Science.gov

Sample records for adiabatic film cooling

  1. Numerical characterization and modeling of adiabatic slot film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voegele, Andrew

    Film cooling is a technique used to protect critical surfaces in combustors, thrust chambers, turbines and nozzles from hot, chemically reacting gases. Accurately predicting the film's performance is especially challenging in the vicinity of the wall and the film injection plane due to the complex interactions of two highly turbulent, shearing, boundary layer flows. Properly characterizing the streams at the inlet of a numerical simulation and the choice of turbulence model are crucial to accurately predicting the decay of the film. To address these issues, this study employs a RANS solver that is used to model a film cooled wall. Menter's baseline model, and shear-stress transport model and the Spalart-Allmaras model are employed to determine the effect on film cooling predictions. Several methods for prescribing the inlet planes are explored. These numerical studies are compared with experimental data obtained in a UMD film cooling wind tunnel.

  2. Adiabatic cooling of antiprotons.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J

    2011-02-18

    Adiabatic cooling is shown to be a simple and effective method to cool many charged particles in a trap to very low temperatures. Up to 3×10(6) p are cooled to 3.5 K-10(3) times more cold p and a 3 times lower p temperature than previously reported. A second cooling method cools p plasmas via the synchrotron radiation of embedded e(-) (with many fewer e(-) than p in preparation for adiabatic cooling. No p are lost during either process-a significant advantage for rare particles. PMID:21405511

  3. Adiabatic Cooling of Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Kalra, R.; Novitski, E.; Oelert, W.; Grzonka, D.; Sefzick, T.; Zielinski, M.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Muellers, A.; Walz, J.

    2011-02-18

    Adiabatic cooling is shown to be a simple and effective method to cool many charged particles in a trap to very low temperatures. Up to 3x10{sup 6} p are cooled to 3.5 K--10{sup 3} times more cold p and a 3 times lower p temperature than previously reported. A second cooling method cools p plasmas via the synchrotron radiation of embedded e{sup -} (with many fewer e{sup -} than p) in preparation for adiabatic cooling. No p are lost during either process--a significant advantage for rare particles.

  4. Adiabatic Effectiveness and Heat Transfer Coefficient on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1997-01-01

    three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a rotating film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the United Technologies Research Center(UTRC) rotor with five film-cooling rows containing 83 holes, including three rows on the shower head with 49 holes, covering about 86% of the blade span. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature 1900 K and stagnation pressure 3 MPa. The blade speed is taken to be 5200 rpm. The adiabatic effectiveness is higher for a rotating blade as compared to that for a stationary blade. Also, the direction of coolant injection from the shower-head holes considerably affects the effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient values on both the pressure and suction surfaces. In all cases the heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic effectiveness are highly three-dimensional in the vicinity of holes but tend to become two-dimensional far downstream.

  5. Heating and cooling in adiabatic mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Cai, Zi; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2010-12-01

    We study the effect of interaction on the temperature change in the process of adiabatic mixing of two components of Fermi gases using the real-space Bogoliubov-de Gennes method. We find that in the process of adiabatic mixing, the competition between the adiabatic expansion and the attractive interaction makes it possible to cool or heat the system depending on the strength of the interaction and the initial temperature of the system. The changes of the temperature in a bulk system and in a trapped system are investigated.

  6. Effect of RANS-Type Turbulence Models on Adiabatic Film Cooling Effectiveness over a Scaled Up Gas Turbine Blade Leading Edge Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepuri, Giridhara Babu; Talanki Puttarangasetty, Ashok Babu; Kolke, Deepak Kumar; Jesuraj, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature is one of the key technologies in raising gas turbine engine power output. Film cooling is one of the efficient cooling techniques to cool the hot section components of a gas turbine engines in turn the turbine inlet temperature can be increased. This study aims at investigating the effect of RANS-type turbulence models on adiabatic film cooling effectiveness over a scaled up gas turbine blade leading edge surfaces. For the evaluation, five different two equation RANS-type turbulent models have been taken in consideration, which are available in the ANSYS-Fluent. For this analysis, the gas turbine blade leading edge configuration is generated using Solid Works. The meshing is done using ANSYS-Workbench Mesh and ANSYS-Fluent is used as a solver to solve the flow field. The considered gas turbine blade leading edge model is having five rows of film cooling circular holes, one at stagnation line and the two each on either side of stagnation line at 30° and 60° respectively. Each row has the five holes with the hole diameter of 4 mm, pitch of 21 mm arranged in staggered manner and has the hole injection angle of 30° in span wise direction. The experiments are carried in a subsonic cascade tunnel facility at heat transfer lab of CSIR-National Aerospace Laboratory with a Reynolds number of 1,00,000 based on leading edge diameter. From the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) evaluation it is found that K-ɛ Realizable model gives more acceptable results with the experimental values, compared to the other considered turbulence models for this type of geometries. Further the CFD evaluated results, using K-ɛ Realizable model at different blowing ratios are compared with the experimental results.

  7. Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Paul C. W.

    2004-01-01

    The research at Houston was focused on optimizing the design of superconducting magnets for advanced adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs), assessing the feasibility of using high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets in ADRs in the future, and developing techniques to deposit HTS thin and thick films on high strength, low thermal conductivity substrates for HTS magnet leads. Several approaches have been tested for the suggested superconducting magnets.

  8. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  9. Hydrogen film/conductive cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewen, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Small scale nozzle tests using heated nitrogen were run to obtain effectiveness and wall heat transfer data with hydrogen film cooling. Effectiveness data are compared with an entrainment model developed from planar, unaccelerated flow data. Results indicate significant effects due to flow turning and acceleration. With injection velocity effects accounted for explicitly, heat transfer correlation coefficients were found to be the same with and without film cooling when properties are evaluated at an appropriate reference temperature for the local gas composition defined by the coolant effectiveness. A design study for an O2/H2 application with 300 psia (207 N/sq cm) chamber pressure and 1500 lbs (6670 N) thrust indicates an adiabatic wall design requires 4 to 5 percent of the total flow as hydrogen film cooling. Internal regenerative cooling designs were found to offer no reduction in coolant requirements.

  10. Interaction-induced adiabatic cooling for antiferromagnetism in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dare, A.-M.; Raymond, L.; Albinet, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2007-08-01

    In the experimental context of cold-fermion optical lattices, we discuss the possibilities to approach the pseudogap or ordered phases by manipulating the scattering length or the strength of the laser-induced lattice potential. Using the two-particle self-consistent approach, as well as quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we provide isentropic curves for the two- and three-dimensional Hubbard models at half-filling. These quantitative results are important for practical attempts to reach the ordered antiferromagnetic phase in experiments on optical lattices of two-component fermions. We find that adiabatically turning on the interaction in two dimensions to cool the system is not very effective. In three dimensions, adiabatic cooling to the antiferromagnetic phase can be achieved in such a manner, although the cooling efficiency is not as high as initially suggested by dynamical mean-field theory. Adiabatic cooling by turning off the repulsion beginning at strong coupling is possible in certain cases.

  11. Hydrogen film cooling investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Effects of flow turning, flow acceleration, and supersonic flow on film cooling were determined experimentally and correlated in terms of an entrainment film cooling model. Experiments were conducted using thin walled metal test sections, hot nitrogen mainstream gas, and ambient hydrogen or nitrogen as film coolants. The entrainment film cooling model relates film cooling effectiveness to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. The experimental apparatus and the analytical model used are described in detail and correlations for the entrainment fraction and film coolant-to-wall heat transfer coefficient are presented.

  12. Optimized sympathetic cooling of atomic mixtures via fast adiabatic strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Stephen; Sundaram, Bala; Onofrio, Roberto

    2011-11-15

    We discuss fast frictionless cooling techniques in the framework of sympathetic cooling of cold atomic mixtures. It is argued that optimal cooling of an atomic species--in which the deepest quantum degeneracy regime is achieved--may be obtained by means of sympathetic cooling with another species whose trapping frequency is dynamically changed to maintain constancy of the Lewis-Riesenfeld adiabatic invariant. Advantages and limitations of this cooling strategy are discussed, with particular regard to the possibility of cooling Fermi gases to a deeper degenerate regime.

  13. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  14. Adiabatic cooling of the artificial Porcupine plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruizhin, Iu. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.; Bauer, O. H.; Moskalenko, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the plasma density obtained during the interaction of the artificial plasma jet, fired into the ionosphere with the body of the Porcupine main payload, have been analyzed for times when there was a well-developed wake effect. Using wake theory, the maximum temperature of the quasi-neutral xenon ion beam has been determined for an intermediate distance from the ion beam source when the beam has left the diamagnetic region but is still much denser than the ionospheric background plasma. The beam temperature is found to be about 4 times less than the temperature at injection. This observation is very well explained by adiabatic cooling of the beam during its initial diamagnetic and current-buildup phases at distances r smaller than 10 m. Outside this region, the beam conserves the temperature achieved. The observation proves that the artificial plasma jet passes through an initial gas-like diamagnetic phase restricted to the vicinity of the beam source, where it expands adiabatically. Partial cooling also takes place outside the diamagnetic region where the beam current still builds up. The observations also support a recently developed current-closure model of the quasi-neutral ion beam.

  15. The 0.1K bolometers cooled by adiabatic demagnetization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T.; Lesyna, L.; Kittel, P.; Werner, M.

    1983-01-01

    The most straightforward way of reducing the noise equivalent power of bolometers is to lower their operating temperature. We have been exploring the possibility of using conventionally constructed bolometers at ultra-low temperatures to achieve NEP's suitable to the background environment of cooled space telescopes. We have chosen the technique of adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt as a gravity independent, compact, and low power way to achieve temperatures below pumped He-3 (0.3 K). The demagnetization cryostat we used was capable of reaching temperatures below 0.08 K using Chromium Potassium Alum as a salt from a starting temperature of 1.5 K and a starting magnetic field of 30,000 gauss. Computer control of the magnetic field decay allowed a temperature of 0.2 K to be maintained to within 0.5 mK over a time period exceeding 14 hours. The refrigerator duty cycle was over 90 percent at this temperature. The success of these tests has motivated us to construct a more compact portable adiabatic demagnetization cryostat capable of bolometer optical tests and use at the 5m Hale telescope at 1mm wavelengths.

  16. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-10-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  17. Combustion effects on film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of: (1) a reactive environment on film cooling effectiveness, and (2) film cooling on rocket engine performance were determined experimentally in a rocket thrust chamber assembly operating with hydrogen and oxygen propellants at 300 psi chamber pressure. Tests were conducted using hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen film coolants in an instrumented, thin walled, steel thrust chamber. The film cooling, performance loss, and heat transfer coefficient data were correlated with the ALRC entrainment film cooling model which relates film coolant effectiveness and mixture ratio at the wall to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. In addition, a comprehensive thermal analysis computer program, HOCOOL, was prepared from previously existing ALRC computer programs and analytical techniques.

  18. Vapour pressure and adiabatic cooling from champagne: slow-motion visualization of gas thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2012-09-01

    We present two simple demonstration experiments recorded with high-speed cameras in the fields of gas dynamics and thermal physics. The experiments feature vapour pressure effects as well as adiabatic cooling observed upon opening a bottle of champagne.

  19. Importance of combining convection with film cooling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    The interaction of film and convection cooling and its effect on wall cooling efficiency is investigated analytically for two cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications. The two schemes are full coverage- and counterflow-film cooling. In full coverage film cooling, the cooling air issues from a large number of small discrete holes in the surface. Counterflow film cooling is a film-convection scheme with film injection from a slot geometry. The results indicate that it is beneficial to utilize as much of the cooling air heat sink as possible for convection cooling prior to ejecting it as a film.

  20. Importance of combining convection with film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    The interaction of film and convection cooling and its effect on wall cooling efficiency is investigated analytically for two cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications. The two schemes are full coverage- and counterflow-film cooling. In full coverage film cooling, the cooling air issues from a large number of small discrete holes in the surface. Counterflow film cooling is a film-convection scheme with film injection from a slot geometry. The results indicate that it is beneficial to utilize as much of the cooling air heat sink as possible for convection cooling prior to ejecting it as a film.

  1. Full-coverage film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    Program calculates coolant flow and wall temperatures of full-coverage film-cooled vanes or blades. Thermal barrier coatings may be specified on outer surfaces of blade. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution on UNIVAC 1100.

  2. Experimental and numerical characterization of turbulent slot film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Carlos A.

    This study presents an experimental and numerical characterization of the turbulent mixing in two-dimensional slot film cooling flows. Three different flows are considered by varying the coolant to mainstream velocity ratio (VR): a wall jet case (VR ≈ 2.0), a boundary layer case (VR ≈ 1.0) and a wall-wake case (VR ≈ 0.5). For each flow, detailed measurements of the film cooling effectiveness, the heat flux, and the heat transfer coefficient are obtained for adiabatic and backside cooled wall conditions. Additionally, detailed flow velocity and temperature are measured under hot conditions using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and a micro-thermocouple probe, respectively. These comprehensive measurements provide a unique data set for characterizing the momentum and thermal mixing of the turbulent flows, and for validating turbulence models in Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations and large-eddy simulations (LES). The three flow families display different performances. The mixing of the film is strongly influenced by the mean shear between the coolant and the hot mainstream, thus explaining that the boundary layer case provides the best effectiveness. Initially governed by the film kinematics at the injection point, the convective heat transfer is influence by the mainstream when the film mixes. Additionally, measurements indicate that semi-empirical correlations largely overpredict the mixing of the film. The results obtained with the Spalart-Allmaras RANS model compare favorably with the measurements, thereby proving that this model is a viable alternative to using correlations for the film cooling effectiveness. A Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) with the dynamic models is performed for the wall jet case under adiabatic wall conditions with inflow conditions prescribed from precursor simulations. The LES results show good agreement with measured adiabatic wall temperatures and provide unique insight into the turbulent transport mechanism and

  3. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1999-01-01

    A multi-block, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute heat transfer coefficient on the blade, hub and shroud for a rotating high-pressure turbine blade with 172 film-cooling holes in eight rows. Film cooling effectiveness is also computed on the adiabatic blade. Wilcox's k-omega model is used for modeling the turbulence. Of the eight rows of holes, three are staggered on the shower-head with compound-angled holes. With so many holes on the blade it was somewhat of a challenge to get a good quality grid on and around the blade and in the tip clearance region. The final multi-block grid consists of 4784 elementary blocks which were merged into 276 super blocks. The viscous grid has over 2.2 million cells. Each hole exit, in its true oval shape, has 80 cells within it so that coolant velocity, temperature, k and omega distributions can be specified at these hole exits. It is found that for the given parameters, heat transfer coefficient on the cooled, isothermal blade is highest in the leading edge region and in the tip region. Also, the effectiveness over the cooled, adiabatic blade is the lowest in these regions. Results for an uncooled blade are also shown, providing a direct comparison with those for the cooled blade. Also, the heat transfer coefficient is much higher on the shroud as compared to that on the hub for both the cooled and the uncooled cases.

  4. Leading edge film cooling enhancement for an inlet guide vane with fan-shaped holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Jun; An, Bai-Tao; Liu, Jie; Zhan, W.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the improvement of leading edge film cooling effectiveness for a turbine inlet guide vane by using fan-shaped film cooling holes. The modification details are presented in comparison with the base-line configuration of cylindrical holes. Numerical simulations were carried out for the base-line and modified configurations by using CFX, in which the κ-ɛ turbulence model and scalable wall function were chosen. Contours of adiabatic film cooling effectiveness on the blade surfaces and span-wise distributions of film cooling effectiveness downstream the rows of cooling holes interested for the different cooling configurations were compared and discussed. It is showed that with the use of fan-shaped cooling holes around the leading edge, the adiabatic film cooling effectiveness can be enhanced considerably. In comparison with the cylindrical film cooling holes, up to 40% coolant mass flow can be saved by using fan-shaped cooling holes to obtain the comparable film cooling effectiveness for the studied inlet guide vane.

  5. Detecting 3d Non-Abelian Anyons via Adiabatic Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Freedman, Michael; Yang, Kun

    2011-03-01

    Majorana fermions lie at the heart of a number of recent developments in condensed matter physics. One important application is the realization of non-abelian statistics and consequently a foundation for topological quantum computation. Theoretical propositions for Majorana systems abound, but experimental detection has proven challenging. Most attempts involve interferometry, but the degeneracy of the anyon state can be leveraged to produce a cooling effect, as previously shown in 2d. We apply this method of anyon detection to the 3d anyon model of Teo and Kane. Like the Fu-Kane model, this involves a hybrid system of topological insulator (TI) and superconductor (SC). The Majorana modes are localized to anisotropic hedgehogs in the order parameter which appear at the TI-SC interface. The effective model bears some resemblance to the non-Abelian Higgs model with scalar coupling as studied, for example, by Jackiw and Rebbi. In order to make concrete estimates relevant to experiments, we use parameters appropriate to Ca doped Bi 2 Se 3 as the topological insulator and Cu doped Bi 2 Se 3 as the superconductor. We find a temperature window in the milli-Kelvin regime where the presence of 3d non-abelian anyons will lead to an observable cooling effect.

  6. Research on cooling effectiveness in stepped slot film cooling vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Wu, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Rong, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine, film cooling technology has been widely used. Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature, uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use. The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air, thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential. A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially. Through numerical methods, the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched. This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions, then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results. The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio. Under this condition, the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness, and also retained a low pressure loss.

  7. Pulsed film cooling on a turbine blade leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, James L.

    2009-12-01

    Unsteadiness in gas turbine film cooling jets may arise due to inherent unsteadiness of the flow through an engine or may be induced as a means of flow control. The traditional technique used to evaluate the performance of a steady film cooling scheme is demonstrated to be insufficient for use with unsteady film cooling and is modified to account for the cross coupling of the time dependent adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient. The addition of a single term to the traditional steady form of the net heat flux reduction equation with time averaged quantities accounts for the unsteady effects. An experimental technique to account for the influence of the new term was devised and used to measure the influence of a pulsating jet on the net heat flux in the leading edge region of a turbine blade. High spatial resolution data was acquired in the near-hole region using infrared thermography coupled with experimental techniques that allowed application of the appropriate thermal boundary conditions immediately adjacent to the film cooling hole. The turbine blade leading edge was simulated by a half cylinder in cross flow with a blunt afterbody. The film cooling geometry consisted of a coolant hole located 21.5° from the leading edge, angled 20° to the surface and 90° from the streamwise direction. Investigated parameters include pulsation frequency, duty cycle, and waveform shape. Separate experiments were conducted in a water channel to provide visualization of the unsteady coolant propagation behavior. Further insight into the flow physics was obtained through computational simulations of the experimental apparatus. The computational results afforded time resolved flow field and net heat flux reduction data unobtainable with the experimental techniques. A technique to predict the performance of an unsteady film cooling scheme through knowledge of only the steady film cooling behavior was developed and demonstrated to be effective.

