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Sample records for adiabatic excitation energies

  1. Transient energy excitation in shortcuts to adiabaticity for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Muga, J. G.

    2010-11-15

    We study for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator the transient energy excitation in speed-up processes ('shortcuts to adiabaticity') designed to reproduce the initial populations at some predetermined final frequency and time. We provide lower bounds and examples. Implications for the limits imposed to the process times and for the principle of unattainability of the absolute zero, in a single expansion or in quantum refrigerator cycles, are drawn.

  2. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  3. The IMOMO and IMONM methods for excited states. A study of the adiabatic S 0 → T 1,2 excitation energies of cyclic alkenes and enones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froese, Robert D. J.; Morokuma, Keiji

    1996-12-01

    The recently proposed integrated MO + MO (IMOMO) and MO + MM (IMOMM) methods have been applied to excited states of large molecules, i.e., the adiabatic triplet excitation energies of cyclic alkenes and enones. The IMOMO methods with G2MS as High level and HF or MP2 as Low level agree well with pure MO benchmarks and experiments. The substituent shifts have been discussed in the IMOMO analysis. The geometries of a testosterone derivative with more than 50 atoms were optimized for the lower triplet excited states with the IMOMM(HF:MM3) method and their energies were calculated using IMOMO and IMOMM methods.

  4. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco; Sorella, Sandro; Casula, Michele

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π(∗) ((1)La) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the (1)La excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral (1)La excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  5. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco Casula, Michele; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π{sup ∗} ({sup 1}L{sub a}) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  6. Selective excitation in a three-state system using a hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yunheung; Lee, Han-gyeol; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-08-01

    The chirped-pulse interaction in the adiabatic coupling regime induces cyclic permutations of the energy states of a three-level system in the V -type configuration, which process is known as the three-level chirped rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Here we show that a spectral hole in a chirped pulse can turn on or off the level mixing at adiabatic crossing points of this process, reducing the system to an effective two-level system. The given hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic transition enables selective excitation of the three-level system, controlled by the laser intensity and spectral position of the hole, as well as the sign of the chirp parameter. Experiments performed with shaped femtosecond laser pulses and the three lowest energy levels (5 S1 /2 , 5 P1 /2 , and 5 P3 /2 ) of atomic rubidium (Rb) show good agreement with the theoretically analyzed dynamics. The result indicates that our method, when being combined with the ordinary chirped RAP, implements an adiabatic transition between the Raman-coupled excited states. Furthermore, our laser intensity-dependent control may have applications including selective excitations of atoms or ions arranged in space when being used in conjunction with laser beam profile programming.

  7. First-order derivative couplings between excited states from adiabatic TDDFT response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Qi; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Bellchambers, Gregory D.; Furche, Filipp

    2015-02-14

    We present a complete derivation of derivative couplings between excited states in the framework of adiabatic time-dependent density functional response theory. Explicit working equations are given and the resulting derivative couplings are compared with derivative couplings from a pseudo-wavefunction ansatz. For degenerate excited states, i.e., close to a conical intersection (CI), the two approaches are identical apart from an antisymmetric overlap term. However, if the difference between two excitation energies equals another excitation energy, the couplings from response theory exhibit an unphysical divergence. This spurious behavior is a result of the adiabatic or static kernel approximation of time-dependent density functional theory leading to an incorrect analytical structure of the quadratic response function. Numerical examples for couplings close to a CI and for well-separated electronic states are given.

  8. First-order derivative couplings between excited states from adiabatic TDDFT response theory.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qi; Bellchambers, Gregory D; Furche, Filipp; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-02-14

    We present a complete derivation of derivative couplings between excited states in the framework of adiabatic time-dependent density functional response theory. Explicit working equations are given and the resulting derivative couplings are compared with derivative couplings from a pseudo-wavefunction ansatz. For degenerate excited states, i.e., close to a conical intersection (CI), the two approaches are identical apart from an antisymmetric overlap term. However, if the difference between two excitation energies equals another excitation energy, the couplings from response theory exhibit an unphysical divergence. This spurious behavior is a result of the adiabatic or static kernel approximation of time-dependent density functional theory leading to an incorrect analytical structure of the quadratic response function. Numerical examples for couplings close to a CI and for well-separated electronic states are given.

  9. Electronic excitation of H{sub 2} by {ital e}{sup +} impact using adiabatic nuclear rotation model

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, T.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1996-06-01

    The adiabatic nuclear rotation (ANR) model has been employed to obtain rotational excitation cross sections for electronically elastic and electronic excitation processes in {ital e}{sup +}-H{sub 2} scattering. The present results are compared with the more accurate laboratory-frame rotational close-coupling approximation (LFCCA) predictions. The electronically inelastic rotational excitation results using the ANR model differ from the corresponding LFCCA results near the electronic excitation threshold energies. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Sideband excitation of trapped ions by rapid adiabatic passage for manipulation of motional states

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.; Nomura, S.; Toyoda, K.; Urabe, S.

    2011-09-15

    We describe an analysis and experimental results of the manipulation of motional states of a single trapped {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion based on sideband excitation by rapid adiabatic passage. When the sideband transition is excited by rapid adiabatic passage, adiabaticity may be affected by ac Stark shifts. We investigate the influence of ac Stark shifts and compensate for these shifts with an additional laser field. This makes the population transfer by rapid adiabatic passage more robust with respect to experimental parameters. Finally, we manipulate the motional states and generate motional Fock states of a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion by rapid adiabatic passage with ac Stark compensation.

  11. Diabatic-At-Construction Method for Diabatic and Adiabatic Ground and Excited States Based on Multistate Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Grofe, Adam; Qu, Zexing; Truhlar, Donald G; Li, Hui; Gao, Jiali

    2017-03-14

    We describe a diabatic-at-construction (DAC) strategy for defining diabatic states to determine the adiabatic ground and excited electronic states and their potential energy surfaces using the multistate density functional theory (MSDFT). The DAC approach differs in two fundamental ways from the adiabatic-to-diabatic (ATD) procedures that transform a set of preselected adiabatic electronic states to a new representation. (1) The DAC states are defined in the first computation step to form an active space, whose configuration interaction produces the adiabatic ground and excited states in the second step of MSDFT. Thus, they do not result from a similarity transformation of the adiabatic states as in the ATD procedure; they are the basis for producing the adiabatic states. The appropriateness and completeness of the DAC active space can be validated by comparison with experimental observables of the ground and excited states. (2) The DAC diabatic states are defined using the valence bond characters of the asymptotic dissociation limits of the adiabatic states of interest, and they are strictly maintained at all molecular geometries. Consequently, DAC diabatic states have specific and well-defined physical and chemical meanings that can be used for understanding the nature of the adiabatic states and their energetic components. Here we present results for the four lowest singlet states of LiH and compare them to a well-tested ATD diabatization method, namely the 3-fold way; the comparison reveals both similarities and differences between the ATD diabatic states and the orthogonalized DAC diabatic states. Furthermore, MSDFT can provide a quantitative description of the ground and excited states for LiH with multiple strongly and weakly avoided curve crossings spanning over 10 Å of interatomic separation.

  12. Energy decomposition analysis in an adiabatic picture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuezhi; Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-02-22

    Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of electronic structure calculations has facilitated quantitative understanding of diverse intermolecular interactions. Nevertheless, such analyses are usually performed at a single geometry and thus decompose a "single-point" interaction energy. As a result, the influence of the physically meaningful EDA components on the molecular structure and other properties are not directly obtained. To address this gap, the absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO)-EDA is reformulated in an adiabatic picture, where the frozen, polarization, and charge transfer energy contributions are defined as energy differences between the stationary points on different potential energy surfaces (PESs), which are accessed by geometry optimizations at the frozen, polarized and fully relaxed levels of density functional theory (DFT). Other molecular properties such as vibrational frequencies can thus be obtained at the stationary points on each PES. We apply the adiabatic ALMO-EDA to different configurations of the water dimer, the water-Cl(-) and water-Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes, metallocenes (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+)), and the ammonia-borane complex. This method appears to be very useful for unraveling how physical effects such as polarization and charge transfer modulate changes in molecular properties induced by intermolecular interactions. As an example of the insight obtained, we find that a linear hydrogen bond geometry for the water dimer is preferred even without the presence of polarization and charge transfer, while the red shift in the OH stretch frequency is primarily a charge transfer effect; by contrast, a near-linear geometry for the water-chloride hydrogen bond is achieved only when charge transfer is allowed.

  13. A harmonic adiabatic approximation to calculate highly excited vibrational levels of ``floppy molecules''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvergnat, David; Nauts, André; Justum, Yves; Chapuisat, Xavier

    2001-04-01

    The harmonic adiabatic approximation (HADA), an efficient and accurate quantum method to calculate highly excited vibrational levels of molecular systems, is presented. It is well-suited to applications to "floppy molecules" with a rather large number of atoms (N>3). A clever choice of internal coordinates naturally suggests their separation into active, slow, or large amplitude coordinates q', and inactive, fast, or small amplitude coordinates q″, which leads to an adiabatic (or Born-Oppenheimer-type) approximation (ADA), i.e., the total wave function is expressed as a product of active and inactive total wave functions. However, within the framework of the ADA, potential energy data concerning the inactive coordinates q″ are required. To reduce this need, a minimum energy domain (MED) is defined by minimizing the potential energy surface (PES) for each value of the active variables q', and a quadratic or harmonic expansion of the PES, based on the MED, is used (MED harmonic potential). In other words, the overall picture is that of a harmonic valley about the MED. In the case of only one active variable, we have a minimum energy path (MEP) and a MEP harmonic potential. The combination of the MED harmonic potential and the adiabatic approximation (harmonic adiabatic approximation: HADA) greatly reduces the size of the numerical computations, so that rather large molecules can be studied. In the present article however, the HADA is applied to our benchmark molecule HCN/CNH, to test the validity of the method. Thus, the HADA vibrational energy levels are compared and are in excellent agreement with the ADA calculations (adiabatic approximation with the full PES) of Light and Bačić [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 4008 (1987)]. Furthermore, the exact harmonic results (exact calculations without the adiabatic approximation but with the MEP harmonic potential) are compared to the exact calculations (without any sort of approximation). In addition, we compare the densities of

  14. Adiabatic quenches and characterization of amplitude excitations in a continuous quantum phase transition.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thai M; Bharath, Hebbe M; Boguslawski, Matthew J; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce A; Chapman, Michael S

    2016-08-23

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in a physical system whenever the ground state does not share the symmetry of the underlying theory, e.g., the Hamiltonian. This mechanism gives rise to massless Nambu-Goldstone modes and massive Anderson-Higgs modes. These modes provide a fundamental understanding of matter in the Universe and appear as collective phase or amplitude excitations of an order parameter in a many-body system. The amplitude excitation plays a crucial role in determining the critical exponents governing universal nonequilibrium dynamics in the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM). Here, we characterize the amplitude excitations in a spin-1 condensate and measure the energy gap for different phases of the quantum phase transition. At the quantum critical point of the transition, finite-size effects lead to a nonzero gap. Our measurements are consistent with this prediction, and furthermore, we demonstrate an adiabatic quench through the phase transition, which is forbidden at the mean field level. This work paves the way toward generating entanglement through an adiabatic phase transition.

  15. Adiabatic quenches and characterization of amplitude excitations in a continuous quantum phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thai M.; Bharath, Hebbe M.; Boguslawski, Matthew J.; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce A.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in a physical system whenever the ground state does not share the symmetry of the underlying theory, e.g., the Hamiltonian. This mechanism gives rise to massless Nambu–Goldstone modes and massive Anderson–Higgs modes. These modes provide a fundamental understanding of matter in the Universe and appear as collective phase or amplitude excitations of an order parameter in a many-body system. The amplitude excitation plays a crucial role in determining the critical exponents governing universal nonequilibrium dynamics in the Kibble–Zurek mechanism (KZM). Here, we characterize the amplitude excitations in a spin-1 condensate and measure the energy gap for different phases of the quantum phase transition. At the quantum critical point of the transition, finite-size effects lead to a nonzero gap. Our measurements are consistent with this prediction, and furthermore, we demonstrate an adiabatic quench through the phase transition, which is forbidden at the mean field level. This work paves the way toward generating entanglement through an adiabatic phase transition. PMID:27503886

  16. Adiabatic quenches and characterization of amplitude excitations in a continuous quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thai M.; Bharath, Hebbe M.; Boguslawski, Matthew J.; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce A.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs in a physical system whenever the ground state does not share the symmetry of the underlying theory, e.g., the Hamiltonian. This mechanism gives rise to massless Nambu-Goldstone modes and massive Anderson-Higgs modes. These modes provide a fundamental understanding of matter in the Universe and appear as collective phase or amplitude excitations of an order parameter in a many-body system. The amplitude excitation plays a crucial role in determining the critical exponents governing universal nonequilibrium dynamics in the Kibble-Zurek mechanism (KZM). Here, we characterize the amplitude excitations in a spin-1 condensate and measure the energy gap for different phases of the quantum phase transition. At the quantum critical point of the transition, finite-size effects lead to a nonzero gap. Our measurements are consistent with this prediction, and furthermore, we demonstrate an adiabatic quench through the phase transition, which is forbidden at the mean field level. This work paves the way toward generating entanglement through an adiabatic phase transition.

  17. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  18. Non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics of phenylene ethynylene dendrimer using a multiconfigurational Ehrenfest approach

    DOE PAGES

    Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Makhov, Dmitry V.; Tretiak, Sergei; ...

    2016-03-10

    Photoinduced dynamics of electronic and vibrational unidirectional energy transfer between meta-linked building blocks in a phenylene ethynylene dendrimer is simulated using a multiconfigurational Ehrenfest in time-dependent diabatic basis (MCE-TDDB) method, a new variant of the MCE approach developed by us for dynamics involving multiple electronic states with numerous abrupt crossings. Excited-state energies, gradients and non-adiabatic coupling terms needed for dynamics simulation are calculated on-the-fly using the Collective Electron Oscillator (CEO) approach. In conclusion, a comparative analysis of our results obtained using MCE-TDDB, the conventional Ehrenfest method and the surface-hopping approach with and without decoherence corrections is presented.

  19. VUV generation by adiabatically expanded and excited by a DC electrical discharge Argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pipergias, K.; Yasemidis, D.; Reppa, E.; Pentaris, D.; Efthimiopoulos, T.; Merlemis, N.; Giannetas, V.

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the emission of Argon (Ar) gas which is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle and excited using a DC electrical discharge. Because of the expansion and the electronic excitation, Ar dimers and clusters are formed, which give radiation in the second (2nd) and in the third (3rd) continua of Ar, centered at about 126 and 254 nm respectively. We particularly focus our study on the 2nd continuum, in order to develop a laser at this wavelength.

  20. Evaluating Electronic Couplings for Excited State Charge Transfer Based on Maximum Occupation Method ΔSCF Quasi-Adiabatic States.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzi; Zhang, Yong; Bao, Peng; Yi, Yuanping

    2017-02-14

    Electronic couplings of charge-transfer states with the ground state and localized excited states at the donor/acceptor interface are crucial parameters for controlling the dynamics of exciton dissociation and charge recombination processes in organic solar cells. Here we propose a quasi-adiabatic state approach to evaluate electronic couplings through combining maximum occupation method (mom)-ΔSCF and state diabatization schemes. Compared with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using global hybrid functional, mom-ΔSCF is superior to estimate the excitation energies of charge-transfer states; moreover it can also provide good excited electronic state for property calculation. Our approach is hence reliable to evaluate electronic couplings for excited state electron transfer processes, which is demonstrated by calculations on a typical organic photovoltaic system, oligothiophene/perylenediimide complex.

  1. Reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-12-01

    Reversible computing is considered to be a key technology to achieve an extremely high energy efficiency in future computers. In this study, we investigated the relationship between reversibility and energy dissipation in adiabatic superconductor logic. We analyzed the evolution of phase differences of Josephson junctions in the reversible quantum-flux-parametron (RQFP) gate and confirmed that the phase differences can change time reversibly, which indicates that the RQFP gate is physically, as well as logically, reversible. We calculated energy dissipation required for the RQFP gate to perform a logic operation and numerically demonstrated that the energy dissipation can fall below the thermal limit, or the Landauer bound, by lowering operation frequencies. We also investigated the 1-bit-erasure gate as a logically irreversible gate and the quasi-RQFP gate as a physically irreversible gate. We calculated the energy dissipation of these irreversible gates and showed that the energy dissipation of these gate is dominated by non-adiabatic state changes, which are induced by unwanted interactions between gates due to logical or physical irreversibility. Our results show that, in reversible computing using adiabatic superconductor logic, logical and physical reversibility are required to achieve energy dissipation smaller than the Landauer bound without non-adiabatic processes caused by gate interactions.

  2. Dark energy and dark matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    The dark sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the Universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent γ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general γ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with γ =constant in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like nonrelativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both dark energy and dark matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The Λ CDM model is included in this family of theories when γ =0 . We fit our model to supernovae Ia, H (z ) and baryonic acoustic oscillation data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early Universe and the growth of small perturbations in this model are also discussed.

  3. Accurate calculation and assignment of highly excited vibrational levels of floppy triatomic molecules in a basis of adiabatic vibrational eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bačić, Z.

    1991-09-01

    We show that the triatomic adiabatic vibrational eigenstates (AVES) provide a convenient basis for accurate discrete variable representation (DVR) calculation and automatic assignment of highly excited, large amplitude motion vibrational states of floppy triatomic molecules. The DVR-AVES states are eigenvectors of the diagonal (in the stretch states) blocks of the adiabatically rearranged triatomic DVR-ray eigenvector (DVR-REV) Hamiltonian [J. C. Light and Z. Bačić, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 4008 (1987)]. The transformation of the full triatomic vibrational Hamiltonian from the DVR-REV basis to the new DVR-AVES basis is simple, and does not involve calculation of any new matrix elements. No dynamical approximation is made in the energy level calculation by the DVR-AVES approach; its accuracy and efficiency are identical to those of the DVR-REV method. The DVR-AVES states, as the adiabatic approximation to the vibrational states of a triatomic molecule, are labeled by three vibrational quantum numbers. Consequently, accurate large amplitude motion vibrational levels obtained by diagonalizing the full vibrational Hamiltonian transformed to the DVR-AVES basis, can be assigned automatically by the code, with the three quantum numbers of the dominant DVR-AVES state associated with the largest (by modulus) eigenvector element in the DVR-AVES basis. The DVR-AVES approach is used to calculate accurate highly excited localized and delocalized vibrational levels of HCN/HNC and LiCN/LiNC. A significant fraction of localized states of both systems, below and above the isomerization barrier, is assigned automatically, without inspection of wave function plots or separate approximate calculations.

  4. Adiabatic principles in atom-diatom collisional energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hovingh, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This work describes the application of numerical methods to the solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation for non-reactive atom-diatom collisions in which only one of the degrees of freedom has been removed. The basic method involves expanding the wave function in a basis set in two of the diatomic coordinates in a body-fixed frame (with respect to the triatomic complex) and defining the coefficients in that expansion as functions on a grid in the collision coordinate. The wave function is then propagated in time using a split operator method. The bulk of this work is devoted to the application of this formalism to the study of internal rotational predissociation in NeHF, in which quasibound states of the triatom predissociate through the transfer of energy from rotation of the diatom into translational energy in the atom-diatom separation coordinate. The author analyzes the computed time dependent wave functions to calculate the lifetimes for several quasibound states; these are in agreement with time independent quantum calculations using the same potential. Moreover, the time dependent behavior of the wave functions themselves sheds light on the dynamics of the predissociation processes. Finally, the partial cross sections of the products in those processes is determined with multiple exit channels. These show strong selectivity in the orbital angular momentum of the outgoing fragments, which the author explains with an adiabatic channel interpretation of the wave function's dynamics. The author also suggests that the same formalism might profitably be used to investigate the quantum dynamics of [open quotes]quasiresonant vibration-rotation transfer[close quotes], in which remarkably strong propensity rules in certain inelastic atom-diatom collision arise from classical adiabatic invariance theory.

  5. Adiabatically tapered microstructured mode converter for selective excitation of the fundamental mode in a few mode fiber.

    PubMed

    Taher, Aymen Belhadj; Di Bin, Philippe; Bahloul, Faouzi; Tartaret-Josnière, Etienne; Jossent, Mathieu; Février, Sébastien; Attia, Rabah

    2016-01-25

    We propose a new technique to selectively excite the fundamental mode in a few mode fiber (FMF). This method of excitation is made from a single mode fiber (SMF) which is inserted facing the FMF into an air-silica microstructured cane before the assembly is adiabatically tapered. We study theoretically and numerically this method by calculating the effective indices of the propagated modes, their amplitudes along the taper and the adiabaticity criteria, showing the ability to achieve an excellent selective excitation of the fundamental mode in the FMF with negligible loss. We experimentally demonstrate that the proposed solution provides a successful mode conversion and allows an almost excellent fundamental mode excitation in the FMF (representing 99.8% of the total power).

  6. Non-locality, adiabaticity, thermodynamics and electron energy probability functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, Roderick; Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Takahashi, Kazunori

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties are revisited for electrons that are governed by nonlocal electron energy probability functions in a plasma of low collisionality. Measurements in a laboratory helicon double layer experiment have shown that the effective electron temperature and density show a polytropic correlation with an index of γe = 1 . 17 +/- 0 . 02 along the divergent magnetic field, implying a nearly isothermal plasma (γe = 1) with heat being brought into the system. However, the evolution of electrons along the divergent magnetic field is essentially an adiabatic process, which should have a γe = 5 / 3 . The reason for this apparent contradiction is that the nearly collisionless plasma is very far from local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electrons behave nonlocally. The corresponding effective electron enthalpy has a conservation relation with the potential energy, which verifies that there is no heat transferred into the system during the electron evolution. The electrons are shown in nonlocal momentum equilibrium under the electric field and the gradient of the effective electron pressure. The convective momentum of ions, which can be assumed as a cold species, is determined by the effective electron pressure and the effective electron enthalpy is shown to be the source for ion acceleration. For these nearly collisionless plasmas, the use of traditional thermodynamic concepts can lead to very erroneous conclusions regarding the thermal conductivity.

  7. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-02-26

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs.

  8. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov- Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs. PMID:26916031

  9. Theoretical study of the CsNa molecule: adiabatic and diabatic potential energy and dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, N; Berriche, H

    2014-09-25

    The adiabatic and diabatic potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states of the NaCs molecule dissociating into Na (3s, 3p) + Cs (6s, 6p, 5d, 7s, 7p, 6d, 8s, 4f) have been investigated. The molecular calculations are performed using an ab initio approach based on nonempirical pseudopotential, parametrized l-dependent polarization potentials and full configuration interaction calculations through the CIPCI quantum chemistry package. The derived spectroscopic constants (Re, De, Te, ωe, ωexe, and Be) of the ground state and lower excited states are compared with the available theoretical and experimental works. Moreover, accurate permanent and transition dipole moment have been determined as a function of the internuclear distance. The adiabatic permanent dipole moment for the first nine (1)Σ(+) electronic states have shown both ionic characters associated with electron transfer related to Cs(+)Na(-) and Cs(-)Na(+) arrangements. By a simple rotation, the diabatic permanent dipole moment is determined and has revealed a linear behavior, particularly at intermediate and large distances. Many peaks around the avoided crossing locations have been observed for the transition dipole moment between neighbor electronic states.

  10. Peroxyacetyl radical: Electronic excitation energies, fundamental vibrational frequencies, and symmetry breaking in the first excited state

    SciTech Connect

    Copan, Andreas V.; Wiens, Avery E.; Nowara, Ewa M.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Agarwal, Jay

    2015-02-07

    Peroxyacetyl radical [CH{sub 3}C(O)O{sub 2}] is among the most abundant peroxy radicals in the atmosphere and is involved in OH-radical recycling along with peroxyacetyl nitrate formation. Herein, the ground (X{sup ~}) and first (A{sup ~}) excited state surfaces of cis and trans peroxyacetyl radical are characterized using high-level ab initio methods. Geometries, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and adiabatic excitation energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit are reported from computations with coupled-cluster theory. Excitation of the trans conformer is found to induce a symmetry-breaking conformational change due to second-order Jahn-Teller interactions with higher-lying excited states. Additional benchmark computations are provided to aid future theoretical work on peroxy radicals.

  11. Energy-Efficient and Secure S-Box circuit using Symmetric Pass Gate Adiabatic Logic

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinesh; Thapliyal, Himanshu; Mohammad, Azhar; Singh, Vijay; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2016-01-01

    Differential Power Analysis (DPA) attack is considered to be a main threat while designing cryptographic processors. In cryptographic algorithms like DES and AES, S-Box is used to indeterminate the relationship between the keys and the cipher texts. However, S-box is prone to DPA attack due to its high power consumption. In this paper, we are implementing an energy-efficient 8-bit S-Box circuit using our proposed Symmetric Pass Gate Adiabatic Logic (SPGAL). SPGAL is energy-efficient as compared to the existing DPAresistant adiabatic and non-adiabatic logic families. SPGAL is energy-efficient due to reduction of non-adiabatic loss during the evaluate phase of the outputs. Further, the S-Box circuit implemented using SPGAL is resistant to DPA attacks. The results are verified through SPICE simulations in 180nm technology. SPICE simulations show that the SPGAL based S-Box circuit saves upto 92% and 67% of energy as compared to the conventional CMOS and Secured Quasi-Adiabatic Logic (SQAL) based S-Box circuit. From the simulation results, it is evident that the SPGAL based circuits are energy-efficient as compared to the existing DPAresistant adiabatic and non-adiabatic logic families. In nutshell, SPGAL based gates can be used to build secure hardware for lowpower portable electronic devices and Internet-of-Things (IoT) based electronic devices.

  12. Dynamics of the reactions of muonium and deuterium atoms with vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules: tunneling and vibrational adiabaticity.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, P G; García, E; Herrero, V J; Sáez-Rábanos, V; Aoiz, F J

    2012-11-14

    Quantum mechanical (QM) and quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations have been carried out for the exchange reactions of D and Mu (Mu = muonium) with hydrogen molecules in their ground and first vibrational states. In all the cases considered, the QM rate coefficients, k(T), are in very good agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, QM calculations on the most accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) predict a rate coefficient for the Mu + H(2) (ν = 1) reaction which is very close to the preliminary estimate of its experimental value at 300 K. In contrast to the D + H(2) (ν = 0,1) and the Mu + H(2) (ν = 0) reactions, the QCT calculations for Mu + H(2) (ν = 1) predict a much smaller k(T) than that obtained with the accurate QM method. This behaviour is indicative of tunneling. The QM reaction probabilities and total reactive cross sections show that the total energy thresholds for the reactions of Mu with H(2) in ν = 0 and ν = 1 are very similar, whereas for the corresponding reaction with D the ν = 0 total energy threshold is about 0.3 eV lower than that for ν = 1. The results just mentioned can be explained by considering the vibrational adiabatic potentials along the minimum energy path. The threshold for the reaction of Mu with H(2) in both ν = 0 and ν = 1 states is the same and is given by the height of the ground vibrational adiabatic collinear potential, whereas for the D + H(2) reaction the adiabaticity is preserved and the threshold for the reaction in ν = 1 is very close to the height of the ν = 1 adiabatic collinear barrier. For Mu + H(2) (ν = 1) the reaction takes place by crossing from the ν = 1 to the ν = 0 adiabat, since the exit channel leading to MuH (ν = 1) is not energetically accessible. At the lowest possible energies, the non-adiabatic vibrational crossing implies a strong tunneling effect through the ν = 1 adiabatic barrier. Absence of tunneling in the classical calculations results in a threshold

  13. Non-Adiabatic Mechanism for Photosynthetic Energy Transfer and All-Optical Determination of Concentration using Femtosecond Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vivek

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the fundamental physics of light-harvesting in both, natural and artificial systems is key for the development of efficient light-harvesting technologies. My thesis addresses the following topics, i.) the mechanism underlying the remarkably efficient electronic energy transfer in natural light harvesting antennas, ii.) a femtosecond time-resolved photonumeric technique to quantitatively characterize transient chemical species. This talk will concentrate on the first project, while briefly touching the key ideas of the second project. Light harvesting antennas use a set of closely spaced pigment molecules held in a controlled relative geometry by a protein. It is shown that in certain antenna proteins the excited state electronic energy gaps between the pigments are resonant with a quantum of pigment vibrational energy. With such a vibrational-electronic resonance, anti-correlated motions between the pigments lead to a strong coupling between the electronic and nuclear motions, that is, breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, over a wide range of pigment vibrational motions. It is shown that the 2D spectroscopic signatures of the resulting unavoidable nested non-adiabatic energy funnel on the excited states of photosynthetic antennas are consistent with all the reported 2D signatures of long-lived coherent oscillations, including the ones that are not explained by prior models of excited state electronic energy transfer. Extensions that account for both resonant and near-resonant pigment vibrations suggest that photosynthetic energy transfer presents a novel design in which electronic energy transfer proceeds non-adiabatically through clusters of vibrations with frequencies distributed around electronic energy gaps. I will also briefly talk about our experiments demonstrating quantitative time-resolved measurement of absolute number of excited state molecules. Based on these measurements, an all-optical technique that simultaneously determines

  14. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Phillip W. K.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens; Sabin, John R.

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  15. Ab - initio non-adiabatic couplings among three lowest singlet states of H3 +: Construction of multisheeted diabatic potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Bijit; Mukherjee, Saikat; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the adiabatic potential energy surfaces and non-adiabatic interactions among the three lowest singlet states (11 A', 21 A' and 31 A') of H3 + in hyperspherical coordinates for a fixed hyperradius, ρ = 9 bohr as functions of hyperangles, θ (0 < θ < 90°) and ϕ (0 < ϕ < 360°). All ab initio calculations are performed using MRCI level of methodology implemented in quantum chemistry package, MOLPRO. The ground (11 A') and the first excited (21 A') states exhibit several conical intersections as functions of ϕ for θ > 70°. Subsequently, we carry out adiabatic to diabatic transformation (ADT) to obtain ADT angles for constructing single-valued, continuous, smooth and symmetric 3 × 3 diabatic potential energy matrix to perform accurate scattering calculations.

  16. Theoretical study of Raman chirped adiabatic passage by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Highly excited electronic states and rotational effects

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Selma; Sisourat, Nicolas Selles, Patricia; Taïeb, Richard; Carniato, Stéphane

    2014-06-21

    Raman Chirped Adiabatic Passage (RCAP) is an efficient method to climb the vibrational ladder of molecules. It was shown on the example of fixed-in-space HCl molecule that selective vibrational excitation can thus be achieved by RCAP and that population transfer can be followed by X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy [S. Engin, N. Sisourat, P. Selles, R. Taïeb, and S. Carniato, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 192–195 (2012)]. Here, in a more detailed analysis of the process, we investigate the effects of highly excited electronic states and of molecular rotation on the efficiency of RCAP. Furthermore, we propose an alternative spectroscopic way to monitor the transfer by means of X-ray absorption spectra.

  17. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O.

    1991-05-01

    The radiative lifetimes of gaseous nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable dye laser radiation are determined for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. When the data are expressed in the form of zero-pressure radiative rate constants (k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1}), they fit a linear equation with respect to excitation energy. This fit predicts a radiative lifetime of 64 {mu}s for 400 nm excitation and 102 {mu}s at 750 nm. The effects of pressure, observation delay time, and wavelength range of the fluorescence detection apparatus are determined for both radiative lifetime and quenching constant. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from excited nitrogen dioxide are analyzed into three-parameter functions that approximate the corresponding excited state population distributions. Energy transfer from nitrogen dioxide excited at 532 nm and colliding with thirteen buffer gases is studied by this population deconvolution method. The energy removal rate constants increase in the order Ne < Ar < Kr < Xe < He < CO < N{sub 2} < O{sub 2} < NO < NO{sub 2} < CO{sub 2} < SF{sub 6} < SO{sub 2}. The energy transfer rate constant is strongly correlated with the number of degrees of freedom of the buffer molecule and with low vibrational frequencies of the buffer molecule. Population deconvolution from excited nitrogen dioxide fluorescence spectra is again employed to find energy removal rate constants for the NO {sub 2}{sup *}-NO{sub 2} collisions, excited by dye laser at 475.34, 435.04, and 400.00 nm. The energy transfer rate constant increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The energy removal rate constant between 400 and 532 nm excitation increases as the (3.6 {plus minus} 0.4) power of the excitation photon energy. 76 refs., 67 figs., 16 tabs.

  18. On the adiabatic preparation of spatially-ordered Rydberg excitations of atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice by laser frequency sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, David; Mølmer, Klaus; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We examine the adiabatic preparation of crystalline phases of Rydberg excitations in a one-dimensional lattice gas by frequency sweep of the excitation laser, as proposed by Pohl et al (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 043002) and recently realized experimentally by Schauß et al (2015 Science 347 1455). We find that the preparation of crystals of a few Rydberg excitations in a unitary system of several tens of atoms requires exceedingly long times for the adiabatic following of the ground state of the system Hamiltonian. Using quantum stochastic (Monte Carlo) wavefunction simulations, we show that realistic decay and dephasing processes affecting the atoms during the preparation lead to a final state of the system that has only a small overlap with the target crystalline state. Yet, the final number and highly sub-Poissonian statistics of Rydberg excitations and their spatial order are little affected by the relaxations.

  19. An energy-efficient, adiabatic electrode stimulator with inductive energy recycling and feedback current regulation.

    PubMed

    Arfin, Scott K; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel energy-efficient electrode stimulator. Our stimulator uses inductive storage and recycling of energy in a dynamic power supply. This supply drives an electrode in an adiabatic fashion such that energy consumption is minimized. It also utilizes a shunt current-sensor to monitor and regulate the current through the electrode via feedback, thus enabling flexible and safe stimulation. Since there are no explicit current sources or current limiters, wasteful energy dissipation across such elements is naturally avoided. The dynamic power supply allows efficient transfer of energy both to and from the electrode and is based on a DC-DC converter topology that we use in a bidirectional fashion in forward-buck or reverse-boost modes. In an exemplary electrode implementation intended for neural stimulation, we show how the stimulator combines the efficiency of voltage control and the safety and accuracy of current control in a single low-power integrated-circuit built in a standard .35 μm CMOS process. This stimulator achieves a 2x-3x reduction in energy consumption as compared to a conventional current-source-based stimulator operating from a fixed power supply. We perform a theoretical analysis of the energy efficiency that is in accord with experimental measurements. This theoretical analysis reveals that further improvements in energy efficiency may be achievable with better implementations in the future. Our electrode stimulator could be widely useful for neural, cardiac, retinal, cochlear, muscular and other biomedical implants where low power operation is important.

  20. Non-adiabatic corrections to the quasiparticle self-energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylenko, Oleksiy V.; Dolgov, Oleg V.; Losyakov, Vladimir V.

    1996-02-01

    High T c superconductors and fullerenes seem to be characterized by very small bandwidths of the order of phonon frequencies. This may imply a breakdown of Migdal's theorem for the electron self-energy. There are two different approaches to the problem. The gauge-invariant self-consistent method proposed by Y. Takada includes many vertex corrections using the Ward identity. The other method by C. Grimaldi, L. Pietronero and S. Strässler (GPS) based on Migdal's idea uses the first correction to the unit vertex. These two approaches have been compared and the main results are the following: 1) Takada's method for the self-energy gives incorrect order in the Migdal parameter λΩ ph /ɛ F , 2) in GPS's method the momentum cut-off offered by the authors cannot be used as a free parameter, and 3) there is a possible instability which can be ascribed to appearing of polaron states.

  1. A classical determination of vibrationally adiabatic barriers and wells of a collinear potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Eli

    1981-05-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a classical vibrationally adiabatic barrier or well in collinear systems is the existence of periodic orbit dividing surfaces. Knowledge of all pods immediately provides all adiabatic barriers and wells. Furthermore, the classical equation connecting the barriers and wells to the masses and potential energy surface of the system is shown, under mild conditions, to be identical in form to the corresponding quantal equation. The only difference is in the determination of the vibrational state which is obtained by WKB quantization classically. The classical barriers and wells can therefore be used to analyze quantal computations. Such analysis is provided for the hydrogen exchange reaction and the F+HH system. A novel result is the existence of vibrationally adiabatic barriers even where no saddle point exists on the static potential energy surface. These barriers are an outcome of competition between the increase of potential energy and decrease of vibrational force constant along the reaction coordinate. Their existence is therefore of general nature — not limited to the specific structure of a given potential energy surface. The experimental significance of these barriers is discussed. The implications on the use of forward or reverse quasiclassical computations is analyzed. A definite conclusion is that one should not average over initial vibrational action in such calculations.

  2. XUV excitation followed by ultrafast non-adiabatic relaxation in PAH molecules as a femto-astrochemistry experiment

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, A.; Despré, V.; Barillot, T.; Rouzée, A.; Galbraith, M.C.E.; Klei, J.; Yang, C.-H.; Smeenk, C.T.L.; Loriot, V.; Reddy, S. Nagaprasad; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Mahapatra, S.; Kuleff, A. I.; Vrakking, M.J.J.; Lépine, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highly excited molecular species are at play in the chemistry of interstellar media and are involved in the creation of radiation damage in a biological tissue. Recently developed ultrashort extreme ultraviolet light sources offer the high excitation energies and ultrafast time-resolution required for probing the dynamics of highly excited molecular states on femtosecond (fs) (1 fs=10−15s) and even attosecond (as) (1 as=10−18 s) timescales. Here we show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) undergo ultrafast relaxation on a few tens of femtoseconds timescales, involving an interplay between the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. Our work reveals a general property of excited radical PAHs that can help to elucidate the assignment of diffuse interstellar absorption bands in astrochemistry, and provides a benchmark for the manner in which coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics determines reaction pathways in large molecules following extreme ultraviolet excitation. PMID:26268456

  3. Practical approximation of the non-adiabatic coupling terms for same-symmetry interstate crossings by using adiabatic potential energies only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeck, Kyoung Koo; An, Heesun

    2017-02-01

    A very simple equation, Fij A p p=[(∂2(Via-Vja ) /∂Q2 ) /(Via-Vja ) ] 1 /2/2 , giving a reliable magnitude of non-adiabatic coupling terms (NACTs, Fij's) based on adiabatic potential energies only (Via and Vja) was discovered, and its reliability was tested for several prototypes of same-symmetry interstate crossings in LiF, C2, NH3Cl, and C6H5SH molecules. Our theoretical derivation starts from the analysis of the relationship between the Lorentzian dependence of NACTs along a diabatization coordinate and the well-established linear vibronic coupling scheme. This analysis results in a very simple equation, α =2 κ /Δc , enabling the evaluation of the Lorentz function α parameter in terms of the coupling constant κ and the energy gap Δc (Δc=|Via-Vja| Q c ) between adiabatic states at the crossing point QC. Subsequently, it was shown that QC corresponds to the point where Fij A p p exhibit maximum values if we set the coupling parameter as κ =[(Via-Vja ) ṡ(∂2(Via-Vja ) /∂Q2 ) ] Qc1 /2 /2 . Finally, we conjectured that this relation could give reasonable values of NACTs not only at the crossing point but also at other geometries near QC. In this final approximation, the pre-defined crossing point QC is not required. The results of our test demonstrate that the approximation works much better than initially expected. The present new method does not depend on the selection of an ab initio method for adiabatic electronic states but is currently limited to local non-adiabatic regions where only two electronic states are dominantly involved within a nuclear degree of freedom.

  4. Density functional theory calculations on rhodamine B and pinacyanol chloride. Optimized ground state, dipole moment, vertical ionization potential, adiabatic electron affinity and lowest excited triplet state.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Juan C; Selsby, Ronald G

    2013-01-01

    The ground state configuration of the gas phase cationic dyes pinacyanol chloride and rhodamine B are optimized with HF/6-311 + G(2d,2p) method and basis set. B3PW91/6-311 + G(2df,2p) functional and basis set is used to calculate the Mulliken atom charge distribution, total molecular energy, the dipole moment, the vertical ionization potential, the adiabatic electron affinity and the lowest excited triplet state, the last three as an energy difference between separately calculated open shell and ground states. The triplet and extra electron states are optimized to find the relaxation energy. In the ground state optimization of both dyes the chloride anion migrates to a position near the center of the chromophore. For rhodamine B the benzoidal group turns perpendicular to the chromophore plane. For both dyes, the LUMO is mostly of π character associated with the aromatic part of the molecule containing the chromophore. The highest occupied MOs consist of three almost degenerate eigenvectors involving the chloride anion coordinated with σ electrons in the molecular framework. The fourth highest MO is of π character. For both molecules in the gas phase ionization process the chloride anion loses the significant fraction of electric charge. In electron capture, the excess charge goes mainly on the dye cation.

  5. Efficient and direct generation of multidimensional free energy surfaces via adiabatic dynamics without coordinate transformations.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jerry B; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2008-12-11

    Adiabatic free energy dynamics (AFED) was introduced by Rosso et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 116, 4389] for computing free energy profiles quickly and accurately using a dynamical adiabatic separation between a set of collective variables or reaction coordinates and the remaining degrees of freedom of a system. This approach has been shown to lead to a significant gain in efficiency versus traditional methods such as umbrella sampling, thermodynamic integration, and free energy perturbation for generating one-dimensional free energy profiles. More importantly, AFED is able to generate multidimensional free energy surfaces efficiently via full sweeps of the surface that rapidly map out the locations of the free energy minima. The most significant drawback to the AFED approach is the need to transform the coordinates into a generalized coordinate system that explicitly contains the collective variables of interest. Recently, Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden built upon the AFED approach by introducing a set of extended phase-space variables, to which the adiabatic decoupling and high temperature are applied [Chem. Phys. Lett. 2006, 426, 168]. In this scheme, which the authors termed "temperature accelerated molecular dynamics" or TAMD, the need for explicit coordinate transformations is circumvented. The ability of AFED and TAMD to generate free energy surfaces efficiently depends on the thermostatting mechanism employed, since both approaches are inherently nonequilibrium due to the adiabatic decoupling. Indeed, Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden did not report any direct generation of free energy surfaces within the overdamped Langevin dynamics employed by these authors. Here, we show that by formulating TAMD in a manner that is closer to the original AFED approach, including the generalized Gaussian moment thermostat (GGMT) and multiple time-scale integration, multidimensional free energy surfaces for complex systems can be generated directly from the probability

  6. Excitation of phonons in medium-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. A. Vicente; Ascolani, H.; Zampieri, G.

    1996-03-01

    The ``elastic'' backscattering of electrons from crystalline surfaces presents two regimes: a low-energy regime, in which the characteristic low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern is observed, and a medium-energy regime, in which the diffraction pattern is similar to those observed in x-ray photoemission diffraction (XPD) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) experiments. We present a model for the electron scattering which, including the vibrational degrees of freedom of the crystal, contains both regimes and explains the passage from one regime to the other. Our model is based on a separation of the electron and atomic motions (adiabatic approximation) and on a cluster-type formulation of the multiple scattering of the electron. The inelastic scattering events (excitation and/or absorption of phonons) are treated as coherent processes and no break of the phase relation between the incident and the exit paths of the electron is assumed. The LEED and the medium-energy electron diffraction regimes appear naturally in this model as the limit cases of completely elastic scattering and of inelastic scattering with excitation and/or absorption of multiple phonons. Intensity patterns calculated with this model are in very good agreement with recent experiments of electron scattering on Cu(001) at low and medium energies. We show that there is a correspondence between the type of intensity pattern and the mean number of phonons excited and/or absorbed during the scattering: a LEED-like pattern is observed when this mean number is less than 2, LEED-like and XPD/AED-like features coexist when this number is 3-4, and a XPD/AED-like pattern is observed when this number is greater than 5-6.

  7. Coupled wave-packets for non-adiabatic molecular dynamics: a generalization of Gaussian wave-packet dynamics to multiple potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    White, Alexander James; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dima V.

    2016-04-25

    Accurate simulation of the non-adiabatic dynamics of molecules in excited electronic states is key to understanding molecular photo-physical processes. Here we present a novel method, based on a semiclassical approximation, that is as efficient as the commonly used mean field Ehrenfest or ad hoc surface hopping methods and properly accounts for interference and decoherence effects. This novel method is an extension of Heller's thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics that includes coupling between potential energy surfaces. By studying several standard test problems we demonstrate that the accuracy of the method can be systematically improved while maintaining high efficiency. The method is suitable for investigating the role of quantum coherence in the non-adiabatic dynamics of many-atom molecules.

  8. Coupled wave-packets for non-adiabatic molecular dynamics: a generalization of Gaussian wave-packet dynamics to multiple potential energy surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    White, Alexander James; Tretiak, Sergei; Mozyrsky, Dima V.

    2016-04-25

    Accurate simulation of the non-adiabatic dynamics of molecules in excited electronic states is key to understanding molecular photo-physical processes. Here we present a novel method, based on a semiclassical approximation, that is as efficient as the commonly used mean field Ehrenfest or ad hoc surface hopping methods and properly accounts for interference and decoherence effects. This novel method is an extension of Heller's thawed Gaussian wave-packet dynamics that includes coupling between potential energy surfaces. By studying several standard test problems we demonstrate that the accuracy of the method can be systematically improved while maintaining high efficiency. The method is suitablemore » for investigating the role of quantum coherence in the non-adiabatic dynamics of many-atom molecules.« less

  9. Zero-point energy, tunneling, and vibrational adiabaticity in the Mu + H2 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Fleming, Donald G.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-09

    Abstract: Isotopic substitution of muonium for hydrogen provides an unparalleled opportunity to deepen our understanding of quantum mass effects on chemical reactions. A recent topical review [Aldegunde et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3169 (2013)] of the thermal and vibrationally-stateselected reaction of Mu with H2 raises a number of issues that are addressed here. We show that some earlier quantum mechanical calculations of the Mu + H2 reaction, which are highlighted in this review and which have been used to benchmark approximate methods, are in error by as much as 19% in the low-temperature limit. We demonstrate that an approximate treatment of the Born–Oppenheimer diagonal correction that was used in some recent studies is not valid for treating the vibrationally-state-selected reaction. We also discuss why vibrationally adiabatic potentials that neglect bend zero-point energy are not a useful analytical tool for understanding reaction rates and why vibrationally nonadiabatic transitions cannot be understood by considering tunneling through vibrationally adiabatic potentials. Finally, we present calculations on a hierarchical family of potential energy surfaces to assess the sensitivity of rate constants to the quality of the potential surface.

  10. Alchemical Free Energy Differences in Flexible Molecules from Thermodynamic Integration or Free Energy Perturbation Combined with Driven Adiabatic Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cuendet, Michel A; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2012-10-09

    Alchemical free energy simulations are commonly used to calculate relative binding or solvation free energies in molecular systems. The convergence of alchemical free energy calculations is often hampered by inefficient sampling of the conformational degrees of freedom, which remain trapped in metastable substates. Here, we show that thermodynamic integration (TI) or free energy perturbation (FEP) can be combined with the recent driven adiabatic free energy dynamics (dAFED) method, in order to enhance conformational sampling along a set of chosen collective variables. The resulting TI-dAFED or FEP-dAFED methods are validated on a two-dimensional analytical problem. The ability of these methods to provide accurate free energy differences for realistic molecular systems is demonstrated by calculating the enantiomerization free energy of the alanine dipeptide in explicit solvent.

  11. Atomistic potentials based energy flux integral criterion for dynamic adiabatic shear banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yun; Chen, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The energy flux integral criterion based on atomistic potentials within the framework of hyperelasticity-plasticity is proposed for dynamic adiabatic shear banding (ASB). System Helmholtz energy decomposition reveals that the dynamic influence on the integral path dependence is originated from the volumetric strain energy and partial deviatoric strain energy, and the plastic influence only from the rest part of deviatoric strain energy. The concept of critical shear banding energy is suggested for describing the initiation of ASB, which consists of the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) threshold energy and the thermal softening energy. The criterion directly relates energy flux to the basic physical processes that induce shear instability such as dislocation nucleations and multiplications, without introducing ad-hoc parameters in empirical constitutive models. It reduces to the classical path independent J-integral for quasi-static loading and elastic solids. The atomistic-to-continuum multiscale coupling method is used to simulate the initiation of ASB. Atomic configurations indicate that DRX induced microstructural softening may be essential to the dynamic shear localization and hence the initiation of ASB.

  12. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of pyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Guorong; Neville, Simon P.; Worth, Graham A.; Schalk, Oliver; Sekikawa, Taro; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Stolow, Albert

    2015-02-21

    The dynamics of pyrrole excited at wavelengths in the range 242-217 nm are studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and wavepacket propagations performed using the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method. Excitation close to the origin of pyrrole’s electronic spectrum, at 242 and 236 nm, is found to result in an ultrafast decay of the system from the ionization window on a single timescale of less than 20 fs. This behaviour is explained fully by assuming the system to be excited to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in accord with previous experimental and theoretical studies. Excitation at shorter wavelengths has previously been assumed to result predominantly in population of the bright A{sub 1}(ππ{sup ∗}) and B{sub 2}(ππ{sup ∗}) states. We here present time-resolved photoelectron spectra at a pump wavelength of 217 nm alongside detailed quantum dynamics calculations that, together with a recent reinterpretation of pyrrole’s electronic spectrum [S. P. Neville and G. A. Worth, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034317 (2014)], suggest that population of the B{sub 1}(πσ{sup ∗}) state (hitherto assumed to be optically dark) may occur directly when pyrrole is excited at energies in the near UV part of its electronic spectrum. The B{sub 1}(πσ{sup ∗}) state is found to decay on a timescale of less than 20 fs by both N-H dissociation and internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state.

  13. Interatomic methods for the dispersion energy derived from the adiabatic connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem.

    PubMed

    Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Ambrosetti, Alberto; DiStasio, Robert A

    2013-02-21

    Interatomic pairwise methods are currently among the most popular and accurate ways to include dispersion energy in density functional theory calculations. However, when applied to more than two atoms, these methods are still frequently perceived to be based on ad hoc assumptions, rather than a rigorous derivation from quantum mechanics. Starting from the adiabatic connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) theorem, an exact expression for the electronic exchange-correlation energy, we demonstrate that the pairwise interatomic dispersion energy for an arbitrary collection of isotropic polarizable dipoles emerges from the second-order expansion of the ACFD formula upon invoking the random-phase approximation (RPA) or the full-potential approximation. Moreover, for a system of quantum harmonic oscillators coupled through a dipole-dipole potential, we prove the equivalence between the full interaction energy obtained from the Hamiltonian diagonalization and the ACFD-RPA correlation energy. This property makes the Hamiltonian diagonalization an efficient method for the calculation of the many-body dispersion energy. In addition, we show that the switching function used to damp the dispersion interaction at short distances arises from a short-range screened Coulomb potential, whose role is to account for the spatial spread of the individual atomic dipole moments. By using the ACFD formula, we gain a deeper understanding of the approximations made in the interatomic pairwise approaches, providing a powerful formalism for further development of accurate and efficient methods for the calculation of the dispersion energy.

  14. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  15. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  16. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  17. Adiabatic and Non-adiabatic quenches in a Spin-1 Bose Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is observed in a wide range of phenomena. We have studied the dynamics of a spin-1 ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic quenches through a QPT. At the quantum critical point (QCP), finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, which makes an adiabatic quench possible through the QPT. We experimentally demonstrate such a quench, which is forbidden at the mean field level. For faster quenches through the QCP, the vanishing energy gap causes the reaction timescale of the system to diverge, preventing the system from adiabatically following the ground state. We measure the temporal evolution of the spin populations for different quench speeds and determine the exponents characterizing the scaling of the onset of excitations, which are in good agreement with the predictions of Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  18. Low Energy Electron Impact Excitation of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralphs, Kevin; Serna, Gabriela; Hargreaves, Leigh R.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, B. Vincent

    2011-10-01

    We present normalized absolute differential and integral cross-section measurements for the low energy electron impact excitation of the lowest dissociative 3B1, 1B1,3A1 and 1A1 states of H2O. The DCS were taken at incident energies of 9 eV, 10 eV, 12 eV, 15 eV and 20 eV and scattering angles of 15° to 130° and normalized to the elastic electron scattering measurements of. The DCS were obtained after a sophisticated unfolding of the electron energy loss spectrum of water using photoabsorption data in the literature as investigated by Thorn et al.. Our measurements extend those of to near-threshold energies. We find both important agreements and differences between our DCS and those of. Comparison to our theory (multi-channel Schwinger) and that of earlier work will also be presented. Funded by an NSF grant # RUI-PHY 0968874.

  19. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Guorong; Neville, Simon P.; Schalk, Oliver; Sekikawa, Taro; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Worth, Graham A.; Stolow, Albert

    2016-01-07

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B{sub 1}(π3p{sub y}) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH{sub 3} dissociation coordinate.

  20. Classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes resonance effects in electronic-vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, Ann E.; Ali, Dominic P.; Miller, William H.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper, a classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes is applied to E → V energy transfer in a collinear system, A + BC (v = 1) → A* + BC (v = 0), resembling Br-H2. Finally, the model, which treats electronic as well as translational, rotational, and vibrational degrees of freedom by classical mechanics, describes the resonance features in this process reasonably well.

  1. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-11-15

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  2. Probing mechanistic photochemistry of glyoxal in the gas phase by ab initio calculations of potential-energy surfaces and adiabatic and nonadiabatic rates.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan-Song; Zhang, Feng; Fang, Wei-Hai; Yu, Jian-Guo

    2006-02-07

    In the present work, the wavelength-dependent mechanistic photochemistry of glyoxal in the gas phase has been explored by ab initio calculations of potential-energy surfaces, surface crossing points, and adiabatic and nonadiabatic rates. The CHOCHO molecules in S1 by photoexcitation at 393-440 nm mainly decay to the ground state via internal conversion, which is followed by molecular eliminations to form CO, H2CO,H2, and HCOH. Upon photodissociation of CHOCHO at 350-390 nm, intersystem crossing to T1 followed by the C-C bond cleavage is the dominant process in this wavelength range, which is responsible for the formation of the CHO radicals. The C-C and C-H bond cleavages along the S1 pathway are energetically accessible upon photodissociation of CHOCHO at 290-310 nm, which can compete with the S1-->T1 intersystem crossing process. The present study predicts that the C-H bond cleavage on the S1 surface is probably a new photolysis pathway at high excitation energy, which has not been observed experimentally. In addition, the trans-cis isomerization is predicted to occur more easily in the ground state than in the excited states.

