7) Ns/m are in good agreement with the micropipette results of Evans and co-workers. The effect of physical, biochemical, and disease-induced structural changes on the viscoelastic parameters is studied. The variability of mu and eta of a cell population of a healthy donor is +/- 45%, which is mainly due to differences in the cell age. The average mu value of cells of different healthy donors scatters by +/- 18%. Osmotic deflation of the cells leads to a fivefold increase of

  12. Complete elastic characterization of viscoelastic materials by dynamic measurements of the complex bulk and Young's moduli as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, François M.; Trivett, D. H.

    2011-07-01

    Two independent systems to measure the dynamic complex Young's and bulk moduli of viscoelastic materials as a function of temperature and hydrostatic pressure are described. In the Young's modulus system, a bar-shaped sample is adhered to a piezoelectric shaker and mounted vertically inside an air-filled pressure vessel. Data are obtained using both the traditional resonant approach and a wave-speed technique. In the bulk modulus system, the compressibility of a sample of arbitrary shape immersed in Castor oil and placed inside a pressure chamber is measured. Data can be obtained at frequencies typically ranging from 50 Hz to 5 kHz, at temperatures comprised between -2 and 50 °C and under hydrostatic pressures ranging from 0 to 2 MPa (Young's), or 6.5 MPa (bulk). Typical data obtained with both systems are presented, and it is shown how these data can be combined to completely characterize the elasticity of the material under investigation. In particular, they can be used to obtain experimental values of the complex Poisson's ratio, whose accurate measurement is otherwise quite challenging to perform directly. As an example, the magnitude and loss tangent of Poisson's ratio are presented for a nearly incompressible rubber.

  13. Bulk elastic moduli and solute potentials in leaves of freshwater, coastal and marine hydrophytes. Are marine plants more rigid?

    PubMed Central

    Touchette, Brant W.; Marcus, Sarah E.; Adams, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Bulk modulus of elasticity (ɛ), depicting the flexibility of plant tissues, is recognized as an important component in maintaining internal water balance. Elevated ɛ and comparatively low osmotic potential (Ψπ) may work in concert to effectively maintain vital cellular water content. This concept, termed the ‘cell water conservation hypothesis’, may foster tolerance for lower soil-water potentials in plants while minimizing cell dehydration and shrinkage. Therefore, the accumulation of solutes in marine plants, causing decreases in Ψπ, play an important role in plant–water relations and likely works with higher ɛ to achieve favourable cell volumes. While it is generally held that plants residing in marine systems have higher leaf tissue ɛ, to our knowledge no study has specifically addressed this notion in aquatic and wetland plants residing in marine and freshwater systems. Therefore, we compared ɛ and Ψπ in leaf tissues of 38 freshwater, coastal and marine plant species using data collected in our laboratory, with additional values from the literature. Overall, 8 of the 10 highest ɛ values were observed in marine plants, and 20 of the lowest 25 ɛ values were recorded in freshwater plants. As expected, marine plants often had lower Ψπ, wherein the majority of marine plants were below −1.0 MPa and the majority of freshwater plants were above −1.0 MPa. While there were no differences among habitat type and symplastic water content (θsym), we did observe higher θsym in shrubs when compared with graminoids, and believe that the comparatively low θsym observed in aquatic grasses may be attributed to their tendency to develop aerenchyma that hold apoplastic water. These results, with few exceptions, support the premise that leaf tissues of plants acclimated to marine environments tend to have higher ɛ and lower Ψπ, and agree with the general tenets of the cell water conservation hypothesis. PMID:24876296

  14. Bulk elastic moduli and solute potentials in leaves of freshwater, coastal and marine hydrophytes. Are marine plants more rigid?

    PubMed

    Touchette, Brant W; Marcus, Sarah E; Adams, Emily C

    2014-03-28

    Bulk modulus of elasticity (ɛ), depicting the flexibility of plant tissues, is recognized as an important component in maintaining internal water balance. Elevated ɛ and comparatively low osmotic potential (Ψπ) may work in concert to effectively maintain vital cellular water content. This concept, termed the 'cell water conservation hypothesis', may foster tolerance for lower soil-water potentials in plants while minimizing cell dehydration and shrinkage. Therefore, the accumulation of solutes in marine plants, causing decreases in Ψπ, play an important role in plant-water relations and likely works with higher ɛ to achieve favourable cell volumes. While it is generally held that plants residing in marine systems have higher leaf tissue ɛ, to our knowledge no study has specifically addressed this notion in aquatic and wetland plants residing in marine and freshwater systems. Therefore, we compared ɛ and Ψπ in leaf tissues of 38 freshwater, coastal and marine plant species using data collected in our laboratory, with additional values from the literature. Overall, 8 of the 10 highest ɛ values were observed in marine plants, and 20 of the lowest 25 ɛ values were recorded in freshwater plants. As expected, marine plants often had lower Ψπ, wherein the majority of marine plants were below -1.0 MPa and the majority of freshwater plants were above -1.0 MPa. While there were no differences among habitat type and symplastic water content (θsym), we did observe higher θsym in shrubs when compared with graminoids, and believe that the comparatively low θsym observed in aquatic grasses may be attributed to their tendency to develop aerenchyma that hold apoplastic water. These results, with few exceptions, support the premise that leaf tissues of plants acclimated to marine environments tend to have higher ɛ and lower Ψπ, and agree with the general tenets of the cell water conservation hypothesis.

  15. Estimation of elastic moduli in a compressible Gibson half-space by inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.; Chen, C.

    2006-01-01

    A Gibson half-space model (a non-layered Earth model) has the shear modulus varying linearly with depth in an inhomogeneous elastic half-space. In a half-space of sedimentary granular soil under a geostatic state of initial stress, the density and the Poisson's ratio do not vary considerably with depth. In such an Earth body, the dynamic shear modulus is the parameter that mainly affects the dispersion of propagating waves. We have estimated shear-wave velocities in the compressible Gibson half-space by inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocities. An analytical dispersion law of Rayleigh-type waves in a compressible Gibson half-space is given in an algebraic form, which makes our inversion process extremely simple and fast. The convergence of the weighted damping solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Calculation efficiency is achieved by reconstructing a weighted damping solution using singular value decomposition techniques. The main advantage of this algorithm is that only three parameters define the compressible Gibson half-space model. Theoretically, to determine the model by the inversion, only three Rayleigh-wave phase velocities at different frequencies are required. This is useful in practice where Rayleigh-wave energy is only developed in a limited frequency range or at certain frequencies as data acquired at manmade structures such as dams and levees. Two real examples are presented and verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements. The results of these real examples are also compared with the results of the layered-Earth model. ?? Springer 2006.

  16. Interaction of angiogenically stimulated intermediate CD163+ monocytes/macrophages with soft hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate) networks with elastic moduli matched to that of human arteries.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Anke; Kratz, Karl; Hiebl, Bernhard; Lendlein, Andreas; Jung, Friedrich

    2012-03-01

    mRNA expression profile of the aMO2 was not influenced by the substrate elasticity. In the supernatant of aMO2 on cPnBA0250, significantly less VEGF-A(165) product was found than expected based on the mRNA level measured (P < 0.01). Tests with recombinant VEGF-A(165) then demonstrated that significantly more VEGF-A(165) was adhered on cPnBA0250 than on cPnBA1100 (P < 0.01). Seeded on cPnBA, aMO2-unaffected by the elastic moduli of both substrates-seemed to remain in their subset status and secreted VEGF-A(165) without release of proinflammatory cytokines. These in vitro results might indicate that this MO subset can be used as cellular delivery system for proangiogenic and noninflammatory mediators to support the endothelialization of cPnBA.

  17. Dynamic and static moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. H.; Johnston, David H.

    1981-01-01

    Static and dynamic bulk moduli (Ks and Kd) are measured as continuous functions of pressure from zero to 2-3 kilobars for two sandstones, a tuff, limestone, granite, and oil shale. Results for the sandstones and granite are in good agreement with previously reported data with Ks/Kd varying from about 0.5 at atmospheric pressure to close to unity at pressures 2 kilobars and above. For rocks behaving elastically under static loading, the Ks/Kd ratio is inversely related to the microcrack density. For the limestone, time dependent deformation associated with pore collapse results in Ks/Kd ratios approaching 0.1 at high pressure. Upon unloading, while initially high ( ˜ 1.0) at high pressures, Ks/Kd becomes lower than values obtained during loading at low pressures ( < 1 kilobar) due to opening of microcracks generated during pore collapse. For the oil shale, in which few microcracks exist, Ks/Kd remains relatively constant with pressure at a value of about 0.7.

  18. Relations between drained and undrained moduli in anisotropic poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loret, Benjamin; Rizzi, Egidio; Zerfa, Zohra

    2001-11-01

    Although the knowledge of the drained moduli is often assumed to define the material coefficients of elastic fluid-saturated porous media, it is not sufficient. Resorting to the properties of the constituents is possible but may not be satisfactory due to lack of accuracy. On the other hand, the mechanical information contained in the undrained moduli is complementary to that provided by the drained moduli but is also overabundant. The compatibility relations between these two types of moduli are examined for several classes of anisotropic solid skeletons and the information required from the undrained moduli is exactly defined through a spectral analysis of the dyadic difference in tensor compliances. A switch of the results is possible if the undrained moduli are given instead of the drained moduli. An incomplete data set of material coefficients for a transverse isotropic shale is treated as an example. Considerable simplifications arise for a particular form of anisotropy defined by a second order fabric tensor.

  19. Evaluation of polydimethylsiloxane scaffolds with physiologically-relevant elastic moduli: interplay of substrate mechanics and surface chemistry effects on vascular smooth muscle cell response.

    PubMed

    Brown, Xin Q; Ookawa, Keiko; Wong, Joyce Y

    2005-06-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is used extensively to study cell-substrate interactions because its mechanical properties are easily tuned in physiologically relevant ranges. However, changes in mechanical properties also modulate surface chemistry and cell response. Here, we correlate the mechanical and surface properties of PDMS to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) behavior. We find that a 5-fold increase in base:crosslinker ratio leads to approximately 40-fold decrease in elastic modulus but no significant differences in surface wettability. However, when polyelectrolyte multilayers are adsorbed to promote cell adhesion, wettability varies inversely with substrate stiffness. Despite these differences in hydrophobicity, the amount of adsorbed protein remains the same. In the absence of serum, there is a 39% decrease in cell attachment and a 42% decrease in spreading as the elastic modulus decreases from 1.79 to 0.05 MPa. In the presence of serum or adsorbed fibronectin, the differences in attachment and spreading are diminished. This is not the case for the rate of serum-stimulated cell proliferation, which remains inversely dependent on crosslinker concentration. We conclude that for the range of crosslinker concentrations investigated, the surface properties dominate the initial cell attachment and spreading, whereas the mechanical properties influence the long-term cell growth.

  20. Elastic moduli, thermal expansion, and inferred permeability of Climax quartz monzonite and Sudbury gabbro to 500/sup 0/C and 55 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.; Heard, H.C.

    1981-03-17

    Young's modulus (E), bulk modulus (K), and the coefficient of thermal linear expansion (..cap alpha..) have been determined for Climax quartz monzonite to 500/sup 0/C and pressures (P) to 55 MPa and for Sudbury gabbro to 300/sup 0/C and 55 MPa. For each rock, both E and K decreased with T and increased with P in a nonlinear manner. In the monzonite, E and K decreased by up to 60% as P decreased from 55.2 to 6.9 MPa isothermally, while the gabbro indicated a decrease up to 70% over the same pressure range. As T increased isobarically, E and K for the monzonite decreased by up to a factor of approx. 80% from 19 to 500/sup 0/C. The moduli of the gabbro decreased by as much as 70% from 19 to 300/sup 0/C. ..cap alpha.. for the monzonite increased with T and decreased with P in a nonmonotonic fashion, with most measured values for ..cap alpha.. greater than values calculated for the crack-free aggregate. Depending on P, ..cap alpha.. in the monzonite increased from 8 to 11.10/sup -6/ /sup 0/C/sup -1/ at 40/sup 0/C to 22 to 25.10/sup -6/C/sup -1/ at 475/sup 0/C. For the gabbro, ..cap alpha.. also generally decreased with increasing P. Values ranged from 6 to 11.10/sup -6/ /sup 0/C/sup -1/, showing a nonlinear trend and very little net increas over the T range from 19 to 300/sup 0/C. Calculated permeability of these rocks based on the ..cap alpha.. determinations indicated that permeabilities may increase by up to a factor of 3 over the temperature interval 19 to 300/sup 0/C, and the permeability of the monzonite is inferred to increase by up to a factor of 8 by 500/sup 0/C. In both rocks, most measurements are consistent with microcracks controlling the thermoelastic response by opening with T and closing with sigma and P.

  1. Ultransonic velocity measurements in sheared granular layers: Implications for the evolution of dynamic elastic moduli of compositionally-diverse cataclastic fault gouges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Matthew William

    The objective of this project was to investigate the mechanical and elastic evolution of laboratory fault gouge analogs during active shear. To do this, I designed, constructed, and implemented a new technique for measuring changes in the elastic properties of granular layers subjected to shear deformation. Granular layers serve as an experimental analog to gouge layers forming in cataclastic faults. The technique combines a double-direct shear configuration with a method of determining ultrasonic elastic compressional and shear wavespeed. Experimental results are divided into chapters based on application to fundamental mechanics or to field cases. The first set of experiments allowed us to develop the technique and apply it to a range of end- member materials including quartz sands, montmorillonite clays, and mixtures of sand and clay. Emphasis is placed on normal stress unload-reload cycles and the resulting behavior as clay content is varied within the layer. We observe consistent decrease in wavespeed with shear for sand, and nonlinear but increasing wavespeed for clay and the sand/clay mixture. The second set of experiments involves the application of this technique to measurements conducted under fluid saturation and controlled pressure conditions, examining the behavior of materials from the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism under shear. I introduce the effects of variable displacement rate and hold time, with implications for fault stability and rate-and-state frictional sliding. The experiments demonstrate a consistent inverse relationship between sliding velocity and wavespeed, and an increase in wavespeed associated with holds. The third set of experiments deals with velocity through stick-slipping glass beads, which has implications for fundamental granular mechanics questions involving velocity-weakening materials. I find that wavespeed decreases in the time between events and increases at "slips", suggesting a strong control related to changes in

  2. Life on moduli space?

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2009-10-15

    While the number of metastable landscape vacua in string theory is vast, the number of supermoduli vacua which lead to distinct low-energy physics is even larger, perhaps infinitely so. From the anthropic perspective it is therefore important to understand whether complex life is possible on moduli space - i.e., in low-energy effective theories with (1) exact supersymmetry and (2) some massless multiplets (moduli). Unless life is essentially impossible on moduli space as a consequence of these characteristics, anthropic reasoning in string theory suggests that the overwhelming majority of sentient beings would observe 1-2. We investigate whether 1 and 2 are by themselves automatically inimical to life and conclude, tentatively, that they are not. In particular, we describe moduli scenarios in which complex life seems possible.

  3. Elasticity of calcium and calcium-sodium amphiboles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Abramson, Evan H.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of single-crystal elastic moduli under ambient conditions are reported for nine calcium to calcium-sodium amphiboles that lie in the composition range of common crustal constituents. Velocities of body and surface acoustic waves measured by Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering (ISLS) were inverted to determine the 13 moduli characterizing these monoclinic samples. Moduli show a consistent pattern: C33 > C22 > C11 and C23 > C12 > C13 and C44 > C55 ∼ C66 and for the uniquely monoclinic moduli, |C35| ≫ C46 ∼ |C25| > |C15| ∼ 0. Most of the compositionally-induced variance of moduli is associated with aluminum and iron content. Seven moduli (C11C12C13C22C44C55C66) increase with increasing aluminum while all diagonal moduli decrease with increasing iron. Three moduli (C11, C13 and C44) increase with increasing sodium and potassium occupancy in A-sites. The uniquely monoclinic moduli (C15C25 and C35) have no significant compositional dependence. Moduli associated with the a∗ direction (C11C12C13C55 and C66) are substantially smaller than values associated with structurally and chemically related clinopyroxenes. Other moduli are more similar for both inosilicates. The isotropically averaged adiabatic bulk modulus does not vary with iron content but increases with aluminum content from 85 GPa for tremolite to 99 GPa for pargasite. Increasing iron reduces while increasing aluminum increases the isotropic shear modulus which ranges from 47 GPa for ferro-actinolite to 64 GPa for pargasite. These results exhibit far greater anisotropy and higher velocities than apparent in earlier work. Quasi-longitudinal velocities are as fast as ∼9 km/s and (intermediate between the a∗- and c-axes) are as slow as ∼6 km/s. Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging based on prior single crystal moduli resulted in calculated rock velocities lower than laboratory measurements, leading to adoption of the (higher velocity) Voigt bound. Thus, former uses of the upper Voigt bound can

  4. Resonant Acoustic Determination of Complex Elastic Moduli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    F ( 79 "C) 1 Complete Cure - days @ 77"F (25" C) 2 - 4 Complete Cure -L hrs. @ 175 F ( 79 °C) 2 - 3 Color Amber or Black Ratio (By Weight): Part A 100...Classification Authority 3 Distribution Availability of Report 2b Declassification/Downgrading Schedule Approved for public release; distribution is...Mechanical Model ..................................................... 7 3 . Complex Modulus, Loss Tangent and Quality Factor .................... 10 4

  5. Elastic scattering, muon transfer, bound states and resonances in the three-body mesic molecular systems in the reduced adiabatic hyperspherical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, D. I.; Gusev, V. V.; Ponomarev, L. I.

    1999-06-01

    The uniform method of numerical investigation of bound states and scattering processes 2→ 2 (including resonance states) in the Coulomb three-body (CTB) systems is developed. It is based on the adiabatic hyperspherical approach (AHSA) and includes the numerical realization and applications to the three-body mesic atomic systems. The results of calculations of bound states of these systems (including the local characteristics of the wave functions) and the scattering processes 2→ 2 (including the characteristics of the resonance states) are presented.

  6. Kahler moduli inflation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Buck, Duncan; Copeland, Edmund J.; Gomez-Reino, Marta; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2010-01-01

    We perform a detailed numerical analysis of inflationary solutions in Kahler moduli of type IIB flux compactifications. We show that there are inflationary solutions even when all the fields play an important role in the overall shape of the scalar potential. Moreover, there exists a direction of attraction for the inflationary trajectories that correspond to the constant volume direction. This basin of attraction enables the system to have an island of stability in the set of initial conditions. We provide explicit examples of these trajectories, compute the corresponding tilt of the density perturbations power spectrum and show that they provide a robust prediction of n s ≈ 0.96 for 60 e-folds of inflation.

  7. Inflationary predictions and moduli masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kumar; Dutta, Koushik; Maharana, Anshuman

    2015-12-01

    A generic feature of inflationary models in supergravity/string constructions is vacuum misalignment for the moduli fields. The associated production of moduli particles leads to an epoch in the post-inflationary history in which the energy density is dominated by cold moduli particles. This modification of the post-inflationary history implies that the preferred range for the number of e-foldings between horizon exit of the modes relevant for CMB observations and the end of inflation (Nk) depends on moduli masses. This in turn implies that the precision CMB observables ns and r are sensitive to moduli masses. We analyse this sensitivity for some representative models of inflation and find the effect to be highly relevant for confronting inflationary models with observations.

  8. Elasticity of single-crystal SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Jay D.

    1984-12-01

    The adiabatic single-crystal elastic moduli of SmAlO 3, GdAlO 3 and ScAlO 3, all with the orthorhombic perovskite structure, have been measured by Brillouin spectroscopy under ambient conditions. These 3 compounds display various degrees of crystallographic distortion from the ideal cubic perovskite structure. We find that longitudinal moduli in directions parallel to the axes of a pseudocubic subcell are nearly equal and insensitive to distortions of the crystal structure from cubic symmetry, whereas, the moduli C 11 and C 22, parallel to the orthorhombic axes, display pronounced anisotropy with the exception of ScAlO 3. The shear moduli also correlate with distortion from cubic symmetry, as measured by rotation, or tilt angles, of the AlO 6 octahedra. Our data support the observations of Liebermann et al. that perovskite-structure compounds define consistent elasticity trends relating bulk modulus and molar volume, and sound speed and mean atomic weight. These relationships have been used to estimate bulk and shear moduli for the high-pressure polymorphs of CaSiO 3 and MgSiO 3 with the perovskite structure.

  9. Effective moduli of particulate solids: Lubrication approximation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, F.; Phan-Thien, N.; X. J. Fan

    To efficiently calculate the effective properties of a composite, which consists of rigid spherical inclusions not necessarily of the same sizes in a homogeneous isotropic elastic matrix, a method based on the lubrication forces between neighbouring particles has been developed. The method is used to evaluate the effective Lamé moduli and the Poisson's ratio of the composite, for the particles in random configurations and in cubic lattices. A good agreement with experimental results given by Smith (1975) for particles in random configurations is observed, and also the numerical results on the effective moduli agree well with the results given by Nunan & Keller (1984) for particles in cubic lattices.

  10. Improved Indentation Test for Measuring Nonlinear Elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2004-01-01

    A cylindrical-punch indentation technique has been developed as a means of measuring the nonlinear elastic responses of materials -- more specifically, for measuring the moduli of elasticity of materials in cases in which these moduli vary with applied loads. This technique offers no advantage for characterizing materials that exhibit purely linear elastic responses (constant moduli of elasticity, independent of applied loads). However, the technique offers a significant advantage for characterizing such important materials as plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coatings, which, in cyclic loading, exhibit nonlinear elasticity with hysteresis related to compaction and sliding within their microstructures.

  11. On the consistency of complex moduli for transversely-isotropic viscoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesieutre, George A.

    The ability of advanced composite materials and structures to damp vibration is important in many applications. Use of the complex modulus approach to represent the dissipative properties of transversely-isotropic materials, such as unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites, requires the definition of a set of 5 (imaginary) loss moduli in addition to the 5 (real) storage moduli needed to describe the elastic behavior. In practice, designers of composite materials rarely have experimental data for all 5 loss moduli, and must assume values for the remaining moduli in their analyses. If values for these unknown loss moduli are specified arbitrarily, physically unreasonable behavior can result. This paper develops the conditions necessary for physical consistency of the complex moduli of transversely isotropic materials.

  12. The heterotic superpotential and moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Ossa, Xenia; Hardy, Edward; Svanes, Eirik Eik

    2016-01-01

    We study the four-dimensional effective theory arising from ten-dimensional heterotic supergravity compactified on manifolds with torsion. In particular, given the heterotic superpotential appropriately corrected at O(α') to account for the Green-Schwarz anomaly cancellation mechanism, we investigate properties of four-dimensional Minkowski vacua of this theory. Considering the restrictions arising from F-terms and D-terms we identify the infinitesimal massless moduli space of the theory. We show that it agrees with the results that have recently been obtained from a ten-dimensional perspective where super-symmetric Minkowski solutions including the Bianchi identity correspond to an integrable holomorphic structure, with infinitesimal moduli calculated by its first cohomology. As has recently been noted, interplay of complex structure and bundle deformations through holomorphic and anomaly constraints can lead to fewer moduli than may have been expected. We derive a relation between the number of complex structure and bundle moduli removed from the low energy theory in this way, and give conditions for there to be no complex structure moduli or bundle moduli remaining in the low energy theory. The link between Yukawa couplings and obstruction theory is also briefly discussed.

  13. On a new compactification of moduli of vector bundles on a surface. IV: Nonreduced moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeeva, Nadezda V

    2013-01-31

    The construction of a nonreduced projective moduli scheme of semistable admissible pairs is performed. We establish the connection of this moduli scheme with the reduced moduli scheme constructed in the previous article and prove that the nonreduced moduli scheme contains an open subscheme which is isomorphic to a moduli scheme of semistable vector bundles. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  14. Moduli mediation without moduli-induced gravitino problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Oikawa, Akane; Otsuka, Hajime

    2016-05-01

    We study the moduli-induced gravitino problem within the framework of the phenomenologically attractive mirage mediations. The huge amount of gravitino generated by the moduli decay can be successfully diluted by introducing an extra light modulus field which does not induce the supersymmetry breaking. Since the lifetime of extra modulus field becomes longer than usually considered modulus field, our proposed mechanism is applied to both the low- and high-scale supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We also point out that such an extra modulus field appears in the flux compactification of type II string theory.

  15. Optimizing Adiabaticity in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermause, Jonathan; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    We demonstrate the utility of Berry's superadiabatic formalism for numerically finding control sequences that implement quasi-adiabatic unitary transformations. Using an iterative interaction picture, we design a shortcut to adiabaticity that reduces the time required to perform an adiabatic inversion pulse in liquid state NMR. We also show that it is possible to extend our scheme to two or more qubits to find adiabatic quantum transformations that are allowed by the control algebra, and demonstrate a two-qubit entangling operation in liquid state NMR. We examine the pulse lengths at which the fidelity of these adiabatic transitions break down and compare with the quantum speed limit.

  16. Moduli backreaction on inflationary attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, Diederik; Scalisi, Marco; Werkman, Pelle

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the interplay between moduli dynamics and inflation, focusing on the Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi scenario and cosmological α -attractors. General couplings between these sectors can induce a significant backreaction and potentially destroy the inflationary regime; however, we demonstrate that this generically does not happen for α -attractors. Depending on the details of the superpotential, the volume modulus can either be stable during the entire inflationary trajectory or become tachyonic at some point and act as a waterfall field, resulting in a sudden end of inflation. In the latter case there is a universal supersymmetric minimum where the scalars end up, preventing the decompactification scenario. The gravitino mass is independent from the inflationary scale with no fine-tuning of the parameters. The observational predictions conform to the universal value of attractors, fully compatible with the Planck data, with possibly a capped number of e -folds due to the interplay with moduli.

  17. The Elastic Properties of Natural Portlandite Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speziale, S.; Reichmann, H. J.; Schilling, F.; Wenk, H. R.; Monteiro, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    Portlandite, Ca(OH) 2, is a simple hydroxide with brucite structure (space group P~{3}m1). It is built up of layers of CaO6 octahedra stacked along the c-axis. Portlandite is of basic interest for the cement and concrete research and industries, because it is a major primary solid phase in hydrated portland cement. It is therefore of particular importance to determine the elastic properties of portlandite. So far a computational (Laugesen, 2005) and an experimental (Holuj et al., 1985) study reported the single crystal elastic moduli Cij. However, these results differ significantly in some off-diagonal moduli. We performed Brillouin spectroscopy measurements on natural single crystal portlandite at ambient conditions. Our measurements have been performed in a new Brillouin laboratory set up at the Geoforschungszentrum, Potsdam. The new system features an Eulerian cradle with an inner diameter of 400 mm, and it has been designed to accommodate an internally heated diamond anvil cell to perform Brillouin measurements at high P and T conditions. We have obtained the following values for the elastic moduli (expressed in GPa followed by 1σ uncertainty in parentheses): C11 = 102.0 (2.0), C12 = 32.1 (1.0), C13 = 8.4 (0.4), C14 = 4.5 (0.2), C33 = 33.6 (0.7), C44 = 12.0 (0.3), C66 = (C11-C12)/2 = 35.0 (1.5). With our new measurements we put a better constraint on the value of C13 which is more than 2.5 times larger than reported by Holuj and coworkers, and is closer to the value calculated by Laugesen. A remarkable feature of the elastic behavior is the high elastic anisotropy of portlandite due to its highly anisotropic layered structure. The zero pressure Voigt and Reuss bounds to the adiabatic bulk modulus of portlandite are: K0SV = 37.3 (0.4) GPa and K0SR = 26.0 (0.3) GPa, with a 43% difference between the two bounds. The Voigt and Reuss bounds to the shear modulus are G0V = 24.4 (0.4) GPa and G0R = 17.5 (0.3) GPa, with a 40% difference between the two bounds. The

  18. Readily fiberizable glasses having a high modulus of elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    New glass compositions yield composites having higher moduli of elasticity and specific moduli of elasticity than commercially available glasses. Over a reasonable temperature range the glasses have a viscosity of about 20,000 poises. They consist of silica, alumina, magnesia, and beryllia, plus at least one uncommon oxide.

  19. Age-related changes in dynamic moduli of ovine vitreous.

    PubMed

    Colter, Jourdan; Williams, Alex; Moran, Patrick; Coats, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Multiple rheological studies have characterized the dynamic material properties of adult vitreous, but no studies have investigated vitreous properties in the immature eye. In this study, premature, infant and adult ovine vitreous specimens were tested in shear to identify differences in dynamic moduli with age. Significant inertial artifact and rapid degradation of the vitreous ex vivo hindered the ability to accurately collect dynamic data through standard oscillation protocols. Therefore, dynamic moduli were calculated by converting relaxation spectrum data to the retardation spectrum, resulting in the calculation of the storage (G') and loss (G") moduli from the first few milliseconds of creep testing when tissue degradation and inertia is minimal. The technique was validated against two synthetic materials that span the viscoelastic spectrum. G' and G" of the primarily viscous synthetic material (polystyrene, tanδ=0.61) and G' of the primarily elastic material (agar, tanδ=0.06) were not significantly different than those calculated from dynamic oscillatory testing (p<0.05). G" of agar was overestimated (4-39%) with the interconversion technique due to creep ringing. Ovine vitreous was primarily viscous (tanδ=1.31), so this technique was used to evaluate changes in dynamic moduli with age. G' and G" for adult vitreous was 2-4 times and 1.5-2 times lower, respectively, than infant vitreous, corresponding to the structural breakdown of the vitreous with age. The dynamic moduli of premature vitreous was lower than infant and adult, likely due to premature development of the vitreal structure. These data suggest that significant differences exist between the viscoelastic response of infant and adult vitreous, and computational models of the pediatric eye will require appropriate age and rate material properties of vitreous.

  20. Elastic module of superhard rhenium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Michael R.; Keppens, Veerle; Sales, Brian C; Jin, Rongying; Mandrus, David

    2009-01-01

    The elastic moduli of polycrystalline rhenium diboride are measured as a function of temperature between 5 and 325 K. The room temperature results show that ReB{sub 2} has very high values for both the bulk and shear modulus, confirming the incompressible and superhard nature of this material. With decreasing temperature, the moduli increase, with a hint of softening below 50 K.

  1. Elastic properties of pyrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Bridget; Bass, Jay D.; Rossman, George R.; Geiger, Charles A.; Langer, Klaus

    1991-03-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy was used to measure the single crystal elastic properties of a pure synthetic pyrope and a natural garnet containing 89.9 mol% of the pyrope end member (Mg3Al2Si3O12). The elastic moduli, c ij , of the two samples are entirely consistent and agree with previous estimates of the elastic properties of pyrope based upon the moduli of solid solutions. Our results indicate that the elastic moduli of pyrope end-member are c 11=296.2±0.5, c 12=111.1±0.6, c 44=91.6±0.3, Ks=172.8±0.3, μ=92.0±0.2, all in units of GPa. These results differ by several percent from those reported previously for synthetic pyrope, but are based upon a much larger data set. Although the hydrous components of the two samples from the present study are substantially different, representing both ‘dry’ and ‘saturated’ samples, we find no discernable effect of structurally bound water on the elastic properties. This is due to the small absolute solubility of water in pyrope, as compared with other garnets such as grossular.

  2. Using Ultrasonic Lamb Waves To Measure Moduli Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of broad-band ultrasonic Lamb waves in plate specimens of ceramic-matrix/fiber and metal-matrix/fiber composite materials used to determine moduli of elasticity of materials. In one class of potential applications of concept, Lamb-wave responses of specimens measured and analyzed at various stages of thermal and/or mechanical processing to determine effects of processing, without having to dissect specimens. In another class, structural components having shapes supporting propagation of Lamb waves monitored ultrasonically to identify signs of deterioration and impending failure.

  3. The moduli and gravitino (non)-problems in models with strongly stabilized moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jason L.; Olive, Keith A.; Garcia, Marcos A.G. E-mail: garciagarcia@physics.umn.edu

    2014-03-01

    In gravity mediated models and in particular in models with strongly stabilized moduli, there is a natural hierarchy between gaugino masses, the gravitino mass and moduli masses: m{sub 1/2} << m{sub 3/2} << m{sub φ}. Given this hierarchy, we show that 1) moduli problems associated with excess entropy production from moduli decay and 2) problems associated with moduli/gravitino decays to neutralinos are non-existent. Placed in an inflationary context, we show that the amplitude of moduli oscillations are severely limited by strong stabilization. Moduli oscillations may then never come to dominate the energy density of the Universe. As a consequence, moduli decay to gravitinos and their subsequent decay to neutralinos need not overpopulate the cold dark matter density.

  4. Young's Moduli of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pawlik, R.; Loewenthal, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic metallic copper alloy and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold spray (CS) or the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition processes. Dynamic elastic modulus property measurements were conducted on these monolithic coating specimens between 300 K and 1273 K using the impulse excitation technique. The Young's moduli decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature at all temperatures except in the case of the CS Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and VPS NiCrAlY, where deviations from linearity were observed above a critical temperature. It was observed that the Young's moduli for VPS Cu-8%Cr were larger than literature data compiled for Cu. The addition of 1%Al to Cu- 8%Cr significantly increased its Young's modulus by 12 to 17% presumably due to a solid solution effect. Comparisons of the Young s moduli data between two different measurements on the same CS Cu- 23%Cr-5%Al specimen revealed that the values measured in the first run were about 10% higher than those in the second run. It is suggested that this observation is due to annealing of the initial cold work microstructure resulting form the cold spray deposition process.

  5. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  6. String moduli stabilization at the conifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Herschmann, Daniela; Wolf, Florian

    2016-08-01

    We study moduli stabilization for type IIB orientifolds compactified on Calabi-Yau threefolds in the region close to conifold singularities in the complex structure moduli space. The form of the periods implies new phenomena like exponential mass hierarchies even in the regime of negligible warping. Integrating out the heavy conic complex structure modulus leads to an effective flux induced potential for the axio-dilaton and the remaining complex structure moduli containing exponentially suppressed terms that imitate non-perturbative effects. It is shown that this scenario can be naturally combined with the large volume scenario so that all moduli are dynamically stabilized in the dilute flux regime. As an application of this moduli stabilization scheme, a string inspired model of aligned inflation is designed that features a parametrically controlled hierarchy of mass scales.

  7. Elastic constant versus temperature behavior of three hardened maraging steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledbetter, H. M.; Austin, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic constants of three maraging steels were determined by measuring ultrasonic velocities. Annealed steels show slightly lower bulk moduli and considerably lower shear moduli than hardened steels. All the elastic constants (Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio) show regular temperature behavior between 76 and 400 K. Young's modulus and the shear modulus increase with increasing yield strength, but the bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio are relatively unchanged. Elastic anisotropy is quite small.

  8. Measurements of Young's and shear moduli of rail steel at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuanye; Zhang, Haifeng; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Karim, Md Afzalul; Felix Wu, H

    2014-03-01

    The design and modelling of the buckling effect of Continuous Welded Rail (CWR) requires accurate material constants, especially at elevated temperatures. However, such material constants have rarely been found in literature. In this article, the Young's moduli and shear moduli of rail steel at elevated temperatures are determined by a new sonic resonance method developed in our group. A network analyser is used to excite a sample hanged inside a furnace through a simple tweeter type speaker. The vibration signal is picked up by a Polytec OFV-5000 Laser Vibrometer and then transferred back to the network analyser. Resonance frequencies in both the flexural and torsional modes are measured, and the Young's moduli and shear moduli are determined through the measured resonant frequencies. To validate the measured elastic constants, the measurements have been repeated by using the classic sonic resonance method. The comparisons of obtained moduli from the two methods show an excellent consistency of the results. In addition, the material elastic constants measured are validated by an ultrasound test based on a pulse-echo method and compared with previous published results at room temperature. The measured material data provides an invaluable reference for the design of CWR to avoid detrimental buckling failure.

  9. Adiabatic limit in Abelian Higgs model with application to Seiberg-Witten equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, A.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we deal with the (2 + 1)-dimensional Higgs model governed by the Ginzburg-Landau Lagrangian. The static solutions of this model, called otherwise vortices, are described by the theorem of Taubes. This theorem gives, in particular, an explicit description of the moduli space of vortices (with respect to gauge transforms). However, much less is known about the moduli space of dynamical solutions. A description of slowly moving solutions may be given in terms of the adiabatic limit. In this limit the dynamical Ginzburg-Landau equations reduce to the adiabatic equation coinciding with the Euler equation for geodesics on the moduli space of vortices with respect to the Riemannian metric (called T-metric) determined by the kinetic energy of the model. A similar adiabatic limit procedure can be used to describe approximately solutions of the Seiberg-Witten equations on 4-dimensional symplectic manifolds. In this case the geodesics of T-metric are replaced by the pseudoholomorphic curves while the solutions of Seiberg-Witten equations reduce to the families of vortices defined in the normal planes to the limiting pseudoholomorphic curve. Such families should satisfy a nonlinear ∂-equation which can be considered as a complex analogue of the adiabatic equation. Respectively, the arising pseudoholomorphic curves may be considered as complex analogues of adiabatic geodesics in (2 + 1)-dimensional case. In this sense the Seiberg-Witten model may be treated as a (2 + 1)-dimensional analogue of the (2 + 1)-dimensional Abelian Higgs model2.