  8. Super-heavy electron material as metallic refrigerant for adiabatic demagnetization cooling

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Piening, Boy; Jeevan, Hirale S.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Low-temperature refrigeration is of crucial importance in fundamental research of condensed matter physics, because the investigations of fascinating quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, superfluidity, and quantum criticality, often require refrigeration down to very low temperatures. Currently, cryogenic refrigerators with 3He gas are widely used for cooling below 1 K. However, usage of the gas has been increasingly difficult because of the current worldwide shortage. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative methods of refrigeration. We show that a new type of refrigerant, the super-heavy electron metal YbCo2Zn20, can be used for adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, which does not require 3He gas. This method has a number of advantages, including much better metallic thermal conductivity compared to the conventional insulating refrigerants. We also demonstrate that the cooling performance is optimized in Yb1−xScxCo2Zn20 by partial Sc substitution, with x ~ 0.19. The substitution induces chemical pressure that drives the materials to a zero-field quantum critical point. This leads to an additional enhancement of the magnetocaloric effect in low fields and low temperatures, enabling final temperatures well below 100 mK. This performance has, up to now, been restricted to insulators. For nearly a century, the same principle of using local magnetic moments has been applied for adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This study opens new possibilities of using itinerant magnetic moments for cryogen-free refrigeration. PMID:27626073

  9. Super-heavy electron material as metallic refrigerant for adiabatic demagnetization cooling.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yoshifumi; Piening, Boy; Jeevan, Hirale S; Bud'ko, Sergey L; Canfield, Paul C; Gegenwart, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    Low-temperature refrigeration is of crucial importance in fundamental research of condensed matter physics, because the investigations of fascinating quantum phenomena, such as superconductivity, superfluidity, and quantum criticality, often require refrigeration down to very low temperatures. Currently, cryogenic refrigerators with (3)He gas are widely used for cooling below 1 K. However, usage of the gas has been increasingly difficult because of the current worldwide shortage. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative methods of refrigeration. We show that a new type of refrigerant, the super-heavy electron metal YbCo2Zn20, can be used for adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, which does not require (3)He gas. This method has a number of advantages, including much better metallic thermal conductivity compared to the conventional insulating refrigerants. We also demonstrate that the cooling performance is optimized in Yb1-x Sc x Co2Zn20 by partial Sc substitution, with x ~ 0.19. The substitution induces chemical pressure that drives the materials to a zero-field quantum critical point. This leads to an additional enhancement of the magnetocaloric effect in low fields and low temperatures, enabling final temperatures well below 100 mK. This performance has, up to now, been restricted to insulators. For nearly a century, the same principle of using local magnetic moments has been applied for adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This study opens new possibilities of using itinerant magnetic moments for cryogen-free refrigeration. PMID:27626073

  10. Heat transfer and film cooling effectiveness in a linear airfoil cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Abuaf, N.; Bunker, R.; Lee, C.P.

    1997-04-01

    A warm (315 C) wind tunnel test facility equipped with a linear cascade of film cooled vane airfoils was used in the simultaneous determination of the local gas side heat transfer coefficients and the adiabatic film cooling effectiveness. The test rig can be operated in either a steady-state or a transient mode. The steady-state operation provides adiabatic film cooling effectiveness values while the transient mode generates data for the determination of the local heat transfer coefficients from the temperature-time variations and of the film effectiveness from the steady wall temperatures within the same aerothermal environment. The linear cascade consists of five airfoils. The 14% cascade inlet free-stream turbulence intensity is generated by a perforated plate, positioned upstream of the airfoil leading edge. For the first transient tests, five cylinders having roughly the same blockage as the initial 20% axial chord of the airfoils were used. The cylinder stagnation point heat transfer coefficients compare well with values calculated from correlations. Static pressure distributions measured over an instrumented airfoil agree with inviscid predictions. Heat transfer coefficients and adiabatic film cooling effectiveness results were obtained with a smooth airfoil having three separate film injection locations, two along the suction side, and the third one covering the leading edge showerhead region. Near the film injection locations, the heat transfer coefficients increase with the blowing film. At the termination of the film cooled airfoil tests, the film holes were plugged and heat transfer tests were conducted with non-film cooled airfoils. These results agree with boundary layer code predictions.

  11. Leading edge film cooling effects on turbine blade heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of spanwise pitch of shower-head holes and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled turbine vane. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. It is found that with the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio fixed, reducing P, the spanwise pitch for shower-head holes, from 7.5 d to 3.0 d, where d is the hole diameter, increases the average effectiveness considerably over the blade surface. However, when P/d= 7.5, increasing the coolant mass flow increases the effectiveness on the pressure surface but reduces it on the suction surface due to coolant jet lift-off. For P/d = 4.5 or 3.0, such an anomaly does not occur within the range of coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios analyzed. In all cases, adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are highly three-dimensional.

  12. Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2003-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

  13. Mpemba effect and phase transitions in the adiabatic cooling of water before freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; De Risi, R.; Somma, L.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, an accurate experimental investigation of the Mpemba effect (that is, of the fact that initially hot water freezes before the colder one) is carried out, showing that, in the adiabatic cooling of water, relevant roles are played by supercooling, and by phase transitions which take place at 6±1 ∘C,3.5±0.5 ∘C and 1.3±0.6 ∘C. The last transition, which occurs with the non-negligible probability of 0.21 with respect to the total number of runs performed, has not been detected earlier. On the basis of our experimental results, we can present a thorough theoretical analysis of supercooling and of such phase transitions, which are interpreted in terms of the different ordering of molecule clusters in water.

  14. Semiconductor cooling by thin-film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tick, P. A.; Vilcans, J.

    1970-01-01

    Thin-film, metal alloy thermocouple junctions do not rectify, change circuit impedance only slightly, and require very little increase in space. Although they are less efficient cooling devices than semiconductor junctions, they may be applied to assist conventional cooling techniques for electronic devices.

  15. Thin film NMR T1 measurement by MRFM using cyclic adiabatic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sungmin; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Won, Soonho

    2014-03-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM). The samples were Alq3, which is widely used as an organic light emitting diode (OLED), thin films of 150 nm thick and a bulk crystal. T1 was measured by using the cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency of 297 MHz and at 12 K. To confirm the reliability of our measurement technique we compared the result with that obtained by conventional NMR method. T1 of thin film samples was measured and compared with that of the bulk sample. thin film, MRFM.

  16. Film cooling enhancement with surface restructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuping

    Discrete-hole film cooling is used extensively in turbine components. In past decades, many research works concerning this technique have been published. Recently, efforts have been directed at seeking technologies that would increase film cooling effectiveness. Particularly, surface reshaping through protective coatings, such as a thermal barrier coating (TBC), is very attractive to turbine designers because extra machining work is not needed for its application. In the present work, film cooling enhancement with surface restructure is experimentally studied using an infrared (IR) imaging technique. The first surface structure studied is the surface with flow-aligned blockers. The studied configurations include single-hole and three-hole-row structures. The single-hole case is used for studying the effects of blocker design parameters, which include blocker height (0.2D, 0.4D, and 0.6D), distance between two neighboring blockers (0.8D, D, and 1.2D), blocker length (2", 4", and 6"), and blowing ratio M (0.43 and 0.93). The design with the best performance is chosen for the three-hole-row cases. The second surface shape studied, is the so-called upstream ramp, which is placed in front of a row of film cooling holes. Investigated geometrical parameters include upstream ramp angles (8.5°, 15°, and 24°) and blowing ratio M (0.29, 0.43, 0.57, 0.93, and 1.36). Detailed local film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are measured using an IR imaging technique. The third film cooling concept is the so-called trenched film cooling holes, i.e., film cooling holes sitting in a transverse groove. The film cooling structure for this experimental test consists of a three-hole row embedded in a trench 0.5D in depth and 2D in width, where D is the diameter of the holes. Five blowing ratios (0.29, 0.43, 0.57, 0.93, and 1.36) are tested. Based on the tested results, the three film cooling schemes are also compared. To implement the experimental work, a test system

  17. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  18. Colossal Spincaloritronic Cooling by Adiabatic Spin-Entropy Expansion in Nanospintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Dinh, Van An; Sato, Kazunori

    2009-03-01

    The exchange interactions in DMS are short ranged and can not play an important role for realizing high-TC because the solubility of magnetic impurity is too low to achieve magnetic percolation [1]. We show that spinodal nano-decomposition under layer-by-layer crystal growth condition (2D) leads to characteristic quasi-one dimensional nano-structures (Konbu- Phase) with highly anisotropic shape and high TC (> 1000K) even for low concentrations in DMS [2]. We design a spin-currents- controlled 100 Tera bits/icnh^2, Tera Hz switching, and non- volatile MRAM without Si-CMOS based on Konbu-Phase [3]. In addition to the conventional Peltier effect, we propose a colossal spincaloritronic cooling based on the adiabatic spin- entropy expansion in a Konbu-Phase (Zn,Cr)Te with very high blocking temperature (TB > 1000 K) by spinodal nano- decomposition and by nano-column of Half-Heusler NiMnSi (TC = 1050 K) [4]. [1] K. Sato et al., Phys. Rev. B70, 201202 (2004). [2] H. Katayama-Yoshida et al., Phys. stat. sol. (a) 204 (2007) 15. [3] Japanese Patent: JP3571034, US Patent: US 7,164,180 B2, EU Patent: EP 1548832A1, Taiwan Patent:1262593, Korean Patent: 0557387. [4] H. Katayama-Yoshida et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46 (2007) L777.

  19. Effects of Hole Length, Supply Plenum Geometry, and Freestream Turbulence on Film Cooling Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burd, Steven W.; Simon, Terrence W.; Thurman, Douglas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experimental measurements are presented in this report to document the sensitivity of film cooling performance to the hole length and coolant delivery plenum geometry. Measurements with hot-wire anemometry detail velocity, local turbulence, and spectral distributions over the exit plane of film cooling holes and downstream of injection in the coolant-freestream interaction zone. Measurements of discharge coefficients and adiabatic effectiveness are also provided. Coolant is supplied to the film cooling holes by means of a large, open plenum and through plenums which force the coolant to approach the holes either co-current or counter-current to the freestream. A single row of film cooling holes with 35 degree-inclined streamwise at two coolant-to-freestream velocity ratios, 0.5 and 1.0, is investigated. The coolant-to-freestream density ratio is maintained in the range 0.96 to 1.0. Measurements were taken under high-freestream (FSTI = 12%) and low-freestream turbulence intensity (FSTI = 0.5%) conditions. The results document the effects of the hole L/D, coolant supply plenum geometry, velocity ratio, and FSTI. In general, hole L/D and the supply plenum geometry play influential roles in the film cooling performance. Hole L/D effects, however, are more pronounced. Film cooling performance is also dependent upon the velocity ratio and FSTI.

  20. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  1. Effects of geometry on slot-jet film cooling performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hyams, D.G.; McGovern, K.T.; Leylek, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    The physics of the film cooling process for shaped, inclined slot-jets with realistic slot-length-to-width ratios (L/s) is studied for a range of blowing ratio (M) and density ratio (DR) parameters typical of gas turbine operations. For the first time in the open literature, the effect of inlet and exit shaping of the slot-jet on both flow and thermal field characteristics is isolated, and the dominant mechanisms responsible for differences in these characteristics are documented. A previously documented computational methodology was applied for the study of four distinct configurations: (1) slot with straight edges and sharp corners (reference case); (2) slot with shaped inlet region; (3) slot with shaped exit region; and (4) slot with both shaped inlet and exit regions. Detailed field results as well as surface phenomena involving adiabatic film effectiveness ({eta}) and heat transfer coefficient (h) are presented. It is demonstrated that both {eta} and h results are vital in the proper assessment of film cooling performance. All simulations were carried out using a multi-block, unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching solver with multi-grid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing type acceleration techniques. Special attention was paid to and full documentation provided for: (1) proper modeling of the physical phenomena; (2) exact geometry and high quality grid generation techniques; (3) discretization schemes; and (4) turbulence modeling issues. The key parameters M and DR were varied from 1.0 to 2.0 and 1.5 to 2.0, respectively, to show their influence. Simulations were repeated for slot length-to-width ratio (L/s) of 3.0 and 4.5 in order to explain the effects of this important parameter. Additionally, the performance of two popular turbulence models, standard k-F, and RNG k-E, were studied to establish their ability to handle highly elliptic jet/crossflow interaction type processes.

  2. Air film cooling in a nonadiabatic wall conical nozzle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Papell, S. S.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data for an air-film cooled conical nozzle operating with a heated-air main stream and a water-cooled wall confirm the validity of Lieu's (1964) method for correlating film cooling data in the accelerated flow of a nonadiabatic-wall nozzle. The film cooling effectiveness modified for nonadiabatic walls by Lieu can be used to correlate film cooling under the condition that the main-stream to coolant velocity ratio at the slot is about 1. Such a ratio provides the optimum cooling effectiveness.

  3. Film cooling in a plane turbine cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. J.; Eckert, E. R. G.; Ito, S.

    A mass transfer study is conducted using simulated turbine blades in order to determine the influence of surface curvature on film cooling effectiveness for ratios of injected gas/mainstream air density of approximately unity and of 2. Great care must be taken in applying the results of flat-plate film-cooling experiments with a single row of holes to the design of turbine blade coolant systems; relative trends for increasing or decreasing effectiveness depend on the momentum flux ratio as well as the sign of the radius-of-curvature of the surface. Greater blockage of the mainstream decreases the relative penetration of jets into the freestream, thereby decreasing the importance of the pressure gradient normal to the surface.

  4. Bright Fans in Mars Cryptic Region Caused by Adiabatic Cooling of CO2 Gas Jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, T. N.; Kieffer, H. H.; Langevin, Y.; Murchie, S.; Seelos, F.; Vincendon, M.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade, observations of the retreat of the southern seasonal cap of Mars have revealed the presence of exotic processes within an area now informally referred to as the cryptic region. The appearance of dark spots, fans, blotches, and halos have been a "hot" topic of scientific discussion since they were first observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) [Malin et al., 1998]. Further observations by the Mars Odyssey (ODY) Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) showed that the dark features remained cold throughout the early-to-mid spring, suggesting that these features were either CO2 ice or were in thermal contact with CO2 ice [Kieffer et al., 2006]. In this paper, we present observations in the near-infrared at spatial resolutions that have previously been unavailable. We present further evidence that many of these features in the cryptic region are the result of cold jets, as first described by Kieffer [2000, 2007]. The adiabatic cooling of gas spewing downwind from the jets produces CO2 frost, thus forming the bright fans. The bright fans appear to be devoid of H2O ice, thus further supporting the hypothesis that they are formed from the downwind settling of CO2 frost. In some areas, the bright fans are adjacent to dark fans and appear to start from common vertices, while in other areas, bright fan-like deposits occur without the strong presence of dark fans. References: Kieffer, H.H. (2000) Annual Punctuated CO2 Slab-Ice and Jets on Mars, International Conference on Mars Polar Science and Exploration, p. 93. Kieffer, H.H. et al. (2006) Nature, 442,793-796. Kieffer, H.H. (2007) JGR, in press. Malin, M.C., M.H. Carr, G.E. Danielson, M.E. Davies, W.K. Hartmann, A.P. Ingersoll, P.B. James, H. Masursky, A.S. McEwen, L.A. Soderblom, P. Thomas, J. Veverka, M.A. Caplinger, M.A. Ravine, and T.A. Soulanille (1998) Early views of the Martian surface from the Mars orbiter camera of Mars global surveyor, Science, 279, 1681-1685.

  5. Film cooling on the pressure surface of a turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.; Gladden, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Film-cooling-air ejection from the pressure surface of a turbine vane was investigated, and experimental data are presented. This investigation was conducted in a four-vane cascade on a J75-size turbine vane that had a double row of staggered holes in line with the primary flow and located downstream of the leading edge region. The results showed that: (1) the average effectiveness of film-convection cooling was higher than that of either film cooling or convection cooling separately; (2) the addition of small quantities of film-cooling air always increased the cooling effectiveness relative to the zero-injection case; however, (3) the injected film must exceed a certain threshold value to obtain a beneficial effect of film cooling relative to convection cooling alone.

  6. Analysis of film cooling in rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbury, Keith A.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings on the NASA contract NAG8-212, Task No. 3. The overall project consists of three tasks, all of which have been successfully completed. In addition, some supporting supplemental work, not required by the contract, has been performed and is documented herein. Task 1 involved the modification of the wall functions in the code FDNS (Finite Difference Navier-Stokes) to use a Reynolds Analogy-based method. This task was completed in August, 1992. Task 2 involved the verification of the code against experimentally available data. The data chosen for comparison was from an experiment involving the injection of helium from a wall jet. Results obtained in completing this task also show the sensitivity of the FDNS code to unknown conditions at the injection slot. This task was completed in September, 1992. Task 3 required the computation of the flow of hot exhaust gases through the P&W 40K subscale nozzle. Computations were performed both with and without film coolant injection. This task was completed in July, 1993. The FDNS program tends to overpredict heat fluxes, but, with suitable modeling of backside cooling, may give reasonable wall temperature predictions. For film cooling in the P&W 40K calorimeter subscale nozzle, the average wall temperature is reduced from 1750R to about 1050R by the film cooling. The average wall heat flux is reduced by a factor of 3.

  7. Impact of rotor-stator interaction on turbine blade film cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Abhari, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this study is to quantify the impact of rotor-stator interaction on surface heat transfer of film cooled turbine blades. In Section 1, a steady-state injection model of the film cooling is incorporated into a two-dimensional, thin shear layer, multiblade row CFD code. This injection model accounts for the penetration and spreading of the coolant jet, as well as the entrainment of the boundary layer fluid by the coolant. The code is validated, in the steady state, by comparing its predictions to data from a blade tested in linear cascade. In Section 2, time-resolved film cooled turbine rotor heat transfer measurements are compared with numerical predictions. Data were taken on a fully film cooled blade in a transonic, high pressure ratio, single-stage turbine in a short duration turbine test facility, which simulates full-engine non-dimensional conditions. Film cooled heat flux on the pressure surface is predicted to be as much as a factor of two higher in the time average of the unsteady calculations compared to the steady-state case. Time-resolved film cooled heat transfer comparison of data to prediction at two spanwise positions is used to validate the numerical code. The unsteady stator-rotor interaction results in the pulsation of the coolant injection flow out of the film holes with large-scale fluctuations. The combination of pulsating coolant flow and the interaction of the coolant with this unsteady external flow is shown to lower the local pressure side adiabatic film effectiveness by as much as 64% when compared to the steady-state case.

  8. Effects of bulk flow pulsations on film cooling from different length injection holes at different blowing ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, H.J.; Lee, J.S.; Ligrani, P.M.

    1999-07-01

    Bulk flow pulsations in the form of sinusoidal variations of velocity and static pressure at injectant Strouhal numbers from 0.8 to 10.0 are investigated as they affect film cooling from a single row of simple angle holes. Similar flow variations are produced by potential flow interactions and passing shock waves near turbine surfaces in gas turbine engines. Time-averaged temperature distributions, phase-averaged temperature distributions, adiabatic film cooling effectiveness values, and iso-energetic Stranton numbers show that important alterations to film cooling protection occur as pulsation frequency, coolant Strouhal number, blowing ratio, and nondimensional injection hole length are changed. Overall, the pulsations affect film performance and behavior more significantly both as L/D decreases, and as blowing ratio decreases.