  3. Energy Gap of Neutral Excitations Implies Vanishing Charge Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki

    2017-03-01

    In quantum many-body systems with a U(1) symmetry, such as particle number conservation and axial spin conservation, there are two distinct types of excitations: charge-neutral excitations and charged excitations. The energy gaps of these excitations may be independent from each other in strongly correlated systems. The static susceptibility of the U(1) charge vanishes when the charged excitations are all gapped, but its relation to the neutral excitations is not obvious. Here we show that a finite excitation gap of the neutral excitations is, in fact, sufficient to prove that the charge susceptibility vanishes (i.e., the system is incompressible). This result gives a partial explanation for why the celebrated quantization condition n (S -mz)∈Z at magnetization plateaus works even in spatial dimensions greater than one.

  4. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H–Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Svenja M.; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H–Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  5. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H-Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Janke, Svenja M; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Kandratsenka, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H-Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  6. Excitation energies of superdeformed states in the Pb isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A. N.; Byrne, A. P.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Davidson, P. M.; Lane, G. J.; Huebel, H.; Rossbach, D.; Schonwasser, G.; Korichi, A.; Hannachi, F.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Clark, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Ward, D.

    2006-04-26

    Measurements of the excitation energies of superdeformed states via the observation of single-step linking transitions have now been made in three even-A Pb nuclei, with a quasicontinuum analysis providing a limit in a fourth, odd-A case. These results allow us to take the first steps towards establishing systematic trends in excitation energies and binding energies in the second minimum in Pb isotopes.

  7. Accurate ab initio determination of the adiabatic potential energy function and the Born-Oppenheimer breakdown corrections for the electronic ground state of LiH isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holka, Filip; Szalay, Péter G.; Fremont, Julien; Rey, Michael; Peterson, Kirk A.; Tyuterev, Vladimir G.

    2011-03-01

    High level ab initio potential energy functions have been constructed for LiH in order to predict vibrational levels up to dissociation. After careful tests of the parameters of the calculation, the final adiabatic potential energy function has been composed from: (a) an ab initio nonrelativistic potential obtained at the multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles level including a size-extensivity correction and quintuple-sextuple ζ extrapolations of the basis, (b) a mass-velocity-Darwin relativistic correction, and (c) a diagonal Born-Oppenheimer (BO) correction. Finally, nonadiabatic effects have also been considered by including a nonadiabatic correction to the kinetic energy operator of the nuclei. This correction is calculated from nonadiabatic matrix elements between the ground and excited electronic states. The calculated vibrational levels have been compared with those obtained from the experimental data [J. A. Coxon and C. S. Dickinson, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 9378 (2004)]. It was found that the calculated BO potential results in vibrational levels which have root mean square (rms) deviations of about 6-7 cm-1 for LiH and ˜3 cm-1 for LiD. With all the above mentioned corrections accounted for, the rms deviation falls down to ˜1 cm-1. These results represent a drastic improvement over previous theoretical predictions of vibrational levels for all isotopologues of LiH.

  8. Accurate ab initio determination of the adiabatic potential energy function and the Born-Oppenheimer breakdown corrections for the electronic ground state of LiH isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Holka, Filip; Szalay, Péter G; Fremont, Julien; Rey, Michael; Peterson, Kirk A; Tyuterev, Vladimir G

    2011-03-07

    High level ab initio potential energy functions have been constructed for LiH in order to predict vibrational levels up to dissociation. After careful tests of the parameters of the calculation, the final adiabatic potential energy function has been composed from: (a) an ab initio nonrelativistic potential obtained at the multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles level including a size-extensivity correction and quintuple-sextuple ζ extrapolations of the basis, (b) a mass-velocity-Darwin relativistic correction, and (c) a diagonal Born-Oppenheimer (BO) correction. Finally, nonadiabatic effects have also been considered by including a nonadiabatic correction to the kinetic energy operator of the nuclei. This correction is calculated from nonadiabatic matrix elements between the ground and excited electronic states. The calculated vibrational levels have been compared with those obtained from the experimental data [J. A. Coxon and C. S. Dickinson, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 9378 (2004)]. It was found that the calculated BO potential results in vibrational levels which have root mean square (rms) deviations of about 6-7 cm(-1) for LiH and ∼3 cm(-1) for LiD. With all the above mentioned corrections accounted for, the rms deviation falls down to ∼1 cm(-1). These results represent a drastic improvement over previous theoretical predictions of vibrational levels for all isotopologues of LiH.

  9. Roles of the Excitation in Harvesting Energy from Vibrations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Ma, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the role of excitation in energy harvesting applications. While the energy ultimately comes from the excitation, it was shown that the excitation may not always behave as a source. When the device characteristics do not perfectly match the excitation, the excitation alternately behaves as a source and a sink. The extent to which the excitation behaves as a sink determines the energy harvesting efficiency. Such contradictory roles were shown to be dictated by a generalized phase defined as the instantaneous phase angle between the velocity of the device and the excitation. An inductive prototype device with a diamagnetically levitated seismic mass was proposed to take advantage of the well established phase changing mechanism of vibro-impact to achieve a broader device bandwidth. Results suggest that the vibro-impact can generate an instantaneous, significant phase shift in response velocity that switches the role of the excitation. If introduced properly outside the resonance zone it could dramatically increase the energy harvesting efficiency. PMID:26496183

  10. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.R.

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  11. Low energy excitations of the neutron star core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    I will summarize recent work on low energy excitations in cold dense matter and its implications for thermal and transport properties, and seismology of neutron stars. I argue that a low energy Lagrangian with a handful of low energy constants (LECs) provides an adequate framework for calculations. The LECs can be related to the equation of state of dense matter at zero temperature.

  12. Vibration energy harvesting from random force and motion excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiudong; Zuo, Lei

    2012-07-01

    A vibration energy harvester is typically composed of a spring-mass system with an electromagnetic or piezoelectric transducer connected in parallel with a spring. This configuration has been well studied and optimized for harmonic vibration sources. Recently, a dual-mass harvester, where two masses are connected in series by the energy transducer and a spring, has been proposed. The dual-mass vibration energy harvester is proved to be able to harvest more power and has a broader bandwidth than the single-mass configuration, when the parameters are optimized and the excitation is harmonic. In fact, some dual-mass vibration energy harvesters, such as regenerative vehicle suspensions and buildings with regenerative tuned mass dampers (TMDs), are subjected to random excitations. This paper is to investigate the dual-mass and single-mass vibration harvesters under random excitations using spectrum integration and the residue theorem. The output powers for these two types of vibration energy harvesters, when subjected to different random excitations, namely force, displacement, velocity and acceleration, are obtained analytically with closed-form expressions. It is also very interesting to find that the output power of the vibration energy harvesters under random excitations depends on only a few parameters in very simple and elegant forms. This paper also draws some important conclusions on regenerative vehicle suspensions and buildings with regenerative TMDs, which can be modeled as dual-mass vibration energy harvesters. It is found that, under white-noise random velocity excitation from road irregularity, the harvesting power from vehicle suspensions is proportional to the tire stiffness and road vertical excitation spectrum only. It is independent of the chassis mass, tire-wheel mass, suspension stiffness and damping coefficient. Under random wind force excitation, the power harvested from buildings with regenerative TMD will depends on the building mass only, not

  13. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, Franco Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  14. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egidi, Franco; Segado, Mireia; Koch, Henrik; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π*, π-π*, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  15. Raman active high energy excitations in URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhot, Jonathan; Gallais, Yann; Cazayous, Maximilien; Sacuto, Alain; Piekarz, Przemysław; Lapertot, Gérard; Aoki, Dai; Méasson, Marie-Aude

    2017-02-01

    We have performed Raman scattering measurements on URu2Si2 single crystals on a large energy range up to ∼1300 cm-1 and in all the Raman active symmetries as a function of temperature down to 15 K. A large excitation, active only in the Eg symmetry, is reported. It has been assigned to a crystal electric field excitation on the Uranium site. We discuss how this constrains the crystal electric field scheme of the Uranium ions. Furthermore, three excitations in the A1g symmetry are observed. They have been associated to double Raman phonon processes consistently with ab initio calculations of the phonons dispersion.

  16. Electric Discharge Excitation and Energy Source Integration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-06

    only one side of the machined bar connecting the mounting plate to the cathode. An electrical schematic of the PFN utilized for the discharge studies...for the initial charge voltage to be 2 VG for optimum energy transfer is still present. All arrangements of transmision lines studied showed the... side of the anode screen are used to achieve a smooth physical transition and, thereby, minimize flow-generated turbulence. With this arrangement the

  17. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  18. Fluorescent resonant excitation energy transfer in linear polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mousumi; Ramasesha, S.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of excitation transfer between two conjugated polyene molecules whose intermolecular separation is comparable to the molecular dimensions. We have employed a correlated electron model that includes both the charge-charge, charge-bond, and bond-bond intermolecular electron repulsion integrals. We have shown that the excitation transfer rate varies as inverse square of donor-acceptor separation R-2 rather than as R-6, suggested by the Förster type of dipolar approximation. Our time-evolution study also shows that the orientational dependence on excitation transfer at a fixed short donor-acceptor separation cannot be explained by Förster type of dipolar approximation beyond a certain orientational angle of rotation of an acceptor polyene with respect to the donor polyene. The actual excitation transfer rate beyond a certain orientational angle is faster than the Förster type of dipolar approximation rate. We have also studied the excitation transfer process in a pair of push-pull polyenes for different push-pull strengths. We have seen that, depending on the push-pull strength, excitation transfer could occur to other dipole coupled states. Our study also allows for the excitation energy transfer to optically dark states which are excluded by Förster theory since the one-photon transition intensity to these states (from the ground state) is zero.

  19. Mean excitation energies for ions in gases and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, Xavier; Deutsch, Claude; Maynard, Gilles

    1987-02-01

    A variational approach yields accurate upper and lower bounds for mean excitation energies and other related parameters describing the stopping of nonrelativistic point charges by isolated species and ions embedded in dense and hot matter of relevance to particle-driven inertial fusion. The resulting I compares nicely with previous ones by Hartree-Fock-Slater and with experimental data when available. An efficient pseudo-analytic formula based on the Thomas-Fermi method is obtained, together with a cubic spline interpolation variationally improved. It is shown that in high temperature plasmas (kBT≥10 eV) mean excitation energies are significantly smaller than their cold homologue.

  20. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  1. Preparation of Quantum States of H2 using Stark-induced Adiabatic Raman Passage (SARP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-02

    diatomic molecule to an excited rovibrational eigenstate. Based on this idea we carried out experiments using a sequence of overlapping pump (532 nm...overlapping pump and Stokes laser pulses it is possible to transfer the complete ground state population of an isolated diatomic molecule to an excited...wide energy gap ( diatoms like H2, D2, HCl, N2) between the ground and excited electronic states, where other adiabatic methods like STIRAP or SCRAP

  2. Regulation of excitation energy transfer in diatom PSII dimer: How does it change the destination of excitation energy?

    PubMed

    Yokono, Makio; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Energy transfer dynamics in dimeric photosystem II (PSII) complexes isolated from four diatoms, Chaetoceros gracilis, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, are examined. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements were conducted in the range of 0-80ns. Delayed fluorescence spectra showed a clear difference between PSII monomer and PSII dimer isolated from the four diatoms. The difference can be interpreted as reflecting suppressed energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer for efficient energy trapping at the reaction center. The observation was especially prominent in C. gracilis and T. pseudonana. The pathways seem to be suppressed under a low pH condition in isolated PSII complexes from C. gracilis, and excitation energy may be quenched with fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein (FCP) that was closely associated with PSII in C. gracilis. The energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer may play a role in excitation energy regulation in diatoms.

  3. Resonant vibrational excitation of CO by low-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Poparic, G. B.; Belic, D. S.; Vicic, M. D.

    2006-06-15

    Electron impact vibrational excitation of the CO molecule, via the {sup 2}{pi} resonance, in the 0-4 eV energy region has been investigated. The energy dependence of the resonant excitation of the first ten vibrational levels, v=1 to v=10, has been measured by use of a crossed-beams double trochoidal electron spectrometer. Obtained relative differential cross sections are normalized to the absolute values. Integral cross sections are determined by using our recent results on scattered electrons angular distributions, which demonstrate clear p-partial wave character of this resonance. Substructures appear in the {sup 2}{pi} resonant excitation of the CO molecule which have not been previously observed.

  4. Numerical Investigation of the effect of adiabatic section location on thermal performance of a heat pipe network with the application in thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Tiari, Saeed; Qiu, Songgang

    2015-11-01

    Latent heat thermal energy storage systems benefits from high energy density and isothermal storing process. However, the low thermal conductivity of the phase change material leads to prolong the melting or solidification time. Using a passive device such as heat pipes is required to enhance the heat transfer and to improve the efficiency of the system. In the present work, the performance of a heat pipe network specifically designed for a thermal energy storage system is studied numerically. The network includes a primary heat pipe, which transfers heat received from solar receiver to the heat engine. The excess heat is simultaneously delivered to charge the phase change material via secondary heat pipes. The primary heat pipe composed of a disk shape evaporator, an adiabatic section and a disk shape condenser. The adiabatic section can be either located at the center or positioned outward to the surrounding of the container. Here, the effect of adiabatic section position on thermal performance of the system is investigated. It was concluded that displacing the adiabatic section outwards dramatically increases the average temperatures of the condensers and reduces the thermal resistance of heat pipes.

  5. Complex fragment emission at low and high excitation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1986-08-01

    Complex fragment emission has been certified as a compound nucleus process at low energies. An extension of the measurements to heavy ion reactions up to 50 MeV/u shows that most complex fragments are emitted by highly excited compound nuclei formed in incomplete fusion reactions. 12 refs., 26 figs.

  6. Efficient near-field wireless energy transfer using adiabatic system variations

    DOEpatents

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljacic, Marin

    2013-01-29

    Disclosed is a method for transferring energy wirelessly including transferring energy wirelessly from a first resonator structure to an intermediate resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the first resonator structure and the intermediate resonator structure is .kappa..sub.1B, transferring energy wirelessly from the intermediate resonator structure to a second resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the intermediate resonator structure and the second resonator structure is .kappa..sub.B2, and during the wireless energy transfers, adjusting at least one of the coupling rates .kappa..sub.1B and .kappa..sub.B2 to reduce energy accumulation in the intermediate resonator structure and improve wireless energy transfer from the first resonator structure to the second resonator structure through the intermediate resonator structure.

  7. Efficient near-field wireless energy transfer using adiabatic system variations

    DOEpatents

    Hamam, Rafif E; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-16

    Disclosed is a method for transferring energy wirelessly including transferring energy wirelessly from a first resonator structure to an intermediate resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the first resonator structure and the intermediate resonator structure is .kappa..sub.1B, transferring energy wirelessly from the intermediate resonator structure to a second resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the intermediate resonator structure and the second resonator structure is .kappa..sub.B2, and during the wireless energy transfers, adjusting at least one of the coupling rates .kappa..sub.1B and .kappa..sub.B2 to reduce energy accumulation in the intermediate resonator structure and improve wireless energy transfer from the first resonator structure to the second resonator structure through the intermediate resonator structure.

  8. Excitation energy dependent Raman spectrum of MoSe2

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dahyun; Lee, Jae-Ung; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2015-01-01

    Raman investigation of MoSe2 was carried out with eight different excitation energies. Seven peaks, including E1g, A1g, E2g1, and A2u2 peaks are observed in the range of 100–400 cm−1. The phonon modes are assigned by comparing the peak positions with theoretical calculations. The intensities of the peaks are enhanced at different excitation energies through resonance with different optical transitions. The A1g mode is enhanced at 1.58 and 3.82 eV, which are near the A exciton energy and the band-to-band transition between higher energy bands, respectively. The E2g1 mode is strongly enhanced with respect to the A1g mode for the 2.71- and 2.81-eV excitations, which are close to the C exciton energy. The different enhancements of the A1g and E2g1 modes are explained in terms of the symmetries of the exciton states and the exciton-phonon coupling. Other smaller peaks including E1g and A2u2 are forbidden but appear due to the resonance effect near optical transition energies. PMID:26601614

  9. Quantum mechanical methods applied to excitation energy transfer: a comparative analysis on excitation energies and electronic couplings.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Losa, A; Curutchet, C; Fdez Galván, I; Mennucci, B

    2008-07-21

    We present a comparative study on the influence of the quantum mechanical (QM) method (including basis set) on the evaluation of transition energies, transition densities and dipoles, and excitation energy transfer (EET) electronic couplings for a series of chromophores (and the corresponding pairs) typically found in organic electro-optical devices and photosynthetic systems. On these systems we have applied five different QM levels of description of increasing accuracy (ZINDO, CIS, TD-DFT, CASSCF, and SAC-CI). In addition, we have tested the effects of a surrounding environment (either mimicking a solvent or a protein matrix) on excitation energies, transition dipoles, and electronic couplings through the polarizable continuum model (PCM) description. Overall, the results obtained suggest that the choice of the QM level of theory affects the electronic couplings much less than it affects excitation energies. We conclude that reasonable estimates can be obtained using moderate basis sets and inexpensive methods such as configuration interaction of single excitations or time-dependent density functional theory when appropriately coupled to realistic solvation models such as PCM.

  10. Adiabatic dynamics of an inhomogeneous quantum phase transition: the case of a z>1 dynamical exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziarmaga, Jacek; Rams, Marek M.

    2010-10-01

    We consider an inhomogeneous quantum phase transition across a multicritical point of the XY quantum spin chain. This is an example of a Lifshitz transition with a dynamical exponent z=2. Just like in the case z=1 considered by Dziarmaga and Rams (2010 New J. Phys. 12 055007), when a critical front propagates much faster than the maximal group velocity of quasiparticles vq, then the transition is effectively homogeneous: the density of excitations obeys a generalized Kibble-Zurek mechanism and scales with the sixth root of the transition rate. However, unlike for the case z=1, the inhomogeneous transition becomes adiabatic not below vq but at a lower threshold velocity \\hat{v} , proportional to the inhomogeneity of the transition, where the excitations are suppressed exponentially. Interestingly, the adiabatic threshold \\hat{v} is nonzero despite the vanishing minimal group velocity of low-energy quasiparticles. In the adiabatic regime below \\hat{v} , the inhomogeneous transition can be used for efficient adiabatic quantum state preparation in a quantum simulator: the time required for the critical front to sweep across a chain of N spins adiabatically is merely linear in N, while the corresponding time for a homogeneous transition across the multicritical point scales with the sixth power of N. What is more, excitations after the adiabatic inhomogeneous transition, if any, are brushed away by the critical front to the end of the spin chain.

  11. Response calculations based on an independent particle system with the exact one-particle density matrix: excitation energies.

    PubMed

    Giesbertz, K J H; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2012-03-07

    Adiabatic response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) suffers from the restriction to basically an occupied → virtual single excitation formulation. Adiabatic time-dependent density matrix functional theory allows to break away from this restriction. Problematic excitations for TDDFT, viz. bonding-antibonding, double, charge transfer, and higher excitations, are calculated along the bond-dissociation coordinate of the prototype molecules H(2) and HeH(+) using the recently developed adiabatic linear response phase-including (PI) natural orbital theory (PINO). The possibility to systematically increase the scope of the calculation from excitations out of (strongly) occupied into weakly occupied ("virtual") natural orbitals to larger ranges of excitations is explored. The quality of the PINO response calculations is already much improved over TDDFT even when the severest restriction is made, to virtually the size of the TDDFT diagonalization problem (only single excitation out of occupied orbitals plus all diagonal doubles). Further marked improvement is obtained with moderate extension to allow for excitation out of the lumo and lumo+1, which become fractionally occupied in particular at longer distances due to left-right correlation effects. In the second place the interpretation of density matrix response calculations is elucidated. The one-particle reduced density matrix response for an excitation is related to the transition density matrix to the corresponding excited state. The interpretation of the transition density matrix in terms of the familiar excitation character (single excitations, double excitations of various types, etc.) is detailed. The adiabatic PINO theory is shown to successfully resolve the problematic cases of adiabatic TDDFT when it uses a proper PI orbital functional such as the PILS functional.

  12. Response calculations based on an independent particle system with the exact one-particle density matrix: Excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesbertz, K. J. H.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2012-03-01

    Adiabatic response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) suffers from the restriction to basically an occupied → virtual single excitation formulation. Adiabatic time-dependent density matrix functional theory allows to break away from this restriction. Problematic excitations for TDDFT, viz. bonding-antibonding, double, charge transfer, and higher excitations, are calculated along the bond-dissociation coordinate of the prototype molecules H2 and HeH+ using the recently developed adiabatic linear response phase-including (PI) natural orbital theory (PINO). The possibility to systematically increase the scope of the calculation from excitations out of (strongly) occupied into weakly occupied ("virtual") natural orbitals to larger ranges of excitations is explored. The quality of the PINO response calculations is already much improved over TDDFT even when the severest restriction is made, to virtually the size of the TDDFT diagonalization problem (only single excitation out of occupied orbitals plus all diagonal doubles). Further marked improvement is obtained with moderate extension to allow for excitation out of the lumo and lumo+1, which become fractionally occupied in particular at longer distances due to left-right correlation effects. In the second place the interpretation of density matrix response calculations is elucidated. The one-particle reduced density matrix response for an excitation is related to the transition density matrix to the corresponding excited state. The interpretation of the transition density matrix in terms of the familiar excitation character (single excitations, double excitations of various types, etc.) is detailed. The adiabatic PINO theory is shown to successfully resolve the problematic cases of adiabatic TDDFT when it uses a proper PI orbital functional such as the PILS functional.

  13. Entropy Driven Excitation Energy Sorting in Superfluid Fission Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz

    2010-05-28

    It is shown that the constant-temperature behavior of nuclei in the superfluid regime leads to an energy-sorting process if two nuclei are in thermal contact, as is the case in the fission process. This effect explains why an increase of the initial excitation energy leads an increase of the number of emitted neutrons from the heavy fission fragment, only. The observed essentially complete energy sorting may be seen as a new counterintuitive manifestation of quantum-mechanical properties of microscopic systems.

  14. The /A 1 Sigma +/ - /X 1 Sigma +/ system of the isotopic lithium hydrides - The molecular constants, potential energy curves, and their adiabatic corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, C. R.; Stwalley, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    The molecular constants and their adiabatic corrections have been determined for the (A 1 Sigma +) - (X 1 Sigma +) system of the isotopic lithium hydrides: (Li-6)H, (Li-7)H, (Li-6)D, and (Li-7)D. Using a fully quantum mechanical variational method, the potential energy curves (IPA potentials) are determined. Extending the variational method, we have obtained for the first time adiabatic corrections of potential energy curves from isotopic spectroscopic data. A significant difference between the potential energy curves of the lithium hydrides and the lithium deuterides has been observed. When Li-6 was replaced by Li-7, a significant difference was only observed for the (A 1 Sigma +) state, but not for the (X 1 Sigma +) state.

  15. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation-energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, E. K.; Gómez-Bombarelli, R.; Lovett, B. W.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how the effectiveness of natural photosynthetic energy-harvesting systems arises from the interplay between quantum coherence and environmental noise represents a significant challenge for quantum theory. Recently it has begun to be appreciated that discrete molecular vibrational modes may play an important role in the dynamics of such systems. Here we present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrations may be able to contribute to the efficiency and directionality of energy transfer. Excited vibrational states create resonant pathways through the system, supporting fast and efficient energy transport. Vibrational damping together with the natural downhill arrangement of molecular energy levels gives intrinsic directionality to the energy flow. Analytical and numerical results demonstrate a significant enhancement of the efficiency and directionality of energy transport that can be directly related to the existence of resonances between vibrational and excitonic levels.

  16. Calculation of reaction energies and adiabatic temperatures for waste tank reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, L.L.

    1995-10-01

    Continual concern has been expressed over potentially hazardous exothermic reactions that might occur in Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. These tanks contain many different oxidizable compounds covering a wide range of concentrations. The chemical hazards are a function of several interrelated factors, including the amount of energy (heat) produced, how fast it is produced, and the thermal absorption and heat transfer properties of the system. The reaction path(s) will determine the amount of energy produced and kinetics will determine the rate that it is produced. The tanks also contain many inorganic compounds inert to oxidation. These compounds act as diluents and can inhibit exothermic reactions because of their heat capacity and thus, in contrast to the oxidizable compounds, provide mitigation of hazardous reactions. In this report the energy that may be released when various organic and inorganic compounds react is computed as a function of the reaction-mix composition and the temperature. The enthalpy, or integrated heat capacity, of these compounds and various reaction products is presented as a function of temperature; the enthalpy of a given mixture can then be equated to the energy release from various reactions to predict the maximum temperature which may be reached. This is estimated for several different compositions. Alternatively, the amounts of various diluents required to prevent the temperature from reaching a critical value can be estimated. Reactions taking different paths, forming different products such as N{sub 2}O in place of N{sub 2} are also considered, as are reactions where an excess of caustic is present. Oxidants other than nitrate and nitrite are considered briefly.

  17. Adiabatic Pseudospectral Technique: Applications to Four Atom Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antikainen, Jyrki Tapio

    1995-01-01

    After the introduction, in chapter 2 we review some of the well established techniques used to solve the Schrodinger equation. The following methods are discussed: the Finite Basis Representation, the Discrete Variable Representation, the Basic Light basis set truncation, and the Lanczos tridiagonalization. After reviewing the previous techniques we present the main features of our Adiabatic Pseudospectral (APS) technique. The Adiabatic Pseudospectral technique is a synthesis of several powerful computational methods such as the sequential adiabatic basis set reduction, the iterative Lanczos diagonalization, the collocation techniques, and a careful implementation of the matrix -vector product for the Hamiltonian in the reduced adiabatic representation. In chapter 3 we use our adiabatic pseudospectral method (APS) to calculate energy levels of the H _2O_2 molecule up to 5000 cm ^{-1}. Reasonably high accuracy (a few wavenumbers) is achieved for a fully six dimensional calculation in a few hours of CPU time on an IBM 580 workstation. These results are a great improvement over previous calculations on the same system which required 50-100 times more computational effort for a similar level of accuracy. The method presented here is both general and robust. It will allow for routine studies of six dimensional potential surfaces and the associated spectroscopy, while making calculations on still larger systems feasible. In chapter 4 the adiabatic pseudospectral method is used to study the high energy vibrational levels of the H_2C_2 molecule. We calculate stimulated emission pumping spectra initialized by the excited electronic state vibrational trans-bent state ~ A_sp{u}{1 }3_{nu}_3 . The calculations show that with the APS-method we can easily investigate energy regions in the excess of 15,000 cm^{-1}; these high energy regions have been previously unattainable by computational techniques.

  18. Calculation of reaction energies and adiabatic temperatures for waste tank reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, L.L.

    1993-03-01

    Continual concern has been expressed over potentially hazardous exothermic reactions that might occur in underground Hanford waste tanks. These tanks contain many different oxidizable compounds covering a wide range of concentrations. Several may be in concentrations and quantities great enough to be considered a hazard in that they could undergo rapid and energetic chemical reactions with nitrate and nitrite salts that are present. The tanks also contain many inorganic compounds inert to oxidation. In this report the computed energy that may be released when various organic and inorganic compounds react is computed as a function of the reaction mix composition and the temperature. The enthalpy, or integrated heat capacity, of these compounds and various reaction products is presented as a function of temperature, and the enthalpy of a given mixture can then be equated to the energy release from various reactions to predict the maximum temperature that may be reached. This is estimated for several different compositions. Alternatively, the amounts of various diluents required to prevent the temperature from reaching a critical value can be estimated.

  19. Topology of the Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for theResonance States of the Water Anion

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-04-15

    The potential energy surfaces corresponding to the long-lived fixed-nuclei electron scattering resonances of H{sub 2}O relevant to the dissociative electron attachment process are examined using a combination of ab initio scattering and bound-state calculations. These surfaces have a rich topology, characterized by three main features: a conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} Feshbach resonance states; charge-transfer behavior in the OH ({sup 2}{Pi}) + H{sup -} asymptote of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} resonances; and an inherent double-valuedness of the surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state the C{sub 2v} geometry, arising from a branch-point degeneracy with a {sup 2}B{sub 2} shape resonance. In total, eight individual seams of degeneracy among these resonances are located.

  20. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  1. Rotary bistable and Parametrically Excited Vibration Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmann, L.; Jia, Y.; Hoffmann, D.; Manoli, Y.; Woias, P.

    2016-11-01

    Parametric resonance is a type of nonlinear vibration phenomenon [1], [2] induced from the periodic modulation of at least one of the system parameters and has the potential to exhibit interesting higher order nonlinear behaviour [3]. Parametrically excited vibration energy harvesters have been previously shown to enhance both the power amplitude [4] and the frequency bandwidth [5] when compared to the conventional direct resonant approach. However, to practically activate the more profitable regions of parametric resonance, additional design mechanisms [6], [7] are required to overcome a critical initiation threshold amplitude. One route is to establish an autoparametric system where external direct excitation is internally coupled to parametric excitation [8]. For a coupled two degrees of freedom (DoF) oscillatory system, principal autoparametric resonance can be achieved when the natural frequency of the first DoF f1 is twice that of the second DoF f2 and the external excitation is in the vicinity of f1. This paper looks at combining rotary and translatory motion and use autoparametric resonance phenomena.

  2. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors.

  3. Magnetic Excitations and the Exchange Energy Available for Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahm, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    We have made detailed comparisons of theoretical calculations and experimental neutron scattering results in absolute units in order to determine the temperature change of the nearest neighbor spin correlations in optimally doped YBCO as one goes from the normal to the superconducting state [1]. This allows us to estimate the magnetic exchange energy change that becomes available for superconducting condensation. Our results show that the available magnetic energy change is about 10-15 times larger than the energy necessary for superconducting condensation [1]. We discuss the issue of the spin sum rule and implications for a spin fluctuation driven pairing interaction as well as implications for low energy excitations in angular photoemission spectroscopy [2]. [1] H. Woo et al, Nature Physics 2, 600 (2006). [2] T. Dahm et al, Phys. Rev. B 72, 214512 (2005).

  4. Semiconductor adiabatic qubits

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Witzel, Wayne; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Ganti, Anand; Landahl, Andrew J.; Lilly, Michael; Nguyen, Khoi Thi; Bishop, Nathaniel; Carr, Stephen M.; Bussmann, Ezra; Nielsen, Erik; Levy, James Ewers; Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-12-27

    A quantum computing device that includes a plurality of semiconductor adiabatic qubits is described herein. The qubits are programmed with local biases and coupling terms between qubits that represent a problem of interest. The qubits are initialized by way of a tuneable parameter, a local tunnel coupling within each qubit, such that the qubits remain in a ground energy state, and that initial state is represented by the qubits being in a superposition of |0> and |1> states. The parameter is altered over time adiabatically or such that relaxation mechanisms maintain a large fraction of ground state occupation through decreasing the tunnel coupling barrier within each qubit with the appropriate schedule. The final state when tunnel coupling is effectively zero represents the solution state to the problem represented in the |0> and |1> basis, which can be accurately read at each qubit location.

  5. Phonon-assisted excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Xin; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong

    2016-09-01

    The phonon-assisted process of energy transfer aiming at exploring the newly emerging frontier between biology and physics is an issue of central interest. This article shows the important role of the intramolecular vibrational modes for excitation energy transfer in the photosynthetic systems. Based on a dimer system consisting of a donor and an acceptor modeled by two two-level systems, in which one of them is coupled to a high-energy vibrational mode, we derive an effective Hamiltonian describing the vibration-assisted coherent energy transfer process in the polaron frame. The effective Hamiltonian reveals in the case that the vibrational mode dynamically matches the energy detuning between the donor and the acceptor, the original detuned energy transfer becomes resonant energy transfer. In addition, the population dynamics and coherence dynamics of the dimer system with and without vibration-assistance are investigated numerically. It is found that, the energy transfer efficiency and the transfer time depend heavily on the interaction strength of the donor and the high-energy vibrational mode, as well as the vibrational frequency. The numerical results also indicate that the initial state and dissipation rate of the vibrational mode have little influence on the dynamics of the dimer system. Results obtained in this article are not only helpful to understand the natural photosynthesis, but also offer an optimal design principle for artificial photosynthesis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174233).

  6. Modeling coherent excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei

    2011-12-01

    Recent non-linear spectroscopy experiments suggest the excitation energy transfer in some biological light harvesting systems initially occurs coherently. Treating such processes brings significant challenge for conventional theoretical tools that usually involve different approximations. In this dissertation, the recently developed Iterative Linearized Density Matrix (ILDM) propagation scheme, which is non-perturbative and non-Markovian is extended to study coherent excitation energy transfer in various light harvesting complexes. It is demonstrated that the ILDM approach can successfully describe the coherent beating of the site populations on model systems and gives quantitative agreement with both experimental results and the results of other theoretical methods have been developed recently to going beyond the usual approximations, thus providing a new reliable theoretical tool to study this phenomenon. This approach is used to investigate the excited energy transfer dynamics in various experimentally studied bacteria light harvesting complexes, such as Fenna-Matthews-Olsen (FMO) complex, Phycocyanin 645 (PC645). In these model calculations, quantitative agreement is found between computed de-coherence times and quantum beating pattens observed in the non-linear spectroscopy. As a result of these studies, it is concluded that the stochastic resonance behavior is important in determining the optimal throughput. To begin addressing possible mechanics for observed long de-coherence time, various models which include correlation between site energy fluctuations as well as correlation between site energy and inter-site coupling are developed. The influence of both types of correlation on the coherence and transfer rate is explored using with a two state system-bath hamiltonian parametrized to model the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteria. To overcome the disadvantages of a fully reduced approach or a full propagation method, a brownian dynamics

  7. Fluctuations, Saturation, and Diffractive Excitation in High Energy Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Flensburg, Christoffer

    2011-07-15

    Diffractive excitation is usually described by the Good-Walker formalism for low masses, and by the triple-Regge formalism for high masses. In the Good-Walker formalism the cross section is determined by the fluctuations in the interaction. By taking the fluctuations in the BFKL ladder into account, it is possible to describe both low and high mass excitation in the Good-Walker formalism. In high energy pp collisions the fluctuations are strongly suppressed by saturation, which implies that pomeron exchange does not factorise between DIS and pp collisions. The Dipole Cascade Model reproduces the expected triple-Regge form for the bare pomeron, and the triple-pomeron coupling is estimated.

  8. Low-energy Coulomb excitation of Sr,9896 beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, E.; Zielińska, M.; Péru, S.; Goutte, H.; Hilaire, S.; Görgen, A.; Korten, W.; Doherty, D. T.; Bastin, B.; Bauer, C.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Butler, P. A.; Butterworth, J.; Cederkäll, J.; Delahaye, P.; Dijon, A.; Ekström, A.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fransen, C.; Georgiev, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Iwanicki, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Larsen, A. C.; Ljungvall, J.; Lutter, R.; Marley, P.; Moschner, K.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pakarinen, J.; Petts, A.; Reiter, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Sotty, C.; Srebrny, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.; De Witte, H.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.

    2016-11-01

    The structure of neutron-rich Sr,9896 nuclei was investigated by low-energy safe Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility, CERN, with the MINIBALL spectrometer. A rich set of transitional and diagonal E 2 matrix elements, including those for non-yrast structures, has been extracted from the differential Coulomb-excitation cross sections. The results support the scenario of a shape transition at N =60 , giving rise to the coexistence of a highly deformed prolate and a spherical configuration in 98Sr, and are compared to predictions from several theoretical calculations. The experimental data suggest a significant contribution of the triaxal degree of freedom in the ground state of both isotopes. In addition, experimental information on low-lying states in 98Rb has been obtained.

  9. Excitation Energy Transfer Dynamics and Excited-State Structure in Chlorosomes of Chlorobium phaeobacteroides

    PubMed Central

    Pšenčík, Jakub; Ma, Ying-Zhong; Arellano, Juan B.; Hála, Jan; Gillbro, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    The excited-state relaxation within bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) e and a in chlorosomes of Chlorobium phaeobacteroides has been studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy at room temperature. Singlet-singlet annihilation was observed to strongly influence both the isotropic and anisotropic decays. Pump intensities in the order of 1011 photons × pulse−1 × cm−2 were required to obtain annihilation-free conditions. The most important consequence of applied very low excitation doses is an observation of a subpicosecond process within the BChl e manifold (∼200–500 fs), manifesting itself as a rise in the red part of the Qy absorption band of the BChl e aggregates. The subsequent decay of the kinetics measured in the BChl e region and the corresponding rise in the baseplate BChl a is not single-exponential, and at least two components are necessary to fit the data, corresponding to several BChl e→BChl a transfer steps. Under annihilation-free conditions, the anisotropic kinetics show a generally slow decay within the BChl e band (10–20 ps) whereas it decays more rapidly in the BChl a region (∼1 ps). Analysis of the experimental data gives a detailed picture of the overall time evolution of the energy relaxation and energy transfer processes within the chlorosome. The results are interpreted within an exciton model based on the proposed structure. PMID:12547796

  10. Dependence of the energy transfer to graphene on the excitation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mackowski, Sebastian Kamińska, Izabela

    2015-07-13

    Fluorescence studies of natural photosynthetic complexes on a graphene layer demonstrate pronounced influence of the excitation wavelength on the energy transfer efficiency to graphene. Ultraviolet light yields much faster decay of fluorescence, with average efficiencies of the energy transfer equal to 87% and 65% for excitation at 405 nm and 640 nm, respectively. This implies that focused light changes locally the properties of graphene affecting the energy transfer dynamics, in an analogous way as in the case of metallic nanostructures. Demonstrating optical control of the energy transfer is important for exploiting unique properties of graphene in photonic and sensing architectures.

  11. Amino Acid Mean Excitation Energies and Directional Dependencies from Core and Bond Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sabin, John R.; Oddershede, Jens; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-12-08

    We determine the mean excitation energies of several amino acids using a Bragg Rule developed for molecular fragments or functional groups. As the composition of the amino acids is very similar, we find that the amino acids have similar mean excitation energies (approximately 70 eV). Differences arise from variation of the side chains (-R); addition of-CH2-groups decreases the mean excitation energy. We also speculate concerning the directional dependence of the amino acid mean excitation energies.

  12. Population shuffling between ground and high energy excited states

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, T Michael; Trent, John O; Lee, Donghan

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic processes powered by thermal energy lead to protein motions traversing time-scales from picoseconds to seconds. Fundamental to protein functionality is the utilization of these dynamics for tasks such as catalysis, folding, and allostery. A hierarchy of motion is hypothesized to connect and synergize fast and slow dynamics toward performing these essential activities. Population shuffling predicts a “top-down” temporal hierarchy, where slow time-scale conformational interconversion leads to a shuffling of the free energy landscape for fast time-scale events. Until now, population shuffling was only applied to interconverting ground states. Here, we extend the framework of population shuffling to be applicable for a system interconverting between low energy ground and high energy excited states, such as the SH3 domain mutants G48M and A39V/N53P/V55L from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, providing another tool for accessing the structural dynamics of high energy excited states. Our results indicate that the higher energy gauche− rotameric state for the leucine χ2 dihedral angle contributes significantly to the distribution of rotameric states in both the major and minor forms of the SH3 domain. These findings are corroborated with unrestrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on both the major and minor states of the SH3 domain demonstrating high correlations between experimental and back-calculated leucine χ2 rotameric populations. Taken together, we demonstrate how fast time-scale rotameric side-chain population distributions can be extracted from slow time-scale conformational exchange data further extending the scope and the applicability of the population shuffling model. PMID:26316263

  13. Population shuffling between ground and high energy excited states.

    PubMed

    Sabo, T Michael; Trent, John O; Lee, Donghan

    2015-11-01

    Stochastic processes powered by thermal energy lead to protein motions traversing time-scales from picoseconds to seconds. Fundamental to protein functionality is the utilization of these dynamics for tasks such as catalysis, folding, and allostery. A hierarchy of motion is hypothesized to connect and synergize fast and slow dynamics toward performing these essential activities. Population shuffling predicts a "top-down" temporal hierarchy, where slow time-scale conformational interconversion leads to a shuffling of the free energy landscape for fast time-scale events. Until now, population shuffling was only applied to interconverting ground states. Here, we extend the framework of population shuffling to be applicable for a system interconverting between low energy ground and high energy excited states, such as the SH3 domain mutants G48M and A39V/N53P/V55L from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, providing another tool for accessing the structural dynamics of high energy excited states. Our results indicate that the higher energy gauche - rotameric state for the leucine χ2 dihedral angle contributes significantly to the distribution of rotameric states in both the major and minor forms of the SH3 domain. These findings are corroborated with unrestrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on both the major and minor states of the SH3 domain demonstrating high correlations between experimental and back-calculated leucine χ2 rotameric populations. Taken together, we demonstrate how fast time-scale rotameric side-chain population distributions can be extracted from slow time-scale conformational exchange data further extending the scope and the applicability of the population shuffling model.

  14. Piezoelectric compliant mechanism energy harvesters under large base excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaokun; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Rahn, Christopher D.

    2016-09-01

    A piezoelectric compliant mechanism (PCM) energy harvester is designed, modeled, and analyzed that consists of a polyvinylidene diflouoride, PVDF unimorph clamped at its base and attached to a compliant mechanism at its tip. The compliant hinge stiffness is carefully tuned to approach a low frequency first mode with an efficient (nearly quadratic) shape that provides a uniform strain distribution. A nonlinear model of the PCM energy harvester under large base excitation is derived to determine the maximum power that can be generated by the device. Experiments with a fabricated PCM energy harvester prototype show that the compliant mechanism introduces a stiffening effect and a much wider bandwidth than a benchmark proof mass cantilever design. The PCM bridge structure self-limits the displacement and maximum strain at large excitations compared with the proof mass cantilever, improving the device robustness. The PCM outperforms the cantilever in both average power and power-strain sensitivity at high accelerations due to the PCM axial stretching effect and its more uniform strain distribution.

  15. Excitation energy transfer: Study with non-Markovian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Xianting

    2010-11-15

    In this paper, we investigate the non-Markovian dynamics of a model to mimic the excitation energy transfer (EET) between chromophores in photosynthesis systems. The numerical path integral method is used. This method includes the non-Markovian effects of the environmental affects, and it does not need the perturbation approximation in solving the dynamics of systems of interest. It implies that the coherence helps the EET between chromophores through lasting the transfer time rather than enhancing the transfer rate of the EET. In particular, the non-Markovian environment greatly increases the efficiency of the EET in the photosynthesis systems.

  16. Internal energy distributions from nitrogen dioxide fluorescence. 2. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O. Jr.; Johnston, H.S. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1993-09-30

    We follow the collisional deactivation of laser-excited nitrogen dioxide through its dispersed fluorescence. The energy acceptor gases are NO[sub 2] at four excitation energies ranging from 18828 to 24989 cm[sup [minus]1] and five monatomic gases, four diatomic gases, and three polyatomic gases with 18828-cm[sup [minus]1] excitation energy. The nominal products are the shapes of the internal energy distributions, which are obtained and plotted for several representative cases. From these distributions, the first three moments of the internal energy distributions are derived as a function of molecular collisions and tabulated as (i) the average internal energy, (ii) energy spread, and (iii) skewness. These quantities are plotted against c(M)t, the product of buffer gas concentration c(M) and delay time after laser excitation t(0.5-2 [mu]s), which is a quantity proportional to number of collisions. The negative slope of average energy vs c(M)t is the macroscopic energy-transfer rate constant, k[sub [epsilon

  17. Accurate potential energy functions, non-adiabatic and spin-orbit couplings in the ZnH(+) system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guiying; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Haifeng; Yan, Bing

    2016-03-05

    A high-level ab initio calculation on the ZnH(+) cation has been carried out with the multi-reference configuration interaction method plus Davison correction (MRCI+Q). The scalar relativistic effect is included by using the Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) method. The calculated potential energy curves (PECs) of the 7 Λ-S states are associated with the dissociation limits of Zn(+)((2)Sg)+H((2)Sg), Zn((1)Sg)+H(+)((1)Sg), and Zn(+)((2)Pu)+H((2)Sg), respectively (The Λ-S state is labeled as (2S+1)Λ, in which Λ is the quantum number for the projection along the internuclear axis of the total electronic orbital angular momentum and S is the total electron spin). The spectroscopic constants of the bound states are determined and in good agreement with the available theoretical and experimental results. The permanent dipole moments (PDMs) of Λ-S states and the spin-orbit (SO) matrix elements between Λ-S states are also computed. The results show that the abrupt changes of the PDMs and SO matrix elements come into being for the reason of the avoided crossing between the states with the same symmetry. In addition, the non-adiabatic couplings matrix elements between Λ-S states are also evaluated. Finally, the spin-orbit couplings (SOCs) for the low-lying states are considered with Breit-Pauli operator. The SOC effect makes the 7 Λ-S states of the ZnH(+) cation split into 12 Ω states (Ω=Λ+Sz, in which Sz is projection of the total electron spin S along the internuclear Z-axis). For the (3)0(+) state, the two energy minima exhibit in the potential, which could be attributed to the formation of the new avoided crossing point. The transition dipole moments (TDMs), Franck-Condon factors, and the radiative lifetimes of the selected transitions (2)0(+)-X0(+), (3)0(+)-X0(+), (2)1-X0(+) and (3)1-X0(+) have been reported.

  18. Accurate potential energy functions, non-adiabatic and spin-orbit couplings in the ZnH+ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guiying; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Haifeng; Yan, Bing

    2016-03-01

    A high-level ab initio calculation on the ZnH+ cation has been carried out with the multi-reference configuration interaction method plus Davison correction (MRCI + Q). The scalar relativistic effect is included by using the Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) method. The calculated potential energy curves (PECs) of the 7 Λ-S states are associated with the dissociation limits of Zn+(2Sg) + H(2Sg), Zn(1Sg) + H+(1Sg), and Zn+(2Pu) + H(2Sg), respectively (The Λ-S state is labeled as 2S + 1Λ, in which Λ is the quantum number for the projection along the internuclear axis of the total electronic orbital angular momentum and S is the total electron spin). The spectroscopic constants of the bound states are determined and in good agreement with the available theoretical and experimental results. The permanent dipole moments (PDMs) of Λ-S states and the spin-orbit (SO) matrix elements between Λ-S states are also computed. The results show that the abrupt changes of the PDMs and SO matrix elements come into being for the reason of the avoided crossing between the states with the same symmetry. In addition, the non-adiabatic couplings matrix elements between Λ-S states are also evaluated. Finally, the spin-orbit couplings (SOCs) for the low-lying states are considered with Breit-Pauli operator. The SOC effect makes the 7 Λ-S states of the ZnH+ cation split into 12 Ω states (Ω = Λ + Sz, in which Sz is projection of the total electron spin S along the internuclear Z-axis). For the (3)0+ state, the two energy minima exhibit in the potential, which could be attributed to the formation of the new avoided crossing point. The transition dipole moments (TDMs), Franck-Condon factors, and the radiative lifetimes of the selected transitions (2)0+-X0+, (3)0+-X0+, (2)1-X0+ and (3)1-X0+ have been reported.

  19. Nonradiative excitation energy transport in one-component disordered systems.

    PubMed

    Bojarski, P; Kulak, L; Bojarski, C; Kawski, A

    1995-12-01

    High-accuracy Monte Carlo simulations of the time-dependent excitation probabilityG (s) (t) and steady-state emission anisotropyr M /r 0M for one-component three-dimensional systems were performed. It was found that the values ofr M /r 0M obtained for the averaged orientation factor[Formula: see text] only slightly overrate those obtained for the real values of the orientation factor κ ik (2) . This result is essentially different from that previously reported. Simulation results were compared with the probability coursesG (s) (t) andR(t) obtained within the frameworks of diagrammatic and two-particle Huber models, respectively. The results turned out to be in good agreement withR(t) but deviated visibly fromG (s) (t) at long times and/or high concentrations. Emission anisotropy measurements on glycerolic solutions of Na-fluorescein and rhodamine 6G were carried out at different excitation wavelengths. Very good agreement between the experimental data and the theory was found, with λex≈λ0-0 for concentrations not exceeding 3.5·10(-2) and 7.5·10(-3) M in the case of Na-fluorescein and rhodamine 6G, respectively. Up to these concentrations, the solutions investigated can be treated as one-component systems. The discrepancies observed at higher concentrations are caused by the presence of dimers. It was found that forλ ex <λ0-0 (Stokes excitation) the experimental emission anisotropies are lower than predicted by the theory. However, upon anti-Stokes excitation (λex>λ0-0), they lie higher than the respective theoretical values. Such a dispersive character of the energy migration can be explained qualitatively by the presence of fluorescent centers with 0-0 transitions differing from the "mean" at λ0-0.

  20. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  1. Limit on rotational energy available to excite Jovian aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    There is a fundamental relationship between the power that is extracted from Jupiter's rotation to drive magnetospheric processes and the rate at which mass is injected into the Io plasma torus. Half of this power is consumed by bulk motion of the plasma and the other half represents an upper limit on the energy from rotation available for dissipation and in particular to excite the Jovian aurora. Since the rotation of the planet is the only plausible source of energy, the power inferred from the observed auroral intensities requires a plasma injection rate of 2.6 x 10 to the 29th AMU/sec or greater. This in turn leads to a residence time of a torus particle of 48 days or less. These results raise doubts about the applicability of equilibrium thermodynamics to the determination of plasma parameters in the Io torus.

  2. Identifying and tracing potential energy surfaces of electronic excitations with specific character via their transition origins: application to oxirane.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Hao; Zuehlsdorff, T J; Payne, M C; Hine, N D M

    2015-05-14

    We show that the transition origins of electronic excitations identified by quantified natural transition orbital (QNTO) analysis can be employed to connect potential energy surfaces (PESs) according to their character across a wide range of molecular geometries. This is achieved by locating the switching of transition origins of adiabatic potential surfaces as the geometry changes. The transition vectors for analysing transition origins are provided by linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations under the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. We study the photochemical CO ring opening of oxirane as an example and show that the results corroborate the traditional Gomer-Noyes mechanism derived experimentally. The knowledge of specific states for the reaction also agrees well with that given by previous theoretical work using TDDFT surface-hopping dynamics that was validated by high-quality quantum Monte Carlo calculations. We also show that QNTO can be useful for considerably larger and more complex systems: by projecting the excitations to those of a reference oxirane molecule, the approach is able to identify and analyse specific excitations of a trans-2,3-diphenyloxirane molecule.

  3. Excitation energy dependence of excited states dynamics in all- trans-carotenes determined by femtosecond absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2005-06-01

    Ultrafast relaxation kinetics in β-carotene and lycopene has been investigated by femtosecond absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies using tunable excitation pulses. The transient signals induced by the photoexcitation with larger excess energy have broader bands and longer lifetimes both in the 11Bu+and21Ag- excited states. The excess vibrational energy remains longer than several picoseconds and slows the relaxation kinetics in carotenoids.

  4. Excitation energy transfer in covalently bonded porphyrin heterodimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschenko, V. Z.; Konovalova, N. V.; Bagdashkin, A. L.; Gorokhov, V. V.; Tusov, V. B.; Yuzhakov, V. I.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the photophysical properties of heterodimers that are formed by the free base 2-(2-carboxyvinyl)-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin and the zinc complex of 5-( p-aminophenyl)-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin and that are covalently bonded by the amide link. These dimers differ in the configuration of the double bond in the spacer group. We determine fluorescence quantum yields of heterodimers and their porphyrin components. The energy transfer rate constants have been estimated from the measured fluorescence lifetimes and fluorescence excitation spectra and, also, they have been calculated from the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra according to the Förster theory. We have found that the efficiency of the intramolecular energy transfer in heterodimers is 0.97-0.99, and the energy migration rate constants have been found to be (1.82-4.49) × 1010 s-1. The results of our investigation show that synthesized heterodimers can be used as efficient light-harvesting elements in solar energy conversion devices.

  5. Exact ensemble density functional theory for excited states in a model system: Investigating the weight dependence of the correlation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Killian; Mazouin, Laurent; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (eDFT) is an exact time-independent alternative to time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) for the calculation of excitation energies. Despite its formal simplicity and advantages in contrast to TD-DFT (multiple excitations, for example, can be easily taken into account in an ensemble), eDFT is not standard, which is essentially due to the lack of reliable approximate exchange-correlation (x c ) functionals for ensembles. Following Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. B 93, 245131 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.245131], we propose in this work to construct an exact eDFT for the nontrivial asymmetric Hubbard dimer, thus providing more insight into the weight dependence of the ensemble x c energy in various correlation regimes. For that purpose, an exact analytical expression for the weight-dependent ensemble exchange energy has been derived. The complementary exact ensemble correlation energy has been computed by means of Legendre-Fenchel transforms. Interesting features like discontinuities in the ensemble x c potential in the strongly correlated limit have been rationalized by means of a generalized adiabatic connection formalism. Finally, functional-driven errors induced by ground-state density-functional approximations have been studied. In the strictly symmetric case or in the weakly correlated regime, combining ensemble exact exchange with ground-state correlation functionals gives better ensemble energies than when calculated with the ground-state exchange-correlation functional. However, when approaching the asymmetric equiensemble in the strongly correlated regime, the former approximation leads to highly curved ensemble energies with negative slope which is unphysical. Using both ground-state exchange and correlation functionals gives much better results in that case. In fact, exact ensemble energies are almost recovered in some density domains. The analysis of density-driven errors is left for future work.