  10. On the anisotropic elastic properties of hydroxyapatite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.; Ukraincik, K.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the isotropic elastic moduli on polycrystalline specimens of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are compared with elastic constants measured directly from single crystals of fluorapatite in order to derive a set of pseudo single crystal elastic constants for hydroxyapatite. The stiffness coefficients thus derived are given. The anisotropic and isotropic elastic properties are then computed and compared with similar properties derived from experimental observations of the anisotropic behavior of bone.

  11. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  12. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudenz, Kristen L.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. This approach consists of two quantum phases, with some amount of classical preprocessing to set up the quantum problems. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. All quantum processing is strictly limited to two-qubit interactions so as to ensure physical feasibility. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation, with a specific example of the learning phase applied to a problem of interest in flight control systems. Beyond this example, the algorithm can be used to attack a broad class of anomaly detection problems.

  13. Effective dynamic moduli and density of fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    A multiple scattering theory is developed to predict the effective dynamic material properties of elastic composites in two dimensions. The system consists of circular fibers distributed randomly in an elastic solid. The coherent wave propagation in the elastic composite is analyzed under the quasi-crystalline approximation. The effective medium equivalent to the original composite material is a medium with space and time dispersion, and hence, its parameters are functions of frequency of the incident field. Although the effective medium is homogeneous and isotropic, its effective dynamic moduli and density depend on the type of propagating wave, e.g., they are different for longitudinal and transverse incident waves. However, they coincide in the long-wave region as expected on physical grounds. Furthermore, the effective material properties are found to be complexvalued, in addition to their dynamic nature. For in-plane waves and in the long-wave limit the effective bulk modulus, mass density and shear modulus are independently determined by a set of monopolar, dipolar and quadrupolar scattering coefficients of the embedded fibers alone, respectively. Likewise, for anti-plane waves, the effective mass density and the shear modulus are specified, respectively, in terms of the monopolar and dipolar scattering coefficients of the corresponding fiberscattering problem. The emerging possibility of designing composite materials to form elastic metamaterials is discussed.

  14. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of {approx} {+-}22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than {approx} 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance {approx} 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance {approx} 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  15. Universal moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lizhen; Jost, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    We construct a moduli space for Riemann surfaces that is universal in the sense that it represents compact Riemann surfaces of any finite genus. This moduli space is a connected complex subspace of an infinite dimensional complex space, and is stratified according to genus such that each stratum has a compact closure, and it carries a metric and a measure that induce a Riemannian metric and a finite volume measure on each stratum. Applications to the Plateau-Douglas problem for minimal surfaces of varying genus and to the partition function of Bosonic string theory are outlined. The construction starts with a universal moduli space of Abelian varieties. This space carries a structure of an infinite dimensional locally symmetric space which is of interest in its own right. The key to our construction of the universal moduli space then is the Torelli map that assigns to every Riemann surface its Jacobian and its extension to the Satake-Baily-Borel compactifications.

  16. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  17. Moduli stabilization in stringy ISS models

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yu; Nakayama, Yu; Yamazaki, Masahito; Yanagida, T.T.

    2007-09-28

    We present a stringy realization of the ISS metastable SUSY breaking model with moduli stabilization. The mass moduli of the ISS model is stabilized by gauging of a U(1) symmetry and its D-term potential. The SUSY is broken both by F-terms and D-terms. It is possible to obtain de Sitter vacua with a vanishingly small cosmological constant by an appropriate fine-tuning of flux parameters.

  18. Moduli Stabilization Using Open String Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alok

    2007-04-01

    In this talk we discuss how by turning on gauge fluxes which couple to the end-points of open strings one can obtain stabilization of closed string moduli. This is done by analyzing supersymmetry constraints and RR tadpole conditions. Stabilization of complex and Kahler moduli is studied in a T6/Z2 orientifold. .

  19. Hard tissue as a composite material. I - Bounds on the elastic behavior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Recent determination of the elastic moduli of hydroxyapatite by ultrasonic methods permits a re-examination of the Voigt or parallel model of the elastic behavior of bone, as a two phase composite material. It is shown that such a model alone cannot be used to describe the behavior of bone. Correlative data on the elastic moduli of dentin, enamel and various bone samples indicate the existence of a nonlinear dependence of elastic moduli on composition of hard tissue. Several composite models are used to calculate the bounds on the elastic behavior of these tissues. The limitations of these models are described, and experiments to obtain additional critical data are discussed.

  20. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  1. Elastic properties of NaXH4 (X = B, Al)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Zhen-Yi; Hou, Yu-Qing; Li, Li-Sha

    2009-07-01

    Elastic properties of NaXH4 (X = B, Al) have been studied by first-principles calculations using a projected augmented plane-wave approach. The calculated elastic constants compare favorably with experimental values. Our calculations show that the theoretically calculated elastic constants and bulk moduli have small values compared with those of typical metals and intermetallic compounds, which indicates that NaXH4 (X = B, Al) are highly compressible. Comparison of bulk moduli B of different complex hydrides shows a correlation between B and the decomposition temperatures. Also, we calculated the elastic anisotropies and the Debye temperatures from the elastic constants.

  2. Elasticity of Wadsleyite at 12 GPa1073K

    SciTech Connect

    W Liu; J Kung; B Li; N Nishiyama; Y Wang

    2011-12-31

    Elasticity of (Mg{sub 0.87}Fe{sub 0.13}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} wadsleyite has been measured at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature to 12 GPa and 1073 K using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation. The elastic moduli and their pressure and temperature derivatives are precisely determined using pressure-standard-free third-order and fourth-order finite strain equations. Combined with previous thermoelastic data on olivine, the density, velocity and acoustic impedance contrasts between {alpha}- and {beta}-(Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} at 410-km depth are calculated along a 1673 K adiabatic geotherm. Both the third- and fourth-order finite strain equation fitting results give estimation of {approx}33-58% olivine content in the upper mantle to account for a seismic discontinuity of {approx}5% velocity jumps, and 8.5% (P wave) and 11.1% (S wave) impedance jumps at 410 km depth.

  3. Micromechanical Prediction of the Effective Behavior of Fully Coupled Electro-Magneto-Thermo-Elastic Multiphase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    The micromechanical generalized method of cells model is employed for the prediction of the effective moduli of electro-magneto-thermo-elastic composites. These include the effective elastic, piezoelectric, piezomagnetic, dielectric, magnetic permeability, electromagnetic coupling moduli, as well as the effective thermal expansion coefficients and the associated pyroelectric and pyromagnetic constants. Results are given for fibrous and periodically bilaminated composites.

  4. Determination of tensile and compressive moduli of laminae in unidirectionally reinforced laminate by flexural tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklinski, Mariusz

    2017-03-01

    The Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is widely used in engineering despite of various simplifications. One of which, that do matters in this article, is neglecting the difference between tensile and compressive moduli. Experimental tests reveal that for fibre reinforced composites tensile moduli are generally greater than compressive ones. This paper presents the results of testing the laminate composed of four unidirectionally glass reinforced laminae separated by layers of glass mat. The specimens were subjected to flexural, tensile and compressive loading in order to calculate corresponding moduli of elasticity. The results were compared using equations of Classical Beam Theory. Knowing the tensile and compressive moduli of glass mat reinforced laminae and performing flexural tests of laminate it is possible to calculate the tensile and compressive moduli of unidirectionally glass reinforced laminae. The experimental data taken into calculations correspond to linear normal strains of 0.0005 and 0.0025. The experimental data are consistent with results of calculations within acceptable margin of tolerance.

  5. Calculated elastic and thermal properties of MGO at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, Donald G.; Cohen, Ronald E.; Mehl, Michael J.

    1990-05-01

    Using the potential-induced breathing model, we calculate the pressure and temperature dependence of the thermoelastic properties of MgO. These calculations represent the first attempt to obtain a consistent set of thermodynamic elastic moduli for an oxide from an ab initio model over a wide range of pressure and temperature. By assuming the quasi-harmonic approximation for the free energies, we find excellent agreement between the temperature dependence of calculated elastic moduli and those obtained from experiments. Comparison of the calculated athermal and isothermal elastic moduli shows approximations using athermal values to be unreliable at high temperature. The elastic moduli for MgO are presented for pressures and temperatures appropriate for the lower mantle, a regime in which elastic moduli cannot be obtained by direct measurement.

  6. Higgs-otic inflation and moduli stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielleman, Sjoerd; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Pedro, Francisco G.; Valenzuela, Irene; Wieck, Clemens

    2017-02-01

    We study closed-string moduli stabilization in Higgs-otic inflation in Type IIB orientifold backgrounds with fluxes. In this setup large-field inflation is driven by the vacuum energy of mobile D7-branes. Imaginary selfdual (ISD) three-form fluxes in the background source a μ-term and the necessary monodromy for large field excursions while imaginary anti-selfdual (IASD) three-form fluxes are sourced by non-perturbative contri-butions to the superpotential necessary for moduli stabilization. We analyze Kähler moduli stabilization and backreaction on the inflaton potential in detail. Confirming results in the recent literature, we find that integrating out heavy Kähler moduli leads to a controlled flattening of the inflaton potential. We quantify the flux tuning necessary for stability even during large-field inflation. Moreover, we study the backreaction of supersymmetrically stabilized complex structure moduli and the axio-dilaton in the Kähler metric of the inflaton. Contrary to previous findings, this backreaction can be pushed far out in field space if a similar flux tuning as in the Kähler sector is possible. This allows for a trans-Planckian field range large enough to support inflation.

  7. Two-field Kaehler moduli inflation in large volume moduli stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huan-Xiong; Ma, Hong-Liang E-mail: hlma@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2008-08-15

    In this paper we present a two-field inflation model, which is distinctive in having a non-canonical kinetic Lagrangian and comes from the large volume approach to the moduli stabilization in flux compactification of type IIB superstring on a Calabi-Yau orientifold with h{sup (1,2)}>h{sup (1,1)}{>=}4. The Kaehler moduli are classified as the volume modulus, heavy moduli and two light moduli. The axion-dilaton, complex structure moduli and all heavy Kaehler moduli including the volume modulus are frozen by a non-perturbatively corrected flux superpotential and the {alpha}{sup '}-corrected Kaehler potential in the large volume limit. The minimum of the scalar potential at which the heavy moduli are stabilized provides the dominant potential energy for the surviving light Kaehler moduli. We consider a simplified case where the axionic components in the light Kaehler moduli are further stabilized at the potential minimum and only the geometrical components are taken as scalar fields to drive an assisted-like inflation. For a certain range of moduli stabilization parameters and inflation initial conditions, we obtain a nearly flat power spectrum of the curvature perturbation, with n{sub s} Almost-Equal-To 0.96 at Hubble exit, and an inflationary energy scale of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} GeV. In our model, there is significant correlation between the curvature and isocurvature perturbations on super-Hubble scales, so at the end of inflation a great deal of the curvature power spectrum originates from this correlation.

  8. Semiconductor adiabatic qubits

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Witzel, Wayne; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Ganti, Anand; Landahl, Andrew J.; Lilly, Michael; Nguyen, Khoi Thi; Bishop, Nathaniel; Carr, Stephen M.; Bussmann, Ezra; Nielsen, Erik; Levy, James Ewers; Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-12-27

    A quantum computing device that includes a plurality of semiconductor adiabatic qubits is described herein. The qubits are programmed with local biases and coupling terms between qubits that represent a problem of interest. The qubits are initialized by way of a tuneable parameter, a local tunnel coupling within each qubit, such that the qubits remain in a ground energy state, and that initial state is represented by the qubits being in a superposition of |0> and |1> states. The parameter is altered over time adiabatically or such that relaxation mechanisms maintain a large fraction of ground state occupation through decreasing the tunnel coupling barrier within each qubit with the appropriate schedule. The final state when tunnel coupling is effectively zero represents the solution state to the problem represented in the |0> and |1> basis, which can be accurately read at each qubit location.

  9. Accidental Kähler moduli inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Maharana, Anshuman; Rummel, Markus; Sumitomo, Yoske E-mail: markus.rummel@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-09-01

    We study a model of accidental inflation in type IIB string theory where inflation occurs near the inflection point of a small Kähler modulus. A racetrack structure helps to alleviate the known concern that string-loop corrections may spoil Kähler Moduli Inflation unless having a significant suppression via the string coupling or a special brane setup. Also, the hierarchy of gauge group ranks required for the separation between moduli stabilization and inflationary dynamics is relaxed. The relaxation becomes more significant when we use the recently proposed D-term generated racetrack model.

  10. Accidental Kähler moduli inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Maharana, Anshuman; Rummel, Markus; Sumitomo, Yoske

    2015-09-14

    We study a model of accidental inflation in type IIB string theory where inflation occurs near the inflection point of a small Kähler modulus. A racetrack structure helps to alleviate the known concern that string-loop corrections may spoil Kähler Moduli Inflation unless having a significant suppression via the string coupling or a special brane setup. Also, the hierarchy of gauge group ranks required for the separation between moduli stabilization and inflationary dynamics is relaxed. The relaxation becomes more significant when we use the recently proposed D-term generated racetrack model.

  11. Pre-Stressed Viscoelastic Composites: Effective Incremental Moduli and Band-Gap Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, William J.

    2010-09-30

    We study viscoelastic wave propagation along pre-stressed nonlinear elastic composite bars. In the pre-stressed state we derive explicit forms for the effective incremental storage and loss moduli with dependence on the pre-stress. We also derive a dispersion relation for the effective wavenumber in the case of arbitrary frequency, hence permitting a study of viscoelastic band-gap tuning via pre-stress.

  12. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  13. An Approach to Calculate Mineralś Bulk Moduli KS from Chemical Composition and Density ρ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, S.; Schilling, F. R.; Mueller, B.; Drüppel, K.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are fundamental parameters for technical and geotechnical applications and an important research topic towards a better understanding of the Earth's interior. Published elastic properties, chemical composition, and density data of 86 minerals (total of 258 data including properties of minerals at various p, T conditions) were collected into a database. It was used to test different hypotheses about relationships between these properties (e.g. water content in minerals and their Poisson's ratio). Furthermore, a scheme to model the average elastic properties, i.e. the bulk modulus KS, based on mineral density and composition was developed. Birch's law, a linearity between density ρ and wave velocity (e.g. vp.), is frequently used in seismic and seismology to derive density of the Earth's interior from seismic velocities. Applying the compiled mineral data contradicts the use of a simple velocity-density relation (e.g. Gardneŕs relation, 1974). The presented model-approach to estimate the mineralś bulk moduli Ks (as Voigt-Reuss-Hill average) is based on the idea of pressure-temperature (p-T) dependent ionś bulk moduli. Using a multi-exponential regression to ascertain the ionś bulk moduli and by applying an exponential scaling with density ρ, their bulk moduli could be modelled. As a result, > 88 % of the 258 bulk moduli data are predicted with an uncertainty of < 20 % compared to published values. Compared to other models (e.g. Anderson et al. 1970 and Anderson & Nafe 1965), the here presented approach to model the bulk moduli only requires the density ρ and chemical composition of the mineral and is not limited to a specific group of minerals, composition, or structure. In addition to this, by using the pressure and temperature dependent density ρ(p, T), it is possible to predict bulk moduli for varying p-T conditions. References:Gardner, G.H.F, Gardner, L.W. and Gregory, A.R. (1974). Geophysics, 39, No. 6, 770

  14. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for elastic constant measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Roe, L.H.

    1993-12-31

    All objects exhibit vibrational resonances when mechanically excited. These resonant frequencies are determined by density, geometry, and elastic moduli. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) takes advantage of the known relationship between the parameters. In particular, for a freely suspended object, with three of the four parameters (vibrational spectra, density, geometry, or elastic moduli) known the remaining one can be calculated. From a materials characterization standpoint it is straight-forward to measure density and geometry but less so to measure all the elastic moduli. It has recently become possible to quickly and accurately measure vibrational spectra, and using code written at Los Alamos, calculate all the elastic moduli simultaneously. This is done to an accuracy of better than one percent for compression and 0.1 percent for shear. RUS provides rapid acquisition of materials information here-to-fore obtainable only with difficulty. It will greatly facilitate the use of real materials properties in models and thus make possible more realistic modeling results. The technique is sensitive to phase changes and microstructure. This offers a change to input real data into microstructure and phase change models. It will also enable measurement of moduli at locations in and about a weld thus providing information for a validating coupled thermomechanical calculations.

  15. Variational method of determining effective moduli of polycrystals: (A) hexagonal symmetry, (B) trigonal symmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Meister, R.

    1965-01-01

    Variational principles of anisotropic elasticity have been applied to aggregates of randomly oriented pure-phase polycrystals having hexagonal symmetry and trigonal symmetry. The bounds of the effective elastic moduli obtained in this way show a considerable improvement over the bounds obtained by means of the Voigt and Reuss assumptions. The Hill average is found to be in most cases a good approximation when compared to the bounds found from the variational method. The new bounds reduce in their limits to the Voigt and Reuss values. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. Elastic properties of granular materials under uniaxial compaction cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, N.; Anderson, O. L.

    1973-01-01

    Data on andesitic and basaltic sands are presented showing compressional sound velocity, density, and creep as functions of uniaxial loading through several compaction cycles. Maximum pressures over which acoustic measurements were made were in the range from 600 to 700 bars. The dynamic elastic modulus varies with pressure in a manner analogous to that of a static elastic modulus defined by small pressure perturbations on a typical compaction cycle. After several compaction cycles, two compressional elastic moduli apparently exist at low pressure (thus two modes of compressional wave propagation through the samples are indicated). The elastic moduli observations are briefly discussed in terms of a general expression for compressibility.

  17. The Elasticity of Synthetic Polycrystalline Complex Garnet to 9.5 GPa and 1000K Determined Using Ultrasonic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triplett, R.; Gwanmesia, G. D.; Wang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Petrological studies show that the transition zone of the Earth's mantle (depth of 410-660 km) is composed of 40-70% garnet by volume. Extensive knowledge of the elastic properties of complex garnet, of chemical composition pertinent to the region and at relevant high pressures and temperatures, is necessary to constrain the composition of the region and to explain the steep compressional wave (P-wave) and shear wave (S-wave) velocity gradients observed from seismic studies. We have measured the acoustic wave velocities of synthetic polycrystalline complex garnet of a suitable pyroxene composition (Mg1.875Ca0.75Fe0.375 Na0.5Al0.5Si4O12) at simultaneous pressures (P) up to 9.5 GPa and temperatures (T) up to 1000 K in a DIA-type apparatus using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging. Travel times of the P- and S-waves, X-ray image data, and X-ray diffraction data were collected during cooling cycles to minimize the effect of non-hydrostatic stress on the specimen. Elastic adiabatic bulk (KS) and shear (G) moduli data were fit to polynomial equations in P and T, yielding (∂KS/∂P)T = 4.6 (1) and (∂G/∂P)T = 1.27 (3) for the pressure derivatives of the elastic KS and G, respectively, and (∂KS/∂T)p = -15.0 (7) MPa/K and (∂G/∂T)P = -10.4 (2) MPa/K for the temperature derivatives of KS and G, respectively. The results are consistent with those of previous studies on garnets of varying compositions, and in general suggest that the pressure and temperature dependence of the elastic bulk and shear moduli of garnet may be insensitive to the garnet composition.

  18. On Adiabatic Pair Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickl, Peter; Dürr, Detlef

    2008-08-01

    We give here a rigorous proof of the well known prediction of pair creation as it arises from the Dirac equation with an external time dependent potential. Pair creation happens with probability one if the potential changes adiabatically in time and becomes overcritical, which means that an eigenvalue curve (as a function of time) bridges the gap between the negative and positive spectral continuum. The potential can be thought of as being zero at large negative and large positive times. The rigorous treatment of this effect has been lacking since the pioneering work of Beck, Steinwedel and Süßmann [1] in 1963 and Gershtein and Zeldovich [8] in 1970.

  19. Low velocity layer (LVL) in subduction zones: elasticity of lawsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantel, J.; Mookherjee, M.; Frost, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    As the oceanic plates subduct, they undergoes a series of phase transformations. The hydrated oceanic crust undergoes dehydrations and eventually transforms to eclogite. However, in cold subduction zones such transformations are kinetically hindered. Eclogite is dense, and its elastic properties are similar to the normal peridotitic mantle. On the other hand, the seismic wave speeds in basalts are 10-15% slower than harzburgite. In certain subduction zones, including southern Japan, a 5-10 km think low velocity layer (LVL) has been observed. The LVL is around 5-7% slower than the surrounding mantle and cannot be readily explained by the presence of meta-stable basalts. Instead, a metamorphic rock such as lawsonite-blueschist is a likely candidate for explaining the observed LVL. We have conducted high-pressure ultrasonic interferometric measurements to gain insight into the elastic properties of lawsonite [CaAl2(Si2O7)(OH)2.H2O]. In addition, we have also computed the full elastic constant tensor at elevated pressures, using electronic structure calculations. The bulk and shear modulus obtained from theory and experiments are in good agreement with an adiabatic bulk (K) and shear (G) moduli of 126.2 ± 0.3 GPa and 52.7 ± 0.2 GPa respectively. The pressure derivaitive of bulk modulus (K’) and shear modulus (G’) are 3.5 and 1.1 respectively. Indeed, lawsonite has unusually low shear modulus and might be a suitable candidate phase to explain the observed LVL in subduction zones.

  20. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  1. Dimensional reduction for D3-brane moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cownden, Brad; Frey, Andrew R.; Marsh, M. C. David; Underwood, Bret

    2016-12-01

    Warped string compactifications are central to many attempts to stabilize moduli and connect string theory with cosmology and particle phenomenology. We present a first-principles derivation of the low-energy 4D effective theory from dimensional reduction of a D3-brane in a warped Calabi-Yau compactification of type IIB string theory with imaginary self-dual 3-form flux, including effects of D3-brane motion beyond the probe approximation, and find the metric on the moduli space of brane positions, the universal volume modulus, and axions descending from the 4-form potential. As D3-branes may be considered as carrying either electric or magnetic charges for the self-dual 5-form field strength, we present calculations in both duality frames. Our results are consistent with, but extend significantly, earlier results on the low-energy effective theory arising from D3-branes in string compactifications.

  2. Single-crystal Elasticity of Zoisite Ca2Al3Si3O12(OH) by Brillouin Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Z.; Jiang, F.; Duffy, T. S.

    2005-12-01

    Zoisite, Ca 2Al3Si3O12(OH), is an important metamorphic mineral and one of the main H2O-containing phases minerals in subduction zones. Experiments in basaltic compositions have shown that zoisite can remain stable to pressures of ~3.1 GPa at 650°C (Forneris and Holloway, 2003), and it is stable to ~7 GPa and 1000°C in the calcium-aluminum-silicon-hydrogen system (Poli et al, 1998). The bulk modulus of zoisite was measured by X-ray diffraction in both multi-anvil apparatus and diamond anvil cells (Holland et al, 1996; Comodi et al, 1997; Pawley et al, 1998; Grevel et al, 2000). However, existing results show large discrepancies. That cannot be explained by presence of small amounts of Fe. In order to provide reliable elastic moduli, the single-crystal elastic constants of zoisite were determined by Brillouin spectroscopy. Three platelets were cut from a gem-quality zoisite sample. Single-crystal x-ray diffraction was performed at x17C of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The lattice parameters are a=16.207(5), b=5.540(5), c=10.056(2) Å with a calculated density 3.343(3)g/cm3. The Brillouin spectra were recorded in a forward scattering geometry at ambient conditions. Measurements were made in a total of 37 directions in each plane. The data were inverted for 9 elastic tensor components and 9 crystal orientation parameters. The single crystal elastic tensor constants C11, C12, C13, C22, C23, C33, C44, C55, C66 are 279.1(8), 95.1(18), 91.3(16), 249.3(8), 30.9(8), 216.5(8), 51.6(4), 80.2(4), 65.9(3)GPa respectively. The resulting bounds on the adiabatic bulk and shear moduli are 127.9(4) and 72.6(2)GPa respectively. Our results are generally consistent with previous static compression studies although we obtain higher c axis compressibility than some X-ray studies. Compared with the elastic moduli of lawsonite, zoisite has a similar bulk modulus (~125 GPa), but a 30% larger shear modulus than lawsonite (~52 GPa) (Sinogeikin et al, 2000). The VP/VS ratio is 1.76 for

  3. Braneworld gravity: influence of the moduli fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barceló, Carlos; Visser, Matt

    2000-10-01

    We consider the case of a generic braneworld geometry in the presence of one or more moduli fields (e.g. the dilaton) that vary throughout the bulk spacetime. Working in an arbitrary conformal frame, using the generalized junction conditions of gr-qc/0008008 and the Gauss-Codazzi equations, we derive the effective ``induced'' on-brane gravitational equations. As usual in braneworld scenarios, these equations do not form a closed system in that the bulk can exchange both information and stress-energy with the braneworld. We work with an arbitrary number of moduli fields described by an arbitrary sigma model, with arbitrary curvature couplings, arbitrary self interactions, and arbitrary dimension for the bulk. (The braneworld is always codimension one.) Among the novelties we encounter are modifications of the on-brane stress-energy conservation law, anomalous couplings between on-brane gravity and the trace of the on-brane stress-energy tensor, and additional possibilities for modifying the on-brane effective cosmological constant. After obtaining the general stress-energy ``conservation'' law and the ``induced Einstein equations'' we particularize the discussion to two particularly attractive cases: for a (n-2)-brane in ([n-1] + 1) dimensions we discuss both the effect of (1) generic variable moduli fields in the Einstein frame, and (2) the effect of a varying dilaton in the string frame.

  4. BCFT moduli space in level truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrna, Matěj; Maccaferri, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new non-perturbative method to search for marginal deformations in level truncated open string field theory. Instead of studying the flatness of the effective potential for the marginal field (which is not expected to give a one-to-one parametrization of the BCFT moduli space), we identify a new non-universal branch of the tachyon potential which, from known analytic examples, is expected to parametrize the marginal flow in a much larger region of the BCFT moduli space. By a level 18 computation in Siegel gauge we find an increasingly flat effective potential in the non-universal sector, connected to the perturbative vacuum and we confirm that the coefficient of the marginal field ( λ SFT) has a maximum compatible with the value where the solutions stop existing in the standard Sen-Zwiebach approach. At the maximal reachable level the effective potential still deviates from flatness for large values of the tachyon, but the Ellwood invariants stay close to the correct BCFT values on the whole branch and the full periodic moduli space of the cosine deformation is covered.

  5. Sound Velocity and Elasticity of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals by Brillouin Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Speziale, S.; Jiang, F.; Caylor, C. L.; Kriminski, S.; Zha, C.-S.; Thorne, R. E.; Duffy, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Quasilongitudinal sound velocities and the second-order elastic moduli of tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals were determined as a function of relative humidity (RH) by Brillouin scattering. In hydrated crystals the measured sound velocities in the [110] plane vary between 2.12 ± 0.03 km/s along the [001] direction and 2.31 ± 0.08 km/s along the [110] direction. Dehydration from 98% to 67% RH increases the sound velocities and decreases the velocity anisotropy in (110) from 8.2% to 2.0%. A discontinuity in velocity and an inversion of the anisotropy is observed with increasing dehydration providing support for the existence of a structural transition below 88% RH. Brillouin linewidths can be described by a mechanical model in which the phonon is coupled to a relaxation mode of hydration water with a single relaxation time of 55 ± 5 ps. At equilibrium hydration (98% RH) the longitudinal moduli C11 + C12 + 2C66 = 12.81 ± 0.08 GPa, C11 = 5.49 ± 0.03 GPa, and C33 = 5.48 ± 0.05 GPa were directly determined. Inversion of the measured sound velocities in the [110] plane constrains the combination C44 + ½C13 to 2.99 ± 0.05 GPa. Further constraints on the elastic tensor are obtained by combining the Brillouin quasilongitudinal results with axial compressibilities determined from high-pressure x-ray diffraction. We constrain the adiabatic bulk modulus to the range 2.7–5.3 GPa. PMID:14581220

  6. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  7. Elastic-wave velocity in marine sediments with gas hydrates: Effective medium modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A.; Sakai, A.; Collett, T.

    1999-01-01

    We offer a first-principle-based effective medium model for elastic-wave velocity in unconsolidated, high porosity, ocean bottom sediments containing gas hydrate. The dry sediment frame elastic constants depend on porosity, elastic moduli of the solid phase, and effective pressure. Elastic moduli of saturated sediment are calculated from those of the dry frame using Gassmann's equation. To model the effect of gas hydrate on sediment elastic moduli we use two separate assumptions: (a) hydrate modifies the pore fluid elastic properties without affecting the frame; (b) hydrate becomes a component of the solid phase, modifying the elasticity of the frame. The goal of the modeling is to predict the amount of hydrate in sediments from sonic or seismic velocity data. We apply the model to sonic and VSP data from ODP Hole 995 and obtain hydrate concentration estimates from assumption (b) consistent with estimates obtained from resistivity, chlorinity and evolved gas data. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Elastic modulus of cetacean auditory ossicles.

    PubMed

    Tubelli, Andrew A; Zosuls, Aleks; Ketten, Darlene R; Mountain, David C

    2014-05-01

    In order to model the hearing capabilities of marine mammals (cetaceans), it is necessary to understand the mechanical properties, such as elastic modulus, of the middle ear bones in these species. Biologically realistic models can be used to investigate the biomechanics of hearing in cetaceans, much of which is currently unknown. In the present study, the elastic moduli of the auditory ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes) of eight species of cetacean, two baleen whales (mysticete) and six toothed whales (odontocete), were measured using nanoindentation. The two groups of mysticete ossicles overall had lower average elastic moduli (35.2 ± 13.3 GPa and 31.6 ± 6.5 GPa) than the groups of odontocete ossicles (53.3 ± 7.2 GPa to 62.3 ± 4.7 GPa). Interior bone generally had a higher modulus than cortical bone by up to 36%. The effects of freezing and formalin-fixation on elastic modulus were also investigated, although samples were few and no clear trend could be discerned. The high elastic modulus of the ossicles and the differences in the elastic moduli between mysticetes and odontocetes are likely specializations in the bone for underwater hearing.

  9. Characterization of the Nonlinear Elastic Properties of Graphite/Epoxy Composites Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The normalized change in ultrasonic "natural" velocity as a function of stress and temperature was measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer. These measurements were used together with the linear (second order) elastic moduli to calculate some of the nonlinear (third order) moduli of this material.

  10. Moduli stabilization and the pattern of sparticle spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kiwoon

    2008-11-23

    We discuss the pattern of low energy sparticle spectra which appears in some class of moduli stabilization scenario. In case that light moduli are stabilized by non-perturbative effects encoded in the superpotential and a phenomenologically viable de Sitter vacuum is obtained by a sequestered supersymmetry breaking sector, the anomaly-mediated soft terms become comparable to the moduli-mediated ones, leading to a quite distinctive pattern of low energy spacticle masses dubbed the mirage mediation pattern. We also discuss low energy sparticle masses in more general mixed-mediation scenario which includes a comparable size of gauge mediation in addition to the moduli and anomaly mediations.

  11. Variational method of determining effective moduli of polycrystals with tetragonal symmetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meister, R.; Peselnick, L.

    1966-01-01

    Variational principles have been applied to aggregates of randomly oriented pure-phase polycrystals having tetragonal symmetry. The bounds of the effective elastic moduli obtained in this way show a substantial improvement over the bounds obtained by means of the Voigt and Reuss assumptions. The Hill average is found to be a good approximation in most cases when compared to the bounds found from the variational method. The new bounds reduce in their limits to the Voigt and Reuss values. ?? 1966 The American Institute of Physics.

  12. Nonperturbative moduli superpotential with positive exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Seto, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    We study nonperturbative moduli superpotentials with positive exponents, i.e. the form like AeaT with a positive constant a and the modulus T. These effects can be generated, e.g., by D-branes which have negative Ramond-Ramond charge of the lower-dimensional D-brane. The scalar potentials including such terms have quite a rich structure. There are several local minima with different potential energies and a high barrier, whose height is of O(Mp4). We discuss their implications from the viewpoints of cosmology and particle phenomenology, e.g. the realization of inflation models, avoiding the overshooting problem. This type of potential would be useful to realize the inflation and low-energy supersymmetry breaking.

  13. The Floquet Adiabatic Theorem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Phillip; Bukov, Marin; D'Alessio, Luca; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Davidson, Shainen; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2015-03-01

    The existance of the adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems has been the subject of an active debate with different articles reaching opposite conclusions over the years. In this talk we clarify the situation by deriving a systematic expansion in the time-derivatives of a slow parameter for the occupation probabilities of the Floque states. Our analysis shows that the in a certain limit the transition between Floquet eigenstates are suppressed and it is possible to define an adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems. Crucially we observe however that the conditions for adiabaticity in ordinary and Floquet systems are different and that this difference can become important when the amplitude of the periodic driving is large. We illustrate our results with specific examples of a periodically driven harmonic oscillator and cold atoms in optical lattices which are relevant in current experiments.

  14. Adiabatic losses in Stirling refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauwens, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Stirling cycle has been used very effectively in cryocoolers; but efficiencies relative to the Carnot limit are typically observed to peak for absolute temperature ratios of about two, which makes it less suitable for low-life refrigeration. The adiabatic loss appears to be responsible for poor performance at small temperature differences. In this paper, adiabatic losses are evaluated, for a temperature ratio of 2/3, taking into account the effect of phase angle between pistons, of volume ratio, of the distribution of the dead volume necessary to reduce the volume ratio, and of the distribution of displacement between expansion and compression spaces. The study is carried out numerically, using an adiabatic Stirling engine model in which cylinder flow is assumed to be stratified. Results show that the best location for the cylinder dead volume is on the compression side. Otherwise, all strategies used to trade off refrigeration for coefficient of performance are found to be roughly equivalent.

  15. Failure of classical elasticity in auxetic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, J. H.; Giller, C. B.; Mott, P. H.; Roland, C. M.

    2013-04-01

    Poisson's ratio, ν, was measured for four materials, a rubbery polymer, a conventional soft foam, and two auxetic foams. We find that for the first two materials, having ν ≥ 0.2, the experimental determinations of Poisson's ratio are in good agreement with values calculated from the shear and tensile moduli using the equations of classical elasticity. However, for the two auxetic materials (ν < 0), the equations of classical elasticity give values significantly different from the measured ν. We offer an interpretation of these results based on a recently published analysis of the bounds on Poisson's ratio for classical elasticity to be applicable.

  16. Complete bundle moduli reduction in heterotic string compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curio, Gottfried

    2012-05-01

    A major problem in discussing heterotic string models is the stabilisation of the many vector bundle moduli via the superpotential generated by world-sheet instantons. In arXiv:1110.6315 we have discussed the method to make a discrete twist in a large and much discussed class of vector bundles such that the generation number gets new contributions (which can be tuned suitably) and at the same time the space of bundle moduli of the new, twisted bundle is a proper subspace (where the 'new', non-generic twist class exists) of the original bundle moduli space; one thus gets a model, closely related to the original model one started with, but with enhanced flexibility in the generation number and where on the other hand the number of bundle moduli is somewhat reduced. Whereas in the previous paper the emphasis was on examples for the new flexibility in the generation number we here classify and describe explicitly the twists and give the precise reduction formula (for the number of moduli) for SU(5) bundles leading to an SU(5) GUT group in four dimensions. Finally we give various examples where the bundle moduli space is reduced completely: the superpotential for such rigid bundles becomes a function of the complex structure moduli alone (besides the exponential Kahler moduli contribution).

  17. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  18. Moduli restriction and chiral matter in heterotic string compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curio, Gottfried

    2012-01-01

    Supersymmetric heterotic string models, built from a stable holomorphic vector bundle V on a Calabi-Yau threefold X , usually come with many vector bundle moduli whose stabilisation is a difficult and complex task. It is therefore of interest to look for bundle constructions which, from the outset, have as few as possible bundle moduli. One way to reach such a set-up is to start from a generic construction and to make discrete mod- ifications of it which are available only over a subset of the bundle moduli space. Turning on such discrete `twists' constrains the moduli to the corresponding subset of their moduli space: the twisted bundle has less parametric freedom. We give an example of a set-up where this idea can be considered concretely. Such non-generic twists lead also to new contributions of chiral matter (which greatly enhances the flexibility in model building); their computation constitutes the main issue of this note.