  9. Slot film cooling: A comprehensive experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffan, Fernando

    When components of a propulsion system are exposed to elevated flow temperatures there is a risk for catastrophic failure if the components are not properly protected from the thermal loads. Among several strategies, slot film cooling is one of the most commonly used, yet poorly understood active cooling techniques. Tangential injection of a relatively cool fluid layer protects the surface(s) in question, but the turbulent mixing between the hot mainstream and cooler film along with the presence of the wall presents an inherently complex problem where kinematics, thermal transport and multimodal heat transfer are coupled. Furthermore, new propulsion designs rely heavily on CFD analysis to verify their viability. These CFD models require validation of their results, and the current literature does not provide a comprehensive data set for film cooling that meets all the demands for proper validation, namely a comprehensive (kinematic, thermal and boundary condition data) data set obtained over a wide range of conditions. This body of work aims at solving the fundamental issue of validation by providing high quality comprehensive film cooling data (kinematics, thermal mixing, heat transfer). 3 distinct velocity ratios (VR=u c/uinfinity) are examined corresponding to wall-wake (VR˜0.5), min-shear (VR ˜ 1.0), and wall-jet (VR˜2.0) type flows at injection, while the temperature ratio TR= Tinfinity/Tc is approximately 1.5 for all cases. Turbulence intensities at injection are 2-4% for the mainstream (urms/uinfinity, vrms/uinfinity,), and on the order of 8-10% for the coolant (urms/uc, vrms/uc,). A special emphasis is placed on inlet characterization, since inlet data in the literature is often incomplete or is of relatively low quality for CFD development. The data reveals that min-shear injection provides the best performance, followed by the wall-jet. The wall-wake case is comparably poor in performance. The comprehensive data suggests that this relative performance

  10. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  11. Long Hole Film Cooling Dataset for CFD Development - Flow and Film Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Poinsatte, Phillip; Thurman, Douglas; Ameri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    An experiment investigating flow and heat transfer of long (length to diameter ratio of 18) cylindrical film cooling holes has been completed. In this paper, the thermal field in the flow and on the surface of the film cooled flat plate is presented for nominal freestream turbulence intensities of 1.5 and 8 percent. The holes are inclined at 30 deg above the downstream direction, injecting chilled air of density ratio 1.0 onto the surface of a flat plate. The diameter of the hole is 0.75 in. (approx. 0.02 m) with center to center spacing (pitch) of 3 hole diameters. Coolant was injected into the mainstream flow at nominal blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The Reynolds number of the freestream was approximately 11,000 based on hole diameter. Thermocouple surveys were used to characterize the thermal field. Infrared thermography was used to determine the adiabatic film effectiveness on the plate. Hotwire anemometry was used to provide flowfield physics and turbulence measurements. The results are compared to existing data in the literature. The aim of this work is to produce a benchmark dataset for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) development to eliminate the effects of hole length to diameter ratio and to improve resolution in the near-hole region. In this report, a Time Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS), also known as Partially Resolved Navier Stokes (PRNS), method that was implemented in the Glenn-HT code is used to model coolant-mainstream interaction. This method is a high fidelity unsteady method that aims to represent large scale flow features and mixing more accurately.

  12. Hypersonic film cooling effectiveness and aero-optical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swigart, R. J.; Shih, W. C. L.; Wang, J. H.; Snow, R.; Trolier, J. W.

    A correlation parameter for film-cooling efficiency has been developed that removes the low-energy outer-flow restriction on which earlier parameters were based. The parameter is shown to collapse a large body of film-cooling efficiency data over a broad range of coolant-injectant and external-flow conditions embodying all speed ranges. The validity and accuracy of the parameter is independently validated using state-of-the-art CFD techniques. The correlation is extremely useful for the design of film-cooling systems, and should be applicable to a broad range of film-cooling applications. Computational algorithms for calculating film-cooling flow-field-induced boresight error and image-blur aerooptical effects are presented. These algorithms should be extremely useful for the prediction of flow-field effects on optical sensor performance.

  13. Effect of weak swirling flow on film cooling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gau, C.; Hwang, W. B.

    1990-10-01

    Experiments have been performed in a large circular pipe to study and obtain the film cooling effectivenesses with the presence of weak swirling flow in the mainstream. The swirling flow is generated by a flat vane swirler situated upstream. Cooling film is injected from an annular slot formed by the pipe wall and the circular cover plate. The radial temperature distribution measurements at several axial locations were used to infer the rate of mixing of film jet with swirling flow. The swirl number, which increases with turbulence intensity and swirl velocity in the mainstream, can significantly increase the mixing rate of film jet with swirl flow and decrease the film cooling effectiveness. During the course of the experiments, the blowing ratio ranged from 0.5 to 1.75 and the swirl number ranged from 0 to 0.6. Correlation equations for the film cooling effectiveness, which account for the effect of swirling flow, are obtained.

  14. Investigation on cooling effectiveness and aerodynamic loss of a turbine cascade with film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Lin, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xiaodong; An, Baitao

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the numerical study on film cooling effectiveness and aerodynamic loss due to coolant and main stream mixing for a turbine guide vane. The effects of blowing ratio, mainstream Mach number, surface curvature on the cooling effectiveness and mixing loss were studied and discussed. The numerical results show that the distributions of film cooling effectiveness on the suction surface and pressure surface at the same blowing ratio (BR) are different due to local surface curvature and pressure gradient. The aerodynamic loss features for film holes on the pressure surface are also different from film holes on the suction surface.

  15. A progress report on using bolometers cooled by adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesyna, L.; Roellig, T.; Savage, M.; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    For sensitive detection of astronomical continuum radiation in the 200 micron to 3 mm wavelength range, bolometers are presently the detectors of choice. In order to approach the limits imposed by photon noise in a cryogenically cooled telescope in space, bolometers must be operated at temperatures near 0.1 K. Researchers report progress in building and using bolometers that operate at these temperatures. The most sensitive bolometer had an estimated noise equivalent power (NEP) of 7 x 10(exp 017) W Hz(exp -1/2). Researchers also briefly discuss the durability of paramagnetic salts used to cool the bolometers.

  16. Laminated turbine vane design and fabrication. [utilizing film cooling as a cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    A turbine vane and associated endwalls designed for advanced gas turbine engine conditions are described. The vane design combines the methods of convection cooling and selective areas of full coverage film cooling. The film cooling technique is utilized on the leading edge, pressure side, and endwall regions. The turbine vane involves the fabrication of airfoils from a stack of laminates with cooling passages photoetched on the surface. Cold flow calibration tests, a thermal analysis, and a stress analysis were performed on the turbine vanes.

  17. Computation of full-coverage film-cooled airfoil temperatures by two methods and comparison with high heat flux data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Yeh, F. C.; Austin, P. J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Two methods were used to calculate the heat flux to full-coverage film cooled airfoils and, subsequently, the airfoil wall temperatures. The calculated wall temperatures were compared to measured temperatures obtained in the Hot Section Facility operating at real engine conditions. Gas temperatures and pressures up to 1900 K and 18 atm with a Reynolds number up to 1.9 million were investigated. Heat flux was calculated by the convective heat transfer coefficient adiabatic wall method and by the superposition method which incorporates the film injection effects in the heat transfer coefficient. The results of the comparison indicate the first method can predict the experimental data reasonably well. However, superposition overpredicted the heat flux to the airfoil without a significant modification of the turbulent Prandtl number. The results suggest that additional research is required to model the physics of full-coverage film cooling where there is significant temperature/density differences between the gas and the coolant.

  18. Plugging of cooling holes in film-cooled turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The plugging of vane cooling holes by impurities in a marine gas turbine was closely simulated in burner rig tests where dopants were added to the combustion products of a clean fuel (Jet-A). Hole plugging occurred when liquid phases, resulting from the dopants, were present in the combustion products. Increasing flame temperature and dopant concentration resulted in an increased rate of deposition and hole plugging.

  19. The design of an improved endwall film-cooling configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrichs, S.; Hodson, H.P.; Dawes, W.N.

    1999-10-01

    The endwall film-cooling cooling configuration investigated by Friedrichs et al. (1196, 1997) had in principle sufficient cooling flow for the endwall, but in practice, the redistribution of this coolant by secondary flows left large endwall areas uncooled. This paper describes the attempt to improve upon this datum cooling configuration by redistributing the available coolant to provide a better coolant coverage on the endwall surface, while keeping the associated aerodynamic losses small. The design of the new, improved cooling configuration was based on the understanding of endwall film-cooling described by Friedrichs et al. (1996, 1997). Computational fluid dynamics were used to predict the basic flow and pressure field without coolant ejection. Using this as a basis, the above-described understanding was used to place cooling holes so that they would provide the necessary cooling coverage at minimal aerodynamic penalty. The simple analytical modeling developed by Friedrichs et al. (1997) was then used to check that the coolant consumption and the increase in aerodynamic loss lay within the limits of the design goal. The improved cooling configuration was tested experimentally in a large-scale, low-speed linear cascade. An analysis of the results shows that the redesign of the cooling configuration has been successful in achieving an improved coolant coverage with lower aerodynamic losses, while using the same amount of coolant as in the datum cooling configuration. The improved cooling configuration has reconfirmed conclusions from Friedrichs et al. (1996, 1997): First, coolant ejection downstream of the three-dimensional separation lines on the endwall does not change the secondary flow structures: second, placement of holes in regions of high static pressure helps reduce the aerodynamic penalties of platform coolant ejection: finally, taking account of secondary flow can improve the design of endwall film-cooling configurations.

  20. Application of an unstructured Navier-Stokes code to prediction of adiabatic effectiveness of endwall flush-slot-cooling for a stator vane passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Evgueni M.; Smirnov, Paul E.

    2008-06-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured finite-volume code developed for RANS computations with the artificial compressibility approach is described. The code is applied to prediction of adiabatic effectiveness of endwall flush-slot-cooling for a stator vane passage. Results obtained with the Spalart-Allmaras and the Menter SST turbulence models are presented and discussed in comparison with measurements and with the data computed using the FLUENT commercial software package.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements of Film Cooling Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, Christopher; Alley, Marcus; Eaton, John

    2009-11-01

    Film cooling through holes and slots is used extensively in gas turbine engines to protect combustor walls, stator vanes, and turbine blades. Film cooling effectiveness has been shown to depend on myriad geometrical and flow parameters. Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) and Concentration (MRC) measurements efficiently acquire entire 3D velocity and scalar information making them well suited to investigate the large design parameter space. In addition, MRV and MRC provide information in the film supply plenum and hole which is traditionally unobtainable. Here, MRC is extended to near wall measurements to determine film cooling effectiveness. Measurements are made for a single film hole (d=5.8 mm, l/d=4 and α=30 ) in the wall of a square channel. Velocity and scalar concentration data are presented for multiple blowing ratios. The data show the evolution of vortices around the jets, the coolant mixing, and the 2D film cooling effectiveness distribution. Measurements within the plenum and injection hole show the origin of specific flow structures.

  2. Vortex-generating coolant-flow-passage design for increased film-cooling effectiveness and surface coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal film-cooling footprints observed by infrared imagery for three coolant-passage configurations embedded in adiabatic-test plates are discussed. The configurations included a standard round-hole cross section and two orientations of a vortex-generating flow passage. Both orientations showed up to factors of four increases in both film-cooling effectiveness and surface coverage over that obtained with the round coolant passage. The crossflow data covered a range of tunnel velocities from 15.5 to 45 m/sec with blowing rates from 0.20 to 2.05. A photographic streakline flow visualization technique supported the concept of the counterrotating apability of the flow passage design and gave visual credence to its role in inhibiting flow separation.

  3. Film cooling from inclined cylindrical holes using large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peet, Yulia V.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of the present study is to investigate numerically the physics of the flow, which occurs during the film cooling from inclined cylindrical holes, Film cooling is a technique used in gas turbine industry to reduce heat fluxes to the turbine blade surface. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed modeling a realistic film cooling configuration, which consists of a large stagnation-type reservoir, feeding an array of discrete cooling holes (film holes) flowing into a flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Special computational methodology is developed for this problem, involving coupled simulations using multiple computational codes. A fully compressible LES code is used in the area above the flat plate, while a low Mach number LES code is employed in the plenum and film holes. The motivation for using different codes comes from the essential difference in the nature of the flow in these different regions. Flowfield is analyzed inside the plenum, film hole and a crossflow region. Flow inside the plenum is stagnating, except for the region close to the exit, where it accelerates rapidly to turn into the hole. The sharp radius of turning at the trailing edge of the plenum pipe connection causes the flow to separate from the downstream wall of the film hole. After coolant injection occurs, a complex flowfield is formed consisting of coherent vortical structures responsible for bringing hot crossflow fluid in contact with the walls of either the film hole or the blade, thus reducing cooling protection. Mean velocity and turbulent statistics are compared to experimental measurements, yielding good agreement for the mean flowfield and satisfactory agreement for the turbulence quantities. LES results are used to assess the applicability of basic assumptions of conventional eddy viscosity turbulence models used with Reynolds-averaged (RANS) approach, namely the isotropy of an eddy viscosity and thermal diffusivity. It is shown here that these assumptions do not hold

  4. Large Eddy Simulations and Turbulence Modeling for Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, Sumanta

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research is to perform Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) for film cooling process, and to evaluate and improve advanced forms of the two equation turbulence models for turbine blade surface flow analysis. The DNS/LES were used to resolve the large eddies within the flow field near the coolant jet location. The work involved code development and applications of the codes developed to the film cooling problems. Five different codes were developed and utilized to perform this research. This report presented a summary of the development of the codes and their applications to analyze the turbulence properties at locations near coolant injection holes.

  5. Film cooling from spanwise-oriented holes in two staggered rows

    SciTech Connect

    Ligrani, P.M.; Ramsey, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    Adiabatic effectiveness and iso-energetic heat transfer coefficients are presented from measurements downstream of film-cooling holes inclined at 30 deg. With respect to the test surface in spanwise/normal planes. With this configuration, holes are spaced 3d apart in the spanwise direction and 4d in the streamwise direction in two staggered rows. Results are presented for an injectant to free-stream density ratio near 1.0, and injection blowing ratios from 0.5 to 1.5. Spanwise-averaged adiabatic effectiveness values downstream of the spanwise/normal plane holes are significantly higher than values measured downstream of simple angle holes for x/d < 25--70 (depending on blowing ratio) when compared for the same normalized streamwise location, blowing ratio, and spanwise and streamwise hole spacings. Spanwise-averaged iso-energetic Stanton number ratios range between 1.0 and 1.41, increase with blowing ratio at each streamwise station, and show little variation with streamwise location for each value of blowing ratio tested.

  6. Prediction of Film Cooling on Gas Turbine Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis tool has been developed in order to study the effect of film cooling on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of actual turbine airfoils. An existing code (Arnone et al., 1991) has been modified for the purpose. The code is an explicit, multigrid, cell-centered, finite volume code with an algebraic turbulence model. Eigenvalue scaled artificial dissipation and variable-coefficient implicit residual smoothing are used with a full-multigrid technique. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (Mayle, 1991) is used. The effects of film cooling have been incorporated into the code in the form of appropriate boundary conditions at the hole locations on the airfoil surface. Each hole exit is represented by several control volumes, thus providing an ability to study the effect of hole shape on the film-cooling characteristics. Comparison is fair with near mid-span experimental data for four and nine rows of cooling holes, five on the shower head, and two rows each on the pressure and suction surfaces. The computations, however, show a strong spanwise variation of the heat transfer coefficient on the airfoil surface, specially with shower-head cooling.

  7. Film Cooling Flow Effects on Post-Combustor Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2003-01-01

    Film cooling injection is widely applied in the thermal design of turbomachinery, as it contributes to achieve higher operating temperature conditions of modern gas turbines, and to meet the requirements for reliability and life cycles. It is a significant part of the high-pressure turbine system. The film cooling injection, however, interacts with the main flow and is susceptible to have an influence on the aerodynamic performance of the cooled components, and through that may cause a penalty on the overall efficiency of the gas turbine. The main reasons are the loss of total pressure resulting from mixing the cooling air with mainstream and the reduction of the gas stagnation temperature at the exit of the combustion chamber to a lower value at the exit of nozzle guide vane. In addition, the impact of the injected air on the evolution of the trace species of the hot gas is not yet quite clear. This work computationally investigates the film cooling influence on post-combustor trace chemistry, as trace species in aircraft exhaust affect climate and ozone.

  8. Film-Cooling Heat-Transfer Measurements Using Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: (1) The Transient Liquid-Crystal Heat-Transfer Technique; (2) 2-D Film-Cooling Heat-Transfer on an AlliedSignal Vane; and (3) Effects of Tab Vortex Generators on Surface Heat Transfer. Downstream of a Jet in Crossflow.

  9. Coarse Grid Modeling of Turbine Film Cooling Flows Using Volumetric Source Terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.; Hunter, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    The recent trend in numerical modeling of turbine film cooling flows has been toward higher fidelity grids and more complex geometries. This trend has been enabled by the rapid increase in computing power available to researchers. However, the turbine design community requires fast turnaround time in its design computations, rendering these comprehensive simulations ineffective in the design cycle. The present study describes a methodology for implementing a volumetric source term distribution in a coarse grid calculation that can model the small-scale and three-dimensional effects present in turbine film cooling flows. This model could be implemented in turbine design codes or in multistage turbomachinery codes such as APNASA, where the computational grid size may be larger than the film hole size. Detailed computations of a single row of 35 deg round holes on a flat plate have been obtained for blowing ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0, and density ratios of 1.0 and 2.0 using a multiblock grid system to resolve the flows on both sides of the plate as well as inside the hole itself. These detailed flow fields were spatially averaged to generate a field of volumetric source terms for each conservative flow variable. Solutions were also obtained using three coarse grids having streamwise and spanwise grid spacings of 3d, 1d, and d/3. These coarse grid solutions used the integrated hole exit mass, momentum, energy, and turbulence quantities from the detailed solutions as volumetric source terms. It is shown that a uniform source term addition over a distance from the wall on the order of the hole diameter is able to predict adiabatic film effectiveness better than a near-wall source term model, while strictly enforcing correct values of integrated boundary layer quantities.

  10. Influence of in-hole roughness and high freestream turbulence on film cooling from a shaped hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Robert P.