  6. Metallic bond effects on mean excitation energies for stopping powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    Mean excitation energies for first row metals are evaluated by means of the local plasma approximation. Particle corrections based on Pines' (1953) procedure and the Wigner Seitz (1934) model of the metallic state are included. The agreement with experimental values is remarkably good. In contrast to previous work, the calculations given here estimate shifts in the plasma frequency according to the theory for plane wave states in an extended plasma as calculated by Pines. It is demonstrated that the effects of the metallic bond in lithium and beryllium are quite large and that they appear mainly as a result of collective oscillations in the 'free' electron gas formed from the valence electrons. The usefulness of the plasma frequency shift derived for a degenerate electron gas in predicting the plasma frequency shift within the ion core is considered surprising.

  7. Electronic excitation of molecular hydrogen by low-energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-09-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, particularly in interstellar plasmas such as atmospheres of gas giant planets and stars. Electron collision data for hydrogen is critical to interpreting the spectroscopy of interstellar objects, as well as being of applied value for modelling technological plasmas. Hydrogen is also fundamentally interesting, as while highly accurate wave functions for this simple molecule are available, providing an accurate, ab initio, treatment the collision dynamics has proven challenging, on account of the need to have a complete description of channel coupling and polarization effects. To date, no single theoretical approach has been able to replicate experimental results across all transitions and incident energies, while the experimental database that is available is far from complete and not all available measurements are in satisfactory agreement. In this talk, we present differential and integral cross section measurements for electronic excitation cross sections for molecular hydrogen by low-energy electron impact. The data were measured at incident energies below 20eV, using a well-tested crossed beam apparatus and employing a moveable gas source approach to ensure that background contributions to the scattering are accurately accounted for. These measurements are compared with new theoretical results employing the convergent close coupling approach.

  8. Dynamics of Rovibrational Energy Transfer from Excited Molecular - Crossed Beam Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hong

    1990-01-01

    Rovibrational inelastic scattering has been studied for the collisions between helium and excited molecular iodine (I_2) in a crossed beam apparatus. I _2 was initially prepared in two vibrational states, upsilon' = 15 and 35, in the B O_{rm u }^ + electronic state. Dispersed single vibrational level fluorescence spectra revealed the vibrational inelastic scattering. The collision energy (Ecm) was varied from 35meV to 190meV. Vibrational state changes up to | Deltaupsilon| = 6 in upsilon' = 35 and | Deltaupsilon| = 3 in upsilon' = 15 were observed. Nearly 200 relative vibrational state-to-state inelastic scattering cross sections were measured. At each Ecm, all the cross sections for both upsilon' = 15 and 35 can be fitted by a single exponential function sigma ~ exp(-| Delta rm E|/beta). At high Ecm, beta_{rm Vto T} is equal to beta_{rm Tto V}. At low ECM, beta _{rm Vto T} is larger than beta_{rm Tto V}. However, all beta's are linear functions of Ecm. Also the cross sections for the Deltaupsilon = +/-1 scattering are nearly independent of Ecm. Considering that the collisions are not adiabatic, these results are not consistent with the well-known Landau-Teller theory. Using the empirical dependence of the cross sections on Ecm, we calculated the thermal rate constants. The calculation at 300K agrees with the bulb experiment for V to T but not for T to V transitions. The calculation also shows that the bulb energy transfer is mainly induced by collisions with velocities ~2 times larger than the most probable velocity. From the cross sections, mean energy transfer per vibrationally inelastic collision, < Deltarm E>, was also obtained. The results show that < Deltarm E> increases linearly with Ecm and levels off to near-zero at high collision energy. At low Ecm, < Deltarm E> in upsilon' = 15 is larger than that in upsilon' = 35. The average rotational energy transfered increases almost linearly with Ecm but is small, only ~ 2% of the Ecm. This is a direct result of

  9. Coherence, Energy and Charge Transfers in De-Excitation Pathways of Electronic Excited State of Biomolecules in Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Henrik G.; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-11-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin-chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used Förster-Dexter theory, which does not allow for charge transfer, is a special case of B-A theory. The latter could, under appropriate circumstances, lead to excimers.

  10. A new ab initio potential energy surface for the collisional excitation of N{sub 2}H{sup +} by H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Spielfiedel, Annie; Balança, Christian; Feautrier, Nicole; Senent, Maria Luisa; Kalugina, Yulia; Scribano, Yohann; Lique, François

    2015-07-14

    We compute a new potential energy surface (PES) for the study of the inelastic collisions between N{sub 2}H{sup +} and H{sub 2} molecules. A preliminary study of the reactivity of N{sub 2}H{sup +} with H{sub 2} shows that neglecting reactive channels in collisional excitation studies is certainly valid at low temperatures. The four dimensional (4D) N{sub 2}H{sup +}–H{sub 2} PES is obtained from electronic structure calculations using the coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitation level of theory. The atoms are described by the augmented correlation consistent triple zeta basis set. Both molecules were treated as rigid rotors. The potential energy surface exhibits a well depth of ≃2530 cm{sup −1}. Considering this very deep well, it appears that converged scattering calculations that take into account the rotational structure of both N{sub 2}H{sup +} and H{sub 2} should be very difficult to carry out. To overcome this difficulty, the “adiabatic-hindered-rotor” treatment, which allows para-H{sub 2}(j = 0) to be treated as if it were spherical, was used in order to reduce the scattering calculations to a 2D problem. The validity of this approach is checked and we find that cross sections and rate coefficients computed from the adiabatic reduced surface are in very good agreement with the full 4D calculations.

  11. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  12. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  13. Modeling excitation energy transfer in multi-BODIPY architectures.

    PubMed

    Azarias, Cloé; Russo, Roberto; Cupellini, Lorenzo; Mennucci, Benedetta; Jacquemin, Denis

    2017-02-15

    The excitation energy transfer (EET) allowing the concentration of the energy has been investigated in several multi-BODIPY architectures with the help of an approach coupling time dependent density functional theory to an implicit solvation scheme, the polarizable continuum model. We have first considered several strategies to compute the electronic coupling in a dyad varying the size of the donor/acceptor units, the bridge, the geometries and conformations. We have next studied the electronic coupling in three different architectures for which the EET rate constants have been experimentally measured both from luminescence and transient absorption data and from Förster theory. A good agreement with experimental values was obtained. Finally, in an effort to further improve these systems, we have designed several series of BODIPY triads, investigating the effect of acidochromism, core modifications, the position of the linkage and chemical substitutions on the EET coupling and rate constant. We show that several architectures allow us to increase the EET rate by one order of magnitude compared to the original compound.

  14. Energy harvesting from human motion: exploiting swing and shock excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Becker, P.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Modern compact and low power sensors and systems are leading towards increasingly integrated wearable systems. One key bottleneck of this technology is the power supply. The use of energy harvesting techniques offers a way of supplying sensor systems without the need for batteries and maintenance. In this work we present the development and characterization of two inductive energy harvesters which exploit different characteristics of the human gait. A multi-coil topology harvester is presented which uses the swing motion of the foot. The second device is a shock-type harvester which is excited into resonance upon heel strike. Both devices were modeled and designed with the key constraint of device height in mind, in order to facilitate the integration into the shoe sole. The devices were characterized under different motion speeds and with two test subjects on a treadmill. An average power output of up to 0.84 mW is achieved with the swing harvester. With a total device volume including the housing of 21 cm3 a power density of 40 μW cm-3 results. The shock harvester generates an average power output of up to 4.13 mW. The power density amounts to 86 μW cm-3 for the total device volume of 48 cm3. Difficulties and potential improvements are discussed briefly.

  15. Excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-Hao

    Quantum biology is a relatively new research area which investigates the rules that quantum mechanics plays in biology. One of the most intriguing systems in this field is the coherent excitation energy transport (EET) in photosynthesis. In this document I will discuss the theories that are suitable for describing the photosynthetic EET process and the corresponding numerical results on several photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes (PPCs). In some photosynthetic EET processes, because of the electronic coupling between the chromophores within the system is about the same order of magnitude as system-bath coupling (electron-phonon coupling), a non-perturbative method called hierarchy equation of motion (HEOM) is applied to study the EET dynamics. The first part of this thesis includes brief introduction and derivation to the HEOM approach. The second part of this thesis the HEOM method will be applied to investigate the EET process within the B850 ring of the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from purple bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. The dynamics of the exciton population and coherence will be analyzed under different initial excitation configurations and temperatures. Finally, how HEOM can be implemented to simulate the two-dimensional electronic spectra of photosynthetic PPCs will be discussed. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is a crucial experimental technique to probe EET dynamics in multi-chromophoric systems. The system we are interested in is the 7-chromophore Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from green sulfur bacteria, Prosthecochloris aestuarii. Recent crystallographic studies report the existence of an additional (eighth) chromophore in some of the FMO monomers. By applying HEOM we are able to calculate the two-dimensional electronic spectra of the 7-site and 8-site FMO complexes and investigate the functionality of the eighth chromophore.

  16. Optimizing Adiabaticity in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermause, Jonathan; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    We demonstrate the utility of Berry's superadiabatic formalism for numerically finding control sequences that implement quasi-adiabatic unitary transformations. Using an iterative interaction picture, we design a shortcut to adiabaticity that reduces the time required to perform an adiabatic inversion pulse in liquid state NMR. We also show that it is possible to extend our scheme to two or more qubits to find adiabatic quantum transformations that are allowed by the control algebra, and demonstrate a two-qubit entangling operation in liquid state NMR. We examine the pulse lengths at which the fidelity of these adiabatic transitions break down and compare with the quantum speed limit.

  17. Theoretical Studies on Excitation Energy Fluctuations of Pigments in a Light-Harvesting Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Masahiro; Saito, Shinji

    2014-03-01

    Excitation energy fluctuations of pigments in light-harvesting complexes play an important role in the excitation energy transfer dynamics. It is considered that protein environment controls the excitation energy fluctuation to maximize the efficiency of excitation energy transfer. However, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. The high computational cost of reliable electronic structure calculations for excited states prevents us from carrying out a large number of sampling needed to evaluate the excitation energy fluctuations. To overcome this difficulty, we develop a new method called molecular mechanics with Shepard interpolation corrections (MMSIC), which enable us to generate potential energy surfaces for pigments in light-harvesting complexes efficiently. We illustrate the new method by application to bacteriochlorophyll a pigments in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. The MMSIC calculations are more than a million times faster than the direct electronic structure calculations, and the calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Toussaint, U. V.; Timucin, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum excitation gap. g min, = O(n 2(exp -n/2), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to 'the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  19. Full-dimensional ground- and excited-state potential energy surfaces and state couplings for photodissociation of thioanisole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaohong L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2017-02-01

    Analytic potential energy surfaces (PESs) and state couplings of the ground and two lowest singlet excited states of thioanisole (C6H5SCH3) are constructed in a diabatic representation based on electronic structure calculations including dynamic correlation. They cover all 42 internal degrees of freedom and a wide range of geometries including the Franck-Condon region and the reaction valley along the breaking S-CH3 bond with the full ranges of the torsion angles. The parameters in the PESs and couplings are fitted to the results of smooth diabatic electronic structure calculations including dynamic electron correlation by the extended multi-configurational quasi-degenerate perturbation theory method for the adiabatic state energies followed by diabatization by the fourfold way. The fit is accomplished by the anchor points reactive potential method with two reactive coordinates and 40 nonreactive degrees of freedom, where the anchor-point force fields are obtained with a locally modified version of the QuickFF package. The PESs and couplings are suitable for study of the topography of the trilayer potential energy landscape and for electronically nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of the photodissociation of the S-CH3 bond.

  20. Full-dimensional ground- and excited-state potential energy surfaces and state couplings for photodissociation of thioanisole.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaohong L; Truhlar, Donald G

    2017-02-14

    Analytic potential energy surfaces (PESs) and state couplings of the ground and two lowest singlet excited states of thioanisole (C6H5SCH3) are constructed in a diabatic representation based on electronic structure calculations including dynamic correlation. They cover all 42 internal degrees of freedom and a wide range of geometries including the Franck-Condon region and the reaction valley along the breaking S-CH3 bond with the full ranges of the torsion angles. The parameters in the PESs and couplings are fitted to the results of smooth diabatic electronic structure calculations including dynamic electron correlation by the extended multi-configurational quasi-degenerate perturbation theory method for the adiabatic state energies followed by diabatization by the fourfold way. The fit is accomplished by the anchor points reactive potential method with two reactive coordinates and 40 nonreactive degrees of freedom, where the anchor-point force fields are obtained with a locally modified version of the QuickFF package. The PESs and couplings are suitable for study of the topography of the trilayer potential energy landscape and for electronically nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of the photodissociation of the S-CH3 bond.

  1. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD that predict H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations. PMID:23277576

  2. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Junhyeok; Meng, Sheng; Sun, Yi-Yang; West, Damien; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Shengbai

    2013-01-15

    Understanding and controlling of excited carrier dynamics is of fundamental and practical importance, particularly in photochemistry and solar energy applications. However, theory of energy relaxation of excited carriers is still in its early stage. Here, using ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) coupled with time-dependent density functional theory, we show a coverage-dependent energy transfer of photoexcited carriers in hydrogenated graphene, giving rise to distinctively different ion dynamics. Graphene with sparsely populated H is difficult to dissociate due to inefficient transfer of the excitation energy into kinetic energy of the H. In contrast, H can easily desorb from fully hydrogenated graphane. The key is to bring down the H antibonding state to the conduction band minimum as the band gap increases. These results can be contrasted to those of standard ground-state MD which predicts H in the sparse case should be much less stable than that in fully hydrogenated graphane. Our findings thus signify the importance of carrying out explicit electronic dynamics in excited-state simulations.

  3. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  4. Adiabatic-nuclei calculations of positron scattering from molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Bray, Igor; Chiari, Luca; Zecca, Antonio; Brunger, Michael J.

    2017-02-01

    The single-center adiabatic-nuclei convergent close-coupling method is used to investigate positron collisions with molecular hydrogen (H2) in the ground and first vibrationally excited states. Cross sections are presented over the energy range from 1 to 1000 eV for elastic scattering, vibrational excitation, total ionization, and the grand total cross section. The present adiabatic-nuclei positron-H2 scattering length is calculated as A =-2.70 a0 for the ground state and A =-3.16 a0 for the first vibrationally excited state. The present elastic differential cross sections are also used to "correct" the low-energy grand total cross-section measurements of the Trento group [A. Zecca et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 032702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevA.80.032702] for the forward-angle-scattering effect. In general, the comparison with experiment is good. By performing convergence studies, we estimate that our Rm=1.448 a0 fixed-nuclei results are converged to within ±5 % for the major scattering integrated cross sections.

  5. Excitation Energy and Temperature Dependence of the Phase Coherent Photorefractive Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, A.; Wagner, H. P.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the influence of excitation energy and temperature on the phase coherent photorefractive (PCP) effect in ZnSe quantum wells. At temperatures below 35 K and nearly exciton resonant excitation the formation of trions suppresses the PCP effect. At lower excitation energies increasing space-charge-fields reduce the trion binding energy which leads to an enhanced thermal ionization of trions resulting in a PCP signal. Due to the thermal dissociation of trions at temperatures exceeding 40 K a strong PCP effect occurs even at nearly resonant excitation.

  6. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  7. [Excitation energy and frequency of transition spectral line of electron in an asymmetry quantum dot].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2009-03-01

    In an asymmetry quantum dot, the properties of the electron, which is strongly coupled with phonon, were investigated. The variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were studied by using a linear combination operator and the unitary transformation methods. Numerical calculations for the variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were performed and the results show that the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will strongly increase with decreasing the transverse and longitudinal effective confinement length. The first internal excited state energy of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will decrease with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength. The excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will increase with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength.

  8. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen; De Meyer, Thierry; De Clerck, Karen

    2014-04-07

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed.

  9. Excitation energy transfer in vitro between phycobiliproteins and thylakoid photosystem II of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Tseng, C. K.

    1992-12-01

    The excitation energy transfer from phycobiliproteins to thylakoid PSII of higher plants was investigated. When incubated with spinach thylakoids, phycobiliproteins isolated from red and blue-green algae transferred light energy absorbed to spinach PSII. The efficiency of energy transfer was dependent on the kind of phycobiliproteins used. If spinach thylakoids were replaced by the thylakoids of Brassica chinensis, R-phycoerythin or C-phycocyanin did not transfer their excitation energy to PSII of Brassica chinensis unless allophycocyanin was present.

  10. Properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L. Shlomo, Sh. Tulupov, B. A. Urin, M. H.

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed particle-hole dispersive optical model is applied to describe properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. In particular, the double transition density averaged over the energy of the isoscalar monopole excitations is considered for {sup 208}Pb in a wide energy interval, which includes the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone. The energy-averaged strength functions of these resonances are also analyzed.

  11. Fractionally Charged Zero-Energy Single-Particle Excitations in a Driven Fermi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalets, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A voltage pulse of a Lorentzian shape carrying half of the flux quantum excites out of a zero-temperature Fermi sea an electron in a mixed state, which looks like a quasiparticle with an effectively fractional charge e /2 . A prominent feature of such an excitation is a narrow peak in the energy distribution function lying exactly at the Fermi energy μ . Another spectacular feature is that the distribution function has symmetric tails around μ , which results in a zero-energy excitation. This sounds improbable since at zero temperature all available states below μ are fully occupied. The resolution lies in the fact that such a voltage pulse also excites electron-hole pairs, which free some space below μ and thus allow a zero-energy quasiparticle to exist. I discuss also how to address separately electron-hole pairs and a fractionally charged zero-energy excitation in an experiment.

  12. Observation of low- and high-energy Gamow-Teller phonon excitations in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Fujita, H; Adachi, T; Bai, C L; Algora, A; Berg, G P A; von Brentano, P; Colò, G; Csatlós, M; Deaven, J M; Estevez-Aguado, E; Fransen, C; De Frenne, D; Fujita, K; Ganioğlu, E; Guess, C J; Gulyás, J; Hatanaka, K; Hirota, K; Honma, M; Ishikawa, D; Jacobs, E; Krasznahorkay, A; Matsubara, H; Matsuyanagi, K; Meharchand, R; Molina, F; Muto, K; Nakanishi, K; Negret, A; Okamura, H; Ong, H J; Otsuka, T; Pietralla, N; Perdikakis, G; Popescu, L; Rubio, B; Sagawa, H; Sarriguren, P; Scholl, C; Shimbara, Y; Shimizu, Y; Susoy, G; Suzuki, T; Tameshige, Y; Tamii, A; Thies, J H; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M; Zegers, R G T; Zell, K O; Zenihiro, J

    2014-03-21

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions in atomic nuclei are sensitive to both nuclear shell structure and effective residual interactions. The nuclear GT excitations were studied for the mass number A = 42, 46, 50, and 54 "f-shell" nuclei in ((3)He, t) charge-exchange reactions. In the (42)Ca → (42)Sc reaction, most of the GT strength is concentrated in the lowest excited state at 0.6 MeV, suggesting the existence of a low-energy GT phonon excitation. As A increases, a high-energy GT phonon excitation develops in the 6-11 MeV region. In the (54)Fe → (54)Co reaction, the high-energy GT phonon excitation mainly carries the GT strength. The existence of these two GT phonon excitations are attributed to the 2 fermionic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  13. KANTBP 3.0: New version of a program for computing energy levels, reflection and transmission matrices, and corresponding wave functions in the coupled-channel adiabatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Abrashkevich, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    A FORTRAN program for calculating energy values, reflection and transmission matrices, and corresponding wave functions in a coupled-channel approximation of the adiabatic approach is presented. In this approach, a multidimensional Schrödinger equation is reduced to a system of the coupled second-order ordinary differential equations on a finite interval with the homogeneous boundary conditions of the third type at the left- and right-boundary points for continuous spectrum problem. The resulting system of these equations containing the potential matrix elements and first-derivative coupling terms is solved using high-order accuracy approximations of the finite element method. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the reflection and transmission matrices and corresponding wave functions for the two-dimensional problem with different barrier potentials.

  14. Spectroscopic evidence for the coexistence of tetragonal and trigonal minima within the exited state adiabatic potential energy surfaces of hexachlorotellurate and -selenate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremers, C.; Degen, J.

    1998-11-01

    Coexistence of Jahn-Teller minima resulting from the coupling to different accepting modes within the adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) is not possible within the framework of linear vibronic coupling theory. For the lowest exited triplet state 3T1u of inorganic complexes with s2 electronic ground-state configuration, such a coexistence, due to quadratic coupling effects, is discussed. As a direct experimental evidence two vibronic progressions with different accepting modes in the emission spectra resulting from a single electronic state are observed in the emission spectra of the title compounds. The observation of vibronic finestructure in the emission spectra of [TeCl6]2- is reported for the first time.

  15. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic-energy

  16. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic X-ray spectra of two simple, impulsive solar flares are examined together with H alpha, microwave and meter wave radio observations. X-ray spectra of both events were characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung from single temperature plasmas. The symmetry between rise and fall was found to hold for the temperature and emission measure. The relationship between temperature and emission measure was that of an adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion; the adiabatic index of 5/3 indicated that the electron distribution remained isotropic. Observations in H alpha provided further evidence for compressive energy transfer.

  17. Two-photon excited quantum dots as energy donors for photosensitizer chlorin e6.

    PubMed

    Skripka, Artiom; Valanciunaite, Jurga; Dauderis, Gediminas; Poderys, Vilius; Kubiliute, Reda; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2013-07-01

    The excitation-related problems in photodynamic therapy of cancer might be solved by combining two-photon (TP) irradiation and quantum dots (QDs) as effective energy donors for conventional photosensitizers (PS). Here, it is demonstrated for the first time that QD-chlorin e6 (Ce6) complex formed due to the hydrophobic interaction between Ce6 molecules and lipid coating of QDs can be effectively excited via TP irradiation at 1030 nm, which spectrally coincides with the biological tissue optical window. TP absorption cross-section for free QDs and Ce6 at 1030 nm was 3325 and 13 Goeppert-Mayer, respectively. Upon TP excitation of QD-Ce6 solution, the fluorescence band of bound Ce6 molecules was observed via energy transfer from excited QDs. Increasing concentration of Ce6 resulted in quenching of the photoluminescence of QDs and an increase in the fluorescence intensity of bound Ce6 molecules. These intensity changes coincided well with those observed upon single-photon excitation of QD-Ce6 solution when QDs alone are excited. The efficiency of energy transfer in QD-Ce6 complex upon TP excitation was about 80% (QD∶Ce61∶5). These results indicate that the effective excitation of PS with a low TP absorption cross-section is possible in such type noncovalent complexes via energy transfer from TP excited QDs.

  18. Pulsed laser excitation power dependence of photoluminescence peak energies in bulk ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Giang T.; Kanbe, Hiroshi; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2011-10-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of hydrothermal bulk ZnO were measured in the temperature range from 5 to 298 K. The sample was excited by means of the 266-nm line of an Nd3+: YAG Q-switched pulsed laser with numerous average excitation powers in the range from 0.33 to 7.50 mW. At constant temperatures, the most intense PL peak red-shifts with average excitation power, whereas positions of other near-band-edge peaks remain unchanged. It was experimentally proven that the red-shift is not due to local heating at the excited spot. Rather, it is due to relaxation of photoexcited carriers to lower energy transitions as the most intense transition is saturated by high excitation photon density. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of energy of the most intense PL peak was fitted with the Varshni equation. The Varshni coefficients α and β decrease with increasing pulsed laser excitation power.

  19. The performance of the quantum adiabatic algorithm on spike Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Linghang; Crosson, Elizabeth

    Spike Hamiltonians arise from optimization instances for which the adiabatic algorithm provably out performs classical simulated annealing. In this work, we study the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm for solving the “the Hamming weight with a spike” problem by analyzing the scaling of the spectral gap at the critical point for various sizes of the barrier. Our main result is a rigorous lower bound on the minimum spectral gap for the adiabatic evolution when the bit-symmetric cost function has a thin but polynomially high barrier, which is based on a comparison argument and an improved variational ansatz for the ground state. We also adapt the discrete WKB method for the case of abruptly changing potentials and compare it with the predictions of the spin coherent instanton method which was previously used by Farhi, Goldstone and Gutmann. Finally, our improved ansatz for the ground state leads to a method for predicting the location of avoided crossings in the excited energy states of the thin spike Hamiltonian, and we use a recursion relation to understand the ordering of some of these avoided crossings as a step towards analyzing the previously observed diabatic cascade phenomenon.

  20. Energy transfer and the distribution of excitation energy in the photosynthetic apparatus of spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Strasser, R J; Butler, W L

    1977-05-11

    Equations are derived from our model of the photochemical apparatus of photosynthesis to show that the yield of energy transfer from Photosystem II to Photosystem I, phi T(II leads to I), can be obtained from measurements on an individual sample of chloroplasts frozen to -196 degrees C by comparing the sum of two specifically defined fluorescence excitation spectra with the absorption spectrum of the sample. Then, given that value of phiT(II leads to I), the fraction of the quanta absorbed by the photochemical apparatus which is distributed initially to Photosystem I, alpha, can be determined as a function of the wavelength of excitation from the same fluorescence excitation spectra. The results obtained in this study of individual samples of chloroplasts frozen to -196 degrees C in the absence of divalent cations, namely, that phi T(II leads to I)varies from a minimum value of 0.10 when the Photosystem II reaction centers are all open to a maximum value of 0.25 when the centers are all closed and that alpha has a value of about 0.30 which is almost independent of wavelength for wavelength shorter than 675 nm (alpha increases rapidly toward unity at wavelength longer than 675 nm), agrees quite well with results obtained previously from comparative measurements of chloroplasts frozen to -196 degrees C in the presence and absence of divalent cations.

  1. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, C. B.; Qin, W. Y.

    2014-09-15

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  2. Energy Excitation Transfer in a Single Molecule of Poly(p-phenylene vinylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudio, Gil; Bittner, Eric

    2002-03-01

    Energy excitation transfer has been shown to occur in conducting polymers such as MEH-PPV [Synth. Met. 116, 35 (2001)]. Initially excited chromophores, which are short oligomers of the polymer, non-radiatively transfer their excitation to longer oligomers of lower energy. We calculate the dynamics of this migration in an ensemble of PPV chains generated by a random growth algorithm [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 9585 (2001)] using the rates described by Förster theory. The proximity of nearby chromophores within the polymer allows for the efficient non-radiative within a single polymer. The great difference in rates between interchain and intrachain transfer also impedes the isolated chromophore from further transfering its excitation to and thus fluoresce with an energy that is red-shifted from the initial excitation.

  3. Excitation energies and potential energy curves for the 19 excited electronic terms of CH: Efficiency examination of the multireference first-order polarization propagator approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, Alexey O.; Khrustov, Vladimir F.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2013-11-01

    The attainability of a uniform precision level for estimates of electronic transition characteristics through the multireference first-order polarization propagator approximation (MR-FOPPA) was examined under extension of a basis set, using the CH ion as an example. The transitions from the ground electronic state to the 19 excited electronic terms were considered. Balanced approximations for (i) transition energies to the studied excited states and (ii) forms and relative dispositions of their potential energy curves were attained in the 3-21G and 6-311G (d,p) basis sets. In both the basis sets, a balanced approximation for the corresponding transition moments was not achieved.

  4. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.R.

    1993-04-01

    Infrared-optical double resonance is being used to study the unimolecular dissociation dynamics of hydrazoic acid (HN[sub 3]). 6[nu][sub NH] vibrational overtone excitation spectra are given for HN[sub 3]. Work was begun to determine the feasibility of extending the infrared-optical double resonance photofragment spectroscopy to small free radicals, and to be able to monitor atomic dissociation fragments via laser induced fluorescence in the VUV spectrum. 1 fig.

  5. Low energy nuclear spin excitations in Ho metal investigated by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tapan; Jalarvo, Niina

    2013-04-17

    We have investigated the low energy excitations in metallic Ho by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. We found at T = 3 K clear inelastic peaks in the energy loss and energy gain sides, along with the central elastic peak. The energy of this low energy excitation, which is 26.59 ± 0.02 μeV at T = 3 K, decreased continuously and became zero at TN ≈ 130 K. By fitting the data in the temperature range 100-127.5 K with a power law we obtained the power-law exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.02, which agrees with the expected value β = 0.367 for a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Thus the energy of the low energy excitations can be associated with the order parameter.

  6. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials composed of elements hydrogen through argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The local plasma model is used to study the effects of the chemical and physical state of a medium on its stopping power. The relationship between that model and a more exact quantum treatment of bound systems is elucidated by examining related quantities in both theories for the case of one and two-electron systems. Atomic mean excitation energies and straggling parameters in the local plasma model are compared with the accurate calculations of Inokuti et al. (1975, 1978, 1981). The use of the Gordon-Kim electron gas model of molecular bonding is used to determine the effects of covalent chemical bond shifts on the mean excitation energies for elements of the first two rows. Calculations of mean excitation energies of ionic bonded substances are presented, and the mean excitation energies of metals are discussed.

  7. Stellar oscillations - II - The non-adiabatic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.; Sonoi, T.

    2015-02-01

    A leap forward has been performed due to the space-borne missions, MOST, CoRoT and Kepler. They provided a wealth of observational data, and more precisely oscillation spectra, which have been (and are still) exploited to infer the internal structure of stars. While an adiabatic approach is often sufficient to get information on the stellar equilibrium structures it is not sufficient to get a full understanding of the physics of the oscillation. Indeed, it does not permit one to answer some fundamental questions about the oscillations, such as: What are the physical mechanisms responsible for the pulsations inside stars? What determines the amplitudes? To what extent the adiabatic approximation is valid? All these questions can only be addressed by considering the energy exchanges between the oscillations and the surrounding medium. This lecture therefore aims at considering the energetical aspects of stellar pulsations with particular emphasis on the driving and damping mechanisms. To this end, the full non-adiabatic equations are introduced and thoroughly discussed. Two types of pulsation are distinguished, namely the self-excited oscillations that result from an instability and the solar-like oscillations that result from a balance between driving and damping by turbulent convection. For each type, the main physical principles are presented and illustrated using recent observations obtained with the ultra-high precision photometry space-borne missions (MOST, CoRoT and Kepler). Finally, we consider in detail the physics of scaling relations, which relates the seismic global indices with the global stellar parameters and gave birth to the development of statistical (or ensemble) asteroseismology. Indeed, several of these relations rely on the same cause: the physics of non-adiabatic oscillations.

  8. Ultrafast Non-Förster Intramolecular Donor-Acceptor Excitation Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Stavros; Alfonso Hernandez, Laura; Beljonne, David; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei

    2017-04-06

    Ultrafast intramolecular electronic energy transfer in a conjugated donor-acceptor system is simulated using nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics. After initial site-selective photoexcitation of the donor, transition density localization is monitored throughout the S2 → S1 internal conversion process, revealing an efficient unidirectional donor → acceptor energy-transfer process. Detailed analysis of the excited-state trajectories uncovers several salient features of the energy-transfer dynamics. While a weak temperature dependence is observed during the entire electronic energy relaxation, an ultrafast initially temperature-independent process allows the molecular system to approach the S2-S1 potential energy crossing seam within the first ten femtoseconds. Efficient energy transfer occurs in the absence of spectral overlap between the donor and acceptor units and is assisted by a transient delocalization phenomenon of the excited-state wave function acquiring Frenkel-exciton character at the moment of quantum transition.

  9. Competition between photochemistry and energy transfer in ultraviolet-excited diazabenzenes. II. Identifying the dominant energy donor for ''supercollisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Sevy, Eric T.; Michaels, Chris A.; Tapalian, H. Charles; Flynn, George W.

    2000-04-01

    CO{sub 2} bath molecules scattered into J=72 of the 00{sup 0}0 vibrational state at short times after 248 or 266 nm UV excitation of pyrazine are probed using high resolution time resolved IR diode laser spectroscopy as a function of UV laser fluence from {approx}3 to 80 mJ/cm2. The implications of pyrazine photodissociation for the interpretation of these collisional energy transfer experiments are considered. Specifically, the possibility that translationally hot HCN resulting from pyrazine dissociation may be the source of excitation for collisions that impart a large amount of rotational and translational energy to CO{sub 2} molecules is examined. Transient absorption measurements probing rotationally and translationally excited CO{sub 2} molecules produced following excitation of pyrazine are analyzed within the context of a kinetic scheme incorporating pyrazine photodissociation, as well as excitation of CO{sub 2} by both translationally hot HCN and vibrationally excited pyrazine. This analysis indicates that vibrationally hot pyrazine, which has sufficient energy to dissociate, is the source of excitation in collisions imparting large amounts of rotational and translational energy to CO{sub 2}. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Enhanced energy transfer in respiratory-deficient endothelial cells probed by microscopic fluorescence excitation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Gschwend, Michael H.; Bauer, Manfred; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1996-12-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction may be concomitant with changes of the redox states of the coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH), as well as flavin.mononucleotide or dinucleotide. The intrinsic fluorescence of these coenzymes was therefore proposed to be a measure of malfunction. Since mitochondrial fluorescence is strongly superposed by autofluorescence from various cytoplasmatic fluorophores, cultivated endothelial cells were incubated with the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123), and after excitation of flavin molecules, energy transfer to R123 was investigated. Due to spectral overlap of flavin and R123 fluorescence, energy transfer flavin yields R123 could not be detected from their emission spectra. Therefore, the method of microscopic fluorescence excitation spectroscopy was established. When detecting R123 fluorescence, excitation maxima at 370 - 390 nm and 420-460 nm were assigned to flavins, whereas a pronounced excitation band at 465 - 490 nm was attributed to R123. Therefore, excitation at 475 nm reflected the intracellular concentration of R123, whereas excitation at 385 nm reflected flavin excitation with a subsequent energy transfer to R123 molecules. An enhanced energy transfer after inhibition of specific enzyme complexes of the respiratory chain is discussed in the present article.

  11. Dynamics of Energy Transfer in a Conjugated Dendrimer Driven by Ultrafast Localization of Excitations.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Johan F; Atas, Evrim; Altan, Aysun; Kuroda, Daniel G; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei; Roitberg, Adrian E; Kleiman, Valeria D

    2015-09-16

    Solar energy conversion starts with the harvest of light, and its efficacy depends on the spatial transfer of the light energy to where it can be transduced into other forms of energy. Harnessing solar power as a clean energy source requires the continuous development of new synthetic materials that can harvest photon energy and transport it without significant losses. With chemically-controlled branched architectures, dendrimers are ideally suited for these initial steps, since they consist of arrays of chromophores with relative positioning and orientations to create energy gradients and to spatially focus excitation energies. The spatial localization of the energy delimits its efficacy and has been a point of intense research for synthetic light harvesters. We present the results of a combined theoretical experimental study elucidating ultrafast, unidirectional, electronic energy transfer on a complex molecule designed to spatially focus the initial excitation onto an energy sink. The study explores the complex interplay between atomic motions, excited-state populations, and localization/delocalization of excitations. Our findings show that the electronic energy-transfer mechanism involves the ultrafast collapse of the photoexcited wave function due to nonadiabatic electronic transitions. The localization of the wave function is driven by the efficient coupling to high-frequency vibrational modes leading to ultrafast excited-state dynamics and unidirectional efficient energy funneling. This work provides a long-awaited consistent experiment-theoretical description of excited-state dynamics in organic conjugated dendrimers with atomistic resolution, a phenomenon expected to universally appear in a variety of synthetic conjugated materials.

  12. Multireference Excitation Energies for Bacteriochlorophylls A within Light Harvesting System 2.

    PubMed

    Anda, André; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-03-08

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range of parameters to reproduce the spectra. Here, we present a method that can determine key parameters to chemical accuracy. These will eliminate free variables in the modeling, thus reducing the problem. Using MS-RASPT2/RASSCF calculations, we compute excitation energies and transition dipole moments of all bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We find that the excitation energies vary among the bacteriochlorophyll monomers and that they are regulated by the curvature of the macrocycle ring and the dihedral angle of an acetyl moiety. Increasing the curvature lifts the ground state energy, which causes a red shift of the excitation energy. Increasing the torsion of the acetyl moiety raises the excited state energy, resulting in a blue shift of the excitation energy. The obtained results mark a giant leap for multiconfigurational multireference quantum chemical methods in the photochemistry of biological systems, which can prove instrumental in exposing the underlying physics of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

  13. Potential energy surface of excited semiconductors: Graphene quantum dot and BODIPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colherinhas, Guilherme; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2016-08-01

    Binding energy (BE) is an important descriptor in chemistry, which determines thermodynamics and phase behavior of a given substance. BE between two molecules is not directly accessible from the experiment. It has to be reconstructed from cohesive energies, vaporization heats, etc. We report BE for the excited states of two semiconductor molecules - boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) and graphene quantum dot (GQD) - with water. We show, for the first time, that excitation increases BE twofold at an optimal separation (energy minimum position), whereas higher separations lead to higher differences. Interestingly, the effects of excitation are similar irrespective of the dominant binding interactions (van der Waals or electrostatic) in the complex. This new knowledge is important for simulations of the excited semiconductors by simplified interaction functions.

  14. Energy transfer in strained graphene assisted by discrete breathers excited by external ac driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evazzade, Iman; Lobzenko, Ivan P.; Korznikova, Elena A.; Ovid'ko, Ilya A.; Roknabadi, Mahmood Rezaee; Dmitriev, Sergey V.

    2017-01-01

    In the present molecular-dynamics study, external ac driving is used at frequencies outside the phonon spectrum to excite gap DBs in uniformly strained graphene nanoribbon. Harmonic displacement or harmonic force is applied to a zigzag atomic chain of graphene. In the former case, nonpropagating DBs are excited on the atoms next to the driven atoms, while in the latter case the excited DBs propagate along the nanoribbon. The energy transfer along the nanoribbon assisted by the DBs is investigated in detail, and the differences between harmonic displacement driving and harmonic force driving are discussed. It is concluded that the amplitude of external driving at out-of-phonon spectrum frequencies should not necessarily be large to obtain a noticeable energy transfer to the system. Overall, our results suggest that external harmonic driving even at relatively small driving amplitudes can be used to control excitation of DBs and consequently the energy transfer to the system.

  15. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  16. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n, f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; ...

    2016-05-13

    Here, accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics.

  17. Excitation energy dependence of the level density parameter close to the doubly magic 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Pratap; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Pandey, R.; Sen, A.; Manna, S.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Roy, T.; Dhal, A.; Dey, A.; Meena, J. K.; Saha, A. K.; Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Neutron evaporation spectra have been measured from 4He+208Pb and 4He+209Bi reactions by using 4He-ion beams of several bombarding energies. Excitation-energy dependence of the level density parameter has been studied for the two systems in the excitation energy range of ˜18 -50 MeV. For both the reactions an overall reduction of the asymptotic level density parameter with increasing excitation energy (temperature) is observed. The trend of the data was compared with the Thomas-Fermi model predictions and found to be in reasonable agreement. The value of the shell damping parameter has been extracted from the lowest-energy data in the case of Po,211210 and At,212211 nuclei close to the Z =82 and N =126 shell closure, and it was found to be consistent with the recent measurement in the vicinity of doubly magic 208Pb nucleus.

  18. On the influence of nonlinearities on vibrational energy transduction under band-limited noise excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Su, D.; Zheng, R.; Cartmell, M.

    2016-09-01

    Vibrational energy harvesters are often excited by band-limited noise excitations. In this paper, the influence of the stiffness nonlinearity on the transduction of the energy harvester and the relative performance of linear, monostable hardening-type and bistable energy harvesters are compared and investigated. The performance is experimentally compared under band-limited noise excitations of different levels, bandwidths, and centre frequencies at first. The rms output power delivered to the same load resistance is measured and compared under the same excitation levels, which indicts the constant electrical damping level. It is shown that the effect of nonlinearities is strongly dependent on the excitation parameters. Under a moderate excitation level it is shown that the monostable hardening-type oscillator performs worse than its linear counterpart under band-limited excitation. However, the results also illustrate that for the most part of the frequency and bandwidth range considered, the bistable harvester can outperforms the linear variant but for around the peak output area. Moreover, the comparison is also numerically conducted with the consideration of the optimised electrical damping level and the displacement constraint of the device. General conclusions are drawn based on the experimental observations.

  19. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  20. Breakdown of the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Simone; Lazzeri, Michele; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Geim, A. K.; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Mauri, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    The adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation (ABO) has been the standard ansatz to describe the interaction between electrons and nuclei since the early days of quantum mechanics. ABO assumes that the lighter electrons adjust adiabatically to the motion of the heavier nuclei, remaining at any time in their instantaneous ground state. ABO is well justified when the energy gap between ground and excited electronic states is larger than the energy scale of the nuclear motion. In metals, the gap is zero and phenomena beyond ABO (such as phonon-mediated superconductivity or phonon-induced renormalization of the electronic properties) occur. The use of ABO to describe lattice motion in metals is, therefore, questionable. In spite of this, ABO has proved effective for the accurate determination of chemical reactions, molecular dynamics and phonon frequencies in a wide range of metallic systems. Here, we show that ABO fails in graphene. Graphene, recently discovered in the free state, is a zero-bandgap semiconductor that becomes a metal if the Fermi energy is tuned applying a gate voltage, Vg. This induces a stiffening of the Raman G peak that cannot be described within ABO.

  1. Comparison of excitation energy transfer in cyanobacterial photosystem I in solution and immobilized on conducting glass.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Sebastian; Giera, Wojciech; D'Haene, Sandrine; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-05-01

    Excitation energy transfer in monomeric and trimeric forms of photosystem I (PSI) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in solution or immobilized on FTO conducting glass was compared using time-resolved fluorescence. Deposition of PSI on glass preserves bi-exponential excitation decay of ~4-7 and ~21-25 ps lifetimes characteristic of PSI in solution. The faster phase was assigned in part to photochemical quenching (charge separation) of excited bulk chlorophylls and in part to energy transfer from bulk to low-energy (red) chlorophylls. The slower phase was assigned to photochemical quenching of the excitation equilibrated over bulk and red chlorophylls. The main differences between dissolved and immobilized PSI (iPSI) are: (1) the average excitation decay in iPSI is about 11 ps, which is faster by a few ps than for PSI in solution due to significantly faster excitation quenching of bulk chlorophylls by charge separation (~10 ps instead of ~15 ps) accompanied by slightly weaker coupling of bulk and red chlorophylls; (2) the number of red chlorophylls in monomeric PSI increases twice-from 3 in solution to 6 after immobilization-as a result of interaction with neighboring monomers and conducting glass; despite the increased number of red chlorophylls, the excitation decay accelerates in iPSI; (3) the number of red chlorophylls in trimeric PSI is 4 (per monomer) and remains unchanged after immobilization; (4) in all the samples under study, the free energy gap between mean red (emission at ~710 nm) and mean bulk (emission at ~686 nm) emitting states of chlorophylls was estimated at a similar level of 17-27 meV. All these observations indicate that despite slight modifications, dried PSI complexes adsorbed on the FTO surface remain fully functional in terms of excitation energy transfer and primary charge separation that is particularly important in the view of photovoltaic applications of this photosystem.

  2. Numerical and experimental study of a compressive-mode energy harvester under random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. T.; Yang, Z.; Zu, J.; Qin, W. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvester working in compressive mode has shown outstanding performance under harmonic excitation. However, it is still not clear if the compressive-mode energy harvester can sustain its superiority under random excitations. This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on a nonlinear compressive-mode piezoelectric energy harvester under random excitations. First, a comprehensive distributed parameter electro-elastic model is developed using the extended Hamilton’s principle and the Euler–Bernoulli beam theory. The embedded force amplification effect of the flexural motion is analytically predicted. Then, the model is numerically solved under random excitations. Strong nonlinear responses was observed in both mechanical and electrical responses. Furthermore, a prototype was fabricated and tested. The experimental data show a good agreement with the model estimations under different level excitations and resistances. The results under random excitation demonstrate that the compressive-mode energy harvester significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art systems in terms of output voltage and normalized power density. If the optimal resistance is chosen in the harvesting circuit, the root mean square power of the prototype will reach three times higher than that of the counterparts.

  3. High-energy electron-impact excitation process: The generalized oscillator strengths of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao-Ying; Li, Jia-Ming

    2006-12-01

    The high-energy electron impact excitation cross sections are directly proportional to the generalized oscillator strengths (GOSs) of the target (an atom or molecule). In the present work, the GOSs of helium from the ground state to nS1 , nP1 , nD1 (n→∞) and adjacent continuum excited states are calculated by a modified R -matrix code within the first Born approximation. In order to treat the bound-bound and bound-continuum transitions in a unified manner, the GOS density (GOSD) is defined based on the quantum defect theory. The GOSD surfaces of S1 , P1 , and D1 channels are calculated and tested stringently by the recent experiments. With the recommended GOSD surfaces with sufficient accuracy, the GOSDs (i.e., GOSs) from the ground state into all nS1 , nP1 , and nD1 excited states of helium can be obtained by interpolation. Thus, the high-energy electron impact excitation cross sections of all these excited states can be readily obtained. In addition to the high-energy electron impact excitation cross sections, a scheme to calculate the cross sections in the entire incident energy range is discussed.

  4. Energies of low-lying excited states of linear polyenes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Ronald L; Galinato, Mary Grace I; Chu, Emily F; Howard, Jason N; Broene, Richard D; Frank, Harry A

    2008-12-11

    Room temperature absorption and emission spectra of the all-trans isomers of decatetraene, dodecapentaene, tetradecahexaene, and hexadecaheptaene have been obtained in a series of nonpolar solvents. The resolved vibronic features in the optical spectra of these model systems allow the accurate determination of S(0) (1(1)A(g)(-)) --> S(2) (1(1)B(u)(+)) and S(1) (2(1)A(g)(-)) --> S(0) (1(1)A(g)(-)) electronic origins as a function of solvent polarizability. These data can be extrapolated to predict the transition energies in the absence of solvent perturbations. The effects of the terminal methyl substituents on the transition energies also can be estimated. Franck-Condon maxima in the absorption and emission spectra were used to estimate differences between S(0) (1(1)A(g)(-)) --> S(1) (2(1)A(g)(-)) and S(0) (1(1)A(g)(-)) --> S(2) (1(1)B(u)(+)) electronic origins and "vertical" transition energies. Experimental estimates of the vertical transition energies of unsubstituted, all-trans polyenes in vacuum as a function of conjugation length are compared with long-standing multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) treatments and with more recent ab initio calculations of the energies of the 2(1)A(g)(-) (S(1)) and 1(1)B(u)(+) (S(2)) states.

  5. Multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy based on modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wenlong; Cai, Zhijian; Zhou, Hongwu; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy is fast and nondestructive, and it is widely used in chemistry, biomedicine, food safety and other areas. However, Raman spectroscopy is often hampered by strong fluorescence background, especially in food additives detection and biomedicine researching. In this paper, one efficient technique was the multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (MERDS) which incorporated a series of small wavelength-shift wavelengths as excitation sources. A modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution (MMECID) algorithm was proposed to reconstruct the Raman Spectroscopy. Computer simulation and experiments both demonstrated that the Raman spectrum can be well reconstructed from large fluorescence background. The more excitation sources used, the better signal to noise ratio got. However, many excitation sources were equipped on the Raman spectrometer, which increased the complexity of the experimental system. Thus, a trade-off should be made between the number of excitation frequencies and experimental complexity.

  6. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    PubMed

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date.

  7. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T. P. T.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  8. Level-energy-dependent mean velocities of excited tungsten atoms sputtered by krypton-ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Nogami, Keisuke; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mineta, Shota; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Furuya, Kenji; Motohashi, Kenji

    2015-11-15

    Visible emission spectra were acquired from neutral atoms sputtered by 35–60 keV Kr{sup +} ions from a polycrystalline tungsten surface. Mean velocities of excited tungsten atoms in seven different 6p states were also obtained via the dependence of photon intensities on the distance from the surface. The average velocities parallel to the surface normal varied by factors of 2–4 for atoms in the different 6p energy levels. However, they were almost independent of the incident ion kinetic energy. The 6p-level energy dependence indicated that the velocities of the excited atoms were determined by inelastic processes that involve resonant charge exchange.

  9. Unexpected asymmetry of the charge distribution in the fission of Th,224222 at high excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paşca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-12-01

    Using the improved scission-point model, the isotopic trends of the charge distribution of fission fragments are studied in induced fission of even-even Th isotopes. The calculated results are in good agreement with available experimental data. With increasing neutron number the transition from symmetric to asymmetric fission mode is shown to be related to the change of the potential energy surface. The change of the shape of mass distribution with increasing excitation energy is discussed for fissioning ATh nuclei. At high excitation energies, there are unexpected large asymmetric modes in the fission of neutron-deficient Th isotopes considered.

  10. On the spin excitation energy of the nucleon in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the Skyrme model of nucleons and nuclei, the spin excitation energy of the nucleon is traditionally calculated by a fit of the rigid rotor quantization of spin/isospin of the fundamental Skyrmion (the hedgehog) to the masses of the nucleon and the Delta resonance. The resulting, quite large spin excitation energy of the nucleon of about 73MeV is, however, rather difficult to reconcile with the small binding energies of physical nuclei, among other problems. Here, we argue that a more reliable interval of values for the spin excitation energy of the nucleon, compatible with many physical constraints is between 15MeV and 30MeV. The fit of the rigid rotor to the Delta, on the other hand, is problematic in any case, because it implies the use of a nonrelativistic method for a highly relativistic system.

  11. Effects of introducing nonlinear components for a random excited hybrid energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoya; Gao, Shiqiao; Liu, Haipeng; Guan, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    This work is mainly devoted to discussing the effects of introducing nonlinear components for a hybrid energy harvester under random excitation. For two different types of nonlinear hybrid energy harvesters subjected to random excitation, the analytical solutions of the mean output power, voltage and current are derived from Fokker-Planck (FP) equations. Monte Carlo simulation exhibits qualitative agreement with FP theory, showing that load values and excitation’s spectral density have an effect on the total mean output power, piezoelectric (PE) power and electromagnetic power. Nonlinear components affect output characteristics only when the PE capacitance of the hybrid energy harvester is non-negligible. Besides, it is also demonstrated that for this type of nonlinear hybrid energy harvesters under random excitation, introducing nonlinear components can improve output performances effectively.

  12. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of excited states of the pyridine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linert, Ireneusz; Zubek, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the pyridine, C5H5N, molecules in the gas phase have been measured to investigate electronic excitation in the energy range 3.5-10 eV. The applied wide range of residual electron energy and the scattering angle range from 10° to 180° enabled to differentiate between optically-allowed and -forbidden transitions. These measurements have allowed vertical excitation energies of the triplet excited states of pyridine to be determined and tentative assignments of these states to be proposed. Some of these states have not been identified in the previous works. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  13. Low-energy electron elastic scattering cross sections for excited Au and Pt atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Zineb; Eure, Amanda R.; Msezane, Alfred Z.; Sokolovski, Dmitri

    2010-05-01

    Electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs) and differential cross sections (DCSs) in both impact energy and scattering angle for the excited Au and Pt atoms are calculated in the electron impact energy range 0 ⩽ E ⩽ 4.0 eV. The cross sections are found to be characterized by very sharp long-lived resonances whose positions are identified with the binding energies of the excited anions formed during the collisions. The recent novel Regge-pole methodology wherein is embedded through the Mulholland formula the electron-electron correlations is used together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential incorporating the crucial core-polarization interaction for the calculations of the TCSs. The DCSs are evaluated using a partial wave expansion. The Ramsauer-Townsend minima, the shape resonances and the binding energies of the excited Au - and Pt - anions are extracted from the cross sections, while the critical minima are determined from the DCSs.

  14. Finite strain effects in piezoelectric energy harvesters under direct and parametric excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mam, Koliann; Peigney, Michaël; Siegert, Dominique

    2017-02-01

    This paper addresses the dynamic behavior of piezoelectric cantilevers under base excitations. Such devices are frequently used for applications in energy harvesting. An Euler-Bernoulli model that accounts for large-deflection effects and piezoelectric nonlinearities is proposed. Closed-form expressions of the frequency response are derived, both for direct excitation (i.e. with a base acceleration transverse to the axis of the cantilever) and parametric excitation (i.e. with a base acceleration along the axis of the cantilever). Experimental results are reported and used for assessing the validity of the proposed model. Building on the model presented, some critical issues related to energy-harvesting are investigated, such as the influence of nonlinearities on the optimal load resistance, the limits of validity of linear models, and hysteresis effects in the electrical power. The efficiency of direct and parametric excitation is also compared in detail.

  15. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  16. Generating Excitement: Build Your Own Generator to Study the Transfer of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Kurt; Rommel-Esham, Katie; Farthing, Dori; Sheldon, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of energy from one form to another can be difficult to understand. The electrical energy that turns on a lamp may come from the burning of coal, water falling at a hydroelectric plant, nuclear reactions, or gusts of wind caused by the uneven heating of the Earth. The authors have developed and tested an exciting hands-on activity to…

  17. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudenz, Kristen L.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. This approach consists of two quantum phases, with some amount of classical preprocessing to set up the quantum problems. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. All quantum processing is strictly limited to two-qubit interactions so as to ensure physical feasibility. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation, with a specific example of the learning phase applied to a problem of interest in flight control systems. Beyond this example, the algorithm can be used to attack a broad class of anomaly detection problems.