  19. Elasticity of the Rod-Shaped Gram-Negative Eubacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulbitch, A.; Quinn, B.; Pink, D.

    2000-12-01

    We report a theoretical calculation of the elasticity of the peptidoglycan network, the only stress-bearing part of rod-shaped Gram-negative eubacteria. The peptidoglycan network consists of elastic peptides and inextensible glycan strands, and it has been proposed that the latter form zigzag filaments along the circumference of the cylindrical bacterial shell. The zigzag geometry of the glycan strands gives rise to nonlinear elastic behavior. The four elastic moduli of the peptidoglycan network depend on its stressed state. For a bacterium under physiological conditions the elasticity is proportional to the bacterial turgor pressure. Our results are in good agreement with recent measurements.

  20. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  1. Elastic Properties of Mantle Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.; Stan, C. V.

    2012-12-01

    The most direct information about the interior structure of the Earth comes from seismic wave velocities. Interpretation of seismic data requires an understanding of how sound velocities and elastic properties of minerals vary with pressure, temperature, crystal structure, and composition as well as the role of anelasticity, melts, etc. More generally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. The database of mineral elasticity measurements has been growing rapidly in recent years. In this work, we report initial results of an ongoing survey of our current knowledge of mineral elasticity at both ambient conditions and high pressures and temperatures. The analysis is selective, emphasizing single crystal measurements but also incorporating polycrystalline measurements and volume compression data as appropriate. The goal is to synthesize our current understanding of mineral elasticity in terms of structure and composition, and to identify the major remaining needs for experimental and theoretical work. Clinopyroxenes (Cpx) provide an example of our approach. A wide range of clinopyroxene compositions are found geologically and Mg-, Ca-, and Na-rich clinopyroxenes are expected to be important components in the upper mantle. The single-crystal elastic properties of a number of endmember Cpx compositions have been measured and these exhibit a range of ~25% in shear velocity. Those with monovalent cations (spodumene, jadeite) in the M2 site exhibit the highest velocities while Fe-rich (hendenbergit, acmite) compositions have the lowest velocities. The effects on velocity due to a wide range of chemical substitutions can be defined, but there are important discrepancies and omissions in the database. New measurements of omphacites, intermediate diopside-hedenbergite compositions, aegerine/acmite, augite, etc. are

  2. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  3. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  4. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  5. Digital waveguide adiabatic passage part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Jesse A.; Steel, M. J.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  6. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  7. Chirality dependent elastic properties of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes under uniaxial and torsional loading

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-02-14

    The elastic behavior of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes is studied under axial and torsional loading. Molecular dynamics simulation is carried out with a tersoff potential for modeling the interatomic interactions. Different chiral configurations with similar diameter are considered to study the effect of chirality on the elastic and shear moduli. Furthermore, the effects of tube length on elastic modulus are also studied by considering different aspects ratios. It is observed that both elastic and shear moduli depend upon the chirality of a nanotube. For aspect ratios less than 15, the elastic modulus reduces monotonically with an increase in the chiral angle. For chiral nanotubes, the torsional response shows a dependence on the direction of loading. The difference between the shear moduli against and along the chiral twist directions is maximum for chiral angle of 15°, and zero for zigzag (0°) and armchair (30°) configurations.

  8. Computation of elastic properties of 3D digital cores from the Longmaxi shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Fu, Li-Yun; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Wei-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of elastic moduli of shales on the mineralogy and microstructure of shales is important for the prediction of sweet spots and shale gas production. Based on 3D digital images of the microstructure of Longmaxi black shale samples using X-ray CT, we built detailed 3D digital images of cores with porosity properties and mineral contents. Next, we used finite-element (FE) methods to derive the elastic properties of the samples. The FE method can accurately model the shale mineralogy. Particular attention is paid to the derived elastic properties and their dependence on porosity and kerogen. The elastic moduli generally decrease with increasing porosity and kerogen, and there is a critical porosity (0.75) and kerogen content (ca. ≤3%) over which the elastic moduli decrease rapidly and slowly, respectively. The derived elastic moduli of gas- and oil-saturated digital cores differ little probably because of the low porosity (4.5%) of the Longmaxi black shale. Clearly, the numerical experiments demonstrated the feasibility of combining microstructure images of shale samples with elastic moduli calculations to predict shale properties.

  9. First-principles calculations of typical anisotropic cubic and hexagonal structures and homogenized moduli estimation based on the Y-parameter: Application to CaO, MgO, CH and Calcite CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jia; Bernard, Fabrice; Kamali-Bernard, Siham

    2017-02-01

    X-ray method to test the material properties and to obtain elastic constants is commonly based on the Reuss model and Kroner model. Y parameter has been turned out to be an effective method to estimate elastic properties of polycrystalline material. Since Y-parameters of cubic polycrystalline material based on the certain uniform stress (Reuss model) has not been given, our work aims to complete this part of the theoretical analysis, which can effectively compare elastic constants measured by the X-ray diffraction method. The structural and the elastic properties of cubic structures (CaO and MgO) and hexagonal structures (CH and Calcite CaCO3) are investigated by the density functional theory method. And then the credibility of Y parameters for determing elastic moduli of cubic structures is proved and elastic properties in typical crystallographic planes of [100], [110] and [111] are also calculated. Meanwhile, Young's moduli of CH and Calcite structure are 58.08 GPa and 84.549 GPa, which are all close to references. Elastic properties of cubic and hexagonal structures under various pressures are calculated and the surface constructions of elastic moduli are drawn, showing the anisotropy at various directions. The crystal structure investigated in this work are typical of some primary or secondary components of Hardened Cements Pastes and their homogenized elastic properties are needed in a hierarchical multi-scale modeling, such as the one developed by some of the authors of this paper.

  10. Study of the elastic behavior of synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Na

    Synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLAs), composed of coal fly ash and recycled plastics, represent a resilient construction material that could be a key aspect to future sustainable development. This research focuses on a prediction of the elastic modulus of SLA, assumed as a homogenous and isotropic composite of particulates of high carbon fly ash (HCFA) and a matrix of plastics (HDPE, LDPE, PS and mixture of plastics), with the emphasis on SLAs made of HCFA and PS. The elastic moduli of SLA with variable fly ash volume fractions are predicted based on finite element analyses (FEA) performed using the computer programs ABAQUS and PLAXIS. The effect of interface friction (roughness) between phases and other computation parameters; e.g., loading strain, stiffness of component, element type and boundary conditions, are included in these analyses. Analytical models and laboratory tests provide a baseline for comparison. Overall, results indicate ABAQUS generates elastic moduli closer to those predicted by well-established analytical models than moduli predicted from PLAXIS, especially for SLAs with lower fly ash content. In addition, an increase in roughness, loading strain indicated increase of SLAs stiffness, especially as fly ash content increases. The elastic moduli obtained from unconfined compression generally showed less elastic moduli than those obtained from analytical and ABAQUS 3D predictions. This may be caused by possible existence of pre-failure surface in specimen and the directly interaction between HCFA particles. Recommendations for the future work include laboratory measurements of SLAs moduli and FEM modeling that considers various sizes and random distribution of HCFA particles in SLAs.

  11. Breakdown of elasticity in amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biroli, Giulio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco

    2016-12-01

    What characterizes a solid is the way that it responds to external stresses. Ordered solids, such as crystals, exhibit an elastic regime followed by a plastic regime, both understood microscopically in terms of lattice distortion and dislocations. For amorphous solids the situation is instead less clear, and the microscopic understanding of the response to deformation and stress is a very active research topic. Several studies have revealed that even in the elastic regime the response is very jerky at low temperature, resembling very much the response of disordered magnetic materials. Here we show that in a very large class of amorphous solids this behaviour emerges upon decreasing temperature, as a phase transition, where standard elastic behaviour breaks down. At the transition all nonlinear elastic moduli diverge and standard elasticity theory no longer holds. Below the transition, the response to deformation becomes history- and time-dependent.

  12. High-pressure single-crystal elasticity study of CO{sub 2} across phase I-III transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin S. Bass, Jay D.; Shieh, Sean R.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2014-04-07

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli of solid single-crystal CO{sub 2} were measured at pressures up to 11.7(3) GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The aggregate adiabatic bulk modulus (K{sub S}), shear modulus (G), and their pressure derivatives for CO{sub 2} Phase I are K{sub S0} = 3.4(6) GPa, G{sub 0} = 1.8(2) GPa, (dK{sub S}/dP){sub 0} = 7.8(3), (dG/dP){sub 0} = 2.5(1), (d{sup 2}K{sub S}/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.23(3) GPa{sup −1}, and (d{sup 2}G/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.10(1) GPa{sup −1}. A small increase of elastic properties was observed between 9.8(1) and 10.5(3) GPa, in agreement with the CO{sub 2} I-III transition pressure determined from previous x-ray diffraction experiments. Above the transition pressure P{sub T}, we observed a mixture dominated by CO{sub 2}-I, with minor CO{sub 2}-III. The CO{sub 2}-I + III mixture shows slightly increased sound velocities compared to pure CO{sub 2}-I. Elastic anisotropy calculated from the single-crystal elasticity tensor exhibits a decrease with pressure beginning at 7.9(1) GPa, which is lower than P{sub T}. Our results coincide with recent X-ray Raman observations, suggesting that a pressure-induced electronic transition is related to local structural and optical changes.

  13. Nonlocal elasticity tensors in dislocation and disclination cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taupin, V.; Gbemou, K.; Fressengeas, C.; Capolungo, L.

    2017-03-01

    Nonlocal elastic constitutive laws are introduced for crystals containing defects such as dislocations and disclinations. In addition to pointwise elastic moduli tensors adequately reflecting the elastic response of defect-free regions by relating stresses to strains and couple-stresses to curvatures, elastic cross-moduli tensors relating strains to couple-stresses and curvatures to stresses within convolution integrals are derived from a nonlocal analysis of strains and curvatures in the defects cores. Sufficient conditions are derived for positive-definiteness of the resulting free energy, and stability of elastic solutions is ensured. The elastic stress/couple stress fields associated with prescribed dislocation/disclination density distributions and solving the momentum and moment of momentum balance equations in periodic media are determined by using a Fast Fourier Transform spectral method. The convoluted cross-moduli bring the following results: (i) Nonlocal stresses and couple stresses oppose their local counterparts in the defects core regions, playing the role of restoring forces and possibly ensuring spatio-temporal stability of the simulated defects, (ii) The couple stress fields are strongly affected by nonlocality. Such effects favor the stability of the simulated grain boundaries and allow investigating their elastic interactions with extrinsic defects, (iii) Driving forces inducing grain growth or refinement derive from the self-stress and couple stress fields of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline configurations.

  14. Nonlocal elasticity tensors in dislocation and disclination cores

    DOE PAGES

    Taupin, V.; Gbemou, K.; Fressengeas, C.; ...

    2017-01-07

    We introduced nonlocal elastic constitutive laws for crystals containing defects such as dislocations and disclinations. Additionally, the pointwise elastic moduli tensors adequately reflect the elastic response of defect-free regions by relating stresses to strains and couple-stresses to curvatures, elastic cross-moduli tensors relating strains to couple-stresses and curvatures to stresses within convolution integrals are derived from a nonlocal analysis of strains and curvatures in the defects cores. Sufficient conditions are derived for positive-definiteness of the resulting free energy, and stability of elastic solutions is ensured. The elastic stress/couple stress fields associated with prescribed dislocation/disclination density distributions and solving the momentum andmore » moment of momentum balance equations in periodic media are determined by using a Fast Fourier Transform spectral method. Here, the convoluted cross-moduli bring the following results: (i) Nonlocal stresses and couple stresses oppose their local counterparts in the defects core regions, playing the role of restoring forces and possibly ensuring spatio-temporal stability of the simulated defects, (ii) The couple stress fields are strongly affected by nonlocality. Such effects favor the stability of the simulated grain boundaries and allow investigating their elastic interactions with extrinsic defects, (iii) Driving forces inducing grain growth or refinement derive from the self-stress and couple stress fields of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline configurations.« less

  15. Elasticity and Strength of Biomacromolecular Crystals: Lysozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, A. M.; Witherow, W. K.; Chen, L. Q.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The static Young modulus, E = 0.1 to 0.5 GPa, the crystal critical strength (sigma(sub c)) and its ratio to E,sigma(sub c)/E is approximately 10(exp 3), were measured for the first time for non cross-linked lysozyme crystals in solution. By using a triple point bending apparatus, we also demonstrated that the crystals were purely elastic. Softness of protein crystals built of hard macromolecules (26 GPa for lysozyme) is explained by the large size of the macromolecules as compared to the range of intermolecular forces and by the weakness of intermolecular bonds as compared to the peptide bond strength. The relatively large reported dynamic elastic moduli (approximately 8 GPa) from resonance light scattering should come from averaging over the moduli of intracrystalline water and intra- and intermolecular bonding.

  16. Stabilizing all geometric moduli in heterotic Calabi-Yau vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Lukas, Andre; Ovrut, Burt

    2011-05-27

    We propose a scenario to stabilize all geometric moduli - that is, the complex structure, Kähler moduli and the dilaton - in smooth heterotic Calabi-Yau compactifications without Neveu-Schwarz three-form flux. This is accomplished using the gauge bundle required in any heterotic compactification, whose perturbative effects on the moduli are combined with non-perturbative corrections. We argue that, for appropriate gauge bundles, all complex structure and a large number of other moduli can be perturbatively stabilized - in the most restrictive case, leaving only one combination of Kähler moduli and the dilaton as a flat direction. At this stage, the remaining moduli space consists of Minkowski vacua. That is, the perturbative superpotential vanishes in the vacuum without the necessity to fine-tune flux. Finally, we incorporate non-perturbative effects such as gaugino condensation and/or instantons. These are strongly constrained by the anomalous U(1) symmetries which arise from the required bundle constructions. We present a specific example, with a consistent choice of non-perturbative effects, where all remaining flat directions are stabilized in an AdS vacuum.

  17. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  18. Chemomechanical evolution of pore space in carbonate microstructures upon dissolution: Linking pore geometry to bulk elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arson, C.; Vanorio, T.

    2015-10-01

    One of the challenges faced today in a variety of geophysical applications is the need to understand the changes of elastic properties due to time-variant chemomechanical processes. The objective of this work is to model carbonate rock elastic properties as functions of pore geometry changes that occur when the solid matrix is dissolved by carbon dioxide. We compared two carbonate microstructures: porous micrite ("mudstone") and grain-supported carbonate ("packstone"). We formulated a mathematical model that distinguishes the effects of microporosity and macroporosity on stiffness changes. We used measures of mechanical and chemical porosity changes recorded during injection tests to compute elastic moduli and compare them to moduli obtained from wave velocity measurements. In mudstones, both experimental and numerical results indicate that bulk moduli change by less than 5%. The evolution of elastic moduli is controlled by macropore enlargement. In packstones, model predictions underestimate changes of elastic moduli with total porosity by 10% to 80%. The total porosity variation is 60% to 75% smaller than the chemical porosity variation, which indicates that pore expansion due to dissolution is counterbalanced by pore shrinkage due to compaction. Packstone elastic properties are controlled by grain sliding. The methodology presented in this paper can be generalized to other chemomechanical processes studied in rocks, such as dislocations, glide, diffusive mass transfer, recrystallization, and precipitation.

  19. Introduction to physical properties and elasticity models: Chapter 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorkin, Jack; Helgerud, Michael B.; Waite, William F.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Nur, Amos

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the in situ methane hydrate volume from seismic surveys requires knowledge of the rock physics relations between wave speeds and elastic moduli in hydrate/sediment mixtures. The elastic moduli of hydrate/sediment mixtures depend on the elastic properties of the individual sedimentary particles and the manner in which they are arranged. In this chapter, we present some rock physics data currently available from literature. The unreferenced values in Table I were not measured directly, but were derived from other values in Tables I and II using standard relationships between elastic properties for homogeneous, isotropic material. These derivations allow us to extend the list of physical property estimates, but at the expense of introducing uncertainties due to combining property values measured under different physical conditions. This is most apparent in the case of structure II (sII) hydrate for which very few physical properties have been measured under identical conditions.

  20. The atomistic representation of first strain-gradient elastic tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Admal, Nikhil Chandra; Marian, Jaime; Po, Giacomo

    2017-02-01

    We derive the atomistic representations of the elastic tensors appearing in the linearized theory of first strain-gradient elasticity for an arbitrary multi-lattice. In addition to the classical second-Piola) stress and elastic moduli tensors, these include the rank-three double-stress tensor, the rank-five tensor of mixed elastic moduli, and the rank-six tensor of strain-gradient elastic moduli. The atomistic representations are closed-form analytical expressions in terms of the first and second derivatives of the interatomic potential with respect to interatomic distances, and dyadic products of relative atomic positions. Moreover, all expressions are local, in the sense that they depend only on the atomic neighborhood of a lattice site. Our results emanate from the condition of energetic equivalence between continuum and atomistic representations of a crystal, when the kinematics of the latter is governed by the Cauchy-Born rule. Using the derived expressions, we prove that the odd-order tensors vanish if the lattice basis admits central-symmetry. The analytical expressions are implemented as a KIM compliant algorithm to compute the strain gradient elastic tensors for various materials. Numerical results are presented to compare representative interatomic potentials used in the literature for cubic crystals, including simple lattices (fcc Al and Cu and bcc Fe and W) and multi-lattices (diamond-cubic Si). We observe that central potentials exhibit generalized Cauchy relations for the rank-six tensor of strain-gradient elastic moduli. In addition, this tensor is found to be indefinite for many potentials. We discuss the relationship between indefiniteness and material stability. Finally, the atomistic representations are specialized to central potentials in simple lattices. These expressions are used with analytical potentials to study the sensitivity of the elastic tensors to the choice of the cutoff radius.

  1. Room temperature elastic properties of V-5Cr-5Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.A.

    1994-09-01

    Elastic moduli were measured for a specimen of the alloy V-5Cr-5Ti in the annealed condition using pulse-echo techniques. The value of Young`s modulus was determined to be 125.6 GPa, the shear modulus was determined to be 45.9 GPa, and the Poisson`s ratio to be 0.367.

  2. Adiabatic-nuclei calculations of positron scattering from molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Bray, Igor; Chiari, Luca; Zecca, Antonio; Brunger, Michael J.

    2017-02-01

    The single-center adiabatic-nuclei convergent close-coupling method is used to investigate positron collisions with molecular hydrogen (H2) in the ground and first vibrationally excited states. Cross sections are presented over the energy range from 1 to 1000 eV for elastic scattering, vibrational excitation, total ionization, and the grand total cross section. The present adiabatic-nuclei positron-H2 scattering length is calculated as A =-2.70 a0 for the ground state and A =-3.16 a0 for the first vibrationally excited state. The present elastic differential cross sections are also used to "correct" the low-energy grand total cross-section measurements of the Trento group [A. Zecca et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 032702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.80.032702] for the forward-angle-scattering effect. In general, the comparison with experiment is good. By performing convergence studies, we estimate that our Rm=1.448 a0 fixed-nuclei results are converged to within ±5 % for the major scattering integrated cross sections.

  3. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  4. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  5. Elastic Properties of Chimpanzee Craniofacial Cortical Bone.

    PubMed

    Gharpure, Poorva; Kontogiorgos, Elias D; Opperman, Lynne A; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Smith, Amanda; Pryor, Leslie C; Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2016-12-01

    Relatively few assessments of cranial biomechanics formally take into account variation in the material properties of cranial cortical bone. Our aim was to characterize the elastic properties of chimpanzee craniofacial cortical bone and compare these to the elastic properties of dentate human craniofacial cortical bone. From seven cranial regions, 27 cylindrical samples were harvested from each of five chimpanzee crania. Assuming orthotropy, axes of maximum stiffness in the plane of the cortical plate were derived using modified equations of Hooke's law in a Mathcad program. Consistent orientations among individuals were observed in the zygomatic arch and alveolus. The density of cortical bone showed significant regional variation (P < 0.001). The elastic moduli demonstrated significant differences between sites, and a distinct pattern where E3  > E2  > E1 . Shear moduli were significantly different among regions (P < 0.001). The pattern by which chimpanzee cranial cortical bone varies in elastic properties resembled that seen in humans, perhaps suggesting that the elastic properties of craniofacial bone in fossil hominins can be estimated with at least some degree of confidence. Anat Rec, 299:1718-1733, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Numerical predictions of viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of innovative pothole patching materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, K. Y.; Yuan, W.; Ju, J. W.; Yang, J. M.; Kao, W.; Carlson, L.

    2013-04-01

    As asphalt pavements age and deteriorate, recurring pothole repair failures and propagating alligator cracks in the asphalt pavements have become a serious issue to our daily life and resulted in high repairing costs for pavement and vehicles. To solve this urgent issue, pothole repair materials with superior durability and long service life are needed. In the present work, revolutionary pothole patching materials with high toughness, high fatigue resistance that are reinforced with nano-molecular resins have been developed to enhance their resistance to traffic loads and service life of repaired potholes. In particular, DCPD resin (dicyclopentadiene, C10H12) with a Rhuthinium-based catalyst is employed to develop controlled properties that are compatible with aggregates and asphalt binders. In this paper, a multi-level numerical micromechanics-based model is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli of these innovative nano-molecular resin reinforced pothole patching materials. Irregular coarse aggregates in the finite element analysis are modeled as randomly-dispersed multi-layers coated particles. The effective properties of asphalt mastic, which consists of fine aggregates, tar, cured DCPD and air voids are theoretically estimated by the homogenization technique of micromechanics in conjunction with the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle. Numerical predictions of homogenized viscoelastic properties and dynamic moduli are demonstrated.

  7. Measurement of elastic nonlinearity of soft solid with transient elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catheline, S.; Gennisson, J.-L.; Fink, M.

    2003-12-01

    Transient elastography is a powerful tool to measure the speed of low-frequency shear waves in soft tissues and thus to determine the second-order elastic modulus μ (or the Young's modulus E). In this paper, it is shown how transient elastography can also achieve the measurement of the nonlinear third-order elastic moduli of an Agar-gelatin-based phantom. This method requires speed measurements of polarized elastic waves measured in a statically stressed isotropic medium. A static uniaxial stress induces a hexagonal anisotropy (transverse isotropy) in solids. In the special case of uniaxially stressed isotropic media, the anisotropy is not caused by linear elastic coefficients but by the third-order nonlinear elastic constants, and the medium recovers its isotropic properties as soon as the uniaxial stress disappears. It has already been shown how transient elastography can measure the elastic (second-order) moduli in a media with transverse isotropy such as muscles. Consequently this method, based on the measurement of the speed variations of a low-frequency (50-Hz) polarized shear strain waves as a function of the applied stress, allows one to measure the Landau moduli A, B, C that completely describe the third-order nonlinearity. The several orders of magnitude found among these three constants can be justified from the theoretical expression of the internal energy.

  8. Elasticity of (Mg[subscript 0.87]Fe[subscript 0.13])[subscript 2]SiO[subscript 4] wadsleyite to 12 GPa and 1073 K

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Kung, Jennifer; Li, Baosheng; Nishiyama, Nori; Wang, Yanbin

    2009-09-14

    Elasticity of (Mg{sub 0.87}Fe{sub 0.13}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} wadsleyite has been measured at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature to 12 GPa and 1073 K using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation. The elastic moduli and their pressure and temperature derivatives are precisely determined using pressure-standard-free third-order and fourth-order finite strain equations. Combined with previous thermoelastic data on olivine, the density, velocity and acoustic impedance contrasts between {alpha}- and {beta}-(Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} at 410-km depth are calculated along a 1673 K adiabatic geotherm. Both the third- and fourth-order finite strain equation fitting results give estimation of {approx}33-58% olivine content in the upper mantle to account for a seismic discontinuity of {approx}5% velocity jumps, and 8.5% (P wave) and 11.1% (S wave) impedance jumps at 410 km depth.

  9. Stabilizing all geometric moduli in heterotic Calabi-Yau vacua

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Lukas, Andre; ...

    2011-05-27

    We propose a scenario to stabilize all geometric moduli - that is, the complex structure, Kähler moduli and the dilaton - in smooth heterotic Calabi-Yau compactifications without Neveu-Schwarz three-form flux. This is accomplished using the gauge bundle required in any heterotic compactification, whose perturbative effects on the moduli are combined with non-perturbative corrections. We argue that, for appropriate gauge bundles, all complex structure and a large number of other moduli can be perturbatively stabilized - in the most restrictive case, leaving only one combination of Kähler moduli and the dilaton as a flat direction. At this stage, the remaining modulimore » space consists of Minkowski vacua. That is, the perturbative superpotential vanishes in the vacuum without the necessity to fine-tune flux. Finally, we incorporate non-perturbative effects such as gaugino condensation and/or instantons. These are strongly constrained by the anomalous U(1) symmetries which arise from the required bundle constructions. We present a specific example, with a consistent choice of non-perturbative effects, where all remaining flat directions are stabilized in an AdS vacuum.« less

  10. Moduli vacuum misalignment and precise predictions in string inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Koushik; Quevedo, Fernando

    2016-08-03

    The predictions for all the cosmological observables of any inflationary model depend on the number of e-foldings which is sensitive to the post-inflationary history of the universe. In string models the generic presence of light moduli leads to a late-time period of matter domination which lowers the required number of e-foldings and, in turn, modifies the exact predictions of any inflationary model. In this paper we compute exactly the shift of the number of e-foldings in Kähler moduli inflation which is determined by the magnitude of the moduli initial displacement caused by vacuum misalignment and the moduli decay rates. We find that the preferred number of e-foldings gets reduced from 50 to 45, causing a modification of the spectral index at the percent level. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding the full post-inflationary evolution of the universe in order to derive precise predictions in string inflation. To perform this task it is crucial to work in a setting where there is good control over moduli stabilisation.

  11. Moduli vacuum misalignment and precise predictions in string inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Dutta, Koushik; Maharana, Anshuman; Quevedo, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The predictions for all the cosmological observables of any inflationary model depend on the number of e-foldings which is sensitive to the post-inflationary history of the universe. In string models the generic presence of light moduli leads to a late-time period of matter domination which lowers the required number of e-foldings and, in turn, modifies the exact predictions of any inflationary model. In this paper we compute exactly the shift of the number of e-foldings in Kähler moduli inflation which is determined by the magnitude of the moduli initial displacement caused by vacuum misalignment and the moduli decay rates. We find that the preferred number of e-foldings gets reduced from 50 to 45, causing a modification of the spectral index at the percent level. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding the full post-inflationary evolution of the universe in order to derive precise predictions in string inflation. To perform this task it is crucial to work in a setting where there is good control over moduli stabilisation.

  12. Influence of Young's moduli in 3D fluid-structure coupled models of the human cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnke, Frank; Semmelbauer, Sebastian; Marquardt, Torsten

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in the human cochlea was studied using a tapered box-model with linear assumptions respective to all mechanical parameters. The discretisation and evaluation is conducted by a commercial finite element package (ANSYS). The main difference to former models of the cochlea was the representation of the basilar membrane by a 3D elastic solid. The Young's moduli of this solid were modified to study their influence on the travelling wave. The lymph in the scala vestibuli and scala tympani was represented by a viscous and nearly incompressible fluid finite element approach. Our results show the maximum displacement for f = 2kHz at half of the length of the cochlea in accordance with former experiments. For low frequencies f <200 Hz nearly zero phase shifts were found, whereas for f =1 kHz it reaches values up to -12 cycles depending on the degree of orthotropy.

  13. Ultrafast adiabatic second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Asaf; Levanon, Assaf; Katz, Mordechai; Suchowski, Haim

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a generalization of the adiabatic frequency conversion method for an efficient conversion of ultrashort pulses in the full nonlinear regime. Our analysis takes into account dispersion as well as two-photon processes and Kerr effect, allowing complete analysis of any three waves with arbitrary phase mismatched design and any nonlinear optical process. We use this analysis to design an efficient and robust second harmonic generation, the most widely used nonlinear process for both fundamental and applied research. We experimentally show that such design not only allows for very efficient conversion of various of ultrashort pulses, but is also very robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and the incoming light. These include variation of more than 100 °C in the crystal temperature, a wide bandwidth of up to 75 nm and a chirp variation of 300 fs to 3.5 ps of the incoming pulse. Also, we show the dependency of the adiabatic second harmonic generation design on the pump intensity and the crystal length. Our study shows that two photon absorption plays a critical role in such high influence nonlinear dynamics, and that it must be considered in order to achieve agreement with experimental results.

  14. Ultrafast adiabatic second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Asaf; Levanon, Assaf; Katz, Mordechai; Suchowski, Haim

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a generalization of the adiabatic frequency conversion method for an efficient conversion of ultrashort pulses in the full nonlinear regime. Our analysis takes into account dispersion as well as two-photon processes and Kerr effect, allowing complete analysis of any three waves with arbitrary phase mismatched design and any nonlinear optical process. We use this analysis to design an efficient and robust second harmonic generation, the most widely used nonlinear process for both fundamental and applied research. We experimentally show that such design not only allows for very efficient conversion of various of ultrashort pulses, but is also very robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and the incoming light. These include variation of more than 100 °C in the crystal temperature, a wide bandwidth of up to 75 nm and a chirp variation of 300 fs to 3.5 ps of the incoming pulse. Also, we show the dependency of the adiabatic second harmonic generation design on the pump intensity and the crystal length. Our study shows that two photon absorption plays a critical role in such high influence nonlinear dynamics, and that it must be considered in order to achieve agreement with experimental results.

  15. Determination of layer moduli from falling weight deflectometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruotoistenmaeki, A.

    Back calculation programs are used for evaluation of pavement layer moduli from falling weight deflectometer (FWD) measurements. A comparison of two programs with different calculation methods, Modulus and Elmod, is made using deflection data derived from 43 SHRP-LTPP (Strategic Highway Research Program, Long-Term Pavement Performance) test sections. Critical strains were calculated using the linear program (BISAR) with layer moduli from the Modulus program as input and with the Elmod program. It was found that calculated strains from the two programs agree very well, even though the calculated moduli are quite different. Calculated strains from FWD loading were compared with measured strains under moving wheel load at Virttaa test site. The differences between the two are most likely due to differences in the loading conditions and in the method of analysis.

  16. Linear elastic behavior of dry soap foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1996-08-10

    Linear elastic constants are computed for three dry foams that have crystal symmetry, bubbles with equal volume V, and films with uniform surface tension T. The Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams contain one, two, and eight bubbles in the unit cell, respectively. All three foams have 14-sided bubbles, but these tetrakaidecahedra have different topology; the Weaire-Phelan foam also contains pentagonal dodecahedra. In addition to the bulk modulus for volume compression, the authors calculate two shear moduli for the Kelvin and Weaire-Phelan foams, which have cubic symmetry, and four shear moduli for the Williams foam, which has tetragonal symmetry. The Williams foam has five elastic constants, not six, because the stress remains isotropic for uniform expansion; this is not guaranteed by symmetry alone. The two shear moduli for the Weaire-Phelan foam differ by less than 5%. The other two foams exhibit much greater elastic anisotropy; their shear moduli differ by a factor of 2. An effective isotropic shear modulus {bar G}, which represents the response averaged over all orientations, is evaluated for each foam. Scaled by T/V{sup 1/3}, {bar G} is 0.8070, 0.7955, and 0.8684 for the Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams, respectively. When extrapolated to the dry limit, the shear modulus data of Princen and Kiss (for concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with polydisperse drop-size distributions) fall within the range of the calculations. The Surface Evolver program, developed by Brakke, was used to compute minimal surfaces for the dry foams. Also reported for each undeformed foam are various geometric constants relating to interfacial energy density, cell edge length, and bubble pressure.

  17. Dynamics of photo-induced changes in the elastic characteristics of lithium niobate crystals doped with Jahn-Teller Fe2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golenishchev-Kutuzov, A. V.; Golenishchev-Kutuzov, V. A.; Kalimullin, R. I.; Semennikov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of admixture Jahn-Teller Fe2+ ions on the elastic characteristics of lithium niobate was studied. The appearance of photostrains and a change in elastic moduli under the influence of laser radiation was established, thus enabling the creation of device elements with optically controlled elastic characteristics.

  18. Sound velocities and elastic constants of iron-bearing hydrous ringwoodite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Steven D.; Smyth, Joseph R.; Spetzler, Hartmut; Holl, Christopher M.; Frost, Daniel J.

    2004-06-01

    The sound velocities and single-crystal elastic constants of Fo 89 hydrous ringwoodite (γ-Mg 1.7Fe 0.22H 0.16SiO 4) containing ˜10,000 ppm by weight (1 wt.%) H 2O have been determined from seven separate pure-mode travel-time measurements using gigahertz ultrasonic interferometry. The experiments feature a new Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (YAG) P-to-S conversion shear buffer rod (BR), capable of producing pure ultrasonic shear waves with known polarization in the region of 0.5-2.0 GHz. To our knowledge they are the first such single-crystal ultrasonic measurements on a high-pressure phase recovered from the multi-anvil press. The cubic single-crystal elastic constants of hydrous Fo 89 ringwoodite at ambient conditions are (in GPa): c11=298±13, c44=112±6, and c12=115±6. Hydration of Fo ˜90 ringwoodite to 1 wt.% H 2O reduces the adiabatic bulk ( K0S=176±7 GPa) and shear ( G=103±5 GPa) moduli by about 6 and 13%, roughly equivalent to raising the temperature at room pressure by 600 and 1000 °C, respectively. Assuming a linear trend with hydration, we calculate that P- and S-wave velocities are reduced by about 40 m/s for every 1000 ppm weight (0.1 wt.%) H 2O added to Fo ˜90 ringwoodite. P- and S-wave velocities of the lower transition zone in PREM are consistent with a hydrated ringwoodite-rich composition.

  19. An interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Bruch, Anton; von Oppen, Felix

    We consider the effect of electron-electron interactions on the performance of an adiabatic quantum motor based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. We model such a device by electrons in a 1d wire coupled to a slowly moving periodic potential associated with the classical mechanical degree of freedom of the motor. This periodic degree of freedom is set into motion by a bias voltage applied to the 1d electron channel. We investigate the Thouless motor with interacting leads modeled as Luttinger liquids. We show that interactions enhance the energy gap opened by the periodic potential and thus the robustness of the Thouless motor against variations in the chemical potential. We show that the motor degree of freedom can be described as a mobile impurity in a Luttinger liquid obeying Langevin dynamics with renormalized coefficients due to interactions, for which we give explicit expressions.

  20. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  1. Single-crystal elasticity of natural Fe-bearing orthoenstatite across a high-pressure phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin S.; Bass, Jay D.

    2016-08-01

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli have been measured on Fe-bearing orthoenstatite (OEN) single crystals up to 12 GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The ambient adiabatic bulk modulus (Ks0) and shear modulus (G0) are determined to be 113(1) GPa and 75.9(7) GPa, respectively. A fourth-order finite strain fit to the data yields pressure derivatives of Ks0' = 8.8(1), Ks0″ = -0.68(6), G0' = 2.9(1), and G0″ = -0.40(2). These values are significantly higher than those for other major mantle minerals up to 10.5 GPa but lower than some previous measurements on OEN. A pronounced increase of shear anisotropy was observed at a pressure of 12.06(9) GPa, coinciding with a phase transition from orthoenstatite to a recently discovered high-pressure phase with space group P21/c. A high-pressure phase transition in OEN is unlikely to be the cause of the X discontinuity in the 250-325 km depth range. Rather, a change in seismic anisotropy would be expected to accompany the orthoenstatite-to-P21/c phase transition in the upper mantle at greater depths.

  2. Mesoscale elastic properties of marine sponge spicules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaqi; Reed, Bryan W; Chung, Frank R; Koski, Kristie J

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponge spicules are silicate fibers with an unusual combination of fracture toughness and optical light propagation properties due to their micro- and nano-scale hierarchical structure. We present optical measurements of the elastic properties of Tethya aurantia and Euplectella aspergillum marine sponge spicules using non-invasive Brillouin and Raman laser light scattering, thus probing the hierarchical structure on two very different scales. On the scale of single bonds, as probed by Raman scattering, the spicules resemble a combination of pure silica and mixed organic content. On the mesoscopic scale probed by Brillouin scattering, we show that while some properties (Young's moduli, shear moduli, one of the anisotropic Poisson ratios and refractive index) are nearly the same as those of artificial optical fiber, other properties (uniaxial moduli, bulk modulus and a distinctive anisotropic Poisson ratio) are significantly smaller. Thus this natural composite of largely isotropic materials yields anisotropic elastic properties on the mesoscale. We show that the spicules' optical waveguide properties lead to pronounced spontaneous Brillouin backscattering, a process related to the stimulated Brillouin backscattering process well known in artificial glass fibers. These measurements provide a clearer picture of the interplay of flexibility, strength, and material microstructure for future functional biomimicry.