    Gas turbines are heavily used for electricity generation and aircraft propulsion with a strong desire in both uses to maximize thermal efficiency while maintaining reasonable power output. As a consequence, gas turbines run at high turbine inlet temperatures that require sophisticated cooling technologies to ensure survival of turbine components. One such technology is film cooling with shaped holes, where air is withdrawn from latter stages of the compressor, is bypassed around the combustor, and is eventually ejected out holes in turbine component surfaces. Air ejected from these shaped holes helps maintain components at temperatures lower than flow from the combustor. Many studies have investigated different factors that influence shaped hole performance. However, no studies in open literature have investigated how cooling performance is affected by roughness along interior walls of the shaped hole. The effect of in-hole roughness on shaped hole film cooling was the focus of this research. Investigation of in-hole roughness effects first required the determination of behavior for a shaped hole with smooth walls. A public shaped hole, now used by other investigators as well, was designed with a diffused outlet having 7º expansion angles and an area ratio of 2.5. At low freestream turbulence intensity of 0.5%, film cooling adiabatic effectiveness for this smooth hole was found to peak at a blowing ratio of 1.5. Measurements of flowfields and thermal fields revealed causes of this behavior. Blowing ratio increases above 1.5 caused the jet from the smooth hole to penetrate higher into the surrounding mainstream, exhibit a stronger counter-rotating vortex pair, and have narrower contact with the wall than at lower blowing ratios. Experiments performed at high freestream turbulence intensity of 13% revealed dynamics of how freestream turbulence both diluted and laterally spread coolant. At the high blowing ratio of 3 the dilution and spreading were competing effects

  11. Cooling Duct Analysis for Transpiration/Film Cooled Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micklow, Gerald J.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a low cost space transportation system requires that the propulsion system be reusable, have long life, with good performance and use low cost propellants. Improved performance can be achieved by operating the engine at higher pressure and temperature levels than previous designs. Increasing the chamber pressure and temperature, however, will increase wall heating rates. This necessitates the need for active cooling methods such as film cooling or transpiration cooling. But active cooling can reduce the net thrust of the engine and add considerably to the design complexity. Recently, a metal drawing process has been patented where it is possible to fabricate plates with very small holes with high uniformity with a closely specified porosity. Such a metal plate could be used for an inexpensive transpiration/film cooled liner to meet the demands of advanced reusable rocket engines, if coolant mass flow rates could be controlled to satisfy wall cooling requirements and performance. The present study investigates the possibility of controlling the coolant mass flow rate through the porous material by simple non-active fluid dynamic means. The coolant will be supplied to the porous material by series of constant geometry slots machined on the exterior of the engine.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Film Cooling at High Blowing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Gabry, Lamyaa; Heidmann, James; Ameri, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is used in the analysis of a film cooling jet in crossflow. Predictions of film effectiveness are compared with experimental results for a circular jet at blowing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 2.0. Film effectiveness is a surface quantity which alone is insufficient in understanding the source and finding a remedy for shortcomings of the numerical model. Therefore, in addition, comparisons are made to flow field measurements of temperature along the jet centerline. These comparisons show that the CFD model is accurately predicting the extent and trajectory of the film cooling jet; however, there is a lack of agreement in the near-wall region downstream of the film hole. The effects of main stream turbulence conditions, boundary layer thickness, turbulence modeling, and numerical artificial dissipation are evaluated and found to have an insufficient impact in the wake region of separated films (i.e. cannot account for the discrepancy between measured and predicted centerline fluid temperatures). Analyses of low and moderate blowing ratio cases are carried out and results are in good agreement with data.

  13. Surface cooling of scramjet engine inlets using heat pipe, transpiration, and film cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Modlin, J.M.; Colwell, G.T. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta )

    1992-09-01

    This article reports the results of applying a finite-difference-based computational technique to the problem of predicting the transient thermal behavior of a scramjet engine inlet exposed to a typical hypersonic flight aerodynamic surface heating environment, including type IV shock interference heating. The leading-edge cooling model utilized incorporates liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling. Results include transient structural temperature distributions, aerodynamic heat inputs, and surface coolant distributions. It seems that these cooling techniques may be used to hold maximum skin temperatures to near acceptable values during the severe aerodynamic and type IV shock interference heating effects expected on the leading edge of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle scramjet engine. 15 refs.

  14. Heat Transfer Measurements for a Film Cooled Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsatte, Philip E.; Heidmann, James D.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained on a large scale film cooled turbine vane cascade. The objective was to investigate heat transfer on a commercial high pressure first stage turbine vane at near engine Mach and Reynolds number conditions. Additionally blowing ratios and coolant density were also matched. Numerical computations were made with the Glenn-HT code of the same geometry and compared with the experimental results. A transient thermochromic liquid crystal technique was used to obtain steady state heat transfer data on the mid-span geometry of an instrumented vane with 12 rows of circular and shaped film cooling holes. A mixture of SF6 and Argon gases was used for film coolant to match the coolant-to-gas density ratio of a real engine. The exit Mach number and Reynolds number were 0.725 and 2.7 million respectively. Trends from the experimental heat transfer data matched well with the computational prediction, particularly for the film cooled case.

  15. The Effect of Wake Passing on Turbine Blade Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James David

    1996-01-01

    The effect of upstream blade row wake passing on the showerhead film cooling performance of a downstream turbine blade has been investigated through a combination of experimental and computational studies. The experiments were performed in a steady-flow annular turbine cascade facility equipped with an upstream rotating row of cylindrical rods to produce a periodic wake field similar to that found in an actual turbine. Spanwise, chordwise, and temporal resolution of the blade surface temperature were achieved through the use of an array of nickel thin-film surface gauges covering one unit cell of showerhead film hole pattern. Film effectiveness and Nusselt number values were determined for a test matrix of various injectants, injectant blowing ratios, and wake Strouhal numbers. Results indicated a demonstratable reduction in film effectiveness with increasing Strouhal number, as well as the expected increase in film effectiveness with blowing ratio. An equation was developed to correlate the span-average film effectiveness data. The primary effect of wake unsteadiness was found to be correlated well by a chordwise-constant decrement of 0.094-St. Measurable spanwise film effectiveness variations were found near the showerhead region, but meaningful unsteady variations and downstream spanwise variations were not found. Nusselt numbers were less sensitive to wake and injection changes. Computations were performed using a three-dimensional turbulent Navier-Stokes code which was modified to model wake passing and film cooling. Unsteady computations were found to agree well with steady computations provided the proper time-average blowing ratio and pressure/suction surface flow split are matched. The remaining differences were isolated to be due to the enhanced mixing in the unsteady solution caused by the wake sweeping normally on the pressure surface. Steady computations were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental Nusselt numbers, but to overpredict

  16. Film cooling in a pulsating stream

    SciTech Connect

    Fasel, H.; Ortega, A.; Wygnanski, I.J.

    1997-12-31

    The mean flow and stability characteristics of a plane, laminar wall jet were investigated experimentally, theoretically, and numerically for a constant wall temperature boundary condition. The streamwise mean velocity and temperature profiles and the downstream development of the hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layer thicknesses were obtained through simultaneous hot and cold wire measurements. Even at relatively low temperature differences, heating or cooling of the surface sufficiently altered the mean velocity profile in the inner region to produce significant effects on the jet stability. Selective forcing of the flow at the most amplified frequencies produced profound effects on the velocity and temperature fields and hence the time-averaged shear stress and heat transfer. Large amplitude excitation of the flow at high frequencies resulted in a reduction in the maximum skin friction by as much as 65% with an increase in the maximum wall heat flux as high as 45%. The skin friction and wall heat flux were much less susceptible to low frequency excitation.

  17. Discharge coefficients of impingement and film cooling holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, T.; Brown, A.; Garret, S.

    1985-03-01

    In this article measurements of fluid flow through impingement and film cooling holes for typical turbine blade cooling systems are presented. The purpose of the measurements was to determine hole discharge coefficients over a range of Reynolds numbers from 5,000 to 30,000 and to observe in this range the dependence of discharge coefficient on Reynolds number. The effect of hole geometry, that is, sharp edged inlet or corner radius inlet, on discharge coefficients is also measured. Correlations relating discharge coefficients to Reynolds number, corner radius to hole diameter ratio, and blowing parameter are suggested.

  18. Film cooling: case of double rows of staggered jets.

    PubMed

    Dorignac, E; Vullierme, J J; Noirault, P; Foucault, E; Bousgarbiès, J L

    2001-05-01

    An experimental investigation of film cooling of a wall in a case of double rows of staggered hot jets (65 degrees C) in an ambient air flow. The wall is heated at a temperature value between the one of the jets and the one of the main flow. Experiments have been carried out for different injection rates, the main flow velocity is maintained at 32 m/s. Association of the measures of temperature profiles by cold wire and the measures of wall temperature by infrared thermography allows us to describe the behaviour of the flows and to propose the best injection which assures a good cooling of the plate. PMID:11460645

  19. Long Hole Film Cooling Dataset for CFD Development . Part 1; Infrared Thermography and Thermocouple Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Phillip; Ameri, Ali; Eichele, Peter; Knight, James

    2013-01-01

    An experiment investigating flow and heat transfer of long (length to diameter ratio of 18) cylindrical film cooling holes has been completed. In this paper, the thermal field in the flow and on the surface of the film cooled flat plate is presented for nominal freestream turbulence intensities of 1.5 and 8 percent. The holes are inclined at 30deg above the downstream direction, injecting chilled air of density ratio 1.0 onto the surface of a flat plate. The diameter of the hole is 0.75 in. (0.01905 m) with center to center spacing (pitch) of 3 hole diameters. Coolant was injected into the mainstream flow at nominal blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The Reynolds number of the freestream was approximately 11,000 based on hole diameter. Thermocouple surveys were used to characterize the thermal field. Infrared thermography was used to determine the adiabatic film effectiveness on the plate. Hotwire anemometry was used to provide flowfield physics and turbulence measurements. The results are compared to existing data in the literature. The aim of this work is to produce a benchmark dataset for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) development to eliminate the effects of hole length to diameter ratio and to improve resolution in the near-hole region. In this report, a Time-Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS), also known as Partially Resolved Navier Stokes (PRNS), method that was implemented in the Glenn-HT code is used to model coolant-mainstream interaction. This method is a high fidelity unsteady method that aims to represent large scale flow features and mixing more accurately.

  20. Analysis of Turbine Blade Relative Cooling Flow Factor Used in the Subroutine Coolit Based on Film Cooling Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer correlations of data on flat plates are used to explore the parameters in the Coolit program used for calculating the quantity of cooling air for controlling turbine blade temperature. Correlations for both convection and film cooling are explored for their relevance to predicting blade temperature as a function of a total cooling flow which is split between external film and internal convection flows. Similar trends to those in Coolit are predicted as a function of the percent of the total cooling flow that is in the film. The exceptions are that no film or 100 percent convection is predicted to not be able to control blade temperature, while leaving less than 25 percent of the cooling flow in the convection path results in nearing a limit on convection cooling as predicted by a thermal effectiveness parameter not presently used in Coolit.

  1. Thin-Film Evaporative Cooling for Side-Pumped Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method are provided for cooling a crystal rod of a side-pumped laser. A transparent housing receives the crystal rod therethrough so that an annular gap is defined between the housing and the radial surface of the crystal rod. A fluid coolant is injected into the annular gap such the annular gap is partially filled with the fluid coolant while the radial surface of the crystal rod is wetted as a thin film all along the axial length thereof.

  2. The influence of curvature on film cooling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, S. G.; Goldstein, R. J.; Eckert, E. R. G.

    1990-06-01

    The effects of injection rate and strength of curvature on film cooling performance of gas injected through a row of holes on a convex surface is studied. Comparisons are made to film cooling of concave and flat surfaces. Three different relative strengths of curvature (ratio of radius of curvature to radius of injection hole), two density ratios (0.95 and 2.0), and a wide range of blowing rates (0.3 to 2.7) are considered. A foreign gas injection technique (mass transfer analogy) is used. The strength of curvature was controlled by varying the injection hole diameter. At low blowing rates, film cooling is more effective on the convex surface than on a flat or a concave surface. The cross stream pressure gradient present in curved flows tends to push the jet into the convex wall. As the injection rate is increased, normal and tangential jet momentum promote lift-off from the convex surface, thereby lowering performance. In contrast, previous studies show that a concave surface, tangential jet momentum, flow instabilities, and blockage improve performance on a concave surface as blowing rate is increased.

  3. Visualization of film wavelike characteristics and measurement of film thickness in spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yan; Tao, Yujia; Huai, Xiulan

    2013-04-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the heat transfer in an eight-nozzle spray cooling system with de-ionized water as the working fluid. Visualization of the liquid-solid contact area and the flow near the heated surface was made using a microscopic lens system in conjunction with an advanced high-speed camera. The film thickness and film wavelike characteristics under liquid volume flow rates ranged from 2.78×10-6 m3/s to 1.39×10-5 m3/s and surface temperatures between 22°C and 78.2°C were examined respectively. The development process of the liquid film on the heated surface was observed. The local mean film thickness, the film wavelike characteristics and the behavior of the bubbles appeared in the liquid film were captured using an image processing technique. It is discovered that there exists a climax of local mean film thickness during the starting process of spray cooling. When the liquid film reaches the dynamic stable state, the dimensionless mean film thickness decreases with the increase of the liquid volume flow rate, and increases with the increase of surface temperature generally. Besides, the volume flow rate has a more significant impact on the wavelength and amplitude of the liquid film compared to the surface temperature.

  4. Support of NASA ADR/ Cross-Enterprise NRA Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10K to 50mK, Development of a Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical heat switches are used in conjunction with sorption refrigerators, adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators and for other cryogenic tasks including the pre-cooling cryogenic systems. They use a mechanical actuator which closes Au plated Cu jaws on an Au plated Cu bar. The thermal conductance in the closed position is essentially independent of the area of the jaws and proportional to the force applied. It varies linearly with T. It is approximately 10mW/K for 200 N at 1.5K. In some applications, the heat switch can be driven from outside the cryostat by a rotating rod and a screw. Such heat switches are available commercially from several sources. In other applications, including systems for space, it is desirable to drive the switch using a cold linear motor, or solenoid. Superconducting windings are used at temperatures s 4.2K to minimize power dissipation, but are not appropriate for pre-cooling a system at higher temperatures. This project was intended to improve the design of solenoid activated mechanical heat switches and to provide such switches as required to support the development of Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10 K to 50 mK at GSFC. By the time funding began in 5/1/01, the immediate need for mechanical heat switches at GSFC had subsided but, at the same time, the opportunity had arisen to improve the design of mechanical heat switching by incorporating a "latching solenoid". In this device, the solenoid current is required only for changing the state of the switch and not during the whole time that the switch is closed.

  5. Modeling of Supersonic Film Cooling on the J-2X Nozzle Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Morris, Christopher I.

    2011-01-01

    Supersonic film cooling (SSFC) of nozzles has been used in several liquid rocket engine designs, and is being applied to the nozzle extension (NE) of the J-2X upper stage engine currently under development. Turbine exhaust gas (TEG) is injected tangentially from a manifold along the NE, and provides a thermal barrier from the core nozzle flow for the NE. As the TEG stream mixes with the nozzle flow, the effectiveness of the thermal barrier is reduced. This paper documents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis work performed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to model the flow of the TEG through the manifold, into the nozzle, and the subsequent mixing of the TEG stream with the core flow. The geometry and grid of the TEG manifold, structural support ribs, and the NE wall will be shown, and the CFD boundary conditions described. The Loci-CHEM CFD code used in this work will also be briefly described. A unique approach to modeling the combined TEG manifold/thrust chamber assembly (TCA) was employed, as it was not practical to model the entire 360 circumferential range in one simulation. Prior CFD validation work modeling Calspan SSFC experiments in the early 1990s, documented in a previous AIAA paper, will also be briefly discussed. The fluid dynamics of the TEG flow through the manifold, into and between the structural support ribs, and into the nozzlette that feeds the TCA will be described. Significant swirl and non-uniformities are present, which along with the wakes from the ribs, act to degrade the film cooling effectiveness compared to idealized injection of TEG gas. The effect of these flow characteristics on the adiabatic wall temperature profile on the NE will be discussed.

  6. Experimental Study of Vane Heat Transfer and Film Cooling at Elevated Levels of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Forrest E.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on the influence of high level turbulence on vane film cooling and the influence of film cooling on vane heat transfer. Three different cooling configurations were investigated which included one row of film cooling on both pressure and suction surfaces, two staggered rows of film cooling on both suction and pressure surfaces, and a shower-head cooling array. The turbulence had a strong influence on film cooling effectiveness, particularly on the pressure surface where local turbulence levels were the highest. For the single row of holes, the spanwise mixing quickly reduced centerline effectiveness levels while mixing in the normal direction was more gradual. The film cooling had a strong influence on the heat transfer in the laminar regions of the vane. The effect of film cooling on heat transfer was noticeable in the turbulent regions but augmentation ratios were significantly lower. In addition to heat transfer and film cooling, velocity profiles were taken downstream of the film cooling rows at three spanwise locations. These profile comparisons documented the strong spanwise mixing due to the high turbulence. Total pressure exit measurements were also documented for the three configurations.

  7. Effect of injector configuration in rocket nozzle film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. Lakshya; Pisharady, J. C.; Shine, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations are carried out to analyze the effect of coolant injector configuration on overall film cooling performance in a divergent section of a rocket nozzle. Two different injector orientations are investigated: (1) shaped slots with a divergence angle of 15° (semi-divergent injector) (2) fully divergent slot (fully divergent injector). A 2-dimensional, axis-symmetric, multispecies computational model using finite volume formulation has been developed and validated against the experimental data. The experiments provided a consistent set of measurements for cooling effectiveness for different blowing ratios ranging from 3.7 to 6. Results show that the semi divergent configuration leads to higher effectiveness compared to fully divergent slot at all blowing ratios. The spatially averaged effectiveness results show that the difference between the two configurations is significant at higher blowing ratios. The increase in effectiveness was around 2 % at BR = 3.7 whereas it was around 12 % in the case of BR = 6. Numerical results show the presence of secondary flow recirculation zones near the jet exit for both the injectors. An additional recirculation zone present in the case of fully divergent injector caused an increase in mixing of the coolant and mainstream, and a reduction in film cooling performance.

  8. A contribution to film coefficient estimation in piston cooling galleries

    SciTech Connect

    Torregrosa, A.J.; Broatch, A.; Olmeda, P.; Martin, J.

    2010-02-15

    The need to reduce fuel consumption and exhaust emissions in internal combustion engines has been drastically increased during last years. One of the most important processes affecting these parameters is heat transfer from the in-cylinder gas to the surrounding walls, as this mechanism has a direct influence on the combustion process. Regarding the different walls (liner, cylinder head and piston surfaces), heat flow to the piston is especially important, as it is essential to avoid excessively high temperatures that could result in material damage and/or oil cracking. With this purpose different cooling strategies are used, among which the improvement of the piston cooling system by using oil galleries is preferred. In this work, the heat flow through the oil gallery in a Diesel piston was investigated on a dedicated test bench. This bench consists of a controlled heat source and a piston oil cooling system in which different test conditions were evaluated in order to obtain a correlation for the film coefficient associated with piston oil cooling. These experimental results were then incorporated into a lumped model for engine heat transfer. Finally, in order to evaluate the accuracy of this model and the effects of the correlation for oil gallery coefficient on engine heat flows, results obtained on a conventional engine test bench equipped with a Diesel engine, in which two piston temperatures had been measured, were used. The results show an improvement in piston temperature predictions when compared with those obtained using a previously reported expression for the calculation of the oil film coefficient. (author)

  9. Convective heat transfer with film cooling around a rotor blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, T.

    This paper deals with an experimental convective heat transfer investigation around a high pressure gas turbine film cooled rotor blade. The measurements were performed in the von Karman Institute short duration isentropic light piston compression tube facility allowing a correct simulation of Mach and Reynolds number as well as free stream to wall and free stream to coolant temperature ratios. The airfoil was mounted in a linear stationary cascade environment and heat transfer measurements were obtained by using platinum thin film gages painted on a blade made of machinable glass ceramic. The coolant flow was ejected simultaneously through the leading edge (3 rows of holes), the suction side (2 rows of holes), and the pressure side (1 row of holes). The coolant hydrodynamic behavior is described and the effects of overall coolant to free stream mass weight ratio, coolant to free stream temperature ratio, and free stream turbulence intensity on the convective heat transfer distribution are successively described.