  18. An accurate and efficient method to predict the electronic excitation energies of BODIPY fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Nan; Jin, Jun-Ling; Geng, Yun; Sun, Shi-Ling; Xu, Hong-Liang; Lu, Ying-Hua; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-03-15

    Recently, the extreme learning machine neural network (ELMNN) as a valid computing method has been proposed to predict the nonlinear optical property successfully (Wang et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2012, 33, 231). In this work, first, we follow this line of work to predict the electronic excitation energies using the ELMNN method. Significantly, the root mean square deviation of the predicted electronic excitation energies of 90 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) derivatives between the predicted and experimental values has been reduced to 0.13 eV. Second, four groups of molecule descriptors are considered when building the computing models. The results show that the quantum chemical descriptions have the closest intrinsic relation with the electronic excitation energy values. Finally, a user-friendly web server (EEEBPre: Prediction of electronic excitation energies for BODIPY dyes), which is freely accessible to public at the web site: http://202.198.129.218, has been built for prediction. This web server can return the predicted electronic excitation energy values of BODIPY dyes that are high consistent with the experimental values. We hope that this web server would be helpful to theoretical and experimental chemists in related research.

  19. Numerical and experimental comparison of the energy transfer in a parametrically excited system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtinger, Andreas; Ecker, Horst

    2016-09-01

    This study is based on experimental results obtained from a test rig for a 2-DOF vibrational system. The main feature of this test rig is an electromechanical actuator which enables the variation of a mechanical stiffness parameter. The vibrational system is excited by this device, resulting in a parametrically excited system. In this study, the test rig is operated such that an initial deflection is applied to the masses, but no external excitation acts on the system. The actuator coils are driven by a current following a harmonic function defined by amplitude and frequency. The latter defines the parametric excitation frequency (PEF). When the mechanical system performs free vibrations, the parametric excitation may initiate an energy transfer between the two vibrational modes of the system. This transfer depends primarily on the PEF. For certain values of the PEF only one of the vibrational modes is affected. At other frequencies both modes are influenced and a continuous intermodal energy transfer is observed. A numerical model for the test rig was established and allows a comparison of experimental and numerical results. The total system energy as well as the modal energies are calculated from the measured and from the simulated signals. Interesting experimental observations are reported concerning the transfer of energy, and are in good agreement with simulated results.

  20. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of {approx} {+-}22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than {approx} 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance {approx} 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance {approx} 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  1. Excited-State Energies and Electronic Couplings of DNA Base Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Christopher R.; Kistler, Kurt A.; Lu, Zhen; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2010-02-04

    The singlet excited electronic states of two π-stacked thymine molecules and their splittings due to electronic coupling have been investigated with a variety of computational methods. Focus has been given on the effect of intermolecular distance on these energies and couplings. Single-reference methods, CIS, CIS(2), EOMCCSD, TDDFT, and the multireference method CASSCF, have been used, and their performance has been compared. It is found that the excited-state energies are very sensitive to the applied method but the couplings are not as sensitive. Inclusion of diffuse functions in the basis set also affects the excitation energies significantly but not the couplings. TDDFT is inadequate in describing the states and their coupling, while CIS(2) gives results very similar to EOM-CCSD. Excited states of cytosine and adenine π-stacked dimers were also obtained and compared with those of thymine dimers to gain a more general picture of excited states in π-stacked DNA base dimers. The coupling is very sensitive to the relative position and orientation of the bases, indicating great variation in the degree of delocalization of the excited states between stacked bases in natural DNA as it fluctuates.

  2. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  3. Quantum adiabatic optimization and combinatorial landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution algorithm on a variant of the satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, γ=M/N . We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (instead of only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold γ=γd starting with some value of K —the number of variables in each clause. Beyond the dynamic threshold, the algorithm should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz. We have been able to map the ensemble of random graphs onto another ensemble with fluctuations significantly reduced. This enabled us to obtain tight upper bounds on the satisfiability transition and to recompute the dynamical transition using the extended set of landscapes.

  4. Time-resolved observation of interatomic excitation-energy transfer in argon dimers.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tomoya; Cörlin, Philipp; Miteva, Tsveta; Gokhberg, Kirill; Kuleff, Alexander; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fischer, Andreas; Moshammer, Robert

    2017-03-14

    The ultrafast transfer of excitation energy from one atom to its neighbor is observed in singly charged argon dimers in a time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV)-pump IR-probe experiment. In the pump step, bound 3s-hole states in the dimer are populated by single XUV-photon ionization. The excitation-energy transfer at avoided crossings of the potential-energy curves leads to dissociation of the dimer, which is experimentally observed by further ionization with a time-delayed IR-probe pulse. From the measured pump-probe delay-dependent kinetic-energy release of coincident Ar(+) + Ar(+) ions, we conclude that the transfer of energy occurs on a time scale of about 800fs. This mechanism represents a fast relaxation process below the energy threshold for interatomic Coulombic decay.

  5. Selective excitation, relaxation, and energy channeling in molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    Research involves theoretical studies of response, relaxation, and correlated motion in time-dependent behavior of large molecular systems ranging from polyatomic molecules to protein molecules in their natural environment. Underlying theme is subsystem modulation dynamics. Main idea is that quantum mechanical correlations between components of a system develop with time, playing a major role in determining the balance between coherent and dissipative forces. Central theme is interplay of coherence and dissipation in determining the nature of dynamic structuring and energy flow in molecular transformation mechanisms. Subsystem equations of motion are being developed to show how nonlinear, dissipative dynamics of a particular subsystem arise from correlated interactions with the rest of the system (substituent groups, solvent, lattice modes, etc.); one consequence is resonance structures and networks. Quantum dynamics and thermodynamics are being applied to understand control and energy transfer mechanisms in biological functions of protein molecules; these mechanisms are both global and local. Besides the above theory, the research deals with phenomenological aspects of molecular systems.

  6. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  7. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  8. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for non-Hermitian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, S.; Martinez-Garaot, S.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Chen Xi

    2011-08-15

    Adiabatic processes driven by non-Hermitian, time-dependent Hamiltonians may be sped up by generalizing inverse engineering techniques based on counter-diabatic (transitionless driving) algorithms or on dynamical invariants. We work out the basic theory and examples described by two-level Hamiltonians: the acceleration of rapid adiabatic passage with a decaying excited level and of the dynamics of a classical particle on an expanding harmonic oscillator.

  9. Vibrational excitation of adsorbed molecules by low-energy photon-emitted electrons: A dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Ureña, A.; Telle, H. H.; Tornero, J.

    2013-01-01

    A simple, inelastic electron-scattering dynamical model is presented to account for vibrational excitation in molecular adsorbates. The basic two ingredients of the theoretical model are: (i) the conservation of the total angular momentum, and (ii) the requirement of a critical time to allow for the intra-molecular energy re-arrangement of the transient negative-ion complex. The model is applied to the vibrational excitation dynamics of molecules chemisorbed at sub-monolayer conditions on ordered metal surfaces. This was exemplified for Acrylonitrile adsorbed on Cu(1 0 0), whose vibrational excitation was studied via energy loss spectra of low-energy two-photon photoemission (2PPE) electrons, and for ammonia (NH3 and ND3) adsorbed on Cu(1 0 0), being probed in a STM experiment. Fits of the model to the data allowed for deducing the energy threshold of the vibrational excitation of the Cdbnd C and Ctbnd N bonds of the ACN adsorbate molecules, and the threshold for the symmetric ν1-stretch mode excitation of adsorbed NH3/ND3. Also, information about the temporal dynamics underlying the inelastic electron scattering was gained.

  10. Triplet-state energies and substituent effects of excited aroyl compounds in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z P; Aue, W A

    2000-01-01

    Triplet-state energy values obtained from the gas phase are still scarce. In this study, the triplet-state energies of 58 aroyl compounds, introduced as gas chromatographic peaks at atmospheric pressure and typically 473 K, have been determined from the 0-0 bands of their n --> pi* type phosphorescence spectra in excited nitrogen. Correlations of those gas-phase triplet-state energies with Hammett constants could be observed for substituted acetophenones, benzaldehydes and benzophenones.

  11. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  12. An experimentally validated bimorph cantilever model for piezoelectric energy harvesting from base excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, A.; Inman, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    Piezoelectric transduction has received great attention for vibration-to-electric energy conversion over the last five years. A typical piezoelectric energy harvester is a unimorph or a bimorph cantilever located on a vibrating host structure, to generate electrical energy from base excitations. Several authors have investigated modeling of cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters under base excitation. The existing mathematical modeling approaches range from elementary single-degree-of-freedom models to approximate distributed parameter solutions in the sense of Rayleigh-Ritz discretization as well as analytical solution attempts with certain simplifications. Recently, the authors have presented the closed-form analytical solution for a unimorph cantilever under base excitation based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions. In this paper, the analytical solution is applied to bimorph cantilever configurations with series and parallel connections of piezoceramic layers. The base excitation is assumed to be translation in the transverse direction with a superimposed small rotation. The closed-form steady state response expressions are obtained for harmonic excitations at arbitrary frequencies, which are then reduced to simple but accurate single-mode expressions for modal excitations. The electromechanical frequency response functions (FRFs) that relate the voltage output and vibration response to translational and rotational base accelerations are identified from the multi-mode and single-mode solutions. Experimental validation of the single-mode coupled voltage output and vibration response expressions is presented for a bimorph cantilever with a tip mass. It is observed that the closed-form single-mode FRFs obtained from the analytical solution can successfully predict the coupled system dynamics for a wide range of electrical load resistance. The performance of the bimorph device is analyzed extensively for the short circuit and open circuit resonance

  13. Quantum dynamics study of fulvene double bond photoisomerization: The role of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution and excitation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Blancafort, Lluis; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2011-10-07

    The double bond photoisomerization of fulvene has been studied with quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Fulvene is a test case to develop optical control strategies based on the knowledge of the excited state decay mechanism. The decay takes place on a time scale of several hundred femtoseconds, and the potential energy surface is centered around a conical intersection seam between the ground and excited state. The competition between unreactive decay and photoisomerization depends on the region of the seam accessed during the decay. The dynamics are carried out on a four-dimensional model surface, parametrized from complete active space self-consistent field calculations, that captures the main features of the seam (energy and locus of the seam and associated branching space vectors). Wave packet propagations initiated by single laser pulses of 5-25 fs duration and 1.85-4 eV excitation energy show the principal characteristics of the first 150 fs of the photodynamics. Initially, the excitation energy is transferred to a bond stretching mode that leads the wave packet to the seam, inducing the regeneration of the reactant. The photoisomerization starts after the vibrational energy has flowed from the bond stretching to the torsional mode. In our propagations, intramolecular energy redistribution (IVR) is accelerated for higher excess energies along the bond stretch mode. Thus, the competition between unreactive decay and isomerization depends on the rate of IVR between the bond stretch and torsion coordinates, which in turn depends on the excitation energy. These results set the ground for the development of future optical control strategies.

  14. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical and quantum processes for scale-invariant driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffner, Sebastian; Jarzynski, Christopher; Del Campo, Adolfo

    2014-03-01

    All real physical processes in classical as well as in quantum devices operate in finite-time. For most applications, however, adiabatic, i.e. infinitely-slow processes, are more favorable, as these do not cause unwanted, parasitic excitations. A shortcut to adiabaticity is a driving protocol which reproduces in a short time the same final state that would result from an adiabatic process. A particular powerful technique to engineer such shortcuts is transitionless quantum driving by means of counterdiabatic fields. However, determining closed form expressions for the counterdiabatic field has generally proven to be a daunting task. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach, with which we find the explicit form of the counterdiabatic driving field in arbitrary scale-invariant dynamical processes, encompassing expansions and transport. Our approach originates in the formalism of generating functions, and unifies previous approaches independently developed for classical and quantum systems. We show how this new approach allows to design shortcuts to adiabaticity for a large class of classical and quantum, single-particle, non-linear, and many-body systems. SD and CJ acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (USA) under grant DMR-1206971. This research is further supported by the U.S Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and a LANL J. Robert Oppenheimer fellowship (AdC).

  15. Low-energy electron attachment and detachment in vibrationally excited oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Anokhin, E. M.

    2009-11-01

    Three-body electron attachment to O2 molecules and electron detachment from O_{2}^{-} ions have been theoretically studied in vibrationally excited oxygen and O2-containing mixtures. Assuming that electron attachment and detachment proceed via the formation of vibrationally excited temporary O_{2}^{-} ions, the rates of these processes were determined on the basis of the statistical approach for the vibrational transfer and relaxation in collisions between O_{2}^{-} ions and O2 molecules. The calculated attachment and detachment rate constants turned out to agree well with available measurements in unexcited oxygen. This method was extended to calculate attachment and detachment rates in vibrationally excited oxygen. It was shown that the effect of vibrational excitation on electron detachment is profound, whereas attachment of low-energy electrons to vibrationally excited O2 is inefficient. The calculated vibrational distribution of stable O_{2}^{-} ions turned out to be non-equilibrium in an excited gas and the effective vibrational temperature of the ions was much lower than the vibrational temperature of molecules. An analytical method was suggested to determine this distribution and the effective vibrational temperature. The calculated rate constants were used to simulate the formation and decay of an electron-beam-generated plasma in N2 : O2 mixtures at elevated vibrational temperatures. The calculations showed that vibrational excitation of molecules leads to orders of magnitude increase in the plasma density and in the plasma lifetime, in agreement with available observations.

  16. Optimum forward scattering zone for intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Singh, Pardeep; Kharab, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Here we present a comparative study of various schemes commonly used for the determination of the safe minimum value of the impact parameter, which decides the maximum value of forward laboratory scattering angle, in intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation experiments. We have found that these are special cases of the recently proposed parameterization scheme in Kumar Rajiv et al., Phys. Rev. C, 81 (2010) 037602. The scheme may be used to demarcate the absorption-free as well as no-flux loss zone for intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation experiments.

  17. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-02-09

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  18. Generation of a pair of photons through the three-body dissociation of a multiply excited water molecule around the double ionization potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagiri, Takeshi; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Tanabe, Takehiko; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Isao H.; Kouchi, Noriyuki

    2009-11-01

    The cross sections for the generation of a photon-pair from excited fragments in photoexcitation of H2O have been measured as a function of incident photon energy. The multiply excited states of H2O have been observed even above the adiabatic double ionization potential.

  19. Double excitations in finite systems.

    PubMed

    Romaniello, P; Sangalli, D; Berger, J A; Sottile, F; Molinari, L G; Reining, L; Onida, G

    2009-01-28

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is widely used in the study of linear response properties of finite systems. However, there are difficulties in properly describing excited states, which have double- and higher-excitation characters, which are particularly important in molecules with an open-shell ground state. These states would be described if the exact TDDFT kernel were used; however, within the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation (xc) kernel, the calculated excitation energies have a strict single-excitation character and are fewer than the real ones. A frequency-dependent xc kernel could create extra poles in the response function, which would describe states with a multiple-excitation character. We introduce a frequency-dependent xc kernel, which can reproduce, within TDDFT, double excitations in finite systems. In order to achieve this, we use the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a dynamically screened Coulomb interaction W(omega), which can describe these excitations, and from this we obtain the xc kernel. Using a two-electron model system, we show that the frequency dependence of W does indeed introduce the double excitations that are instead absent in any static approximation of the electron-hole screening.

  20. Excitation of torsional modes of proteins via collisional energy transfer: A quantum dynamical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, David C.; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.

    2002-06-01

    Quantum dynamical calculations have been carried out on the excitation of the torsional vibrations of a protein by collision with a solvent molecule. This energy transfer process represents the first step in the unfolding of the protein. The method developed for this purpose is the torsional close coupling, infinite order sudden approximation. Both time-independent and time dependent methods are used to solve the scattering problem and individual excitation of all the torsional modes of the protein is treated. The method is applied to the excitation of the HIV protein gp41 colliding with a water molecule. This protein has 1101 atoms, 56 amino acids, and 452 torsional modes. A major mode-selective effect is found in the computations: it is much easier to excite backbone torsions than sidechain torsions in the protein. In addition, resonances arise in the collisional process and these complexes involve temporary trapping of the water molecule inside the pockets of the protein.

  1. Synthesis of silver nanorods by low energy excitation of spherical plasmonic seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Langille, Mark R; Mirkin, Chad A

    2011-06-08

    Plasmon excitation of Ag seed particles with 600-750 nm light in the presence of Ag(+) and trisodium citrate was used to synthesize penta-twinned nanorods. Importantly, the excitation wavelength can be used to control the reaction rate and, consequently, the aspect ratio of the nanorods. When the excitation wavelength is red-shifted from the surface plasmon resonance of the spherical seed particles, the rate of Ag(+) reduction becomes slower and more kinetically controlled. Such conditions favor the deposition of silver onto the tips of the growing nanorods as compared to their sides, resulting in the generation of higher aspect ratio rods. However, control experiments reveal that there is only a range of low energy excitation wavelengths (between 600 and 750 nm) that yields monodisperse nanorods. This study further highlights the utility of using wavelength to control the size and shape of growing nanoparticles using plasmon-mediated methods.

  2. High spin spectroscopy near the N=Z line: Channel selection and excitation energy systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, C.E.; Cameron, J.A.; Flibotte, S.

    1996-12-31

    The total {gamma}-ray and charged-particle energies emitted in fusion-evaporation reactions leading to N=Z compound systems in the A = 50-70 mass region have been measured with the 8{pi} {gamma}-ray spectrometer and the miniball charged-particle detector array. A new method of channel selection has been developed which combines particle identification with these total energy measurements and greatly improves upon the selectivity possible with particle detection alone. In addition, the event by event measurement of total {gamma}-ray energies using the BGO ball of the 8{pi} spectrometer has allowed a determination of excitation energies following particle evaporation for a large number of channels in several different reactions. The new channel selection procedure and excitation energy systematics are illustrated with data from the reaction of {sup 24}Mg on {sup 40}Ca at E{sub lab} = 80MeV.

  3. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M.; Milin, M.

    2009-08-26

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  4. Triplet excited states of cyclic disulfides and related compounds: electronic structures, geometries, energies, and decay.

    PubMed

    Ginagunta, Saroja; Bucher, Götz

    2011-02-03

    We have performed a computational study on the properties of a series of heterocycles bearing two adjacent heteroatoms, focusing on the structures and electronic properties of their first excited triplet states. If the heteroatoms are both heavy chalcogens (S, Se, or Te) or isoelectronic species, then the lowest excited triplet state usually has (π*, σ*) character. The triplet energies are fairly low (30-50 kcal mol(-1)). The (π*, σ*) triplet states are characterized by a significantly lengthened bond between the two heteroatoms. Thus, in 1,2-dithiolane (1b), the S-S bond length is calculated to be 2.088 Å in the singlet ground state and 2.568 Å in the first triplet excited state. The spin density is predicted to be localized almost exclusively on the sulfur atoms. Replacing one heavy chalcogen atom by an oxygen atom or an NR group results in a significant destabilization of the (π*, σ*) triplet excited state, which then no longer is lower in energy than an open-chain biradical. The size of the heterocyclic ring also contributes to the stability of the (π*, σ*) triplet state, with five-membered rings being more favorable than six-membered rings. Benzoannulation, finally, usually lowers the energy of the (π*, σ*) triplet excited states. If one of the heteroatoms is an oxygen or nitrogen atom, however, the corresponding lowest triplet states are better described as σ,π-biradicals.

  5. Theoretical characterization of excitation energy transfer in chlorosome light-harvesting antennae from green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Huh, Joonsuk; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of excitation dynamics in the chlorosome antenna complex of green photosynthetic bacteria based on a recently proposed model for the molecular assembly. Our model for the excitation energy transfer (EET) throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of the supramolecular structure and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. We characterized the optical properties of the chlorosome with absorption, circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy decay spectra. The simulation results for the excitation dynamics reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to several tens of ps. We assign the time scales of the EET to specific physical processes by comparing our results with the data obtained from time-resolved spectroscopy experiments.

  6. Anti-correlated vibrations drive fast non-adiabatic light harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, David

    2015-03-01

    We have recently shown that intramolecular vibrations shared across pigments can drive electronic energy transfer beyond the Born-Oppenheimer framework developed by Forster. The key features of this mechanism are a small change in vibrational equilibrium (less than the zero point amplitude) upon electronic excitation of the pigments and vibrational resonance with the adiabatic electronic energy gap. For identical pigments, delocalized, anti-correlated vibrations increase the speed of energy transfer. The same anti-correlated vibrations are excited by an electronically enhanced Raman process on the ground electronic state of photosynthetic antennas, and these vibrational wavepackets generate all of the reported signatures of photosynthetic energy transfer in femtosecond two-dimensional Fourier transform spectra. The talk will discuss how these results are generalized for differences between donor and acceptor and for multiple vibrations. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0258.

  7. Airflow energy harvesters of metal-based PZT thin films by self-excited vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, E.; Tsujiura, Y.; Kurokawa, F.; Hida, H.; Kanno, I.

    2014-11-01

    We developed self-excited vibration energy harvesters of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) thin films using airflow. To enhance the self-excited vibration, we used 30-μm-thick stainless steel (SS304) foils as base cantilevers on which PZT thin films were deposited by rf-magnetron sputtering. To compensate for the initial bending of PZT/SS304 unimorph cantilever due to the thermal stress, we deposited counter PZT thin films on the back of the SS304 cantilever. We evaluated power-generation performance and vibration mode of the energy harvester in the airflow. When the angle of attack (AOA) was 20° to 30°, large vibration was generated at wind speeds over 8 m/s. By FFT analysis, we confirmed that stable self-excited vibration was generated. At the AOA of 30°, the output power reached 19 μW at wind speeds of 12 m/s.

  8. Corrections to charge exchange spectroscopic measurements in TFTR due to energy-dependent excitation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.B.; Fonck, R.J.; Knize, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.

    1988-08-01

    The use of charge exchange spectrocopy to determine plasma rotation speeds and ion temperature is complicated by the energy dependence of the excitation cross sections. The Doppler-broadened spectral line shape is distorted by the relative velocity between the neutral hydrogen atoms of the injected beam and impurity ions. The asymmetric nature of the energy dependence of this cross section causes a non-motional shift of the line center and a non-thermal change in the line width. These effects vary with the angles between the beam direction, rotation velocity direction, and direction of the viewing sightline. When viewing two neutral beams at different angles on TFTR, the two measurements of v/sub phi/(r) show discrepancies about 20 to 30% with each other. The calculation of the spectral intensity profiles, using the excitation rates available, overcorrects these discrepancies and indicates the need for better excitation coefficients. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Linear-response theory for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method: excitation energies.

    PubMed

    Jagau, Thomas-C; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-28

    The recently presented linear-response function for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method (Mk-MRCC) [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044115 (2012)] is employed to determine vertical excitation energies within the singles and doubles approximation (Mk-MRCCSD-LR) for ozone as well as for o-benzyne, m-benzyne, and p-benzyne, which display increasing multireference character in their ground states. In order to assess the impact of a multireference ground-state wavefunction on excitation energies, we compare all our results to those obtained at the single-reference coupled-cluster level of theory within the singles and doubles as well as within the singles, doubles, and triples approximation. Special attention is paid to the artificial splitting of certain excited states which arises from the redundancy intrinsic to Mk-MRCC theory and hinders the straightforward application of the Mk-MRCC-LR method.

  10. Spins, Parity, Excitation Energies, and Octupole Structure of an Excited Superdeformed Band in {sup 194}Hg and Implications for Identical Bands

    SciTech Connect

    Hackman, G.; Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.P.; Lauritsen, T.; Calderin, I.J.; Janssens, R.V.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Agarwala, S.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Nisius, D.; Reiter, P.; Young, J.; Amro, H.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Hannachi, F.; Korichi, A.; Amro, H.; Moore, E.F.; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Do Nakatsukasa, T.

    1997-11-01

    An excited superdeformed band in {sup 194}Hg , observed to decay directly to both normal-deformed and superdeformed yrast states, is proposed to be a K{sup {pi}}=2{sup {minus}} octupole vibrational band, based on its excitation energies, spins, and likely parity. The transition energies are identical to those of the yrast superdeformed band in {sup 192}Hg , but originate from levels with different spins and parities. The evolution of transition energies with spin suggests that cancellations between pairing and particle alignment are partly responsible for the identical transition energies. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mukaida, Kyohei E-mail: jinno@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  12. Molecular properties of excited electronic state: Formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical second energy derivatives within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory/molecular mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen; Liu, Jie

    2014-05-14

    This work extends our previous works [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011); J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184111 (2011)] on analytical excited-state energy Hessian within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to couple with molecular mechanics (MM). The formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical first and second energy derivatives of TDDFT/MM excited state with respect to the nuclear and electric perturbations are presented. Their performances are demonstrated by the calculations of adiabatic excitation energies, and excited-state geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities for a number of benchmark systems. The consistent results with the full quantum mechanical method and other hybrid theoretical methods indicate the reliability of the current numerical implementation of developed algorithms. The computational accuracy and efficiency of the current analytical approach are also checked and the computational efficient strategies are suggested to speed up the calculations of complex systems with many MM degrees of freedom. Finally, we apply the current analytical approach in TDDFT/MM to a realistic system, a red fluorescent protein chromophore together with part of its nearby protein matrix. The calculated results indicate that the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond interactions between the chromophore and the protein matrix is responsible for the large Stokes shift.

  13. Molecular properties of excited electronic state: formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical second energy derivatives within the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory/molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiao; Liu, Jie; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-05-14

    This work extends our previous works [J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 014113 (2011); J. Liu and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 184111 (2011)] on analytical excited-state energy Hessian within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to couple with molecular mechanics (MM). The formalism, implementation, and applications of analytical first and second energy derivatives of TDDFT/MM excited state with respect to the nuclear and electric perturbations are presented. Their performances are demonstrated by the calculations of adiabatic excitation energies, and excited-state geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities for a number of benchmark systems. The consistent results with the full quantum mechanical method and other hybrid theoretical methods indicate the reliability of the current numerical implementation of developed algorithms. The computational accuracy and efficiency of the current analytical approach are also checked and the computational efficient strategies are suggested to speed up the calculations of complex systems with many MM degrees of freedom. Finally, we apply the current analytical approach in TDDFT/MM to a realistic system, a red fluorescent protein chromophore together with part of its nearby protein matrix. The calculated results indicate that the rearrangement of the hydrogen bond interactions between the chromophore and the protein matrix is responsible for the large Stokes shift.

  14. The role of the individual Lhcas in photosystem I excitation energy trapping.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Emilie; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2011-08-03

    In this work, we have investigated the role of the individual antenna complexes and of the low-energy forms in excitation energy transfer and trapping in Photosystem I of higher plants. To this aim, a series of Photosystem I (sub)complexes with different antenna size/composition/absorption have been studied by picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy. The data show that Lhca3 and Lhca4, which harbor the most red forms, have similar emission spectra (λ(max) = 715-720 nm) and transfer excitation energy to the core with a relative slow rate of ∼25/ns. Differently, the energy transfer from Lhca1 and Lhca2, the "blue" antenna complexes, occurs about four times faster. In contrast to what is often assumed, it is shown that energy transfer from the Lhca1/4 and the Lhca2/3 dimer to the core occurs on a faster timescale than energy equilibration within these dimers. Furthermore, it is shown that all four monomers contribute almost equally to the transfer to the core and that the red forms slow down the overall trapping rate by about two times. Combining all the data allows the construction of a comprehensive picture of the excitation-energy transfer routes and rates in Photosystem I.

  15. Communication: On the competition between adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics in vibrationally mediated ammonia photodissociation in its A band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changjian; Zhu, Xiaolei; Ma, Jianyi; Yarkony, David R.; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Non-adiabatic processes play an important role in photochemistry, but the mechanism for conversion of electronic energy to chemical energy is still poorly understood. To explore the possibility of vibrational control of non-adiabatic dynamics in a prototypical photoreaction, namely, the A-band photodissociation of NH 3 ( X ˜ 1 A 1 ) , full-dimensional state-to-state quantum dynamics of symmetric or antisymmetric stretch excited NH 3 ( X ˜ 1 A 1 ) is investigated on recently developed coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces. The experimentally observed H atom kinetic energy distributions are reproduced. However, contrary to previous inferences, the NH 2 ( A ˜ 2 A 1 ) /NH 2 ( X ˜ 2 B 1 ) branching ratio is found to be small regardless of the initial preparation of NH 3 ( X ˜ 1 A 1 ) , while the internal state distribution of the preeminent fragment, NH 2 ( X ˜ 2 B 1 ) , is found to depend strongly on the initial vibrational excitation of NH 3 ( X ˜ 1 A 1 ) . The slow H atoms in photodissociation mediated by the antisymmetric stretch fundamental state are due to energy sequestered in the internally excited NH 2 ( X ˜ 2 B 1 ) fragment, rather than in NH 2 ( A ˜ 2 A 1 ) as previously proposed. The high internal excitation of the NH 2 ( X ˜ 2 B 1 ) fragment is attributed to the torques exerted on the molecule as it passes through the conical intersection seam to the ground electronic state of NH3. Thus in this system, contrary to previous assertions, the control of electronic state branching by selective excitation of ground state vibrational modes is concluded to be ineffective. The juxtaposition of precise quantum mechanical results with complementary results based on quasi-classical surface hopping trajectories provides significant insights into the non-adiabatic process.

  16. Highly correlated systems. Excitation energies of first row transition metals Sc-Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavachari, Krishnan; Trucks, Gary W.

    1989-07-01

    The low-lying dns2→dn+1s1 excitation energies of the first row transition metal atoms Sc-Cu are calculated using fourth-order M≂ller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP4) as well as quadratic configuration interaction (QCI) techniques with large spd and spdf basis sets. The MP4 method performs well for Sc-Mn but fails dramatically for Fe-Cu. In contrast, the QCI technique performs uniformly for all excitation energies with a mean deviation from experiment of only 0.14 eV after including relativistic corrections. f functions contribute 0.1-0.4 eV to the excitation energies for these systems. The highly correlated d10 state of the Ni atom is also considered in detail. The QCI technique obtains the d9s1→d10 splitting of the Ni atom with an error of only 0.13 eV. The results show that single-configuration Hartree-Fock based methods can be successful in calculating excitation energies of transition metal atoms.

  17. Ionic bond effects on the mean excitation energy for stopping power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Chang, C. K.; Kamaratos, E.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular mean excitation energies for ionic bonded molecules calculated according to the local plasma approximation are compared to the Bragg rule. Adjustments of 15% are calculated for LiF in agreement with experiments while 6% adjustments are predicted for HF and 3% for LiH.

  18. Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low- to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work.

  19. Computing dispersive, polarizable, and electrostatic shifts of excitation energy in supramolecular systems: PTCDI crystal.

    PubMed

    Megow, Jörg

    2016-09-07

    The gas-to-crystal-shift denotes the shift of electronic excitation energies, i.e., the difference between ground and excited state energies, for a molecule transferred from the gas to the bulk phase. The contributions to the gas-to-crystal-shift comprise electrostatic as well as inductive polarization and dispersive energy shifts of the molecular excitation energies due to interaction with environmental molecules. For the example of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-diimide (PTCDI) bulk, the contributions to the gas-to-crystal shift are investigated. In the present work, electrostatic interaction is calculated via Coulomb interaction of partial charges while inductive and dispersive interactions are obtained using respective sum over states expressions. The coupling of higher transition densities for the first 4500 excited states of PTCDI was computed using transition partial charges based on an atomistic model of PTCDI bulk obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. As a result it is concluded that for the investigated model system of a PTCDI crystal, the gas to crystal shift is dominated by dispersive interaction.

  20. Highly correlated systems. Excitation energies of first row transition metals Sc--Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavachari, K.; Trucks, G. W.

    1989-07-15

    The low-lying /ital d//sup /ital n/s//sup 2//r arrow//ital d//sup /ital n/+1//ital s//sup 1/ excitation energies of the first row transition metal atoms Sc--Cu are calculated using fourth-order M/congruent/ller--Plesset perturbation theory (MP4) as well as quadratic configuration interaction (QCI) techniques with large /ital spd/ and /ital spdf/ basis sets. The MP4 method performs well for Sc--Mn but fails dramatically for Fe--Cu. In contrast, the QCI technique performs uniformly for all excitation energies with a mean deviation from experiment of only 0.14 eV after including relativistic corrections. /ital f/ functions contribute 0.1--0.4 eV to the excitation energies for these systems. The highly correlated /ital d//sup 10/ state of the Ni atom is also considered in detail. The QCI technique obtains the /ital d//sup 9//ital s1//r arrow//ital d10/ splitting of the Ni atom with an error of only 0.13 eV. The results show that single-configuration Hartree--Fock based methods can be successful in calculating excitation energies of transition metal atoms.

  1. Excitation energies and spins of the yrast superdeformed band in {sup 191}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Siem, S.; Reiter, P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M.P.; Ahmad, I.; Calderin, I.J.; Duguet, T.; Fischer, S.M.; Gassmann, D.; Hackman, G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Nisius, D.; Heenen, P.-H.; Amro, H.; Moore, E.F.; Doessing, T.; Garg, U.; Kharraja, B.; Hannachi, F.

    2004-07-01

    The excitation energies and spins of the levels in the yrast superdeformed band of {sup 191}Hg have been determined from two single-step {gamma} transitions and the quasicontinuum spectrum connecting the superdeformed and normal-deformed states. The results are compared with those from theoretical mean-field calculations with different interactions. A discussion of pairing in superdeformed states is also included.

  2. High-energy collective electronic excitations in free-standing single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsmuth, P.; Hambach, R.; Kinyanjui, M. K.; Guzzo, M.; Benner, G.; Kaiser, U.

    2013-08-01

    In this joint experimental and theoretical work, we investigate collective electronic excitations (plasmons) in free-standing, single-layer graphene. The energy- and momentum-dependent electron energy-loss function was measured up to 50eV along two independent in-plane symmetry directions (ΓM and ΓK) over the first Brillouin zone by momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. We compare our experimental results with corresponding time-dependent density-functional theory calculations. For finite momentum transfers, good agreement with experiments is found if crystal local-field effects are taken into account. In the limit of small and vanishing momentum transfers, we discuss differences between calculations and the experimentally obtained electron energy-loss functions of graphene due to a finite momentum resolution and out-of-plane excitations.

  3. Testing Noncollinear Spin-Flip, Collinear Spin-Flip, and Conventional Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Predicting Electronic Excitation Energies of Closed-Shell Atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefei; Yang, Ke R; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-05-13

    Conventional time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is based on a closed-shell Kohn-Sham (KS) singlet ground state with the adiabatic approximation, using either linear response (KS-LR) or the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (KS-TDA); these methods can only directly predict singly excited states. This deficiency can be overcome by using a triplet state as the reference in the KS-TDA approximation and "exciting" the singlet by a spin flip (SF) from the triplet; this is the method suggested by Krylov and co-workers, and we abbreviate this procedure as SF-KS-TDA. SF-KS-TDA can be applied either with the original collinear kernel of Krylov and co-workers or with a noncollinear kernel, as suggested by Wang and Ziegler. The SF-KS-TDA method does bring some new practical difficulties into play, but it can at least formally model doubly excited states and states with double-excitation character, so it might be more useful than conventional TDDFT (both KS-LR and KS-TDA) for photochemistry if these additional difficulties can be surmounted and if it is accurate with existing approximate exchange-correlation functionals. In the present work, we carried out calculations specifically designed to understand better the accuracy and limitations of the conventional TDDFT and SF-KS-TDA methods; we did this by studying closed-shell atoms and closed-shell monatomic cations because they provide a simple but challenging testing ground for what we might expect in studying the photochemistry of molecules with closed-shell ground states. To test their accuracy, we applied conventional KS-LR and KS-TDA and 18 versions of SF-KS-TDA (nine collinear and nine noncollinear) to the same set of vertical excitation energies (including both Rydberg and valence excitations) of Be, B(+), Ne, Na(+), Mg, and Al(+). We did this for 10 exchange-correlation functionals of various types, both local and nonlocal. We found that the GVWN5 and M06 functionals with nonlocal kernels in spin-flip calculations

  4. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N4). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as < hat{S}2rangle are also developed and tested.

  5. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-07

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N{sup 4}). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as 〈S{sup ^2}〉 are also developed and tested.

  6. Restricted second random phase approximations and Tamm-Dancoff approximations for electronic excitation energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Peng, Degao; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Weitao

    2014-12-07

    In this article, we develop systematically second random phase approximations (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximations (TDA) of particle-hole and particle-particle channels for calculating molecular excitation energies. The second particle-hole RPA/TDA can capture double excitations missed by the particle-hole RPA/TDA and time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), while the second particle-particle RPA/TDA recovers non-highest-occupied-molecular-orbital excitations missed by the particle-particle RPA/TDA. With proper orbital restrictions, these restricted second RPAs and TDAs have a formal scaling of only O(N(4)). The restricted versions of second RPAs and TDAs are tested with various small molecules to show some positive results. Data suggest that the restricted second particle-hole TDA (r2ph-TDA) has the best overall performance with a correlation coefficient similar to TDDFT, but with a larger negative bias. The negative bias of the r2ph-TDA may be induced by the unaccounted ground state correlation energy to be investigated further. Overall, the r2ph-TDA is recommended to study systems with both single and some low-lying double excitations with a moderate accuracy. Some expressions on excited state property evaluations, such as ⟨Ŝ(2)⟩ are also developed and tested.

  7. Energy-Looping Nanoparticles: Harnessing Excited-State Absorption for Deep-Tissue Imaging.

    PubMed

    Levy, Elizabeth S; Tajon, Cheryl A; Bischof, Thomas S; Iafrati, Jillian; Fernandez-Bravo, Angel; Garfield, David J; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sohal, Vikaas S; Schuck, P James; Cohen, Bruce E; Chan, Emory M

    2016-09-27

    Near infrared (NIR) microscopy enables noninvasive imaging in tissue, particularly in the NIR-II spectral range (1000-1400 nm) where attenuation due to tissue scattering and absorption is minimized. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals are promising deep-tissue imaging probes due to their photostable emission in the visible and NIR, but these materials are not efficiently excited at NIR-II wavelengths due to the dearth of lanthanide ground-state absorption transitions in this window. Here, we develop a class of lanthanide-doped imaging probes that harness an energy-looping mechanism that facilitates excitation at NIR-II wavelengths, such as 1064 nm, that are resonant with excited-state absorption transitions but not ground-state absorption. Using computational methods and combinatorial screening, we have identified Tm(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles as efficient looping systems that emit at 800 nm under continuous-wave excitation at 1064 nm. Using this benign excitation with standard confocal microscopy, energy-looping nanoparticles (ELNPs) are imaged in cultured mammalian cells and through brain tissue without autofluorescence. The 1 mm imaging depths and 2 μm feature sizes are comparable to those demonstrated by state-of-the-art multiphoton techniques, illustrating that ELNPs are a promising class of NIR probes for high-fidelity visualization in cells and tissue.

  8. Excitation Energies of Superdeformed States in {sup 196}Pb: Towards a Systematic Study of the Second Well in Pb Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.N.; Singh, A.K.; Huebel, H.; Rossbach, D.; Schonwasser, G.; Davidson, P.M.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Lane, G.J.; Goergen, A.; Buforn, N.; Redon, N.

    2005-10-28

    The excitation energy of the lowest-energy superdeformed band in {sup 196}Pb is established using the techniques of time-correlated {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Together with previous measurements on {sup 192}Pb and {sup 194}Pb, this result allows superdeformed excitation energies, binding energies, and two-proton and two-neutron separation energies to be studied systematically, providing stringent tests for current nuclear models. The results are examined for evidence of a 'superdeformed shell gap'.

  9. Excitation energies of superdeformed States in 196Pb: towards a systematic study of the second well in Pb isotopes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A N; Singh, A K; Hübel, H; Davidson, P M; Görgen, A; Rossbach, D; Korichi, A; Astier, A; Azaiez, F; Bazzacco, D; Bourgeois, C; Buforn, N; Byrne, A P; Dracoulis, G D; Hannachi, F; Hauschild, K; Korten, W; Kröll, T; Lane, G J; Lopez-Martens, A; Redon, N; Reiter, P; Rossi-Alvarez, C; Schonwasser, G; Stezowski, O; Thirolf, P G

    2005-10-28

    The excitation energy of the lowest-energy superdeformed band in 196Pb is established using the techniques of time-correlated gamma-ray spectroscopy. Together with previous measurements on 192Pb and 194Pb, this result allows superdeformed excitation energies, binding energies, and two-proton and two-neutron separation energies to be studied systematically, providing stringent tests for current nuclear models. The results are examined for evidence of a "superdeformed shell gap."

  10. Chemical reaction versus vibrational quenching in low energy collisions of vibrationally excited OH with O

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, G. B.; Juanes-Marcos, J. C.; Balakrishnan, N.; Kendrick, Brian K.

    2013-11-21

    Quantum scattering calculations are reported for state-to-state vibrational relaxation and reactive scattering in O + OH(v = 2 − 3, j = 0) collisions on the electronically adiabatic ground state {sup 2}A′′ potential energy surface of the HO{sub 2} molecule. The time-independent Schrödinger equation in hyperspherical coordinates is solved to determine energy dependent probabilities and cross sections over collision energies ranging from ultracold to 0.35 eV and for total angular momentum quantum number J = 0. A J-shifting approximation is then used to compute initial state selected reactive rate coefficients in the temperature range T = 1 − 400 K. Results are found to be in reasonable agreement with available quasiclassical trajectory calculations. Results indicate that rate coefficients for O{sub 2} formation increase with increasing the OH vibrational level except at low and ultralow temperatures where OH(v = 0) exhibits a slightly different trend. It is found that vibrational relaxation of OH in v = 2 and v = 3 vibrational levels is dominated by a multi-quantum process.

  11. [Selective excitation spectra and energy level structure of Dy3+:ThO2 crystal].

    PubMed

    Yin, M; Krupa, J C

    2001-08-01

    Dy3+:ThO2 crystal was grown by the flux technique for the first time. The emission spectra, excitation spectra and fluorescence decay curves were measured and discussed. By using emission spectra obtained under selective dye laser excitation at 12 K, together with the crystal-field theory, the site symmetry of Dy3+ ions in ThO2 was determined as C3 nu and its energy level structure was tabulated. The lifetime of radiative level 4F9/2 was also determined as 0.40 ms.

  12. Surface-catalyzed recombination into excited electronic, vibrational, rotational, and kinetic energy states: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofsky, I. L.; Barrett, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments in which recombined CO, CO2, D2O, OH, N2, H2, and O2 molecules desorb from surfaces in excited internal and translational states are briefly reviewed. Unequilibrated distributions predominate from the principally catalytic metal substrates so far investigated. Mean kinetic energies have been observed up to approx. 3x, and in some cases less than, wall-thermal; the velocity distributions generally vary with emission angle, with non-Lambertian particle fluxes. The excitation state populations are found to depend on surface impurities, in an as yet unexplained way.

  13. On the Performances of the M06 Family of Density Functionals for Electronic Excitation Energies.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Perpète, Eric A; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo; Valero, Rosendo; Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2010-07-13

    We assessed the accuracy of the four members of the M06 family of functionals (M06-L, M06, M06-2X, and M06-HF) for the prediction of electronic excitation energies of main-group compounds by time-dependent density functional theory. This is accomplished by comparing the predictions both to high-level theoretical benchmark calculations and some experimental data for gas-phase excitation energies of small molecules and to experimental data for midsize and large chromogens in liquid-phase solutions. The latter comparisons are carried out using implicit solvation models to include the electrostatic effects of solvation. We find that M06-L is one of the most accurate local functionals for evaluating electronic excitation energies, that M06-2X outperforms BHHLYP, and that M06-HF outperforms HF, although in each case, the compared functionals have the same or a similar amount of Hartree-Fock exchange. For the majority of investigated excited states, M06 emerges as the most accurate functional among the four tested, and it provides an accuracy similar to the best of the other global hybrids such as B3LYP, B98, and PBE0. For 190 valence excited states, 20 Rydberg states, and 16 charge transfer states, we try to provide an overall assessment by comparing the quality of the predictions to those of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory and nine other density functionals. For the valence excited states, M06 yields a mean absolute deviation (MAD) of 0.23 eV, whereas B3LYP, B98, and PBE0 have MADs in the range 0.19-0.22 eV. Of the functionals tested, M05-2X, M06-2X, and BMK are found to perform best for Rydberg states, and M06-HF performs best for charge transfer states, but no single functional performs satisfactorily for all three kinds of excitation. The performance of functionals with no Hartree-Fock exchange is of great practical interest because of their high computational efficiency, and we find that M06-L predicts more accurate excitation energies than other such functionals.

  14. A local framework for calculating coupled cluster singles and doubles excitation energies (LoFEx-CCSD)

    DOE PAGES

    Baudin, Pablo; Bykov, Dmytro; Liakh, Dmitry I.; ...

    2017-02-22

    Here, the recently developed Local Framework for calculating Excitation energies (LoFEx) is extended to the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) model. In the new scheme, a standard CCSD excitation energy calculation is carried out within a reduced excitation orbital space (XOS), which is composed of localised molecular orbitals and natural transition orbitals determined from time-dependent Hartree–Fock theory. The presented algorithm uses a series of reduced second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles (CC2) calculations to optimise the XOS in a black-box manner. This ensures that the requested CCSD excitation energies have been determined to a predefined accuracy compared tomore » a conventional CCSD calculation. We present numerical LoFEx-CCSD results for a set of medium-sized organic molecules, which illustrate the black-box nature of the approach and the computational savings obtained for transitions that are local compared to the size of the molecule. In fact, for such local transitions, the LoFEx-CCSD scheme can be applied to molecular systems where a conventional CCSD implementation is intractable.« less

  15. Excitation-energy dependence of solvation dynamics in room-temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daekeon; Park, Sang-Won; Shim, Youngseon; Kim, Hyung J.; Jung, YounJoon

    2016-07-01

    Influence of the excitation energy of a probe solute molecule on its solvation dynamics and emission spectrum in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (EMI+PF6-) is studied via molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained model description. By exciting the probe at different energies, each with an extremely narrow distribution, ensuing solvent relaxation and its dynamic variance are monitored using the isoconfigurational ensemble method. Resulting Stokes shift function, S(t), indicates that long-time solvent relaxation becomes slower with the decreasing excitation energy and approaches the equilibrium correlation function, C(t), of solvent fluctuations. This suggests that the system excited at the red-edge of the spectrum observes linear response better than that at the blue-edge. A detailed analysis of nonequilibrium trajectories shows that the effect of initial configurations on variance of relaxation dynamics is mainly confined to short times; it reaches a maximum around 0.1 ≲ t ≲ 1 ps and diminishes as time further increases. The influence of the initial velocity distribution, on the other hand, tends to grow with time and dominates the long-time variations of dynamics. The emission spectrum shows the red-edge effect in accord with previous studies.

  16. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  18. Excited-state energies and fine structure of highly charged lithiumlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-ying; Ding, Da-jun; Wang, Zhi-wen

    2013-10-01

    The full-core-plus-correlation method (FCPC) is extended to calculate the energies and fine structures of 1s2nd and 1s2nf (n≤5) states for the lithiumlike systems with high nuclear charge from Z = 41 to 50. In calculating energy, the higher-order relativistic contribution is estimated under a hydrogenic approximation. The nonrelativistic energies and wave functions are calculated by the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The mass polarization and the relativistic corrections including the kinetic energy correction, the Darwin term, the electron-electron contact term, and the orbit-orbit interaction are calculated perturbatively as the first-order correction. The quantum-electrodynamics contributions to the energy and to the fine-structure splitting are estimated by using the effective nuclear charge formula. The excited energies, the fine structures, and other relevant term energies are given and compared with the data available in the literature.

  19. Effect of collision energy and vibrational excitation on endothermic ion-molecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.P.

    1984-07-01

    This thesis is divided into two major parts. In the first part an experimental study of proton and deuteron transfer in H/sub 2//sup +/ + He and HD/sup +/ + He has been carried out as a function of kinetic and vibrational energy. The data gives evidence that at lower kinetic energies, the spectator stripping mechanism indeed plays an important role when H/sub 2//sup +/ or HD/sup +/ is vibrationally excited. The second half of this thesis examines the relative efficiencies between the excitation of C-C stretching vibration and collision energy on the promotion of the H atom transfer reaction of C/sub 2/H/sub 2//sup +/ + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. C/sub 2/H/sub 3//sup +/ + H.

  20. Energy transfer from PO excited states to alkali metal atoms in the phosphorus chemiluminescence flame

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahsan U.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorus chemiluminescence under ambient conditions of a phosphorus oxidation flame is found to offer an efficient electronic energy transferring system to alkali metal atoms. The lowest resonance lines, 2P3 / 2,½→2S½, of potassium and sodium are excited by energy transfer when an argon stream at 80°C carrying potassium or sodium atoms intersects a phosphorus vapor stream, either at the flame or in the postflame region. The lowest electronically excited metastable 4IIi state of PO or the (PO[unk]PO)* excimer is considered to be the probable energy donor. The (PO[unk]PO)* excimer results from the interaction of the 4IIi state of one PO molecule with the ground 2IIr state of another. Metastability of the donor state is strongly indicated by the observation of intense sensitized alkali atom fluorescence in the postflame region. PMID:16592925

  1. Intermediate-energy differential and integral cross sections for vibrational excitation in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Pettifer, Z.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; White, R. D.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-06-07

    Differential and integral cross section measurements, for incident electron energies in the 20–50 eV range, are reported for excitation of several composite vibrational modes in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). Optimisation and frequency calculations, using GAUSSIAN 09 at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, were also undertaken for the two most abundant conformers of THFA, with results being reported for their respective mode classifications and excitation energies. Those calculations assisted us in the experimental assignments of the composite features observed in our measured energy loss spectra. There are, to the best of our knowledge, no other experimental or theoretical data currently available in the literature against which we can compare the present results.

  2. Fusion excitation function measurement for 6Li+64Ni at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin Shaikh, Md.; Roy, Subinit; Rajbanshi, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, P.; Pal, S.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Shrivastav, A.

    2015-01-01

    Total fusion excitation function has been measured for the reaction of weakly bound 6Li projectile on medium mass 64Ni target at energies near the Coulomb barrier of the system. Online characteristic γ-ray detection method has been used to identify and determine the cross sections of the residues. No suppression of total fusion cross section (σTF) is observed at above barrier energies. But enhancement of measured cross section with respect to the one-dimensional barrier penetration model (1-DBPM) calculation is observed at below barrier energies. The enhancement can not be explained by coupled channels calculation with dominant projectile and target excitations as well as one-neutron stripping reaction.

  3. Self-energy correction to the hyperfine splitting for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Wundt, B. J.; Jentschura, U. D.

    2011-05-15

    The self-energy corrections to the hyperfine splitting is evaluated for higher excited states in hydrogenlike ions using an expansion in the binding parameter Z{alpha}, where Z is the nuclear-charge number and {alpha} is the fine-structure constant. We present analytic results for D, F, and G states, and for a number of highly excited Rydberg states, with principal quantum numbers in the range 13{<=}n{<=}16, and orbital angular momenta l=n-2 and l=n-1. A closed-form analytic expression is derived for the contribution of high-energy photons, valid for any state with l{>=}2 and arbitrary n, l, and total angular momentum j. The low-energy contributions are written in the form of generalized Bethe logarithms and evaluated for selected states.

  4. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol.

    PubMed

    Neves, R F C; Jones, D B; Lopes, M C A; Nixon, K L; de Oliveira, E M; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Lima, M A P; da Silva, G B; Brunger, M J

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C6H5OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15-40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10-90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C6H5OH molecule by electron impact.

  5. Energy transport in weakly nonlinear wave systems with narrow frequency band excitation.

    PubMed

    Kartashova, Elena

    2012-10-01

    A novel discrete model (D model) is presented describing nonlinear wave interactions in systems with small and moderate nonlinearity under narrow frequency band excitation. It integrates in a single theoretical frame two mechanisms of energy transport between modes, namely, intermittency and energy cascade, and gives the conditions under which each regime will take place. Conditions for the formation of a cascade, cascade direction, conditions for cascade termination, etc., are given and depend strongly on the choice of excitation parameters. The energy spectra of a cascade may be computed, yielding discrete and continuous energy spectra. The model does not require statistical assumptions, as all effects are derived from the interaction of distinct modes. In the example given-surface water waves with dispersion function ω(2)=gk and small nonlinearity-the D model predicts asymmetrical growth of side-bands for Benjamin-Feir instability, while the transition from discrete to continuous energy spectrum, excitation parameters properly chosen, yields the saturated Phillips' power spectrum ~g(2)ω(-5). The D model can be applied to the experimental and theoretical study of numerous wave systems appearing in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, electrodynamics, plasma, convection theory, etc.

  6. Comparison of plasma excitation, ionization, and energy influx in single and dual frequency capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-12-01

    Argon (Ar) plasma characteristics in a single and dual-frequency (DF), capacitively coupled plasma processing system are compared for drive frequencies 13.56 MHz, 320 MHz and their mixture as dual frequencies (DF). We present frequency dependent changes that occur in discharges in terms of plasma parameters such as plasma density, electron temperature, electron energy distribution function, optical emission, gas temperature, and metastable Ar density in a pressure range of 10-150 mTorr. Additionally, this work also presents the formulation and characterization of energy fluxes from plasma to a substrate/probe during the plasma generation. By variation of the operating pressure and plasma excitation frequency, the different contributions originating from the kinetic energy, the recombination of charge carriers such as electrons and ions at the surface along with the contributions from the neutral and excited species are determined. Data reveals that Ar metastable density in low-frequency radio frequency (RF) plasma is not a strong function of operating pressure even though plasma ionization increases with pressure. However, in the case of high-frequency and DF, the excitation of Ar metastable decreases and ionization increases due to enhanced collisions and efficient electron-neutral momentum/energy transfer. Also, data reveals that energy flux in the low-frequency RF plasmas is very high compared to that of high-frequency and DF operations.

  7. Low-Energy Excitation Spectra in the Excitonic Phase of Cobalt Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoki; Sugimoto, Koudai; Ohta, Yukinori

    2017-04-01

    We study the excitonic phase and low-energy excitation spectra of perovskite cobalt oxides. Constructing the five-orbital Hubbard model defined on the three-dimensional cubic lattice for the 3d bands of Pr0.5Ca0.5CoO3, we calculate the excitonic susceptibility in the normal state in the random-phase approximation (RPA) to show the presence of the instability toward excitonic condensation. On the basis of the excitonic ground state with a magnetic multipole obtained in the mean-field approximation, we calculate the dynamical susceptibility of the excitonic phase in the RPA and find that there appear a gapless collective excitation in the spin-transverse mode (Goldstone mode) and a gapful collective excitation in the spin-longitudinal mode (Higgs mode). The experimental relevance of our results is discussed.