  3. Elastic and osmotic properties of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, David; Dimitriadis, Emilios; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Horkay, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves cellular and biochemical processes linked to mechanical stress. A better understanding of the mechanism of these processes and how they cause changes in the composition, macro- and micro-structure, and mechanical properties of cartilage is necessary for developing effective preventative and treatment strategies. In this study, elastic and osmotic swelling properties of tissue-engineered cartilage were explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a tissue osmometer. AFM was also used to image the surface of the specimens while chemical composition was determined by biochemical analysis. Estimation of the Young's moduli of the tissue from AFM force-indentation data was performed using an optimization approach to fit appropriate models to the data. Force-indentation data were acquired both with sharp, pyramidal and with microspherical probes. The procedure has been validated by making measurements on model gel systems of known elastic properties. This approach is presented as a robust method of optimally extracting Young's moduli of soft, crosslinked materials from AFM data. Gross inhomogeneities at different scales in the cartilage tissue are manifested in the high degree of variance in local Young's moduli values obtained from both AFM and osmotic swelling data. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of cartilage are affected by the local macromolecular composition.

  4. Discrete and Continuum Elastic Properties of Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Elliott Solomon

    The microstructure of defects in solids, e.g. interfaces, is heterogeneous and, consequently, so are the elastic properties. The complete anisotropic fourth-order tensors of both the discrete and the effective elastic moduli are defined in the interfacial region. To examine the meaning of discrete elastic constants, (i) a piecewise-continuous medium is considered where individual phases occupy the Voronoi polyhedra and have the elastic moduli associated with individual atoms, and (ii) the relationship between natural vibrations of the discrete systems and continuum waves is explored. Questions of local energy changes and stability are addressed in terms of continuum properties of the moduli, particularly positive definiteness and strong ellipticity. Comparisons between the atomistic results (exact effective moduli) and those for the continuum analog (bounds) establish the validity of the definition of elastic properties for heterogeneous structures at atomic scales and lead to criteria to assess the stability of a given microstructure. Homogenization of interfacial properties gives heterogeneous transition zone (or interphase) model. Interface phenomena in macrosystems (composites) and microsystems (grain boundaries) is explained by inner layer conditions between homogeneous bulk regions. Dynamical membrane and spring models of the imperfect interfaces are shown to be limiting models (similar to Reuss and Voigt bounding approximations in multiphase composite mechanics) for asymptotic expansions of stress and strain fields, respectively. Asymptotic expansion of both fields (in terms of small parameter h -thickness of the layer) produces mixed-type, exact approximation of the first order in h. Derived models of imperfect interface are used for investigation of interface waves in anisotropic bicrystals and for comparison with corresponding acoustical modes in phonon spectra. Localized interface waves are explained as general inhomogeneous plane waves in subsonic

  5. Discrete and continuum elastic properties of interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Elliott Solomon

    1993-06-01

    The microstructure of defects in solids, e.g. interfaces, is heterogeneous and, consequently, so are the elastic properties. The complete anisotropic fourth-order tensors of both the discrete and the effective elastic moduli are defined in the interfacial region. To examine the meaning of discrete elastic constants, (1) a piecewise-continuous medium is considered where individual phases occupy the Voronoi polyhedra and have the elastic moduli associated with individual atoms, and (2) the relationship between natural vibrations of the discrete systems and continuum waves is explored. Questions of local energy changes and stability are addressed in terms of continuum properties of the moduli, particularly positive definiteness and strong ellipticity. Comparisons between the atomistic results (exact effective moduli) and those for the continuum analog (bounds) establish the validity of the definition of elastic properties for heterogeneous structures at atomic scales and lead to criteria to assess the stability of a given microstructure. Homogenization of interfacial properties gives heterogeneous transition zone (or interphase) model. Interface phenomena in macrosystems (composites) and microsystems (grain boundaries) is explained by inner layer conditions between homogeneous bulk regions. Dynamical membrane and spring models of the imperfect interfaces are shown to be limiting models (similar to Reuss and Voigt bounding approximations in multiphase composite mechanics) for asymptotic expansions of stress and strain fields, respectively. Asymptotic expansion of both fields (in terms of small parameter h-thickness of the layer) produces mixed-type, exact approximation of the first order in h. Derived models of imperfect interface are used for investigation of interface waves in anisotropic bicrystals and for comparison with corresponding acoustical modes in phonon spectra. Localized interface waves are explained as general inhomogeneous plane waves in subsonic

  6. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-04-01

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in [1] of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of [2], so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  7. On the possibility of large axion moduli spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-04-28

    We study the diameters of axion moduli spaces, focusing primarily on type IIB compactifications on Calabi-Yau three-folds. In this case, we derive a stringent bound on the diameter in the large volume region of parameter space for Calabi-Yaus with simplicial Kähler cone. This bound can be violated by Calabi-Yaus with non-simplicial Kähler cones, but additional contributions are introduced to the effective action which can restrict the field range accessible to the axions. We perform a statistical analysis of simulated moduli spaces, finding in all cases that these additional contributions restrict the diameter so that these moduli spaces are no more likely to yield successful inflation than those with simplicial Kähler cone or with far fewer axions. Further heuristic arguments for axions in other corners of the duality web suggest that the difficulty observed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1475-7516/2003/06/001 of finding an axion decay constant parametrically larger than M{sub p} applies not only to individual axions, but to the diagonals of axion moduli space as well. This observation is shown to follow from the weak gravity conjecture of http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2007/06/060, so it likely applies not only to axions in string theory, but also to axions in any consistent theory of quantum gravity.

  8. Generalized Kähler Geometry of Instanton Moduli Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursztyn, Henrique; Cavalcanti, Gil R.; Gualtieri, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We prove that Hitchin's generalized Kähler structure on the moduli space of instantons over a compact, even generalized Kähler four-manifold may be obtained by generalized Kähler reduction, in analogy with the usual Kähler case. The underlying reduction of Courant algebroids is a realization of Donaldson's μ-map in degree three.

  9. Elastic properties of hybrid composites by the effective field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaun, S. K.; Jeulin, D.

    2001-10-01

    The work is dedicated to the calculation of the overall elastic properties of matrix composite materials containing two different populations of inclusions (three phase hybrid composites). The application of the well known Mori-Tanaka method or self-consistent effective medium method to the solution of this problem gives overall elastic moduli tensors of such composites that do not have the necessary symmetry (the symmetry with respect to the first and second pairs of indices). In this work, a new version of the effective field method that takes into account specific features of the microstructure of three phase composites is developed. In this version, the field that acts on every inclusion in the composite is assumed to be different for inclusions of different populations. It is shown that the modified effective field method gives a correct symmetry of the overall elastic moduli tensors of three phase composites. The method allows us to describe the influence of the peculiarities in spatial distributions of inclusions on the overall elastic constants. The cases of media containing infinite cylindrical fibers and thin ellipsoidal disks or spherical pores are considered. Various boolean type probabilistic models of random sets of such inclusions are proposed and the elastic moduli tensors of the corresponding three phase composites are obtained and analyzed. It turns out that these tensors strongly depend on statistical properties of the random fields of inclusions. It is shown that for two phase composites, the Mori-Tanaka method is a particular case of the effective field method. In the case of three phase composites, the formulas of the Mori-Tanaka method follow from the equations of the effective field method if a general property of the symmetry of cross-correlation functions of different populations of inclusions is violated. As a result, the overall elastic moduli tensors obtained by Mori-Tanaka method lose their natural symmetry.

  10. Infinitesimal moduli of G2 holonomy manifolds with instanton bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Ossa, Xenia; Larfors, Magdalena; Svanes, Eirik E.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the infinitesimal moduli space of pairs ( Y, V) where Y is a manifold with G 2 holonomy, and V is a vector bundle on Y with an instanton connection. These structures arise in connection to the moduli space of heterotic string compactifications on compact and non-compact seven dimensional spaces, e.g. domain walls. Employing the canonical G 2 cohomology developed by Reyes-Carrión and Fernández and Ugarte, we show that the moduli space decomposes into the sum of the bundle moduli {H}_{{overset{ěe }{d}}_A}^1(Y,End(V)) plus the moduli of the G 2 structure preserving the instanton condition. The latter piece is contained in {H}_{overset{ěe }{d}θ}^1(Y,TY) , and is given by the kernel of a map overset{ěe }{F} which generalises the concept of the Atiyah map for holomorphic bundles on complex manifolds to the case at hand. In fact, the map overset{ěe }{F} is given in terms of the curvature of the bundle and maps {H}_{overset{ěe }{d}θ}^1(Y,TY) into {H}_{{overset{ěe }{d}}_A}^2(Y,End(V)) , and moreover can be used to define a cohomology on an extension bundle of TY by End( V). We comment further on the resemblance with the holomorphic Atiyah algebroid and connect the story to physics, in particular to heterotic compactifications on ( Y, V) when α' = 0.

  11. Blind inversion method using Lamb waves for the complete elastic property characterization of anisotropic plates.

    PubMed

    Vishnuvardhan, J; Krishnamurthy, C V; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2009-02-01

    A novel blind inversion method using Lamb wave S(0) and A(0) mode velocities is proposed for the complete determination of elastic moduli, material symmetries, as well as principal plane orientations of anisotropic plates. The approach takes advantage of genetic algorithm, introduces the notion of "statistically significant" elastic moduli, and utilizes their sensitivities to velocity data to reconstruct the elastic moduli. The unknown material symmetry and the principal planes are then evaluated using the method proposed by Cowin and Mehrabadi [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 40, 451-476 (1987)]. The blind inversion procedure was verified using simulated ultrasonic velocity data sets on materials with transversely isotropic, orthotropic, and monoclinic symmetries. A modified double ring configuration of the single transmitter and multiple receiver compact array was developed to experimentally validate the blind inversion approach on a quasi-isotropic graphite-epoxy composite plate. This technique finds application in the area of material characterization and structural health monitoring of anisotropic platelike structures.

  12. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic X-ray spectra of two simple, impulsive solar flares are examined together with H alpha, microwave and meter wave radio observations. X-ray spectra of both events were characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung from single temperature plasmas. The symmetry between rise and fall was found to hold for the temperature and emission measure. The relationship between temperature and emission measure was that of an adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion; the adiabatic index of 5/3 indicated that the electron distribution remained isotropic. Observations in H alpha provided further evidence for compressive energy transfer.

  13. Dynamic considerations in pavement layers moduli evaluation using falling weight deflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Samir N.; Martinelli, David R.; Selezneva, Olga I.

    1996-11-01

    Falling weight deflectometer (FWD) test is employed by many state highway agencies for the nondestructive evaluation of pavement layers moduli. The accuracy of test results changes significantly for different pavement systems and may results in misleading conclusions. In this study, explicit finite element analysis was used to investigate the behavior of pavement layers under the action of an impact load. The time dependent dynamic responses of origin and flexible pavements were compared and significant differences in behavior were observed. Analysis of the time-histories of vertical deformations propagating through the pavement depth reveals that the displacements measured on the surface layer at standard FWD sensors' positions may not be indicative of the displacements of underlying layers. Computer results are provided for the extreme cases of fully bonded and unbonded pavement layers' interfaces. The results of the analysis reveal that the dynamic displacement patterns are much more complicated than the static ones. Animation of the model results indicates that near-surface pavement layers may behave as a set of composite plates resting on an elastic foundation in absence of bonds between the layers interfaces. If there are strong bonds, the near surface layers behave as a single composite solid resting on elastic foundation.

  14. Elastic and magnetostrictive properties of Tb6Fe1-xCioBi2 (0 < x < 0.375)

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Michael R.; Jia, Lin; McCarthy, David; McGuire, Michael A; Keppens, Veerle

    2011-01-01

    Elastic moduli and magnetostriction data are reported for polycrystalline Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Bi{sub 2} (0 {le} x {le} 0.375). The elastic moduli c{sub 11} and c{sub 44} have been measured as a function of temperature (5-300 K) and magnetic field (0-5 T), and reflect the ferromagnetic transition observed in these materials around 250 K. A remarkable elastic softening, which is partially suppressed upon application of a magnetic field, is observed at low temperatures and is believed to be linked to a structural transition that takes place in the Co-doped samples. The soft elastic moduli lead to large magnetostriction below 50 K, reaching a value of 700 ppm at 20 kOe for Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 0.75}Co{sub 0.25}Bi{sub 2}.

  15. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    and compared with directly measured and tabulated material values. The noninvasive technique will be repeated for tissue phantoms enclosed in a...peak negative pressure, time averaged intensity) will be consistent with limits established as safe for humans, and ultrasound frequencies will be...3-D ultrasonic intensity distributions in tissue-like materials . The model was used to compare and refine candidate designs for the new radiation

  16. A Laboratory Study of the Effect of Stress State on the Elastic Moduli of Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Aouad, Mohammed Kayal and James Lee. I would like to express my appreciation to the U.S. Air Force and the Air Force Institute of Technology whose...devices constructed for pulse testing are either right circular cylinder or cubic in nature. Cubic devices have the advantage to vary the three orthogonal...testing in cubic devices has the advantage of measuring dilatational and shear body waves under triaxial stress conditions with relative ease. Through

  17. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    pathologies. APPROACH This work builds upon the principles of ultrasonic elastographyi, wherein ultrasound is used to both generate and observe low ...an ensemble of forcing pulses , the low frequency drive spectrum has a low pass filtered comb spectrum consisting of 64 Hz harmonics, as shown in the...objective of this project is to develop an ultrasound -based system for non-invasive determination of in vivo shear and bulk properties of cetacean soft

  18. Estimation of elastic moduli of graphene monolayer in lattice statics approach at nonzero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zubko, I. Yu. Kochurov, V. I.

    2015-10-27

    For the aim of the crystal temperature control the computational-statistical approach to studying thermo-mechanical properties for finite sized crystals is presented. The approach is based on the combination of the high-performance computational techniques and statistical analysis of the crystal response on external thermo-mechanical actions for specimens with the statistically small amount of atoms (for instance, nanoparticles). The heat motion of atoms is imitated in the statics approach by including the independent degrees of freedom for atoms connected with their oscillations. We obtained that under heating, graphene material response is nonsymmetric.

  19. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    scatterer such as bone. The second technique involved a pulsed ultrasonic carrier signal from which the motion of a reflecting surface was...extracted by repeated correlation of the echoed pulses with those that were transmitted. This technique permitted different scatterers to be simultaneously...combine the measurement resolution of pure­ tone vibrometry with the spatial resolution of pulse -echo vibrometry. The new technique requires that the

  20. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    and data collection hardware. 3. Hemorrhage and edema detection study The feasibility study addressing the use of the prototype elastography ...universally optimal, should not impose a limit on the attainable performance of the overall prototype elastography system. 3. Hemorrhage and

  1. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT A confocal ultrasonic elastography system was designed, developed, and tested with discrete...technology called elastography . The methods described by Greenleaf (Chen et al, 2002) and Sarvazyan (Sarvazyan et al, 1998) provide the basis for shear... elastography system was designed, developed, and tested with discrete scatterers and tissue phantoms. The former experiments demonstrated the ability to

  2. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    as a precursor to elastography measurements. 2 4. Hemorrhage and Edema Simulation A finite element model-based simulation effort was initiated...profiles, as are 3 commonly used in ultrasound elastography , and ring-shaped force profiles. The critical findings from the simulation effort are

  3. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    and with harvested tissue samples. In vivo testing will be conducted on Navy dolphins . Ultrasound parameters (peak negative pressure, time averaged...A synthetic material was developed which mimicks the ultrasonic properties of living bottlenose dolphin soft tissues. RESULTS 1. System...NIVMS) and with a laser doppler vibrometer (Polytec PDV-100). A variety of pulse drive levels, durations, and bandwidths for both ultrasound

  4. Room Temperature Elastic Moduli and Vickers Hardness of Hot-Pressed LLZO Cubic Garnet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    was examined on uncoated fracture surfaces by SEM with an accelerating voltage of 1 and 3 kV. Phase purity was evaluated from X-ray diffraction data... hydroxyapatite [14], langatates [20], La0.5Sr0.5Fe1-xCoxO3-d perovskites [22], SmScO3 [23], and NdScO3 [23], a number of ternary and quaternary carbides...Microstructure and lattice parameter of LLZO specimens In this study, the LLZO microstructure was observed on a (i) fracture surface of LLZO-01 (Fig. 1a) and

  5. In Vivo Determination of the Complex Elastic Moduli of Cetacean Head Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    formed by the ultrasonic source. As the ring radius is changed through a change in the ultrasonic carrier frequency, a fixed receiver measures the...of an ultrasonic Doppler vibration measurement system called NVMS developed at Georgia Tech iii. Algorithms have been developed to enable the...magnitude and phase of vibration to be determined as a function of range (tissue depth) along the ultrasonic beam. By measuring the differential phase of

  6. Estimation of the engineering elastic constants of a directionally solidified superalloy for finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1991-01-01

    The temperature-dependent engineering elastic constants of a directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy were estimated from the single-crystal elastic constants of nickel and MAR-MOO2 superalloy by using Wells' method. In this method, the directionally solidified (columnar-grained) nickel-base superalloy was modeled as a transversely isotropic material, and the five independent elastic constants of the transversely isotropic material were determined from the three independent elastic constants of a cubic single crystal. Solidification for both the single crystals and the directionally solidified superalloy was assumed to be along the (001) direction. Temperature-dependent Young's moduli in longitudinal and transverse directions, shear moduli, and Poisson's ratios were tabulated for the directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy. These engineering elastic constants could be used as input for performing finite element structural analysis of directionally solidified turbine engine components.

  7. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  8. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems.

    PubMed

    Wild, Dominik S; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-10-07

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  9. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  10. General conditions for quantum adiabatic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Comparat, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Adiabaticity occurs when, during its evolution, a physical system remains in the instantaneous eigenstate of the Hamiltonian. Unfortunately, existing results, such as the quantum adiabatic theorem based on a slow down evolution [H({epsilon}t),{epsilon}{yields}0], are insufficient to describe an evolution driven by the Hamiltonian H(t) itself. Here we derive general criteria and exact bounds, for the state and its phase, ensuring an adiabatic evolution for any Hamiltonian H(t). As a corollary, we demonstrate that the commonly used condition of a slow Hamiltonian variation rate, compared to the spectral gap, is indeed sufficient to ensure adiabaticity but only when the Hamiltonian is real and nonoscillating (for instance, containing exponential or polynomial but no sinusoidal functions)

  11. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  12. Simulation of periodically focused, adiabatic thermal beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Akylas, T. R.; Barton, T. J.; Field, D. M.; Lang, K. M.; Mok, R. V.

    2012-12-21

    Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K.R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 14, 103102 (2007); J. Zhou, K.R. Samokhvalova and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 15, 023102 (2008)]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  13. An Estimation Method of Pore Structure and Mineral Moduli Based on Kuster-Toksöz (KT) Model and Biot's Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Da; Yin, Cheng; Zhao, Hu; Liu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Pore structure and mineral matrix elastic moduli are indispensable in rock physics models. We propose an estimation method of pore structure and mineral moduli based on Kuster-Toksöz model and Biot's coefficient. In this technique, pore aspect ratios of five different scales from 100 to 10-4 are considered, Biot's coefficient is used to determine bounds of mineral moduli, and an estimation procedure combined with simulated annealing (SA) algorithm to handle real logs or laboratory measurements is developed. The proposed method is applied to parameter estimations on 28 sandstone samples, the properties of which have been measured in lab. The water saturated data are used for estimating pore structure and mineral moduli, and the oil saturated data are used for testing these estimated parameters through fluid substitution in Kuster-Toksöz model. We then compare fluid substitution results with lab measurements and find that relative errors of P-wave and S-wave velocities are all less than 5%, which indicates that the estimation results are accurate.

  14. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  15. Moduli evolution in the presence of thermal corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Barreiro, Tiago; Carlos, Beatriz de; Copeland, Edmund J.; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2008-09-15

    We study the effect of thermal corrections on the evolution of moduli in effective supergravity models. This is motivated by previous results in the literature suggesting that these corrections could alter and even erase the presence of a minimum in the zero temperature potential, something that would have disastrous consequences in these particular models. We show that, in a representative sample of flux compactification constructions, this need not be the case, although we find that the inclusion of thermal corrections can dramatically decrease the region of initial conditions for which the moduli are stabilized. Moreover, the bounds on the reheating temperature coming from demanding that the full, finite temperature potential, has a minimum can be considerably relaxed given the slow pace at which the evolution proceeds.

  16. Moduli spaces of vortex knots for an exact fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The moduli spaces S ( D ) of non-isotopic vortex knots are introduced for the ideal fluid flows in invariant domains D . The analogous moduli spaces of the magnetic fields B knots are defined. We derive and investigate new exact fluid flows (and analogous plasma equilibria) satisfying the Beltrami equation which have nested invariant balls Bk 3 with radii Rk ≈ (k + 1) π, k⟶∞. The first flow is z-axisymmetric; the other ones do not possess any rotational symmetries. The axisymmetric flow has an invariant plane z = 0. Due to an involutive symmetry of the flow, its vortex knots in the invariant half-spaces z > 0 and z < 0 are equivalent. It is demonstrated that the moduli space 𝒮(ℝ3) for the derived fluid flow in ℝ3 is naturally isomorphic to the set of all rational numbers p/q in the interval J 1 : 0 . 25 < q < M ˜ 1 ≈ 0 . 5847 , where q is the safety factor. For the fluid flow in the first invariant ball B1 3 , it is shown that all values of the safety factor q belong to a small interval of length ℓ ≈ 0.1261. It is established that only torus knots Kp,q with 0.25 < p/q < 0.5847 are realized as vortex knots for the constructed flow in ℝ3. Each torus knot Kp,q with 0.25 < p/q < 0.5 is realized on countably many invariant tori Tk 2 located between the invariant spheres Sk 2 and Sk + 1 2 , while torus knots with 0 . 5 < p / q < M ˜ 1 are realized only on finitely many invariant tori. The moduli spaces S m ( Ba 3 ) ( m = 1 , 2 , … ) of vortex knots are constructed for some axisymmetric steady fluid flows that are solutions to the boundary eigenvalue problem for the curl operator on a ball Ba 3 .

  17. Pressuremeter Moduli for Airport Pavement Design and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    Dissertation, Department of Civil Engineering , Uni- versity of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Briaud, J.-L. & Garland, E., 1985, "Loading Rate Method for Pile...Response in Clay," Jour. of Geotechnical Engineering , ASCE, Vol. 111, No. 3, pp. 319-335. Briand, J.-L., Lytton, R.L. & Hung, J.T., 1982, "Using a...DOT/FAA/PM-87/10 Pressuremeter Moduli for Program Engineering Airport Pavement Design and Maintenance Service Washington, D.C. 20591 and Evaluation

  18. The moduli space of superconformal instantons in sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Monastyrsky, M.I. ); Natanzon, S.M. )

    1991-06-21

    In this paper, an approach to instantons in supersymmetrical 2-dimensional sigma models is discussed. In this approach superinstantons are characterized as the superconformal maps of a physical space into the isotopic (target) space. The authors consider a special case of the supersphere with punctures. New topological invariants as the number of the so-called fermionic points appear in this case. The authors also analyze the structure of the moduli space of superinstantons within this framework.

  19. Geometry of moduli stacks of (k , l) -stable vector bundles over algebraic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata-Gutiérrez, O.; Neumann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    We study the geometry of the moduli stack of vector bundles of fixed rank and degree over an algebraic curve by introducing a filtration made of open substacks build from (k , l) -stable vector bundles. The concept of (k , l) -stability was introduced by Narasimhan and Ramanan to study the geometry of the coarse moduli space of stable bundles. We will exhibit the stacky picture and analyse the geometric and cohomological properties of the moduli stacks of (k , l) -stable vector bundles. For particular pairs (k , l) of integers we also show that these moduli stacks admit coarse moduli spaces and we discuss their interplay.

  20. Aggregate and Single-Crystalline Elasticity of hcp Cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonangeli, D.; Krisch, M.; Fiquet, G.; Badro, J.; Farber, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    The capability to produce detailed models of the internal structure of the Earth and other planets critically hinges on our knowledge of the pressure dependence of sound velocities and elastic moduli. Here we present data on the complete elastic tensor of hcp cobalt under hydrostatic compression to 39 GPa, derived by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering (IXS). These results are complemented by an IXS study on polycrystalline cobalt throughout the stability range of the hcp phase, to 99 GPa. Interestingly, the single crystal elastic anisotropy is only very weakly reflected in the effective anisotropy of the aggregate. A Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the single crystal moduli reproduces the results on powder within 3%, up to 75 GPa. Above this pressure, we observe an anomalous softening in the density evolution of the aggregate velocities. This type of comparative analysis between single crystal and polycrystal is essential for characterizing the bulk properties of textured samples and provides a basis for the rigorous testing of the orientational averaging schemes currently employed to link the single crystal elastic moduli with the aggregate sound velocities. We note that only through the combined approach of experiment and theory (ab initio calculations) we can progress in both refining first principle methods and in getting more insights into the physics of the investigated system. In the specific case of Co, we inferred a magnetic transition to be the physical origin for the high pressure elastic anomaly. Finally, our study points out the importance of coupling between the electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom to elastic properties at high pressure. We suggest that these effects likely play an important role in elasticity of deep planetary interiors.

  1. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  2. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Collagen Type I Single Fiber.

    PubMed

    Dutov, Pavel; Antipova, Olga; Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibers are the main components of the extra cellular matrix and the primary contributors to the mechanical properties of tissues. Here we report a novel approach to measure the longitudinal component of the elastic moduli of biological fibers under conditions close to those found in vivo and apply it to type I collagen from rat tail tendon. This approach combines optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, and exploits Euler-Bernoulli elasticity theory for data analysis. This approach also avoids drying for measurements or visualization, since samples are freshly extracted. Importantly, strains are kept below 0.5%, which appear consistent with the linear elastic regime. We find, surprisingly, that the longitudinal elastic modulus of type I collagen cannot be represented by a single quantity but rather is a distribution that is broader than the uncertainty of our experimental technique. The longitudinal component of the single-fiber elastic modulus is between 100 MPa and 360 MPa for samples extracted from different rats and/or different parts of a single tail. Variations are also observed in the fibril-bundle/fibril diameter with an average of 325±40 nm. Since bending forces depend on the diameter to the fourth power, this variation in diameter is important for estimating the range of elastic moduli. The remaining variations in the modulus may be due to differences in composition of the fibril-bundles, or the extent of the proteoglycans constituting fibril-bundles, or that some single fibrils may be of fibril-bundle size.

  3. Surface tension and the dodecahedron model for lung elasticity.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, E; Budiansky, B

    1990-05-01

    Macroscopic elastic moduli governing the incremental deformations of lung parenchyma are calculated on the basis of a model for an individual lung element in the shape of a regular dodecahedron. Elastic stiffness within the element is provided by pin-jointed tension members along the edges of the dodecahedron, surface tension is incorporated into its pentagonal faces, and the influence of transpulmonary pressure is simulated by an externally applied hydrostatic tension. The analysis is based on a variational statement of nonlinear structural mechanics, and the results show how the moduli depend on the effective inflation pressure, the constitutive behavior of the idealized truss members, and the surface-area dependent surface tension. The theory is discussed in the light of available experimental information. A more general analysis is needed to account for the effects of structural as well as surface-tension hysteresis.

  4. Crystal structure, thermal expansivity, and elasticity of OH-chondrodite: Trends among dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Yu; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Mao, Zhu; ...

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report the structure and thermoelastic properties of OH-chondrodite. The sample was synthesized at 12 GPa and 1523 K, coexisting with hydroxyl-clinohumite and hydrous olivine. The Fe content Fe/(Fe+Mg) is 1.1 mol%, and the monoclinic unit-cell parameters are: a = 4.7459(2) Å, b = 10.3480(7) Å, c = 7.9002(6) Å, α = 108.702(7)°, and V = 367.50(4) Å3. At ambient conditions the crystal structure was refined in space group P21/b from 1915 unique reflection intensities measured by single-crystal x-ray diffraction. The volume thermal expansion coefficient was measured between 150 and 800 K, resulting in αV = 2.8(5)×10-9(K-2) × Tmore » + 40.9(7) × 10-6(K-1) – 0.81(3)(K)/T2, with an average value of 38.0(9)×10-6 K-1. Brillouin spectroscopy was used to measure a set of acoustic velocities from which all thirteen components (Cij) of the elastic tensor were determined. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the moduli yield for the adiabatic bulk modulus, KS0 = 117.9(12) GPa, and for shear modulus, G0 = 70.1(5) GPa. The Reuss bound on the isothermal bulk modulus (KT0) is 114.2(14) GPa. From the measured thermodynamic properties, the Grüneisen parameter (γ) is calculated to be 1.66(4). Fitting previous static compression data using our independently measured bulk modulus (isothermal Reuss bound) as a fixed parameter, we refined the first pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, KT’ = 5.5(1). Systematic trends between H2O content and physical properties are evaluated among dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases along the forsterite-brucite join.« less

  5. Connection between elastic and electrical properties of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Sevostianov, I

    2016-03-21

    The paper focuses on the connection between elastic and electrical properties of cortical bone. Both these properties are governed by microstructure that consists of several pore systems filled with mechanically soft and electrically conductive tissue. Microstructural changes induced by aging, various diseases, microgravity conditions etc. lead to variation in both properties. The paper address the problem of evaluation of the changes in mechanical performance (decrease in Young׳s moduli) via monitoring electrical conductivity. The theoretical results are verified experimentally.

  6. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  7. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. Elasticity of hcp cobalt at high pressure and temperature: a quasi-harmonic case

    SciTech Connect

    Antonangeli, D; Krisch, M; Farber, D L; Ruddle, D G; Fiquet, G

    2007-11-30

    We performed high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on a single crystal of hcp cobalt at simultaneous high pressure and high temperature, deriving 4 of the 5 independent elements of the elastic tensor. Our experiments indicate that the elasticity of hcp-Co is well described within the frame of a quasi-harmonic approximation and that anharmonic high-temperature effects on the elastic moduli, sound velocities and elastic anisotropy are minimal at constant density. These results support the validity of the Birch's law and represent an important benchmark for ab initio thermal lattice dynamics and molecular-dynamics simulations.

  9. Elastic Properties of Rolled Uranium -- 10 wt.% Molybdenum Nuclear Fuel Foils

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Brown; D. J. Alexander; K. D. Clarke; B. Clausen; M. A. Okuniewski; T. A. Sisneros

    2013-11-01

    In situ neutron diffraction data was collected during elastic loading of rolled foils of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum bonded to a thin layer of zirconium. Lattice parameters were ascertained from the diffraction patterns to determine the elastic strain and, subsequently, the elastic moduli and Poisson’s ratio in the rolling and transverse directions. The foil was found to be elastically isotropic in the rolling plane with an effective modulus of 86 + / - 3 GPa and a Poisson’s ratio 0.39 + / - 0.04.

  10. The Single-Crystal Elasticity of Yttria (Y2O3) to High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriven, Waltraud M.; Palko, James W.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Bass, Jay D.; Sayir, Ali; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic moduli of yttria have been measured by Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1200 C. The room temperature values obtained are C11 = 223.6 +/- 0.6 GPa, C44 = 74.6 +/- 0.5 GPa, and C12 = 112.4 +/- 1.0 GPa. The resulting bulk and (Voigt-Reuss-Hill) shear moduli are K = 149.5 +/- 1.0 GPa and G(sub VRH) = 66.3 +/- 0.8 GPa, respectively. These agree much more closely with experimental values reported for polycrystalline samples than do previous single-crystal measurements. Linear least squares regressions to the variation of bulk and shear moduli with temperature result in derivatives of dK/dT = -17 +/- 2 MPa/degC and dG(sub VRH)/dT = -8 +/- 2 MPa/degC. Elastic anisotropy was found to remain essentially constant over the temperature range studied.

  11. Single-Crystal Elastic Constants of Yttria (Y2O3) Measured to High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali; Palko, James W.; Kriven, Waltraud M.; Sinogeikin, Sergey V.; Bass, Jay D.

    2001-01-01

    Yttria, or yttrium sesquioxide (Y2O3), has been considered for use in nuclear applications and has gained interest relatively recently for use in infrared optics. Single crystals of yttria have been grown successfully at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a laser-heated float zone technique in a fiber and rod. Such samples allow measurement of the single-crystal elastic properties, and these measurements provide useful property data for the design of components using single crystals. They also yield information as to what degree the elastic properties of yttria ceramics are a result of the intrinsic properties of the yttria crystal in comparison to characteristics that may depend on processing, such as microstructure and intergranular phases, which are common in sintered yttria. The single-crystal elastic moduli are valuable for designing such optical components. In particular, the temperature derivatives of elastic moduli allow the dimensional changes due to heating under physical constraints, as well as acoustic excitation, to be determined. The single-crystal elastic moduli of yttria were measured by Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1200 C. The room-temperature values obtained were C(sub 11) = 223.6 + 0.6 GPa, C(sub 44) = 74.6 + 0.5 GPa, and C(sub 12) = 112.4 + 1.0 GPa. The resulting bulk and (Voigt-Reuss-Hill) shear moduli were K = 149.5 + 1.0 GPa and G(sub VRH) = 66.3 + 0.8 GPa, respectively. Linear least-squares regressions to the variation of bulk and shear moduli with temperature resulted in derivatives of dK/dT = -17 + 2 MPa/C and dG(sub VRH)/dT = -8 + 2 MPa/ C. Elastic anisotropy was found to remain essentially constant over the temperature range studied.

  12. More on the Abrikosov strings with non-Abelian moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.; Tallarita, Gianni; Yung, Alexei

    2014-04-01

    We continue explorations of deformed Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen (ANO) strings, with non-Abelian moduli on the worldsheet. In a simple model with an extra field, we find classically stable ANO and non-Abelian strings. The tension of the latter is a few percent lower than the tension of the ANO string. Then, we calculate the interpolating field configuration. Once the kink mass Mk and the difference of tensions ΔT are found, we calculate the decay rate of the ANO string with a higher tension ("false vacuum") into the non-Abelian string with the lower tension ("genuine vacuum") through the "bubble" formation in the quasiclassical approximation.

  13. Dynamic Young's moduli of space materials at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L. Z.; Tu, Z. H.; Zhang, P. Q.

    Using vibration analysis methods, the dynamic mechanical properties of space materials at low temperatures (from 4.2 to 300 K) are studied in this paper. System identification techniques in the time domain are used to identify the dynamic parameters of the space materials Ti-5Al-2.5Sn extra-low-interstitial (ELI) alloy and Al-2.5Li-1.3Cu-0.9Mg-0.13Zr (Al-Li) alloy. The dynamic Young's moduli of these materials are calculated using the basic natural frequencies at different temperatures.

  14. Determination of Biomembrane Bending Moduli in Fully Atomistic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bilayer bending modulus (Kc) is one of the most important physical constants characterizing lipid membranes, but precisely measuring it is a challenge, both experimentally and computationally. Experimental measurements on chemically identical bilayers often differ depending upon the techniques employed, and robust simulation results have previously been limited to coarse-grained models (at varying levels of resolution). This Communication demonstrates the extraction of Kc from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations for three different single-component lipid bilayers (DPPC, DOPC, and DOPE). The results agree quantitatively with experiments that measure thermal shape fluctuations in giant unilamellar vesicles. Lipid tilt, twist, and compression moduli are also reported. PMID:25202918

  15. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  16. On black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Han, Yan

    2012-12-01

    In this Letter, we obtain the black hole spectroscopy by combining the black hole property of adiabaticity and the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. This velocity is obtained in the tunneling framework. In particular, we declare, if requiring canonical invariance, the adiabatic invariant quantity should be of the covariant form Iadia = ∮pi dqi. Using it, the horizon area of a Schwarzschild black hole is quantized independently of the choice of coordinates, with an equally spaced spectroscopy always given by ΔA = 8 π lp2 in the Schwarzschild and Painlevé coordinates.

  17. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mukaida, Kyohei E-mail: jinno@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  18. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  19. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  20. Adiabatic cluster-state quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.

    2010-09-15

    Models of quantum computation (QC) are important because they change the physical requirements for achieving universal QC. For example, one-way QC requires the preparation of an entangled ''cluster'' state, followed by adaptive measurement on this state, a set of requirements which is different from the standard quantum-circuit model. Here we introduce a model based on one-way QC but without measurements (except for the final readout), instead using adiabatic deformation of a Hamiltonian whose initial ground state is the cluster state. Our results could help increase the feasibility of adiabatic schemes by using tools from one-way QC.

  1. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τ_{A}(t) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τ_{A}(t) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  2. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  3. An inverse problem approach for elasticity imaging through vibroacoustics.