  10. Discrete-hole film cooling characteristics over concave and convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Shao-Yen; Yao, Yong-Qing; Xia, Bin; Tsou, Fu-Kang

    The local film-cooling effectiveness and local pressure distribution for single-row discrete holes were measured over the whole areas of concave and convex surfaces, using a plexiglass test section with curvature radii of 140 mm and 70 mm for the concave and the convex surfaces and film-cooling holes (34 on the convex surface and 22 on the concave surface) 8 mm in diameter. The results indicate that the concave surface has the widest film-cooling coverage area in the z-direction (perpendicular to the x-flow direction), while the highest film-cooling effectiveness of the convex surface is near the ejection hole. High blowing ratios at holes have an adverse effect on film cooling. The weakest cooling region is near the center line between holes; such a poorly cooled region is larger on convex surfaces than on the concave ones. Optimal design characteristics for turbine blades surfaces are discussed.

  11. Gas turbine rotor blade film cooling with and without simulated NGV shock waves and wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, M. J.; Johnson, A. B.; Oldfield, M. L. G.

    1990-06-01

    Detailed heat transfer measurements have been made around a film-cooled transonic gas turbine rotor blade in the Oxford Isentropic Light Piston Tunnel. Film cooling behavior for four film cooling configurations have been analyzed for a range of blowing rates both without and with simulated nozzle guide vane (NGV) shock wave and wake passing. The superposition model of film cooling has been employed in analysis of time-mean heat transfer data, while time resolved unsteady heat transfer measurements have been analyzed to determine interaction between film-cooling and unsteady shock wave and wake passing. It is found that there is a significant change of film-cooling behavior on the suction surface when simulated NGV unsteady effects are introduced.

  12. Entrained liquid fraction calculation in adiabatic disperse-annular flows at low rate in film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagov, V. V.; Minko, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we continue our study [1] and extend further an approach to low reduced pressures. An approximate model of droplets entrainment from the laminar film surface and an equation for calculating entrainment intensity are proposed. To carry out direct verification of this equation using experimental data is extremely difficult because the integral effect—liquid flow rate in a film at a dynamic equilibrium between entrainment and deposition—is usually measured in the experiments. The balance between flows of droplets entrainment and deposition corresponds to the dynamic equilibrium because of turbulent diffusion. The transcendental equation, which was obtained on the basis of this balance, contains one unknown numerical factor and allows one to calculate the liquid rate. Comparing calculation results with the experimental data for the water-air and water-helium flows at low reduced pressures (less than 0.03) has shown their good agreement at the universal value of a numerical constant, if an additional dimensionless parameter, a fourth root of vaporliquid densities ratio, is introduced. The criterion that determines the boundary of using methods of this work and that of [1] in calculations and that reflects effect of pressure and state of film surface on distribution of the liquid in the annular flow is proposed; the numerical value of this criterion has been determined.

  13. Validation of Supersonic Film Cooling Modeling for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.; Ruf, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    Topics include: upper stage engine key requirements and design drivers; Calspan "stage 1" results, He slot injection into hypersonic flow (air); test articles for shock generator diagram, slot injector details, and instrumentation positions; test conditions; modeling approach; 2-d grid used for film cooling simulations of test article; heat flux profiles from 2-d flat plate simulations (run #4); heat flux profiles from 2-d backward facing step simulations (run #43); isometric sketch of single coolant nozzle, and x-z grid of half-nozzle domain; comparison of 2-d and 3-d simulations of coolant nozzles (run #45); flowfield properties along coolant nozzle centerline (run #45); comparison of 3-d CFD nozzle flow calculations with experimental data; nozzle exit plane reduced to linear profile for use in 2-d film-cooling simulations (run #45); synthetic Schlieren image of coolant injection region (run #45); axial velocity profiles from 2-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); coolant mass fraction profiles from 2-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); heat flux profiles from 2-d film cooling simulations (run #45); heat flux profiles from 2-d film cooling simulations (runs #47, #45, and #47); 3-d grid used for film cooling simulations of test article; heat flux contours from 3-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); and heat flux profiles from 3-d and 2-d film cooling simulations (runs #44, #46, and #47).

  14. Effects of film injection angle on turbine vane cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Film ejection from discrete holes in the suction surface of a turbine vane was studied for hole axes (1) slanted 30 deg to the surface in the streamwise direction and (2) slanted 30 deg to the surface and 45 deg from the streamwise direction toward the hub. The holes were near the throat area in a five-row staggered array with 8-diameter spacing. Mass flux ratios were as high as 1.2. The data were obtained in an annular sector cascade at conditions where both the ratio of the boundary layer momentum thickness-to-hole diameter and the momentum thickness Reynolds number were typical of an advanced turbofan engine at both takeoff and cruise. Wall temperatures were measured downstream of each of the rows of holes. Results of this study are expressed as a comparison of cooling effectiveness between the in-line angle injection and the compound-angle injection as a function of mass flux ratio. These heat transfer results are also compared with the results of a referenced flow visualization study. Also included is a closed-form analytical solution for temperature within the film cooled wall.

  15. A model for correlating flat plate film cooling effectiveness for rows of round holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecuyer, M. R.; Soechting, F. O.

    1985-09-01

    An effective method of cooling, that has found widespread application in aircraft gas turbines, is the injection of a film of cooling air through holes into the hot mainstream gas to provide a buffer layer between the hot gas and the airfoil surface. Film cooling has been extensively investigated and the results have been reported in the literature. However, there is no generalized method reported in the literature to predict the film cooling performance as influenced by the major variables. A generalized film cooling correlation has been developed, utilizing data reported in the literature, for constant velocity and flat plate boundary layer development. This work provides a basic understanding of the complex interaction of the major variables effecting film cooling performance.

  16. Contribution of heat transfer to turbine blades and vanes for high temperature industrial gas turbines. Part 1: Film cooling.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, K; Aoki, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper deals with the contribution of heat transfer to increase the turbine inlet temperature of industrial gas turbines in order to attain efficient and environmentally benign engines. High efficiency film cooling, in the form of shaped film cooling and full coverage film cooling, is one of the most important cooling technologies. Corresponding heat transfer tests to optimize the film cooling effectiveness are shown and discussed in this first part of the contribution. PMID:11460641

  17. Analysis and comparison of wall cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    The relative performance of (1) counterflow film cooling, (2) parallel-flow film cooling, (3) convection cooling, (4) adiabatic film cooling, (5) transpiration cooling, and (6) full-coverage film cooling was investigated for heat loading conditions expected in future gas turbine engines. Assumed in the analysis were hot-gas conditions of 2200 K (3500 F) recovery temperature, 5 to 40 atmospheres total pressure, and 0.6 gas Mach number and a cooling air supply temperature of 811 K (1000 F). The first three cooling methods involve film cooling from slots. Counterflow and parallel flow describe the direction of convection cooling air along the inside surface of the wall relative to the main gas flow direction. The importance of utilizing the heat sink available in the coolant for convection cooling prior to film injection is illustrated.

  18. Hypersonic aerospace vehicle leading-edge cooling using heat-pipe, transpiration and film-cooling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Modlin, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of cooling hypersonic-vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heat fluxes was studied, using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipes and surface-mass-transfer cooling techniques. A generalized, transient, finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed that incorporated these effects and was demonstrated on an assumed aerospace plane-type wing leading edge section and a SCRAMJET engine inlet leading-edge section. The hypersonic leading-edge cooling model was developed using an existing, experimentally verified heat-pipe model. Then the existing heat-pipe model was modified by adding both transpiration and film-cooling options as new surface boundary conditions. The models used to predict the leading-edge surface heat-transfer reduction effects of the transpiration and film cooling were modifications of more-generalized, empirically based models obtained from the literature. It is concluded that cooling leading-edge structures exposed to severe hypersonic-flight environments using a combination of liquid-metal heat pipe, surface transpiration, and film cooling methods appears feasible.

  19. Coupled Velocity and Cooling Effectiveness Measurements of a Film Cooling Hole With Varied Blowing Rates and Ejection Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issakhanian, Emin; Elkins, Chris J.; Eaton, John K.

    2010-11-01

    Film cooling is used to shield turbine blades from combustion gases which are at temperatures above the melting point of the blade's constituent alloy. Maximizing film cooling effectiveness allows higher combustion temperatures and decreases need for bypass air. The present experiment studies flow through a single film cooling hole jetting into a square channel. The momentum thickness Reynolds number of the main flow is 500. The diameter of the cooling flow is 10 times the momentum thickness at the hole exit. The cooling flow Reynolds number varies between 1250 and 5000. Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) and Concentration (MRC) are used to measure mean velocity and coolant concentration of the 3-D field both inside the main channel and inside the cooling hole and feed plenum. By marking only the main flow with a passive scalar, the MRC data allow measurement of cooling flow concentration, which by analogy is related to the temperature of the fluid. The velocity data shows the development of a counter-rotating vortex pair downstream of the jet. These vortices transport cooling flow away from the channel floor resulting in a lifted kidney-shaped coolant cross-section and reduced effectiveness. The varying strength of this flow feature and of surface effectiveness due to different ejection angles and blowing ratios is studied.

  20. An experimental comparison between a novel and a conventional cooling system for the blown film process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janas, M.; Andretzky, M.; Neubert, B.; Kracht, F.; Wortberg, J.

    2016-03-01

    The blown film extrusion is a significant manufacturing process of plastic films. Compared to other extrusion processes, the productivity is limited by the cooling of the extrudate. A conventional cooling system for the blown film application provides the cooling air tangentially, homogeneous over the whole circumference of the bubble, using a single or dual lip cooling ring. In prior works, major effects could be identified that are responsible for a bad heat transfer. Besides the formation of a boundary sublayer on the film surface due to the fast flowing cooling air, there is the interaction between the cooling jet and the ambient air. In order to intensify the cooling of a tubular film, a new cooling approach was developed, called Multi-Jet. This system guides the air vertically on the film surface, using several slit nozzles over the whole tube formation zone. Hence, the jets penetrate the sublayer. To avoid the interaction with the ambient air, the bubble expansion zone is surrounded by a housing. By means of a numeric investigation, the novel cooling approach and the efficiency of the cooling system could be proved. Thereby, a four times higher local heat transfer coefficient is achieved compared to a conventional cooling device. In this paper, the Multi-Jet cooling system is experimentally tested for several different process conditions. To identify a worth considering cooling configuration of the novel cooling system for the experiment, a simulation tool presets the optimal process parameters. The comparison between the results of the new and a conventional system shows that the novel cooling method is able to gain the same frost line height using a 40% lower cooling air volume flow. Due to the housing of the tube formation zone, a heat recovery can be achieved.

  1. Increased output of blown film extrusion lines by using a cooling sleeve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Christian; Windeck, Christian; Hennigs, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Production efficiency is one of the most important demands in blown film production. In many cases, the cooling power is the limiting factor for an increased output. A possible solution for a better cooling is the use of a cooling sleeve right after the outlet of the die in addition to the conventional air rings and internal bubble cooling (IBC). At the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV), first tests were conducted to investigate the advantages of the use of a cooling sleeve. Therefore, the influence of several geometries of the cooling sleeve surface and different cooling sleeve temperatures on the process stability and the mechanical and optical film properties is investigated. The cooling sleeve surfaces differ in the tapping between inlet and outlet diameter from 0 % (cylindric) to 10 % (conical). The tests show that a high amount of tapping as well as too high resp. low cooling sleeve temperatures cause process instabilities and an uneven thickness profile of the film. While the mechanical film properties (E-modulus, elongation at break, tensile strength) of the films produced by the use of a cooling sleeve (cs-films) do not significantly differ from the values of the reference films, the haze of the cs-films was higher and therefore worse. A measurement of the bubble temperatures above the air ring shows that the use of a cooling sleeve can significant lower the bubble temperature at this point. Because of this and because of the results of the mechanical tests, the principle of a contact cooling is generally applicable. Further research and development on the geometry of the cooling sleeve surface has to be done to improve the process stability and the haze for a possible industrial application.

  2. Film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer with injection through holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the local film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer downstream of injection of air through discrete holes into a turbulent boundary layer of air on a flat plate is reported. Secondary air is injected through a single hole normal to the main flow and through both a single hole and a row of holes spaced at three diameter intervals with an injection angle of 35 deg to the main flow. Two values of the mainstream Reynolds number are used; the blowing rate is varied from 0.1 to 2.0. Photographs of a carbon dioxide-water fog injected into the main flow at an angle of 90 deg are also presented to show interaction between the jet and mainstream.

  3. Experimental and computational studies of film cooling with compound angle injection

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Eckert, E.R.G.; Patankar, S.V.; Simon, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    The thermal efficiency of gas turbine systems depends largely on the turbine inlet temperature. Recent decades have seen a steady rise in the inlet temperature and a resulting reduction in fuel consumption. At the same time, it has been necessary to employ intensive cooling of the hot components. Among various cooling methods, film cooling has become a standard method for cooling of the turbine airfoils and combustion chamber walls. The University of Minnesota program is a combined experimental and computational study of various film-cooling configurations. Whereas a large number of parameters influence film cooling processes, this research focuses on compound angle injection through a single row and through two rows of holes. Later work will investigate the values of contoured hole designs. An appreciation of the advantages of compound angle injection has risen recently with the demand for more effective cooling and with improved understanding of the flow; this project should continue to further this understanding. Approaches being applied include: (1) a new measurement system that extends the mass/heat transfer analogy to obtain both local film cooling and local mass (heat) transfer results in a single system, (2) direct measurement of three-dimensional turbulent transport in a highly-disturbed flow, (3) the use of compound angle and shaped holes to optimize film cooling performance, and (4) an exploration of anisotropy corrections to turbulence modeling of film cooling jets.

  4. Experimental and computational studies of film cooling with compound angle injection

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Eckert, E.R.G.; Patankar, S.V.

    1995-10-01

    The thermal efficiency of gas turbine systems depends largely on the turbine inlet temperature. Recent decades have seen a steady rise in the inlet temperature and a resulting reduction in fuel consumption. At the same time, it has been necessary to employ intensive cooling of the hot components. Among various cooling methods, film cooling has become a standard method for cooling of the turbine airfoils and combustion chamber walls. The University of Minnesota program is a combined experimental and computational study of various film-cooling configurations. Whereas a large number of parameters influence film cooling processes, this research focuses on compound angle injection through a single row and through two rows of holes. Later work will investigate the values of contoured hole designs. An appreciation of the advantages of compound angle injection has risen recently with the demand for more effective cooling and with improved understanding of the flow; this project should continue to further this understanding. Approaches being applied include: (1) a new measurement system that extends the mass/heat transfer analogy to obtain both local film cooling and local mass (heat) transfer results in a single system, (2) direct measurement of three-dimensional turbulent transport in a highly-disturbed flow, (3) the use of compound angle and shaped holes to optimize film cooling performance, and (4) an exploration of anisotropy corrections to turbulence modeling of film cooling jets.

  5. Experimental flow coefficients of a full-coverage film-cooled-vane chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.; Hippensteele, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient- and elevated-temperature flow tests were performed on a four-times-actual-size model of an impingement- and film-cooled segment of a core engine turbine vane. Tests were conducted with the impingement and film cooling plates combined to form a chamber and also with each of the individual separated plates. For the combined tests, the proximity of the film cooling plate affected the flow of coolant through the impingement plate, but not conversely. Impingement flow is presented in terms of a discharge coefficient, and the film cooling flow discharging into still air with no main stream gas flow is presented in terms of a total pressure-loss coefficient. The effects of main stream gas flow on discharge from the film cooling holes are evaluated as a function of coolant to main-stream gas momentum flux ratio. A smoothing technique is developed that identifies and helps reduce flow measurement data scatter.

  6. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Effects of dimensionless coolant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnice, M. A.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to mode the film cooling performance for a turbine vane leading edge using the stagnation region of a cylinder in cross flow. Experiments were conducted with a single row of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio and dimensionless coolant temperature with free stream-to-wall temperature ratio approximately 1.7 and Re sub D = 90000. the cylindrical test surface was instrumented with miniature heat flux gages and wall thermocouples to determine the percentage reduction in the Stanton number as a function of the distance downstream from injection (x/d sub 0) and the location between adjacent holes (z/S). Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d = 5. The film coolant was injected with T sub c T sub w with a dimensionless coolant temperature in the range 1.18 or equal to theta sub c or equal to 1.56. The data for local Stanton Number Reduction (SNR) showed a significant increase in SNR as theta sub c was increased above 1.0.

  7. Vortex generating flow passage design for increased film-cooling effectiveness and surface coverage. [aircraft engine blade cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The fluid mechanics of the basic discrete hole film cooling process is described as an inclined jet in crossflow and a cusp shaped coolant flow channel contour that increases the efficiency of the film cooling process is hypothesized. The design concept requires the channel to generate a counter rotating vortex pair secondary flow within the jet stream by virture of flow passage geometry. The interaction of the vortex structures generated by both geometry and crossflow was examined in terms of film cooling effectiveness and surface coverage. Comparative data obtained with this vortex generating coolant passage showed up to factors of four increases in both effectiveness and surface coverage over that obtained with a standard round cross section flow passage. A streakline flow visualization technique was used to support the concept of the counter rotating vortex pair generating capability of the flow passage design.

  8. Experimental investigation of the effects of compound angle holes on film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer performance using a transient liquid crystal thermometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seager, David J.; Liburdy, James A.

    1997-11-01

    To further understand the effect of both compound angle holes and hole shaping on film cooling, detailed heat transfer measurements were obtained using hue based thermochromic liquid crystal method. The data were analyzed to measure both the full surface adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient. The compound angles that were evaluated consist of holes that were aligned 0 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees and 90 degrees to the main cross flow direction. Hole shaping variations from the traditional cylindrical shaped hole include forward diffused and laterally diffused hole geometries. Geometric parameters that were selected were the length to diameter ratio of 3.0, and the inclination angle 35 degrees. A density ratio of 1.55 was obtained for all teste. For each set of conditions the blowing ratio was varied to be 0.88, 1.25, and 1.88. Adiabatic effectiveness was obtained using a steady state test, while an active heating surface was used to determine the heat transfer coefficient using a transient method. The experimental method provides a unique method of analyzing a three-temperature heat transfer problem by providing detailed surface transport properties. Based on these results for the different hole geometries at each blowing ratio conclusions are drawn relative to the effects of compound angle holes on the overall film cooling performance.

  9. Measured effects of coolant injection on the performance of a film cooled turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonel, J. D.; Eiswerth, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Tests have been conducted on a 20-inch diameter single-stage air-cooled turbine designed to evaluate the effects of film cooling air on turbine aerodynamic performance. The present paper reports the results of five test configurations, including two different cooling designs and three combinations of cooled and solid airfoils. A comparison is made of the experimental results with a previously published analytical method of evaluating coolant injection effects on turbine performance.

  10. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  11. An experimental study of turbine vane heat transfer with leading edge and downstream film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmalan, V.; Hylton, L. D.

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of downstream film cooling, with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling, on turbine-vane external heat transfer. Steady-state experimental measurements were made in a three-vane linear two-dimensional cascade. The principal independent parameters were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions. The test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. The data obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The downstream film cooling process was shown to be a complex interaction of two competing mechanisms. The thermal dilution effect, associated with the injection of relatively cold fluid, results in a decrease in the heat transfer to the airfoil. Conversely, the turbulence augmentation, produced by the injection process, results in increased heat transfer to the airfoil.