  8. Superconducting qubit in a nonstationary transmission line cavity: Parametric excitation, periodic pumping, and energy dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Remizov, S. V.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a superconducting qubit coupled to the nonstationary transmission line cavity with modulated frequency taking into account energy dissipation. Previously, it was demonstrated that in the case of a single nonadiabatical modulation of a cavity frequency there are two channels of a two-level system excitation which are due to the absorption of Casimir photons and due to the counterrotating wave processes responsible for the dynamical Lamb effect. We show that the parametric periodical modulation of the resonator frequency can increase dramatically the excitation probability. Remarkably, counterrotating wave processes under such a modulation start to play an important role even in the resonant regime. Our predictions can be used to control qubit-resonator quantum states as well as to study experimentally different channels of a parametric qubit excitation.

  9. Calibration of Cholesky Auxiliary Basis Sets for Multiconfigurational Perturbation Theory Calculations of Excitation Energies.

    PubMed

    Boström, Jonas; Delcey, Mickaël G; Aquilante, Francesco; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Lindh, Roland

    2010-03-09

    The accuracy of auxiliary basis sets derived from Cholesky decomposition of two-electron integrals is assessed for excitation energies calculated at the state-average complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and multiconfigurational second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) levels of theory using segmented as well as generally contracted atomic orbital basis sets. Based on 196 valence excitations in 26 organic molecules and 72 Rydberg excitations in 3 organic molecules, the results show that Cholesky auxiliary basis sets can be used without compromising the accuracy of the multiconfigurational methods. Specifically, with a decomposition threshold of 10(-4) au, the mean error due to the Cholesky auxiliary basis set is 0.001 eV, or smaller, decreasing with increasing atomic orbital basis set quality.

  10. Controlling quasiparticle excitations in a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, S.J.; Choi, S.; Bigelow, N.P.

    2005-08-15

    We describe an approach to quantum control of the quasiparticle excitations in a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate based on adiabatic and diabatic changes in the trap anisotropy. We describe our approach in the context of the Landau-Zener transition at the avoided crossings in the quasiparticle excitation spectrum. We find also that there can be population oscillation between different modes at the specific aspect ratios of the trapping potential at which the mode energies are almost degenerate. These effects may have implications in the expansion of an excited condensate as well as the dynamics of a moving condensate in an atomic waveguide with a varying width.

  11. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-10-15

    We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.

  12. Benchmarking the completely renormalised equation-of-motion coupled-cluster approaches for vertical excitation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Piecuch, Piotr; Hansen, Jared A.; Ajala, Adeayo O.

    2015-09-15

    When vertical energies are excited for a comprehensive test set of about 150 singlet excited states of 28 medium-sized organic molecules computed using two variants of the completely renormalised (CR) equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled-cluster (CC) method with singles, doubles, and non-iterative triples, abbreviated as δ-CR-EOMCCSD(T), and the analogous two variants of the newer, left-eigenstate δ-CR-EOMCC(2,3) approach are benchmarked against the previously published CASPT2, CC3, and EOMCCSDT-3 results, as well as the suggested theoretical best estimate (TBE) values. The δ-CR-EOMCC approaches are also used to identify and characterise about 50 additional excited states, including several states having substantial two-electron excitation components, which have not been found in the previous work and which can be used in future benchmark studies. We demonstrated that the non-iterative triples corrections to the EOMCCSD excitation energies defining the relatively inexpensive, single-reference, black-box δ-CR-EOMCC approaches provide significant improvements in the EOMCCSD data, while closely matching the results of the iterative and considerably more expensive CC3 and EOMCCSDT-3 calculations and their CASPT2 and TBE counterparts. It is also shown that the δ-CR-EOMCC methods, especially δ-CR-EOMCC(2,3), are capable of bringing the results of the CC3 and EOMCCSDT-3 calculations to a closer agreement with the CASPT2 and TBE data, demonstrating the utility of the cost-effective δ-CR-EOMCC methods in applications involving molecular electronic spectra. Finally, we show that there may exist a relationship between the magnitude of the triples corrections defining δ-CR-EOMCC approaches and the reduced excitation level diagnostic resulting from EOMCCSD.

  13. Benchmarking the completely renormalised equation-of-motion coupled-cluster approaches for vertical excitation energies

    DOE PAGES

    Piecuch, Piotr; Hansen, Jared A.; Ajala, Adeayo O.

    2015-09-15

    When vertical energies are excited for a comprehensive test set of about 150 singlet excited states of 28 medium-sized organic molecules computed using two variants of the completely renormalised (CR) equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled-cluster (CC) method with singles, doubles, and non-iterative triples, abbreviated as δ-CR-EOMCCSD(T), and the analogous two variants of the newer, left-eigenstate δ-CR-EOMCC(2,3) approach are benchmarked against the previously published CASPT2, CC3, and EOMCCSDT-3 results, as well as the suggested theoretical best estimate (TBE) values. The δ-CR-EOMCC approaches are also used to identify and characterise about 50 additional excited states, including several states having substantial two-electron excitation components, whichmore » have not been found in the previous work and which can be used in future benchmark studies. We demonstrated that the non-iterative triples corrections to the EOMCCSD excitation energies defining the relatively inexpensive, single-reference, black-box δ-CR-EOMCC approaches provide significant improvements in the EOMCCSD data, while closely matching the results of the iterative and considerably more expensive CC3 and EOMCCSDT-3 calculations and their CASPT2 and TBE counterparts. It is also shown that the δ-CR-EOMCC methods, especially δ-CR-EOMCC(2,3), are capable of bringing the results of the CC3 and EOMCCSDT-3 calculations to a closer agreement with the CASPT2 and TBE data, demonstrating the utility of the cost-effective δ-CR-EOMCC methods in applications involving molecular electronic spectra. Finally, we show that there may exist a relationship between the magnitude of the triples corrections defining δ-CR-EOMCC approaches and the reduced excitation level diagnostic resulting from EOMCCSD.« less

  14. Quantum electrodynamical theory of high-efficiency excitation energy transfer in laser-driven nanostructure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeraddana, Dilusha; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-08-01

    A fundamental theory is developed for describing laser-driven resonance energy transfer (RET) in dimensionally constrained nanostructures within the framework of quantum electrodynamics. The process of RET communicates electronic excitation between suitably disposed emitter and detector particles in close proximity, activated by the initial excitation of the emitter. Here, we demonstrate that the transfer rate can be significantly increased by propagation of an auxiliary laser beam through a pair of nanostructure particles. This is due to the higher order perturbative contribution to the Förster-type RET, in which laser field is applied to stimulate the energy transfer process. We construct a detailed picture of how excitation energy transfer is affected by an off-resonant radiation field, which includes the derivation of second and fourth order quantum amplitudes. The analysis delivers detailed results for the dependence of the transfer rates on orientational, distance, and laser intensity factor, providing a comprehensive fundamental understanding of laser-driven RET in nanostructures. The results of the derivations demonstrate that the geometry of the system exercises considerable control over the laser-assisted RET mechanism. Thus, under favorable conformational conditions and relative spacing of donor-acceptor nanostructures, the effect of the auxiliary laser beam is shown to produce up to 70% enhancement in the energy migration rate. This degree of control allows optical switching applications to be identified.

  15. Estimation of excitation energy of diatomic molecules in expanding nonequilibrium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul

    1992-01-01

    The energy contained in the highly excited vibrational and rotational states in a diatomic gas in a thermochemical nonequilibrium state during expansion is estimated. The estimation is made on the assumption that the populations of the vibrational and rotational states, when normalized by their respective equilibrium values, are describable by simple functions containing no more than four arbitrary parameters. A cubic polynomial, a logarithmic-cubic polynomial, and a bimodal step function are used for this purpose. The four parameters are determined by imposing conditions known at the ground state and the dissociation limit and the mass conservation law. The energy in excess of that accounted for by assuming a Boltzmann distribution of these states, defined here as excess excitation energy, is calculated for N2, O2, NO, CO, OH, and H2. A calculation made for a typical nozzle flow shows that the excess energy may reach 6 percent of the total enthalpy of the flow, and that the flow velocity may decrease by as much as 4 percent due to the nonequilibrium excitation phenomenon.

  16. Excitation energy and nuclear dissipation probed with evaporation-residue cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, W.

    2011-04-15

    Using a Langevin equation coupled with a statistical decay model, we calculate the excess of evaporation-residue cross sections over its standard statistical-model value as a function of nuclear dissipation strength for {sup 200}Hg compound nuclei (CNs) under two distinct types of initial conditions for populated CNs: (i) high excitation energy but low angular momentum (produced via proton-induced spallation reactions at GeV energies and via peripheral heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies) and (ii) high angular momentum but low excitation energy (produced through fusion mechanisms). We find that the conditions of case (ii) not only amplify the effect of dissipation on the evaporation residues, but also substantially increase the sensitivity of this excess to nuclear dissipation. These results suggest that, in experiments, to obtain accurate information of presaddle nuclear dissipation strength by measuring evaporation-residue cross sections, it is best to choose the heavy-ion-induced fusion reaction approach to yield excited compound nuclei.

  17. B1-based specific energy absorption rate determination for nonquadrature radiofrequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Katscher, Ulrich; Findeklee, Christian; Voigt, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    The current gold standard to estimate local and global specific energy absorption rate for MRI involves numerically modeling the patient and the transmit radiofrequency coil. Recently, a patient-individual method was presented, which estimated specific energy absorption rate from individually measured B(1) maps. This method, however, was restricted to quadrature volume coils due to difficulties distinguishing phase contributions from radiofrequency transmission and reception. In this study, a method separating these two phase contributions by comparing the electric conductivity reconstructed from different transmit channels of a parallel radiofrequency transmission system is presented. This enables specific energy absorption rate estimation not only for quadrature excitation but also for the nonquadrature excitation of the single elements of the transmit array. Though the contributions of the different phases are known, unknown magnetic field components and tissue boundary artifacts limit the technique. Nevertheless, the high agreement between simulated and experimental results found in this study is promising. B(1)-based specific energy absorption rate determination might become possible for arbitrary radiofrequency excitation on a patient-individual basis.

  18. Electrohydroelastic dynamics of macro-fiber composites for underwater energy harvesting from base excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Erturk, A.

    2014-04-01

    Low-power electronic systems are used in various underwater applications ranging from naval sensor networks to ecological monitoring for sustainability. In this work, underwater base excitation of cantilevers made of Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) piezoelectric structures is explored experimentally and theoretically to harvest energy for such wireless electronic components toward enabling self-powered underwater systems. Bimorph cantilevers made of MFCs with different length-to-width ratios and same thickness are tested in air and under water to characterize the change in natural frequency and damping with a focus on the fundamental bending mode. The real and imaginary parts of hydrodynamic frequency response functions are identified and corrected based on this set of experiments. An electrohydroelastic model is developed and experimentally validated for predicting the power delivered to an electrical load as well as the shunted underwater vibration response under base excitation. Variations of the electrical power output with excitation frequency and load resistance are obtained for different length-to-width ratios. Underwater power density results are reported and compared with their in-air counterparts. Specifically a nonlinear dependence of the power density to the cantilever width is reported for energy harvesting from underwater base excitation.

  19. Ultrafast excited-state deactivation and energy transfer in guanine-cytosine DNA double helices.

    PubMed

    Miannay, François-Alexandre; Bányász, Akos; Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2007-11-28

    The DNA double helix poly(dGdC).poly(dGdC) is studied by fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with femtosecond resolution. It is shown that the excited-state relaxation of the duplex is faster than that of the monomeric components dGMP and dCMP. This contrasts with the behavior of duplexes composed exclusively of adenine-thymine base pairs, for which an overall lengthening of the fluorescence lifetimes with respect to that of an equimolar mixture of dAMP and TMP was reported previously. Despite the difference in the excited-state deactivation rate between the two types of duplexes, the signature of ultrafast energy transfer is present in both of them. It is attested by the decrease of fluorescence anisotropy decay of the duplexes on the subpicosecond time scale, where molecular motions are inhibited, and is corroborated by the fact that their steady-state fluorescence spectra do not change with the excitation wavelength. Energy transfer involves excited states delocalized over at least two bases, whose existence is revealed by the UV absorption spectrum of the duplex, clearly different from that of an equimolar spectrum of dGMP and dCMP.

  20. Excitation Mechanisms in Moderate-Energy Na+-He and K+-He Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shigetomo; Hattori, Takehito; Shimakura, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Excitation mechanisms in Na+-He and K+-He collisions were studied at laboratory collision energies of 1000 ≤ Elab ≤ 1500 eV by differential scattering spectroscopy. Extensive measurements were performed at Elab = 1500 eV. Double differential cross sections σ(Θ)k were measured over a wide range of center-of-mass scattering angles, 7.3 ≤ Θ ≤ 173°, by detecting all the scattered particles (Na+, Na, K+, K, He+, and He), where the subscript k denotes the number of exit channels in the reactions. At the collision energy of Elab = 1500 eV, one- and two-electron excitations were observed appreciably for the Na+-He collisions, while only one-electron excitations were observed in the K+-He collisions. The analyses of the experimental results for these collision systems indicate that the electronic transitions in the Na+-He and K+-He collisions take place at the internuclear distances of R < RC = 0.63 × 10-10 m [potential height V(R) > 49 eV] and R < RC = 0.80 × 10-10 m [V(R) > 36 eV], respectively. For these asymmetric systems, at Elab= 1500 eV, the electronic transition probabilities around the threshold angles are so small that the integral excitation cross sections have small values of Sex < 1.2 × 10-21 m2.

  1. An interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Bruch, Anton; von Oppen, Felix

    We consider the effect of electron-electron interactions on the performance of an adiabatic quantum motor based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. We model such a device by electrons in a 1d wire coupled to a slowly moving periodic potential associated with the classical mechanical degree of freedom of the motor. This periodic degree of freedom is set into motion by a bias voltage applied to the 1d electron channel. We investigate the Thouless motor with interacting leads modeled as Luttinger liquids. We show that interactions enhance the energy gap opened by the periodic potential and thus the robustness of the Thouless motor against variations in the chemical potential. We show that the motor degree of freedom can be described as a mobile impurity in a Luttinger liquid obeying Langevin dynamics with renormalized coefficients due to interactions, for which we give explicit expressions.

  2. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Munafò, A; Panesi, M; Magin, T E

    2014-02-01

    A Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model is proposed to reduce a detailed kinetic mechanism database developed at NASA Ames Research Center for internal energy transfer and dissociation in N(2)-N interactions. The coarse-grained model is constructed by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N(2) molecule into energy bins. The population of the levels within each bin is assumed to follow a Boltzmann distribution at the local translational temperature. Excitation and dissociation rate coefficients for the energy bins are obtained by averaging the elementary rate coefficients. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The proposed coarse-grained model is applied to the study of nonequilibrium flows behind normal shock waves and within converging-diverging nozzles. In both cases, the flow is assumed inviscid and steady. Computational results are compared with those obtained by direct solution of the master equation for the rovibrational collisional model and a more conventional multitemperature model. It is found that the proposed coarse-grained model is able to accurately resolve the nonequilibrium dynamics of internal energy excitation and dissociation-recombination processes with only 20 energy bins. Furthermore, the proposed coarse-grained model provides a superior description of the nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in shock heated and nozzle flows when compared with the conventional multitemperature models.

  3. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    PubMed

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  4. On Adiabatic Pair Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickl, Peter; Dürr, Detlef

    2008-08-01

    We give here a rigorous proof of the well known prediction of pair creation as it arises from the Dirac equation with an external time dependent potential. Pair creation happens with probability one if the potential changes adiabatically in time and becomes overcritical, which means that an eigenvalue curve (as a function of time) bridges the gap between the negative and positive spectral continuum. The potential can be thought of as being zero at large negative and large positive times. The rigorous treatment of this effect has been lacking since the pioneering work of Beck, Steinwedel and Süßmann [1] in 1963 and Gershtein and Zeldovich [8] in 1970.

  5. KANTBP: A program for computing energy levels, reaction matrix and radial wave functions in the coupled-channel hyperspherical adiabatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Abrashkevich, A. G.; Amaya-Tapia, A.; Kaschiev, M. S.; Larsen, S. Y.; Vinitsky, S. I.

    2007-10-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program is presented which calculates energy values, reaction matrix and corresponding radial wave functions in a coupled-channel approximation of the hyperspherical adiabatic approach. In this approach, a multi-dimensional Schrödinger equation is reduced to a system of the coupled second-order ordinary differential equations on the finite interval with homogeneous boundary conditions of the third type. The resulting system of radial equations which contains the potential matrix elements and first-derivative coupling terms is solved using high-order accuracy approximations of the finite-element method. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the energy values and reaction matrix for an exactly solvable 2D-model of three identical particles on a line with pair zero-range potentials. Program summaryProgram title: KANTBP Catalogue identifier: ADZH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4224 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 232 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: Intel Xeon EM64T, Alpha 21264A, AMD Athlon MP, Pentium IV Xeon, Opteron 248, Intel Pentium IV Operating system: OC Linux, Unix AIX 5.3, SunOS 5.8, Solaris, Windows XP RAM: depends on (a) the number of differential equations; (b) the number and order of finite-elements; (c) the number of hyperradial points; and (d) the number of eigensolutions required. Test run requires 30 MB Classification: 2.1, 2.4 External routines: GAULEG and GAUSSJ [W.H. Press, B.F. Flanery, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterley, Numerical Recipes: The Art of Scientific Computing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986] Nature of problem: In the hyperspherical adiabatic

  6. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  7. Excitation energy-transfer in functionalized nanoparticles: Going beyond the Förster approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, G.; Corni, S.; Delgado, A.; Bertoni, A.; Goldoni, G.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a novel approach to treat excitation energy transfer in hybrid nanosystems composed by an organic molecule attached to a semiconductor nanoparticle. Our approach extends the customary Förster theory by considering interaction between transition multipole moments of the nanoparticle at all orders and a point-like transition dipole moment representing the molecule. Optical excitations of the nanoparticle are described through an envelope-function configuration interaction method for a single electron-hole pair. We applied the method to the prototypical case of a core/shell CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dot which shows a complete suppression of the energy transfer for specific transitions which could not be captured by Förster theory.

  8. Unusual characteristics of electromagnetic waves excited by cometary newborn ions with large perpendicular energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinca, A. L.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of electromagnetic waves excited by cometary newborn ions with large perpendicular energies are examined using a model of solar wind permeated by dilute drifting ring distributions of electrons and oxygen ions with finite thermal spreads. The model has parameters compatible with the ICE observations at the Giacobini-Zinner comet. It is shown that cometary newborn ions with large perpendicular energies can excite a wave mode with rest frame frequencies in the order of the heavy ion cyclotron frequency, Omega(i), and unusual propagation characteristics at small obliquity angles. For parallel propagation, the mode is left-hand circularly polarized, might be unstable in a frequency range containing Omega(i), and moves in the direction of the newborn ion drift along the static magnetic field.

  9. Energy shift of collective electron excitations in highly corrugated graphitic nanostructures: Experimental and theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedelnikova, O. V. Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Yushina, I. V.

    2014-04-21

    Effect of corrugation of hexagonal carbon network on the collective electron excitations has been studied using optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. Onion-like carbon (OLC) was taken as a material, where graphitic mantle enveloping agglomerates of multi-shell fullerenes is strongly curved. Experiments showed that positions of π and π + σ plasmon modes as well as π → π* absorption peak are substantially redshifted for OLC as compared with those of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and thermally exfoliated graphite consisted of planar sheets. This effect was reproduced in behavior of dielectric functions of rippled graphite models calculated within the random phase approximation. We conclude that the energy of electron excitations in graphitic materials could be precisely tuned by a simple bending of hexagonal network without change of topology. Moreover, our investigation suggests that in such materials optical exciton can transfer energy to plasmon non-radiatively.

  10. Nonlinear vibrational-state excitation and piezoelectric energy conversion in harmonically driven granular chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, C.; Kim, E.; Charalampidis, E. G.; Kim, H.; Li, F.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Lydon, J.; Daraio, C.; Yang, J.

    2016-05-01

    This article explores the excitation of different vibrational states in a spatially extended dynamical system through theory and experiment. As a prototypical example, we consider a one-dimensional packing of spherical particles (a so-called granular chain) that is subject to harmonic boundary excitation. The combination of the multimodal nature of the system and the strong coupling between the particles due to the nonlinear Hertzian contact force leads to broad regions in frequency where different vibrational states are possible. In certain parametric regions, we demonstrate that the nonlinear Schrödinger equation predicts the corresponding modes fairly well. The electromechanical model we apply predicts accurately the conversion from the obtained mechanical energy to the electrical energy observed in experiments.

  11. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  12. Current status of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of free radicals and electronically excited metastable species as high energy propellants for rocket engines. Nascent or atomic forms of diatomic gases are considered free radicals as well as the highly reactive diatomic triatomic molecules that posess unpaired electrons. Manufacturing and storage problems are described, and a review of current experimental work related to the manufacture of atomic hydrogen propellants is presented.

  13. Frontiers in propulsion research: Laser, matter-antimatter, excited helium, energy exchange thermonuclear fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papailiou, D. D. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Concepts are described that presently appear to have the potential for propulsion applications in the post-1990 era of space technology. The studies are still in progress, and only the current status of investigation is presented. The topics for possible propulsion application are lasers, nuclear fusion, matter-antimatter annihilation, electronically excited helium, energy exchange through the interaction of various fields, laser propagation, and thermonuclear fusion technology.

  14. Photogeneration of, and Efficient Collisional Energy Transfer from, Vibrationally Excited Hydrogen Isocyanide (hnc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2013-06-01

    Time-resolved IR emission spectroscopy has previously been used to characterize the 193 nm photodissociation dynamics of vinyl cyanide, H_{2}CC(H)CN. Of significance, it was observed that the major molecular elimination channels generated ro-vibrationally excited photofragments consisting of: HCN + H_{2}CC: and HNC + HCCH, for which the HCN / HNC branching ratio was deduced to be 3.3 to 1. In the present study, we examine the collisional deactivation of the vibrationally excited (E_{vib}=15 kcal mole^{-1} above the zero-point energy) ν_{1} NH and ν_{3} NC stretches of HNC, in response to collisions with a series of inert rare-gas atoms: Rg=He, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Spectral modeling of the IR emission allows direct determination of the time-dependent average internal energy of HNC, and therefore a quantification of the average energy lost per collision, as a function of the internal energy. Similar to vibrationally excited radicals, collisional deactivation of HNC is shown to be remarkably efficient, likely due to comparatively strong HNC / Rg intermolecular attractive interactions. Subsequently, depending upon the relative rates, excited HNC can either isomerize to the energetically more stable HCN, or be rapidly quenched and kinetically trapped as HNC. Potential implications for the astrophysical HNC / HCN abundance ratio problem will be discussed. M. J. Wilhelm, M. Nikow, L. Letendre, and H. L. Dai J. Chem. Phys. 130, 044307 (2009). M. J. Wilhelm, M. Nikow, J. M. Smith, and H. L. Dai J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 23 (2013).

  15. Benchmarking singlet and triplet excitation energies of molecular semiconductors for singlet fission: Tuning the amount of HF exchange and adjusting local correlation to obtain accurate functionals for singlet-triplet gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Vertical and adiabatic singlet and triplet excitation energies of molecular p-type semiconductors calculated with various DFT functionals and wave-function based approaches are benchmarked against MS-CASPT2/cc-pVTZ reference values. A special focus lies on the singlet-triplet gaps that are very important in the process of singlet fission. Singlet fission has the potential to boost device efficiencies of organic solar cells, but the scope of existing singlet-fission compounds is still limited. A computational prescreening of candidate molecules could enlarge it; yet it requires efficient methods accurately predicting singlet and triplet excitation energies. Different DFT formulations (Tamm-Dancoff approximation, linear response time-dependent DFT, Δ-SCF) and spin scaling schemes along with several ab initio methods (CC2, ADC(2)/MP2, CIS(D), CIS) are evaluated. While wave-function based methods yield rather reliable singlet-triplet gaps, many DFT functionals are shown to systematically underestimate triplet excitation energies. To gain insight, the impact of exact exchange and correlation is in detail addressed.

  16. Light absorption and excitation energy transfer calculations in primitive photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Kayanuma, Megumi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji; Umemura, Masayuki

    2015-06-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, light energy is converted into chemical energy through the light absorption and excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. These processes start in light-harvesting complexes, which contain special photosynthetic pigments. The exploration of unique mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes is directly related to studies, such as artificial photosynthesis or biosignatures in astrobiology. We examined, through ab initio calculations, the light absorption and EET processes using cluster models of light-harvesting complexes in purple bacteria (LH2). We evaluated absorption spectra and energy transfer rates using the LH2 monomer and dimer models to reproduce experimental results. After the calibration tests, a LH2 aggregation model, composed of 7 or 19 LH2s aligned in triangle lattice, was examined. We found that the light absorption is red shifted and the energy transfer becomes faster as the system size increases. We also found that EET is accelerated by exchanging the central pigments to lower energy excited pigments. As an astrobiological application, we calculated light absorptions efficiencies of the LH2 in different photoenvironments.

  17. KANTBP 2.0: New version of a program for computing energy levels, reaction matrix and radial wave functions in the coupled-channel hyperspherical adiabatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Abrashkevich, A. G.

    2008-11-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program for calculating energy values, reaction matrix and corresponding radial wave functions in a coupled-channel approximation of the hyperspherical adiabatic approach is presented. In this approach, a multi-dimensional Schrödinger equation is reduced to a system of the coupled second-order ordinary differential equations on a finite interval with homogeneous boundary conditions: (i) the Dirichlet, Neumann and third type at the left and right boundary points for continuous spectrum problem, (ii) the Dirichlet and Neumann type conditions at left boundary point and Dirichlet, Neumann and third type at the right boundary point for the discrete spectrum problem. The resulting system of radial equations containing the potential matrix elements and first-derivative coupling terms is solved using high-order accuracy approximations of the finite element method. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the reaction matrix and radial wave functions for 3D-model of a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field. This version extends the previous version 1.0 of the KANTBP program [O. Chuluunbaatar, A.A. Gusev, A.G. Abrashkevich, A. Amaya-Tapia, M.S. Kaschiev, S.Y. Larsen, S.I. Vinitsky, Comput. Phys. Commun. 177 (2007) 649-675]. Program summaryProgram title: KANTBP Catalogue identifier: ADZH_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZH_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 20 403 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 147 563 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: Intel Xeon EM64T, Alpha 21264A, AMD Athlon MP, Pentium IV Xeon, Opteron 248, Intel Pentium IV Operating system: OC Linux, Unix AIX 5.3, SunOS 5.8, Solaris, Windows XP RAM: This depends on the

  18. Excited state potential energy surfaces of bistridentate RuII complexes - A TD-DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Österman, Tomas; Persson, Petter

    2012-10-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations have been used to investigate low-energy singlet and triplet excited state potential energy surfaces (PES) of two prototype RuII-bistridentate complexes: [RuII(tpy)2]2+ (tpy is 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and [RuII(dqp)2]2+ (dqp is 2,6-di(quinolin-8-yl)pyridine). Solvent effects were considered using a self-consistent reaction field scheme. The calculations provide information about the excited state manifold along pathways for activated decay of metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited states via metal-centered (MC) states for the two complexes. Significant differences in the energy profiles of the investigated PESs are explained through characterization of the electronic properties of the involved states calculated by the TD-DFT calculations. Finally, implications of the computational results for the design of octahedral metal complexes utilizing ligand field splitting (LFS) strategies for efficient light-harvesting in photochemical applications such as artificial photosynthesis are discussed.

  19. Tracking the Energy Flow on Nanoscale via Sample-Transmitted Excitation Photoluminescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Pavel; Razgoniaeva, Natalia; He, Yufan; Jensen, Gregory; Eckard, Holly; Lu, H Peter; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2017-03-23

    Tracking the energy flow in nanoscale materials is an important yet challenging goal. Experimental methods for probing the intermolecular energy transfer (ET) are often burdened by the spectral crosstalk between donor and acceptor species, which complicates unraveling their individual contributions. This issue is particularly prominent in inorganic nanoparticles and biological macromolecules featuring broad absorbing profiles. Here, we demonstrate a general spectroscopic strategy for measuring the ET efficiency between nanostructured or molecular dyes exhibiting a significant donor-acceptor spectral overlap. The reported approach is enabled through spectral shaping of the broadband excitation light with solutions of donor molecules, which inhibits the excitation of respective donor species in the sample. The resulting changes in the acceptor emission induced by the spectral modulation of the excitation beam are then used to determine the quantum efficiency and the rate of ET processes between arbitrary fluorophores (molecules, nanoparticles, polymers) with high accuracy. The feasibility of the reported method was demonstrated using a control donor-acceptor system utilizing a protein-bridged Cy3-Cy5 dye pair and subsequently applied for studying the energy flow in a CdSe560-CdSe600 binary nanocrystal film.

  20. Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces of Polyenes and Protonated Schiff Bases.

    PubMed

    Send, Robert; Sundholm, Dage; Johansson, Mikael P; Pawłowski, Filip

    2009-09-08

    The potential energy surface of the (1)Bu and (1)A' states of all-trans-polyenes and the corresponding protonated Schiff bases have been studied at density functional theory and coupled cluster levels. Linear polyenes and protonated Schiff bases with 4 to 12 heavy atoms have been investigated. The calculations show remarkable differences in the excited state potential energy surfaces of the polyenes and the protonated Schiff bases. The excited states of the polyenes exhibit high torsion barriers for single-bond twists and low torsion barriers for double-bond twists. The protonated Schiff bases, on the other hand, are very flexible molecules in the first excited state with low or vanishing torsion barriers for both single and double bonds. Calculations at density functional theory and coupled cluster levels yield qualitatively similar potential energy surfaces. However, significant differences are found for some single-bond torsions in longer protonated Schiff bases, which indicate a flaw of the employed time-dependent density functional theory methods. The close agreement between the approximate second and third order coupled cluster levels indicates that for these systems calculations at second order coupled cluster level are useful in the validation of results based on time-dependent density functional theory.

  1. Low-energy Coulomb excitation of neutron-rich zinc isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, J.; Aksouh, F.; Behrens, T.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Cederkäll, J.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Davinson, T.; Delahaye, P.; Eberth, J.; Ekström, A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Franchoo, S.; Gernhauser, R.; Georgiev, G.; Habs, D.; Heyde, K.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Ibrahim, F.; Ivanov, O.; Iwanicki, J.; Jolie, J.; Kester, O.; Köster, U.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Lauer, M.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Lutter, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Mayet, P.; Niedermaier, O.; Pantea, M.; Raabe, R.; Reiter, P.; Sawicka, M.; Scheit, H.; Schrieder, G.; Schwalm, D.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sieber, T.; Sletten, G.; Smirnova, N.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Thomas, J.-C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Duppen, P. Van; Verney, D.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Weisshaar, D.; Wenander, F.; Wolf, B. H.; Zielińska, M.

    2009-01-01

    At the radioactive ion beam facility REX-ISOLDE, neutron-rich zinc isotopes were investigated using low-energy Coulomb excitation. These experiments have resulted in B(E2,21+→01+) values in Zn74-80, B(E2,41+→21+) values in Zn74,76 and the determination of the energy of the first excited 21+ states in Zn78,80. The zinc isotopes were produced by high-energy proton- (A=74,76,80) and neutron- (A=78) induced fission of U238, combined with selective laser ionization and mass separation. The isobaric beam was postaccelerated by the REX linear accelerator and Coulomb excitation was induced on a thin secondary target, which was surrounded by the MINIBALL germanium detector array. In this work, it is shown how the selective laser ionization can be used to deal with the considerable isobaric beam contamination and how a reliable normalization of the experiment can be achieved. The results for zinc isotopes and the N=50 isotones are compared to collective model predictions and state-of-the-art large-scale shell-model calculations, including a recent empirical residual interaction constructed to describe the present experimental data up to 2004 in this region of the nuclear chart.

  2. Excitation energies of double isobar-analog states in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Poplavskii, I. V.

    1988-12-01

    Several new relationships are established for isomultiplets on the basis of a theory in which the Coulomb coupling constant (CCC) is allowed to be complex. In particular, the following rule is formulated: the energies for fission or decay of members of an isomultiplet into a charged cluster and members of the corresponding daughter isomultiplet are equidistant. This relationship is well satisfied for isomultiplets with /ital A/less than or equal to60. By extrapolating the rule for fission and decay energies to the region of heavy nuclei, the excitation energies /ital E//sub /ital x// of double isobar-analog states (DIASs) are found for the nuclei /sup 197,199/Hg, /sup 205/Pb, /sup 205 - -209/Po, /sup 209/At, and /sup 238/Pu. A comparison of the computed energies /ital E//sub /ital x// with the experimentally measured values for /sup 208/Po attest to the reliability and good accuracy of the method proposed here when used to determine the excitation energies of DIASs in heavy nuclei.

  3. Targeted energy transfers and passive acoustic wave redirection in a two-dimensional granular network under periodic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yijing Moore, Keegan J.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; McFarland, D. Michael

    2015-12-21

    We study passive pulse redirection and nonlinear targeted energy transfer in a granular network composed of two semi-infinite, ordered homogeneous granular chains mounted on linear elastic foundations and coupled by weak linear stiffnesses. Periodic excitation in the form of repetitive half-sine pulses is applied to one of the chains, designated as the “excited chain,” whereas the other chain is initially at rest and is regarded as the “absorbing chain.” We show that passive pulse redirection and targeted energy transfer from the excited to the absorbing chain can be achieved by macro-scale realization of the spatial analog of the Landau-Zener quantum tunneling effect. This is realized by finite stratification of the elastic foundation of the excited chain and depends on the system parameters (e.g., the percentage of stratification) and on the parameters of the periodic excitation. Utilizing empirical mode decomposition and numerical Hilbert transforms, we detect the existence of two distinct nonlinear phenomena in the periodically forced network; namely, (i) energy localization in the absorbing chain due to sustained 1:1 resonance capture leading to irreversible pulse redirection from the excited chain, and (ii) continuous energy exchanges in the form of nonlinear beats between the two chains in the absence of resonance capture. Our results extend previous findings of transient passive energy redirection in impulsively excited granular networks and demonstrate that steady state passive pulse redirection in these networks can be robustly achieved under periodic excitation.

  4. Excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ayse; Akalin, Elif; Sarcan, Fahrettin; Donmez, Omer; Akyuz, Sevim; Arikan, Cetin M; Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea

    2012-11-28

    The excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum, vibration, electronic or both, has been studied using different excitation sources on as-grown and annealed n- and p-type modulation-doped Ga1 - xInxNyAs1 - y/GaAs quantum well structures. The samples were grown by molecular beam technique with different N concentrations (y = 0%, 0.9%, 1.2%, 1.7%) at the same In concentration of 32%. Micro-Raman measurements have been carried out using 532 and 758 nm lines of diode lasers, and the 1064 nm line of the Nd-YAG laser has been used for Fourier transform-Raman scattering measurements. Raman scattering measurements with different excitation sources have revealed that the excitation energy is the decisive mechanism on the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum. When the excitation energy is close to the electronic band gap energy of any constituent semiconductor materials in the sample, electronic transition dominates the spectrum, leading to a very broad peak. In the condition that the excitation energy is much higher than the band gap energy, only vibrational modes contribute to the Raman scattering spectrum of the samples. Line shapes of the Raman scattering spectrum with the 785 and 1064 nm lines of lasers have been observed to be very broad peaks, whose absolute peak energy values are in good agreement with the ones obtained from photoluminescence measurements. On the other hand, Raman scattering spectrum with the 532 nm line has exhibited only vibrational modes. As a complementary tool of Raman scattering measurements with the excitation source of 532 nm, which shows weak vibrational transitions, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy has been also carried out. The results exhibited that the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum is strongly excitation energy-dependent, and with suitable excitation energy, electronic and/or vibrational transitions can be investigated.

  5. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  6. Chemical bonding in excited states: Energy transfer and charge redistribution from a real space perspective.

    PubMed

    Jara-Cortés, Jesús; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Martín Pendás, Ángel; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2017-05-15

    This work provides a novel interpretation of elementary processes of photophysical relevance from the standpoint of the electron density using simple model reactions. These include excited states of H2 taken as a prototype for a covalent bond, excimer formation of He2 to analyze non-covalent interactions, charge transfer by an avoided crossing of electronic states in LiF and conical interesections involved in the intramolecular scrambling in C2 H4 . The changes of the atomic and interaction energy components along the potential energy profiles are described by the interacting quantum atoms approach and the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Additionally, the topological analysis of one- and two-electron density functions is used to explore basic reaction mechanisms involving excited and degenerate states in connection with the virial theorem. This real space approach allows to describe these processes in a unified way, showing its versatility and utility in the study of chemical systems in excited states. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGES

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  8. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  9. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Jones, D B; Neves, R F C; Lopes, M C A; da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Bettega, M H F; Lima, M A P; García, G; Blanco, F; Brunger, M J

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°-90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  10. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  11. Importance of excitation and trapping conditions in photosynthetic environment-assisted energy transport.

    PubMed

    León-Montiel, Roberto de J; Kassal, Ivan; Torres, Juan P

    2014-09-11

    It has been argued that excitonic energy transport in photosynthetic complexes is efficient because of a balance between coherent evolution and decoherence, a phenomenon called environment-assisted quantum transport (ENAQT). Studies of ENAQT have usually assumed that the excitation is initially localized on a particular chromophore, and that it is transferred to a reaction center through a similarly localized trap. However, these assumptions are not physically accurate. We show that more realistic models of excitation and trapping can lead to very different predictions about the importance of ENAQT. In particular, although ENAQT is a robust effect if one assumes a localized trap, its effect can be negligible if the trapping is more accurately modeled as Förster transfer to a reaction center. Our results call into question the suggested role of ENAQT in the photosynthetic process of green sulfur bacteria and highlight the subtleties associated with drawing lessons for designing biomimetic light-harvesting complexes.

  12. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G.; Nixon, K. L.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  13. Energies, radiative and Auger transitions of the core-excited states for the boron atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Sun, Yan; Cong Gou, Bing

    2014-09-01

    Energies, radiative and Auger transitions of the 1s vacancy resonances 1s2s22p2, 1s2s22p3p, 1s2s2p3, 1s2p4, and 1s2p33p, 4L (L=S, P, D) for the neutral boron atom are calculated using the saddle-point variation and saddle-point complex-rotation methods. Large-scale wave functions are used to obtain reliable results. Relativistic and mass polarization corrections are included by the first-order perturbation theory. The calculated term energies, x-ray wavelengths, and Auger electron energies for these core-excited states are compared with available theoretical and experimental results. Auger electron energies and branching ratios are used to identify high-resolution B Auger spectrum produced in 300 keV B+ on CH4 collision experiment. It is found that the Auger decay of core-excited states of the boron atom gives significant contributions to Auger spectrum in the range of 165-210 eV, and many previously unknown line identifications are presented.

  14. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  15. Excitation energies with linear response density matrix functional theory along the dissociation coordinate of an electron-pair bond in N-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Time dependent density matrix functional theory in its adiabatic linear response formulation delivers exact excitation energies ωα and oscillator strengths fα for two-electron systems if extended to the so-called phase including natural orbital (PINO) theory. The Löwdin-Shull expression for the energy of two-electron systems in terms of the natural orbitals and their phases affords in this case an exact phase-including natural orbital functional (PILS), which is non-primitive (contains other than just J and K integrals). In this paper, the extension of the PILS functional to N-electron systems is investigated. With the example of an elementary primitive NO functional (BBC1) it is shown that current density matrix functional theory ground state functionals, which were designed to produce decent approximations to the total energy, fail to deliver a qualitatively correct structure of the (inverse) response function, due to essential deficiencies in the reconstruction of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM). We now deduce essential features of an N-electron functional from a wavefunction Ansatz: The extension of the two-electron Löwdin-Shull wavefunction to the N-electron case informs about the phase information. In this paper, applications of this extended Löwdin-Shull (ELS) functional are considered for the simplest case, ELS(1): one (dissociating) two-electron bond in the field of occupied (including core) orbitals. ELS(1) produces high quality ωα(R) curves along the bond dissociation coordinate R for the molecules LiH, Li2, and BH with the two outer valence electrons correlated. All of these results indicate that response properties are much more sensitive to deficiencies in the reconstruction of the 2RDM than the ground state energy, since derivatives of the functional with respect to both the NOs and the occupation numbers need to be accurate.

  16. Physical Meaning of Virtual Kohn-Sham Orbitals and Orbital Energies: An Ideal Basis for the Description of Molecular Excitations.

    PubMed

    van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2014-10-14

    In recent years, several benchmark studies on the performance of large sets of functionals in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of excitation energies have been performed. The tested functionals do not approximate exact Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital energies closely. We highlight the advantages of (close to) exact Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital energies for a simple description, very often as just a single orbital-to-orbital transition, of molecular excitations. Benchmark calculations are performed for the statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP) functional for the potential [J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 1344; 2001, 114, 652], which approximates the true Kohn-Sham potential much better than LDA, GGA, mGGA, and hybrid potentials do. An accurate Kohn-Sham potential does not only perform satisfactorily for calculated vertical excitation energies of both valence and Rydberg transitions but also exhibits appealing properties of the KS orbitals including occupied orbital energies close to ionization energies, virtual-occupied orbital energy gaps very close to excitation energies, realistic shapes of virtual orbitals, leading to straightforward interpretation of most excitations as single orbital transitions. We stress that such advantages are completely lost in time-dependent Hartree-Fock and partly in hybrid approaches. Many excitations and excitation energies calculated with local density, generalized gradient, and hybrid functionals are spurious. There is, with an accurate KS, or even the LDA or GGA potentials, nothing problematic about the "band gap" in molecules: the HOMO-LUMO gap is close to the first excitation energy (the optical gap).

  17. Interplay between vibrational energy transfer and excited state deactivation in DNA components.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Womick, Jordan M; Moran, Andrew M

    2013-07-25

    Femtosecond laser spectroscopies are used to examine a thymine family of systems chosen to expose the interplay between excited state deactivation and two distinct vibrational energy transfer (VET) pathways: (i) VET from the base to the deoxyribose ring; (ii) VET between neighboring units in a dinucleotide. We find that relaxation in the ground electronic state accelerates markedly as the molecular sizes increase from the nucleobase to the dinucleotide. This behavior directly reflects growth in the density of vibrational quantum states on the substituent of the base. Excited state lifetimes are studied at temperatures ranging from 100 to 300 K to characterize the thermal fluctuations that connect the Franck-Condon geometries and the conical intersections leading back to the ground state. An Arrhenius analysis yields an approximate excited state energy barrier of 13 meV in the thymine dinucleotide. In addition, we find that the transfer of vibrational energy from the base to the substituent suppresses thermal fluctuations across this energy barrier. The possibility that the solvent viscosity imposes friction on the reaction coordinate is examined by comparing thymine and adenine systems. Experiments suggest that the solvent viscosity has little effect on barrier crossing dynamics in thymine because the conical intersection is accessed through relatively small out-of-plane atomic displacements. Overall, we conclude that the transfer of vibrational quanta from thymine to the deoxyribose ring couples significantly to the internal conversion rate, whereas the neighboring unit in the dinucleotide serves as a secondary heat bath. In natural DNA, it follows that (local) thermal fluctuations in the geometries of subunits involving the base and deoxyribose ring are most important to this subpicosecond relaxation process.

  18. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  19. Statistics of low energy excitations for the directed polymer in a random medium.

    PubMed

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    We consider a directed polymer of length L in a random medium of space dimension d = 1,2,3. The statistics of low energy excitations as a function of their size l is numerically evaluated. These excitations can be divided into bulk and boundary excitations, with respective densities rho(bulk)(L) (E = 0,l) and rho(boundary)(L)(E=0,l). We find that both densities follow the scaling behavior rho(bulk, boundary)(L)(E = 0,l)=L(-1-theta)(d)R(bulk,boundary)(x = l/L), where theta(d) is the exponent governing the energy fluctuations at zero temperature (with the well-known exact value theta(1)= 1/3 in one dimension). In the limit x = l/L --> 0, both scaling functions R(bulk)(x) and R(boundary)(x) behave as R(bulk,boundary)(x) approximately x(-1-theta)(d), leading to the droplet power law rho(bulk, boundary)(L) (E = 0,l) approximately l(-1-theta)(d) in the regime 1 < l < L. Beyond their common singularity near x --> 0, the two scaling functions R(bulk,boundary)(x) are very different: whereas R(bulk)(x) decays monotonically for 0 < x < 1, the function R(boundary)(x) first decays for 0 < x < x(min), then grows for x(min) < x < 1, and finally presents a power law singularity R(boundary)(x) approximately (1-x)(-sigma)(d) near x -->1. The density of excitations of length l = L accordingly decays as rho(boundary)(L)(E = 0,l = L) approximately L(-lambda)(d) where gamma(d) = 1+ theta(d) - lambda(d). We obtain lambda(1) approximately 10.67, lambda(2) = 0.53, and lambda(3) approximately 0.39, suggesting the possible relation lambda(d) = 2theta(d).

  20. Variational calculation of highly excited rovibrational energy levels of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Polyansky, Oleg L; Kozin, Igor N; Ovsyannikov, Roman I; Małyszek, Paweł; Koput, Jacek; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N

    2013-08-15

    Results are presented for highly accurate ab initio variational calculation of the rotation-vibration energy levels of H2O2 in its electronic ground state. These results use a recently computed potential energy surface and the variational nuclear-motion programs WARV4, which uses an exact kinetic energy operator, and TROVE, which uses a numerical expansion for the kinetic energy. The TROVE calculations are performed for levels with high values of rotational excitation, J up to 35. The purely ab initio calculations of the rovibrational energy levels reproduce the observed levels with a standard deviation of about 1 cm(-1), similar to that of the J = 0 calculation, because the discrepancy between theory and experiment for rotational energies within a given vibrational state is substantially determined by the error in the vibrational band origin. Minor adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry and to the height of the torsional barrier. Using these and correcting the band origins using the error in J = 0 states lowers the standard deviation of the observed-calculated energies to only 0.002 cm(-1) for levels up to J = 10 and 0.02 cm(-1) for all experimentally known energy levels, which extend up to J = 35.

  1. Trajectory study of energy transfer and unimolecular dissociation of highly excited allyl with argon.

    PubMed

    Conte, Riccardo; Houston, Paul L; Bowman, Joel M

    2014-09-11

    The influence of rotational excitation on energy transfer in single collisions of allyl with argon and on allyl dissociation is investigated. About 90,000 classical scattering simulations are performed in order to determine collision-induced changes in internal energy and in allyl rotational angular momentum. Dissociation is studied by means of about 50,000 additional trajectories evolved for the isolated allyl under three different conditions: allyl with no angular momentum (J = 0); allyl with the same microcanonically sampled initial conditions used for the collisions (J*); allyl evolving from the corresponding exit conditions after the collision. The potential energy surface is the sum of an intramolecular potential and an interaction one, and it has already been used in a previous work on allyl-argon scattering (Conte, R.; Houston, P. L.; Bowman, J. M. J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 14028-14041). Energy transfer data show that increased initial rotation favors, on average, increased relaxation of the excited molecule. The availability of a high-level intramolecular potential energy surface permits us to study the dependence of energy transfer on the type of starting allyl isomer. A turning point analysis is presented, and highly efficient collisions are detected. Collision-induced variations in the allyl rotational angular momentum may be quite large and are found to be distributed according to three regimes. The roles of rotational angular momentum, collision, and type of isomer on allyl unimolecular dissociation are considered by looking at dissociations times, kinetic energies of the fragments, and branching ratios. Generally, rotational angular momentum has a strong influence on the dissociation dynamics, while the single collision and the type of starting isomer are less influential.

  2. Quantum and classical non-adiabatic dynamics of Li_{2}^{+}Ne photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouilly, Brigitte; Monnerville, Maurice; Zanuttini, David; Gervais, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    The 3D photodissociation dynamics of Li2+Ne system is investigated by quantum calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method and by classical simulations with the trajectory surface hopping (TSH) approach. Six electronic states of A’ symmetry and two states of A” symmetry are involved in the process. Couplings in the excitation region and two conical intersections in the vicinity of the Franck-Condon zone control the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics. A diabatic representation including all the states and the couplings is determined. Diabatic and adiabatic populations calculated for initial excitation to pure diabatic and adiabatic states lead to a clear understanding of the mechanisms governing the non-adiabatic photodissociation process. The classical and quantum photodissociation cross-sections for absorption in two adiabatic states of the A’ symmetry are calculated. A remarkable agreement between quantum and classical results is obtained regarding the populations and the absorption cross-sections.

  3. Excited-state charging energies in quantum dots investigated by terahertz photocurrent spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Shibata, K.; Nagai, N.; Ndebeka-Bandou, C.; Bastard, G.; Hirakawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the excited-state (ES) charging energies in quantum dots (QDs) by measuring a terahertz (THz)-induced photocurrent in a single-electron transistor (SET) geometry that contains a single InAs QD between metal nanogap electrodes. A photocurrent is produced in the QD SETs through THz intersublevel transitions and the subsequent resonant tunneling. We have found that the photocurrent exhibits stepwise change even within one Coulomb blockaded region as the electrochemical potential in the QD is swept by the gate voltage. From the threshold for the photocurrent generation, we have determined the charging energies for adding an electron in the photoexcited state in the QD. Furthermore, the charging energies for the ESs with different electron configurations are clearly resolved. The present THz photocurrent measurements are essentially dynamical experiments and allow us to analyze electronic properties in off-equilibrium states in the QD.

  4. Neutron Scattering Study of Low Energy Magnetic Excitation in FeTeSe System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Schneeloch, John; Matsuda, Masaaki; Christianson, A. D.; Gu, Genda; Zaliznyak, I. A.; Xu, Guangyong; Tranquada, J. M.; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    We have performed neutron scattering and magnetization/transport measurements on a series of FeTe1-xSex system single crystals to study the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity. Comparing to pure FeTe1-xSex compounds, extra Fe and Ni/Cu doping on Fe-site can change physics properties of these samples, including resistivity, magnetization and superconducting properties. Our neutron scattering studies also show the Fe-site doping change low energy magnetic spectrum, including the magnetic excitations intensity, position and magnetic correlation length in these samples. On the other hand, the temperature dependence of the low energy magnetic fluctuations are also found to be different depending on the composition. This work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE.

  5. High excitation transfer efficiency from energy relay dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Brian E; Yum, Jun-Ho; Hoke, Eric T; Jun, Young Chul; Péchy, Peter; Torres, Tomás; Brongersma, Mark L; Nazeeruddin, Md Khaja; Grätzel, Michael; McGehee, Michael D

    2010-08-11

    The energy relay dye, 4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM), was used with a near-infrared sensitizing dye, TT1, to increase the overall power conversion efficiency of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) from 3.5% to 4.5%. The unattached DCM dyes exhibit an average excitation transfer efficiency (ETE) of 96% inside TT1-covered, mesostructured TiO(2) films. Further performance increases were limited by the solubility of DCM in an acetonitrile based electrolyte. This demonstration shows that energy relay dyes can be efficiently implemented in optimized dye-sensitized solar cells, but also highlights the need to design highly soluble energy relay dyes with high molar extinction coefficients.

  6. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, M.; Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CS) for electronic excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at low coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The lowest EEL features found at 3.55 and 4.02 eV are ascribed to transitions from the ground state to the two lowest triplet 1 3A′(π→π*) and 2 3A′(π→π*) valence states of the molecule. Their energy dependent CS exhibit essentially a common maximum at about 6 eV with a value of 1.84 × 10−17 cm2 for the former and 4.94 × 10−17 cm2 for the latter. In contrast, the CS for the next EEL feature at 4.65 eV, which is ascribed to the optically allowed transition to the 2 1A′(π→π*) valence state, shows only a steep rise to about 1.04 × 10−16 cm2 followed by a monotonous decrease with the incident electron energy. The higher EEL features at 5.39, 6.18, 6.83, and 7.55 eV are assigned to the excitations of the 3 3, 1A′(π→π*), 4 1A′(π→π*), 5 1A′(π→π*), and 6 1A′(π→π*) valence states, respectively. The CS for the 3 3, 1A′ and 4 1A′ states exhibit a common enhancement at about 10 eV superimposed on a more or less a steep rise, reaching respectively a maximum of 1.27 and 1.79 × 10−16 cm2, followed by a monotonous decrease. This latter enhancement and the maximum seen at about 6 eV in the lowest triplet states correspond to the core-excited electron resonances that have been found by dissociative electron attachment experiments with cytosine in the gas phase. The weak EEL feature found at 5.01 eV with a maximum CS of 3.8 × 10−18 cm2 near its excitation threshold is attributed to transitions from the ground state to the 1 3, 1A″(n→π*) states. The monotonous rise of the EEL signal above 8 eV is attributed to the ionization of the molecule. It is partitioned into four excitation energy regions at about 8.55, 9.21, 9.83, and 11.53 eV, which correspond closely to the ionization energies of

  7. An analytical approach for predicting the energy capture and conversion by impulsively-excited bistable vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, R. L.; Zhang, Chunlin; Li, Bing; Wang, K. W.