    PubMed

    Aguiló, Miguel A; Aquino, Wilkins; Brigham, John C; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2010-04-01

    A methodology for estimating the spatial distribution of elastic moduli using the steady-state dynamic response of solids immersed in fluids is presented. The technique relies on the ensuing acoustic field from a remotely excited solid to inversely estimate the spatial distribution of Young's modulus of biological structures (e.g., breast tissue). This work proposes the use of Gaussian radial basis functions (GRBF) to represent the spatial variation of elastic moduli. GRBF are shown to possess the advantage of representing smooth functions with quasi-compact support and can efficiently represent elastic moduli distributions such as those that occur in soft biological tissue in the presence of unhealthy tissue (e.g., tumors and calcifications). The direct problem consists of a coupled acoustic-structure interaction boundary-value problem solved in the frequency domain using the finite element method. The inverse problem is cast as an optimization problem in which the error functional is defined as a measure of discrepancy between an experimentally measured response and a finite element representation of the system. Nongradient based optimization algorithms are used to solve the resulting optimization problem. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated through a series of simulations and an experiment. For comparison purposes, the surface velocity response was also used for the inverse characterization as the measured response in place of the acoustic pressure.

  4. Adiabatic compressibility of myosin subfragment-1 and heavy meromyosin with or without nucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Y; Suzuki, N; Mihashi, K

    1993-01-01

    The partial specific adiabatic compressibilities of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) and heavy meromyosin (HMM) of skeletal muscle in solution were determined by measuring the density and the sound velocity of the solution. The partial specific volumes of S1 and HMM were 0.713 and 0.711 cm3/g, respectively. The partial specific adiabatic compressibilities of S1 and HMM were 4.2 x 10(-12) and 2.9 x 10(-12) cm2/dyn, respectively. These values are in the same range as the most of globular proteins so far studied. The result indicates that the flexibility of S1 region almost equals to that of HMM. After binding to ADP.orthovanadate, S1 and HMM became softer than their complexes with ADP. The bulk moduli of S1 and HMM were of the order of (4-6) x 10(10) dyn/cm2, which are very comparable with the bulk modulus of muscle fiber. PMID:8298019

  5. Elastic-Plastic Finite-Difference Analysis of Unidirectional Composites Subjected to Thermomechanical Cyclic Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    1Nb matrix was attained using a bilinear elastic -plastic model with temperature dependent elastic and plastic moduli , yield stress and coefficient of...J., "Investigation of the Thermomechanical Response of a Titanium - Aluminide /Silicon-Carbide Composite using a Unified State Variable Model and the...Analysis of MMC Subjected to Thermomechanical Fatigue", Titanium Aluminide Composites, WL-TR-91- 4020, Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio

  6. A diffraction correction for storage and loss moduli imaging using radiation force based elastography.

    PubMed

    Budelli, Eliana; Brum, Javier; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Tanter, Mickaël; Lema, Patricia; Negreira, Carlos; Gennisson, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-07

    Noninvasive evaluation of the rheological behavior of soft tissues may provide an important diagnosis tool. Nowadays, available commercial ultrasound systems only provide shear elasticity estimation by shear wave speed assessment under the hypothesis of a purely elastic model. However, to fully characterize the rheological behavior of tissues, given by its storage (G') and loss (G″) moduli, it is necessary to estimate both: shear wave speed and shear wave attenuation. Most elastography techniques use the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For this type of source the shear waves are not plane and a diffraction correction is needed to properly estimate the shear wave attenuation. The use of a cylindrical wave approximation to evaluate diffraction has been proposed by other authors before. Here the validity of such approximation is numerically and experimentally revisited. Then, it is used to generate images of G' and G″ in heterogeneous viscoelastic mediums. A simulation algorithm based on the anisotropic and viscoelastic Green's function was used to establish the validity of the cylindrical approximation. Moreover, two experiments were carried out: a transient elastography experiment where plane shear waves were generated using a vibrating plate and a SSI experiment that uses the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For both experiments the shear wave propagation was followed with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner. Then, the shear wave velocity and shear wave attenuation were recovered from the phase and amplitude decay versus distance respectively. In the SSI experiment the cylindrical approximation was applied to correct attenuation due to diffraction effects. The numerical and experimental results validate the use of a cylindrical correction to assess shear wave attenuation. Finally, by applying the cylindrical correction G' and G″ images were generated in heterogeneous phantoms and a preliminary in vivo feasibility study was

  7. A diffraction correction for storage and loss moduli imaging using radiation force based elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budelli, Eliana; Brum, Javier; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Tanter, Mickaël; Lema, Patricia; Negreira, Carlos; Gennisson, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the rheological behavior of soft tissues may provide an important diagnosis tool. Nowadays, available commercial ultrasound systems only provide shear elasticity estimation by shear wave speed assessment under the hypothesis of a purely elastic model. However, to fully characterize the rheological behavior of tissues, given by its storage (G‧) and loss (G″) moduli, it is necessary to estimate both: shear wave speed and shear wave attenuation. Most elastography techniques use the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For this type of source the shear waves are not plane and a diffraction correction is needed to properly estimate the shear wave attenuation. The use of a cylindrical wave approximation to evaluate diffraction has been proposed by other authors before. Here the validity of such approximation is numerically and experimentally revisited. Then, it is used to generate images of G‧ and G″ in heterogeneous viscoelastic mediums. A simulation algorithm based on the anisotropic and viscoelastic Green’s function was used to establish the validity of the cylindrical approximation. Moreover, two experiments were carried out: a transient elastography experiment where plane shear waves were generated using a vibrating plate and a SSI experiment that uses the acoustic radiation force to generate shear waves. For both experiments the shear wave propagation was followed with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner. Then, the shear wave velocity and shear wave attenuation were recovered from the phase and amplitude decay versus distance respectively. In the SSI experiment the cylindrical approximation was applied to correct attenuation due to diffraction effects. The numerical and experimental results validate the use of a cylindrical correction to assess shear wave attenuation. Finally, by applying the cylindrical correction G‧ and G″ images were generated in heterogeneous phantoms and a preliminary in vivo feasibility study

  8. Elastic Anisotropy of Trabecular Bone in the Elderly Human Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Ginu U.; Gallagher, John A.; Hussein, Amira I.; Barest, Glenn D.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the nature of the elastic symmetry of trabecular bone is fundamental to the study of bone adaptation and failure. Previous studies have classified human vertebral trabecular bone as orthotropic or transversely isotropic but have typically obtained samples from only selected regions of the centrum. In this study, the elastic symmetry of human vertebral trabecular bone was characterized using microfinite element (μFE) analyses performed on 1019 cubic regions of side length equal to 5 mm, obtained via thorough sampling of the centrums of 18 human L1 vertebrae (age = 81.17 ± 7.7 yr; eight males and ten females). An optimization procedure was used to find the closest orthotropic representation of the resulting stiffness tensor for each cube. The orthotropic elastic constants and orientation of the principal elastic axes were then recorded for each cube and were compared to the constants predicted from Cowin's fabric-based constitutive model (Cowin, 1985, “The Relationship Between the Elasticity Tensor and the Fabric Tensor,” Mech. Mater., 4(2), pp. 137–147.) and the orientation of the principal axes of the fabric tensor, respectively. Deviations from orthotropy were quantified by the “orthotropic error” (van Rietbergen et al., 1996, “Direct Mechanics Assessment of Elastic Symmetries and Properties of Trabecular Bone Architecture,” J. Biomech., 29(12), pp. 1653–1657), and deviations from transverse isotropy were determined by statistical comparison of the secondary and tertiary elastic moduli. The orthotropic error was greater than 50% for nearly half of the cubes, and the secondary and tertiary moduli differed from one another (p < 0.0001). Both the orthotropic error and the difference between secondary and tertiary moduli decreased with increasing bone volume fraction (BV/TV; p ≤ 0.007). Considering only the cubes with an orthotropic error less than 50%, only moderate correlations were observed between the fabric

  9. Elastic loss and dispersion in ceramic-matrix piezocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybyanets, A. N.; Naumenko, A. A.; Konstantinov, G. M.; Shvetsova, N. A.; Lugovaya, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic-matrix composites of different types have been comprehensively studied using three-dimensional numerical simulation, resonance analysis of impedance spectra, and pulse-echo ultrasonic measurements. The results of finite-difference simulation of longitudinal ultrasonic wave propagation in different viscoelastic ceramic-matrix composites (porous ceramics and ceramics/crystal) have been presented. The experimental studies have revealed regions of elastic dispersion characterized by anomalies of the frequency dependences of the imaginary and real parts of the elastic moduli. The simulation results have been compared with experimental data.

  10. Elastic properties of silver borate glasses doped with praseodymium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, G. V. Jagadeesha; Eraiah, B.

    2014-04-01

    A series of glasses xPr6O11-(35-x) Ag2O-65B2O3 with x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mol % were synthesized by melt quenching technique. Longitudinal and shear ultrasonic velocity were measured at 5 MHz frequency and at room temperature. Elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio and Debye temperature have been calculated from the measured density and ultrasonic velocity at room temperature. The experimental results indicate that the elastic constants depend upon the composition of the glasses. The role of the Pr6O11 inside the glass network was discussed.

  11. Precisely predicting and designing the elasticity of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. Q. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn; Wang, R. F.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn

    2014-05-28

    We reveal that the elastic moduli of metallic glasses (MGs) invariably vary in a much steeper manner than that predicted by the conventional “rule of mixtures” in individual alloy systems. Such deviations are proved to originate fundamentally from their disordered atomic structures and intrinsic local heterogeneities. By treating the MGs as atomic-level dual phase hybrids, we further propose universal relations to be capable of precisely predicting and designing the elastic constants of MGs. This may contribute to the development of MGs with intended properties and behaviors, and allow new understandings on the structures and properties as well as their relationships in MGs.

  12. A Preponderance of Elastic Properties of Alpha Plutonium Measured Via Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Tarik A.; Farrow, Adam M.; Freibert, Franz J.

    2012-06-06

    Samples of {alpha} plutonium were fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility. Cylindrical samples were machined from cast pucks. Precision immersion density and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements were completed on 27 new samples, yielding elastic moduli measurements. Mechanical tests were performed in compression yielding stress-strain curves as a function of rate, temperature and phase.

  13. Thermal and elastic properties of oxy-fluoro zinc tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmmad, Shaik Kareem; Samee, M. A.; Taqiullah, S. M.; Rahman, Syed

    2014-04-01

    A glass system based on ZnF2-ZnO-As2O3-TeO2 was prepared. A number of properties such as glass transition temperature, glass stability, Elastic moduli, Debye temperature, poisons ratio studies. The results indicated that most of the properties are observed to be dependent on ZnF2 content.

  14. Elastic and magnetostrictive properties of Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Bi{sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.375)

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Michael R.; Jia Lin; McCarthy, David; Keppens, Veerle; McGuire, Michael A.

    2011-04-01

    Elastic moduli and magnetostriction data are reported for polycrystalline Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Bi{sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.375). The elastic moduli c{sub 11} and c{sub 44} have been measured as a function of temperature (5-300 K) and magnetic field (0-5 T), and reflect the ferromagnetic transition observed in these materials around 250 K. A remarkable elastic softening, which is partially suppressed upon application of a magnetic field, is observed at low temperatures and is believed to be linked to a structural transition that takes place in the Co-doped samples. The soft elastic moduli lead to large magnetostriction below 50 K, reaching a value of 700 ppm at 20 kOe for Tb{sub 6}Fe{sub 0.75}Co{sub 0.25}Bi{sub 2}.

  15. Non-affine elasticity in jammed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Symmetry dictates that perfect crystals should deform homogeneously, or affinely, under external load, and computing the elastic moduli from the underlying interaction potential is then straightforward. For disordered materials no such simple procedure exists, and recent numerical works have demonstrated that non-affine corrections can dramatically reduce the naive expectation for the shear modulus in a broad class of disordered systems and may control rigidity loss in the zero pressure limit in purely repulsive systems, i.e. the unjamming transition (c.f. [O'Hern et. al. PRE 68, 011306 (2003)]). We present numerical results and an analytical framework for the study of these non-affine corrections to the elastic response of disordered packings.

  16. Non-Gaussian Error Distributions of LMC Distance Moduli Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Sara; Ratra, Bharat

    2015-12-01

    We construct error distributions for a compilation of 232 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) distance moduli values from de Grijs et al. that give an LMC distance modulus of (m - M)0 = 18.49 ± 0.13 mag (median and 1σ symmetrized error). Central estimates found from weighted mean and median statistics are used to construct the error distributions. The weighted mean error distribution is non-Gaussian—flatter and broader than Gaussian—with more (less) probability in the tails (center) than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution; this could be the consequence of unaccounted-for systematic uncertainties. The median statistics error distribution, which does not make use of the individual measurement errors, is also non-Gaussian—more peaked than Gaussian—with less (more) probability in the tails (center) than is predicted by a Gaussian distribution; this could be the consequence of publication bias and/or the non-independence of the measurements. We also construct the error distributions of 247 SMC distance moduli values from de Grijs & Bono. We find a central estimate of {(m-M)}0=18.94+/- 0.14 mag (median and 1σ symmetrized error), and similar probabilities for the error distributions.

  17. Quiver theories for moduli spaces of classical group nilpotent orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Amihay; Kalveks, Rudolph

    2016-06-01

    We approach the topic of Classical group nilpotent orbits from the perspective of the moduli spaces of quivers, described in terms of Hilbert series and generating functions. We review the established Higgs and Coulomb branch quiver theory constructions for A series nilpotent orbits. We present systematic constructions for BCD series nilpotent orbits on the Higgs branches of quiver theories defined by canonical partitions; this paper collects earlier work into a systematic framework, filling in gaps and providing a complete treatment. We find new Coulomb branch constructions for above minimal nilpotent orbits, including some based upon twisted affine Dynkin diagrams. We also discuss aspects of 3 d mirror symmetry between these Higgs and Coulomb branch constructions and explore dualities and other relationships, such as HyperKähler quotients, between quivers. We analyse all Classical group nilpotent orbit moduli spaces up to rank 4 by giving their unrefined Hilbert series and the Highest Weight Generating functions for their decompositions into characters of irreducible representations and/or Hall Littlewood polynomials.

  18. Soap Bubble Elasticity: Analysis and Correlation with Foam Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Tsekov, R.; Manev, E. D.; Nguyen, A. V.

    2010-05-01

    A correlation between the elastic modulus of soap bubble and the foam stability was found. A model system was chosen: a soap bubble stabilized by simple nonionic surfactant tetraethylene glycol octyl ether (C8E4) and 10^-5 M NaCl. The Elastic moduli were determined by periodical expansion and shrinking of foam bubbles with frequency of 0.1 Hz and volumetric amplitude of 2 mm 3. The film tension was monitored via commercial profile analysis tensiometer (Sinterface Technologies, GmbH). The elastic moduli of foam bubbles versus surfactant concentration in the range of 2x10^-3 - 10^-2 M were obtained. In addition, the theory of Lucassen and van den Tempel for the elastic modulus of single liquid/air interface at given frequency was exploited as well. The bulk diffusion coefficient of the surfactant molecules is unknown parameter through the adsorption frequency in this theory. Hence, a fitting procedure (with one free parameter) was conducted matching experimental and theoretical data. The value of the bulk diffusion coefficient of C8E4 obtained was 5.1x10^-11 m^2/s, which is an order of magnitude lower value than what is expected for. The foam was generated by shaking method and left to decay. A correlation between the elastic modulus and foam life time upon surfactant concentration was found.

  19. Impact of Hydration Media on Ex Vivo Corneal Elasticity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noël M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of hydration media on ex vivo corneal elasticity. Methods Experiments were conducted on forty porcine eyes retrieved from an abattoir (10 eyes each for PBS, BSS, Optisol, 15% Dextran). The epithelium was removed and the cornea was excised with an intact scleral rim and placed in 20% Dextran overnight to restore its physiological thickness. For each hydration media, corneas were evenly divided into two groups: one with an intact scleral rim and the other without. Corneas were mounted onto a custom chamber and immersed in a hydration medium for elasticity testing. While in each medium, corneal elasticity measurements were performed for 2 hours: at 5-minute intervals for the first 30 minutes and then 15-minute intervals for the remaining 90 minutes. Elasticity testing was performed using nanoindentation with spherical indenters and Young’s modulus was calculated using the Hertz model. Thickness measurements were taken before and after elasticity testing. Results The percentage change in corneal thickness and elasticity was calculated for each hydration media group. BSS, PBS, and Optisol showed an increase in thickness and Young’s moduli for corneas with and without an intact scleral rim. 15% Dextran exhibited a dehydrating effect on corneal thickness and provided stable maintenance of corneal elasticity for both groups. Conclusions Hydration media affects the stability of corneal thickness and elasticity measurements over time. 15% Dextran was most effective in maintaining corneal hydration and elasticity, followed by Optisol. PMID:25603443

  20. Single-Crystal Elasticity of Earth Materials: An Appraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic properties of minerals are of central importance for interpreting seismic data for the Earth's crust, mantle, and core. Mineral elasticity data also have more general applications towards understanding equations of state, phase equilibria, interatomic forces, material strength, and phase transitions. The singe-crystal elastic properties are the most generally useful as they provide complete information on the anisotropy of elastic moduli (e.g. Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus), sound velocities, and compressibility. Measurement of the full set of single-crystal elastic properties remains challenging especially for lower symmetry crystals. In this talk, I present an overview of our current understanding of single-crystal elasticity based on a newly constructed database of single-crystal elastic properties. At ambient conditions the full elastic tensor of about 150 minerals have now been measured, along with about another 60 related compounds that are not formally minerals. About two-thirds of the measured minerals are oxides or silicates. A limitation of the existing database is that only about 10% of the measurements are on crystals of monoclinic or triclinic symmetry, while these two systems account for about 40% of known minerals. Additionally, only a smaller subset of minerals have been examined at high pressure or temperature conditions. Several applications of the database will be presented emphasizing trends in elastic anisotropy. The pyroxenes will be used as an illustrative example.

  1. A novel method to determine the elastic modulus of extremely soft materials.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Tamás; Zrínyi, Miklós

    2015-06-07

    Determination of the elastic moduli of extremely soft materials that may deform under their own weight is a rather difficult experimental task. A new method has been elaborated by means of which the elastic modulus of such materials can be determined. This method is generally applicable to all soft materials with purely neo-Hookean elastic deformation behaviour with elastic moduli lower than 1 kPa. Our novel method utilises the self-deformation of pendent gel cylinders under gravity. When suspended, the material at the very top bears the weight of the entire gel cylinder, but that at the bottom carries no load at all. Due to the non-uniform stress distribution along the gel sample both the stress and the resulting strain show position dependence. The cross-sectional area of the material is lowest at the top of the sample and gradually increases towards its bottom. The equilibrium geometry of the pendant gel is used to evaluate the elastic modulus. Experimental data obtained by the proposed new method were compared to the results obtained from underwater measurements. The parameters affecting the measurement uncertainty were studied by a Pareto analysis of a series of adaptive Monte Carlo simulations. It has been shown that our method provides an easily achievable method to provide an accurate determination of the elastic modulus of extremely soft matter typically applicable for moduli below 1 kPa.

  2. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  3. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  4. Dynamic bulk and shear moduli due to grain-scale local fluid flow in fluid-saturated cracked poroelastic rocks: Theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Grain-scale local fluid flow is an important loss mechanism for attenuating waves in cracked fluid-saturated poroelastic rocks. In this study, a dynamic elastic modulus model is developed to quantify local flow effect on wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in porous isotropic rocks. The Eshelby transform technique, inclusion-based effective medium model (the Mori-Tanaka scheme), fluid dynamics and mass conservation principle are combined to analyze pore-fluid pressure relaxation and its influences on overall elastic properties. The derivation gives fully analytic, frequency-dependent effective bulk and shear moduli of a fluid-saturated porous rock. It is shown that the derived bulk and shear moduli rigorously satisfy the Biot-Gassmann relationship of poroelasticity in the low-frequency limit, while they are consistent with isolated-pore effective medium theory in the high-frequency limit. In particular, a simplified model is proposed to quantify the squirt-flow dispersion for frequencies lower than stiff-pore relaxation frequency. The main advantage of the proposed model over previous models is its ability to predict the dispersion due to squirt flow between pores and cracks with distributed aspect ratio instead of flow in a simply conceptual double-porosity structure. Independent input parameters include pore aspect ratio distribution, fluid bulk modulus and viscosity, and bulk and shear moduli of the solid grain. Physical assumptions made in this model include (1) pores are inter-connected and (2) crack thickness is smaller than the viscous skin depth. This study is restricted to linear elastic, well-consolidated granular rocks.

  5. Adiabatic and Non-adiabatic quenches in a Spin-1 Bose Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is observed in a wide range of phenomena. We have studied the dynamics of a spin-1 ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic quenches through a QPT. At the quantum critical point (QCP), finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, which makes an adiabatic quench possible through the QPT. We experimentally demonstrate such a quench, which is forbidden at the mean field level. For faster quenches through the QCP, the vanishing energy gap causes the reaction timescale of the system to diverge, preventing the system from adiabatically following the ground state. We measure the temporal evolution of the spin populations for different quench speeds and determine the exponents characterizing the scaling of the onset of excitations, which are in good agreement with the predictions of Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  6. Elasticity, composition and temperature of the Earth's lower mantle: a reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Ian

    1998-07-01

    .02), reviving the possibility of a substantially superadiabatic temperature gradient. Experimentally determined thermoelastic properties of the major (Mg, Fe)SiO3 perovskite and (Mg, Fe)O magnesiowüstite phases are used to constrain the equation-of-state parameters employed in the analysis of seismological information, although the scarcity of information concerning the pressure and temperature dependence of the elastic moduli for the perovskite phase remains a serious impediment. Nevertheless, it is demonstrated that the combination of a pyrolite composition simplified to the three-component system (SiO2-MgO-FeO) with molar XPv = 0.67 and XMg = 0.89, and a lower-mantle adiabat with a potential temperature of 1600 K-consistent with the preferred geotherm for the upper mantle and transition zone-is compatible with the PREM seismological model, within the residual uncertainties of the thermoelastic parameters for the perovskite phase. In particular, such consistency requires values for the perovskite phase of KS' = (∂KS /∂P)T and Q = (∂ ln γ/∂ ln V)T of approximately 3.8 and 2, and ∂G/∂T near -0.022 GPa K-1 for the lower-mantle assemblage. More silicic models, which have sometimes been advocated, can also be reconciled with the seismological data, but require lower-mantle temperatures which are much higher-by about 700 K for pyroxene stoichiometry. However, the absence of seismological and rheological evidence for the pair of thermal boundary layers separating convection above and below, which is implied by such models, remains a formidable difficulty. Under these circumstances, the simplest possible model, that of grossly uniform chemical composition throughout the mantle, is preferred.

  7. Elastic response of thermal spray deposits under indentation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, S.H.; Lin, C.K.; Berndt, C.C.

    1997-08-01

    The elastic response behavior of thermal spray deposits at Knoop indentations has been investigated using indentation techniques. The ration of hardness to elastic modulus, which is an important prerequisite for the evaluation of indentation fracture toughness, is determined by measuring the elastic recovery of the in-surface dimensions of Knoop indentations. The elastic moduli of thermal spray deposits are in the range of 12%--78% of the comparable bulk materials and reveal the anisotropic behavior of thermal spray deposits. A variety of thermal spray deposits has been examined, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ), and NiAl. Statistical tools have been used to evaluate the error estimates of the data.

  8. Structure and elastic properties of smectic liquid crystalline elastomer films.

    PubMed

    Stannarius, R; Köhler, R; Dietrich, U; Lösche, M; Tolksdorf, C; Zentel, R

    2002-04-01

    Mechanical measurements, x-ray investigations, and optical microscopy are employed to characterize the interplay of chemical composition, network topology, and elastic response of smectic liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) in various mesophases. Macroscopically ordered elastomer films of submicrometer thicknesses were prepared by cross linking freely suspended smectic polymer films. The cross-linked material preserves the mesomorphism and phase transitions of the precursor polymer. The elastic response of the smectic LCE is entropic, and the corresponding elastic moduli are of the order of MPa. In the tilted ferroelectric smectic-C* phase, the network structure plays an important role. Due to the coupling of elastic network deformations to the orientation of the mesogenic groups in interlayer cross-linked materials (mesogenic cross-linker units), the stress-strain characteristics is found to differ qualitatively from that in the other phases.

  9. Fixed-point adiabatic quantum search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Alexander M.; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-point quantum search algorithms succeed at finding one of M target items among N total items even when the run time of the algorithm is longer than necessary. While the famous Grover's algorithm can search quadratically faster than a classical computer, it lacks the fixed-point property—the fraction of target items must be known precisely to know when to terminate the algorithm. Recently, Yoder, Low, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 210501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.210501] gave an optimal gate-model search algorithm with the fixed-point property. Previously, it had been discovered by Roland and Cerf [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042308 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.042308] that an adiabatic quantum algorithm, operating by continuously varying a Hamiltonian, can reproduce the quadratic speedup of gate-model Grover search. We ask, can an adiabatic algorithm also reproduce the fixed-point property? We show that the answer depends on what interpolation schedule is used, so as in the gate model, there are both fixed-point and non-fixed-point versions of adiabatic search, only some of which attain the quadratic quantum speedup. Guided by geometric intuition on the Bloch sphere, we rigorously justify our claims with an explicit upper bound on the error in the adiabatic approximation. We also show that the fixed-point adiabatic search algorithm can be simulated in the gate model with neither loss of the quadratic Grover speedup nor of the fixed-point property. Finally, we discuss natural uses of fixed-point algorithms such as preparation of a relatively prime state and oblivious amplitude amplification.

  10. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Xue, Longjian

    2015-05-28

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol-gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 10(7) μm(3) are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media.

  11. Adiabatic circuits: converter for static CMOS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Amirante, E.; Bargagli-Stoffi, A.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2003-05-01

    Ultra low power applications can take great advantages from adiabatic circuitry. In this technique a multiphase system is used which consists ideally of trapezoidal voltage signals. The input signals to be processed will often come from a function block realized in static CMOS. The static rectangular signals must be converted for the oscillating multiphase system of the adiabatic circuitry. This work shows how to convert the input signals to the proposed pulse form which is synchronized to the appropriate supply voltage. By means of adder structures designed for a 0.13µm technology in a 4-phase system there will be demonstrated, which additional circuits are necessary for the conversion. It must be taken into account whether the data arrive in parallel or serial form. Parallel data are all in one phase and therefore it is advantageous to use an adder structure with a proper input stage, e.g. a Carry Lookahead Adder (CLA). With a serial input stage it is possible to read and to process four signals during one cycle due to the adiabatic 4-phase system. Therefore input signals with a frequency four times higher than the adiabatic clock frequency can be used. This reduces the disadvantage of the slow clock period typical for adiabatic circuits. By means of an 8 bit Ripple Carry Adder (8 bit RCA) the serial reading will be introduced. If the word width is larger than 4 bits the word can be divided in 4 bit words which are processed in parallel. This is the most efficient way to minimize the number of input lines and pads. At the same time a high throughput is achieved.

  12. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  13. ElaStic: A tool for calculating second-order elastic constants from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golesorkhtabar, Rostam; Pavone, Pasquale; Spitaler, Jürgen; Puschnig, Peter; Draxl, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Elastic properties play a key role in materials science and technology. The elastic tensors at any order are defined by the Taylor expansion of the elastic energy or stress in terms of the applied strain. In this paper, we present ElaStic, a tool that is able to calculate the full second-order elastic stiffness tensor for any crystal structure from ab initio total-energy and/or stress calculations. This tool also provides the elastic compliances tensor and applies the Voigt and Reuss averaging procedure in order to obtain an evaluation of the bulk, shear, and Young moduli as well as the Poisson ratio of poly-crystalline samples. In a first step, the space-group is determined. Then, a set of deformation matrices is selected, and the corresponding structure files are produced. In a next step, total-energy or stress calculations for each deformed structure are performed by a chosen density-functional theory code. The computed energies/stresses are fitted as polynomial functions of the applied strain in order to get derivatives at zero strain. The knowledge of these derivatives allows for the determination of all independent components of the elastic tensor. In this context, the accuracy of the elastic constants critically depends on the polynomial fit. Therefore, we carefully study how the order of the polynomial fit and the deformation range influence the numerical derivatives, and we propose a new approach to obtain the most reliable results. We have applied ElaStic to representative materials for each crystal system, using total energies and stresses calculated with the full-potential all-electron codes exciting and WIEN2k as well as the pseudo-potential code Quantum ESPRESSO.

  14. Electronic excitation of H{sub 2} by {ital e}{sup +} impact using adiabatic nuclear rotation model

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, T.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1996-06-01

    The adiabatic nuclear rotation (ANR) model has been employed to obtain rotational excitation cross sections for electronically elastic and electronic excitation processes in {ital e}{sup +}-H{sub 2} scattering. The present results are compared with the more accurate laboratory-frame rotational close-coupling approximation (LFCCA) predictions. The electronically inelastic rotational excitation results using the ANR model differ from the corresponding LFCCA results near the electronic excitation threshold energies. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Exact moduli space metrics for hyperbolic vortex polygons

    SciTech Connect

    Krusch, S.; Speight, J. M.

    2010-02-15

    Exact metrics on some totally geodesic submanifolds of the moduli space of static hyperbolic N-vortices are derived. These submanifolds, denoted as {sigma}{sub n,m}, are spaces of C{sub n}-invariant vortex configurations with n single vortices at the vertices of a regular polygon and m=N-n coincident vortices at the polygon's center. The geometric properties of {sigma}{sub n,m} are investigated, and it is found that {sigma}{sub n,n-1} is isometric to the hyperbolic plane of curvature -(3{pi}n){sup -1}. The geodesic flow on {sigma}{sub n,m} and a geometrically natural variant of geodesic flow recently proposed by Collie and Tong ['The dynamics of Chern-Simons vortices', Phys. Rev. D Part. Fields Gravit. Cosmol. 78, 065013 (2008);e-print arXiv:hep-th/0805.0602] are analyzed in detail.

  16. Instanton transition in thermal and moduli deformed de Sitter cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounnas, Costas; Partouche, Hervé

    2008-04-01

    We consider the de Sitter cosmology deformed by the presence of a thermal bath of radiation and/or time-dependent moduli fields. Depending on the parameters, either a first or second-order phase transition can occur. In the first case, an instanton allows a double analytic continuation. It induces a probability to enter the inflationary evolution by tunnel effect from another cosmological solution. The latter starts with a big bang and, in the case the transition does not occur, ends with a big crunch. A temperature duality exchanges the two cosmological branches. In the limit where the pure de Sitter universe is recovered, the tunnel effect reduces to a “creation from nothing”, due to the vanishing of the big bang branch. However, the latter may be viable in some range of the deformation parameter. In the second case, there is a smooth evolution from a big bang to the inflationary phase.

  17. Second virial coefficient and mechanical moduli of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wan Qiang

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between the bulk, shear moduli and second virial coefficient of amorphous materials is derived according to their dependences with the radial distribution function. Lennard-Jones-Gaussian potential is used to investigate the relationship between second virial coefficient and temperature, where Lennard-Jones potential represents interactions with the nearest neighbor atoms, and Gaussian potential is responsible for the multi-atom interactions including the next nearest neighbor atoms and heterogeneous structures for a metallic glass. The results show that deep potential well formed by Gaussian potential causes a large second virial coefficient at low temperatures, which is very obvious for the larger fragility glasses. The quadratic form relationship of shear modulus and compositions is proposed, and confirmed by the experimental results of PdxNi100-x-20P20 alloy.

  18. Quantum-Classical Correspondence of Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    We formulate the theory of shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical mechanics. For a reference Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is constructed from the dispersionless Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy. Then the adiabatic theorem holds exactly for an arbitrary choice of time-dependent parameters. We use the Hamilton-Jacobi theory to define the generalized action. The action is independent of the history of the parameters and is directly related to the adiabatic invariant. The dispersionless KdV hierarchy is obtained from the classical limit of the KdV hierarchy for the quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity. This correspondence suggests some relation between the quantum and classical adiabatic theorems.

  19. Porous grain model and equivalent elastic medium approach for predicting effective elastic properties of sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Franklin J.

    This dissertation presents the results of using different inclusion and granular effective medium models and poroelasticity to predict the elastic properties of rocks with complex microstructures. Effective medium models account for the microstructure and texture of rocks, and can be used to predict the type of rock and microstructure from seismic velocities and densities. We introduce the elastic equivalency approach, using the differential effective medium model, to predict the effective elastic moduli of rocks and attenuation. We introduce the porous grain concept and develop rock physics models for rocks with microporosity. We exploit the porous grain concept to describe a variety of arrangements of uncemented and cemented grains with different degrees of hydraulic connectivity in the pore space. We first investigate the accuracy of the differential effective medium and self-consistent estimations of elastic properties of complex rock matrix using composites as analogs. We test whether the differential effective-medium (DEM) and self-consistent (SC) models can accurately estimate the elastic moduli of a complex rock matrix and compare the results with the average of upper and lower Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. We find that when the material microstructure is consistent with DEM, this model is more accurate than both SC and the bound-average method for a variety of inclusion aspect ratios, concentrations, and modulus contrasts. Based on these results, we next pose a question: can a theoretical inclusion model, specifically, the differential effective-medium model (DEM), be used to match experimental velocity data in rocks that are not necessarily made of inclusions (such as elastics)? We first approach this question by using empirical velocity-porosity equations as proxies for data. By finding a DEM inclusion aspect ratio (AR) to match these equations, we find that the required range of AR is remarkably narrow. Moreover, a constant AR of about 0.13 can be used to

  20. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  1. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  2. Comment on ``Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smondyrev, M. A.; Devreese, J. T.

    1996-05-01

    Comments are given on the application of the Bogoliubov-Tyablikov approach to the bipolaron problem in a recent paper by Lakhno [Phys. Rev. B 51, 3512 (1995)]. This author believes that his model (1) is the translation-invariant adiabatic theory of bipolarons and (2) gives asymptotically exact solutions in the adiabatic limit while the other approaches are considered as either phenomenological or variational in nature. Numerical results by Lakhno are in contradiction with all other papers published on the subject because his model leads to much lower energies. Thus, the author concludes that bipolarons ``are more stable than was considered before.'' We prove that both the analytical and the numerical results presented by Lakhno are wrong.

  3. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  4. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  5. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Libor Pittner, Jiří

    2014-06-07

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  6. Fast forward to the classical adiabatic invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher; Deffner, Sebastian; Patra, Ayoti; Subaşı, Yiǧit

    2017-03-01

    We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under nonadiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian H =p2/2 m +U (q ,t ) in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action I0, we construct a so-called fast-forward potential energy function VFF(q ,t ) that, when added to H , guides all trajectories with initial action I0 to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant J (q ,p ,t ) whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  7. Adiabatic invariance with first integrals of motion.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B

    2002-10-01

    The construction of a microthermodynamic formalism for isolated systems based on the concept of adiabatic invariance is an old but seldom appreciated effort in the literature, dating back at least to P. Hertz [Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 33, 225 (1910)]. An apparently independent extension of such formalism for systems bearing additional first integrals of motion was recently proposed by Hans H. Rugh [Phys. Rev. E 64, 055101 (2001)], establishing the concept of adiabatic invariance even in such singular cases. After some remarks in connection with the formalism pioneered by Hertz, it will be suggested that such an extension can incidentally explain the success of a dynamical method for computing the entropy of classical interacting fluids, at least in some potential applications where the presence of additional first integrals cannot be ignored.

  8. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  9. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  10. Multiphoton adiabatic passage for atom optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, Gabor; Djotyan, Gagik P.

    2009-04-15

    We study the force exerted on two-level atoms by short, counterpropagating laser pulses. When the counterpropagating pulses overlap each other partially, multiphoton adiabatic processes are possible in several configurations, which amplify the force exerted on the atoms. We investigate the practical usefulness of such multiphoton adiabatic transitions for the manipulation of the atoms' mechanical state. In particular, we compare the efficiency of a pair of constant frequency, oppositely detuned laser pulses and that of a pair of frequency-chirped pulses. We also consider the case of prolonged exposure to a sequence of laser pulses for a duration that is comparable to or much larger than the spontaneous lifetime of the atoms. We use numerical methods to calculate the reduction of the force and the heating of the atomic ensemble when spontaneous emission cannot be neglected during the interaction. In addition, we derive simple approximate formulas for the force and the heating, and compare them to the numerical results.

  11. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGES

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  12. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  13. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions. PMID:25308187

  14. Nonaffine rubber elasticity for stiff polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Heussinger, Claus; Schaefer, Boris; Frey, Erwin

    2007-09-01

    We present a theory for the elasticity of cross-linked stiff polymer networks. Stiff polymers, unlike their flexible counterparts, are highly anisotropic elastic objects. Similar to mechanical beams, stiff polymers easily deform in bending, while they are much stiffer with respect to tensile forces ("stretching"). Unlike in previous approaches, where network elasticity is derived from the stretching mode, our theory properly accounts for the soft bending response. A self-consistent effective medium approach is used to calculate the macroscopic elastic moduli starting from a microscopic characterization of the deformation field in terms of "floppy modes"-low-energy bending excitations that retain a high degree of nonaffinity. The length scale characterizing the emergent nonaffinity is given by the "fiber length" lf, defined as the scale over which the polymers remain straight. The calculated scaling properties for the shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the results of recent simulations obtained in two-dimensional model networks. Furthermore, our theory can be applied to rationalize bulk rheological data in reconstituted actin networks.