  12. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  13. The effects of leading edge and downstream film cooling on turbine vane heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, L. D.; Nirmalan, V.; Sultanian, B. K.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1988-11-01

    The progress under contract NAS3-24619 toward the goal of establishing a relevant data base for use in improving the predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes, including the effect of downstream film cooling with and without leading edge showerhead film cooling. Experimental measurements were made in a two-dimensional cascade previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-22761 and leading edge showerhead film cooled airfoils under contract NAS3-23695. The principal independent parameters (Mach number, Reynolds number, turbulence, wall-to-gas temperature ratio, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio) were maintained over ranges consistent with actual engine conditions and the test matrix was structured to provide an assessment of the independent influence of parameters of interest, namely, exit Mach number, exit Reynolds number, coolant-to-gas temperature ratio, and coolant-to-gas pressure ratio. Data provide a data base for downstream film cooled turbine vanes and extends the data bases generated in the two previous studies. The vane external heat transfer obtained indicate that considerable cooling benefits can be achieved by utilizing downstream film cooling. The data obtained and presented illustrate the interaction of the variables and should provide the airfoil designer and computational analyst the information required to improve heat transfer design capabilities for film cooled turbine airfoils.

  14. Investigation of film cooling from cylindrical hole with plasma actuator on flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yang; Dai, Sheng-ji; He, Li-ming; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Hou, Peng-hui

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling studies on the effect of plasma aerodynamic actuation on combustor film cooling performance. By comparing Case (i.e. film cooling hole with plasma actuator) result to Base (i.e. film cooling hole without plasma actuator) result, the mechanism of improving film cooling performance by using plasma actuator was analyzed. The results show that the Counter Rotating Vortex Pairs in Base are weakened by a new pair of vortex in Case, which is induced by the plasma-actuator-generated arc-shape-distributed electric body force. This leads to less interaction and less mixing between the main flow and the jet flow. Then it causes enhancement of the stability and the steadiness of the jet flow. Finally the average film cooling effectiveness in Case is higher than that in Base. For Case, the uniformity of temperature distribution along spanwise wall surface is improved as the actuator electrode radian increases, so does the average film cooling effectiveness. The film cooling effectiveness is higher when actuator is closer to the exit of hole.

  15. Investigation of film cooling from cylindrical hole with plasma actuator on flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yang; Dai, Sheng-ji; He, Li-ming; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Qian; Hou, Peng-hui

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling studies on the effect of plasma aerodynamic actuation on combustor film cooling performance. By comparing Case (i.e. film cooling hole with plasma actuator) result to Base (i.e. film cooling hole without plasma actuator) result, the mechanism of improving film cooling performance by using plasma actuator was analyzed. The results show that the Counter Rotating Vortex Pairs in Base are weakened by a new pair of vortex in Case, which is induced by the plasma-actuator-generated arc-shape-distributed electric body force. This leads to less interaction and less mixing between the main flow and the jet flow. Then it causes enhancement of the stability and the steadiness of the jet flow. Finally the average film cooling effectiveness in Case is higher than that in Base. For Case, the uniformity of temperature distribution along spanwise wall surface is improved as the actuator electrode radian increases, so does the average film cooling effectiveness. The film cooling effectiveness is higher when actuator is closer to the exit of hole.

  16. Effect of Film-Hole Shape on Turbine Blade Film Cooling Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Teng, S.

    2000-01-01

    The detailed heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness distributions as well as tile detailed coolant jet temperature profiles on the suction side of a gas turbine blade A,ere measured using a transient liquid crystal image method and a traversing cold wire and a traversing thermocouple probe, respectively. The blade has only one row of film holes near the gill hole portion on the suction side of the blade. The hole geometries studied include standard cylindrical holes and holes with diffuser shaped exit portion (i.e. fanshaped holes and laidback fanshaped holes). Tests were performed on a five-blade linear cascade in a low-speed wind tunnel. The mainstream Reynolds number based on cascade exit velocity was 5.3 x 10(exp 5). Upstream unsteady wakes were simulated using a spoke-wheel type wake generator. The wake Strouhal number was kept at 0 or 0.1. Coolant blowing ratio was varied from 0.4 to 1.2. Results show that both expanded holes have significantly improved thermal protection over the surface downstream of the ejection location, particularly at high blowing ratios. However, the expanded hole injections induce earlier boundary layer transition to turbulence and enhance heat transfer coefficients at the latter part of the blade suction surface. In general, the unsteady wake tends to reduce film cooling effectiveness.

  17. Improving Durability of Turbine Components Through Trenched Film Cooling and Contoured Endwalls

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, David G.; Thole, Karen A.

    2014-09-30

    The experimental and computational studies of the turbine endwall and vane models completed in this research program have provided a comprehensive understanding of turbine cooling with combined film cooling and TBC. To correctly simulate the cooling effects of TBC requires the use of matched Biot number models, a technique developed in our laboratories. This technique allows for the measurement of the overall cooling effectiveness which is a measure of the combined internal and external cooling for a turbine component. The overall cooling effectiveness provides an indication of the actual metal temperature that would occur at engine conditions, and is hence a more powerful performance indicator than the film effectiveness parameter that is commonly used for film cooling studies. Furthermore these studies include the effects of contaminant depositions which are expected to occur when gas turbines are operated with syngas fuels. Results from the endwall studies performed at Penn State University and the vane model studies performed at the University of Texas are the first direct measurements of the combined effects of film cooling and TBC. These results show that TBC has a dominating effect on the overall cooling effectiveness, which enhances the importance of the internal cooling mechanisms, and downplays the importance of the film cooling of the external surface. The TBC was found to increase overall cooling effectiveness by a factor of two to four. When combined with TBC, the primary cooling from film cooling holes was found to be due to the convective cooling within the holes, not from the film effectiveness on the surface of the TBC. Simulations of the deposition of contaminants on the endwall and vane surfaces showed that these depositions caused a large increase in surface roughness and significant degradation of film effectiveness. However, despite these negative factors, the depositions caused only a slight decrease in the overall cooling effectiveness on

  18. Investigation of annular flow at high evaporation rates in view of liquid film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahstoll, Juergen

    1988-01-01

    The process of liquid film cooling of combustion chamber walls which are subjected to extremely high heat rates was investigated. A theoretical model was developed for a reliable prediction of the film cooling length. The mass transfer at the liquid-gas interface results from evaporated liquid and entrained liquid droplets. The film cooling length analysis, which includes the physical effects in detail, is separated into two regions: heating the liquid and evaporating the liquid. The theoretical results were experimentally verified at high pressures and temperatures using a modified H2/O2-rocket motor. There is a good agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results over the experimental range.

  19. Modeling and simulation of mixing layer flows for rocket engine film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellimore, Kiran Hamilton Jeffrey

    Film cooling has been selected for the thermal protection of the composite nozzle extension of the J-2X engine which is currently being developed for the second stage of NASA's next generation launch vehicle, the Ares I rocket. However, several challenges remain in order to achieve effective film cooling of the nozzle extension and to ensure its safe operation. The extreme complexity of the flow (three-dimensional wakes, lateral flows, vorticity, and flow separation) makes predicting film cooling performance difficult. There is also a dearth of useful supersonic film cooling data available for engineers to use in engine design and a lack of maturity of CFD tools to quantitatively match supersonic film cooling data. This dissertation advances the state of the art in film cooling by presenting semi-empirical analytical models which improve the basic physical understanding and prediction of the effects of pressure gradients, compressibility and density gradients on film cooling effectiveness. These models are shown to correlate most experimental data well and to resolve several conflicts in the open literature. The core-to-coolant stream velocity ratio, R, and the Kays acceleration parameter, KP, are identified as the critical parameters needed to understand how pressure gradients influence film cooling performance. The convective Mach number, MC, the total temperature ratio, theta0, and the Mach number of the high speed stream, MHS, are shown to be important when explaining the effects of compressibility and density gradient on film cooling effectiveness. An advance in the simulation of film cooling flows is also presented through the development of a computationally inexpensive RANS methodology capable of correctly predicting film cooling performance under turbulent, subsonic conditions. The subsonic simulation results suggest that it in order to obtain accurate predictions using RANS it is essential to thoroughly characterize the turbulent states at the inlet of

  20. An Experimental Study of the Effect of Wake Passing on Turbine Blade Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.; Lucci, Barbara L.; Reshotko, Eli

    1997-01-01

    The effect of wake passing on the showerhead film cooling performance of a turbine blade has been investigated experimentally. The experiments were performed in an annular turbine cascade with an upstream rotating row of cylindrical rods. Nickel thin-film gauges were used to determine local film effectiveness and Nusselt number values for various injectants, blowing ratios, and Strouhal numbers. Results indicated a reduction in film effectiveness with increasing Strouhal number, as well as the expected increase in film effectiveness with blowing ratio. An equation was developed to correlate the span-average film effectiveness data. The primary effect of wake unsteadiness was found to be correlated by a streamwise-constant decrement of 0.094.St. Steady computations were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental Nusselt numbers, but to overpredict experimental film effectiveness values. This is likely due to the inability to match actual hole exit velocity profiles and the absence of a credible turbulence model for film cooling.

  1. Comparison of effectiveness of convection-, transpiration-, and film-cooling methods with air as coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Livingood, N B

    1954-01-01

    Various parts of aircraft propulsion engines that are in contact with hot gases often require cooling. Transpiration and film cooling, new methods that supposedly utilize cooling air more effectively than conventional convection cooling, have already been proposed. This report presents material necessary for a comparison of the cooling requirements of these three methods. Correlations that are regarded by the authors as the most reliable today are employed in evaluating each of the cooling processes. Calculations for the special case in which the gas velocity is constant along the cooled wall (flat plate) are presented. The calculations reveal that a comparison of the three cooling processes can be made on quite a general basis. The superiority of transpiration cooling is clearly shown for both laminar and turbulent flow. This superiority is reduced when the effects of radiation are included; for gas-turbine blades, however, there is evidence indicating that radiation may be neglected.

  2. Flow and heat transfer predictions for film cooling.

    PubMed

    Acharya, S; Tyagi, M; Hoda, A

    2001-05-01

    Film cooling flows are characterized by a row of jets injected at an angle from the blade surface or endwalls into the heated crossflow. The resulting flowfield is quite complex, and accurate predictions of the flow and heat transfer have been difficult to obtain, particularly in the near field of the injected jet. The flowfield is characterized by a spectrum of vortical structures including the dominant kidney vortex, the horse-shoe vortex, the wake vortices and the shear layer vortices. These anisotropic and unsteady structures are not well represented by empirical or ad-hoc turbulence models, and lead to inaccurate predictions in the near field of the jet. In this paper, a variety of modeling approaches have been reviewed, and the limitations of these approaches are identified. Recent emergence of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tools allow the resolution of the coherent structure dynamics, and it is shown in this paper, that such approaches provide improved predictions over that obtained with turbulence models. PMID:11460622

  3. Experimental assessment of film cooling performance of short cylindrical holes on a flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Premachandran, B.; Ravi, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    The present study is an experimental investigation of film-cooling over a flat surface from the short cylindrical holes. The film cooling holes used in the combustion chamber and the afterburner liner of an aero engine has length-to-diameter (L/D) typically in the range 1-2, while the cooling holes used in turbine blades has L/D > 3. Based on the classification given in the literature, cooling holes with L/D ≤ 3 are named as short holes and cooling holes with L/D > 3 are named as long holes. Short film cooling holes cause jetting of the secondary fluid whereas the secondary fluid emerging from long holes has characteristics similar to fully developed turbulent flow in pipe. In order to understand the difference in the film cooling performance of long and short cooling holes, experimental study is carried out for five values of L/D in the range 1-5, five injection angles, α = 15°-90° and five mainstream Reynolds number 1.25 × 105-6.25 × 105 and two blowing ratios, M = 0.5-1.0. The surface temperature of the test plate is monitored using infrared thermography. The results obtained from the present study showed that the film-cooling effectiveness is higher for the longest holes (L/D = 5) investigated in the present work in comparison to that for the shorter holes. Short holes are found to give better effectiveness at the lowest investigated injection angle i.e. α = 15° in the near cooling hole region, whereas film cooling effectiveness obtained at injection angle, α = 45° is found to be better than other injection angles for longest investigated holes, i.e. L/D = 5.

  4. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Charge Transport in Semiconducting Polymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Evan; Kim, Eunseong; CenterSupersolid; Quantum Matter Research Team

    2011-03-01

    Thermal annealing of polymer thin films often enhances charge carrier mobility which can be attributed to self-healing of the film morphology. We have investigated the effect of cooling rate following the annealing treatment on the thin film microstructure and the charge transport properties using a high performance semiconducting polymer, poly(2,5-bis(3-alkylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT). The cooling rate plays a key role in determining the microstructure and performance of polymer thin films. Differential scanning calorimeter measurement shows that fast cooling suppresses the crystallization process. The microstructure of thin films is investigated by using 2D X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Slow cooling results in well-connected large domains with enhanced three dimensional ordering whereas fast cooling leads to misalignment of small domains with relatively rough surface. Transport characteristics at various temperatures show increase in the charge carrier mobility and decrease in the activation energy when the cooling rate is slowed. This change in the mobility and activation energy becomes saturated with cooling rate below 15 °C/min. E. S. H. K. and E. K. gratefully acknowledge financial support from the National Research Foundation of Korea through the Creative Research Initiatives (CSQR).

  5. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  6. Convective Heat Transfer with and without Film Cooling in High Temperature, Fuel Rich and Lean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Nathan J.

    Modern turbine engines require high turbine inlet temperatures and pressures to maximize thermal efficiency. Increasing the turbine inlet temperature drives higher heat loads on the turbine surfaces. In addition, increasing pressure ratio increases the turbine coolant temperature such that the ability to remove heat decreases. As a result, highly effective external film cooling is required to reduce the heat transfer to turbine surfaces. Testing of film cooling on engine hardware at engine temperatures and pressures can be exceedingly difficult and expensive. Thus, modern studies of film cooling are often performed at near ambient conditions. However, these studies are missing an important aspect in their characterization of film cooling effectiveness. Namely, they do not model effect of thermal property variations that occur within the boundary and film cooling layers at engine conditions. Also, turbine surfaces can experience significant radiative heat transfer that is not trivial to estimate analytically. The present research first computationally examines the effect of large temperature variations on a turbulent boundary layer. Subsequently, a method to model the effect of large temperature variations within a turbulent boundary layer in an environment coupled with significant radiative heat transfer is proposed and experimentally validated. Next, a method to scale turbine cooling from ambient to engine conditions via non-dimensional matching is developed computationally and the experimentally validated at combustion temperatures. Increasing engine efficiency and thrust to weight ratio demands have driven increased combustor fuel-air ratios. Increased fuel-air ratios increase the possibility of unburned fuel species entering the turbine. Alternatively, advanced ultra-compact combustor designs have been proposed to decrease combustor length, increase thrust, or generate power for directed energy weapons. However, the ultra-compact combustor design requires a

  7. Numerical optimization of a multi-jet cooling system for the blown film extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janas, M.; Wortberg, J.

    2015-05-01

    The limiting factor for every extrusion process is the cooling. For the blown film process, this task is usually done by means of a single or dual lip air ring. Prior work has shown that two major effects are responsible for a bad heat transfer. The first one is the interaction between the jet and the ambient air. It reduces the velocity of the jet and enlarges the straight flow. The other one is the formation of a laminar boundary layer on the film surface due to the fast flowing cooling air. In this case, the boundary layer isolates the film and prevents an efficient heat transfer. To improve the heat exchange, a novel cooling approach is developed, called Multi-Jet. The new cooling system uses several slit nozzles over the whole tube formation zone for cooling the film. In contrast to a conventional system, the cooling air is guided vertically on the film surface in different heights to penetrate the boundary sublayer. Simultaneously, a housing of the tube formation zone is practically obtained to reduce the interaction with the ambient air. For the numerical optimization of the Multi-Jet system, a new procedure is developed. First, a prediction model identifies a worth considering cooling configuration. Therefore, the prediction model computes a film curve using the formulation from Zatloukal-Vlcek and the energy balance for the film temperature. Thereafter, the optimized cooling geometry is investigated in detail using a process model for the blown film extrusion that is able to compute a realistic bubble behavior depending on the cooling situation. In this paper, the Multi-Jet cooling system is numerically optimized for several different process states, like mass throughputs and blow-up ratios using one slit nozzle setting. For each process condition, the best cooling result has to be achieved. Therefore, the height of any nozzle over the tube formation zone is adjustable. The other geometrical parameters of the cooling system like the nozzle diameter or the

  8. Film cooling in a combustor operating at fuel-rich exit conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacina, R. R.; Marek, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    Data were taken with a film-cooled test plate placed in the exhaust stream of a rectangular combustor. Results showed that in a fuel-rich zone, fuel entrained into the film-cooling air would burn at the conditions tested. Test conditions were cooling-gas flow rates, 9.5 and 5 percent of total gas flow; cooling-gas velocities, 23 and 12 m/sec; ambient-temperature cooling gas; hot-gas velocity, nominally 215 m/sec; fuel-air ratio to stoichiometric fuel-air ratio values of 0.1, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.35, resulting in hot-gas temperatures from 590 to 2100 K; and atmospheric pressure. Analytical prediction of wall temperatures agreed reasonably well with experimental results.

  9. Turbine endwall film cooling with combustor-turbine interface gap leakage flow: Effect of incidence angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Yuan, Xin

    2013-04-01

    This paper is focused on the film cooling performance of combustor-turbine leakage flow at off-design condition. The influence of incidence angle on film cooling effectiveness on first-stage vane endwall with combustor-turbine interface slot is studied. A baseline slot configuration is tested in a low speed four-blade cascade comprising a large-scale model of the GE-E3Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV). The slot has a forward expansion angle of 30 deg. to the endwall surface. The Reynolds number based on the axial chord and inlet velocity of the free-stream flow is 3.5 × 105 and the testing is done in a four-blade cascade with low Mach number condition (0.1 at the inlet). The blowing ratio of the coolant through the interface gap varies from M = 0.1 to M = 0.3, while the blowing ratio varies from M = 0.7 to M = 1.3 for the endwall film cooling holes. The film-cooling effectiveness distributions are obtained using the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique. The results show that with an increasing blowing ratio the film-cooling effectiveness increases on the endwall. As the incidence angle varies from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., at low blowing ratio, the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly near the leading edge suction side area. The case of i = +10 deg. has better film-cooling performance at the downstream part of this region where the axial chord is between 0.15 and 0.25. However, the disadvantage of positive incidence appears when the blowing ratio increases, especially at the upstream part of near suction side region where the axial chord is between 0 and 0.15. On the main passage endwall surface, as the incidence angle changes from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly and the negative incidence appears to be more effective for the downstream part film cooling of the endwall surface where the axial chord is between 0.6 and 0.8.