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive energies are abundant throughout the natural and built environments, for instance as stimulated by wind gusts, foot-steps, or vehicle-road interactions. In the interest of maximizing the sustainability of society's technological developments, one idea is to capture these high-amplitude and abrupt energies and convert them into usable electrical power such as for sensors which otherwise rely on less sustainable power supplies. In this spirit, the considerable sensitivity to impulse-type events previously uncovered for bistable oscillators has motivated recent experimental and numerical studies on the power generation performance of bistable vibration energy harvesters. To lead to an effective and efficient predictive tool and design guide, this research develops a new analytical approach to estimate the electroelastic response and power generation of a bistable energy harvester when excited by an impulse. Comparison with values determined by direct simulation of the governing equations shows that the analytically predicted net converted energies are very accurate for a wide range of impulse strengths. Extensive experimental investigations are undertaken to validate the analytical approach and it is seen that the predicted estimates of the impulsive energy conversion are in excellent agreement with the measurements, and the detailed structural dynamics are correctly reproduced. As a result, the analytical approach represents a significant leap forward in the understanding of how to effectively leverage bistable structures as energy harvesting devices and introduces new means to elucidate the transient and far-from-equilibrium dynamics of nonlinear systems more generally.

  8. On the General Class of Models of Adiabatic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2016-10-01

    The general class of models of adiabatic evolution was proposed to speed up the usual adiabatic computation in the case of quantum search problem. It was shown [8] that, by temporarily increasing the ground state energy of a time-dependent Hamiltonian to a suitable quantity, the quantum computation can perform the calculation in time complexity O(1). But it is also known that if the overlap between the initial and final states of the system is zero, then the computation based on the generalized models of adiabatic evolution can break down completely. In this paper, we find another severe limitation for this class of adiabatic evolution-based algorithms, which should be taken into account in applications. That is, it is still possible that this kind of evolution designed to deal with the quantum search problem fails completely if the interpolating paths in the system Hamiltonian are chosen inappropriately, while the usual adiabatic evolutions can do the same job relatively effectively. This implies that it is not always recommendable to use nonlinear paths in adiabatic computation. On the contrary, the usual simple adiabatic evolution may be sufficient for effective use.

  9. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  10. Measurement of the fusion excitation function for 19O + 12C at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T. K.; Vadas, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Hudan, S.; Desouza, R. T.; Baby, L. T.; Tripathi, V.; Kuvin, S. A.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2015-10-01

    Fusion of neutron-rich light nuclei in the outer crust of an accreting neutron star has been proposed as responsible for triggering X-ray super-bursts. The underlying hypothesis in this proposition is that the fusion of neutron-rich nuclei is enhanced as compared to stable nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis, an experiment has been performed to measure the fusion excitation function for 18O and 19O nuclei incident on a 12C target. A beam of 19O was produced by the 18O(d,p) reaction at Florida State University and separated using the RESOLUT mass spectrometer. The resulting 19O beam bombarded a 100 μg/cm2 12C target at an intensity of 2-4 × 103 p/s. Evaporation residues resulting from the de-excitation of the fusion product were distinguished by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. Using silicon detectors, micro-channel plate detectors, and an ionization chamber, evaporation residues were detected in the angular range θlab <= 23° with high efficiency. Initial experimental results including measurement of the fusion cross-section to approximately the 100 mb level will be presented. The measured excitation function will be compared to theoretical predictions. Supported by the US DOE under Grand No. DEFG02-88ER-40404.

  11. Energy spectra of 2D gravity and capillary waves with narrow frequency band excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, E.

    2012-02-01

    In this letter we present a new method, called increment chain equation method (ICEM), for computing a cascade of distinct modes in a two-dimensional weakly nonlinear wave system generated by narrow frequency band excitation. The ICEM is a means for computing the quantized energy spectrum as an explicit function of frequency ω0 and stationary amplitude A0 of excitation. The physical mechanism behind the generation of the quantized cascade is modulation instability. The ICEM can be used in numerous 2D weakly nonlinear wave systems with narrow frequency band excitation appearing in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, electrodynamics, convection theory etc. In this letter the ICEM is demonstrated with examples of gravity and capillary waves with dispersion functions ω(k)~k1/2 and ω(k)~k3/2, respectively, and for two different levels of nonlinearity ɛ=A0k0: small (ɛ~0.1 to 0.25) and moderate (ɛ~0.25 to 0.4).

  12. Mechanisms for production of doubly excited states in low energies Iq+-He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, C.; Jouin, H.; Pons, B.

    1993-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of the mechanisms leading to the formation of doubly excited states of the series 3l3l' (or 4l') and 2lnl' in N7+, O8+ and C6+-He low energy collisions. The importance of both direct transitions from the entry channel (involving electron-electron interaction couplings) and transitions through a single electron capture channel has been analyzed for a range of impact velocities between 0.2 and 0.6 a.u.

  13. Atomic mean excitation energies for stopping powers from local plasma oscillator strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Chang, C. K.; Kamaratos, E.

    1984-01-01

    The stopping of a charged particle by isolated atoms is investigated theoretically using an 'atomic plasma' model in which atomic oscillator strengths are replaced by the plasma frequency spectrum. The plasma-frequency correction factor for individual electron motion proposed by Pines (1953) is incorporated, and atomic mean excitation energies are calculated for atoms through Sr. The results are compared in a graph with those obtained theoretically by Inokuti et al. (1978, 1981) and Dehmer et al. (1975) and with the experimental values compiled by Seltzer and Berger (1982): good agreement is shown.

  14. Effect of the initial excitation energy on the average fission lifetime of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gontchar, I. I. Ponomarenko, N. A. Litnevsky, A. L.

    2008-07-15

    The dependence of the fission time on the initial nuclear excitation energy E{sub tot0}* is studied on the basis of a refined combined dynamical and statistical model. It is shown that this dependence may be nonmonotonic, in which case it features a broad maximum. It turns out that the form of the average fission time as a function of E{sub tot0}* depends greatly on the orbital angular momentum L{sub n} carried away by prescission neutrons.

  15. Quadrupole collectivity beyond N = 28: intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation of (47,48)Ar.

    PubMed

    Winkler, R; Gade, A; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Glasmacher, T; Grinyer, G F; Meharchand, R; McDaniel, S; Ratkiewicz, A; Weisshaar, D

    2012-05-04

    We report on the first experimental study of quadrupole collectivity in the very neutron-rich nuclei (47,48)Ar using intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation. These nuclei are located along the path from doubly magic Ca to collective S and Si isotopes, a critical region of shell evolution and structural change. The deduced B(E2) transition strengths are confronted with large-scale shell-model calculations in the sdpf shell using the state-of-the-art SDPF-Uand EPQQM effective interactions. The comparison between experiment and theory indicates that a shell-model description of Ar isotopes around N=28 remains a challenge.

  16. Quadrupole Collectivity beyond N=28: Intermediate-Energy Coulomb Excitation of Ar47,48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Gade, A.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Glasmacher, T.; Grinyer, G. F.; Meharchand, R.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Weisshaar, D.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the first experimental study of quadrupole collectivity in the very neutron-rich nuclei Ar47,48 using intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation. These nuclei are located along the path from doubly magic Ca to collective S and Si isotopes, a critical region of shell evolution and structural change. The deduced B(E2) transition strengths are confronted with large-scale shell-model calculations in the sdpf shell using the state-of-the-art SDPF-Uand EPQQM effective interactions. The comparison between experiment and theory indicates that a shell-model description of Ar isotopes around N=28 remains a challenge.

  17. Theorectical Studies of Excitation in Low-Energy Electron-Polyatomic Molecule Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Isaacs, W A; Orel, A E; Meyer, H D

    2001-08-13

    This paper focuses on the channeling of energy from electronic to nuclear degrees of freedom in electron-polyatomic molecule collisions. We examine the feasibility of attacking the full scattering problem, both the fixed-nuclei electronic problem and the post-collision nuclear dynamics, entirely from first principles. The electron-CO{sub 2} system is presented as an example. We study resonant vibrational excitation, showing how a6 initio, fixed-nuclei electronic cross sections can provide the necessary input for a multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear vibrational dynamics.

  18. High-energy non-Franck-Condon vibrational excitation of CH4 by intramolecular photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, L.; Plésiat, E.; Kukk, E.; Ueda, K.; Decleva, P.; Martín, F.

    2012-11-01

    Distinct oscillations in vibrationally resolved cross section ratios for the photoionization of CH4 from the C 1s orbital at photon energies as high as 1keV are predicted. The oscillations are attributed to the different relative vibrational excitation due to the scattering of the photoelectron by the peripheral hydrogen atoms. The latter effect is also responsible for the well known EXAFS oscillations in the integrated photoelectron spectrum. The calculations are performed with an ab-initio DFT method [1], as well as with a single-particle semi-analytical model, which incorporate both the effect of the nuclear recoil and of the Coulomb corrections.

  19. Excitation energies of a water-bridged twisted retinal structure in the bacteriorhodopsin proton pump: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Tino; Welke, Kai; Phatak, Prasad; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Elstner, Marcus

    2013-08-14

    The first proton transfer in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle takes place during the L → M transition. Structural details of the pre proton transfer L intermediate have been investigated using experiments and computations. Here, we assess L-state structural models by performing hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics and excitation energy calculations. The computations suggest that a water-bridged twisted retinal structure gives the closest agreement with the experimental L/bR shift in the excitation energy.

  20. Low-energy electron scattering by N2 molecules physisorbed on Ag: Study of the resonant vibrational excitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djamo, V.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1995-02-01

    Molecules adsorbed on a metal surface can be excited by low-energy electron impact. Resonant processes in which an intermediate negative ion is formed during the collision are very efficient. The resonant vibrational excitation of N2 molecules physisorbed on Ag by low-energy electrons is studied theoretically with the coupled-angular-mode method. The influence of the neighboring surface on the excitation process (including the excitation of overtones) is analyzed. The results are compared with the experimental results of Demuth, Schmeisser, and Avouris. It is found that in a scattering experiment, most of the vibrational excitation concerns electrons that are inelastically scattered into the metal and are thus not observed experimentally.

  1. Quantum Mechanical Molecular Interactions for Calculating the Excitation Energy in Molecular Environments: A First-Order Interacting Space Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Jun-ya; Yanai, Kazuma; Ishimura, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions regulate the molecular properties in proteins and solutions such as solvatochromic systems. Some of the interactions have to be described at an electronic-structure level. In this study, a commutator for calculating the excitation energy is used for deriving a first-order interacting space (FOIS) to describe the environmental response to solute excitation. The FOIS wave function for a solute-in-solvent cluster is solved by second-order perturbation theory. The contributions to the excitation energy are decomposed into each interaction and for each solvent. PMID:25393373

  2. Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis at Low Beam Energy: Almost Always an Adventure!

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of various materials at low-incident beam energies, E 0≤5 keV, using peak fitting and following the measured standards/matrix corrections protocol embedded in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Desktop Spectrum Analyzer-II analytical software engine. Low beam energy analysis provides improved spatial resolution laterally and in-depth. The lower beam energy restricts the atomic shells that can be ionized, reducing the number of X-ray peak families available to the analyst. At E 0=5 keV, all elements of the periodic table except H and He can be measured. As the beam energy is reduced below 5 keV, elements become inaccessible due to lack of excitation of useful characteristic X-ray peaks. The shallow sampling depth of low beam energy microanalysis makes the technique more sensitive to surface compositional modification due to formation of oxides and other reaction layers. Accurate and precise analysis is possible with the use of appropriate standards and by accumulating high count spectra of unknowns and standards (>1 million counts integrated from 0.1 keV to E 0).

  3. Comment on ``Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smondyrev, M. A.; Devreese, J. T.

    1996-05-01

    Comments are given on the application of the Bogoliubov-Tyablikov approach to the bipolaron problem in a recent paper by Lakhno [Phys. Rev. B 51, 3512 (1995)]. This author believes that his model (1) is the translation-invariant adiabatic theory of bipolarons and (2) gives asymptotically exact solutions in the adiabatic limit while the other approaches are considered as either phenomenological or variational in nature. Numerical results by Lakhno are in contradiction with all other papers published on the subject because his model leads to much lower energies. Thus, the author concludes that bipolarons ``are more stable than was considered before.'' We prove that both the analytical and the numerical results presented by Lakhno are wrong.

  4. Fast forward to the classical adiabatic invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher; Deffner, Sebastian; Patra, Ayoti; Subaşı, Yiǧit

    2017-03-01

    We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under nonadiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian H =p2/2 m +U (q ,t ) in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action I0, we construct a so-called fast-forward potential energy function VFF(q ,t ) that, when added to H , guides all trajectories with initial action I0 to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant J (q ,p ,t ) whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  5. Excited state absorption and energy transfer in Ho3+-doped indium fluoride glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Laercio; Fortin, Vincent; Bernier, Martin; Maes, Frédéric; Vallée, Réal; Poulain, Samuel; Poulain, Marcel; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2017-04-01

    This investigation examines in detail the rates of energy transfer relevant to the 5I5 → 5I6 transition (at 3930 nm) in Ho3+-doped InF3 glass as a function of the Ho3+ concentration. The decay times, branching ratios and rate parameters for energy transfer were measured in this investigation for Ho3+ (x)-doped InF3 glass with x = 2, 4 and 10 mol.% and they were used as the input parameters for a rate equation analysis. Excited state absorption (ESA) initiating from the lower laser level is included in the study. Numerical simulation of CW laser emission at 3.9 μm was performed using two pump wavelengths, one for upper laser level excitation (i.e., 5I8 → 5I5 = λP1) and the other for lower laser level de-excitation (i.e., 5I6 → 5S2 = λP2). The pump wavelength λP2 = 962 nm was chosen based on the measurements of ESA and the application of the McCumber method. Critically, the estimated ESA cross section at λP2 = 962 nm (σESA = 7.1 × 10-21 cm2) is approximately sixteen times larger than ground state (5I8) absorption cross section (σGSA = 4.3 × 10-22 cm2) and ESA does not overlap with any ground state absorption process. Our calculations suggest that even for high Ho3+ concentration in which cross relaxation has been shown in a previous study to quench the 5I5 level, ESA is nevertheless strong enough to allow a sufficient population inversion required for practical CW emission.

  6. Dependence of Fission-Fragment Properties On Excitation Energy For Neutron-Rich Actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Audouin, L.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Clement, E.; Cortina, D.; Delaune, O.; Derkx, X.; Dijon, A.; Doré, D.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; de France, G.; Heinz, A.; Jacquot, B.; Navin, A.; Paradela, C.; Rejmund, M.; Roger, T.; Salsac, M. D.; Schmitt, C.

    2016-03-01

    Experimental access to full isotopic fragment distributions is very important to determine the features of the fission process. However, the isotopic identification of fission fragments has been, in the past, partial and scarce. A solution based on the use of inverse kinematics to study transfer-induced fission of exotic actinides was carried out at GANIL, resulting in the first experiment accessing the full identification of a collection of fissioning systems and their corresponding fission fragment distribution. In these experiments, a 238U beam at 6.14 AMeV impinged on a carbon target to produce fissioning systems from U to Am by transfer reactions, and Cf by fusion reactions. Isotopic fission yields of 250Cf, 244Cm, 240Pu, 239Np and 238U are presented in this work. With this information, the average number of neutrons as a function of the atomic number of the fragments is calculated, which reflects the impact of nuclear structure around Z=50, N=80 on the production of fission fragments. The characteristics of the Super Long, Standard I, Standard II, and Standard III fission channels were extracted from fits of the fragment yields for different ranges of excitation energy. The position and contribution of the fission channels as function of excitation energy are presented.

  7. Calculation of excitation energies from the CC2 linear response theory using Cholesky decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Baudin, Pablo; Marín, José Sánchez; Cuesta, Inmaculada García; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M. J.

    2014-03-14

    A new implementation of the approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles CC2 linear response model is reported. It employs a Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals that significantly reduces the computational cost and the storage requirements of the method compared to standard implementations. Our algorithm also exploits a partitioning form of the CC2 equations which reduces the dimension of the problem and avoids the storage of doubles amplitudes. We present calculation of excitation energies of benzene using a hierarchy of basis sets and compare the results with conventional CC2 calculations. The reduction of the scaling is evaluated as well as the effect of the Cholesky decomposition parameter on the quality of the results. The new algorithm is used to perform an extrapolation to complete basis set investigation on the spectroscopically interesting benzylallene conformers. A set of calculations on medium-sized molecules is carried out to check the dependence of the accuracy of the results on the decomposition thresholds. Moreover, CC2 singlet excitation energies of the free base porphin are also presented.

  8. Excitation energies, photoionization cross sections, and asymmetry parameters of the methyl and silyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, A. M.; Lavín, C.; Dolgounitcheva, O.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2014-08-21

    Vertical excitation energies of the methyl and silyl radicals were inferred from ab initio electron propagator calculations on the electron affinities of CH{sub 3}{sup +} and SiH{sub 3}{sup +}. Photoionization cross sections and angular distribution of photoelectrons for the outermost orbitals of both CH{sub 3} and SiH{sub 3} radicals have been obtained with the Molecular Quantum Defect Orbital method. The individual ionization cross sections corresponding to the Rydberg channels to which the excitation of the ground state's outermost electron gives rise are reported. Despite the relevance of methyl radical in atmospheric chemistry and combustion processes, only data for the photon energy range of 10–11 eV seem to be available. Good agreement has been found with experiment for photoionization cross section of this radical. To our knowledge, predictions of the above mentioned photoionization parameters on silyl radical are made here for the first time, and we are not aware of any reported experimental measurements. An analysis of our results reveals the presence of a Cooper minimum in the photoionization of the silyl radical. The adequacy of the two theoretical procedures employed in the present work is discussed.

  9. Excitation energy transfer in chlorosomes of green bacteria: theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed Central

    Fetisova, Z; Freiberg, A; Mauring, K; Novoderezhkin, V; Taisova, A; Timpmann, K

    1996-01-01

    A theory of excitation energy transfer within the chlorosomal antennae of green bacteria has been developed for an exciton model of aggregation of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c (d or e). This model of six exciton-coupled BChl chains with low packing density, approximating that in vivo, and interchain distances of approximately 2 nm was generated to yield the key spectral features found in natural antennae, i.e., the exciton level structure revealed by spectral hole burning experiments and polarization of all the levels parallel to the long axis of the chlorosome. With picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy it was demonstrated that the theory explains the antenna-size-dependent kinetics of fluorescence decay in chlorosomal antenna, measured for intact cells of different cultures of the green bacterium C. aurantiacus, with different chlorosomal antenna size determined by electron microscopic examination of the ultrathin sections of the cells. The data suggest a possible mechanism of excitation energy transfer within the chlorosome that implies the formation of a cylindrical exciton, delocalized over a tubular aggregate of BChl c chains, and Forster-type transfer of such a cylindrical exciton between the nearest tubular BChl c aggregates as well as to BChl a of the baseplate. PMID:8842237

  10. Live-cell visualization of excitation energy dynamics in chloroplast thylakoid structures

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Masakazu; Yokono, Makio; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Ichihara, Akira; Nakano, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    The intricate molecular processes underlying photosynthesis have long been studied using various analytic approaches. However, the three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of such photosynthetic processes remain unexplored due to technological limitations related to investigating intraorganellar mechanisms in vivo. By developing a system for high-speed 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy combined with high-sensitivity multiple-channel detection, we visualized excitation energy dynamics in thylakoid structures within chloroplasts of live Physcomitrella patens cells. Two distinct thylakoid structures in the chloroplast, namely the grana and stroma lamellae, were visualized three-dimensionally in live cells. The simultaneous detection of the shorter (than ~670 nm) and longer (than ~680 nm) wavelength regions of chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence reveals different spatial characteristics—irregular and vertical structures, respectively. Spectroscopic analyses showed that the shorter and longer wavelength regions of Chl fluorescence are affected more by free light-harvesting antenna proteins and photosystem II supercomplexes, respectively. The high-speed 3D time-lapse imaging of the shorter and longer wavelength regions also reveals different structural dynamics—rapid and slow movements within 1.5 seconds, respectively. Such structural dynamics of the two wavelength regions of Chl fluorescence would indicate excitation energy dynamics between light-harvesting antenna proteins and photosystems, reflecting the energetically active nature of photosynthetic proteins in thylakoid membranes. PMID:27416900

  11. Quantum chemical calculations of tryptophan → heme electron and excitation energy transfer rates in myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Suess, Christian J; Hirst, Jonathan D; Besley, Nicholas A

    2017-04-01

    The development of optical multidimensional spectroscopic techniques has opened up new possibilities for the study of biological processes. Recently, ultrafast two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy experiments have determined the rates of tryptophan → heme electron transfer and excitation energy transfer for the two tryptophan residues in myoglobin (Consani et al., Science, 2013, 339, 1586). Here, we show that accurate prediction of these rates can be achieved using Marcus theory in conjunction with time-dependent density functional theory. Key intermediate residues between the donor and acceptor are identified, and in particular the residues Val68 and Ile75 play a critical role in calculations of the electron coupling matrix elements. Our calculations demonstrate how small changes in structure can have a large effect on the rates, and show that the different rates of electron transfer are dictated by the distance between the heme and tryptophan residues, while for excitation energy transfer the orientation of the tryptophan residues relative to the heme is important. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Excitation energies, polarizabilities, multipole transition rates, and lifetimes of ions along the francium isoelectronic sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.; Safronova, M. S.

    2007-10-15

    Relativistic many-body perturbation theory is applied to study properties of ions of the francium isoelectronic sequence. Specifically, energies of the 7s, 7p, 6d, and 5f states of Fr-like ions with nuclear charges Z=87-100 are calculated through third order; reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for 7s-7p, 7p-6d, and 6d-5f electric-dipole transitions; and 7s-6d, 7s-5f, and 5f{sub 5/2}-5f{sub 7/2} multipole matrix elements are evaluated to obtain the lifetimes of low-lying excited states. Moreover, for the ions Z=87-92 calculations are also carried out using the relativistic all-order single-double method, in which single and double excitations of Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders in perturbation theory. With the aid of the single-double wave functions, we obtain accurate values of energies, transition rates, oscillator strengths, and the lifetimes of these six ions. Ground state scalar polarizabilities in Fr I, Ra II, Ac III, and Th IV are calculated using relativistic third-order and all-order methods. Ground state scalar polarizabilities for other Fr-like ions are calculated using a relativistic second-order method. These calculations provide a theoretical benchmark for comparison with experiment and theory.

  13. In vitro characterization of Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence: broadening the scope of energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Holland, Alexandra D; Rückerl, Florian; Dragavon, Joseph M; Rekiki, Abdessalem; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Tournebize, Régis; Shorte, Spencer L

    2014-03-15

    Energy transfer mechanisms represent the basis for an array of valuable tools to infer interactions in vitro and in vivo, enhance detection or resolve interspecies distances such as with resonance. Based upon our own previously published studies and new results shown here we present a novel framework describing for the first time a model giving a view of the biophysical relationship between Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL), a conventional radiative excitation-emission process, and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer. We show here that in homogeneous solutions and in fluorophore-targeted bacteria, FUEL is the dominant mechanism responsible for the production of red-shifted photons. The minor resonance contribution was ascertained by comparing the intensity of the experimental signal to its theoretical resonance counterpart. Distinctive features of the in vitro FUEL signal include a macroscopic depth dependency, a lack of enhancement upon targeting at a constant fluorophore concentration cf and a non-square dependency on cf. Significantly, FUEL is an important, so far overlooked, component of all resonance phenomena which should guide the design of appropriate controls when elucidating interactions. Last, our results highlight the potential for FUEL as a means to enhance in vivo and in vitro detection through complex media while alleviating the need for targeting.

  14. Time dependent thermal lensing measurements of V-T energy transfer from highly excited NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toselli, Beatriz M.; Walunas, Theresa L.; Barker, John R.

    1990-04-01

    The vibrational relaxation of NO2 (excited at 21,631/cm) by Ar, Kr, and Xe is investigated experimentally using the time-dependent thermal lensing (TDTL) apparatus and methods described by Barker and Rothem (1982) and Barker and Toselli (1989). The theoretical basis of TDTL is reviewed; the techniques used to analyze the TDTL signals and determine the beam size are discussed; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The bulk average energy transfer per collision is shown to depend strongly on the vibrational energy, and a sharp increase above about 10,000/cm is tentatively attributed to large-amplitude vibration associated with coupled electronic states. Ar deactivation of NO2 (010) is found to have a V-T rate constant of (5.1 + or - 1.0) x 10 to the -14th cu cm/sec.

  15. Mass-number and excitation-energy dependence of the spin cutoff parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, S. M.; Voinov, A. V.; Massey, T. N.

    2016-07-12

    Here, the spin cutoff parameter determining the nuclear level density spin distribution ρ(J) is defined through the spin projection as < J2z > 1/2 or equivalently for spherical nuclei, (< J(J+1) >/3)1/2. It is needed to divide the total level density into levels as a function of J. To obtain the total level density at the neutron binding energy from the s-wave resonance count, the spin cutoff parameter is also needed. The spin cutoff parameter has been calculated as a function of excitation energy and mass with a super-conducting Hamiltonian. Calculations have been compared with two commonly used semiempirical formulas. A need for further measurements is also observed. Some complications for deformed nuclei are discussed. The quality of spin cut off parameter data derived from isomeric ratio measurement is examined.

  16. Mass-number and excitation-energy dependence of the spin cutoff parameter

    DOE PAGES

    Grimes, S. M.; Voinov, A. V.; Massey, T. N.

    2016-07-12

    Here, the spin cutoff parameter determining the nuclear level density spin distribution ρ(J) is defined through the spin projection as < J2z > 1/2 or equivalently for spherical nuclei, (< J(J+1) >/3)1/2. It is needed to divide the total level density into levels as a function of J. To obtain the total level density at the neutron binding energy from the s-wave resonance count, the spin cutoff parameter is also needed. The spin cutoff parameter has been calculated as a function of excitation energy and mass with a super-conducting Hamiltonian. Calculations have been compared with two commonly used semiempirical formulas.more » A need for further measurements is also observed. Some complications for deformed nuclei are discussed. The quality of spin cut off parameter data derived from isomeric ratio measurement is examined.« less

  17. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  18. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential. PMID:22970340

  19. Energy exchange and localization in a modular metastructure under impulsive excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Harne, R. L.; Wang, K. W.

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations on the concept of modular metastructures have demonstrated remarkable adaptivity of properties as a synergistic product of assembling together metastable modules, modules that exhibit coexisting states for the same topology. It has been found that such modularity provides an accessible pathway for unprecedented massive property adaptation. Despite the extensive report on the static or quasistatic characteristics of modular metastructures, much remains to be explored regarding their dynamic characteristics. This research initiates the study on transient response of a modular metastructure under impulsive excitation. Numerical studies characterize the adaptability of energy exchange and localization characteristics afforded by metastable states. It is found that responses of internal bistable masses of the metastable modules play an important role in determining energy distribution of the overall system. It is discovered that low internal bistable mass and high impulsive energy level are beneficial for energy to be localized and dissipated internally. Additionally, mechanism behind effective energy absorption is disclosed. Overall, this investigation provides opportunities to tailor dynamical responses using modular metastructures and opens potential avenues for designing transient vibration absorbers.

  20. The excitation of electronic transverse energy levels in an intense magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of the X-ray pulsar Hercules X-1 show a line emission feature at about 60 keV, which has been interpreted as the fundamental electron cyclotron line in a magnetic field of around six trillion gauss. In this interpretation, the line radiation results from transitions between transverse energy levels, which are quantized by the field. The expected line luminosity from the excitation of these levels by protons which are falling into the polar cap of a neutron star are calculated. They are assumed to attain kinetic energies up to around 200 MeV, the gravitational potential energy at the surface. The cross sections for high energy Coulomb encounters between small pitch angle protons and electrons in a strong field are measured and used to calculate the energy loss rate of the infalling protons. This rate, together with the rate of elastic nuclear proton collisions, is then used to calculate the number of line photons an infalling proton can be expected to produce, directly or indirectly. The results are applied to Hercules X-1.

  1. Hybrid lead halide perovskites for light energy conversion: Excited state properties and photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manser, Joseph S.

    travel 220 nm over the course of 2 ns after photoexcitation, with an extrapolated diffusion length greater than one micrometer over the full excited state lifetime. The solution-processability of metal halide perovskites necessarily raises questions as to the properties of the solvated precursors and their connection to the final solid-state perovskite phase. Through structural and steady-state and time-resolved absorption studies, the important link between the excited state properties of the precursor components, composed of solvated and solid-state halometallate complexes, and CH3NH3PbI3 is evinced. This connection provides insight into optical nonlinearities and electronic properties of the perovskite phase. Fundamental studies of CH 3NH3PbI3 ultimately serve as a foundation for application of this and other related materials in high-performance devices. In the final chapter, the operation of CH3NH3PbI 3 solar cells in a tandem architecture is presented. The quest for economic, large scale hydrogen production has motivated the search for new materials and device designs capable of splitting water using only energy from the sun. In light of this, we introduce an all solution-processed tandem water splitting assembly composed of a BiVO4 photoanode and a single-junction CH3NH3PbI3 hybrid perovskite solar cell. This unique configuration allows efficient solar photon management, with the metal oxide photoanode selectively harvesting high energy visible photons and the underlying perovskite solar cell capturing lower energy visible-near IR wavelengths in a single-pass excitation. Operating without external bias under standard terrestrial one sun illumination, the photoanode-photovoltaic architecture, in conjunction with an earthabundant cobalt phosphate catalyst, exhibits a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 2.5% at neutral pH. The design of low-cost tandem water splitting assemblies employing single-junction hybrid perovskite materials establishes a potentially

  2. Molecular wave function and effective adiabatic potentials calculated by extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Ide, Yoshihiro; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2015-12-31

    We first calculate the ground-state molecular wave function of 1D model H{sub 2} molecule by solving the coupled equations of motion formulated in the extended multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method by the imaginary time propagation. From the comparisons with the results obtained by the Born-Huang (BH) expansion method as well as with the exact wave function, we observe that the memory size required in the extended MCTDHF method is about two orders of magnitude smaller than in the BH expansion method to achieve the same accuracy for the total energy. Second, in order to provide a theoretical means to understand dynamical behavior of the wave function, we propose to define effective adiabatic potential functions and compare them with the conventional adiabatic electronic potentials, although the notion of the adiabatic potentials is not used in the extended MCTDHF approach. From the comparison, we conclude that by calculating the effective potentials we may be able to predict the energy differences among electronic states even for a time-dependent system, e.g., time-dependent excitation energies, which would be difficult to be estimated within the BH expansion approach.

  3. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  4. Electron-driven excitations and dissociation of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Greg; Orel, Ann E.

    2015-02-13

    This program studied how energy is interchanged in electron and photon collisions with molecules leading to ex-citation and dissociation. Modern ab initio techniques, both for the photoionization and electron scattering, and the subsequent nuclear dynamics studies, are used to accurately treat these problems. This work addresses vibrational ex-citation and dissociative attachment following electron impact, and the dynamics following inner shell photoionzation. These problems are ones for which a full multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear dynamics is essential and where non-adiabatic effects are expected to be important.

  5. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library designed using a 10 kA cm-2 niobium fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Nagasawa, Shuichi; China, Fumihiro; Ando, Takumi; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-03-01

    Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic is an energy-efficient superconductor logic with zero static power consumption and very small switching energy. In this paper, we report a new AQFP cell library designed using the AIST 10 kA cm-2 Nb high-speed standard process (HSTP), which is a high-critical-current-density version of the AIST 2.5 kA cm-2 Nb standard process (STP2). Since the intrinsic damping of the Josephson junction (JJ) of HSTP is relatively strong, shunt resistors for JJs were removed and the energy efficiency improved significantly. Also, excitation transformers in the new cells were redesigned so that the cells can operate in a four-phase excitation mode. We described the detail of HSTP and the AQFP cell library designed using HSTP, and showed experimental results of cell test circuits.

  6. Excitation energies, oscillator strengths and lifetimes in Mg-like vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-08-01

    Excitation energies from the ground state for 86 fine-structure levels as well as oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all fine-structure transitions among the levels of the terms (1s22s22p6)3s2(1S), 3s3p(1,3Po), 3s3d(1,3D), 3s4s(1,3S), 3s4p(1,3Po), 3s4d(1,3D), 3s4f(1,3Fo), 3p2(1S, 3P, 1D), 3p3d(1,3Po, 1,3Do, 1,3Fo), 3p4s(1,3Po), 3p4p(1,3S, 1,3P, 1,3D), 3p4d(1,3Po, 1,3Do, 1,3Fo), 3p4f(1,3D, 1,3F, 1,3G) and 3d2(1S, 3P, 1D,3F,1G) of V XII are calculated using extensive configuration-interaction wave functions obtained with the configuration-interaction version 3 computer code of Hibbert. The important relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are included through the Breit-Pauli approximation. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the corresponding experimental values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. The mixing among several fine-structure levels is found to be very strong. Our fine-tuned excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement (better than 0.25%) with the available experimental results. From our calculated radiative decay rates, we have also calculated the radiative lifetimes of fine-structure levels. Generally, our calculated data for the excitation energies and radiative decay rates are found to agree reasonably well with other available calculations. However, significant differences between our calculated lifetimes and those from the calculation of Froese Fischer et al (2006 At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 92 607) for a few fine-structure levels, mainly those belonging to the 3p4d configuration, are noted and discussed. Also, our calculated lifetime for the longer-lived level 3s3p(3P1) is found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding value of Curtis (1991 Phys. Scr. 43 137). ) for all 1108 transitions in V XII are available with the first author ().

  7. Taple-top imaging of the non-adiabatically driven isomerization in the acetylene cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Samuel; Ibrahim, Heide; Wales, Benji; Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T.; Wanie, Vincent; Giguere, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joe; Schuurman, Michael S.; Légaré, François

    2014-05-01

    One of the primary goals of modern ultrafast science is to follow nuclear and electronic evolution of molecules as they undergo a photo-chemical reaction. Most of the interesting dynamics phenomena in molecules occur when an electronically excited state is populated. When the energy difference between electronic ground and excited states is large, Free Electron Laser (FEL) and HHG-based VUV sources were, up to date, the only light sources able to efficiently initiate those non-adiabatic dynamics. We have developed a simple table-top approach to initiate those rich dynamics via multiphoton absorption. As a proof of principle, we studied the ultrafast isomerization of the acetylene cation. We have chosen this model system for isomerization since the internal conversion mechanism which leads to proton migration is still under debate since decades. Using 266 nm multiphoton absorption as a pump and 800 nm induced Coulomb Explosion as a probe, we have shoot the first high-resolution molecular movie of the non-adiabatically driven proton migration in the acetylene cation. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with high level ab initio trajectory simulations.

  8. Excitation energies from extended random phase approximation employed with approximate one- and two-electron reduced density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Koushik; Pernal, Katarzyna

    2012-11-01

    Starting from Rowe's equation of motion we derive extended random phase approximation (ERPA) equations for excitation energies. The ERPA matrix elements are expressed in terms of the correlated ground state one- and two-electron reduced density matrices, 1- and 2-RDM, respectively. Three ways of obtaining approximate 2-RDM are considered: linearization of the ERPA equations, obtaining 2-RDM from density matrix functionals, and employing 2-RDM corresponding to an antisymmetrized product of strongly orthogonal geminals (APSG) ansatz. Applying the ERPA equations with the exact 2-RDM to a hydrogen molecule reveals that the resulting ^1Σ _g^+ excitation energies are not exact. A correction to the ERPA excitation operator involving some double excitations is proposed leading to the ERPA2 approach, which employs the APSG one- and two-electron reduced density matrices. For two-electron systems ERPA2 satisfies a consistency condition and yields exact singlet excitations. It is shown that 2-RDM corresponding to the APSG theory employed in the ERPA2 equations yields excellent singlet excitation energies for Be and LiH systems, and for the N2 molecule the quality of the potential energy curves is at the coupled cluster singles and doubles level. ERPA2 nearly satisfies the consistency condition for small molecules that partially explains its good performance.

  9. Analytic energy gradient of excited electronic state within TDDFT/MMpol framework: Benchmark tests and parallel implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Qiao; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-07

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has become the most popular method to calculate the electronic excitation energies, describe the excited-state properties, and perform the excited-state geometric optimization of medium and large-size molecules due to the implementation of analytic excited-state energy gradient and Hessian in many electronic structure software packages. To describe the molecules in condensed phase, one usually adopts the computationally efficient hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) models. Here, we extend our previous work on the energy gradient of TDDFT/MM excited state to account for the mutual polarization effects between QM and MM regions, which is believed to hold a crucial position in the potential energy surface of molecular systems when the photoexcitation-induced charge rearrangement in the QM region is drastic. The implementation of a simple polarizable TDDFT/MM (TDDFT/MMpol) model in Q-Chem/CHARMM interface with both the linear response and the state-specific features has been realized. Several benchmark tests and preliminary applications are exhibited to confirm our implementation and assess the effects of different treatment of environmental polarization on the excited-state properties, and the efficiency of parallel implementation is demonstrated as well.

  10. Analytic model for low energy excitation states and phase transitions in spin-ice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Bara, F. I.; López-Aguilar, F.

    2017-04-01

    Low energy excitation states in magnetic structures of the so-called spin-ices are produced via spin flips among contiguous tetrahedra of their crystal structure. These spin flips generate entities which mimic magnetic dipoles in every two tetrahedra according to the dumbbell model. When the temperature increases, the spin-flip processes are transmitted in the lattice, generating so-called Dirac strings, which constitute structural entities that can present mimetic behavior similar to that of magnetic monopoles. In recent studies of both specific heat and ac magnetic susceptibility, two (even possibly three) phases have been shown to vary the temperature. The first of these phases presents a sharp peak in the specific heat and another phase transition occurs for increasing temperature whose peak is broader than that of the former phase. The sharp peak occurs when there are no free individual magnetic charges and temperature of the second phase transition coincides with the maximum proliferation of free deconfined magnetic charges. In the present paper, we propose a model for analyzing the low energy excitation many-body states of these spin-ice systems. We give analytical formulas for the internal energy, specific heat, entropy and their temperature evolution. We study the description of the possible global states via the nature and structure of their one-body components by means of the thermodynamic functions. Below 0.37 K, the Coulomb-like magnetic charge interaction can generate a phase transition to a condensation of pole–antipole pairs, possibly having Bose–Einstein structure which is responsible for the sharp peak of the first phase transition. When there are sufficient free positive and negative charges, the system tends to behave as a magnetic plasma, which implies the broader peak in the specific heat appearing at higher temperature than the sharper experimental peak.

  11. Homogeneous competitive hybridization assay based on two-photon excitation fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingzhi; Dong, Xiaohu; Lian, Wenlong; Peng, Xiaoniu; Liu, Zhihong; He, Zhike; Wang, Ququan

    2010-02-15

    Recently, we have successfully developed a two-photon excitation fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TPE-FRET)-based homogeneous immunoassay using two-photon excitable small organic molecule as the energy donor. In the present work, the newly emerging TPE-FRET technique was extended to the determination of oligonucleotide. A new TPE molecule with favorable two-photon action cross section was synthesized [2-(2,5-bis(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)acetic acid, abbreviated as TP-COOH], with the tagged reactive carboxyl group allowing facile conjugation with streptavidin (SA). Employing the TP-COOH molecule as energy donor and black hole quencher 1 (BHQ-1) as acceptor, a TPE-FRET-based homogeneous competitive hybridization model was constructed via a biotin-streptavidin bridge. Through the hybridization between a biotinylated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and a BHQ-1-linked ssDNA, and the subsequent capture of the as-formed hybrid by TP-COOH labeled SA, the donor fluorescence was quenched due to the FRET between TP-COOH and BHQ-1. Upon the competition between a target ssDNA and the quencher-linked ssDNA toward the biotinylated oligonucleotide, the donor fluorescence was recovered in a target-dependent manner. Good linearity was obtained with the target oligonucleotide ranging from 0.08 to 1.52 microM. The method was applied to spiked serum and urine samples with satisfying recoveries obtained. The results of this work verified the applicability of TPE-FRET technique in hybridization assay and confirmed the advantages of TPE-FRET in complicated matrix.

  12. Azole energetic materials: Initial mechanisms for the energy release from electronical excited nitropyrazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Bing; Yu, Zijun; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-21

    Decomposition of energetic material 3,4-dinitropyrazole (DNP) and two model molecules 4-nitropyrazole and 1-nitropyrazole is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The initial decomposition mechanisms for these three nitropyrazoles are explored with complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level. The NO molecule is observed as an initial decomposition product from all three materials subsequent to UV excitation. Observed NO products are rotationally cold (<50 K) for all three systems. The vibrational temperature of the NO product from DNP is (3850 ± 50) K, 1350 K hotter than that of the two model species. Potential energy surface calculations at the CASSCF(12,8)/6-31+G(d) level illustrate that conical intersections plays an essential role in the decomposition mechanism. Electronically excited S{sub 2} nitropyraozles can nonradiatively relax to lower electronic states through (S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}){sub CI} and (S{sub 1}/S{sub 0}){sub CI} conical intersection and undergo a nitro-nitrite isomerization to generate NO product either in the S{sub 1} state or S{sub 0} state. In model systems, NO is generated in the S{sub 1} state, while in the energetic material DNP, NO is produced on the ground state surface, as the S{sub 1} decomposition pathway is energetically unavailable. The theoretically predicted mechanism is consistent with the experimental results, as DNP decomposes in a lower electronic state than do the model systems and thus the vibrational energy in the NO product from DNP should be hotter than from the model systems. The observed rotational energy distributions for NO are consistent with the final structures of the respective transition states for each molecule.

  13. Response analysis of a nonlinear magnetoelectric energy harvester under harmonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naifar, S.; Bradai, S.; Viehweger, C.; Kanoun, O.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetostrictive (MS) piezoelectric composites provide interesting possibilities to harvest energy from low amplitude and low frequency vibrations with a relative high energy outcome. In this paper a magnetoelectric (ME) vibration energy harvester has been designed, which consists of two ME transducers a magnetic circuit and a magnetic spring. The ME transducers consist of three layered Terfenol-D and Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) laminated composites. The outcoming energy is collected directly from the piezo layer to avoid electrical losses. In the system under consideration, the magnetic forces between the ME transducers and the magnetic circuit introduce additional stiffness on the magnetic spring. The one degree of freedom system is analysed analytically and the corresponding governing equation is solved with the Lindstedt-Poincaré method. The effects of the structure parameters, such as the nonlinear magnetic forces and the magnetic field distribution, are analysed based on finite element analysis for optimization of electric output performances. Investigations demonstrate that 1.56 mW output power across 8 MΩ load resistance can be harvested for an excitation amplitude of 1 mm at 21.84 Hz.

  14. Dissipation of excess excitation energy of the needle leaves in Pinus trees during cold winters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, AO; Cui, Zhen-Hai; Yu, Jia-Lin; Hu, Zi-Ling; Ding, Rui; Ren, Da-Ming; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Photooxidative damage to the needle leaves of evergreen trees results from the absorption of excess excitation energy. Efficient dissipation of this energy is essential to prevent photodamage. In this study, we determined the fluorescence transients, absorption spectra, chlorophyll contents, chlorophyll a/ b ratios, and relative membrane permeabilities of needle leaves of Pinus koraiensis, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Pinus armandi in both cold winter and summer. We observed a dramatic decrease in the maximum fluorescence ( F m) and substantial absorption of light energy in winter leaves of all three species. The F m decline was not correlated with a decrease in light absorption or with changes in chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a/ b ratio. The results suggested that the winter leaves dissipated a large amount of excess energy as heat. Because the cold winter leaves had lost normal physiological function, the heat dissipation depended solely on changes in the photosystem II supercomplex rather than the xanthophyll cycle. These findings imply that more attention should be paid to heat dissipation via changes in the photosystem complex structure during the growing season.

  15. Nanotubular J-aggregates and quantum dots coupled for efficient resonance excitation energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Kirmse, Holm; Steeg, Egon; Kühn, Sergei; Friede, Sebastian; Kirstein, Stefan; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2015-02-24

    Resonant coupling between distinct excitons in organic supramolecular assemblies and inorganic semiconductors is supposed to offer an approach to optoelectronic devices. Here, we report on colloidal nanohybrids consisting of self-assembled tubular J-aggregates decorated with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) via electrostatic self-assembly. The role of QDs in the energy transfer process can be switched from a donor to an acceptor by tuning its size and thereby the excitonic transition energy while keeping the chemistry unaltered. QDs are located within a close distance (<4 nm) to the J-aggregate surface, without harming the tubular structures and optical properties of J-aggregates. The close proximity of J-aggregates and QDs allows the strong excitation energy transfer coupling, which is around 92% in the case of energy transfer from the QD donor to the J-aggregate acceptor and approximately 20% in the reverse case. This system provides a model of an organic-inorganic light-harvesting complex using methods of self-assembly in aqueous solution, and it highlights a route toward hierarchical synthesis of structurally well-defined supramolecular objects with advanced functionality.

  16. Evidence for a cysteine-mediated mechanism of excitation energy regulation in a photosynthetic antenna complex

    PubMed Central

    Orf, Gregory S.; Saer, Rafael G.; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Zhang, Hao; McIntosh, Chelsea L.; Schultz, Jason W.; Mirica, Liviu M.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Light-harvesting antenna complexes not only aid in the capture of solar energy for photosynthesis, but regulate the quantity of transferred energy as well. Light-harvesting regulation is important for protecting reaction center complexes from overexcitation, generation of reactive oxygen species, and metabolic overload. Usually, this regulation is controlled by the association of light-harvesting antennas with accessory quenchers such as carotenoids. One antenna complex, the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) antenna protein from green sulfur bacteria, completely lacks carotenoids and other known accessory quenchers. Nonetheless, the FMO protein is able to quench energy transfer in aerobic conditions effectively, indicating a previously unidentified type of regulatory mechanism. Through de novo sequencing MS, chemical modification, and mutagenesis, we have pinpointed the source of the quenching action to cysteine residues (Cys49 and Cys353) situated near two low-energy bacteriochlorophylls in the FMO protein from Chlorobaculum tepidum. Removal of these cysteines (particularly removal of the completely conserved Cys353) through N-ethylmaleimide modification or mutagenesis to alanine abolishes the aerobic quenching effect. Electrochemical analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra suggest that in aerobic conditions the cysteine thiols are converted to thiyl radicals which then are capable of quenching bacteriochlorophyll excited states through electron transfer photochemistry. This simple mechanism has implications for the design of bio-inspired light-harvesting antennas and the redesign of natural photosynthetic systems. PMID:27335466

  17. Excitation energies, radiative and autoionization rates, dielectronic satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination rates for excited states of Yb-like W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, A. S.

    2012-06-01

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for [Cd]4f^145p^65l'nl, [Cd]4f^145p^66l''nl, [Cd]4f^145p^55d^2nl, [Cd]4f^145p^55d6l''nl, [Cd]4f^135p^65d^2nl, and [Cd]4f^135p^65d6l''nl (l'=d, f, g , l''=s,p,d,f, g, n=5-7) states of Yb-like tungsten (W^4+) are calculated using the RMBPT, HULLAC, and COWAN codes. Branching ratios relative to the [Cd]4f^145p^65d, [Cd]4f^145p^66s, and [Cd]4f^145p^66p thresholds in Tm-like tungsten and intensity factors are calculated for satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients are determined for the singly excited, as well as non-autoionizing core-excited states in Yb-like tungsten. Contributions from the autoionizing doubly excited states and core-excited states (with n up to 100), which are particulary important for calculating total DR rates, are estimated. Synthetic dielectronic satellite spectra from Yb-like W are simulated in a broad spectral range from 200 to 1400 å. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of W^4+ properties useful for a variety of applications including for fusion applications.

  18. A pair natural orbital implementation of the coupled cluster model CC2 for excitation energies.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2013-08-28

    We demonstrate how to extend the pair natural orbital (PNO) methodology for excited states, presented in a previous work for the perturbative doubles correction to configuration interaction singles (CIS(D)), to iterative coupled cluster methods such as the approximate singles and doubles model CC2. The original O(N(5)) scaling of the PNO construction is reduced by using orbital-specific virtuals (OSVs) as an intermediate step without spoiling the initial accuracy of the PNO method. Furthermore, a slower error convergence for charge-transfer states is analyzed and resolved by a numerical Laplace transformation during the PNO construction, so that an equally accurate treatment of local and charge-transfer excitations is achieved. With state-specific truncated PNO expansions, the eigenvalue problem is solved by combining the Davidson algorithm with deflation to project out roots that have already been determined and an automated refresh with a generation of new PNOs to achieve self-consistency of the PNO space. For a large test set, we found that truncation errors for PNO-CC2 excitation energies are only slightly larger than for PNO-CIS(D). The computational efficiency of PNO-CC2 is demonstrated for a large organic dye, where a reduction of the doubles space by a factor of more than 1000 is obtained compared to the canonical calculation. A compression of the doubles space by a factor 30 is achieved by a unified OSV space only. Moreover, calculations with the still preliminary PNO-CC2 implementation on a series of glycine oligomers revealed an early break even point with a canonical RI-CC2 implementation between 100 and 300 basis functions.

  19. A pair natural orbital implementation of the coupled cluster model CC2 for excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate how to extend the pair natural orbital (PNO) methodology for excited states, presented in a previous work for the perturbative doubles correction to configuration interaction singles (CIS(D)), to iterative coupled cluster methods such as the approximate singles and doubles model CC2. The original O(N^5) scaling of the PNO construction is reduced by using orbital-specific virtuals (OSVs) as an intermediate step without spoiling the initial accuracy of the PNO method. Furthermore, a slower error convergence for charge-transfer states is analyzed and resolved by a numerical Laplace transformation during the PNO construction, so that an equally accurate treatment of local and charge-transfer excitations is achieved. With state-specific truncated PNO expansions, the eigenvalue problem is solved by combining the Davidson algorithm with deflation to project out roots that have already been determined and an automated refresh with a generation of new PNOs to achieve self-consistency of the PNO space. For a large test set, we found that truncation errors for PNO-CC2 excitation energies are only slightly larger than for PNO-CIS(D). The computational efficiency of PNO-CC2 is demonstrated for a large organic dye, where a reduction of the doubles space by a factor of more than 1000 is obtained compared to the canonical calculation. A compression of the doubles space by a factor 30 is achieved by a unified OSV space only. Moreover, calculations with the still preliminary PNO-CC2 implementation on a series of glycine oligomers revealed an early break even point with a canonical RI-CC2 implementation between 100 and 300 basis functions.

  20. Scaled Second Order Perturbation Corrections to Configuration Interaction Singles: Efficient and Reliable Excitation Energy Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Young Min; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-02-01

    Two modifications of the perturbative doubles correction to configuration interaction with single substitutions (CIS(D)) are suggested, which are excited state analogs of ground state scaled second order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) methods. The first approach employs two parameters to scale the two spin components of the direct term of CIS(D), starting from the two-parameter spin-component scaled (SCS) MP2 ground state, and is termed SCS-CIS(D). An efficient resolution-of-the-identity (RI) implementation of this approach is described. The second approach employs a single parameter to scale only the opposite-spin direct term of CIS(D), starting from the one-parameter scaled opposite spin (SOS) MP2 ground state, and is called SOS-CIS(D). By utilizing auxiliary basis expansions and a Laplace transform, a fourth order algorithm for SOS-CIS(D) is described and implemented. The parameters describing SCS-CIS(D) and SOS-CIS(D) are optimized based on a training set including valence excitations of various organic molecules and Rydberg transitions of water and ammonia, and they significantly improve upon CIS(D) itself. The accuracy of the two methods is found to be comparable. This arises from a strong correlation between the same-spin and opposite-spin portions of the excitation energy terms. The methods are successfully applied to the zincbacteriochlorin-bacteriochlorin charge transfer transition, for which time-dependent density functional theory, with presently available exchange-correlation functionals, is known to fail. The methods are also successfully applied to describe various electronic transitions outside of the training set. The efficiency of SOS-CIS(D) and the auxiliary basis implementation of CIS(D) and SCS-CIS(D) are confirmed with a series of timing tests.

  1. Investigation of the energy-averaged double transition density of isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, M. L.; Shlomo, S.; Tulupov, B. A.; Urin, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    The particle-hole dispersive optical model, developed recently, is applied to study properties of high-energy isoscalar monopole excitations in medium-heavy mass spherical nuclei. The energy-averaged strength functions of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance and its overtone in 208Pb are analyzed. In particular, we analyze the energy-averaged isoscalar monopole double transition density, the key quantity in the description of the hadron-nucleus inelastic scattering, and studied the validity of the factorization approximation using semi classical and microscopic one body transition densities, respectively, in calculating the cross sections for the excitation of isoscalar giant resonances by inelastic alpha scattering.

  2. Vibrational excitation in low-energy electron scattering by H 2 molecules physisorbed on a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet-Billy, D.; Stibbe, D. T.; Tennyson, J.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1999-12-01

    The electron impact vibrational excitation of H 2 molecules physisorbed on a free-electron metal surface is studied theoretically at collision energies of a few eV. The role of the short-lived low-lying 2Σ u resonance is investigated. The electron scattering by a free H 2 molecule is described by the R-matrix method and the corresponding results are used to model the electron scattering by the physisorbed molecule with the coupled angular mode (CAM) method. The strength of the vibrational excitation and, in particular, the overtone vibrational excitation ratio are found to be smaller for the physisorbed molecule than for the free molecule. However, the energy dependence of the vibrational excitation process is found to be weakly influenced by the physisorption, as observed experimentally by Demuth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 47 (1981) 1166].

  3. Ergodicity, configurational entropy and free energy in pigment solutions and plant photosystems: influence of excited state lifetime.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert C; Zucchelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We examine ergodicity and configurational entropy for a dilute pigment solution and for a suspension of plant photosystem particles in which both ground and excited state pigments are present. It is concluded that the pigment solution, due to the extreme brevity of the excited state lifetime, is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. Conversely, due to the rapid energy transfer among pigments, each photosystem is ergodic and the configurational entropy is positive. This decreases the free energy of the single photosystem pigment array by a small amount. On the other hand, the suspension of photosystems is non-ergodic and the configurational entropy approaches zero. The overall configurational entropy which, in principle, includes contributions from both the single excited photosystems and the suspension which contains excited photosystems, also approaches zero. Thus the configurational entropy upon photon absorption by either a pigment solution or a suspension of photosystem particles is approximately zero.