  15. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  16. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-01-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  17. Aspects of adiabatic population transfer and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirplak, Mustafa

    This thesis explores two different questions. The first question we answer is how to restore a given population transfer scenario given that it works efficiently in the adiabatic limit but fails because of lack of intensity and/or short duration. We derive a very simple algorithm to do this and apply it to both toy and realistic models. Two results emerge from this study. While the mathematical existence of the programme is certain it might not always be physically desirable. The restoration of adiabaticity is phase sensitive. The second question that is answered in this thesis is not how to invent new control paradigms, but rather what would happen to them in the presence of stochastic perturbers. We first use a phenomenological model to study the effect of stochastic dephasing on population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. The results of this Monte Carlo calculation are qualitatively explained with a perturbation theoretical result in the dressed state basis. The reliability of our phenomenological model is questioned through a more rigorous hybrid quantal-classical simulation of controlled population transfer in HCl in Ar.

  18. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, B.; Markham, D.; Anders, J.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of \\dot{H} as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.

  19. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  20. New effective moduli of isotropic viscoelastic composites. Part I. Theoretical justification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetashkov, A. A.; Vakurov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    According to the approach based on the commonality of problems of determining effective moduli of composites and viscoelastic solids, which properties are time-inhomogeneous, it is assumed that a viscoelastic solid is a two-component composite. One component displays temporal properties defined by a pair of Castiglianian-type effective moduli, and the other is defined by a pair of Lagrangian-type effective moduli. The Voigt and Reuss averaging is performed for the obtained two-composite solid with the introduction of a time function of volume fraction. In order to determine closer estimates, a method of iterative transformation of time effective moduli is applied to the viscoelastic Voigt-Reuss model. The physical justification of the method is provided. As a result, new time effective moduli of the viscoelastic solid are obtained which give a closer estimate of temporal properties as compared to the known models.

  1. Finite elastic-plastic deformation of polycrystalline metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwakuma, T.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1984-01-01

    Applying Hill's self-consistent method to finite elastic-plastic deformations, the overall moduli of polycrystalline solids are estimated. The model predicts a Bauschinger effect, hardening, and formation of vertex or corner on the yield surface for both microscopically non-hardening and hardening crystals. The changes in the instantaneous moduli with deformation are examined, and their asymptotic behavior, especially in relation to possible localization of deformations, is discussed. An interesting conclusion is that small second-order quantities, such as shape changes of grains and residual stresses (measured relative to the crystal elastic moduli), have a first-order effect on the overall response, as they lead to a loss of the overall stability by localized deformation. The predicted incipience of localization for a uniaxial deformation in two dimensions depends on the initial yield strain, but the orientation of localization is slightly less than 45 deg with respect to the tensile direction, although the numerical instability makes it very difficult to estimate this direction accurately.

  2. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  3. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meng; Ke, Changhong; Bae, In-Tae; Park, Cheol; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2012-03-09

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  4. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Meng; Ke, Changhong; Bae, In-Tae; Park, Cheol; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  5. Breakdown of nonlinear elasticity in stress-controlled thermal amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailidonis, Vladimir; Ilyin, Valery; Procaccia, Itamar; Shor, Carmel A. B. Z.

    2017-03-01

    In recent work it was clarified that amorphous solids under strain control do not possess nonlinear elastic theory in the sense that the shear modulus exists but nonlinear moduli exhibit sample-to-sample fluctuations that grow without bound with the system size. More relevant, however, for experiments are the conditions of stress control. In the present Rapid Communication we show that also under stress control the shear modulus exists, but higher-order moduli show unbounded sample-to-sample fluctuation. The unavoidable consequence is that the characterization of stress-strain curves in experiments should be done with a stress-dependent shear modulus rather than with nonlinear expansions.

  6. Multi-scale imaging and elastic simulation of carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Titly Farhana; Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Jouini, Mohamed Soufiane; Jouiad, Mustapha; Chevalier, Sylvie; Sassi, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Digital Rock Physics (DRP) is an emerging technology that can be used to generate high quality, fast and cost effective special core analysis (SCAL) properties compared to conventional experimental techniques and modeling techniques. The primary workflow of DRP conssits of three elements: 1) image the rock sample using high resolution 3D scanning techniques (e.g. micro CT, FIB/SEM), 2) process and digitize the images by segmenting the pore and matrix phases 3) simulate the desired physical properties of the rocks such as elastic moduli and velocities of wave propagation. A Finite Element Method based algorithm, that discretizes the basic Hooke's Law equation of linear elasticity and solves it numerically using a fast conjugate gradient solver, developed by Garboczi and Day [1] is used for mechanical and elastic property simulations. This elastic algorithm works directly on the digital images by treating each pixel as an element. The images are assumed to have periodic constant-strain boundary condition. The bulk and shear moduli of the different phases are required inputs. For standard 1.5" diameter cores however the Micro-CT scanning reoslution (around 40 μm) does not reveal smaller micro- and nano- pores beyond the resolution. This results in an unresolved "microporous" phase, the moduli of which is uncertain. Knackstedt et al. [2] assigned effective elastic moduli to the microporous phase based on self-consistent theory (which gives good estimation of velocities for well cemented granular media). Jouini et al. [3] segmented the core plug CT scan image into three phases and assumed that micro porous phase is represented by a sub-extracted micro plug (which too was scanned using Micro-CT). Currently the elastic numerical simulations based on CT-images alone largely overpredict the bulk, shear and Young's modulus when compared to laboratory acoustic tests of the same rocks. For greater accuracy of numerical simulation prediction, better estimates of moduli inputs

  7. Nonuniform elastic properties of macromolecules and effect of prestrain on their continuum nature.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ankush; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Klug, William S

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical methods have been developed to calculate the coarse-grained continuum elastic properties of macromolecules. However, all of those methods assume uniform elastic properties. Following the continuum mechanics framework, we present a systematic way of calculating the nonuniform effective elastic properties from atomic thermal fluctuations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation at any coarse-grained scale using a potential of the mean-force approach. We present the results for a mutant of Sesbania mosaic virus capsid, where we calculate the elastic moduli at different scales and observe an apparent problem with the chosen reference configuration in some cases. We present a possible explanation using an elastic network model, where inducing random prestrain results in a similar behavior. This phenomenon provides a novel insight into the continuum nature of macromolecules and defines the limits on details that the elasticity theory can capture. Further investigation into prestrains could elucidate important aspects of conformational dynamics of macromolecules.

  8. Elastic constants of a Laves phase compound: C15 NbCr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ormeci, A. |; Chu, F.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.P.; Albers, R.C.; Thoma, D.J.; Mitchell, T.E.

    1997-04-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants of C15 NbCr{sub 2} have been computed by using a first-principles, self-consistent, full-potential total energy method. From these single-crystal elastic constants the isotropic elastic moduli are calculated using the Voigt and Reuss averages. The calculated values are in fair agreement with the experimental values. The implications of the results are discussed with regards to Poisson`s ratio and the direction dependence of Young`s modulus.

  9. Computer Simulation of the Elastic Properties of Titanium Alloys for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez, Elsa Paz; Burganova, R. M.; Lysogorskii, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    Results of a computer simulation of the elastic properties of α+β- and β-titanium alloys, used for medical purposes, within the framework of the molecular-dynamics method are presented. It is shown that β-titanium alloys are best suited for the use as bone implants because of their small moduli of elasticity. The advisability of the use of the molecular-dynamics method for the study of the elastic properties of titanium alloys, serving as bone implants, is demonstrated.

  10. Elastic properties of compressed rare-gas crystals in a model of deformable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbenko, Ie. Ie.; Troitskaya, E. P.; Pilipenko, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The elastic properties of compressed Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe rare-gas crystals were studied in a model of deformable and polarizable atoms. The second-order Fuchs elasticity moduli, their pressure derivatives, and the Zener elastic anisotropy ratio were calculated with allowance for three-body interaction and quadrupole deformation in electron shells within a wide pressure range. Comparison with the experiment and results of other authors was performed. In xenon at a compression of 0.6, the shear modulus B 44 was observed to become zero, thus corresponding to the FCC-HCP transition at 75 GPa.

  11. Theoretical calculations of structural, electronic, and elastic properties of CdSe1-x Te x : A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Shakil; Muhammad, Zafar; Shabbir, Ahmed; Muhammad Raza-ur-rehman, Hashmi; M, A. Choudhary; T, Iqbal

    2016-07-01

    The plane wave pseudo-potential method was used to investigate the structural, electronic, and elastic properties of CdSe1-x Te x in the zinc blende phase. It is observed that the electronic properties are improved considerably by using LDA+U as compared to the LDA approach. The calculated lattice constants and bulk moduli are also comparable to the experimental results. The cohesive energies for pure CdSe and CdTe binary and their mixed alloys are calculated. The second-order elastic constants are also calculated by the Lagrangian theory of elasticity. The elastic properties show that the studied material has a ductile nature.

  12. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  13. Elastic properties of C40 transition metal disilicides

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, F.; Maloy, S.A.; Petrovic, J.J.; Mitchell, T.E.; Lei, M.

    1996-08-01

    Room-temperature and low temperature elastic properties of hexagonal C40 transition metal disilicides, NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2}, have been studied using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). All five independent elastic stiffness constants c{sub ij} for NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} single crystals have been obtained. The temperature dependence of the c{sub ij} is normal but not large. The orientation dependence of the Young`s and shear moduli was examined in comparison with other transition metal disilicides. The room temperature shear moduli in the {l_brace}0001{r_brace} plane, with values of 145.3 and 143.7 GPa for NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} respectively, are low relative to those in the equivalent pseudo hexagonal {l_brace}220{r_brace} close-packed plane for tetragonal C11{sub b} MoSi{sub 2} and WSi{sub 2}. The isotropic elastic constants for polycrystalline materials were also calculated. The results show that the various moduli are all much higher than those of the constituent elements. The room temperature Poisson`s ratios of NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} are 0.18 and 0.19, respectively, which are smaller than those of the constituent elements and smaller than most materials. The Debye temperatures, {theta}{sub D}, were estimated to be 688 K for NbSi{sub 2} and 552 K for TaSi{sub 2}. The elastic properties of C40 VSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2}, TaSi{sub 2}, and CrSi{sub 2} and C11{sub b} MoSi{sub 2} and WSi{sub 2} are compared and the possible influence on mechanical behavior discussed.

  14. WE-E-9A-01: Ultrasound Elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Emelianov, S; Hall, T; Bouchard, R

    2014-06-15

    Principles and techniques of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging will be presented, including quasistatic strain imaging, shear wave elasticity imaging, and their implementations in available systems. Deeper exploration of quasistatic methods, including elastic relaxation, and their applications, advantages, artifacts and limitations will be discussed. Transient elastography based on progressive and standing shear waves will be explained in more depth, along with applications, advantages, artifacts and limitations, as will measurement of complex elastic moduli. Comparisons will be made between ultrasound radiation force techniques, MR elastography, and the simple A mode plus mechanical plunger technique. Progress in efforts, such as that by the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance, to reduce the differences in the elastic modulus reported by different commercial systems will be explained. Dr. Hall is on an Advisory Board for Siemens Ultrasound and has a research collaboration with them, including joint funding by R01CA140271 for nonlinear elasticity imaging. Learning Objectives: Be reminded of the long history of palpation of tissue elasticity for critical medical diagnosis and the relatively recent advances to be able to image tissue strain in response to an applied force. Understand the differences between shear wave speed elasticity measurement and imaging and understand the factors affecting measurement and image frame repletion rates. Understand shear wave propagation effects that can affect measurements, such as essentially lack of propagation in fluids and boundary effects, so important in thin layers. Know characteristics of available elasticity imaging phantoms, their uses and limitations. Understand thermal and cavitational limitations affecting radiation force-based shear wave imaging. Have learning and references adequate to for you to use in teaching elasticity imaging to residents and technologists. Be able to explain how elasticity measurement

  15. Magnetic charge lattices, moduli spaces and fusion rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmeijer, L.; Slingerland, J. K.; Schroers, B. J.; Bais, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the labelling and fusion properties of magnetic charge sectors consisting of smooth BPS monopoles in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with arbitrary gauge group G spontaneously broken to a subgroup H. The magnetic charges are restricted by a generalized Dirac quantization condition and by an inequality due to Murray. Geometrically, the set of allowed charges is a solid cone in the coroot lattice of G, which we call the Murray cone. We argue that magnetic charge sectors correspond to points in this cone divided by the Weyl group of H so that magnetic charge sectors are labelled by dominant integral weights of the dual group H. We define generators of the Murray cone modulo Weyl group, and interpret the monopoles in the associated magnetic charge sectors as basic; monopoles in sectors with decomposable charges are interpreted as composite configurations. This interpretation is supported by the dimensionality of the moduli spaces associated to the magnetic charges and by classical fusion properties for smooth monopoles in particular cases. Throughout the paper we compare our findings with corresponding results for singular monopoles recently obtained by Kapustin and Witten.

  16. Explaining the electroweak scale and stabilizing moduli in M theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bobby S.; Bobkov, Konstantin; Kane, Gordon L.; Kumar, Piyush; Shao Jing

    2007-12-15

    In a recent paper [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] it was shown that in fluxless M theory vacua with at least two hidden sectors undergoing strong gauge dynamics and a particular form of the Kaehler potential, all moduli are stabilized by the effective potential and a stable hierarchy is generated, consistent with standard gauge unification. This paper explains the results of [B. Acharya, K. Bobkov, G. Kane, P. Kumar, and D. Vaman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 191601 (2006).] in more detail and generalizes them, finding an essentially unique de Sitter vacuum under reasonable conditions. One of the main phenomenological consequences is a prediction which emerges from this entire class of vacua: namely, gaugino masses are significantly suppressed relative to the gravitino mass. We also present evidence that, for those vacua in which the vacuum energy is small, the gravitino mass, which sets all the superpartner masses, is automatically in the TeV-100 TeV range.

  17. Perturbations and moduli space dynamics of tachyon kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Li Huiquan

    2008-03-15

    The dynamic process of unstable D-branes decaying into stable ones with one dimension lower can be described by a tachyon field with a Dirac-Born-Infeld effective action. In this paper we investigate the fluctuation modes of the tachyon field around a two-parameter family of static solutions representing an array of brane-antibrane pairs. Besides a pair of zero modes associated with the parameters of the solution, and instabilities associated with annihilation of the brane-antibrane pairs, we find states corresponding to excitations of the tachyon field around the brane and in the bulk. In the limit that the brane thickness tends to zero, the support of the eigenmodes is limited to the brane, consistent with the idea that propagating tachyon modes drop out of the spectrum as the tachyon field approaches its ground state. The zero modes, and other low-lying excited states, show a fourfold degeneracy in this limit, which can be identified with some of the massless superstring modes in the brane-antibrane system. Finally, we also discuss the slow motion of the solution corresponding to the decay process in the moduli space, finding a trajectory which oscillates periodically between the unstable D-brane and the brane-antibrane pairs of one dimension lower.

  18. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  19. Quantized adiabatic transport in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek Y H; Gong, Jiangbin

    2012-07-06

    Though topological aspects of energy bands are known to play a key role in quantum transport in solid-state systems, the implications of Floquet band topology for transport in momentum space (i.e., acceleration) have not been explored so far. Using a ratchet accelerator model inspired by existing cold-atom experiments, here we characterize a class of extended Floquet bands of one-dimensional driven quantum systems by Chern numbers, reveal topological phase transitions therein, and theoretically predict the quantization of adiabatic transport in momentum space. Numerical results confirm our theory and indicate the feasibility of experimental studies.

  20. Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for space use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Warner, B. A.; Castles, S.; Breon, S. R.; San Sebastian, M.; Hait, T.

    1990-01-01

    An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) for space use is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The breadboard ADR operated at 100 mK for 400 minutes. Some significant changes to that ADR, designed to eliminate shortcomings revealed during tests, are reported. To increase thermal contact, the ferric ammonium sulfate crystals were grown directly on gold-plated copper wires which serve as the thermal bus. The thermal link to the X-ray sensors was also markedly improved. To speed up the testing required to determine the best design parameters for the gas gap heat switch, the new heat switch has a modular design and is easy to disassemble.

  1. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-01-01

    We study the Ising Hamiltonian with a transverse field term to simulate the quantum annealing. Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we design the time dependence of the Hamiltonian. The dynamical invariant is obtained by the mean-field ansatz, and the Hamiltonian is designed by the inverse engineering. We show that the time dependence of physical quantities such as the magnetization is independent of the speed of the Hamiltonian variation in the infinite-range model. We also show that rotating transverse magnetic fields are useful to achieve the ideal time evolution.

  2. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  3. Decoherence in a scalable adiabatic quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-15

    We consider the effects of decoherence on Landau-Zener crossings encountered in a large-scale adiabatic-quantum-computing setup. We analyze the dependence of the success probability--i.e., the probability for the system to end up in its new ground state--on the noise amplitude and correlation time. We determine the optimal sweep rate that is required to maximize the success probability. We then discuss the scaling of decoherence effects with increasing system size. We find that those effects can be important for large systems, even if they are small for each of the small building blocks.

  4. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  5. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  6. In-situ Young's moduli of the constitutive layers in a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In-situ Young's moduli of thin constituent layers of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are needed to estimate the mechanical reliability of the fuel cell unit. Because a robust technique to measure the same is not available, an improved methodology is proposed to determine the in-situ Young's moduli of thin ceramic layers of a substrate-supported SOFC. The measured Young's moduli of the constituent layers were found to be close to those of corresponding bulk materials using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique but were different from the values obtained using nanoindentation.

  7. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-14

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  8. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-01

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  9. Generating shortcuts to adiabaticity in quantum and classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Transitionless quantum driving achieves adiabatic evolution in a hurry, using a counterdiabatic Hamiltonian to stifle nonadiabatic transitions. Here this shortcut to adiabaticity is cast in terms of a generator of adiabatic transport. This yields a classical analog of transitionless driving, and provides a strategy for constructing quantal counterdiabatic Hamiltonians. As an application of this framework, exact classical and quantal counterdiabatic terms are obtained for a particle in a box and for even-power-law potentials in one degree of freedom.

  10. Numerical simulations of solar spicules: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuźma, B.; Murawski, K.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Konkol, P.; Mignone, A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the formation and evolution of solar spicules using numerical simulations of a vertical velocity pulse that is launched from the upper chromosphere. Methods: With the use of the PLUTO code, we numerically solved adiabatic and non-adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D cylindrical geometry. We followed the evolution of spicules triggered by pulses that are launched in a vertical velocity component from the upper chromosphere. Then we compared the results obtained with and without non-adiabatic terms in the MHD equations. Results: Our numerical results reveal that the velocity pulse is steepened into a shock that propagates upward into the corona. The chromospheric cold and dense plasma follows the shock and rises into the corona with the mean speed of 20-25 km s-1. The nonlinear wake behind the pulse in the stratified atmosphere leads to quasi-periodic rebound shocks, which lead to quasi-periodic rising of chromospheric plasma into the corona with a period close to the acoustic cut-off period of the chromosphere. We found that the effect of non-adiabatic terms on spicule evolution is minor; the general properties of spicules such as their heights and rising-time remain slightly affected by these terms. Conclusions: In the framework of the axisymmetric model we devised, we show that the solar spicules can be triggered by the vertical velocity pulses, and thermal conduction and radiative cooling terms do not exert any significant influence on the dynamics of these spicules.

  11. Structure, stability and elasticity of DNA nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Himanshu; Dwaraknath, Anjan; Maiti, Prabal K

    2015-01-14

    DNA nanotubes are tubular structures composed of DNA crossover molecules. We present a bottom up approach for the construction and characterization of these structures. Various possible topologies of nanotubes are constructed such as 6-helix, 8-helix and tri-tubes with different sequences and lengths. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure, stability and elasticity of these structures. Several nanosecond long MD simulations give the microscopic details about DNA nanotubes. Based on the structural analysis of simulation data, we show that 6-helix nanotubes are stable and maintain their tubular structure; while 8-helix nanotubes are flattened to stabilize themselves. We also comment on the sequence dependence and the effect of overhangs. These structures are approximately four times more rigid having a stretch modulus of ∼4000 pN compared to the stretch modulus of 1000 pN of a DNA double helix molecule of the same length and sequence. The stretch moduli of these nanotubes are also three times larger than those of PX/JX crossover DNA molecules which have stretch moduli in the range of 1500-2000 pN. The calculated persistence length is in the range of a few microns which is close to the reported experimental results on certain classes of DNA nanotubes.

  12. On the Role of Prior Probability in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Yang, Liping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the role of prior probability on the efficiency of quantum local adiabatic search algorithm. The following aspects for prior probability are found here: firstly, only the probabilities of marked states affect the running time of the adiabatic evolution; secondly, the prior probability can be used for improving the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm; thirdly, like the usual quantum adiabatic evolution, the running time for the case of multiple solution states where the number of marked elements are smaller enough than the size of the set assigned that contains them can be significantly bigger than that of the case where the assigned set only contains all the marked states.

  13. Adiabatic following for a three-state quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Shore, Bruce W.; Rangelov, Andon; Kyoseva, Elica

    2017-01-01

    Adiabatic time-evolution - found in various forms of adiabatic following and adiabatic passage - is often advantageous for controlled manipulation of quantum systems due to its insensitivity to deviations in the pulse shapes and timings. In this paper we discuss controlled adiabatic evolution of a three-state quantum system, a natural advance to the widespread use of two-state systems in numerous contemporary applications. We discuss, and illustrate, not only possibilities for population transfer but also for creating, with prescribed relative phase, 50:50 superpositions of two Zeeman sublevels in a letter-vee coupling linkage.

  14. Adiabatic approximation via hodograph translation and zero-curvature equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasev, M. V.

    2014-04-01

    For quantum as well classical slow-fast systems, we develop a general method which allows one to compute the adiabatic invariant (approximate integral of motion), its symmetries, the adiabatic guiding center coordinates and the effective scalar Hamiltonian in all orders of a small parameter. The scheme does not exploit eigenvectors or diagonalization, but is based on the ideas of isospectral deformation and zero-curvature equations, where the role of "time" is played by the adiabatic (quantization) parameter. The algorithm includes the construction of the zero-curvature adiabatic connection and its splitting generated by averaging up to an arbitrary order in the small parameter.

  15. Ab initio study of thermodynamic, electronic, magnetic, structural, and elastic properties of Ni4N allotropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemzalová, P.; Friák, M.; Šob, M.; Ma, D.; Udyansky, A.; Raabe, D.; Neugebauer, J.

    2013-11-01

    We have employed parameter-free density functional theory calculations to study the thermodynamic stability and structural parameters as well as elastic and electronic properties of Ni4N in eight selected crystallographic phases. In agreement with the experimental findings, the cubic structure with Pearson symbol cP5, space group Pm3¯m (221) is found to be the most stable and it is also the only thermodynamically stable structure at T=0 K with respect to decomposition to the elemental Ni crystal and N2 gas phase. We determine structural parameters, bulk moduli, and their pressure derivatives for all eight allotropes. The thermodynamic stability and bulk modulus is shown to be anticorrelated. Comparing ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic states, we find common features between the magnetism of elemental Ni and studied ferromagnetic Ni4N structures. For the ground-state Ni4N structure and other two Ni4N cubic allotropes, we predict a complete set of single-crystalline elastic constants (in the equilibrium and under hydrostatic pressure), the Young and area moduli, as well as homogenized polycrystalline elastic moduli obtained by different homogenization methods. We demonstrate that the elastic anisotropy of the ground-state Ni4N is qualitatively opposite to that in the elemental Ni, i.e., these materials have hard and soft crystallographic directions interchanged. Moreover, one of the studied metastable cubic phases is found auxetic, i.e., exhibiting negative Poisson ratio.

  16. Elastic Rock Heterogeneity Controls Brittle Rock Failure during Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    For interpretation and inversion of microseismic data it is important to understand, which properties of the reservoir rock control the occurrence probability of brittle rock failure and associated seismicity during hydraulic stimulation. This is especially important, when inverting for key properties like permeability and fracture conductivity. Although it became accepted that seismic events are triggered by fluid flow and the resulting perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir rock, the magnitude of stress perturbations, capable of triggering failure in rocks, can be highly variable. The controlling physical mechanism of this variability is still under discussion. We compare the occurrence of microseismic events at the Cotton Valley gas field to elastic rock heterogeneity, obtained from measurements along the treatment wells. The heterogeneity is characterized by scale invariant fluctuations of elastic properties. We observe that the elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation controls the occurrence of brittle failure. In particular, we find that the density of events is increasing with the Brittleness Index (BI) of the rock, which is defined as a combination of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We evaluate the physical meaning of the BI. By applying geomechanical investigations we characterize the influence of fluctuating elastic properties in rocks on the probability of brittle rock failure. Our analysis is based on the computation of stress fluctuations caused by elastic heterogeneity of rocks. We find that elastic rock heterogeneity causes stress fluctuations of significant magnitude. Moreover, the stress changes necessary to open and reactivate fractures in rocks are strongly related to fluctuations of elastic moduli. Our analysis gives a physical explanation to the observed relation between elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation and the occurrence of brittle failure during hydraulic reservoir stimulations. A crucial factor for understanding

  17. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  18. The genesis of adiabatic shear bands

    PubMed Central

    Landau, P.; Osovski, S.; Venkert, A.; Gärtnerová, V.; Rittel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a unique dynamic failure mechanism that results in an unpredicted catastrophic failure due to a concentrated shear deformation mode. It is universally considered as a material or structural instability and as such, ASB is hardly controllable or predictable to some extent. ASB is modeled on the premise of stability analyses. The leading paradigm is that a competition between strain (rate) hardening and thermal softening determines the onset of the failure. It was recently shown that microstructural softening transformations, such as dynamic recrystallization, are responsible for adiabatic shear failure. These are dictated by the stored energy of cold work, so that energy considerations can be used to macroscopically model the failure mechanism. The initial mechanisms that lead to final failure are still unknown, as well as the ASB formation mechanism(s). Most of all - is ASB an abrupt instability or rather a gradual transition as would be dictated by microstructural evolutions? This paper reports thorough microstructural characterizations that clearly show the gradual character of the phenomenon, best described as a nucleation and growth failure mechanism, and not as an abrupt instability as previously thought. These observations are coupled to a simple numerical model that illustrates them. PMID:27849023

  19. Accurate Variational Description of Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, Giuseppe; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    Adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) is a quantum computing protocol where a system is driven by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The initial Hamiltonian has an easily prepared ground-state and the final Hamiltonian encodes some desired optimization problem. An adiabatic time evolution then yields a solution to the optimization problem. Several challenges emerge in the theoretical description of this protocol: on one hand, the exact simulation of quantum dynamics is exponentially complex in the size of the optimization problem. On the other hand, approximate approaches such as tensor network states (TNS) are limited to small instances by the amount of entanglement that can be encoded. I will present here an extension of the time-dependent Variational Monte Carlo approach to problems in AQO. This approach is based on a general class of (Jastrow-Feenberg) entangled states, whose parameters are evolved in time according to a stochastic variational principle. We demonstrate this approach for optimization problems of the Ising spin-glass type. A very good accuracy is achieved when compared to exact time-dependent TNS on small instances. We then apply this approach to larger problems, and discuss the efficiency of the quantum annealing scheme in comparison with its classical counterpart.

  20. Nonadiabatic Transitions in Adiabatic Rapid Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Optical forces much larger than the ordinary radiative force can be achieved on a two-level atom by multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage sweeps with counterpropagating light beams. Chirped light pulses drive the atom-laser system up a ladder of dressed state energy sheets on sequential trajectories, thereby decreasing the atomic kinetic energy. Nonadiabatic transitions between the energy sheets must be avoided for this process to be effective. We have calculated the nonadiabatic transition probability for various chirped light pulses numerically. These results were compared to the first Demkov-Kunike model and the well-known Landau-Zener model. In addition, an analytical form of the nonadiabatic transition probability has been found for linearly chirped pulses and an approximate form for generic symmetric finite-time pulses has been found for the entire parameter space using the technique of unitary integration. From this, the asymptotic transition probability in the adiabatic limit was derived. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005). Yu. Demkov and M. Kunike, Vestn. Leningr. Univ. Fis. Khim., 16, 39 (1969); K.-A. Suominen and B. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A45, 374 (1992)

  1. The formation of multiple adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Wright, T. W.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2006-07-01

    In a previous paper, Zhou et al. [2006. A numerical methodology for investigating adiabatic shear band formation. J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 54, 904-926] developed a numerical method for analyzing one-dimensional deformation of thermoviscoplastic materials. The method uses a second order algorithm for integration along characteristic lines, and computes the plastic flow after complete localization with high resolution and efficiency. We apply this numerical scheme to analyze localization in a thermoviscoplastic material where multiple shear bands are allowed to form at random locations in a large specimen. As a shear band develops, it unloads neighboring regions and interacts with other bands. Beginning with a random distribution of imperfections, which might be imagined as arising qualitatively from the microstructure, we obtain the average spacing of shear bands through calculations and compare our results with previously existing theoretical estimates. It is found that the spacing between nucleating shear bands follows the perturbation theory due to Wright and Ockendon [1996. A scaling law for the effect of inertia on the formation of adiabatic shear bands. Int. J. Plasticity 12, 927-934], whereas the spacing between mature shear bands is closer to that predicted by the momentum diffusion theory of Grady and Kipp [1987. The growth of unstable thermoplastic shear with application to steady-wave shock compression in solids. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 35, 95-119]. Scaling laws for the dependence of band spacing on material parameters differ in many respects from either theory.

  2. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  3. Non-adiabatic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Jesse; Denissen, Nicholas; Reisner, Jon

    2016-11-01

    Onset of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a non-adiabatic environment is investigated with the multi-physics numerical model, FLAG. This work was inspired by laboratory experiments of non-adiabatic RTI, where a glass vessel with a layer of tetrahyrdofuran (THF) below a layer of toluene was placed inside a microwave. THF, a polar solvent, readily absorbs electromagnetic energy from microwaves. Toluene, a non-polar solvent, is nearly transparent to microwave heating. The presence of a heat source in the THF layer produced convection and a time-dependent Atwood number (At). The system, initially in stable hydrostatic equilibrium At < 0 , was set into motion by microwave induced, volumetric heating of the THF. The point when At > 0 , indicates that the system is RTI unstable. The observed dominant mode at the onset of RTI was the horizontal length scale of the vessel. This scale is contrary to classical RTI, where the modes start small and increases in scale with time. It is shown that the dominant RTI mode observed in the experiments was determined by the THF length scale prior to RTI. The dominant length scale transitions from the THF to the toluene via the updrafts and downdrafts in the convective cells. This happens when At passes from negative to positive. This work was funded by the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program.

  4. Adiabatic effects of electrons and ions on electro-acoustic solitary waves in an adiabatic dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanjia, Fatema; Mamun, A. A.

    2009-02-01

    A dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged cold dust, adiabatic hot ions, and inertia-less adiabatic hot electrons has been considered. The adiabatic effects of electrons and ions on the basic properties of electro-acoustic solitary waves associated with different types of electro-acoustic (viz. ion-acoustic (IA), dust ion-acoustic (DIA), and dust acoustic (DA)) waves are thoroughly investigated by the reductive perturbation method. It is found that the basic properties of the IA, DIA, and DA waves are significantly modified by the adiabatic effects of ions and inertia-less electrons. The implications of our results in space and laboratory dusty plasmas are briefly discussed.

  5. Numerical Weil-Petersson metrics on moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Julien; Lukic, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a simple and very fast algorithm to compute Weil-Petersson metrics on moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau varieties. Additionally, we introduce a second algorithm to approximate the same metric using Donaldson's quantization link between infinite and finite dimensional Geometric Invariant Theoretical (GIT) quotients that describe moduli spaces of varieties. Although this second algorithm is slower and more sophisticated, it can also be used to compute similar metrics on other moduli spaces (e.g. moduli spaces of vector bundles on Calabi-Yau varieties). We study the convergence properties of both algorithms and provide explicit computer implementations using a family of Calabi-Yau quintic hypersurfaces in P4. Also, we include discussions on: the existing methods that are used to compute this class of metrics, the background material that we use to build our algorithms, and how to extend the second algorithm to the vector bundle case.

  6. Bubbles attenuate elastic waves at seismic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Chapman, Samuel; Podladchikov, Yury; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The vertical migration of multiphase fluids in the crust can cause hazardous events such as eruptions, explosions, pollution and earthquakes. Although seismic tomography could potentially provide a detailed image of such fluid-saturated regions, the interpretation of the tomographic signals is often controversial and fails in providing a conclusive map of the subsurface saturation. Seismic tomography should be improved considering seismic wave attenuation (1/Q) and the dispersive elastic moduli which allow accounting for the energy lost by the propagating elastic wave. In particular, in saturated media a significant portion of the energy carried by the propagating wave is dissipated by the wave-induced-fluid-flow and the wave-induced-gas-exsolution-dissolution (WIGED) mechanisms. The WIGED mechanism describes how a propagating wave modifies the thermodynamic equillibrium between different fluid phases causing the exsolution and the dissolution of the gas in the liquid, which in turn causes a significant frequency dependent 1/Q and moduli dispersion. The WIGED theory was initially postulated for bubbly magmas but only recently was extended to bubbly water and experimentally demonstrated. Here we report these theory and laboratory experiments. Specifically, we present i) attenuation measurements performed by means of the Broad Band Attenuation Vessel on porous media saturated with water and different gases, and ii) numerical experiments validating the laboratory observations. Finally, we will extend the theory to fluids and to pressure-temperature conditions which are typical of phreatomagmatic and hydrocarbon domains and we will compare the propagation of seismic waves in bubble-free and bubble-bearing subsurface domains. With the present contribution we extend the knowledge about attenuation in rocks which are saturated with multiphase fluid demonstrating that the WIGED mechanism could be extremely important to image subsurface gas plumes.

  7. An effective medium theory for three-dimensional elastic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    A second-order Born approximation is used to formulate a self-consistent theory for the effective elastic parameters of stochastic media with ellipsoidal distributions of small-scale heterogeneity. The covariance of the stiffness tensor is represented as the product of a one-point tensor variance and a two-point scalar correlation function with ellipsoidal symmetry, which separates the statistical properties of the local anisotropy from those of the geometric anisotropy. The spatial variations can then be rescaled to an isotropic distribution by a simple metric transformation; the spherical average of the strain Green's function in the transformed space reduces to a constant Kneer tensor, and the second-order corrections to the effective elastic parameters are given by the contraction of the rescaled Kneer tensor against the single-point variance of the stiffness tensor. Explicit results are derived for stochastic models in which the heterogeneity is transversely isotropic and its second moments are characterized by a horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio η. If medium is locally isotropic, the expressions for the anisotropic effective moduli reduce in the limit η → ∞ to Backus's second-order expressions for a 1-D stochastic laminate. Comparisons with the exact Backus theory show that the second-order approximation predicts the effective anisotropy for non-Gaussian media fairly well for relative rms fluctuations in the moduli smaller than about 30 per cent. A locally anisotropic model is formulated in which the local elastic properties have hexagonal symmetry, guided by a Gaussian random vector field that is transversely isotropic and specified by a horizontal-to-vertical orientation ratio ξ. The self-consistent theory provides closed-form expressions for the dependence of the effective moduli on 0 < ξ < ∞ and 0 < η < ∞. The effective-medium parametrizations described here appear to be suitable for incorporation into tomographic modelling.

  8. Elastic laboratory measurements and modeling of saturated basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Ludmila; Otheim, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the elastic behavior of basalt is important to seismically monitor volcanoes, subsea basalts, and carbon sequestration in basalt. We estimate the elastic properties of basalt samples from the Snake River Plain, Idaho, at ultrasonic (0.8 MHz) and seismic (2-300 Hz) frequencies. To test the sensitivity of seismic waves to the fluid content in the pore structure, measurements are performed at three saturation conditions: saturated with liquid CO2, water, and dry. When CO2 replaces water, the P-wave velocity drops, on average, by 10%. Vesicles and cracks, observed in the rock microstructure, control the relaxation of pore-fluid pressures in the rock as a wave propagates. The bulk and shear moduli of basalts saturated with liquid CO2 are not frequency dependent, suggesting that fluid pore pressures are in equilibrium between 2 Hz and 0.8 MHz. However, when samples are water saturated, the bulk modulus of the rock is frequency dependent. Modeling with Gassmann's equations predicts the measured saturated rock bulk modulus for all fluids for frequencies below 20 Hz but underpredicts the water-saturated basalt bulk modulus for frequencies greater than 20 Hz. The most likely reason is that the pore-fluid pressures are unrelaxed. Instead, the ultrasonic frequency rock moduli are modeled with high-frequency elastic theories of squirt flow and Kuster-Toksöz (KT). Although KT's model is based on idealized pore shapes, a combination of spheres (vesicles) and penny-shaped cracks (fractures) interpreted and quantified from petrographical data predicts the ultrasonic dry and saturated rock moduli for the measured basalts.