  10. Flow visualization of discrete-hole film cooling with spanwise injection over a cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Insight into the fluid mechanics encountered when film air from a single row of holes is injected over a cylinder in a mainstream at conditions simulating a film cooled, turbulent-vane leading edge was investigated. Smoke was added to the cooling air to visualize its flow path. Film was injected in the spanwise direction at angles of 30 deg and 45 deg to the surface; at angular locations of 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg from the stagnation line; and at various blowing ratios. The observations were related to the measured heat transfer data of others. The results indicate that, in addition to the expected growth in film thickness and the greater penetration of the boundary layer with increasing blowing ration, there was an absence of spanwise spreading and only a small spanwise deflection of the injected film.

  11. Effect of shocks on film cooling of a full scale turbojet exhaust nozzle having an external expansion surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straight, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental film cooling data obtained during exploratory testing with an axisymmetric plug nozzle having external expansion and installed on an afterburning turbojet engine in an altitude test facility is presented. The shocks and local hot gas stream conditions had a marked effect on film cooling effectiveness. An existing film cooling correlation was adequate at some operating conditions but inadequate at other conditions such as in separated flow regions resulting from shock boundary layer interactions.

  12. A Numerical Study of Anti-Vortex Film Cooling Designs at High Blowing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.

    2008-01-01

    A concept for mitigating the adverse effects of jet vorticity and liftoff at high blowing ratios for turbine film cooling flows has been developed and studied at NASA Glenn Research Center. This "anti-vortex" film cooling concept proposes the addition of two branched holes from each primary hole in order to produce a vorticity counter to the detrimental kidney vortices from the main jet. These vortices typically entrain hot freestream gas and are associated with jet separation from the turbine blade surface. The anti-vortex design is unique in that it requires only easily machinable round holes, unlike shaped film cooling holes and other advanced concepts. The anti-vortex film cooling hole concept has been modeled computationally for a single row of 30deg angled holes on a flat surface using the 3D Navier-Stokes solver Glenn-HT. A modification of the anti-vortex concept whereby the branched holes exit adjacent to the main hole has been studied computationally for blowing ratios of 1.0 and 2.0 and at density ratios of 1.0 and 2.0. This modified concept was selected because it has shown the most promise in recent experimental studies. The computational results show that the modified design improves the film cooling effectiveness relative to the round hole baseline and previous anti-vortex cases, in confirmation of the experimental studies.

  13. Heat flux sensor research and development: The cool film calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abtahi, A.; Dean, P.

    1990-01-01

    The goal was to meet the measurement requirement of the NASP program for a gauge capable of measuring heat flux into a 'typical' structure in a 'typical' hypersonic flight environment. A device is conceptually described that has fast response times and is small enough to fit in leading edge or cowl lip structures. The device relies heavily on thin film technology. The main conclusion is the description of the limitations of thin film technology both in the art of fabrication and in the assumption that thin films have the same material properties as the original bulk material. Three gauges were designed and fabricated. Thin film deposition processes were evaluated. The effect of different thin film materials on the performance and fabrication of the gauge was studied. The gauges were tested in an arcjet facility. Survivability and accuracy were determined under various hostile environment conditions.

  14. Heat-Transfer Characteristics of Partially Film Cooled Plug Nozzle on a J-85 Afterburning Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, S. M.; Straight, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    Plug nozzle film cooling data were obtained downstream of a slot located at 42 percent of the total plug length on a J-85 engine. Film cooling reduced the aft end wall temperature as much as 150 K, reduced total pressure loss in the upstream convection cooling passages by 50 percent, and reduced estimated compressor bleed flow requirement by 14 percent compared to an all convectively cooled nozzle. Shock waves along the plug surface strongly influenced temperature distributions on both convection and film cooled portions. The effect was most severe at nozzle pressure ratios below 10 where adverse pressure gradients were most severe.

  15. Measurements of mean flow and eddy transport over a film cooling surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Tsang, H.; Simon, T.; Eckert, E.

    1996-05-01

    Results of an experimental study of the effects of blowing Velocity Ratio (VR = 0.5 and 1.0) and Free-Stream Turbulence Intensity (FSTI = 0.5% and 12%) on turbulent transport over a film-cooling test surface are presented. The surface has a single lateral row of streamwise-oriented holes angled 35{degree} from the surface and separated from one another by three hole diameters. The film cooling flow and mainstream flow are at the same temperature and the film cooling is supplied through long delivery tubes. Velocity, turbulence intensity and eddy transport profiles are presented. The ratios of lateral eddy diffusivity to wall-normal eddy diffusivity values measured in this program (4-15) provide documentation of strong anisotropy of eddy transport in the flow.

  16. Development of an experiment for measuring film cooling performance in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqbool, Daanish

    This thesis describes the development of an experiment for acquiring supersonic film cooling performance data in canonical configurations suitable for code validation. A methodology for selecting appropriate experimental conditions is developed and used to select test conditions in the UMD atmospheric pressure wind tunnel that are relevant to film cooling conditions encountered in the J-2X rocket engine. A new technique for inferring wall heat flux with 10% uncertainty from temperature-time histories of embedded sensors is developed and implemented. Preliminary heat flux measurements on the uncooled upper wall and on the lower wall with the film cooling flow turned off suggest that RANS solvers using Menter's SST model are able to predict heat flux within 15% in the far-field (> 10 injection slot heights) but are very inaccurate in the near-field. However, more experiments are needed to confirm this finding. Preliminary Schlieren images showing the shear layer growth rate are also presented.

  17. Numerical investigation of heat transfer on film-cooled turbine blades.

    PubMed

    Ginibre, P; Lefebvre, M; Liamis, N

    2001-05-01

    The accurate heat transfer prediction of film-cooled blades is a key issue for the aerothermal turbine design. For this purpose, advanced numerical methods have been developed at Snecma Moteurs. The goal of this paper is the assessment of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver, based on the ONERA CANARI-COMET code, devoted to the steady aerothermal computations of film-cooled blades. The code uses a multidomain approach to discretize the blade to blade channel with overlapping structured meshes for the injection holes. The turbulence closure is done by means of either Michel mixing length model or Spalart-Allmaras one transport equation model. Computations of thin 3D slices of three film-cooled nozzle guide vane blades with multiple injections are performed. Aerothermal predictions are compared to experiments carried out by the von Karman Institute. The behavior of the turbulence models is discussed, and velocity and temperature injection profiles are investigated. PMID:11460651

  18. Numerical and experimental investigation of the methane film cooling in subscale combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimon, Y.; Negishi, H.; Koshi, M.; Suslov, D.

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of film cooling in a CH4/O2 subscale chamber with multiinjector elements and two kinds of film cooling slot dimensions are investigated using a calorimeter chamber in experiments and simulations, in which the finite rate chemistry with a reduced CH4/O2 reaction mechanism is taken into account. The computed wall heat flux and pressure distributions are compared to the experimental results, which overall show good agreement. A large slot dimension is shown to induce mixing with core flow. This mixing causes a low heat-flux distribution near face plate along with high combustion efficiency.

  19. An experimental study of film cooling in a rotating transonic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhari, Reza S.; Epstein, A. H.

    1992-06-01

    Time-resolved measurements of heat transfer on a fully cooled transonic turbine stage have been taken in a short duration turbine test facility which simulates full engine nondimensional conditions. The time average of this data is compared to uncooled rotor data and cooled linear cascade measurements made on the same profile. The film cooling reduces the time-averaged heat transfer compared to the uncooled rotor on the blade suction surface by as much as 60 percent, but has relative little effect on the pressure surface. The suction surface rotor heat transfer is lower than that measured in the cascade. The results are similar over the central 3/4 of the span implying that the flow here is mainly two-dimensional. The film cooling is shown to be much less effective at high blowing ratios than at low ones. Time-resolved measurements reveal that the cooling, when effective, both reduce the dc level of heat transfer and changed the shape of the unsteady waveform. Unsteady blowing is shown to be a principal driver of film cooling fluctuations, and a linear model is shown to do a good job in predicting the unsteady heat transfer. The unsteadiness results in a 12 percent decrease in heat transfer on the suction surface and a 5 percent increase on the pressure surface.

  20. An experimental study of film cooling in a rotating transonic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Abhari, R.S. ); Epstein, A.H. )

    1994-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of heat transfer on a fully cooled transonic turbine stage have been taken in a short duration turbine test facility, which simulates full engine nondimensional conditions. The time average of this data is compared to uncooled rotor data and cooled linear cascade measurements made on the same profile. The film cooling reduces the time-averaged heat transfer compared to the uncooled rotor on the blade suction surface by as much as 60 percent, but has relatively little effect on the pressure surface. The suction surface rotor heat transfer is lower than that measured in the cascade. The results are similar over the central 3/4 of the span, implying that the flow here is mainly two dimensional. The film cooling is shown to be much less effective at high blowing ratios than at low ones. Time-resolved measurements reveal that the cooling, when effective, both reduced the dc level of heat transfer and changed the shape of the unsteady waveform. Unsteady blowing is shown to be a principal driver of film cooling fluctuations, and a linear model is shown to do a good job in predicting the unsteady heat transfer. The unsteadiness results in a 12 percent decrease in heat transfer on the suction surface and a 5 percent increase on the pressure surface.

  1. Thermionic cooling with functionalized carbon nanotube thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Feng; Little, Scott

    2015-03-16

    A large thermionic cooling effect is reported. Temperature reduction as much as 81 °C has been observed on a functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) cathode surface. This cathode utilizes a thin coating of low work function barium strontium oxide emissive materials on top of the CNTs to lower the surface work function. This, combined with the field effect induced by the CNTs, results in an even lower effective work function, and thus strong thermionic emission. Strong thermionic emission is the underlying reason for the large cooling effect observed, and the largest emission current in this study is around 160 mA on a 0.0727 cm{sup 2} emitting surface at around 995 °C. Multiple samples were used in studying thermionic mission at cathode temperature ranging between 750 °C and 1100 °C, and in establishing correlation between the cooling effect and the emission current. Details of the cooling effect measurement are provided, and the measurement results show a clear linear dependence of temperature drop on thermionic emission current. The possible implication of this linear dependence is also discussed.

  2. A Three-Dimensional Coupled Internal/External Simulation of a Film-Cooled Turbine Vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.; Rigby, David L.; Ameri, Ali A.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulation has been performed for a realistic film-cooled turbine vane using the LeRC-HT code. The simulation includes the flow regions inside the coolant plena and film cooling holes in addition to the external flow. The vane is the subject of an upcoming NASA Glenn Research Center experiment and has both circular cross-section and shaped film cooling holes. This complex geometry is modeled using a multi-block grid which accurately discretizes the actual vane geometry including shaped holes. The simulation matches operating conditions for the planned experiment and assumes periodicity in the spanwise direction on the scale of one pitch of the film cooling hole pattern. Two computations were performed for different isothermal wall temperatures, allowing independent determination of heat transfer coefficients and film effectiveness values. The results indicate separate localized regions of high heat transfer coefficient values, while the shaped holes provide a reduction in heat flux through both parameters. Hole exit data indicate rather simple skewed profiles for the round holes, but complex profiles for the shaped holes with mass fluxes skewed strongly toward their leading edges.

  3. Flow visualization of discrete hole film cooling for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Russell, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a three row staggered array with 5-diameter spacing is studied. The boundary layer thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and Reynolds number are typical of gas turbine film cooling applications. Two different injection locations are studied to evaluate the effect of boundary layer thickness on film penetration and mixing. Detailed streaklines showing the turbulent motion of the injected air are obtained by photographing neutrally buoyant helium filled soap bubbles which follow the flow field. The bubble streaklines passing downstream injection locations are clearly identifiable and can be traced back to their origin. Visualization of surface temperature patterns obtained from infrared photographs of a similar film cooled surface are also included.

  4. Heat transfer measurements with film cooling on a turbine blade profile in cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, F. G.; Schultz, D. L.; Forest, A. E.

    1985-03-01

    Heat transfer measurements with film cooling have been made on a gas turbine rotor profile in a cascade at engine representative operating conditions. The blade temperature was varied independently to investigate the scaling of heat transfer coefficient, and a superposition model was found to correlate the data. Contrasting results are presented for films on the two surfaces, along with predictions from a two-dimensional boundary layer method.

  5. LES of density ratio effects on film cooling under rotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Zurfi, Nabeel; Turan, Ali

    2016-03-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the performance of film cooling injection from a row of multiple square holes spaced laterally across a flat plate. LES with the standard Smagorinsky-Lilly model was used to investigate the dynamic mixing process between the coolant jet stream and the mainstream flows. The finite volume method and the unsteady PISO algorithm on a non-uniform staggered grid were applied. The values of rotation number (Ro) examined were 0.0, 0.03021, 0.06042, and 0.12084, jet spacing to jet width ratio (P/D) was 3.0, and a jet Reynolds number (Re) of 4700, which based on the hole width and the jet exit velocity. The effects of the coolant to mainstream density ratio (DR) on the film cooling effectiveness were investigated by injecting either nitrogen (DR = 0.98) or carbon dioxide (DR = 1.55) as the coolant streams. The effect of DR on the film-cooling effectiveness is coupled with varying velocity ratio (VR = 0.5 and 1.0). The coolant gas was injected at 90° to the mainstream flow. The flow fields of the present study were compared with experimental data in order to validate the reliability of the LES technique. It was shown that rotation has a strong impact on the jet trajectory behaviour and the film cooling effectiveness. In all cases, as the rotation number increases, the film effectiveness increases; this effect is increased as the velocity ratio increases. The results also showed the strong influence of velocity ratio on the flow field behaviour and the film cooling where the jet penetrates further into the cross flow as VR increases and the wake region increases with increasing VR. Furthermore, it was concluded that DR has only a minor effect on flow field and heat transfer at a constant velocity ratio.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Dual Bell Nozzle Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, Kalen; Garcia, Christian; Ruf, Joseph; Bui, Trong

    2015-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) are working together to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the dual bell nozzle concept. Dual bell nozzles are a form of altitude compensating nozzle that consists of two connecting bell contours. At low altitude the nozzle flows fully in the first, relatively lower area ratio, nozzle. The nozzle flow separates from the wall at the inflection point which joins the two bell contours. This relatively low expansion results in higher nozzle efficiency during the low altitude portion of the launch. As ambient pressure decreases with increasing altitude, the nozzle flow will expand to fill the relatively large area ratio second nozzle. The larger area ratio of the second bell enables higher Isp during the high altitude and vacuum portions of the launch. Despite a long history of theoretical consideration and promise towards improving rocket performance, dual bell nozzles have yet to be developed for practical use and have seen only limited testing. One barrier to use of dual bell nozzles is the lack of control over the nozzle flow transition from the first bell to the second bell during operation. A method that this team is pursuing to enhance the controllability of the nozzle flow transition is manipulation of the film coolant that is injected near the inflection between the two bell contours. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is being run to assess the degree of control over nozzle flow transition generated via manipulation of the film injection. A cold flow dual bell nozzle, without film coolant, was tested over a range of simulated altitudes in 2004 in MSFC's nozzle test facility. Both NASA centers have performed a series of simulations of that dual bell to validate their computational models. Those CFD results are compared to the experimental results within this paper. MSFC then proceeded to add film injection to the CFD grid of the dual bell nozzle. A series of

  7. Modeling of the Evaporative Cooling of Running-Down Liquid Films in the Slit Channel of the Spraying Device of a Cooling Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashkov, G. V.; Malenko, G. L.; Solodukhin, A. D.; Tyutyuma, V. D.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the results of computational modeling of the nonstationary evaporative cooling of a liquid film running down a vertical surface cooled by a turbulent vapor-air counterflow. The heat and mass transfer problem has been formulated in conjugate form. The calculation data on the total heat flow density at the interface for various instants of time are given.

  8. An Approximate Analysis of Film Cooling on Blunt Bodies by Gas Injection Near the Stagnation Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Byron L.

    1961-01-01

    An approximate method for the estimation of laminar heat transfer to blunt bodies with gaseous film cooling i s developed. Attention is focused on the parameters which are important for the design of an attractive heat protection system. Application of the analysis is made to calculate the approximate coolant weight requirement for both a circular and a parabolic entry.

  9. Measurements in film cooling flows: Hole L/D and turbulence intensity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, S.W.; Kaszeta, R.W.; Simon, T.W.

    1996-12-31

    Hot-wire anemometry of simulated film cooling was used to study the influence of freestream turbulence intensity and film cooling hole length-to-diameter ratio on mean velocity and turbulence intensity. Measurements were made in the zone where the coolant and freestream flows mix. Flow from one row of film cooling holes with a streamwise injection of 35{degree} and no lateral injection and with a coolant- to-freestream flow velocity ratio of 1.0 was investigated under freestream turbulence levels of 0.5 and 12%. Coolant-to-freestream density ratio was unity. Two length-to-diameter ratios for the film cooling holes, 2.3 and 7.0, are tested. Results show that under low freestream turbulence conditions, pronounced differences exist in the flowfield between L/D=7.0 and 2.3; the differences are less prominent at high freestream turbulence intensities. Generally, short-L/D injection results in ``jetting`` of the coolant further into the freestream flow and enhanced mixing. Other changes in the flowfield attributable to a rise in freestream turbulence intensity to engine- representative conditions are documented. 15 figs, 2 tabs, refs.

  10. Numerical simulation of film-cooled ablative rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. B.; Beard, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research effort was to evaluate the impact of incorporating an additional cooling port downstream between the injector and nozzle throat in the NASA Fast Track chamber. A numerical model of the chamber was developed for the analysis. The analysis did not model ablation but instead correlated the initial ablation rate with the initial nozzle wall temperature distribution. The results of this study provide guidance in the development of a potentially lighter, second generation ablative rocket nozzle which maintains desired performance levels.

  11. Streakline flow visualization of discrete hole film cooling with holes inclined 30 deg to surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Russell, L. M.; Lane, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Film injection from three rows of discrete holes angled 30 deg to the surface in line with mainstream flow and spaced 5 diameters apart in a staggered array was visualized by using helium bubbles as tracer particles. Both the main stream and the film injectant were ambient air. Detailed streaklines showing the turbulent motion of the film mixing with the main stream were obtained by photographing small, neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles which followed the flow field. The ratio of boundary layer thickness to hole diameter and the Reynolds number were typical of gas turbine film cooling applications. The results showed the behavior of the film and its interaction with the main stream for a range of blowing rates and two initial boundary layer thicknesses.

  12. Transonic aerodynamic losses due to turbine airfoil, suction surface film cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.J.; Lee, K.L.; Ligrani, P.M.; Johnson, P.D.

    2000-04-01

    The effects of suction surface film cooling on aerodynamic losses are investigated using an experimental apparatus designed especially for this purpose. A symmetric airfoil with the same transonic Mach number distribution on both sides is employed. Mach numbers range from 0.4 to 1.24 and match values on the suction surface of airfoils from operating aeroengines. Film cooling holes are located on one side of the airfoil near the passage throat where the free-stream Mach number is nominally 1.07. Round cylindrical and conical diffused film cooling hole configurations are investigated with density ratios from 0.8 to 1.3 over a range of blowing ratios, momentum flux ratios, and Mach number ratios. Also included are discharge coefficients, local and integrated total pressure losses, down-stream kinetic energy distributions, Mach number profiles, and a correlation for integral aerodynamic losses as they depend upon film cooling parameters. The contributions of mixing and shock waves to total pressure losses are separated and quantified. These results show that losses due to shock waves vary with blowing ratio as shock wave strength changes. Aerodynamic loss magnitudes due to mixing vary significantly with film cooling hole geometry, blowing ratio, Mach number ratio, and (in some situations) density ratio. Integrated mixing losses from round cylindrical holes are three times higher than from conical diffused holes, when compared at the same blowing ratio. Such differences depend upon mixing losses just downstream of the airfoil, as well as turbulent diffusion of streamwise momentum normal to the airfoil symmetry plane.