  4. Bond-Specific Dissociation Following Excitation Energy Transfer for Distance Constraint Determination in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  5. Bond-specific dissociation following excitation energy transfer for distance constraint determination in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Lareau, Nichole M; Stow, Sarah M; McLean, John A; Julian, Ryan R

    2014-09-24

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase.

  6. Excited baryon form-factors at high momentum transfer at CEBAF at higher energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stoler, P.

    1994-04-01

    The possibilities of measuring the properties of excited nucleons at high Q{sup 2} by means of exclusive single meson production at CEBAF with an electron energy of 8 GeV is considered. The motivation is to access short range phenomena in baryon structure, and to investigate the transition from the low Q{sup 2} non-perturbative QCD regime, where constituent quark models are valid, to higher Q{sup 2} where it is believed perturbative QCD plays an increasingly important role. It is found that high quality baryon decay angular distributions can be obtained for the most prominent states up to Q{sup 2} {approximately} 12 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using a set of moderate resolution, large solid angle magnetic spectrometers.

  7. Logarithmic mean excitation energies: II. Helium, lithium, beryllium, and the 2s state of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendorff, S.; Schlaile, H. G.

    1993-10-01

    The four logarithmic excitation eneriges I(ν) for ν=-1, 0, 1, and 2 have been calculated for helium, lithium, beryllium, and the 2s state of hydrogen. They appear in the expressions of the total cross section, the stopping power, and the straggling effect for fast charged particles, and in the expressions of the Lamb shift of atomic energy levels. The method was introduced some years ago [Rosendorff and Birman, Phys. Rev. A 31, 612 (1985)]. For hydrogen the method is rigorous. Exact one-particle wave functions given by Clementi were used. Thus, correlation and symmetrization effects were neglected. For the nonhydrogen states, the relevant differential equations were solved by using a computer. An effective charge was defined which has interesting features. It is helpful in gaining some physical insight into the results obtained for helium and the 1s and 2s states of lithium and beryllium.

  8. Formation of H{sub 2} from internally heated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Excitation energy dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T. E-mail: henning@fysik.su.se; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H. E-mail: henning@fysik.su.se; Delaunay, R.; Rousseau, P.; Adoui, L.; Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2015-04-14

    We have investigated the effectiveness of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) formation from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are internally heated by collisions with keV ions. The present and earlier experimental results are analyzed in view of molecular structure calculations and a simple collision model. We estimate that H{sub 2} formation becomes important for internal PAH temperatures exceeding about 2200 K, regardless of the PAH size and the excitation agent. This suggests that keV ions may effectively induce such reactions, while they are unlikely due to, e.g., absorption of single photons with energies below the Lyman limit. The present analysis also suggests that H{sub 2} emission is correlated with multi-fragmentation processes, which means that the [PAH-2H]{sup +} peak intensities in the mass spectra may not be used for estimating H{sub 2}-formation rates.

  9. Vibrational energy flow in highly excited molecules: Role of intramolecular vibrational redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, D.J. |; Field, R.W.

    1996-08-01

    A pedagogical overview of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) phenomena in vibrationally excited molecules is presented. In the interest of focus and simplicity, the topics covered deal primarily with IVR in the ground electronic state, relying on examples from the literature to illustrate key points. The experimental topics discussed attempt to sample systematically three different energy regimes on the full potential surface corresponding to (i) `low`, e.g., moderate- to high-resolution vibrational spectroscopies, (ii) `intermediate`, e.g., stimulated emission pumping and high overtone spectroscopies, and (iii) `high`, e.g., photofragment/predissociation dynamical spectroscopies. The interplay between experiment and theory is highlighted here because it has facilitated enormous advances in the field over the past decade. 183 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  11. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  12. Oligo(phenylenevinylene) hybrids and self-assemblies: versatile materials for excitation energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Vakayil K; Ranjith, Choorikkat; Bandini, Elisa; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai; Armaroli, Nicola

    2014-06-21

    Oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs) are extensively investigated π-conjugated molecules that exhibit absorption and fluorescence in the UV-Vis spectral region, which can be widely tuned by chemical functionalisation and external control (e.g. solvent, temperature, pH). Further modulation of the optoelectronic properties of OPVs is possible by supramolecular aggregation, primarily driven by hydrogen bonding or π-stacking interactions. In recent years, extensive research work has been accomplished in exploiting the unique combination of the structural and electronic properties of OPVs, most of which has been targeted at the preparation of molecules and materials featuring photoinduced energy transfer. This review intends to offer an overview of the multicomponent arrays and self-assembled materials based on OPV which have been designed to undergo energy transfer by means of a thorough choice of excitation donor-acceptor partners. We present a few selected examples of photoactive dyads and triads containing organic moieties (e.g. fullerene, phenanthroline) as well as coordination compounds (Cu(I) complexes). We then focus more extensively on self-assembled materials containing suitably functionalised OPVs that lead to hydrogen bonded aggregates, helical structures, gels, nanoparticles, vesicles, mesostructured organic-inorganic hybrid films, functionalised nanoparticles and quantum dots. In most cases, these materials exhibit luminescence whose colour and intensity is related to the efficiency and direction of the energy transfer processes.

  13. Role of thermal excitation in ultrafast energy transfer in chlorosomes revealed by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jun, Sunhong; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Tae Wu; Isaji, Megumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Jeongho

    2015-07-21

    Chlorosomes are the largest light harvesting complexes in nature and consist of many bacteriochlorophyll pigments forming self-assembled J-aggregates. In this work, we use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) to investigate ultrafast dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in chlorosomes and their temperature dependence. From time evolution of the measured 2D electronic spectra of chlorosomes, we directly map out the distribution of the EET rate among the manifold of exciton states in a 2D energy space. In particular, it is found that the EET rate varies gradually depending on the energies of energy-donor and energy-acceptor states. In addition, from comparative 2D-ES measurements at 77 K and room temperature, we show that the EET rate exhibits subtle dependence on both the exciton energy and temperature, demonstrating the effect of thermal excitation on the EET rate. This observation suggests that active thermal excitation at room temperature prevents the excitation trapping at low-energy states and thus promotes efficient exciton diffusion in chlorosomes at ambient temperature.

  14. Excited state potential energy surfaces and their interactions in Fe(IV)=O active sites.

    PubMed

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-12-21

    The non-heme ferryl active sites are of significant interest for their application in biomedical and green catalysis. These sites have been shown to have an S = 1 or S = 2 ground spin state; the latter is functional in biology. Low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (LT MCD) spectroscopy probes the nature of the excited states in these species including ligand-field (LF) states that are otherwise difficult to study by other spectroscopies. In particular, the temperature dependences of MCD features enable their unambiguous assignment and thus determination of the low-lying excited states in two prototypical S = 1 and S = 2 NHFe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O complexes. Furthermore, some MCD bands exhibit vibronic structures that allow mapping of excited-state interactions and their effects on the potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the S = 2 species, there is also an unusual spectral feature in both near-infrared absorption and MCD spectra - Fano antiresonance (dip in Abs) and Fano resonance (sharp peak in MCD) that indicates the weak spin-orbit coupling of an S = 1 state with the S = 2 LF state. These experimental data are correlated with quantum-chemical calculations that are further extended to analyze the low-lying electronic states and the evolution of their multiconfigurational characters along the Fe-O PESs. These investigations show that the lowest-energy states develop oxyl Fe(III) character at distances that are relevant to the transition state (TS) for H-atom abstraction and define the frontier molecular orbitals that participate in the reactivity of S = 1 vs. S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O active sites. The S = 1 species has only one available channel that requires the C-H bond of a substrate to approach perpendicular to the Fe-oxo bond (the π channel). In contrast, there are three channels (one σ and two π) available for the S = 2 non-heme Fe(IV)[double bond, length as m-dash]O system allowing C-H substrate approach

  15. Highly emitting near-infrared lanthanide "encapsulated sandwich" metallacrown complexes with excitation shifted toward lower energy.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Evan R; Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Jankolovits, Joseph; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Petoud, Stéphane; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2014-01-29

    Near-infrared (NIR) luminescent lanthanide complexes hold great promise for practical applications, as their optical properties have several complementary advantages over organic fluorophores and semiconductor nanoparticles. The fundamental challenge for lanthanide luminescence is their sensitization through suitable chromophores. The use of the metallacrown (MC) motif is an innovative strategy to arrange several organic sensitizers at a well-controlled distance from a lanthanide cation. Herein we report a series of lanthanide “encapsulated sandwich” MC complexes of the form Ln3+ [12-MC(Zn(II),quinHA)-4]2[24-MC(Zn(II),quinHA)-8] (Ln3+ [Zn(II)MC(quinHA)]) in which the MC framework is formed by the self-assembly of Zn2+ ions and tetradentate chromophoric ligands based on quinaldichydroxamic acid (quinHA). A first-generation of luminescent MCs was presented previously but was limited due to excitation wavelengths in the UV. We report here that through the design of the chromophore of the MC assembly, we have significantly shifted the absorption wavelength toward lower energy (450 nm). In addition to this near-visible inter- and/or intraligand charge transfer absorption, Ln3+ [Zn(II)MC(quinHA)] exhibits remarkably high quantum yields, long luminescence lifetimes (CD3OD; Yb3+, QLn(L) = 2.88(2)%, τobs = 150.7(2) μs; Nd3+, QLn(L) = 1.35(1)%, τobs = 4.11(3) μs; Er3+, QLn(L) = 3.60(6)·10–2%, τobs = 11.40(3) μs), and excellent photostability. Quantum yields of Nd3+ and Er3+ MCs in the solid state and in deuterated solvents, upon excitation at low energy, are the highest values among NIR-emitting lanthanide complexes containing C–H bonds. The versatility of the MC strategy allows modifications in the excitation wavelength and absorptivity through the appropriate design of the ligand sensitizer, providing a highly efficient platform with tunable properties.

  16. Direct Delta-MBPT(2) method for ionization potentials, electron affinities, and excitation energies using fractional occupation numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Ortiz, J. Vincent

    2013-01-01

    A direct method (D-Delta-MBPT(2)) to calculate second-order ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinities (EAs), and excitation energies is developed. The Delta-MBPT(2) method is defined as the correlated extension of the Delta-HF method. Energy differences are obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to occupation numbers over the appropriate parameter range. This is made possible by writing the second-order energy as a function of the occupation numbers. Relaxation effects are fully included at the SCF level. This is in contrast to linear response theory, which makes the D-Delta-MBPT(2) applicable not only to single excited but also higher excited states. We show the relationship of the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for IPs and EAs to a second-order approximation of the effective Fock-space coupled-cluster Hamiltonian and a second-order electron propagator method. We also discuss the connection between the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for excitation energies and the CIS-MP2 method. Finally, as a proof of principle, we apply our method to calculate ionization potentials and excitation energies of some small molecules. For IPs, the Delta-MBPT(2) results compare well to the second-order solution of the Dyson equation. For excitation energies, the deviation from EOM-CCSD increases when correlation becomes more important. When using the numerical integration technique, we encounter difficulties that prevented us from reaching the Delta-MBPT(2) values. Most importantly, relaxation beyond the Hartree Fock level is significant and needs to be included in future research.

  17. Energy transfer of non-equidistant radiators via the nonlinear excitation mechanism inside of an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pislari, Tatiana; Enaki, Nicolae

    2016-12-01

    The energy transferring between three q-bits system flying simultaneously through an optical cavity, is discussed. It is observed the migration of energy from one excited radiator with dipole forbidden transitions relatively to another two- radiators with half excitation energy of first atom. Photon entangled state between distinct atoms and their transfer is studied. These atoms in our interpretations are named, D - dipole forbidden atom, S1 and S2 - two dipole active atoms with summer energy ћɷ1 + ћɷ2 = ћɷn, ɷ1 observe the periodical transfer of energy from D- atom to ensemble of two S- atoms. This effect may be used for quantum gates processing in which the energy transfer depends on the input information. The quantum discord and entanglement for this system of q-bits was explored.

  18. New Dynamical Scaling Universality for Quantum Networks Across Adiabatic Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2014-01-01

    We reveal universal dynamical scaling behavior across adiabatic quantum phase transitions in networks ranging from traditional spatial systems (Ising model) to fully connected ones (Dicke and Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models). Our findings, which lie beyond traditional critical exponent analysis and adiabatic perturbation approximations, are applicable even where excitations have not yet stabilized and, hence, provide a time-resolved understanding of quantum phase transitions encompassing a wide range of adiabatic regimes. We show explicitly that even though two systems may traditionally belong to the same universality class, they can have very different adiabatic evolutions. This implies that more stringent conditions need to be imposed than at present, both for quantum simulations where one system is used to simulate the other and for adiabatic quantum computing schemes.

  19. New Dynamical Scaling Universality for Quantum Networks Across Adiabatic Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Oscar L.; Rodriguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F.; Rey, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    We reveal universal dynamical scaling behavior across adiabatic quantum phase transitions in networks ranging from traditional spatial systems (Ising model) to fully connected ones (Dicke and Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick models). Our findings, which lie beyond traditional critical exponent analysis and adiabatic perturbation approximations, are applicable even where excitations have not yet stabilized and, hence, provide a time-resolved understanding of quantum phase transitions encompassing a wide range of adiabatic regimes. We show explicitly that even though two systems may traditionally belong to the same universality class, they can have very different adiabatic evolutions. This implies that more stringent conditions need to be imposed than at present, both for quantum simulations where one system is used to simulate the other and for adiabatic quantum computing schemes.

  20. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a three-level superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. S.; Vepsäläinen, A.; Danilin, S.; Paraoanu, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    The adiabatic manipulation of quantum states is a powerful technique that opened up new directions in quantum engineering—enabling tests of fundamental concepts such as geometrical phases and topological transitions, and holding the promise of alternative models of quantum computation. Here we benchmark the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage for circuit quantum electrodynamics by employing the first three levels of a transmon qubit. In this ladder configuration, we demonstrate a population transfer efficiency >80% between the ground state and the second excited state using two adiabatic Gaussian-shaped control microwave pulses. By doing quantum tomography at successive moments during the Raman pulses, we investigate the transfer of the population in time domain. Furthermore, we show that this protocol can be reversed by applying a third adiabatic pulse, we study a hybrid nondiabatic–adiabatic sequence, and we present experimental results for a quasi-degenerate intermediate level. PMID:26902454

  1. An accurate density functional theory calculation for electronic excitation energies: the least-squares support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Sun, Shi-Ling; Shi, Li-Li; Li, Hui; Li, Hong-Zhi; Su, Zhong-Min; Lu, Ying-Hua

    2009-05-14

    Support vector machines (SVMs), as a novel type of learning machine, has been very successful in pattern recognition and function estimation problems. In this paper we introduce least-squares (LS) SVMs to improve the calculation accuracy of density functional theory. As a demonstration, this combined quantum mechanical calculation with LS-SVM correction approach has been applied to evaluate the electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules. The newly introduced LS-SVM approach reduces the root-mean-square deviation of the calculated electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules from 0.32 to 0.11 eV for the B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculation. Thus, the LS-SVM correction on top of B3LYP/6-31G(d) is a better method to correct electronic excitation energies and can be used as the approximation of experimental results which are impossible to obtain experimentally.

  2. Vibronic enhancement of excitation energy transport: Interplay between local and non-local exciton-phonon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myeong H.; Troisi, Alessandro

    2017-02-01

    It has been reported in recent years that vibronic resonance between vibrational energy of the intramolecular nuclear mode and excitation-energy difference is crucial to enhance excitation energy transport in light harvesting proteins. Here we investigate how vibronic enhancement induced by vibronic resonance is influenced by the details of local and non-local exciton-phonon interactions. We study a heterodimer model with parameters relevant to the light-harvesting proteins with the surrogate Hamiltonian quantum dynamics method in a vibronic basis. In addition, the impact of field-driven excitation on the efficiency of population transfer is compared with the instantaneous excitation, and the effect of multi-mode vibronic coupling is presented in comparison with the coupling to a single effective vibrational mode. We find that vibronic enhancement of site population transfer is strongly suppressed with the increase of non-local exciton-phonon interaction and increasing the number of strongly coupled high-frequency vibrational modes leads to a further decrease in vibronic enhancement. Our results indicate that vibronic enhancement is present but may be much smaller than previously thought and therefore care needs to be taken when interpreting its role in excitation energy transport. Our results also suggest that non-local exciton-phonon coupling, which is related to the fluctuation of the excitonic coupling, may be as important as local exciton-phonon coupling and should be included in any quantum dynamics model.

  3. Electron Attachment in Low-Energy Electron Elastic Collisions with Au and Pt Atoms: Identification of Excited Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Eure, A.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been benchmarked [1] on the accurately measured binding energies of the excited Ge= and Sn= anions [2] through the binding energies (BEs) extracted from the Regge-pole calculated elastic total cross sections (TCSs). Here the methodology is applied together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the vital core polarization interaction to investigate the possibility of forming excited Au= and Pt= anions in low-energy electron elastic collisions with Au and Pt atoms. From the positions of the characteristic extremely narrow resonances in the total cross sections, we extract the binding energies of the excited Au= and Pt= anions formed as Regge resonances during the collisions. The angular life of the complexes thus formed is used to differentiate the stable excited bound states of the anions from the shape resonances [3]. The BEs for the excited Au= and Pt= anions are found to be 0.475eVand 0.543eV, respectively, challenging both theory and experiment to verify. [1] A. Msezane et al, Phys. Rev. A, Submitted (2009) [2] M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. A 58, 2844 (1998) [3] Z. Felfli et al, Phys. Rev. A 79, 012714 (2009)

  4. The Floquet Adiabatic Theorem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Phillip; Bukov, Marin; D'Alessio, Luca; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Davidson, Shainen; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2015-03-01

    The existance of the adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems has been the subject of an active debate with different articles reaching opposite conclusions over the years. In this talk we clarify the situation by deriving a systematic expansion in the time-derivatives of a slow parameter for the occupation probabilities of the Floque states. Our analysis shows that the in a certain limit the transition between Floquet eigenstates are suppressed and it is possible to define an adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems. Crucially we observe however that the conditions for adiabaticity in ordinary and Floquet systems are different and that this difference can become important when the amplitude of the periodic driving is large. We illustrate our results with specific examples of a periodically driven harmonic oscillator and cold atoms in optical lattices which are relevant in current experiments.

  5. Adiabatic losses in Stirling refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauwens, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Stirling cycle has been used very effectively in cryocoolers; but efficiencies relative to the Carnot limit are typically observed to peak for absolute temperature ratios of about two, which makes it less suitable for low-life refrigeration. The adiabatic loss appears to be responsible for poor performance at small temperature differences. In this paper, adiabatic losses are evaluated, for a temperature ratio of 2/3, taking into account the effect of phase angle between pistons, of volume ratio, of the distribution of the dead volume necessary to reduce the volume ratio, and of the distribution of displacement between expansion and compression spaces. The study is carried out numerically, using an adiabatic Stirling engine model in which cylinder flow is assumed to be stratified. Results show that the best location for the cylinder dead volume is on the compression side. Otherwise, all strategies used to trade off refrigeration for coefficient of performance are found to be roughly equivalent.

  6. Modeling the doubly excited state with time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2008-11-01

    Multielectron excited states have become a hot topic in many cutting-edge research fields, such as the photophysics of polyenes and in the possibility of multiexciton generation in quantum dots for the purpose of increasing solar cell efficiency. However, obtaining multielectron excited states has been a major obstacle as it is often done with multiconfigurational methods, which involve formidable computational cost for large systems. Although they are computationally much cheaper than multiconfigurational wave function based methods, linear response adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density functional theory (TDDFT) are generally considered incapable of obtaining multielectron excited states. We have developed a real-time TDHF and adiabatic TDDFT approach that is beyond the perturbative regime. We show that TDHF/TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite two electrons from the ground state to the doubly excited state and that the real-time TDHF/TDDFT implicitly includes double excitation within a superposition state. We also present a multireference linear response theory to show that the real-time electron density response corresponds to a superposition of perturbative linear responses of the S0 and S2 states. As a result, the energy of the two-electron doubly excited state can be obtained with several different approaches. This is done within the adiabatic approximation of TDDFT, a realm in which the doubly excited state has been deemed missing. We report results on simple two-electron systems, including the energies and dipole moments for the two-electron excited states of H2 and HeH+. These results are compared to those obtained with the full configuration interaction method.

  7. Quantized adiabatic transport in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek Y H; Gong, Jiangbin

    2012-07-06

    Though topological aspects of energy bands are known to play a key role in quantum transport in solid-state systems, the implications of Floquet band topology for transport in momentum space (i.e., acceleration) have not been explored so far. Using a ratchet accelerator model inspired by existing cold-atom experiments, here we characterize a class of extended Floquet bands of one-dimensional driven quantum systems by Chern numbers, reveal topological phase transitions therein, and theoretically predict the quantization of adiabatic transport in momentum space. Numerical results confirm our theory and indicate the feasibility of experimental studies.

  8. Radiative electronic energy transfer-time studies of naphthalene-biacetyl system by one and two-photon excitation, and optical antenna mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bayrakceken, Fuat

    2005-04-01

    In principle, the optical energy absorbed by a complex molecule raises that molecule to one of its excited states, and afterwards this excitation energy decays through the relaxation channels. Initially, electronically excited naphthalene emits photons and these emitted photons are absorbed by the acceptor molecule biacetyl, then excited biacetyl fluoresces. In this investigation radiative energy transfer-time is measured in cyclohexane by one and two-photon excitations. The UV-vis spectrum of biacetyl vapor at room temperature conditions was broad and structureless.

  9. Effects of low-energy excitations on spectral properties at higher binding energy: the metal-insulator transition of VO(2).

    PubMed

    Gatti, Matteo; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Reining, Lucia

    2015-03-20

    The effects of electron interaction on spectral properties can be understood in terms of coupling between excitations. In transition-metal oxides, the spectral function close to the Fermi level and low-energy excitations between d states have attracted particular attention. In this work we focus on photoemission spectra of vanadium dioxide over a wide (10 eV) range of binding energies. We show that there are clear signatures of the metal-insulator transition over the whole range due to a cross coupling of the delocalized s and p states with low-energy excitations between the localized d states. This coupling can be understood by advanced calculations based on many-body perturbation theory in the GW approximation. We also advocate the fact that tuning the photon energy up to the hard-x-ray range can help to distinguish fingerprints of correlation from pure band-structure effects.

  10. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  11. Communication: On the competition between adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics in vibrationally mediated ammonia photodissociation in its A band

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Changjian; Zhu, Xiaolei; Yarkony, David R. E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Ma, Jianyi E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Xie, Daiqian E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Guo, Hua E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu E-mail: hguo@unm.edu

    2015-03-07

    Non-adiabatic processes play an important role in photochemistry, but the mechanism for conversion of electronic energy to chemical energy is still poorly understood. To explore the possibility of vibrational control of non-adiabatic dynamics in a prototypical photoreaction, namely, the A-band photodissociation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}), full-dimensional state-to-state quantum dynamics of symmetric or antisymmetric stretch excited NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}) is investigated on recently developed coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces. The experimentally observed H atom kinetic energy distributions are reproduced. However, contrary to previous inferences, the NH{sub 2}(A{sup ~2}A{sub 1})/NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) branching ratio is found to be small regardless of the initial preparation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}), while the internal state distribution of the preeminent fragment, NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}), is found to depend strongly on the initial vibrational excitation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}). The slow H atoms in photodissociation mediated by the antisymmetric stretch fundamental state are due to energy sequestered in the internally excited NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) fragment, rather than in NH{sub 2}(A{sup ~2}A{sub 1}) as previously proposed. The high internal excitation of the NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) fragment is attributed to the torques exerted on the molecule as it passes through the conical intersection seam to the ground electronic state of NH{sub 3}. Thus in this system, contrary to previous assertions, the control of electronic state branching by selective excitation of ground state vibrational modes is concluded to be ineffective. The juxtaposition of precise quantum mechanical results with complementary results based on quasi-classical surface hopping trajectories provides significant insights into the non-adiabatic process.

  12. Quantitative Förster resonance energy transfer efficiency measurements using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Sanam; Hannagan, John; Rigby, Paul; Pfleger, Kevin; Corry, Ben

    2013-02-01

    Accurate quantification of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using intensity-based methods is difficult due to the overlap of fluorophore excitation and emission spectra. Consequently, mechanisms are required to remove bleedthrough of the donor emission into the acceptor channel and direct excitation of the acceptor when aiming to excite only the donor fluorophores. Methods to circumvent donor bleedthrough using the unmixing of emission spectra have been reported, but these require additional corrections to account for direct excitation of the acceptor. Here we present an alternative method for robust quantification of FRET efficiencies based upon the simultaneous spectral unmixing of both excitation and emission spectra. This has the benefit over existing methodologies in circumventing the issue of donor bleedthrough and acceptor cross excitation without the need for additional corrections. Furthermore, we show that it is applicable with as few as two excitation wavelengths and so can be used for quantifying FRET efficiency in microscope images as easily as for data collected on a spectrofluorometer. We demonstrate the accuracy of the approach by reproducing efficiency values in well characterized FRET standards: HEK cells expressing a variety of linked cerulean and venus fluorescent proteins. Finally we describe simple ImageJ plugins that can be used to calculate and create images of FRET efficiencies from microscope images.

  13. Low-Scaling Quantum Chemistry Approach to Excited-State Properties via an ab Initio Exciton Model: Application to Excitation Energy Transfer in a Self-Assembled Nanotube.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Adrian F; Herbert, John M

    2015-11-05

    We introduce a charge-embedding scheme for an excited-state quantum chemistry method aimed at weakly interacting molecular aggregates. The Hamiltonian matrix for the aggregate is constructed in a basis of direct products of configuration-state functions for the monomers, and diagonalization of this matrix affords excitation energies within ∼0.2 eV of the corresponding supersystem calculation. Both the basis states and the coupling matrix elements can be computed in a distributed way, resulting in an algorithm whose time-to-solution is independent of the number of chromophores, and we report calculations on systems with almost 55 000 basis functions using fewer than 450 processors. In a semiconducting organic nanotube, we find evidence of ultrafast, coherent dynamics followed by energy localization driven by static disorder. Truncation of the model system has a qualitative effect on the energy-transfer dynamics, demonstrating the importance of simulating an extended portion of the nanotube, which is not feasible using traditional quantum chemistry.

  14. Excitation and photon decay of giant multipole resonances - the role and future of medium-energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.; Beene, J.R.; Horen, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of medium energy heavy ions provides very large cross sections and peak-to-continuum ratios for excitation of giant resonances. For energies above about 50 MeV/nucleon, giant resonances are excited primarily through Coulomb excitation, which is indifferent to isospin, thus providing a good probe for the study of isovector giant resonances. The extremely large cross sections available from heavy ion excitation permit the study of rare decay modes of the photon decay of giant resonances following excitation by 22 and 84 MeV/nucleon /sup 17/O projectiles. The singles results at 84 MeV/nucleon yield peak cross sections for the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance and the isovector giant dipole resonance of approximately 0.8 and 3 barns/sr, respectively. Data on the ground state decay of the isoscalar giant quadrupole and isovector giant dipole resonances are presented and compared with calculations. Decays to low-lying excited states are also discussed. Preliminary results from an experiment to isolate the /sup 208/Pb isovector quadrupole resonance using its gamma decay are presented.

  15. Vibrational excitation in CO by electron impact in the energy range 10-90 eV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Truhlar, D. G.; Williams, W.; Trajmar, S.

    1972-01-01

    The ratio of the scattering intensity for the v double prime = 1 excitation to the elastic scattering intensity at 40- and 80-deg scattering angles has been determined for 10- to 90-eV impact energies for electron scattering by CO. These ratio curves exhibit broad peaks near 20-eV impact energy which cannot be accounted for by plane-wave calculations based on potential scattering models. The peaks are indicative of a resonant excitation process (or processes) in the v double prime = 1 channel in the range from 15 to 25 eV.

  16. Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yan; Gou Bingcong; Chen Feng

    2011-09-28

    Energy levels, Auger branching ratios, and radiative rates of the core-excited states of B-like carbon are calculated by the saddle-point variation and saddle-point complex-rotation methods. Relativistic and mass polarization corrections are included using first-order perturbation theory. Calculated Auger channel energies and branching ratios are used to identify high-resolution Auger spectrum in the 300-keV C{sup +}{yields} CH{sub 4} collision experiment. It is found that Auger decay of these five-electron core-excited states gives significant contributions to Auger spectrum in the range of 238-280 eV.

  17. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2012-03-01

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  18. Excitation energy transfer in the LHC-II trimer: from carotenoids to chlorophylls in space and time.

    PubMed

    Martiskainen, Jari; Kananavičius, Robertas; Linnanto, Juha; Lehtivuori, Heli; Keränen, Mika; Aumanen, Viivi; Tkachenko, Nikolai; Korppi-Tommola, Jouko

    2011-02-01

    Exciton model for description of experimentally determined excitation energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophylls in the LHC-II trimer of spinach is presented. Such an approach allows connecting the excitonic states to the spatial structure of the complex and hence descriptions of advancements of the initially created excitations in space and time. Carotenoids were excited at 490 nm and at 500 nm and induced absorbance changes probed in the Chl Q(y) region to provide kinetic data that were interpreted by using the results from exciton calculations. Calculations included the 42 chlorophylls and the 12 carotenoids of the complex, Soret, Q(x) and Q(y) states of the chlorophylls, and the main absorbing S(2) state of the carotenoids. According to the calculations excitation at 500 nm populates mostly a mixed Lut S(2) Chl a Soret state, from where excitation is transferred to the Q(x) and Q(y) states of the Chl a's on the stromal side. Internal conversion of the mixed state to a mixed Lut S(1) and Chl a Q(y) state provides a channel for Lut S(1) to Chl a Q(y) energy transfer. The results from the calculations support a picture where excitation at 490 nm populates primarily a mixed neoxanthin S(2) Chl b Soret state. From this state excitation from neoxanthin is transferred to iso-energetic Chl b Soret states or via internal conversion to S(1) Chl b Q(y) states. From the Soret states excitation proceeds via internal conversion to Q(y) states of Chl b's mostly on the lumenal side. A rapid Chl b to Chl a transfer and subsequent transfer to the stromal side Chl a's and to the final state completes the process after 490 nm excitation. The interpretation is further supported by the fact that excitation energy transfer kinetics after excitation of neoxanthin at 490 nm and the Chl b Q(y) band at 647 nm (Linnanto et al., Photosynth Res 87:267-279, 2006) are very similar.

  19. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  20. Ground state spin and excitation energies in half-filled Lieb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţolea, M.; Niţǎ, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present detailed spectral calculations for small Lieb lattices having up to N =4 number of cells, in the regime of half-filling, an instance of particular relevance for the nanomagnetism of discrete systems such as quantum dot arrays, due to the degenerate levels at midspectrum. While for the Hubbard interaction model—and even number of sites—the ground state spin is given by the Lieb theorem, the inclusion of long-range interaction—or odd number of sites—makes the spin state not known a priori, which justifies our approach. We calculate also the excitation energies, which are of experimental importance, and find significant variation induced by the interaction potential. One obtains insights on the mechanisms involved that impose as ground state the Lieb state with lower spin rather than the Hund one with maximum spin for the degenerate levels, showing this in the first and second orders of the interaction potential for the smaller lattices. The analytical results agree with the numerical ones, which are performed by exact diagonalization calculations or by a combined mean-field and configuration interaction method. While the Lieb state is always lower in energy than the Hund state, for strong long-range interaction, when possible, another minimal spin state is imposed as ground state.

  1. Nanostructure protein repellant amphiphilic copolymer coatings with optimized surface energy by Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Sudhir; Pulpytel, Jérome; Ceccone, Giacomo; Lisboa, Patricia; Rossi, François; Kumar, Virendra; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2011-12-06

    Statistically designed amphiphilic copolymer coatings were deposited onto Thermanox, Si wafer, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) substrates via Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate and diethylene glycol vinyl ether in an Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma reactor. Plasma deposited amphiphilic coatings were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Water Contact Angle techniques. The surface energy of the coatings can be adjusted between 12 and 70 mJ/m(2). The roughness of the coatings can be tailored depending on the plasma mode used. A very smooth coating was deposited with a CW (continuous wave) power, whereas a rougher surface with R(a) in the range of 2 to 12 nm was deposited with the PW (pulsed wave) mode. The nanometer scale roughness of amphiphilic PFDA-co-DEGVE coatings was found to be in the range of the size of the two proteins namely BSA and lysozyme used to examine for the antifouling properties of the surfaces. The results show that the statistically designed surfaces, presenting a surface energy around 25 mJ/m(2), present no adhesion with respect to both proteins measured by QCM.

  2. Organic surfaces excited by low-energy ions: atomic collisions, molecular desorption and buckminsterfullerenes.

    PubMed

    Delcorte, Arnaud

    2005-10-07

    This article reviews the recent progress in the understanding of kiloelectronvolt particle interactions with organic solids, including atomic displacements in a light organic medium, vibrational excitation and desorption of fragments and entire molecules. This new insight is the result of a combination of theoretical and experimental approaches, essentially molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Classical MD simulations provide us with a detailed microscopic view of the processes occurring in the bombarded target, from the collision cascade specifics to the scenarios of molecular emission. Time-of-flight SIMS measures the mass and energy distributions of sputtered ionized fragments and molecular species, a precious source of information concerning their formation, desorption, ionization and delayed unimolecular dissociation in the gas phase. The mechanisms of energy transfer and sputtering are compared for bulk molecular solids, organic overlayers on metal and large molecules embedded in a low-molecular weight matrix. These comparisons help understand some of the beneficial effects of metal substrates and matrices for the analysis of molecules by SIMS. In parallel, I briefly describe the distinct ionization channels of molecules sputtered from organic solids and overlayers. The specific processes induced by polyatomic projectile bombardment, especially fullerenes, are discussed on the basis of new measurements and calculations. Finally, the perspective addresses the state-of-the-art and potential developments in the fields of surface modification and analysis of organic materials by kiloelectronvolt ion beams.

  3. Nonadiabatic Transitions in Adiabatic Rapid Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Optical forces much larger than the ordinary radiative force can be achieved on a two-level atom by multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage sweeps with counterpropagating light beams. Chirped light pulses drive the atom-laser system up a ladder of dressed state energy sheets on sequential trajectories, thereby decreasing the atomic kinetic energy. Nonadiabatic transitions between the energy sheets must be avoided for this process to be effective. We have calculated the nonadiabatic transition probability for various chirped light pulses numerically. These results were compared to the first Demkov-Kunike model and the well-known Landau-Zener model. In addition, an analytical form of the nonadiabatic transition probability has been found for linearly chirped pulses and an approximate form for generic symmetric finite-time pulses has been found for the entire parameter space using the technique of unitary integration. From this, the asymptotic transition probability in the adiabatic limit was derived. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005). Yu. Demkov and M. Kunike, Vestn. Leningr. Univ. Fis. Khim., 16, 39 (1969); K.-A. Suominen and B. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A45, 374 (1992)

  4. YIELDS OF IONS AND EXCITED STATES IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS EXPOSED TO X-RAYS OF 1 TO 30 KEV ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    1999-08-18

    When x-rays from a synchrotron source are absorbed in a liquid, the x-ray energy (E{sub x}) is converted by the photoelectric effect into the kinetic energy of the electrons released. For hydrocarbons, absorption by the K-electrons of carbon dominates. Thus the energy of the photoelectron (E{sub pe}) is E{sub x}-E{sub b}, where E{sub b} is the K-shell binding energy of carbon. Additional electrons with energy equal to E{sub b} is released in the Auger process that fills the hole in the K-shell. These energetic electrons will produce many ionizations, excitations and products. The consequences of the high density of ionizations and excitations along the track of the photoelectron and special effects near the K-edge are examined here.

  5. Theoretical Studies of Possible Synthetic Routes for the High Energy Density Material Td N4: Excited Electronic States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    Vertical electronic excitation energies for single states have been computed for the high energy density material (HEDM) Td N4 in order to assess possible synthetic routes that originate from excited electronic states of N2 molecules. Several ab initio theoretical approaches have been used, including complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF), state averaged CASSCF (SA-CASSCF), singles configuration interaction (CIS), CIS with second-order and third-order correlation corrections [CIS(D)) and CIS(3)], and linear response singles and doubles coupled-cluster (LRCCSD), which is the highest level of theory employed. Standard double zeta polarized (DZP) and triple zeta double polarized (TZ2P) one-particle basis sets were used. The CASSCF calculations are found to overestimate the excitation energies, while the SA-CASSCF approach rectifies this error to some extent, but not completely. The accuracy of the CIS calculations varied depending on the particular state, while the CIS(D), CIS(3), and LRCCSD results are in generally good agreement. Based on the LRCCSD calculations, the lowest six excited singlet states are 9.35(l(sup)T1), 10.01(l(sup)T2), 10.04(1(sup)A2), 10.07(1(sup)E), 10.12(2(sup)T1), and 10.42(2(sup)T2) eV above the ground state, respectively. Comparison of these excited state energies with the energies of possible excited states of N2+N2 fragments, leads us to propose that the most likely synthetic route for Td N4 involving this mechanism arises from combination of two bound quintet states of N2.

  6. Excitation energies, radiative and autoionization rates, dielectronic satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination rates for excited states of Yb-like W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, A. S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2012-04-01

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates for [Cd]4f145p65l‧nl, [Cd]4f145p66l″nl, [Cd]4f145p55d2nl, [Cd]4f145p55d6l″nl, [Cd]4f135p65d2nl and [Cd]4f135p65d6l″nl (l‧ = d, f, g, l″ = s, p, d, l = s, p, d, f, g and n = 5-7) states of Yb-like tungsten (W4 +) are calculated using the relativistic many-body perturbation theory method (RMBPT code), the multiconfiguration relativistic Hebrew University-Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC code) and the Hartree-Fock relativistic method (COWAN code). Branching ratios relative to the [Cd]4f145p65d, [Cd]4f145p66s and [Cd]4f145p66p thresholds in Tm-like tungsten and intensity factors are calculated for satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients are determined for the singly excited, as well as non-autoionizing core-excited states in Yb-like tungsten. Contributions from the autoionizing doubly excited states [Cd]4f145p65fnl, [Cd]4f145p66l″nl and core-excited [Cd]4f145p55d2nl, [Cd]4f145p55d6l″nl, [Cd]4f135p65d2nl, [Cd]4f135p65d6l″nl states (with n up to 100), which are particulary important for calculating the total DR rates, are estimated. Synthetic dielectronic satellite spectra from Yb-like W are simulated in a broad spectral range from 200 to 1400 Å. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of W4 + properties useful for a variety of applications including for fusion applications.

  7. Energy transfer in aminonaphthalimide-boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyads upon one- and two-photon excitation: applications for cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Collado, Daniel; Remón, Patricia; Vida, Yolanda; Najera, Francisco; Sen, Pratik; Pischel, Uwe; Perez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel

    2014-03-01

    Aminonaphthalimide-BODIPY energy transfer cassettes were found to show very fast (kEET ≈ 10(10)-10(11) s(-1) and efficient BODIPY fluorescence sensitization. This was observed upon one- and two-photon excitation, which extends the application range of the investigated bichromophoric dyads in terms of accessible excitation wavelengths. In comparison with the direct excitation of the BODIPY chromophore, the two-photon absorption cross-section δ of the dyads is significantly incremented by the presence of the aminonaphthalimide donor [δ ≈ 10 GM for the BODIPY versus 19-26 GM in the dyad at λ(exc)=840 nm; 1 GM (Goeppert-Mayer unit)=10(-50) cm(4) smolecule(-1) photon-(1)]. The electronic decoupling of the donor and acceptor, which is a precondition for the energy transfercassette concept, was demonstrated by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The applicability of the new probes in the one- and twophoton excitation mode was demonstrated in a proof-of-principle approach in the fluorescence imaging of HeLa cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the merging of multiphoton excitation with the energy transfer cassette concept for a BODIPY-containing dyad.

  8. Doubly excited states of water as studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy in coincidence with detecting Lyman-α photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Toshinori; Odagiri, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Lisa; Yachi, Kazufumi; Shigemura, Keisuke; Ohno, Naruhito; Hosaka, Kouichi; Kitajima, Masashi; Kouchi, Noriyuki

    2011-09-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum of H2O in coincidence with detecting Lyman-α photons (CoEELS) has been measured at the incident electron energy of 100 eV and electron scattering angle of 8° in the inner valence range in order to investigate the formation and decay of the doubly excited states. The present CoEELS has been compared with that at the infinite incident electron energy and 0° electron scattering angle, which was derived from the density of the dipole oscillator strength of H2O for the emission of the Lyman-α photons against the incident photon energy (Nakano et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 215206). It is remarkable that there exists a large difference in shape between these CoEELSs. This difference has turned out to be attributed to the noticeable contribution of the forbidden doubly excited states at 100 eV incident electron energy and 8° scattering angle. They lie at 25.0 and 27.4 eV and have been found out in this study. The differential cross sections for the excitation to the superexcited states resulting in H(2p) formation have been obtained at 100 eV and 8° and compared with those at the infinite energy and 0°. The electron collisions at 100 eV and 8° enhance the dissociative double excitation against the dissociative single excitation as compared with the electron collision at the infinite energy and 0°.

  9. Reduction of the virtual space for coupled-cluster excitation energies of large molecules and embedded systems.

    PubMed

    Send, Robert; Kaila, Ville R I; Sundholm, Dage

    2011-06-07

    We investigate how the reduction of the virtual space affects coupled-cluster excitation energies at the approximate singles and doubles coupled-cluster level (CC2). In this reduced-virtual-space (RVS) approach, all virtual orbitals above a certain energy threshold are omitted in the correlation calculation. The effects of the RVS approach are assessed by calculations on the two lowest excitation energies of 11 biochromophores using different sizes of the virtual space. Our set of biochromophores consists of common model systems for the chromophores of the photoactive yellow protein, the green fluorescent protein, and rhodopsin. The RVS calculations show that most of the high-lying virtual orbitals can be neglected without significantly affecting the accuracy of the obtained excitation energies. Omitting all virtual orbitals above 50 eV in the correlation calculation introduces errors in the excitation energies that are smaller than 0.1 eV. By using a RVS energy threshold of 50 eV, the CC2 calculations using triple-ζ basis sets (TZVP) on protonated Schiff base retinal are accelerated by a factor of 6. We demonstrate the applicability of the RVS approach by performing CC2/TZVP calculations on the lowest singlet excitation energy of a rhodopsin model consisting of 165 atoms using RVS thresholds between 20 eV and 120 eV. The calculations on the rhodopsin model show that the RVS errors determined in the gas-phase are a very good approximation to the RVS errors in the protein environment. The RVS approach thus renders purely quantum mechanical treatments of chromophores in protein environments feasible and offers an ab initio alternative to quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics separation schemes.

  10. Charge transfer and excitation in H++CH3 collisions below 10keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Masatoshi; Hida, Ken-Nosuke; Kimura, Mineo; Rai, Sachchida N.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Suno, Hiroya; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2008-07-01

    Charge transfer and electronic excitation in collisions of H+ ions with CH3 from a few tens of eV up to 10keV are theoretically investigated. The adiabatic potential energy curves and corresponding wave functions are calculated by using the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction method, and the scattering dynamics is studied based on the semiclassical impact parameter molecular-orbital close-coupling approach. Charge-transfer cross sections are found to be large and rather energy-dependent over the entire energy region studied. Electronic excitation is also energy-dependent with a sharp increase from below 10-17to10-16cm2 . Most of the molecular products produced through charge transfer or excitation are known to be unstable and undergo fragmentation producing various hydrocarbon radical species. Hence, identification of fragmented species and their production mechanism are important for spectroscopic analysis.

  11. Time-resolved X-ray measurements of energy relaxation in ultrafast laser excited semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo Heyong

    In semiconductors, the properties and dynamics of photoexcited carriers and subsequent energy relaxation through lattice vibrations are quite complex and occur on a variety of time scales. Typically the transient dynamics involving transitions of electrons from lower energy states to higher ones upon photoexcitation take place almost instantaneously. The electrons eventually recombine with holes while losing most of their kinetic energy to the lattice through various routes at different time scales. The lattice relaxation processes, especially at high photoexcitation levels, have been subjected to numerous experimental and theoretical investigations during past decades. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXD) method provides a novel tool for studying these dynamics because X-rays have short wavelength, long material penetration depth and relatively strong interaction with core electrons. In my work, femtosecond laser pulses excite electrons in opaque materials, and subsequent carrier relaxation process and coherent/incoherent lattice dynamics are investigated using TRXD. My thesis covers quantitative detail of the generation and propagation of ultrafast laser induces acoustic strain waves in bulk semiconductor materials as well as at the heterostructure interface. In particular propagation of strain waves, which are comprised of broadband low wave vector phonons, is studied in an AlGaAs/GaAs multilayer structure. The spatial and temporal profiles of the acoustic waves at varying photoexcitation density are characterized. We are able to distinguish thermal from carrier-induced strain and measure the free-carrier absorption cross-section. The approximation that impulsively generated acoustic waves are uniaxial is found to break down. The research also demonstrates a novel approach to explore laser induced acoustic phonon dynamics at high wavevector, near the Brillouin zone-boundary, the details of which are inaccessible to optical pump-probe methods. Throughout this

  12. New Fluorescence Parameters for the Determination of QA Redox State and Excitation Energy Fluxes.

    PubMed

    Kramer, David M; Johnson, Giles; Kiirats, Olavi; Edwards, Gerald E

    2004-02-01

    A number of useful photosynthetic parameters are commonly derived from saturation pulse-induced fluorescence analysis. We show, that qP, an estimate of the fraction of open centers, is based on a pure 'puddle' antenna model, where each Photosystem (PS) II center possesses its own independent antenna system. This parameter is incompatible with more realistic models of the photosynthetic unit, where reaction centers are connected by shared antenna, that is, the so-called 'lake' or 'connected units' models. We thus introduce a new parameter, qL, based on a Stern-Volmer approach using a lake model, which estimates the fraction of open PS II centers. We suggest that qL should be a useful parameter for terrestrial plants consistent with a high connectivity of PS II units, whereas some marine species with distinct antenna architecture, may require the use of more complex parameters based on intermediate models of the photosynthetic unit. Another useful parameter calculated from fluorescence analysis is ΦII, the yield of PS II. In contrast to qL, we show that the ΦII parameter can be derived from either a pure 'lake' or pure 'puddle' model, and is thus likely to be a robust parameter. The energy absorbed by PS II is divided between the fraction used in photochemistry, ΦII, and that lost non-photochemically. We introduce two additional parameters that can be used to estimate the flux of excitation energy into competing non-photochemical pathways, the yield induced by downregulatory processes, ΦNPQ, and the yield for other energy losses, ΦNO.

  13. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  14. Nuclear level densities below 40 MeV excitation energy in the mass region A ≃ 50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Ivaşcu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1990-09-01

    Consistent pre-equilibrium emission and statistical model calculations of fast neutron induced reaction cross sections are used to validate nuclear level densities for excitation energies up to 40 MeV in the mass region A ≃50. A “composed” level density approach has been employed by using the back-shifted Fermi gas model for excitation energies lower than 12 MeV and a realistic analytical formula for higher excitations. In the transition region from the BSFG model range to that of full applicability of the realistic formula, an interpolation between the predictions of the two models is adopted. The interpolation rule, suggested by microscopic level density calculations, has been validated through the comparison of the calculated and experimental cross sections.

  15. Beller Lectureship Talk: Ultrafast Excitation Energy Transfer and the Mechanism of Non-Photochemical Quenching in Plant Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-03-01

    The success of photosynthesis relies on two ultrafast processes: excitation energy transfer in the light-harvesting antenna followed by charge separation in the reaction center. LHCII, the peripheral light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II, plays a major role. At the same time, the same light-harvesting system can be `switched' into a quenching state, which effectively protects the reaction center of Photosystem II from over-excitation and photodamage. In this talk I will demonstrate how LHCII collects and transfers excitation energy. Using single molecule spectroscopy we have discovered how LHCII can switch between this light-harvesting state, a quenched state and a red-shifted state. We show that the switching properties between the light-harvesting state and the quenched state depend strongly on the environmental conditions, where the quenched state is favoured under `NPQ-like' conditions. It is argued that this is the mechanism of non-photochemical quenching in plants.

  16. Surface plasmon excitations in metal spheres: Direct comparison of light scattering and electron energy-loss spectroscopy by modal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Sean M.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2013-06-01

    In previous publications, qualitative agreement between studies of surface plasmon excitations in nanoparticles by near-field light scattering and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has been found for experiments and simulations. Here, we present a quantitative method for the comparison of light scattering and EELS for surface plasmons in metal spheres. Defining the Fourier transform of the modal component of the scattered electric field along the equivalent electron trajectory enables a direct evaluation of the relative weighting factor for light- and electron-excited surface plasmon modes. This common quantity for light scattering and EELS is examined for size, composition, and trajectory dependencies, facilitating the analysis of key differences between light and electron excitation. A single functional dependence on Drude model plasmon energies is identified to explain the relative modal weighting factors for light scattering and EELS. This method represents an important step toward the complete spectral and spatial reconstruction of EELS maps from near-field light scattering calculations.

  17. MLCT excited states at interfaces and in rigid media: Applications in energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2014-10-31

    In this proposal for continued support from the DOE, we propose to build on our understanding of light-driven electron transfer by molecules and molecular assemblies on oxide surfaces. We will conduct a systematic investigation of injection and back electron transfer dynamics on the surfaces of thin (1-10 μm), mesoporous, transparent conducting oxide films consisting of 10-20 nm tin-doped indium oxide (Sn:In2O3, ITO)) nanoparticles. These materials are unique because they mimic the morphology, surface area, and oxide nature of conventional mesoporous, nanocrystalline metal oxide thin films such as TiO2, SnO2, and NiO used in DSSC and DSPEC applications but they are conductive with high electron mobilities (0.1-10 cm2 V-1 s-1) and conductivities (101-104 Ω-1 cm-1) over a wide range of applied potentials. Their high conductivities and metallic behavior allow the Fermi level at nanoparticle surfaces to be tuned systematically by varying an applied bias. We will investigate injection, intra-assembly, and back electron transfer dynamics on nanoITO by transient absorption measurements on the picosecond to millisecond timescales. One series of experiments will build on initial results from DOE-supported research and focus on the bias- and medium-dependence of interfacial electron transfer by surface-bound molecular chromophores to investigate: i) the bias dependence of injection and back electron transfer, ii) injection by short-lived, otherwise inaccessible excited-states, and iii) medium effects. In parallel, we will investigate the dynamic interfacial properties of nanoITO-bound molecular assemblies designed for photogalvanic solar energy conversion. These studies will focus on surface-prepared, layer-by-layer donor-chromophore-acceptor assemblies in which inter-molecular excited-state quenching leads to redox separation as opposed to interfacial electron transfer quenching by the semiconductor material. Transient absorption measurements performed on nano

  18. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  19. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  20. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  1. Excitation energy pathways in the photosynthetic units of reaction center LM- and H-subunit deletion mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Amarie, Sergiu; Lupo, Domenico; Lenz, Martin O; Saegesser, Rudolf; Ghosh, Robin; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2010-03-01

    Light-induced reaction dynamics of isolated photosynthetic membranes obtained from wild-type (WT) and reaction center (RC)-subunit deletion strains SPUHK1 (an H-subunit deletion mutant) and SK Delta LM (an (L+M) deletion mutant) of the purple non-sulphur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum have been investigated by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Upon excitation of the spirilloxanthin (Spx) S(2) state at 546 nm, of the bacteriochlorophyll Soret band at 388 nm and probing spectral regions, which are characteristic for carotenoids, similar dynamics in the SPUHK1, SK Delta LM and WT strains could be observed. The excitation of Spx S(2) is followed by the simultaneous population of the lower singlet excited states S(1) and S* which decay with lifetimes of 1.4 and 5 ps, respectively for the mutants, and 1.4 and 4 ps, respectively, for the wild-type. The excitation of the BChl Soret band is followed by relaxation into BChl lower excited states which compete with excitation energy transfer BChl-to-Spx. The deexcitation pathway BChl(Soret) --> Spx(S(2)) --> Spx(S(1)) occurs with the same transition rate for all investigated samples (WT, SPUHK1 and SK Delta LM). The kinetic traces measured for the Spx S(1) --> S(N) transition display similar behaviour for all samples showing a positive signal which increases within the first 400 fs (i.e. the time needed for the excitation energy to reach the Spx S(1) excited state) and decays with a lifetime of about 1.5 ps. This suggests that the Spx excited state dynamics in the investigated complexes do not differ significantly. Moreover, a longer excited state lifetime of BChl for SPUHK1 in comparison to WT was observed, consistent with a photochemical quenching channel present in the presence of RC. For long delay times, photobleaching of the RC special pair and an electrochromic blue shift of the monomeric BChl a can be observed only for the WT but not for the mutants. The close similarity of the excited state decay

  2. Energy Dependence of the Ruthenium(II)-Bipyridine Metal-to-Ligand-Charge-Transfer Excited State Radiative Lifetimes: Effects of ππ*(bipyridine) Mixing.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ryan A; Tsai, Chia Nung; Mazumder, Shivnath; Lu, I Chen; Lord, Richard L; Schlegel, H Bernhard; Chen, Yuan Jang; Endicott, John F

    2015-06-18

    The variations in band shape with excited state energy found for the triplet metal to ligand charge transfer ((3)MLCT) emission spectra of ruthenium-bipyridine (Ru-bpy) chromophores at 77 K have been postulated to arise from excited state/excited state configurational mixing. This issue is more critically examined through the determination of the excited state energy dependence of the radiative rate constants (kRAD) for these emissions. Experimental values for kRAD were determined relative to known literature references for Ru-bpy complexes. When the lowest energy excited states are metal centered, kRAD can be anomalously small and such complexes have been identified using density functional theory (DFT) modeling. When such complexes are removed from the energy correlation, there is a strong (3)MLCT energy-dependent contribution to kRAD in addition to the expected classical energy cubed factor for complexes with excited state energies greater than 10 000 cm(-1). This correlates with the DFT calculations which show significant excited state electronic delocalization between a π(bpy-orbital) and a half-filled dπ*-(Ru(III)-orbital) for Ru-bpy complexes with (3)MLCT excited state energies greater than about 16 000 cm(-1). Overall, this work implicates the "stealing" of emission bandshapes as well as intensity from the higher energy, strongly allowed bpy-centered singlet ππ* excited state.