  9. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm-1 in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si4+ ions by Al3+ and Na+ ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties.

  10. Bagger-Witten line bundles on moduli spaces of elliptic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wei; Sharpe, Eric

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss Bagger-Witten line bundles over moduli spaces of SCFTs. We review how in general they are “fractional” line bundles, not honest line bundles, twisted on triple overlaps. We discuss the special case of moduli spaces of elliptic curves in detail. There, the Bagger-Witten line bundle does not exist as an ordinary line bundle, but rather is necessarily fractional. As a fractional line bundle, it is nontrivial (though torsion) over the uncompactified moduli stack, and its restriction to the interior, excising corners with enhanced stabilizers, is also fractional. It becomes an honest line bundle on a moduli stack defined by a quotient of the upper half plane by a metaplectic group, rather than SL(2, ℤ). We review and compare to results of recent work arguing that well-definedness of the worldsheet metric implies that the Bagger-Witten line bundle admits a flat connection (which includes torsion bundles as special cases), and gives general arguments on the existence of universal structures on moduli spaces of SCFTs, in which superconformal deformation parameters are promoted to nondynamical fields ranging over the SCFT moduli space.

  11. The size-dependent elastic properties of nanofilms with surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian-Gang; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2005-10-01

    Size-dependent elastic constants are investigated theoretically with reference to a nanoscale single-crystal thin film. A three-dimensional (3D) model is presented with the relaxation on the surface of the nanofilm taken into consideration. The constitutive relation of the 3D model is derived by using the energy approach, and analytical expressions for the four nonzero elastic constants of the nanofilm are obtained. The size effects of the four elastic constants are then discussed, and the dependence of these elastic constants on the surface relaxation and the ambiguity in the definition of the thickness of the nanofilm are also analyzed. In addition, the elastic moduli of the nanofilm in two kinds of plane problem are obtained and discussed in the case of a special boundary condition.

  12. High-pressure elastic properties of cubic Ir2P from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Wei; Bioud, Nadhira; Fu, Zhi-Jian; Wei, Xiao-Ping; Song, Ting; Li, Zheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    A study of the high-pressure elastic properties of new synthetic Ir2P in the anti-fluorite structure is conducted using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. The elastic constants C11, C12 and C44 for the cubic Ir2P are obtained by the stress-strain method and the elastic stability calculations under pressure indicate that it is stable at least 100 GPa. Additionally, the electronic density of states, the aggregate elastic moduli, that is bulk modulus, shear modulus, and Young's modulus along with the Debye temperature, Poisson's ratio, and elastic anisotropy factor are all successfully obtained. Moreover, the pressure dependence of the longitudinal and shear wave velocities in three different directions [100], [110], and [111] for Ir2P are also predicted for the first time.

  13. Determination of elastic modulus of the components at dentin-resin interface using the ultrasonic device.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tamayo; Miyazaki, Masashi; Inage, Hirohiko; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elastic moduli of the components at resin-dentin interface with the use of an ultrasonic device. Dentin plates were obtained from freshly extracted bovine incisors with a shape in rectangular form. Resin composites and bonding agents were polymerized and trimmed in the same shape as the dentin specimens. The ultrasonic equipment employed in this study was comprised of a Pulser-Receiver, transducers, and an oscilloscope. Each elastic modulus was determined by measuring the longitudinal and shear wave sound velocities. The mean elastic modulus of mineralized dentin was 17.4 GPa, while that of demineralized dentin was 1.4 GPa. When the demineralized dentin was immersed in bonding agents, the elastic modulus changed to 3.7-4.7 GPa, and these values were significantly higher than those of demineralized dentin. A gradient in elastic modulus was detected as the analysis shifted from the dentin side to the resin composite.

  14. A Modified Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Evaluation of Boolean Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a modified construction of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for Boolean functions studied by M. Andrecut et al. [13, 14]. Our algorithm has the time complexity O(1) for the evaluation of Boolean functions, without additional computational cost of implementing the driving Hamiltonian, which is required by the adiabatic evolution described in [13, 14].

  15. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  16. The Adiabatic Invariance of the Action Variable in Classical Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Clive G.; Siklos, Stephen T. C.

    2007-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional classical time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with quasi-periodic orbits. It is well known that such systems possess an adiabatic invariant which coincides with the action variable of the Hamiltonian formalism. We present a new proof of the adiabatic invariance of this quantity and illustrate our arguments by means of…

  17. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  18. Elastic properties computation and fluid substitution simulation from X-ray CT scan images in Middle East carbonates samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouini, M. S.; Vega, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most common problems in rock physics is the prediction of the elastic rock properties. Although about half hydrocarbons reserves in the world are in carbonate reservoir rocks, little has been published concerning their elastic properties. Fluid substitution experiments in laboratory are time consuming and can affect the original carbonate elastic rock properties, due to chemical interaction with fluids and re-crystallization. Nowadays, computational methods make possible to conduct complex, fast and realistic simulations of elasticity equations directly on digitized models. Carbonate digital structures can be obtained by a nondestructive technique using X-ray computed tomography scanner providing a 3-D structure representing rock density for each voxel. The main advantages of such a technique are to provide a data representative of core plug scale and to allow repeating indefinitely simulations without any impact in the original rock frame. In this paper, an image processing technique is used to segment automatically into rock matrix and pore space the digitalized structure of a high porosity carbonate reservoir samples in the Middle East. However due to the medium resolution of our data (20µm), we added a pre-processing step to enhance the contrast of the digitalized structure in order to improve the segmentation result (Fig). The rock elastic properties are then computed by simulating a static deformation experiment after assigning for each voxel its specific elastic moduli. The finite elements method is used to estimate local and average strains providing an estimation of bulk and shear moduli. Finally, we assume that linear elasticity laws are valid within the sample which allows converting elastic moduli into elastic-wave velocities. In order to validate these results, we compared our simulated elastic moduli with laboratory measurements in the carbonates samples under different saturation conditions: dried, oil saturated and brine saturated

  19. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  20. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  1. The HAWC and SAFIRE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; Behr, Jason; Kunes, Evan; Hait, Tom; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High-Resolution Airborne Wide-band Camera (HAWC) and Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) are far-infrared experiments which will fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. HAWC's detectors will operate at 0.2 Kelvin, while those of SAFIRE will be at 0.1 Kelvin. Each instrument will include an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to cool its detector stage from the liquid helium bath temperature (HAWC's at 4.2 Kelvin and SAFIRE's pumped to about 1.3 Kelvin) to its operating temperature. Except for the magnets used to achieve the cooling and a slight difference in the heat switch design, the two ADRs are nearly identical. We describe the ADR design and present the results of performance testing.

  2. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  3. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-02-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  4. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  5. On stress collapse in adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. W.; Walter, J. W.

    T HE DYNAMICS of adiabatic shear band formation is considered making use of a simplified thermo/visco/plastic flow law. A new numerical solution is used to follow the growth of a perturbation from initiation, through early growth and severe localization, to a slowly varying terminal configuration. Asymptotic analyses predict the early and late stage patterns, but the timing and structure of the abrupt transition to severe localization can only be studied numerically, to date. A characteristic feature of the process is that temperature and plastic strain rate begin to localize immediately, but only slowly, whereas the stress first evolves almost as if there were no perturbation, but then collapses rapidly when severe localization occurs.

  6. Index Theory and Adiabatic Limit in QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzycki, Jarosław

    2013-08-01

    The paper has the form of a proposal concerned with the relationship between the three mathematically rigorous approaches to quantum field theory: (1) local algebraic formulation of Haag, (2) Wightman formulation and (3) the perturbative formulation based on the microlocal renormalization method. In this project we investigate the relationship between (1) and (3) and utilize the known relationships between (1) and (2). The main goal of the proposal lies in obtaining obstructions for the existence of the adiabatic limit ( confinement problem in the phenomenological standard model approach). We extend the method of deformation of Dütsch and Fredenhagen (in the Bordeman-Waldmann sense) and apply Fedosov construction of the formal index—an analog of the index for deformed symplectic manifolds, generalizing the Atiyah-Singer index. We present some first steps in realization of the proposal.

  7. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  8. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    1992-01-01

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  9. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  10. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  11. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; McCaskey, Alex; Bennink, Ryan S; Billings, Jay Jay; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Sullivan, Blair D; Klymko, Christine F; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  12. An integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, T. S.; McCaskey, A. J.; Bennink, R. S.; Billings, J. J.; DʼAzevedo, E. F.; Sullivan, B. D.; Klymko, C. F.; Seddiqi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for AQO called Jade Adiabatic Development Environment (JADE) that provides control over all the steps taken during program synthesis. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously specify the AQO algorithm while allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its potential use for benchmarking AQO programs by the quantum computer science community.

  13. Adiabatic theory, Liapunov exponents, and rotation number for quadratic Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, François; Foulon, Patrick

    1987-11-01

    We consider the adiabatic problem for general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonians and develop a method quite different from WKB. In particular, we apply our results to the Schrödinger equation in a strip. We show that there exists a first regular step (avoiding resonance problems) providing one adiabatic invariant, bounds on the Liapunov exponents, and estimates on the rotation number at any order of the perturbation theory. The further step is shown to be equivalent to a quantum adiabatic problem, which, by the usual adiabatic techniques, provides the other possible adiabatic invariants. In the special case of the Schrödinger equation our method is simpler and more powerful than the WKB techniques.

  14. The asymptotic homogenization elasticity tensor properties for composites with material discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penta, Raimondo; Gerisch, Alf

    2017-01-01

    The classical asymptotic homogenization approach for linear elastic composites with discontinuous material properties is considered as a starting point. The sharp length scale separation between the fine periodic structure and the whole material formally leads to anisotropic elastic-type balance equations on the coarse scale, where the arising fourth rank operator is to be computed solving single periodic cell problems on the fine scale. After revisiting the derivation of the problem, which here explicitly points out how the discontinuity in the individual constituents' elastic coefficients translates into stress jump interface conditions for the cell problems, we prove that the gradient of the cell problem solution is minor symmetric and that its cell average is zero. This property holds for perfect interfaces only (i.e., when the elastic displacement is continuous across the composite's interface) and can be used to assess the accuracy of the computed numerical solutions. These facts are further exploited, together with the individual constituents' elastic coefficients and the specific form of the cell problems, to prove a theorem that characterizes the fourth rank operator appearing in the coarse-scale elastic-type balance equations as a composite material effective elasticity tensor. We both recover known facts, such as minor and major symmetries and positive definiteness, and establish new facts concerning the Voigt and Reuss bounds. The latter are shown for the first time without assuming any equivalence between coarse and fine-scale energies ( Hill's condition), which, in contrast to the case of representative volume elements, does not identically hold in the context of asymptotic homogenization. We conclude with instructive three-dimensional numerical simulations of a soft elastic matrix with an embedded cubic stiffer inclusion to show the profile of the physically relevant elastic moduli (Young's and shear moduli) and Poisson's ratio at increasing (up to

  15. Adiabatic vs. non-adiabatic determination of specific absorption rate of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natividad, Eva; Castro, Miguel; Mediano, Arturo

    2009-05-01

    The measurement of temperature variations in adiabatic conditions allows the determination of the specific absorption rate of magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids from the correct incremental expression, SAR=(1/ m MNP) C(Δ T/Δ t). However, when measurements take place in non-adiabatic conditions, one must approximate this expression by SAR≈ Cβ/ m MNP, where β is the initial slope of the temperature vs. time curve during alternating field application. The errors arising from the use of this approximation were estimated through several experiments with different isolating conditions, temperature sensors and sample-sensor contacts. It is concluded that small to appreciable errors can appear, which are difficult to infer or control.

  16. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  17. Energy decomposition analysis in an adiabatic picture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuezhi; Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-02-22

    Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of electronic structure calculations has facilitated quantitative understanding of diverse intermolecular interactions. Nevertheless, such analyses are usually performed at a single geometry and thus decompose a "single-point" interaction energy. As a result, the influence of the physically meaningful EDA components on the molecular structure and other properties are not directly obtained. To address this gap, the absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO)-EDA is reformulated in an adiabatic picture, where the frozen, polarization, and charge transfer energy contributions are defined as energy differences between the stationary points on different potential energy surfaces (PESs), which are accessed by geometry optimizations at the frozen, polarized and fully relaxed levels of density functional theory (DFT). Other molecular properties such as vibrational frequencies can thus be obtained at the stationary points on each PES. We apply the adiabatic ALMO-EDA to different configurations of the water dimer, the water-Cl(-) and water-Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes, metallocenes (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+)), and the ammonia-borane complex. This method appears to be very useful for unraveling how physical effects such as polarization and charge transfer modulate changes in molecular properties induced by intermolecular interactions. As an example of the insight obtained, we find that a linear hydrogen bond geometry for the water dimer is preferred even without the presence of polarization and charge transfer, while the red shift in the OH stretch frequency is primarily a charge transfer effect; by contrast, a near-linear geometry for the water-chloride hydrogen bond is achieved only when charge transfer is allowed.

  18. Using capillary forces to determine the elastic properties of mesoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolley, E.; Garroum, N.; Grosman, A.

    2017-02-01

    The capillary forces in mesoporous materials, when imbibed with liquid, are large enough to induce mechanical deformations. Using anisotropic porous silicon, we show that systematic measurements of strain as a function of the pore pressure can yield most of the elastic constants characterizing the porous matrix. The results of this poroelastic approach are in agreement with independent standard stress-strain measurements. The porosity dependence of Young's moduli as well as the values of Poisson's ratios are qualitatively consistent with porous silicon having a honeycomb structure. For a quantitative comparison, we performed finite element modeling of realistic pore geometries. The calculated elastic moduli are found to be much smaller than the measured ones. This is presumably due to both (i) finite-size effects, the Young's modulus of the 5-nm thick walls of the honeycomb could be notably smaller than the Young's modulus of bulk Si, and (ii) defects of the honeycomb structure along the pore axis.

  19. Effective-medium theory of elastic waves in random networks of rods.

    PubMed

    Katz, J I; Hoffman, J J; Conradi, M S; Miller, J G

    2012-06-01

    We formulate an effective medium (mean field) theory of a material consisting of randomly distributed nodes connected by straight slender rods, hinged at the nodes. Defining wavelength-dependent effective elastic moduli, we calculate both the static moduli and the dispersion relations of ultrasonic longitudinal and transverse elastic waves. At finite wave vector k the waves are dispersive, with phase and group velocities decreasing with increasing wave vector. These results are directly applicable to networks with empty pore space. They also describe the solid matrix in two-component (Biot) theories of fluid-filled porous media. We suggest the possibility of low density materials with higher ratios of stiffness and strength to density than those of foams, aerogels, or trabecular bone.

  20. High-precision study of time- and temperature-dependence of the elastic properties of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, B.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Shekhter, A.; Betts, J. B.; Freibert, F.; Migliori, A.

    2015-03-01

    It is important to determine the origin of changes in elastic properties in 239Pu as a function of time. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. The precision of these measurements enabled observation of changes in elastic properties of 1 part in 107 for measurements lasting hours up to several days. The most-likely source of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products such as He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) phase instabilities associated with transformations to the delta phase or to Pu3Ga. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, measurements were made of the mechanical resonance frequencies of 300mg cylinders of fine-grained polycrystalline alpha-phase 239Pu with about 600PPM Ga. We present the surprising result that at temperatures below 60K, there is a strong dependence on temperature of the rate of change of elastic moduli with time. Older results showed that the sign of this rate of change reverses at higher temperature. Such studies of nascent state are key to exploring damage evolution and its impact on specific volume and elastic moduli. Future studies will continue these measurements to above ambient temperatures.

  1. Ab initio study of electronic structure, elastic and optical properties of anti-perovskite type alkali metal oxyhalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanna, J.; Yedukondalu, N.; Ramesh Babu, K.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2013-06-01

    We report the structural, elastic, electronic, and optical properties of antiperovskite alkali metal oxyhalides Na3OCl, Na3OBr, and K3OBr using two different density functional methods within generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Plane wave pseudo potential (PW-PP) method has been used to calculate the ground state structural and elastic properties while the electronic structure and optical properties are calculated explicitly using full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The calculated ground state properties of the investigated compounds agree quite well with the available experimental data. The predicted elastic constants using both PW-PP and FP-LAPW methods are in good accord with each other and show that the materials are mechanically stable. The low values of the elastic moduli indicate that these materials are soft in nature. The bulk properties such as shear moduli, Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio are derived from the calculated elastic constants. Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential improves the band gaps over GGA and Engel-Vosko GGA. The computed TB-mBJ electronic band structure reveals that these materials are direct band gap insulators. The complex dielectric function of the metal oxyhalide compounds have been calculated and the observed prominent peaks are analyzed through the TB-mBJ electronic structures. By using the knowledge of complex dielectric function other important optical properties including absorption, reflectivity, refractive index and loss function have been obtained as a function of energy.

  2. Crystal structure, thermal expansivity, and elasticity of OH-chondrodite: Trends among dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Yu; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Mao, Zhu; Duffy, Thomas S.; Hirner, Sarah M.; Smyth, Joseph R.

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report the structure and thermoelastic properties of OH-chondrodite. The sample was synthesized at 12 GPa and 1523 K, coexisting with hydroxyl-clinohumite and hydrous olivine. The Fe content Fe/(Fe+Mg) is 1.1 mol%, and the monoclinic unit-cell parameters are: a = 4.7459(2) Å, b = 10.3480(7) Å, c = 7.9002(6) Å, α = 108.702(7)°, and V = 367.50(4) Å3. At ambient conditions the crystal structure was refined in space group P21/b from 1915 unique reflection intensities measured by single-crystal x-ray diffraction. The volume thermal expansion coefficient was measured between 150 and 800 K, resulting in αV = 2.8(5)×10-9(K-2) × T + 40.9(7) × 10-6(K-1) – 0.81(3)(K)/T2, with an average value of 38.0(9)×10-6 K-1. Brillouin spectroscopy was used to measure a set of acoustic velocities from which all thirteen components (Cij) of the elastic tensor were determined. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the moduli yield for the adiabatic bulk modulus, KS0 = 117.9(12) GPa, and for shear modulus, G0 = 70.1(5) GPa. The Reuss bound on the isothermal bulk modulus (KT0) is 114.2(14) GPa. From the measured thermodynamic properties, the Grüneisen parameter (γ) is calculated to be 1.66(4). Fitting previous static compression data using our independently measured bulk modulus (isothermal Reuss bound) as a fixed parameter, we refined the first pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, KT’ = 5.5(1). Systematic trends between H2O content and physical properties are evaluated among dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases along the forsterite-brucite join.

  3. In vitro comparison of flexural strength and elastic modulus of three provisional crown materials used in fixed prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Poonacha, Seema; Salagundi, Basavaraj; Rupesh, P L.; Raghavan, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the flexural strength and the elastic moduli of three provisional crown materials (methyl methacrylate based autopolymerized resin, bis acryl composite based autopolymerized resin and urethane dimethacrylate based light polymerized resin) after storing in artificial saliva and testing at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days. Study design: A metal master mould with four slots of dimensions 25x2x2 mm was fabricated to obtain samples of standard dimensions. A total of 135 specimens were thus obtained with 45 each of three provisional materials. Further 15 samples of each group were tested after storing for one hour at room temperature and again at intervals of 24 hours and 7 days after storing in artificial saliva. Three point flexural tests were carried out in the universal testing machine to calculate the flexural strength and the elastic modulus. The changes were calculated and data was analyzed with Fisher’s test and ANOVA. Results: The flexural strength of the methyl methacrylate resin reduced significantly while bis-acrylic composite resin showed a significant increase in its flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and the values of both remained constant thereafter. Contrary to these findings, light polymerized resin showed a significant decrease in flexural strength after storing in artificial saliva for 24 hours and then significantly increased in flexural strength after 7 days. However the changes in the values for elastic modulus of respective materials were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Methacrylate based autopolymerizing resin showed the highest flexural strength and elastic moduli after fabrication and after storing in artificial saliva and for 24 hours and 7 days. Bis-acrylic composite resin showed the least flexural strength and elastic moduli. Key words:Provisional restorations, interim restorations, Methyl Methacrylate, composite restoration, flexural strength, elastic moduli

  4. The Effects of Elastic Fiber Protein Insufficiency and Treatment on the Modulus of Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gabriela Espinosa, M.; Gardner, William S.; Bennett, Lisa; Sather, Bradley A.; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Wagenseil, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Elastic fibers are critical for the mechanical function of the large arteries. Mechanical effects of elastic fiber protein deficiency have been investigated in whole arteries, but not in isolated smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The elastic moduli of SMCs from elastin (Eln-/-) and fibulin-4 (Fbln4-/-) knockout mice were measured using atomic force microscopy. Compared to control SMCs, the modulus of Eln-/- SMCs is reduced by 40%, but is unchanged in Fbln4-/- SMCs. The Eln-/- SMC modulus is rescued by soluble or α elastin treatment. Altered gene expression, specifically of calponin, suggests that SMC phenotypic modulation may be responsible for the modulus changes. PMID:24322348

  5. Adiabatic Shear Bands in One Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    8217j0 = 50/s. 2 FINITE ELEMENT SOLUTIONS Finite element calculations , [3] and [4] are able to follow the development of the band through successive...in a highly localized, late stage morphology. In the earlier calculations elasticity and work hardening were ignored, and linear thermal softening...was assumed; the material parameters used were for a moderately high strength steel. Typical results from these calculations are shown in Figures 1 and

  6. On the General Class of Models of Adiabatic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2016-10-01

    The general class of models of adiabatic evolution was proposed to speed up the usual adiabatic computation in the case of quantum search problem. It was shown [8] that, by temporarily increasing the ground state energy of a time-dependent Hamiltonian to a suitable quantity, the quantum computation can perform the calculation in time complexity O(1). But it is also known that if the overlap between the initial and final states of the system is zero, then the computation based on the generalized models of adiabatic evolution can break down completely. In this paper, we find another severe limitation for this class of adiabatic evolution-based algorithms, which should be taken into account in applications. That is, it is still possible that this kind of evolution designed to deal with the quantum search problem fails completely if the interpolating paths in the system Hamiltonian are chosen inappropriately, while the usual adiabatic evolutions can do the same job relatively effectively. This implies that it is not always recommendable to use nonlinear paths in adiabatic computation. On the contrary, the usual simple adiabatic evolution may be sufficient for effective use.

  7. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  8. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  9. High-Temperature Elasticity, Cation Disorder and Magnetic Transition in Magnesioferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Antao,S.; Jackson, I.; Li, B.; Kung, J.; Chen, J.; Hassan, I.; Liebermann, R.; Parise, J.

    2007-01-01

    The elastic moduli of magnesioferrite spinel, MgFe2O4, and their temperature dependence have been determined for the first time by ultrasonic measurements on a polycrystalline specimen. The measurements were carried out at 300 MPa and to 700 C in a gas-medium high-pressure apparatus. On heating, both the elastic bulk (K S) and shear (G) moduli decrease linearly to 350 C. By combining with extant thermal-expansion data, the values for the room-temperature K S and G, and their temperature derivatives are as follows: K 0 = 176.3(7) GPa, G 0 = 80.1(2) GPa, ({partial_derivative}K S/{partial_derivative}T) P = -0.032(3) GPa K-1 and ({partial_derivative}G/{partial_derivative}T) P = -0.012(1) GPa K-1. Between 350 and 400 C, there are abrupt increases of 1.4% in both of the elastic moduli; these closely coincide with the magnetic Curie transition that was observed by thermal analyses at about 360 C.

  10. Moduli Dark Matter and the Search for Its Decay Line using Suzaku X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusenko, Alexander; Loewenstein, Michael; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2013-01-01

    Light scalar fields called moduli arise from a variety of different models involving supersymmetry and/or string theory; thus their existence is a generic prediction of leading theories for physics beyond the standard model. They also present a formidable, long-standing problem for cosmology. We argue that an anthropic solution to the moduli problem exists in the case of small moduli masses and that it automatically leads to dark matter in the form of moduli. The recent discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson implies a lower bound on the moduli mass of about a keV. This form of dark matter is consistent with the observed properties of structure formation, and it is amenable to detection with the help of x-ray telescopes. We present the results of a search for such dark matter particles using spectra extracted from the first deep x-ray observations of the Draco and Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxies, which are darkmatter- dominated systems with extreme mass-to-light ratios and low intrinsic backgrounds. No emission line is positively detected, and we set new constraints on the relevant new physics.

  11. Shear elastic modulus estimation from indentation and SDUV on gelatin phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties such as elasticity are linked to tissue pathology state. Several groups have proposed shear wave propagation speed to quantify tissue mechanical properties. It is well known that biological tissues are viscoelastic materials; therefore velocity dispersion resulting from material viscoelasticity is expected. A method called Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) can be used to quantify tissue viscoelasticity by measuring dispersion of shear wave propagation speed. However, there is not a gold standard method for validation. In this study we present an independent validation method of shear elastic modulus estimation by SDUV in 3 gelatin phantoms of differing stiffness. In addition, the indentation measurements are compared to estimates of elasticity derived from shear wave group velocities. The shear elastic moduli from indentation were 1.16, 3.40 and 5.6 kPa for a 7, 10 and 15% gelatin phantom respectively. SDUV measurements were 1.61, 3.57 and 5.37 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. Shear elastic moduli derived from shear wave group velocities were 1.78, 5.2 and 7.18 kPa for the gelatin phantoms respectively. The shear elastic modulus estimated from the SDUV, matched the elastic modulus measured by indentation. On the other hand, shear elastic modulus estimated by group velocity did not agree with indentation test estimations. These results suggest that shear elastic modulus estimation by group velocity will be bias when the medium being investigated is dispersive. Therefore a rheological model should be used in order to estimate mechanical properties of viscoelastic materials. PMID:21317078

  12. Elastic Moduli and Seismic Wave Attenuation in Dry and Saturated Rock. Volume 2. Modulus Dispersion and Attenuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    similar densities and viscosities but had very different chemical, electrochemical, and dielectric properties. He concluded that electrochemical...duplicated for a low loss standard aluminum cot’t with the same dimensions to calibrate the hyste-esis of the experimental apparatus. The experimental...specimen using fluids with different electrical properties and electrolytes but with similar densities and viscosities . Frequency dependence in

  13. Dynamic elastic response of KMn1-xCaxF3 : Elastic softening and domain freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schranz, W.; Sondergeld, P.; Kityk, A. V.; Salje, E. K. H.

    2009-09-01

    Results of continuous-wave resonance (MHz-region) and ultralow-frequency (Hz-region) dynamic mechanical analyzer measurements of pure KMnF3 and mixed crystals KMn1-xCaxF3 (x<0.017) are presented in a broad temperature range including the phase-transition regions. The elastic anomalies depend strongly on the measurement frequency: The MHz-elastic constants can be well fitted by Landau theory including the difference between isothermal and adiabatic behavior. Contrary, at low frequencies (0.1-50 Hz) an elastic softening (superelasticity) due to domain-wall motion is found quite similar to that observed recently in isostructural SrTiO3 [A. V. Kityk , Phys. Rev. B 61, 946 (2000)]. However, unlike to SrTiO3 , for the mixed system KMn1-xCaxF3 we have measured freezing of the domain-wall movement around 100 K in a certain range of concentration of Ca2+ ions (x=0.003) . Calculating the dynamic elastic response to the ac-stress field by taking into account the motion of randomly pinned ferroelastic domain walls in KMn1-xCaxF3 yields excellent agreement between theory and experiment.

  14. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  15. Acoustic, elastic, and anharmonic properties of Sm1- x R x S solid solutions with trivalent impurities (R = Y, Lа, Tm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belomestnykh, V. N.; Tesleva, E. P.

    2012-10-01

    Based on the known experimental data on the rigidity constants c ij ( x) of single crystals of samarium monosulfide solid solutions (alloys) with yttrium, lanthanum, and thulium impurities, their anisotropic and isotropic acoustic (sound velocities), elastic (elasticity moduli and Poisson's ratios), and anharmonic (Grüneisen parameters) properties are investigated. Anomalous behavior of these characteristics at isostructural electron phase transitions in the examined mixed systems in the intermediate valence state is discussed.

  16. Elastic behavior of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite: An atomistic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suvankar; Dutta, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mechanical properties, nanocomposites with homogeneous chemical composition throughout the matrix and the dispersed phase are of particular interest. In this study, the elastic moduli of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite have been estimated using atomistic simulations. A comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the elastic behavior is significantly influenced by the crystal-amorphous interphase. On observing the effect of volume-fraction of the crystalline phase, an anomalous trend for the bulk modulus is obtained. This phenomenon is attributed to the relaxation displacements of the amorphous atoms.

  17. Elastic properties of silver borate glasses doped with praseodymium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gowda, G. V. Jagadeesha; Eraiah, B.

    2014-04-24

    A series of glasses xPr{sub 6}O{sub 11−}(35−x) Ag{sub 2}O−65B{sub 2}O{sub 3} with x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mol % were synthesized by melt quenching technique. Longitudinal and shear ultrasonic velocity were measured at 5 MHz frequency and at room temperature. Elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio and Debye temperature have been calculated from the measured density and ultrasonic velocity at room temperature. The experimental results indicate that the elastic constants depend upon the composition of the glasses. The role of the Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} inside the glass network was discussed.

  18. Stabilizing electrodeposition in elastic solid electrolytes containing immobilized anions

    PubMed Central

    Tikekar, Mukul D.; Archer, Lynden A.; Koch, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Ion transport–driven instabilities in electrodeposition of metals that lead to morphological instabilities and dendrites are receiving renewed attention because mitigation strategies are needed for improving rechargeability and safety of lithium batteries. The growth rate of these morphological instabilities can be slowed by immobilizing a fraction of anions within the electrolyte to reduce the electric field at the metal electrode. We analyze the role of elastic deformation of the solid electrolyte with immobilized anions and present theory combining the roles of separator elasticity and modified transport to evaluate the factors affecting the stability of planar deposition over a wide range of current densities. We find that stable electrodeposition can be easily achieved even at relatively high current densities in electrolytes/separators with moderate polymer-like mechanical moduli, provided a small fraction of anions are immobilized in the separator. PMID:27453943

  19. The method of Gaussian weighted trajectories. III. An adiabaticity correction proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, L.

    2008-01-28

    The addition of an adiabaticity correction (AC) to the Gaussian weighted trajectory (GWT) method and its normalized version (GWT-N) is suggested. This correction simply consists in omitting vibrationally adiabatic nonreactive trajectories in the calculations of final attributes. For triatomic exchange reactions, these trajectories satisfy the criterion {omega} not much larger than ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), where {omega} is a vibrational action defined by {omega}={integral}{sup []}-[]dt(pr-p{sub 0}r{sub 0}), r being the reagent diatom bond length, p its conjugate momentum, and r{sub 0} and p{sub 0} the corresponding variables for the unperturbed diatom ({omega}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) bears some analogy with the semiclassical elastic scattering phase shift). The resulting GWT-AC and GWT-ACN methods are applied to the recently studied H{sup +}+H{sub 2} and H{sup +}+D{sub 2} reactions and the agreement between their predictions and those of exact quantum scattering calculations is found to be much better than for the initial GWT and GWT-N methods. The GWT-AC method, however, appears to be the most accurate one for the processes considered, in particular, the H{sup +}+D{sub 2} reaction.

  20. The method of Gaussian weighted trajectories. III. An adiabaticity correction proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, L.

    2008-01-01

    The addition of an adiabaticity correction (AC) to the Gaussian weighted trajectory (GWT) method and its normalized version (GWT-N) is suggested. This correction simply consists in omitting vibrationally adiabatic nonreactive trajectories in the calculations of final attributes. For triatomic exchange reactions, these trajectories satisfy the criterion Ω not much larger than ℏ, where Ω is a vibrational action defined by Ω =∫-∞∞dt(pṙ0), r being the reagent diatom bond length, p its conjugate momentum, and r0 and p0 the corresponding variables for the unperturbed diatom (Ω /ℏ bears some analogy with the semiclassical elastic scattering phase shift). The resulting GWT-AC and GWT-ACN methods are applied to the recently studied H++H2 and H++D2 reactions and the agreement between their predictions and those of exact quantum scattering calculations is found to be much better than for the initial GWT and GWT-N methods. The GWT-AC method, however, appears to be the most accurate one for the processes considered, in particular, the H++D2 reaction.

  1. Quantum adiabatic optimization and combinatorial landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution algorithm on a variant of the satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, γ=M/N . We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (instead of only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold γ=γd starting with some value of K —the number of variables in each clause. Beyond the dynamic threshold, the algorithm should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz. We have been able to map the ensemble of random graphs onto another ensemble with fluctuations significantly reduced. This enabled us to obtain tight upper bounds on the satisfiability transition and to recompute the dynamical transition using the extended set of landscapes.

  2. Design of the PIXIE adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a telescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: (1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and (2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 mW, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 mW. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 μW. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  3. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    PubMed

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  4. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  5. On the persistence of adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakye-Yiadom, S.; Bassim, M. N.; Al-Ameeri, S.

    2012-08-01

    It is generally agreed that the initiation and development of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) are manifestations of damage in metallic materials subjected to high strain rates and large strains as those due to impact in a Hopkinson Bar system. Models for evolution of these bands have been described in the literature. One question that has not received attention is how persistent these bands are and whether their presence and effect can be reversed or eliminated by using a process of thermal (heat treatment) or thermo-mechanical treatment that would relieve the material from the high strain associated with ASBs and their role as precursors to crack initiation and subsequent failure. Since ASBs are more prevalent and more defined in BCC metals including steels, a study was conducted to investigate the best conditions of generating ASBs in a heat treatable steel, followed by determining the best conditions for heat treatment of specimens already damaged by the presence of ASBs in order to relieve the strains due to ASBs and restore the material to an apparent microstructure without the "scars" due to the previous presence of ASBs. It was found that heat treatment achieves the curing from ASBs. This presentation documents the process undertaken to achieve this objective.

  6. Adiabatic Spin Pumping with Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciolo, Eduardo R.

    Electronic transport in mesoscopic systems has been intensively studied for more the last three decades. While there is a substantial understanding of the stationary regime, much less is know about phase-coherent nonequilibrium transport when pulses or ac perturbations are used to drive electrons at low temperatures and at small length scales. However, about 20 years ago Thouless proposed to drive nondissipative currents in quantum systems by applying simultaneously two phase-locked external perturbations. The so-called adiabatic pumping mechanism has been revived in the last few years, both theoretically and experimentally, in part because of the development of lateral semiconductor quantum dots. Here we will explain how open dots can be used to create spin-polarized currents with little or no net charge transfer. The pure spin pump we propose is the analog of a charge battery in conventional electronics and may provide a needed circuit element for spin-based electronics. We will also discuss other relevant issues such as rectification and decoherence and point out possible extensions of the mechanism to closed dots.

  7. Elastic wave velocities of pyrope-majorite garnets (Py 62Mj 38 and Py 50Mj 50) to 9 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Chen, Ganglin; Gwanmesia, Gabriel D.; Liebermann, Robert C.

    2000-06-01

    Polycrystalline specimens of two pyrope-majorite garnets (Py 62Mj 38 and Py 62Mj 38) were synthesized in a 2000-ton uniaxial split-sphere apparatus (USSA-2000) at pressures of 16 GPa and temperatures of 1670 K for run durations of about 2 h using homogeneous glasses as starting materials. Ultrasonic interferometric measurements on these specimens were conducted at pressures up to 9 GPa at room temperature using a 1000-ton uniaxial split-cylinder apparatus (USCA-1000) with Bi as an internal pressure marker. From the measurements of the travel times for compressional (P) and shear (S) waves, the velocities and elastic moduli are calculated using length/density changes determined from the travel-time data. Third-order Eulerian finite strain analysis of these data yield the longitudinal ( L) and shear ( G) moduli and their pressure derivatives [ M0'=(∂ M/∂ P) T]: for Py 62Mj 38, L0=291±6 GPa and L0'=9.1±0.6, G0=90±1 GPa and G0'=1.9±0.2, from which we calculate the values for the adiabatic bulk modulus ( K= L-4/3 G) to be K0=171±5 GPa and K0'=6.2±0.5. These new data for the shear modulus and its pressure derivative are in agreement with the previous values for the same composition (Rigden, S.M., Gwanmesia, G.D., Liebermann, R.C., 1994. Elastic wave velocities of a pyrope-majorite garnet to 3 GPa. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 86, 35-44.), but the P wave velocity, the bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are somewhat higher. For the Py 50Mj 50 composition, these values are L0=289±6 GPa, L0'=9.2±0.7, G0=89±1 GPa, G0'=2.1±0.2, K0=170±5 GPa, and K0'=6.4±0.5. The high-pressure derivatives of K and G for these Py-Mj garnets may be important in explaining the high velocity gradients observed in seismic models of the transition zone of the Earth's mantle. Compositions Mg 2Al 3Si 2O 12-MgSiO 3 form a continuous solid-solution at high pressures and temperatures. The end members are: Mg 2Al 3Si 2O 12-pyrope and MgSiO 3-majorite (abbreviated here and throughout our

  8. Abnormal Elasticity of Single-Crystal Magnesiosiderite across the Spin Transition in Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Suyu; Yang, Jing; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Brillouin light scattering and impulsive stimulated light scattering have been used to determine the full elastic constants of magnesiosiderite [(Mg0.35Fe0.65)CO3 ] up to 70 GPa at room temperature in a diamond-anvil cell. Drastic softening in C11 , C33 , C12 , and C13 elastic moduli associated with the compressive stress component and stiffening in C44 and C14 moduli associated with the shear stress component are observed to occur within the spin transition between ˜42.4 and ˜46.5 GPa . Negative values of C12 and C13 are also observed within the spin transition region. The Born criteria constants for the crystal remain positive within the spin transition, indicating that the mixed-spin state remains mechanically stable. Significant auxeticity can be related to the electronic spin transition-induced elastic anomalies based on the analysis of Poisson's ratio. These elastic anomalies are explained using a thermoelastic model for the rhombohedral system. Finally, we conclude that mixed-spin state ferromagnesite, which is potentially a major deep-carbon carrier, is expected to exhibit abnormal elasticity, including a negative Poisson's ratio of -0.6 and drastically reduced VP by 10%, in Earth's midlower mantle.

  9. Strain rate, temperature, and humidity on strength and moduli of a graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifshitz, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of strain rate, temperature and humidity on the mechanical behavior of a graphite/epoxy fiber composite are presented. Three principal strengths (longitudinal, transverse and shear) and four basic moduli (E1, E2, G12 and U12) of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite were followed as a function of strain rate, temperature and humidity. Each test was performed at a constant tensile strain rate in an environmental chamber providing simultaneous temperature and humidity control. Prior to testing, specimens were given a moisture preconditioning treatment at 60 C. Values for the matrix dominated moduli and strength were significantly influenced by both environmental and rate parameters, whereas the fiber dominated moduli were not. However, the longitudinal strength was significantly influenced by temperature and moisture content. A qualitative explanation for these observations is presented.

  10. Elasticity and structure of mantle pyroxenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, J. D.; Zhang, J. S.; Sang, L.; Reynard, B.; Montagnac, G.; Dera, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    The elastic properties of both natural orthoenstatite and natural diopside have been determined at high pressures to over 14 GPa at room temperature by Brillouin spectroscopy. Single crystals of Fe-bearing orthoenstatite from San Carlos, AZ were used in one part of the study. The sound velocity data display a pronounced change in elastic character upon cold compression to above 12 GPa. There is an abrupt change in velocity anisotropy above that pressure. Single-crystal X-ray structure refinements, performed at the GSECARS beamline, Sector 13 of the APS, demonstrate that orthoenstatite transforms to a new high-pressure phase with space group P21/c (HPCEN2), with the transition pressure bracketed to be between about 10-14 GPa (JS Zhang et al., 2012). No evidence of a structure with C2/c space group was observed. Raman spectroscopy was used to explore the compositional dependence of the transition pressure and structure of the high-pressure phase. Single crystals of nearly pure Mg end-member OPX, a high-alumina sample, and an Fe-rich sample were examined. We find that Al and Fe both effect the transition pressure, but that the high-pressure phase is still P21/c HPCEN2 in all cases. The single-crystal elasticity diopside was measured to transition zone pressures using Brillouin spectroscopy. A very dense high-quality velocity data set was obtained, from which the single-crystal elastic moduli as a function of pressure were obtained. Results for the aggregate bulk elastic properties are in very good agreement with polycrystalline acoustic measurements of Li and Neuville. This is a case where the results of single-crystal Brillouin and polycrystalline acoustic measurements give highly consistent results. Li, B.S., and Neuville, D.R. (2010) Elasticity of diopside to 8 GPa and 1073 K and implications for the upper mantle. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 183(3-4), 398-403. Zhang, JS, P Dera, and JD Bass (2012) A new high-pressure phase transition in natural Fe

  11. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-10-15

    We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.

  12. Adiabatic shear bands localization in materials undergoing deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, P. N.; Kudryashov, N. A.; Muratov, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic shear banding phenomenon in composite materials undergoing the high speed shear deformations. The mathematical model of adiabatic shear banding in thermo-visco-plastic material is given. New two step numerical algorithm which is based on the Courant-Isaacson-Rees scheme that allows one to simulate fully localized plastic flow from initial stage of localization is proposed. To test this numerical algorithm we use three benchmark problems. The testing results show the accuracy and efficiency of proposed algorithm. The features of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites are studied. The existence of characteristic depth of localization in composites is shown. Influence of initial temperature distribution on the processes of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites is considered.

  13. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  14. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Chris; Saffin, Paul M. E-mail: Paul.Saffin@nottingham.ac.uk

    2013-08-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit.

  15. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  16. Elastic modulus of single cellulose microfibrils from tunicate measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Shinichiro; Kai, Weihua; Isogai, Akira; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2009-09-14

    The elastic modulus of single microfibrils from tunicate ( Halocynthia papillosa ) cellulose was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Microfibrils with cross-sectional dimensions 8 x 20 nm and several micrometers in length were obtained by oxidation of cellulose with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) as a catalyst and subsequent mechanical disintegration in water and by sulfuric acid hydrolysis. The nanocellulosic materials were deposited on a specially designed silicon wafer with grooves 227 nm in width, and a three-point bending test was applied to determine the elastic modulus using an AFM cantilever. The elastic moduli of single microfibrils prepared by TEMPO-oxidation and acid hydrolysis were 145.2 +/- 31.3 and 150.7 +/- 28.8 GPa, respectively. The result showed that the experimentally determined modulus of the highly crystalline tunicate microfibrils was in agreement with the elastic modulus of native cellulose crystals.

  17. Elastic anisotropy and shear-induced atomistic deformation of tetragonal silicon carbon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Haiyan; Zhang, Meiguang; Zhao, Yaru; Zhou, Xinchun; Wei, Qun

    2014-07-14

    First-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features, elastic anisotropy, shear-induced atomistic deformation behaviors, and its electronic origin of the recently proposed superhard t-SiCN. According to the dependences of the elastic modulus on different crystal directions, the t-SiCN exhibits a well-pronounced elastic anisotropy which may impose certain limitations and restrictions on its applications. The further mechanical calculations demonstrated that t-SiCN shows lower elastic moduli and ideal shear strength than those of typical hard substances of TiN and TiC, suggesting that it cannot be intrinsically superhard as claimed in the recent works. We find that the failure modes of t-SiCN at the atomic level during shear deformation can be attributed to the breaking of C-C bonds through the bonding evolution and electronic localization analyses.

  18. The geometry of the light-cone cell decomposition of moduli space

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, David Ramgoolam, Sanjaye

    2015-11-15

    The moduli space of Riemann surfaces with at least two punctures can be decomposed into a cell complex by using a particular family of ribbon graphs called Nakamura graphs. We distinguish the moduli space with all punctures labelled from that with a single labelled puncture. In both cases, we describe a cell decomposition where the cells are parametrised by graphs or equivalence classes of finite sequences (tuples) of permutations. Each cell is a convex polytope defined by a system of linear equations and inequalities relating light-cone string parameters, quotiented by the automorphism group of the graph. We give explicit examples of the cell decomposition at low genus with few punctures.

  19. Gravitational particle production in massive chaotic inflation and the moduli problem.

    PubMed

    de Haro, Jaume; Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-02-10

    Particle production from vacuum fluctuations during inflation is briefly revisited. The moduli problem occurring with light particles produced at the end of inflation is addressed, namely, the fact that some results are in disagreement with nucleosynthesis constrains. A universal solution to this problem is found which leads to reasonable reheating temperatures in all cases. It invokes the assumption that, immediately after inflation, the moduli evolve like nonrelativistic matter. The assumption is justified in the context of massive chaotic inflation where, at the end of inflation, the Universe evolves as if it were matter dominated.

  20. The information metric on the moduli space of instantons with global symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Emanuel; Murugan, Jeff; Shock, Jonathan P.

    2016-02-01

    In this note we revisit Hitchin's prescription [1] of the Fisher metric as a natural measure on the moduli space of instantons that encodes the space-time symmetries of a classical field theory. Motivated by the idea of the moduli space of supersymmetric instantons as an emergent space in the sense of the gauge/gravity duality, we extend the prescription to encode also global symmetries of the underlying theory. We exemplify our construction with the instanton solution of the CPN sigma model on R2.

  1. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for non-Hermitian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, S.; Martinez-Garaot, S.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Chen Xi

    2011-08-15

    Adiabatic processes driven by non-Hermitian, time-dependent Hamiltonians may be sped up by generalizing inverse engineering techniques based on counter-diabatic (transitionless driving) algorithms or on dynamical invariants. We work out the basic theory and examples described by two-level Hamiltonians: the acceleration of rapid adiabatic passage with a decaying excited level and of the dynamics of a classical particle on an expanding harmonic oscillator.

  2. Nonadiabatic transitions in finite-time adiabatic rapid passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2007-06-01

    To apply the adiabatic rapid passage process repetitively [T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 71, 061405(R) (2005)], the nonadiabatic transition probability of a two-level atom subject to chirped light pulses over a finite period of time needs to be calculated. Using a unitary first-order perturbation method in the rotating adiabatic frame, an approximate formula has been derived for such transition probabilities in the entire parameter space of the pulses.

  3. ENTROPY-VORTEX WAVES IN NON-ADIABATIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Ibáñez S, Miguel H.

    2016-02-20

    The Ertel theorem on the vorticity along the flow of adiabatic fluids is generalized for non-adiabatic flows. Several limiting cases are analyzed and the results are applied to flows behind different hydrodynamics fronts, particularly to thermal fronts (heat and cooling fronts). An important conclusion of the present analysis is that vorticity is inherent in the condensation’s (or hot spots) formation by thermal instabilities in plasma flows. Implications for several astrophysical plasmas are outlined.

  4. Vacuum vessel eddy current modeling for TFTR adiabatic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    DeLucia, J.; Bell, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1985-07-01

    A relatively simple current filament model of the TFTR vacuum vessel is described. It is used to estimate the three-dimensional structure of magnetic field perturbations in the vicinity of the plasma that arise from vacuum vessel eddy currents induced during adiabatic compression. Eddy currents are calculated self-consistently with the plasma motion. The Shafranov formula and adiabatic scaling laws are used to model the plasma. Although the specific application is to TFTR, the present model is of generation applicability.

  5. Effect of PbO on the elastic behavior of ZnO-P2O5 glass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidek, H. A. A.; El-Mallawany, R.; Matori, K. A.; Halimah, M. K.

    A series of ternary phosphate glasses in the form of 40(P2O5)-(60 - x)ZnO-xPbO and 50(P2O5)-(50 - x)ZnO-xPbO where x = 0-60 mol%, have been successfully prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. Both longitudinal and shear ultrasonic velocities were measured in different compositions of PbO using the MBS8000 ultrasonic data acquisition system at 10 MHz frequency and at room temperature. The ultrasonic velocity data, the density and the calculated elastic moduli are found to be composition dependent and discussed in terms of PbO modifiers. The correlation of elastic moduli with the atomic packing density of these glasses was discussed. To predict the compositional dependence of elastic moduli of this glass system, the interpretation of the variation in the experimental elastic behavior observed has been studied based on various of the bond compression and the Makishima-Mackenzie models.

  6. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  7. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, B. D.; Thijssen, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green’s function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  8. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Napitu, B D; Thijssen, J M

    2015-07-15

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  9. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachimowicz, P.; Kowal, M.; Skalski, J.

    2017-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy, we calculated static fission barriers Bf for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei 98 ≤Z ≤126 , including even-even, odd-even, even-odd and odd-odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential-energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from the 10th below to the 10th above the Fermi level. The parameters of the model that have been fixed previously by a fit to masses of even-even heavy nuclei were kept unchanged. A search for saddle points has been performed by the "imaginary water flow" method on a basic five-dimensional deformation grid, including triaxiality. Two auxiliary grids were used for checking the effects of the mass asymmetry and hexadecapole nonaxiality. The ground states (g.s.) were found by energy minimization over configurations and deformations. We find that the nonaxiality significantly changes first and second fission saddle in many nuclei. The effect of the mass asymmetry, known to lower the second, very deformed saddles in actinides, in the heaviest nuclei appears at the less deformed saddles in more than 100 nuclei. It happens for those saddles in which the triaxiality does not play any role, which suggests a decoupling between effects of the mass asymmetry and triaxiality. We studied also the influence of the pairing interaction strength on the staggering of Bf for odd- and even-particle numbers. Finally, we provide a comparison of our results with other theoretical fission barrier evaluations and with available experimental estimates.

  10. Development of a Single-Crystal Mineral Elasticity Database and Applications to Crustal and Upper Mantle Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The single-crystal elastic stiffness tensor fully characterizes the anisotropic elastic response of minerals. An understanding of how such elastic properties vary with pressure, temperature, structure, and composition are needed to interpret seismic data for the Earth. Additionally, elastic moduli are important for understanding many solid-state phenomena including mechanical stability, interatomic interactions, material strength, compressibility, and phase transition mechanisms. A database of single-crystal elastic properties of minerals and related phases is being assembled. This dataset currently incorporates over 400 sets of elastic constant measurements on more than 270 separate phases. In addition to compiling the individual elastic stiffnesses, the database also allows calculation of a variety of additional properties including anisotropy factors, bulk and linear compressibilities, and stability criteria, as well as evaluation of aggregate properties including bounds and averages of bulk, shear, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and elastic wave speeds. Extensions of the database to include high pressure and high temperature data as well as theoretical calculations are being planned. Examples of application of this database to geophysical problems will be highlighted. Specific applications to be discussed include: 1) variation of elastic anisotropy with pressure for mantle and crustal minerals; 2) evaluation of elasticity data for pyroxenes revealing major structural and chemical controls on elasticity as well as remaining ambiguities and uncertainties.

  11. The Effect of Iron on the Elastic Properties of Ringwoodite at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Higo,Y.; Inoue, T.; Li, B.; Irifune, T.; Liebermann, R.

    2006-01-01

    Elastic wave velocities of ringwoodite with compositions of Mg2SiO4, (Mg0.8Fe0.2)2SiO4 and (Mg0.5Fe0.5)2SiO4 have been measured to address the effect of iron on the elastic properties of silicate spinel under high pressure. Ultrasonic measurements on specimens produced by hot-pressing at about 19 GPa and at 1200 C were conducted at pressures up to 14 GPa at room temperature in a multianvil apparatus. Pressure was estimated from a relationship between the travel time in an Al2O3 buffer rod and the pressure estimated from in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. Thus, measured bulk modulus (K) of ringwoodite slightly increases with increasing iron content, while the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus remains virtually the same (K' = 4.4 for XFe = Fe/(Fe + Mg) = 0-0.5). In contrast, the shear modulus (G) decreases significantly with increasing iron content, while the pressure derivative of the shear modulus slightly decreases or remains almost unchanged (G' = 1.4-1.0 for XFe = 0-0.5). The effects of iron content on the elastic moduli are somewhat different from those of an earlier study using Brillion scattering method, but are consistent with the elastic moduli of the Fe2SiO4 end-member measured in a piston-cylinder apparatus using ultrasonic interferometry. The effects of iron on the elastic moduli of ringwoodite are described as K = 184(1) + 16(1)XFe (GPa) and G = 124(2) - 45(3)XFe (GPa), by combining the present and earlier results based on the ultrasonic interferometry at high pressure. The present result suggests that the temperature anomalies, rather than the variations of iron content in ringwoodite, are more likely causes for the observed variations in seismic velocities in the mantle transition region.

  12. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-03

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  13. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: The case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Erba, A. Mahmoud, A.; Dovesi, R.; Belmonte, D.

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  14. High pressure elastic properties of minerals from ab initio simulations: the case of pyrope, grossular and andradite silicate garnets.

    PubMed

    Erba, A; Mahmoud, A; Belmonte, D; Dovesi, R

    2014-03-28

    A computational strategy is devised for the accurate ab initio simulation of elastic properties of crystalline materials under pressure. The proposed scheme, based on the evaluation of the analytical stress tensor and on the automated computation of pressure-dependent elastic stiffness constants, is implemented in the CRYSTAL solid state quantum-chemical program. Elastic constants and related properties (bulk, shear and Young moduli, directional seismic wave velocities, elastic anisotropy index, Poisson's ratio, etc.) can be computed for crystals of any space group of symmetry. We apply such a technique to the study of high-pressure elastic properties of three silicate garnet end-members (namely, pyrope, grossular, and andradite) which are of great geophysical interest, being among the most important rock-forming minerals. The reliability of this theoretical approach is proved by comparing with available experimental measurements. The description of high-pressure properties provided by several equations of state is also critically discussed.

  15. A stringy mechanism for a small cosmological constant — multi-moduli cases

    SciTech Connect

    Sumitomo, Yoske; Tye, S.-H. Henry E-mail: iastye@ust.hk

    2013-02-01

    Based on the properties of probability distributions of functions of random variables, we proposed earlier a simple stringy mechanism that prefers the meta-stable vacua with a small cosmological constant Λ. As an illustration of this approach, we study in this paper particularly simple but non-trivial models of the Kähler uplift in the large volume flux compactification scenario in Type IIB string theory, where all parameters introduced in the model are treated either as fixed constants motivated by physics, or as random variables with some given uniform probability distributions. We determine the value w{sub 0} of the superpotential W{sub 0} at the supersymmetric minima, and find that the resulting probability distribution P(w{sub 0}) peaks at w{sub 0} = 0; furthermore, this peaking behavior strengthens as the number of complex structure moduli increases. The resulting probability distribution P(Λ) for meta-stable vacua also peaks as Λ → 0, for both positive and negative Λ. This peaking/divergent behavior of P(Λ) strengthens as the number of moduli increases. In some scenarios for Λ > 0, the likely value of Λ decreases exponentially as the number of moduli increases. The light cosmological moduli issue accompanying a very small Λ is also mentioned.

  16. On metric geometry of conformal moduli spaces of four-dimensional superconformal theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asnin, Vadim

    2010-09-01

    Conformal moduli spaces of four-dimensional superconformal theories obtained by deformations of a superpotential are considered. These spaces possess a natural metric (a Zamolodchikov metric). This metric is shown to be Kahler. The proof is based on superconformal Ward identities.

  17. Fernique-type inequalities and moduli of continuity for anisotropic Gaussian random fields

    PubMed Central

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Yimin

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with sample path properties of anisotropic Gaussian random fields. We establish Fernique-type inequalities and utilize them to study the global and local moduli of continuity for anisotropic Gaussian random fields. Applications to fractional Brownian sheets and to the solutions of stochastic partial differential equations are investigated. PMID:24825922

  18. Baker-Akhiezer Spinor Kernel and Tau-functions on Moduli Spaces of Meromorphic Differentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalla, C.; Korotkin, D.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we study the Baker-Akhiezer spinor kernel on moduli spaces of meromorphic differentials on Riemann surfaces. We introduce the Baker-Akhiezer tau-function which is related to both the Bergman tau-function (which was studied before in the context of Hurwitz spaces and spaces of holomorphic Abelian and quadratic differentials) and the KP tau-function on such spaces. In particular, we derive variational formulas of Rauch-Ahlfors type on moduli spaces of meromorphic differentials with prescribed singularities: we use the system of homological coordinates, consisting of absolute and relative periods of the meromorphic differential, and show how to vary the fundamental objects associated to a Riemann surface (the matrix of b-periods, normalized Abelian differentials, the Bergman bidifferential, the Szegö kernel and the Baker-Akhiezer spinor kernel) with respect to these coordinates. The variational formulas encode dependence both on the moduli of the Riemann surface and on the choice of meromorphic differential (variation of the meromorphic differential while keeping the Riemann surface fixed corresponds to flows of KP type). Analyzing the global properties of the Bergman and Baker-Akhiezer tau-functions, we establish relationships between various divisor classes on the moduli spaces.

  19. Numerical approximation of tangent moduli for finite element implementations of nonlinear hyperelastic material models.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Chaikof, Elliot L; Levenston, Marc E

    2008-12-01

    Finite element (FE) implementations of nearly incompressible material models often employ decoupled numerical treatments of the dilatational and deviatoric parts of the deformation gradient. This treatment allows the dilatational stiffness to be handled separately to alleviate ill conditioning of the tangent stiffness matrix. However, this can lead to complex formulations of the material tangent moduli that can be difficult to implement or may require custom FE codes, thus limiting their general use. Here we present an approach, based on work by Miehe (Miehe, 1996, "Numerical Computation of Algorithmic (Consistent) Tangent Moduli in Large Strain Computational Inelasticity," Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng., 134, pp. 223-240), for an efficient numerical approximation of the tangent moduli that can be easily implemented within commercial FE codes. By perturbing the deformation gradient, the material tangent moduli from the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress are accurately approximated by a forward difference of the associated Kirchhoff stresses. The merit of this approach is that it produces a concise mathematical formulation that is not dependent on any particular material model. Consequently, once the approximation method is coded in a subroutine, it can be used for other hyperelastic material models with no modification. The implementation and accuracy of this approach is first demonstrated with a simple neo-Hookean material. Subsequently, a fiber-reinforced structural model is applied to analyze the pressure-diameter curve during blood vessel inflation. Implementation of this approach will facilitate the incorporation of novel hyperelastic material models for a soft tissue behavior into commercial FE software.

  20. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  1. AB INITIO STUDY OF PHONON DISPERSION AND ELASTIC PROPERTIES OF L12 INTERMETALLICS Ti3Al AND Y3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, N.; Ersen, M.; Ocak, H. Y.; Iyigör, A.; Candan, A.; UǦUR, Ş.; UǦUR, G.; Khenata, R.; Varshney, D.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the structural, elastic and phonon properties of Ti3Al and Y3Al in L12(Cu3Al) phase are studied by performing first-principles calculations within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated lattice constants, static bulk moduli, first-order pressure derivative of bulk moduli and elastic constants for both compounds are reported. The phonon dispersion curves along several high-symmetry lines at the Brillouin zone, together with the corresponding phonon density of states, are determined using the first-principles linear-response approach of the density functional perturbation theory. Temperature variations of specific heat in the range of 0-500 K are obtained using the quasi-harmonic model.

  2. Observation of Low-Temperature Softening of Transverse Elastic Modulus Due to Cobalt Impurities in Mercury Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevstovskikh, Irina V.; Okulov, Vsevolod I.; Gudkov, Vladimir V.; Sarychev, Maksim N.; Medvedev, Kirill A.; Andriichuk, Myroslav D.; Paranchich, Lidiya D.

    2016-12-01

    Influence on elastic moduli of donor electron d-states of cobalt impurities has been investigated in mercury selenide crystals. Experiments have been carried out at the frequency of 53 MHz in the temperature interval of 1.3-100 K. Softening of the (C_{11} - C_{12})/2 modulus below 10 K has been observed in the impurity crystals in contrast with the (C_{11} + C_{12} + 2C_{44})/2 and C_{44} moduli those have exhibited hardening at cooling typical for dielectric and semiconductor crystals. The softening of the elastic modulus has been interpreted as manifestation of hybridization of the impurity d-states in the conduction band of the crystal. Comparison of theoretical calculations with experimental data has been proved to be in good agreement and has made it possible to determine the parameters characterizing the hybridized electron states.

  3. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Adiabatic process reversibility: microscopic and macroscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mário G.

    2009-05-01

    The reversibility of adiabatic processes was recently addressed by two publications. In the first (Miranda 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 937-43), an equation was derived relating the initial and final volumes and temperatures for adiabatic expansions of an ideal gas, using a microscopic approach. In that relation the parameter r accounts for the process reversibility, ranging between 0 and 1, which corresponds to the free and reversible expansion, respectively. In the second (Anacleto and Pereira 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30 177-83), the authors have shown that thermodynamics can effectively and efficiently be used to obtain the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas, including compressions, for which r \\ge 1. The present work integrates and extends the aforementioned studies, providing thus further insights into the analysis of the adiabatic process. It is shown that Miranda's work is wholly valid for compressions. In addition, it is demonstrated that the adiabatic reversibility coefficient given in terms of the piston velocity and the root mean square velocity of the gas particles is equivalent to the macroscopic description, given just by the quotient between surroundings and system pressure values.

  4. Effect of the elastic modulus of the matrix on magnetostrictive strain in composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Snyder, J.E.; Schwichtenberg, C.R.; Dennis, K.W.; Falzgraf, D.K.; McCallum, R.W.; Jiles, D.C.

    1999-02-01

    The effect of the matrix material on the magnetostriction of composites containing highly magnetostrictive particles has been studied. Experimental results showed that the elastic modulus of the matrix is an important factor determining the bulk magnetostriction of the composite. For a series of composites with the same volume fraction of magnetostrictive particles but different matrix materials, the bulk magnetostriction was found to increase systematically with decreasing elastic modulus of the matrix. A model theory for the magnetostriction of such composites has been developed, based on two limiting assumptions: uniform strain or uniform stress inside the composite. The theory was then used to predict the magnetostriction of the entire material from the volume fractions of the components, their elastic moduli and magnetostrictions. These predictions were in agreement with the experimental results. It is concluded that to obtain a high magnetostriction and adequate mechanical properties of a composite, the elastic moduli of the magnetostrictive phase and the matrix should be as close as possible in value. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Lattice instability and elastic response of metastable Mo1-xSix thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillon, A.; Jaouen, C.; Michel, A.; Abadias, G.; Tromas, C.; Belliard, L.; Perrin, B.; Djemia, Ph.

    2013-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study on Mo1-xSix thin films, an archetypal alloy system combining metallic and semiconductor materials. The correlations between structure and elastic response are comprehensively investigated. We focus on assessing trends for understanding the evolution of elastic properties upon Si alloying in relation to the structural state (crystalline vs amorphous), bonding character (metallic vs covalent), and local atomic environment. By combining picosecond ultrasonics and Brillouin light scattering techniques, a complete set of effective elastic constants and mechanical moduli (B, G, E) is provided in the whole compositional range, covering bcc solid solutions (x < 0.20) and the amorphous phase (0.20 < x < 1.0). A softening of the shear and Young moduli and a concomitant decrease of the Debye temperature is revealed for crystalline alloys, with a significant drop being observed at x ˜ 0.2 corresponding to the limit of crystal lattice stability. Amorphous alloys exhibit a more complex elastic response, related to variations in coordination number, atomic volume, and bonding state, depending on Si content. Finally, distinct evolutions of the G/B ratio as a function of Cauchy pressure are reported for crystalline and amorphous alloys, enabling us to identify signatures of ductility vs brittleness in the features of the local atomic environment. This work paves the way to design materials with improved mechanical properties by appropriate chemical substitution or impurity incorporation during thin-film growth.

  6. Elasticity of Single Crystal MgO to 8 Gigapascals and 1600 Kelvin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,G.; Liebermann, R.; Weidner, D.

    1998-01-01

    The cross pressure (P) and temperature (T) dependence of the elastic moduli (C{sub ij}) of single-crystal samples of periclase (MgO) from acoustic wave travel times was measured with ultrasonic interferometry: {partial_derivative}{sup 2}C{sub 11}/{partial_derivative}P{partial_derivative}T = (-1.3 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -3} per kelvin; {partial_derivative}{sup 2}C{sub 110}/{partial_derivative}P{partial_derivative}T = (1.7 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup -3} per kelvin; and {partial_derivative}{sup 2}C{sub 44}/{partial_derivative}P{partial_derivative}T = (-0.2 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -3} per kelvin. The elastic anisotropy of MgO decreases with increasing pressure at ambient temperature, but then increases as temperature is increased at high pressure. An assumption of zero cross pressure and temperature derivatives for the elastic moduli underestimates the elastic anisotropy and overestimates the acoustic velocities of MgO at the extrapolated high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of Earth's mantle.

  7. Cross-type optical separation of elastic oblate capsules in a uniform flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheong Bong; Sung, Hyung Jin; Huang, Wei-Xi

    2015-01-21

    The dynamic behavior of an elastic capsule with an initially oblate spheroidal shape during cross-type optical separation was numerically investigated. The penalty immersed boundary method was adopted for the fluid-membrane interaction, and the optical force calculation was conducted by using the ray optics method including the ray-surface intersection algorithm. The oblate elastic capsule of b/a = 0.5 with different surface Young's moduli and different initial inclination angles was considered. The oblate capsule with higher surface Young's moduli was less deformed, and was more migrated for each initial inclination angle. Unlike the oblate rigid particle, the initially inclined capsules with moderate inclination angles were similarly migrated since the oblate elastic capsule was deformed during rotation near the laser beam axis. The oblate capsules can be separated according to the surface Young's modulus, except for nearly non-inclined capsules. As the fluid velocity decreased, the migration distance increased. The maximum deformation parameter was insensitive to the fluid velocity. Furthermore, a new dimensionless number (S{sub ec}) was introduced to predict the migration distance of the oblate elastic capsule.

  8. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  9. The effect of extreme temperatures on the elastic properties and fracture behavior of graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Simonds, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of elevated and cryogenic temperatures on the elastic moduli and fracture strengths of several C6000/PMR-15 and C6000/NR-15082 laminates was measured. Tests were conducted at -157 C, 24 C, and 316 C (-250 F, 75 F, and 600 F). Both notched and unnotched laminates were tested. The average stress failure criterion was used to predict the fracture strength of quasi-isotropic notched laminates.

  10. A Coupled Local Mode Investigation of Elastic Anisotropy in Shallow Water Environments: A Study of Antisotropy Beyond VTI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-28

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 12. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From...The summary, conclusions and discussion of results are contained in section 5. A variety of useful relations, such as theory , and concepts concerning...moduli. Although the elastic symmetry has been limited to transverse isotropy for this work, the theory and some portions of the code can incorporate

  11. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential. PMID:22970340

  12. Adiabatic circular polarizer based on chiral fiber grating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Xue, Lin-Lin; Li, Cheng; Su, Jue; Qian, Jing-Ren

    2011-01-31

    Based on the adiabatic coupling principle, a new scheme of a broadband circular polarizer formed by twisting a high-birefringence (Hi-Bi) fiber with a slowly varying twist rate is proposed. The conditions of adiabatic coupling for the adiabatic polarizer are first identified through analytical derivations. These conditions are easily realized by choosing a reasonable variation of the twist rate. Moreover, the bandwidth of the polarizer is able to be directly determined by the twist rates at the two ends. Finally, the broadband characteristics of the polarizer are demonstrated by simulations. It is also shown that the performance of the polarizer can be remarkably improved by accomplishing a multi-mode phase-matching along the grating or by using of the couplings of the core mode to lossy modes.

  13. Effect of dephasing on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.A.; Vitanov, N.V.; Bergmann, K.

    2004-12-01

    This work explores the effect of phase relaxation on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The study is based on the Liouville equation, which is solved analytically in the adiabatic limit. The transfer efficiency of STIRAP is found to decrease exponentially with the dephasing rate; this effect is stronger for shorter pulse delays and weaker for larger delays, since the transition time is found to be inversely proportional to the pulse delay. Moreover, it is found that the transfer efficiency of STIRAP in the presence of dephasing does not depend on the peak Rabi frequencies at all, as long as they are sufficiently large to enforce adiabatic evolution; hence increasing the field intensity cannot reduce the dephasing losses. It is shown also that for any dephasing rate, the final populations of the initial state and the intermediate state are equal. For strong dephasing all three populations tend to (1/3)

  14. Applications of chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage to atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L.; Kinast, Joseph M.; Johnson, David M. S.; Radojevic, Antonije M.; Timmons, Brian P.; Stoner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    We present robust atom optics, based on chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP), in the context of atom interferometry. Such ARP light pulses drive coherent population transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two fixed-intensity optical fields with large single photon detunings. Since adiabatic transfer is less sensitive to atom temperature and non-uniform Raman beam intensity than standard Raman pulses, this approach should improve the stability of atom interferometers operating in dynamic environments. In such applications, chirped Raman ARP may also provide advantages over the previously demonstrated stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique, which requires precise modulation of beam intensity and zeroing of the single photon detuning. We demonstrate a clock interferometer with chirped Raman ARP pulses, and compare its stability to that of a conventional Raman pulse interferometer. We also discuss potential improvements to inertially sensitive atom interferometers. Copyright 2011 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  16. Adiabatic Pseudospectral Technique: Applications to Four Atom Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antikainen, Jyrki Tapio

    1995-01-01

    After the introduction, in chapter 2 we review some of the well established techniques used to solve the Schrodinger equation. The following methods are discussed: the Finite Basis Representation, the Discrete Variable Representation, the Basic Light basis set truncation, and the Lanczos tridiagonalization. After reviewing the previous techniques we present the main features of our Adiabatic Pseudospectral (APS) technique. The Adiabatic Pseudospectral technique is a synthesis of several powerful computational methods such as the sequential adiabatic basis set reduction, the iterative Lanczos diagonalization, the collocation techniques, and a careful implementation of the matrix -vector product for the Hamiltonian in the reduced adiabatic representation. In chapter 3 we use our adiabatic pseudospectral method (APS) to calculate energy levels of the H _2O_2 molecule up to 5000 cm ^{-1}. Reasonably high accuracy (a few wavenumbers) is achieved for a fully six dimensional calculation in a few hours of CPU time on an IBM 580 workstation. These results are a great improvement over previous calculations on the same system which required 50-100 times more computational effort for a similar level of accuracy. The method presented here is both general and robust. It will allow for routine studies of six dimensional potential surfaces and the associated spectroscopy, while making calculations on still larger systems feasible. In chapter 4 the adiabatic pseudospectral method is used to study the high energy vibrational levels of the H_2C_2 molecule. We calculate stimulated emission pumping spectra initialized by the excited electronic state vibrational trans-bent state ~ A_sp{u}{1 }3_{nu}_3 . The calculations show that with the APS-method we can easily investigate energy regions in the excess of 15,000 cm^{-1}; these high energy regions have been previously unattainable by computational techniques.

  17. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchon-Enrich, R.; Benseny, A.; Ahufinger, V.; Greentree, A. D.; Busch, Th; Mompart, J.

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound.

  18. Quantum dynamics by the constrained adiabatic trajectory method

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, A.; Jolicard, G.; Guerin, S.; Killingbeck, J. P.

    2011-03-15

    We develop the constrained adiabatic trajectory method (CATM), which allows one to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation constraining the dynamics to a single Floquet eigenstate, as if it were adiabatic. This constrained Floquet state (CFS) is determined from the Hamiltonian modified by an artificial time-dependent absorbing potential whose forms are derived according to the initial conditions. The main advantage of this technique for practical implementation is that the CFS is easy to determine even for large systems since its corresponding eigenvalue is well isolated from the others through its imaginary part. The properties and limitations of the CATM are explored through simple examples.

  19. Adiabatic regularisation of power spectra in k-inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Alinea, Allan L.; Kubota, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Yukari; Naylor, Wade E-mail: kubota@celas.osaka-u.ac.jp E-mail: naylor@phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    We look at the question posed by Parker et al. about the effect of UV regularisation on the power spectrum for inflation. Focusing on the slow-roll k-inflation, we show that up to second order in the Hubble and sound flow parameters, the adiabatic regularisation of such model leads to no difference in the power spectrum apart from certain cases that violate near scale-invariant power spectra. Furthermore, extending to non-minimal k-inflation, we establish the equivalence of the subtraction terms in the adiabatic regularisation of the power spectrum in Jordan and Einstein frames.

  20. Dynamics with the effective adiabatic theory: The Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Benny; Chandler, David

    1988-07-01

    This paper extends our earlier work on the effective adiabatic theory [J. Chem. Phys. 82, 3400 (1985)] to study relaxation of a two-level system coupled to a Gaussian dissipative bath—the spin-boson problem. Bloch equations are derived which, under the limited circumstances described herein, treat the role of bath fluctuations omitted in the equilibrium effective adiabatic reference system. Applications to the Lorentzian dissipative bath show that the theory agrees closely with numerical simulation results. Application to an Ohmic bath shows that the theory is in agreement with currently accepted results concerned with the problem of macroscopic quantum coherence.