  3. Accurate and efficient calculation of excitation energies with the active-space particle-particle random phase approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Du; Yang, Weitao

    2016-10-13

    An efficient method for calculating excitation energies based on the particle-particle random phase approximation (ppRPA) is presented. Neglecting the contributions from the high-lying virtual states and the low-lying core states leads to the significantly smaller active-space ppRPA matrix while keeping the error to within 0.05 eV from the corresponding full ppRPA excitation energies. The resulting computational cost is significantly reduced and becomes less than the construction of the non-local Fock exchange potential matrix in the self-consistent-field (SCF) procedure. With only a modest number of active orbitals, the original ppRPA singlet-triplet (ST) gaps as well as the low-lying single and doublemore » excitation energies can be accurately reproduced at much reduced computational costs, up to 100 times faster than the iterative Davidson diagonalization of the original full ppRPA matrix. For high-lying Rydberg excitations where the Davidson algorithm fails, the computational savings of active-space ppRPA with respect to the direct diagonalization is even more dramatic. The virtues of the underlying full ppRPA combined with the significantly lower computational cost of the active-space approach will significantly expand the applicability of the ppRPA method to calculate excitation energies at a cost of O(K^{4}), with a prefactor much smaller than a single SCF Hartree-Fock (HF)/hybrid functional calculation, thus opening up new possibilities for the quantum mechanical study of excited state electronic structure of large systems.« less

  4. Accurate and efficient calculation of excitation energies with the active-space particle-particle random phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Du; Yang, Weitao

    2016-10-13

    An efficient method for calculating excitation energies based on the particle-particle random phase approximation (ppRPA) is presented. Neglecting the contributions from the high-lying virtual states and the low-lying core states leads to the significantly smaller active-space ppRPA matrix while keeping the error to within 0.05 eV from the corresponding full ppRPA excitation energies. The resulting computational cost is significantly reduced and becomes less than the construction of the non-local Fock exchange potential matrix in the self-consistent-field (SCF) procedure. With only a modest number of active orbitals, the original ppRPA singlet-triplet (ST) gaps as well as the low-lying single and double excitation energies can be accurately reproduced at much reduced computational costs, up to 100 times faster than the iterative Davidson diagonalization of the original full ppRPA matrix. For high-lying Rydberg excitations where the Davidson algorithm fails, the computational savings of active-space ppRPA with respect to the direct diagonalization is even more dramatic. The virtues of the underlying full ppRPA combined with the significantly lower computational cost of the active-space approach will significantly expand the applicability of the ppRPA method to calculate excitation energies at a cost of O(K^{4}), with a prefactor much smaller than a single SCF Hartree-Fock (HF)/hybrid functional calculation, thus opening up new possibilities for the quantum mechanical study of excited state electronic structure of large systems.

  5. Accurate and efficient calculation of excitation energies with the active-space particle-particle random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Du; Yang, Weitao

    2016-10-01

    An efficient method for calculating excitation energies based on the particle-particle random phase approximation (ppRPA) is presented. Neglecting the contributions from the high-lying virtual states and the low-lying core states leads to the significantly smaller active-space ppRPA matrix while keeping the error to within 0.05 eV from the corresponding full ppRPA excitation energies. The resulting computational cost is significantly reduced and becomes less than the construction of the non-local Fock exchange potential matrix in the self-consistent-field (SCF) procedure. With only a modest number of active orbitals, the original ppRPA singlet-triplet (ST) gaps as well as the low-lying single and double excitation energies can be accurately reproduced at much reduced computational costs, up to 100 times faster than the iterative Davidson diagonalization of the original full ppRPA matrix. For high-lying Rydberg excitations where the Davidson algorithm fails, the computational savings of active-space ppRPA with respect to the direct diagonalization is even more dramatic. The virtues of the underlying full ppRPA combined with the significantly lower computational cost of the active-space approach will significantly expand the applicability of the ppRPA method to calculate excitation energies at a cost of O(K4), with a prefactor much smaller than a single SCF Hartree-Fock (HF)/hybrid functional calculation, thus opening up new possibilities for the quantum mechanical study of excited state electronic structure of large systems.

  6. Digital waveguide adiabatic passage part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Jesse A.; Steel, M. J.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  7. Energy-Specific Equation-of-Motion Coupled-Cluster Methods for High-Energy Excited States: Application to K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Lestrange, Patrick J; Goings, Joshua J; Caricato, Marco; Li, Xiaosong

    2015-09-08

    Single-reference techniques based on coupled-cluster (CC) theory, in the forms of linear response (LR) or equation of motion (EOM), are highly accurate and widely used approaches for modeling valence absorption spectra. Unfortunately, these equations with singles and doubles (LR-CCSD and EOM-CCSD) scale as O(N⁶), which may be prohibitively expensive for the study of high-energy excited states using a conventional eigensolver. In this paper, we present an energy-specific non-Hermitian eigensolver that is able to obtain high-energy excited states (e.g., XAS K-edge spectrum) at low computational cost. In addition, we also introduce an improved trial vector for iteratively solving the EOM-CCSD equation with a focus on high-energy eigenstates. The energy-specific EOM-CCSD approach and its low-scaling alternatives are applied to calculations of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur K-edge excitations. The results are compared to other implementations of CCSD for excited states, energy-specific linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and experimental results with multiple statistical metrics are presented and evaluated.

  8. A semi-classical approach to the calculation of highly excited rotational energies for asymmetric-top molecules.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Schlemmer, Stephan; Yurchenko, Sergey N; Yachmenev, Andrey; Jensen, Per

    2017-01-18

    We report a new semi-classical method to compute highly excited rotational energy levels of an asymmetric-top molecule. The method forgoes the idea of a full quantum mechanical treatment of the ro-vibrational motion of the molecule. Instead, it employs a semi-classical Green's function approach to describe the rotational motion, while retaining a quantum mechanical description of the vibrations. Similar approaches have existed for some time, but the method proposed here has two novel features. First, inspired by the path integral method, periodic orbits in the phase space and tunneling paths are naturally obtained by means of molecular symmetry analysis. Second, the rigorous variational method is employed for the first time to describe the molecular vibrations. In addition, we present a new robust approach to generating rotational energy surfaces for vibrationally excited states; this is done in a fully quantum-mechanical, variational manner. The semi-classical approach of the present work is applied to calculating the energies of very highly excited rotational states and it reduces dramatically the computing time as well as the storage and memory requirements when compared to the fullly quantum-mechanical variational approach. Test calculations for excited states of SO2 yield semi-classical energies in very good agreement with the available experimental data and the results of fully quantum-mechanical calculations.

  9. A semi-classical approach to the calculation of highly excited rotational energies for asymmetric-top molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Schlemmer, Stephan; Yurchenko, Sergey N.; Yachmenev, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    We report a new semi-classical method to compute highly excited rotational energy levels of an asymmetric-top molecule. The method forgoes the idea of a full quantum mechanical treatment of the ro-vibrational motion of the molecule. Instead, it employs a semi-classical Green's function approach to describe the rotational motion, while retaining a quantum mechanical description of the vibrations. Similar approaches have existed for some time, but the method proposed here has two novel features. First, inspired by the path integral method, periodic orbits in the phase space and tunneling paths are naturally obtained by means of molecular symmetry analysis. Second, the rigorous variational method is employed for the first time to describe the molecular vibrations. In addition, we present a new robust approach to generating rotational energy surfaces for vibrationally excited states; this is done in a fully quantum-mechanical, variational manner. The semi-classical approach of the present work is applied to calculating the energies of very highly excited rotational states and it reduces dramatically the computing time as well as the storage and memory requirements when compared to the fullly quantum-mechanical variational approach. Test calculations for excited states of SO2 yield semi-classical energies in very good agreement with the available experimental data and the results of fully quantum-mechanical calculations. PMID:28000807

  10. The genesis of adiabatic shear bands

    PubMed Central

    Landau, P.; Osovski, S.; Venkert, A.; Gärtnerová, V.; Rittel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a unique dynamic failure mechanism that results in an unpredicted catastrophic failure due to a concentrated shear deformation mode. It is universally considered as a material or structural instability and as such, ASB is hardly controllable or predictable to some extent. ASB is modeled on the premise of stability analyses. The leading paradigm is that a competition between strain (rate) hardening and thermal softening determines the onset of the failure. It was recently shown that microstructural softening transformations, such as dynamic recrystallization, are responsible for adiabatic shear failure. These are dictated by the stored energy of cold work, so that energy considerations can be used to macroscopically model the failure mechanism. The initial mechanisms that lead to final failure are still unknown, as well as the ASB formation mechanism(s). Most of all - is ASB an abrupt instability or rather a gradual transition as would be dictated by microstructural evolutions? This paper reports thorough microstructural characterizations that clearly show the gradual character of the phenomenon, best described as a nucleation and growth failure mechanism, and not as an abrupt instability as previously thought. These observations are coupled to a simple numerical model that illustrates them. PMID:27849023

  11. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  12. Non-Adiabatic Dynamics of ICN-(Ar)n and BrCN-(Ar)n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opoku-Agyeman, Bernice; McCoy, Anne B.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the photodissociation of ICN-(Ar)n and BrCN-(Ar)n following electronic excitation to states that dissociate into X- + CN and X* + CN- (X = I or Br) using classical dynamics approaches. Observations made from previous experiments and calculations of these anions demonstrated that non-adiabatic effects are important in the photodissociation process and are reflected in the branching ratios of the photoproducts. The addition of an argon atom is expected to shift the relative energies of these excited states, thereby altering the product branching. Interestingly, experimental studies show that electronically exciting ICN- solvated with even a single argon atom leads to a small fraction of the products recombine to form ICN-.a In this study, the dynamics are carried out using classical mechanics, treating the non-adiabatic effect with a surface hopping algorithm. We assess the accuracy of this approach by first calculating the branching ratios for the bare anions and comparing the results to those from quantum dynamics calculations.a,b Once the results from both the quantum and classical dynamics are shown to be consistent, the classical dynamics simulations are extended to the argon solvated anions. S. Case, E. M. Miller, J. P. Martin, Y. J. Lu, L. Sheps, A. B. McCoy, and W. C. Lineberger, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 51, 2651 (2012). B. Opoku-Agyeman, A. S. Case, J. H. Lehman, W. Carl Lineberger and A. B. McCoy, J. Chem Phys. 141, 084305 (2014). J. C. Tully, J. Chem Phys. 93, 1061 (1990).

  13. The structure of the high-energy spin excitations in YBa2Cu3O6+x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    The most obvious feature in the magnetic excitations of high-Tc superconductors is the so-called `resonance-mode'. This mode is strongly coupled to the superconductivity, however, it has not been found in the La2-x(Ba,Sr)xCuO4 family and is not universally present in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to characterize other excitations at higher energies which may be relevant to the superconductive pairing in YBa2Cu3O6.6. We observe a square-shaped continuum of excitations in reciprocal space [1]. These excitations have energies greater than the superconducting pairing energy, are present at Tc, and have spectral weight far exceeding that of the `resonance'. The discovery of similar excitations in La2-xBaxCuO4 [2] suggests that they are a general property of the copper oxides, and a candidate for mediating the electron pairing. Our data show that the high-energy magnetic excitations in the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6.6 consists of a continuum of scattering bounded by a square and peaked at wavevector positions Qɛ =(1/2±ɛ,1/2±ɛ) and (1/2±ɛ,1/2ɛ). A similar structure is observed in the high-energy magnetic excitations of the magnetically ordered but weakly superconducting compound La1.85Ba0.125CuO4 [2]. This suggests there is universality, both in the low-energy and the high-energy spin dynamics between two very different classes of high-Tc superconductor. [1] S.M. Hayden, H.A. Mook, P.C. Dai, T.G. Perring, and F. Dogan, Nature 429, 531-534 (2004) [2] J.M. Tranquada, H. Woo, T.G. Perring, H. Goka, G.D. Gu , G. Xu, M. Fujita, K.Yamada K, Nature 429, 534-538 (2004).

  14. Dipole polarizability, sum rules, mean excitation energies, and long-range dispersion coefficients for buckminsterfullerene C 60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2011-11-01

    Experimental photoabsorption cross-sections combined with constraints provided by the Kuhn-Reiche-Thomas sum rule and the high-energy behavior of the dipole-oscillator-strength density are used to construct dipole oscillator strength distributions for buckminsterfullerene (C60). The distributions are used to predict dipole sum rules Sk, mean excitation energies Ik, the frequency dependent polarizability, and C6 coefficients for the long-range dipole-dipole interactions of C60 with a variety of atoms and molecules.

  15. EFFECTS OF THE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY ON THE MASER INSTABILITY EXCITED BY LOWER ENERGY CUTOFF BEHAVIOR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H. E-mail: djwu@pmo.ac.cn

    2011-02-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) conventionally driven by velocity anisotropies of energetic electrons trapped in magnetic fields is one of the most important radio-emission mechanisms in astrophysics. Recently, Wu and Tang proposed that a proper lower energy cutoff behavior of power-law electrons can effectively excite the ECM emission. This paper considers effects of temperature anisotropy on this new ECM mechanism. The results show that the growth rates of the ECM emissions increase with {beta}{sub perpendicular0} and {beta}{sub ||0}, where {beta}{sub perpendicular0} and {beta}{sub ||0} are the perpendicular and parallel velocity spreads (in units of the light velocity c) of the energetic electron beam, respectively. Moreover, the growth rates of O1 and X2 modes both sensitively depend on the ratio of the electron-cyclotron frequency to the plasma frequency {Omega} and reach their extremum values at {Omega} {approx_equal} 1.5 for the O1 mode and at {Omega} {approx_equal} 1.0 for the X2 mode. Meanwhile, as the mean velocity of the electron beam {beta}{sub s} (in units of c) increases, the growth rate of the O1 mode remains approximately constant and that of the X2 mode decreases considerably.

  16. Potential energy curves for the ground and low-lying excited states of CuAg

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Davood; Shayesteh, Alireza E-mail: ashayesteh@ut.ac.ir; Jamshidi, Zahra E-mail: ashayesteh@ut.ac.ir

    2014-10-21

    The ground and low-lying excited states of heteronuclear diatomic CuAg are examined by multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) method. Relativistic effects were treated and probed in two steps. Scalar terms were considered using the spin-free DKH Hamiltonian as a priori and spin-orbit coupling was calculated perturbatively via the spin-orbit terms of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian based on MRCI wavefunctions. Potential energy curves of the spin-free states and their corresponding Ω components correlating with the separated atom limits {sup 2}S(Cu) + {sup 2}S(Ag) and {sup 2}D(Cu) + {sup 2}S(Ag) are obtained. The results are in fine agreement with the experimental measurements and tentative conclusions for the ion-pair B0{sup +} state are confirmed by our theoretical calculations. Illustrative results are presented to reveal the relative importance and magnitude of the scalar and spin-orbit effects on the spectroscopic properties of this molecule. Time dependent density functional theory calculations, using the LDA, BLYP, B3LYP, and SAOP functionals have been carried out for CuAg and the accuracy of TD-DFT has been compared with ab initio results.

  17. Electron-impact excitation and ionization of atomic boron at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of electron collisions with neutral boron atoms. The calculations were performed with the B-Spline R-matrix (close-coupling) method, by employing a parallelized version of the associated computer code. Elastic, excitation, and ionization cross sections were obtained for all transitions involving the lowest 11 states of boron, for incident electron energies ranging from threshold to 100 eV. A multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal term-dependent orbitals was used to generate accurate wave functions for the target states. Close-coupling expansions including 13, 51, and 999 physical and pseudo states were set up to check the sensitivity of the predictions to variations in the theoretical model. The cross-section dataset generated in this work is expected to be the most accurate one available today and should be sufficiently comprehensive for most modeling applications involving neutral boron. Work supported by the China Scholarship Council and the United States National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1403245 and PHY-1520970, and by the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031.

  18. Unequal allocation of excitation energy between photosystem II and I reduces cyanolichen photosynthesis in blue light.

    PubMed

    Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Xie, Li; Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthesis was compared in two cyanobacterial lichens (Lobaria hallii and Peltigera praetextata) and two green algal lichens (Lobaria pulmonaria and Peltigera leucophlebia) exposed to red, green or blue light. Cyanolichens had substantially lower photosynthetic CO(2) uptake and O(2) evolution than the green algal lichens in blue light, but slightly higher photosynthesis in red and green light. The effective quantum yield of photosystem (PS) II (Φ(PSII)) decreased with increasing red and green light for all species, but in blue light this response occurred in green algal lichens only. Cyanolichen Φ(PSII) increased with increasing blue light at low irradiances, but decreased at stronger exposures. However, after adding red light the efficiency of blue light for photosynthetic O(2) evolution increased by 2.4 times. Because phycobilisomes associated with PSII have a low blue light absorption, our results are consistent with blue light absorption mainly by Chl in PSI. Thereby, unequal allocation of excitation energy between PSII and PSI results in low cyanolichen photosynthesis under blue light. This is new knowledge in the science of lichenology with important implications for e.g. the reliability of using Chl fluorometers with blue light for cyanolichens.

  19. Optimal load resistance of a randomly excited nonlinear electromagnetic energy harvester with Coulomb friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y. P.; Wang, Y.; Jin, X. L.; Huang, Z. L.

    2014-09-01

    A nonlinear electromagnetic energy harvester directly powering a load resistance is considered in this manuscript. The nonlinearity includes the cubic stiffness and the unavoidable Coulomb friction, and the base excitation is confined to Gaussian white noise. Directly starting from the coupled equations, a novel procedure to evaluate the random responses and the mean output power is developed through the generalized harmonic transformation and the equivalent non-linearization technique. The dependence of the optimal ratio of the load resistance to the internal resistance and the associated optimal mean output power on the internal resistance of the coil is established. The principle of impedance matching is correct only when the internal resistance is infinity, and the optimal mean output power approaches an upper limit as the internal resistance is close to zero. The influence of the Coulomb friction on the optimal resistance ratio and the optimal mean output power is also investigated. It is proved that the Coulomb friction almost does not change the optimal resistance ratio although it prominently reduces the optimal mean output power.

  20. Tensor numerical methods in quantum chemistry: from Hartree-Fock to excitation energies.

    PubMed

    Khoromskaia, Venera; Khoromskij, Boris N

    2015-12-21

    We resume the recent successes of the grid-based tensor numerical methods and discuss their prospects in real-space electronic structure calculations. These methods, based on the low-rank representation of the multidimensional functions and integral operators, first appeared as an accurate tensor calculus for the 3D Hartree potential using 1D complexity operations, and have evolved to entirely grid-based tensor-structured 3D Hartree-Fock eigenvalue solver. It benefits from tensor calculation of the core Hamiltonian and two-electron integrals (TEI) in O(n log n) complexity using the rank-structured approximation of basis functions, electron densities and convolution integral operators all represented on 3D n × n × n Cartesian grids. The algorithm for calculating TEI tensor in a form of the Cholesky decomposition is based on multiple factorizations using algebraic 1D "density fitting" scheme, which yield an almost irreducible number of product basis functions involved in the 3D convolution integrals, depending on a threshold ε > 0. The basis functions are not restricted to separable Gaussians, since the analytical integration is substituted by high-precision tensor-structured numerical quadratures. The tensor approaches to post-Hartree-Fock calculations for the MP2 energy correction and for the Bethe-Salpeter excitation energies, based on using low-rank factorizations and the reduced basis method, were recently introduced. Another direction is towards the tensor-based Hartree-Fock numerical scheme for finite lattices, where one of the numerical challenges is the summation of electrostatic potentials of a large number of nuclei. The 3D grid-based tensor method for calculation of a potential sum on a L × L × L lattice manifests the linear in L computational work, O(L), instead of the usual O(L(3) log L) scaling by the Ewald-type approaches.

  1. Improvement of energy efficiency via spectrum optimization of excitation sequence for multichannel simultaneously triggered airborne sonar system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-Hao; Yao, Zhen-Jing; Peng, Han-Yang

    2009-12-01

    Both the energy efficiency and correlation characteristics are important in airborne sonar systems to realize multichannel ultrasonic transducers working together. High energy efficiency can increase echo energy and measurement range, and sharp autocorrelation and flat cross correlation can help eliminate cross-talk among multichannel transducers. This paper addresses energy efficiency optimization under the premise that cross-talk between different sonar transducers can be avoided. The nondominated sorting genetic algorithm-II is applied to optimize both the spectrum and correlation characteristics of the excitation sequence. The central idea of the spectrum optimization is to distribute most of the energy of the excitation sequence within the frequency band of the sonar transducer; thus, less energy is filtered out by the transducers. Real experiments show that a sonar system consisting of eight-channel Polaroid 600 series electrostatic transducers excited with 2 ms optimized pulse-position-modulation sequences can work together without cross-talk and can measure distances up to 650 cm with maximal 1% relative error.

  2. Influence of site-dependent pigment-protein interactions on excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Eva; Montemayor, Daniel; Masia, Marco; Coker, David F

    2013-05-09

    A site-dependent spectral density system-bath model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen (FMO) pigment-protein complex is developed using results from ground-state molecular mechanics simulations together with a partial charge difference model for how the long-range contributions to the chromophore excitation energies fluctuate with environmental configuration. A discussion of how best to consistently process the chromophore excitation energy fluctuation correlation functions calculated in these classical simulations to obtain reliable site-dependent spectral densities is presented. The calculations reveal that chromophores that are close to the protein-water interface can experience strongly dissipative environmental interactions characterized by reorganization energies that can be as much as 2-3 times those of chromophores that are buried deep in the hydrophobic protein scaffolding. Using a linearized density matrix quantum propagation method, we demonstrate that the inhomogeneous system-bath model obtained from our site-dependent spectral density calculations gives results consistent with experimental dissipation and dephasing rates. Moreover, we show that this model can simultaneously enhance the energy-transfer rate and extend the decoherence time. Finally, we explore the influence of initially exciting different chromophores and mutating local environments on energy transfer through the network. These studies suggest that different pathways, selected by varying initial photoexcitation, can exhibit significantly different relaxation times depending on whether the energy-transfer path involves chromophores at the protein-solvent interface or if all chromophores in the pathway are buried in the protein.

  3. Two-photon excitation into low-energy singlet states of anthracene in mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, A.; Leyderman, A.; Taliani, C.

    1985-08-01

    The two-photon excitation spectrum of the first excited state of anthracene in fluorene and biphenyl at 4.2 K has been measured. Intensity is induced into the origin by the static dipole moment of fluorene, and into b 1u vibrons through coupling to an A g state near 29400 cm -1; the nature of this A g state is discussed.

  4. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n, f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verriere, M.

    2016-05-13

    Here, accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics.

  5. Relative spins and excitation energies of superdeformed bands in {sup 190}Hg: Further evidence for octupole vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, B.; Carpenter, M.; Janssens, R.; Blumenthal, D.; Timar, J.; Wilson, A.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. |; Nakatsukasa, T.; Ahmad, I.; Astier, A.; Azaiez, F.; du Croux, L.; Gall, B.; Hannachi, F.; Khoo, T.; Korichi, A.; Lauritsen, T.; Lopez-Martens, A.

    1995-04-01

    An experiment using the Eurogam phase II {gamma}-ray spectrometer confirms the existence of an excited superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 190}Hg and its very unusual decay into the lowest SD band over 3--4 transitions. The energies of the transitions linking the two SD bands have been firmly established, and their angular distributions are consistent with a dipole character. Comparisons with calculations using random-phase approximation indicate that the excited SD band can be interpreted as an octupole-vibrational structure.

  6. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-02-12

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape.

  7. Communication: Partial linearized density matrix dynamics for dissipative, non-adiabatic quantum evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2011-11-01

    An approach for treating dissipative, non-adiabatic quantum dynamics in general model systems at finite temperature based on linearizing the density matrix evolution in the forward-backward path difference for the environment degrees of freedom is presented. We demonstrate that the approach can capture both short time coherent quantum dynamics and long time thermal equilibration in an application to excitation energy transfer in a model photosynthetic light harvesting complex. Results are also presented for some nonadiabatic scattering models which indicate that, even though the method is based on a "mean trajectory" like scheme, it can accurately capture electronic population branching through multiple avoided crossing regions and that the approach offers a robust and reliable way to treat quantum dynamical phenomena in a wide range of condensed phase applications.

  8. ONIOM approach for non-adiabatic on-the-fly molecular dynamics demonstrated for the backbone controlled Dewar valence isomerization.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Benjamin P; Oesterling, Sven; Haiser, Karin; Heil, Korbinian; Glas, Andreas; Schreier, Wolfgang J; Zinth, Wolfgang; Carell, Thomas; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2012-05-28

    Non-adiabatic on-the-fly molecular dynamics (NA-O-MD) simulations require the electronic wavefunction, energy gradients, and derivative coupling vectors in every timestep. Thus, they are commonly restricted to the excited state dynamics of molecules with up to ≈20 atoms. We discuss an approximation that combines the ONIOM(QM:QM) method with NA-O-MD simulations to allow calculations for larger molecules. As a proof of principle we present the excited state dynamics of a (6-4)-lesion containing dinucleotide (63 atoms), and especially the importance to include the confinement effects of the DNA backbone. The method is able to include electron correlation on a high level of theory and offers an attractive alternative to QM:MM approaches for moderate sized systems with unknown force fields.

  9. ONIOM approach for non-adiabatic on-the-fly molecular dynamics demonstrated for the backbone controlled Dewar valence isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Oesterling, Sven; Haiser, Karin; Heil, Korbinian; Glas, Andreas; Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Zinth, Wolfgang; Carell, Thomas; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2012-05-01

    Non-adiabatic on-the-fly molecular dynamics (NA-O-MD) simulations require the electronic wavefunction, energy gradients, and derivative coupling vectors in every timestep. Thus, they are commonly restricted to the excited state dynamics of molecules with up to ≈20 atoms. We discuss an approximation that combines the ONIOM(QM:QM) method with NA-O-MD simulations to allow calculations for larger molecules. As a proof of principle we present the excited state dynamics of a (6-4)-lesion containing dinucleotide (63 atoms), and especially the importance to include the confinement effects of the DNA backbone. The method is able to include electron correlation on a high level of theory and offers an attractive alternative to QM:MM approaches for moderate sized systems with unknown force fields.

  10. Energies and Auger widths of the high-lying triply excited states for Li-like beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Gou Bingcong; Zhu Jingjing; Sun Yan

    2009-12-15

    The energies, fine-structure splittings, Auger channel energies, and the Auger widths of the high-lying triply excited 2l2l{sup '}nl{sup ''} (n>=2) states of {sup 2}S, {sup 2}D, and {sup 2}P{sup o} resonances for Be{sup +} are studied using the saddle-point variational method and saddle-point complex-rotation method. The relativistic corrections and mass polarization are included using the first-order perturbation theory. Restricted variational method is carried out to extrapolate better energies. The partial Auger widths are calculated for the individual open channels and the total Auger widths are obtained by coupling the important open channels and summing over the other channels. The configuration mixings of the triply excited resonances are described and differences in the literature on the designation of the intershell states are pointed out. These results are compared with other theoretical and experimental data in the literature.

  11. Multiple low-energy excitation states in FeNi disks observed by broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Y.; Zhou, C.; Sun, L.; Chui, S. T.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetization excitation in micron sized FeNi disks with different diameters is studied by broadband ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurement. Except the main FMR peak, additional adsorption peaks with lower energies are observed. Both micromagnetic simulation and quantum spin wave calculation confirm that the low-energy excitation states are attributed to backward volume magnetostatic (BVM) spin waves. The size dependence of the low-energy states is systematically studied in 50-nm-thick Py disks with diameters larger than 500 nm, and the linewidth of the first BVM state is found to be obviously smaller than that of the FMR absorption peak. Through a quantitative comparison with experimental results, the quantum spin wave calculation is proven to be a reliable method to get the susceptibility and is much faster than the classical micromagnetic simulations.

  12. The low-energy, charge-transfer excited states of 4-amino-4-prime-nitrodiphenyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Donald B.; Scott, Gary W.; Tran, Kim; Coulter, Daniel R.; Miskowski, Vincent M.; Stiegman, Albert E.; Wnek, Gary E.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption and emission spectra of 4-amino-4-prime-nitrodiphenyl sulfide in polar and nonpolar solvents were used to characterize and assign the low-energy excited states of the molecule. Fluorescence-excitation anisotropy spectra and fluorescence quantum yields were also used to characterize the photophysics of these states. The lowest-energy fluorescent singlet state was determined to be an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state involving transfer of a full electron charge from the amino to the nitro group yielding a dipole moment of about 50 D. A low-energy, intense absorption band is assigned as a transition to a different ICT state involving a partial electron charge transfer from sulfur to the nitro group.

  13. Molecular approaches to solar energy conversion: the energetic cost of charge separation from molecular-excited states.

    PubMed

    Durrant, James R

    2013-08-13

    This review starts with a brief overview of the technological potential of molecular-based solar cell technologies. It then goes on to focus on the core scientific challenge associated with using molecular light-absorbing materials for solar energy conversion, namely the separation of short-lived, molecular-excited states into sufficiently long-lived, energetic, separated charges capable of generating an external photocurrent. Comparisons are made between different molecular-based solar cell technologies, with particular focus on the function of dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells as well as parallels with the function of photosynthetic reaction centres. The core theme of this review is that generating charge carriers with sufficient lifetime and a high quantum yield from molecular-excited states comes at a significant energetic cost-such that the energy stored in these charge-separated states is typically substantially less than the energy of the initially generated excited state. The role of this energetic loss in limiting the efficiency of solar energy conversion by such devices is emphasized, and strategies to minimize this energy loss are compared and contrasted.

  14. Dynamic interactions of an integrated vehicle-electromagnetic energy harvester-tire system subject to uneven road excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jing Tang; Sun, Zhe; Zhou, Sulian; Tan, Mingyi

    2017-03-01

    An investigation is undertaken of an integrated mechanical-electromagnetic coupling system consisting of a rigid vehicle with heave, roll, and pitch motions, four electromagnetic energy harvesters and four tires subject to uneven road excitations in order to improve the passengers' riding comfort and harvest the lost engine energy due to uneven roads. Following the derived mathematical formulations and the proposed solution approaches, the numerical simulations of this interaction system subject to a continuous sinusoidal road excitation and a single ramp impact are completed. The simulation results are presented as the dynamic response curves in the forms of the frequency spectrum and the time history, which reveals the complex interaction characteristics of the system for vibration reductions and energy harvesting performance. It has addressed the coupling effects on the dynamic characteristics of the integrated system caused by: (1) the natural modes and frequencies of the vehicle; (2) the vehicle rolling and pitching motions; (3) different road excitations on four wheels; (4) the time delay of a road ramp to impact both the front and rear wheels, etc., which cannot be tackled by an often used quarter vehicle model. The guidelines for engineering applications are given. The developed coupling model and the revealed concept provide a means with analysis idea to investigate the details of four energy harvester motions for electromagnetic suspension designs in order to replace the current passive vehicle isolators and to harvest the lost engine energy. Potential further research directions are suggested for readers to consider in the future.

  15. Ultrafast redistribution of vibrational energy after excitation of NH stretching modes in DNA oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozich, V.; Szyc, Ł.; Nibbering, E. T. J.; Werncke, W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2009-04-01

    Vibrational relaxation after spectrally selective excitation within the NH stretching band of adenine-thymine base pairs in DNA oligomers was studied by subpicosecond infrared-pump/anti-Stokes Raman-probe spectroscopy. The decay of the different NH stretching vibrations populates distinct accepting modes in the NH bending range with a rise time of 0.6 ps that is close to the NH stretching decay times. The population of thymine fingerprint modes after excitation of the adenine antisymmetric NH 2 stretching mode points to an ultrafast excitation transfer to the thymine NH stretching vibration before relaxation. The nonequilibrium fingerprint populations decay on a time scale of several picoseconds.

  16. Non-adiabatic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Jesse; Denissen, Nicholas; Reisner, Jon

    2016-11-01

    Onset of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a non-adiabatic environment is investigated with the multi-physics numerical model, FLAG. This work was inspired by laboratory experiments of non-adiabatic RTI, where a glass vessel with a layer of tetrahyrdofuran (THF) below a layer of toluene was placed inside a microwave. THF, a polar solvent, readily absorbs electromagnetic energy from microwaves. Toluene, a non-polar solvent, is nearly transparent to microwave heating. The presence of a heat source in the THF layer produced convection and a time-dependent Atwood number (At). The system, initially in stable hydrostatic equilibrium At < 0 , was set into motion by microwave induced, volumetric heating of the THF. The point when At > 0 , indicates that the system is RTI unstable. The observed dominant mode at the onset of RTI was the horizontal length scale of the vessel. This scale is contrary to classical RTI, where the modes start small and increases in scale with time. It is shown that the dominant RTI mode observed in the experiments was determined by the THF length scale prior to RTI. The dominant length scale transitions from the THF to the toluene via the updrafts and downdrafts in the convective cells. This happens when At passes from negative to positive. This work was funded by the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program.

  17. Development of infrared sensors using energy transfer/energy upconversion processes: Study of laser excited fluorescence in rare Earth ion doped crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Reddy, B. R.; Venkateswarlu, P.

    1994-01-01

    A summary is presented of the spectroscopic study of three systems: LaF3:Ho(3+), LaF3:Er(3+) and CaF2:Nd(3+). When the D levels of Ho(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 640 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from J (416 nm), F (485 nm), and E (546 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F and E levels of Ho(3+) when the material was excited with an 800 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Er(3+) in LaF3 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 637 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the E (540 nm) and P (320, 400, and 468 nm) levels. Energy upconverted emissions were also observed from F, E, and D levels of Er(3+) when the material was resonantly excited with an 804 nm near infrared laser. When the D levels of Nd(3+) in CaF2 were resonantly excited with a laser beam of 577 nm, upconverted emissions were detected from the L (360 and 382 nm), K (418 nm), and I (432 nm) levels. Very weak upconverted emissions were detected when this system was irradiated with a near infrared laser. The numbers in parentheses are the wavelengths of the emissions.

  18. On the correlation between photoelectron energy and bending excitation in molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. Scott; Poliakoff, E. D.

    2000-07-01

    We report on excitation of the bending vibration following 3σu-1 photoionization of CO2. Dispersed fluorescence is used to determine the v+=(0,1,0)/v+=(0,0,0) ratio over the range 18⩽hνexc⩽190 eV. The results demonstrate that the bending excitation varies over this wide range, and is influenced by the photoelectron.

  19. Passive broadband targeted energy transfers and control of self-excited vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young S.

    This work consists of the three main parts---Nonlinear energy pumping (that is, passive broadband targeted energy transfers---TETs), and its applications to theoretical and experimental suppression of aeroelastic instabilities. In the first part, nonlinear energy pumping (or TETs) in coupled oscillators is studied. The system is composed of a primary linear subsystem coupled through an essentially nonlinear stiffness and a linear viscous damper to an additional mass (which is called, as a whole, a nonlinear energy sink---NES). By considering the linear damping as a perturbation to the system, periodic solutions of the underlying Hamiltonian system are formulated by means of the non-smooth temporal transformation and solved numerically by a shooting method. The special periodic orbits, which are corresponding to the impulsive initial conditions for the primary subsystem, bear their importance as baits for initiating localized transfers of a significant portion of energy to the NES. The second part theoretically deals with suppression of limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) in self-excited systems by means of passive energy localizations. As a pilot scheme, suppression or even complete elimination of the LCO in a van der Pol (VDP) oscillator coupled with two types of NESS---grounded and ungrounded---is studied. Computational parametric study proves the efficacy of LCO elimination by means of passive nonlinear energy pumping from the VDP oscillator to appropriately designed NESs. The numerical study of the transient dynamics of the system showed that the dynamical mechanism for LCO suppression is a series of 1:1 and 1:3 transient resonance captures, with the damped transient dynamics following closely corresponding resonant manifolds of the underlying Hamiltonian system. It is through the TRCs that energy gets transferred from the VDP oscillator to the NES, thus causing LCO suppression. By performing an additional bifurcation analysis of the steady state responses through

  20. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  1. A method of combined treatment for the evaluation of core excitation energies in molecules involving heavy atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruani, J.; Khoudir, A.; Kuleff, A.; Tronc, M.; Giorgi, G.; Bonnelle, C.

    Core excitation energies (CEs) are known to depend on the chemical environment mostly through the charge transfered from or to the would-be excited atom in the ground-state molecule. We have made use of this peculiarity to set up a combined method for evaluating the CEs of molecules involving heavy atoms, where cumulated handicaps make direct calculations very difficult. We have evaluated the CEs of np levels in chromium, molybdenum and tungsten hexafluorides and compared the contributions of relaxation and relativity. In a first step, various approximate methods were used to evaluate the amount of charge transfered in the three hexafluorides, using the experimental geometries and testing different definitions of the charge. Results show the following trends: i) the calculated charge transfer increases as CrF6 << MoF6 < WF6; ii) Mulliken (balanced) charges vary in the order REX >> RHF > CISD > DFT, and Weinhold (natural) charges tend to be slightly larger; iii) our best (CISD) calculations give a natural percentage of electron transfer from the metal atom to the bonded fluorines of about 45% for CrF6, 56% for MoF6, and 59% for WF6. In a second step, numerical ab-initio, relativistic, [Delta]DF calculations of the total and orbital energies were performed on the ground-state and core-excited metal ions involving 1 to 5 valence ionizations. Core excitation energies were deduced and the relative importance of relaxation and relativity effects was discussed. In a last step, the core excitation energies for the molecules were evaluated by interpolating between values previously obtained for the free ions, using the net atomic charges derived for the ground-state molecules in our best previous approximation. The results are particularly striking for WF6: 1) for core excitations from the 2p1/2, 2p3/2 and 3p1/2, 3p3/2 levels, experimental energies are reproduced within 0.4-1.2 eV; 2) there is a relaxation alteration of the charge transfer stronger for the 3p than for the 2

  2. Double-resonance spectroscopy of the high Rydberg states of HCO. I. A precise determination of the adiabatic ionization potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Eric; Grant, Edward R.

    1995-12-01

    We report the first spectroscopic observation of the high Rydberg states of HCO. Individual lines in a system of vibrationally autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the (010) state of HCO+ are rotationally labeled in a double-resonance excitation scheme that uses resolved levels in the (010) A' vibronic component of the 3pπ 2Π Rydberg state as intermediates. Observed high-Rydberg structure extends from the adiabatic ionization threshold—which falls just below the principal quantum number of 12 in the vibrationally excited series—to the (010) vertical threshold. Elements of a single series extending from n=12 to 50, for which the total angular momentumless spin can be assigned as N=1, are extrapolated to obtain a vertical convergence limit with respect to the 3pπ 2Π(010)A' N'=0 intermediate state of 20 296.9±0.3 cm-1. Referring this transition energy to the ground state, and subtracting the precisely known fundamental bending frequency of the cation, establishes the adiabatic ionization potential corresponding to the transition from HCO 2A'(000) J″=0, K″=0 to HCO+ J+=0 1Σ+(000). The result is 65 735.9±0.5 cm-1 or 8.150 22±0.000 06 eV.

  3. Intramolecular excited-state proton-transfer studies on flavones in different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Jain, Sapan K.; Sharma, Neera; Rastogi, Ramesh C.

    2001-02-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of some biologically active flavones have been studied as a function of the acidity (pH/H 0) of the solution. Dissociation constants have been determined for the ground and first excited singlet states. The results are compared with those obtained from Forster-Weller calculations. The acidity constants obtained by fluorimetric titration method are in complete agreement (in most of the systems) with ground state data indicating a excited state deactivation prior to prototropic equilibration. Compared to umbelliferones, flavones are only weakly fluorescent in alkaline solution. This behaviour is explained by the small energy difference between the singlet excited state and triplet excited state giving rise to more efficient intersystem crossing. Most of the flavones studied here undergo adiabatic photodissociation in the singlet excited state indicating the formation of an exciplex or a phototautomer.

  4. Valence excitation energies of alkenes, carbonyl compounds, and azabenzenes by time-dependent density functional theory: linear response of the ground state compared to collinear and noncollinear spin-flip TDDFT with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, Miho; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-04-07

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) holds great promise for studying photochemistry because of its affordable cost for large systems and for repeated calculations as required for direct dynamics. The chief obstacle is uncertain accuracy. There have been many validation studies, but there are also many formulations, and there have been few studies where several formulations were applied systematically to the same problems. Another issue, when TDDFT is applied with only a single exchange-correlation functional, is that errors in the functional may mask successes or failures of the formulation. Here, to try to sort out some of the issues, we apply eight formulations of adiabatic TDDFT to the first valence excitations of ten molecules with 18 density functionals of diverse types. The formulations examined are linear response from the ground state (LR-TDDFT), linear response from the ground state with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDDFT-TDA), the original collinear spin-flip approximation with the Tamm-Dancoff (TD) approximation (SF1-TDDFT-TDA), the original noncollinear spin-flip approximation with the TDA approximation (SF1-NC-TDDFT-TDA), combined self-consistent-field (SCF) and collinear spin-flip calculations in the original spin-projected form (SF2-TDDFT-TDA) or non-spin-projected (NSF2-TDDFT-TDA), and combined SCF and noncollinear spin-flip calculations (SF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA and NSF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA). Comparing LR-TDDFT to TDDFT-TDA, we observed that the excitation energy is raised by the TDA; this brings the excitation energies underestimated by full linear response closer to experiment, but sometimes it makes the results worse. For ethylene and butadiene, the excitation energies are underestimated by LR-TDDFT, and the error becomes smaller making the TDA. Neither SF1-TDDFT-TDA nor SF2-TDDFT-TDA provides a lower mean unsigned error than LR-TDDFT or TDDFT-TDA. The comparison between collinear and noncollinear kernels shows that the noncollinear kernel

  5. Valence excitation energies of alkenes, carbonyl compounds, and azabenzenes by time-dependent density functional theory: Linear response of the ground state compared to collinear and noncollinear spin-flip TDDFT with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isegawa, Miho; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-04-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) holds great promise for studying photochemistry because of its affordable cost for large systems and for repeated calculations as required for direct dynamics. The chief obstacle is uncertain accuracy. There have been many validation studies, but there are also many formulations, and there have been few studies where several formulations were applied systematically to the same problems. Another issue, when TDDFT is applied with only a single exchange-correlation functional, is that errors in the functional may mask successes or failures of the formulation. Here, to try to sort out some of the issues, we apply eight formulations of adiabatic TDDFT to the first valence excitations of ten molecules with 18 density functionals of diverse types. The formulations examined are linear response from the ground state (LR-TDDFT), linear response from the ground state with the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDDFT-TDA), the original collinear spin-flip approximation with the Tamm-Dancoff (TD) approximation (SF1-TDDFT-TDA), the original noncollinear spin-flip approximation with the TDA approximation (SF1-NC-TDDFT-TDA), combined self-consistent-field (SCF) and collinear spin-flip calculations in the original spin-projected form (SF2-TDDFT-TDA) or non-spin-projected (NSF2-TDDFT-TDA), and combined SCF and noncollinear spin-flip calculations (SF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA and NSF2-NC-TDDFT-TDA). Comparing LR-TDDFT to TDDFT-TDA, we observed that the excitation energy is raised by the TDA; this brings the excitation energies underestimated by full linear response closer to experiment, but sometimes it makes the results worse. For ethylene and butadiene, the excitation energies are underestimated by LR-TDDFT, and the error becomes smaller making the TDA. Neither SF1-TDDFT-TDA nor SF2-TDDFT-TDA provides a lower mean unsigned error than LR-TDDFT or TDDFT-TDA. The comparison between collinear and noncollinear kernels shows that the noncollinear kernel

  6. Vibration-translation energy transfer in vibrationally excited diatomic molecules. Ph.D. Thesis - York Univ., Toronto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A semiclassical collision model is applied to the study of energy transfer rates between a vibrationally excited diatomic molecule and a structureless atom. The molecule is modeled as an anharmonic oscillator with a multitude of dynamically coupled vibrational states. Three main aspects in the prediction of vibrational energy transfer rates are considered. The applicability of the semiclassical model to an anharmonic oscillator is first evaluated for collinear encounters. Second, the collinear semiclassical model is applied to obtain numerical predictions of the vibrational energy transfer rate dependence on the initial vibrational state quantum number. Thermally averaged vibration-translation rate coefficients are predicted and compared with CO-He experimental values for both ground and excited initial states. The numerical model is also used as a basis for evaluating several less complete but analytic models. Third, the role of rational motion in the dynamics of vibrational energy transfer is examined. A three-dimensional semiclassical collision model is constructed with coupled rotational motion included. Energy transfer within the molecule is shown to be dominated by vibration-rotation transitions with small changes in angular momentum. The rates of vibrational energy transfer in molecules with rational frequencies that are very small in comparison to their vibrational frequency are shown to be adequately treated by the preceding collinear models.

  7. Excitation energies, radiative and autoionization rates, dielectronic satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination rates for excited states of Rb-like W from Kr-like W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, A. S.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2016-11-01

    Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for [Ni]4{s}24{p}6{nl}, [Ni]4{s}24{p}54l\\prime {nl} (l\\prime =d,f,n = 4-7), [Ni]4s4{p}64l\\prime {nl}, (l\\prime =d,f,n = 4-7), [Ni]4{s}24{p}55l\\prime {nl} (n = 5-7), and [Ni]4s4{p}66l\\prime {nl} (n = 6-7) states in Rb-like tungsten (W37+) are calculated using the relativistic many-body perturbation theory method (RMBPT code) and the Hartree-Fock-relativistic method (COWAN code). Autoionizing levels above the [Ni]4{s}24{p}6 threshold are considered. It is found that configuration mixing among [Ni]4{s}24{p}54l\\prime {nl} and [Ni]4s4{p}64l\\prime {nl} plays an important role for all atomic characteristics. Branching ratios relative to the first threshold and intensity factors are calculated for satellite lines, and dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients are determined for the [Ni]4{s}24{p}6{nl} (n = 4-7) singly excited states, as well as the [Ni]4{s}24{p}54{dnl}, [Ni]4{s}24{p}54{fnl}, [Ni]4s4{p}64{dnl}, [Ni]4{s}24{p}64{fnl}, (n = 4-6), and [Ni]4{s}24{p}55l\\prime 5l doubly excited nonautoionizing states in Rb-like W37+ ion. Contributions from the [Ni]4s24{p}64{fnl} (n = 6-7), [Ni]4{s}24{p}55l\\prime {nl} (n = 5-6), and [Ni]4{s}24{p}56l\\prime {nl} (n = 6-7) doubly excited autoionizing states are evaluated numerically. The high-n state (with n up to 500) contributions are very important for high temperatures. These contributions are determined by using a scaling procedure. Synthetic dielectronic satellite spectra from Rb-like W are simulated in a broad spectral range from 8 to 70 Å. These calculations provide highly accurate values for a number of W37+ properties useful for a variety of applications including for fusion applications.

  8. Controlled Rapid Adiabatic Passage in a V-Type System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yunheung; Lee, Han-Gyeol; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-01

    In chirped rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), chirp sign determines the final state to which the complete population transfer (CPT) occurs in a three-level V-type system. In this study, we show that laser intensity can be alternatively used as a control means in RAP, when the laser pulse is chirped and of a spectral hole resonant to one of the excited states. We verified such excitation selectivity in the experiment performed as-shaped femtosecond laser pulses interacting with the lowest three levels (5S, 5 P1/2, and 5 P3/2) of atomic rubidium. The successful demonstration implies that this intensity-dependent RAP in conjunction with laser beam profile programming may allow excitation selectivity for atoms or ions arranged in space.

  9. The excitation energies and term energies of the excited states 1s2ns (n=3,4,5) and 1s2nf (n=4,5) of lithium-like systems of Z=11-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zi-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Zhou, Ya-Jun; He, Li-Ming; Liu, Guo-Guang

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, the full-core plus correlation (FCPC) and the Ritz method is extended to calculate the non-relativistic energies of 1s2ns (n=3,4,5) and 1s2nf (n=4,5) states and the wavefunctions of the lithium-like systems from Z=11-20. The mass-polarization and the relativistic correction including the kinetic-energy correction, the Darwin term, the electron-electron contact term and the orbit-orbit interaction are evaluated perturbatively as the first-order correction. The contribution from quantum electrodynamic is also included by using the effective nuclear charge formula. The excited energies, the term-energy and fine structure, are given and compared with the other theoretical calculation and experimental results. It is shown that the correlative wave in the FCPC method embodies well the strong correlation between the 1s2 core and the valence electron.

  10. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  11. A simplified relativistic time-dependent density-functional theory formalism for the calculations of excitation energies including spin-orbit coupling effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Ziegler, Tom

    2005-10-15

    In the present work we have proposed an approximate time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) formalism to deal with the influence of spin-orbit coupling effect on the excitation energies for closed-shell systems. In this formalism scalar relativistic TDDFT calculations are first performed to determine the lowest single-group excited states and the spin-orbit coupling operator is applied to these single-group excited states to obtain the excitation energies with spin-orbit coupling effects included. The computational effort of the present method is much smaller than that of the two-component TDDFT formalism and this method can be applied to medium-size systems containing heavy elements. The compositions of the double-group excited states in terms of single-group singlet and triplet excited states are obtained automatically from the calculations. The calculated excitation energies based on the present formalism show that this formalism affords reasonable excitation energies for transitions not involving 5p and 6p orbitals. For transitions involving 5p orbitals, one can still obtain acceptable results for excitations with a small truncation error, while the formalism will fail for transitions involving 6p orbitals, especially 6p1/2 spinors.

  12. Calculated low-energy electron-impact vibrational excitation cross sections for CO2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Tennyson, J.; Celiberto, R.

    2016-12-01

    Vibrational-excitation cross sections of ground electronic states of a carbon dioxide molecule by electron-impact through CO2-≤ft({{}2}{{\\Pi}u}\\right) shape resonance is considered in the separation of the normal modes approximation. Resonance curves and widths are computed for each vibrational mode. The calculations assume a decoupling between normal modes and employ the local complex potential model for the treatment of nuclear dynamics, usually adopted for electron-scattering involving diatomic molecules. Results are presented for excitation up to 10 vibrational levels in each mode and a comparison with data present in the literature is discussed.

  13. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  14. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  15. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  16. Revealing the high-energy electronic excitations underlying the onset of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Giannetti, Claudio; Cilento, Federico; Conte, Stefano Dal; Coslovich, Giacomo; Ferrini, Gabriele; Molegraaf, Hajo; Raichle, Markus; Liang, Ruixing; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Greven, Martin; Damascelli, Andrea; van der Marel, Dirk; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2011-01-01

    In strongly correlated systems the electronic properties at the Fermi energy (EF) are intertwined with those at high-energy scales. One of the pivotal challenges in the field of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) is to understand whether and how the high-energy scale physics associated with Mott-like excitations (|E−EF|>1 eV) is involved in the condensate formation. Here, we report the interplay between the many-body high-energy CuO2 excitations at 1.5 and 2 eV, and the onset of HTSC. This is revealed by a novel optical pump-supercontinuum-probe technique that provides access to the dynamics of the dielectric function in Bi2Sr2Ca0.92Y0.08Cu2O8+δ over an extended energy range, after the photoinduced suppression of the superconducting pairing. These results unveil an unconventional mechanism at the base of HTSC both below and above the optimal hole concentration required to attain the maximum critical temperature (Tc). PMID:21673674

  17. Revealing the high-energy electronic excitations underlying the onset of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Claudio; Cilento, Federico; Dal Conte, Stefano; Coslovich, Giacomo; Ferrini, Gabriele; Molegraaf, Hajo; Raichle, Markus; Liang, Ruixing; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Greven, Martin; Damascelli, Andrea; van der Marel, Dirk; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2011-06-14

    In strongly correlated systems the electronic properties at the Fermi energy (E(F)) are intertwined with those at high-energy scales. One of the pivotal challenges in the field of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) is to understand whether and how the high-energy scale physics associated with Mott-like excitations (|E-E(F)|>1 eV) is involved in the condensate formation. Here, we report the interplay between the many-body high-energy CuO(2) excitations at 1.5 and 2 eV, and the onset of HTSC. This is revealed by a novel optical pump-supercontinuum-probe technique that provides access to the dynamics of the dielectric function in Bi(2)Sr(2)Ca(0.92)Y(0.08)Cu(2)O(8+δ) over an extended energy range, after the photoinduced suppression of the superconducting pairing. These results unveil an unconventional mechanism at the base of HTSC both below and above the optimal hole concentration required to attain the maximum critical temperature (T(c)).

  18. High-frequency vibration energy harvesting from impulsive excitation utilizing intentional dynamic instability caused by strong nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remick, Kevin; Dane Quinn, D.; Michael McFarland, D.; Bergman, Lawrence; Vakakis, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The authors investigate a vibration-based energy harvesting system utilizing essential (nonlinearizable) nonlinearities and electromagnetic coupling elements. The system consists of a grounded, weakly damped linear oscillator (primary system) subjected to a single impulsive load. This primary system is coupled to a lightweight, damped oscillating attachment (denoted as nonlinear energy sink, NES) via a neodymium magne