  13. Thermoelastic stress analysis of multilayered films in a micro-thermoelectric cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Mei; Wang, Xing-Zhe; Zhang, Wen-Jie

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for the thermoelastic stress in a typical in-plane's thin-film micro-thermoelectric cooling device under different operating conditions. The distributions of the permissible temperature fields in multilayered thin-films are analytically obtained, and the characteristics, including maximum temperature difference and maximum refrigerating output of the thermoelectric device, are discussed for two operating conditions. Analytical expressions of the thermoelastic stresses in the layered thermoelectric thin-films induced by the temperature difference are formulated based on the theory of multilayer system. The results demonstrate that, the geometric dimension is a significant factor which remarkably affects the thermoelastic stresses. The stress distributions in layers of semiconductor thermoelements, insulating and supporting membrane show distinctly different features. The present work may profitably guide the optimization design of high-efficiency micro-thermoelectric cooling devices.

  14. Computation of leading edge film cooling from a CONSOLE geometry (CONverging Slot hOLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelailia, A.; Khorsi, A.; Hamidou, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of mass flow rate on film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer over a gas turbine rotor blade with three staggered rows of shower-head holes which are inclined at 30° to the spanwise direction, and are normal to the streamwise direction on the blade. To improve film cooling effectiveness, the standard cylindrical holes, located on the leading edge region, are replaced with the converging slot holes (console). The ANSYS CFX has been used for this computational simulation. The turbulence is approximated by a k-ɛ model. Detailed film effectiveness distributions are presented for different mass flow rate. The numerical results are compared with experimental data.

  15. A two-dimensional cascade solution using minimized surface singularity density distributions - with application to film cooled turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E.; Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of coolant injection on the aerodynamic performance of cooled turbine blades is presented. The coolant injection is modeled in the inviscid irrotational adiabatic flow analysis through the cascade using the distributed singularities approach. The resulting integral equations are solved using a minimized surface singularity density criteria. The aerodynamic performance was evaluated using this solution in conjunction with an existing mixing theory analysis. The results of the present analysis are compared with experimental measurements in cold flow tests.

  16. A Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer and Effectiveness on Film Cooled Turbine Blade Tip Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A. A.; Rigby, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study has been performed to predict the distribution of convective heat transfer coefficient on a simulated blade tip with cooling holes. The purpose of the examination was to assess the ability of a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver to predict the rate of tip heat transfer and the distribution of cooling effectiveness. To this end, the simulation of tip clearance flow with blowing of Kim and Metzger was used. The agreement of the computed effectiveness with the data was quite good. The agreement with the heat transfer coefficient was not as good but improved away from the cooling holes. Numerical flow visualization showed that the uniformity of wetting of the surface by the film cooling jet is helped by the reverse flow due to edge separation of the main flow.

  17. Adiabatic Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landahl, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Quantum computers promise to exploit counterintuitive quantum physics principles like superposition, entanglement, and uncertainty to solve problems using fundamentally fewer steps than any conventional computer ever could. The mere possibility of such a device has sharpened our understanding of quantum coherent information, just as lasers did for our understanding of coherent light. The chief obstacle to developing quantum computer technology is decoherence--one of the fastest phenomena in all of physics. In principle, decoherence can be overcome by using clever entangled redundancies in a process called fault-tolerant quantum error correction. However, the quality and scale of technology required to realize this solution appears distant. An exciting alternative is a proposal called ``adiabatic'' quantum computing (AQC), in which adiabatic quantum physics keeps the computer in its lowest-energy configuration throughout its operation, rendering it immune to many decoherence sources. The Adiabatic Quantum Architectures In Ultracold Systems (AQUARIUS) Grand Challenge Project at Sandia seeks to demonstrate this robustness in the laboratory and point a path forward for future hardware development. We are building devices in AQUARIUS that realize the AQC architecture on up to three quantum bits (``qubits'') in two platforms: Cs atoms laser-cooled to below 5 microkelvin and Si quantum dots cryo-cooled to below 100 millikelvin. We are also expanding theoretical frontiers by developing methods for scalable universal AQC in these platforms. We have successfully demonstrated operational qubits in both platforms and have even run modest one-qubit calculations using our Cs device. In the course of reaching our primary proof-of-principle demonstrations, we have developed multiple spinoff technologies including nanofabricated diffractive optical elements that define optical-tweezer trap arrays and atomic-scale Si lithography commensurate with placing individual donor atoms with

  18. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu{sup +3}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  19. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chyu, M.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  20. Unsteady High Turbulence Effects on Turbine Blade Film Cooling Heat Transfer Performance Using a Transient Liquid Crystal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Ekkad, S. V.; Du, H.; Teng, S.

    2000-01-01

    Unsteady wake effect, with and without trailing edge ejection, on detailed heat transfer coefficient and film cooling effectiveness distributions is presented for a downstream film-cooled gas turbine blade. Tests were performed on a five-blade linear cascade at an exit Reynolds number of 5.3 x 10(exp 5). Upstream unsteady wakes were simulated using a spoke-wheel type wake generator. Coolant blowing ratio was varied from 0.4 to 1.2; air and CO2 were used as coolants to simulate different density ratios. Surface heat transfer and film effectiveness distributions were obtained using a transient liquid crystal technique; coolant temperature profiles were determined with a cold wire technique. Results show that Nusselt numbers for a film cooled blade are much higher compared to a blade without film injection. Unsteady wake slightly enhances Nusselt numbers but significantly reduces film effectiveness versus no wake cases. Nusselt numbers increase only slic,htly but film cooling, effectiveness increases significantly with increasing, blowing ratio. Higher density coolant (CO2) provides higher effectiveness at higher blowing ratios (M = 1.2) whereas lower density coolant (Air) provides higher 0 effectiveness at lower blowing ratios (M = 0.8). Trailing edge ejection generally has more effect on film effectiveness than on the heat transfer, typically reducing film effectiveness and enhancing heat transfer. Similar data is also presented for a film cooled cylindrical leading edge model.

  1. Finite element analysis of flowfield in the single hole film cooling technique.

    PubMed

    Bazdidi-Tehrani, F; Mahmoodi, A A

    2001-05-01

    Film cooling is currently used in gas turbine hot sections, such as the combustor wall and the turbine blades, to prevent those sections from failing at elevated temperatures. In the single hole film cooling method, coolant air is injected from a hole into the mainstream and thus the flow is naturally three dimensional. In this paper, the Navier-Stokes and the energy equations are solved on a flat plate by the Finite Element Method (FEM) using brick elements. Algebraic equations are obtained by use of the Petrov-Galerkin method. The pressure term is removed from the momentum equations, by employing the Penalty method. The governing equations are transient and the flow is incompressible and turbulent. The model of turbulence in the near wall region is the wall function method, and in the fully turbulent region is the k-epsilon model. The system of the algebraic equations are solved by the Frontal method. The coolant injection angle and the blowing rate are among the parameters which are studied. In order to examine the present computer code, the results are compared with the Blasius (exact) solution and also with the empirical 1/7th power-law and good agreement is shown. Also, the optimum cooling performance is shown to be at 35 degree angle of coolant injection and the optimum blowing rate is 0.5. The film cooling effectiveness data, at the optimum conditions, is directly compared with the experimental results of Goldstein et al. and good agreement is demonstrated. PMID:11460653

  2. Effect of Velocity and Temperature Distribution at the Hole Exit on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, V. K.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    An existing three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code (Arnone et al, 1991), modified Turbine Branch, to include film cooling considerations (Garg and Gaugler, 1994), has been used to study the effect of coolant velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on the heat transfer coefficient on three film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the C3X vane, the VKI rotor, and the ACE rotor. Results are also compared with the experimental data for all the blades. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (1991), Forest's model for augmentation of leading edge heat transfer due to free-stream turbulence (1977), and Crawford's model for augmentation of eddy viscosity due to film cooling (Crawford et al, 1980) are used. Use of Mayle's and Forest's models is relevant only for the ACE rotor due to the absence of showerhead cooling on this rotor. It is found that, in some cases, the effect of distribution of coolant velocity and temperature at the hole exit can be as much as 60 percent on the heat transfer coefficient at the blade suction surface, and 50 percent at the pressure surface. Also, different effects are observed on the pressure and suction surface depending upon the blade as well as upon the hole shape, conical or cylindrical.

  3. Effect of velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on film cooling of turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of coolant velocity and temperature distribution at the hole exit on the heat transfer coefficient on three-film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the C3X vane, the VKI rotor, and the ACE rotor. Results are also compared with the experimental data for all the blades. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion, Forest's model for augmentation of leading edge heat transfer due to freestream turbulence, and Crawford's model for augmentation of eddy viscosity due to film cooling are used. Use of Mayle's and Forest's models is relevant only for the ACE rotor due to the absence of showerhead cooling on this rotor. It is found that, in some cases, the effect of distribution of coolant velocity and temperature at the hole exit can be as much as 60% on the heat transfer coefficient at the blade suction surface, and 50% at the pressure surface. Also, different effects are observed on the pressure and suction surface depending upon the blade as well as upon the hole shape, conical or cylindrical.

  4. A Numerical Study of the Effect of Wake Passing on Turbine Blade Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.

    1995-01-01

    Time-accurate and steady three-dimensional viscous turbulent numerical simulations were performed to study the effect of upstream blade wake passing unsteadiness on the performance of film cooling on a downstream axial turbine blade. The simulations modeled the blade as spanwise periodic and of infinite span. Both aerodynamic and heat transfer quantities were explored. A showerhead film cooling arrangement typical of modern gas turbine engines was employed. Showerhead cooling was studied because of its anticipated strong sensitivity to upstream flow fluctuations. The wake was modeled as a region of zero axial velocity on the upstream computational boundary which translated with each iteration. This model is compatible with a planned companion experiment in which the wakes will be produced by a rotating row of cylindrical rods upstream of an annular turbine cascade. It was determined that a steady solution with appropriate upstream swirl and stagnation pressure predicted the span-average film effectiveness quite well. The major difference is a 2 to 3 percent overprediction of span-average film effectiveness by the steady simulation on the pressure surface and in the showerhead region. Local overpredictions of up to 8 percent were observed in the showerhead region. These differences can be explained by the periodic relative lifting of the boundary layer and enhanced mixing in the unsteady simulations.

  5. Cooling Rate Dependent Ellipsometry Measurements to Determine the Dynamics of Thin Glassy Films.

    PubMed

    Glor, Ethan C; Fakhraai, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    This report aims to fully describe the experimental technique of using ellipsometry for cooling rate dependent Tg (CR-Tg) experiments. These measurements are simple high-throughput characterization experiments, which can determine the glass transition temperature (Tg), average dynamics, fragility and the expansion coefficient of the super-cooled liquid and glassy states for a variety of glassy materials. This technique allows for these parameters to be measured in a single experiment, while other methods must combine a variety of different techniques to investigate all of these properties. Measurements of dynamics close to Tg are particularly challenging. The advantage of cooling rate dependent Tg measurements over other methods which directly probe bulk and surface relaxation dynamics is that they are relatively quick and simple experiments, which do not utilize fluorophores or other complicated experimental techniques. Furthermore, this technique probes the average dynamics of technologically relevant thin films in temperature and relaxation time (τα) regimes relevant to the glass transition (τα > 100 sec). The limitation to using ellipsometry for cooling rate dependent Tg experiments is that it cannot probe relaxation times relevant to measurements of viscosity (τα < 1 sec). Other cooling rate dependent Tg measurement techniques, however, can extend the CR-Tg method to faster relaxation times. Furthermore, this technique can be used for any glassy system so long as the integrity of the film remains throughout the experiment. PMID:26863256

  6. Local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoil leading edge regions. I - Impingement cooling without film coolant extraction. II - Impingement cooling with film coolant extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, R. S.; Metzger, D. E.

    The highly localized internal heat transfer characteristics of large-scale models of impingement-cooled turbine blade leading edge regions presently studied derives its cooling from a single line of equally-spaced multiple jets aimed at the leading-edge apex, and exiting the leading-edge region in the opposite or chordwise direction. Detailed two-dimensional local surface Nusselt number distributions have been obtained with temperature-indicating coatings. Results indicate generally increasing heat transfer with the 0.6 power of jet Reynolds number. In the second part of this study, in which the same cooling process is used in conjunction with the extraction of the coolant fluid, the results obtained indicate that heat transfer is primarily dependent on jet Reynolds number, with smaller influences from the flow-extraction rate.

  7. Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

  8. Origin of paramagnetic magnetization in field-cooled YBa2Cu3O7-δ films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzhbin, D. A.; Pan, A. V.; Komashko, V. A.; Flis, V. S.; Pan, V. M.; Dou, S. X.; Esquinazi, P.

    2004-01-01

    Temperature dependences of the magnetic moment have been measured in YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films over a wide magnetic-field range (5⩽H⩽104 Oe). In these films a paramagnetic signal known as the paramagnetic Meissner effect has been observed. The experimental data in the films, which have strong pinning and high critical current densities (Jc˜2×106 A/cm2 at 77 K), are shown to be highly consistent with the theoretical model proposed by Koshelev and Larkin [Phys. Rev. B 52, 13 559 (1995)]. This finding indicates that the origin of the paramagnetic effect is ultimately associated with nucleation and inhomogeneous spatial redistribution of magnetic vortices in a sample which is cooled down in a magnetic field. It is also shown that the distribution of vortices is extremely sensitive to the interplay of film properties and the real experimental conditions of the measurements.

  9. Heat transfer measurement in the full coverage film cooling on a convexly curved wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, Masaya; Mitsuya, Teruaki; Kasagi, Nobuhide; Hirata, Masaru

    The full coverage film cooling (FCFC) high temperature gas turbine-cooling technique is presently investigated for the case of wall curvature effects, with attention to local heat transfer coefficient effects on a wall of constant radius as well as on a flat recovery wall with three blowing-mass fluxes. The FCFC Stanton number at the convex wall changes only slightly with the mass flux ratio, while the maximum reduction is obtained with a mass flux ratio of 0.4. The Stanton number shows considerable delay in recovering toward the value of the equilibrium turbulent boundary layer.

  10. Streakline flow visualization of discrete-hole film cooling with normal, slanted, and compound angle injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Russell, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a three-row, staggered array with five-diameter spacing was studied for three hole angles: (1) normal, (2) slanted 30 deg to the surface in the direction of the main stream, and (3) slanted 30 deg to the surface and 45 deg laterally to the main stream. The ratio of the boundary layer thickness-to-hole diameter and Reynolds number were typical of gas-turbine film-cooling applications. Detailed streaklines showing the turbulent motion of the injected air were obtained by photographing very small neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles which follow the flow field.

  11. Large eddy simulations of turbulent flows on graphics processing units: Application to film-cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Aaron F.

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations can be very computationally expensive, especially for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent ows. In LES the large, energy containing eddies are resolved by the computational mesh, but the smaller (sub-grid) scales are modeled. In DNS, all scales of turbulence are resolved, including the smallest dissipative (Kolmogorov) scales. Clusters of CPUs have been the standard approach for such simulations, but an emerging approach is the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which deliver impressive computing performance compared to CPUs. Recently there has been great interest in the scientific computing community to use GPUs for general-purpose computation (such as the numerical solution of PDEs) rather than graphics rendering. To explore the use of GPUs for CFD simulations, an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver was developed for a GPU. This solver is capable of simulating unsteady laminar flows or performing a LES or DNS of turbulent ows. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved via a fractional-step method and are spatially discretized using the finite volume method on a Cartesian mesh. An immersed boundary method based on a ghost cell treatment was developed to handle flow past complex geometries. The implementation of these numerical methods had to suit the architecture of the GPU, which is designed for massive multithreading. The details of this implementation will be described, along with strategies for performance optimization. Validation of the GPU-based solver was performed for fundamental bench-mark problems, and a performance assessment indicated that the solver was over an order-of-magnitude faster compared to a CPU. The GPU-based Navier-Stokes solver was used to study film-cooling flows via Large Eddy Simulation. In modern gas turbine engines, the film-cooling method is used to protect turbine blades from hot combustion gases. Therefore, understanding the physics of

  12. Numerical investigation of film cooling flow induced by cylindrical and shaped holes.

    PubMed

    Barthet, S; Kulisa, P

    2001-05-01

    The present study is the second half of a two part work carried out in collaboration with SNECMA which tends to investigate a shaped hole film cooling experimentally and numerically. The aim of this paper is the numerical study of 3D phenomena induced by cylindrical and shaped hole film cooling on a flat wall. The two calculations show up classical structures such as horseshoe or kidney vortices and their differences according to the shape configuration. A detailed study demonstrates their influence on the jet behaviour. Comparing both cases reveals the impact of shaping on the velocity field and vortex motions. The calculations were performed by resolving the 3D Navier-Stokes equations associated with a k-epsilon turbulence model. The solver is the CANARI code developed by ONERA. PMID:11460649

  13. Covering solid, film cooled surfaces with a duplex thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating systems were applied to hardware having passageways in the walls connecting apertures in the surface to a gas supply for film cooling. An inert gas, such as argon, is discharged through the apertures during the application of the thermal barrier coating system by plasma spraying. This flow of inert gas reduces both blocking of the holes and base metal oxidation during the coating operation.

  14. Study of the effects of fuel vortex film cooling on high temperature coating durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A report on the effects of fuel vortex film cooling on high temperature coating durability is presented. The program evaluated candidate high temperature oxidation resistant reaction control system engine thrust chamber material. As a result of the evaluation, the current and future programs may be optimized from the materials standpoint. Engine firing data for the evaluation of one material system is generated. The subjects considered are: (1) screening of materials, (2) thrust chamber fabrication, (3) engine testing, and (4) analysis of the data.

  15. Influence of coolant tube curvature on film cooling effectiveness as detected by infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Graham, R. W.; Cageao, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal film cooling footprints observed by infrared imagery from straight, curved, and looped coolant tube geometries are compared. It was hypothesized that the differences in secondary flow and in the turbulence structure of flow through these three tubes should influence the mixing properties between the coolant and the main stream. A flow visualization tunnel, an infrared camera and detector, and a Hilsch tube were employed to test the hypothesis.

  16. Flow-field analysis of anti-kidney vortex film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräf, Lars; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2012-02-01

    Film cooling is an important measure to enable an increase of the inlet temperature of a gas turbine and, thereby, to improve its overall efficiency. The coolant is ejected through spanwise rows of holes in the blades or endwalls to build up a film shielding the material. The holes often are inclined in the downstream direction and give rise to a kidney vortex. This is a counter-rotating vortex pair, with an upward flow direction between the two vortices, which tends to lift off the surface and to locally feed hot air towards the blade outside the pair. Reversing the rotational sense of the vortices reverses these two drawbacks into advantages. In the considered case, an anti-kidney vortex is generated using two subsequent rows of holes both inclined downstream and yawed spanwise with alternating angles. In a previous study, we performed large-eddy simulations (which focused on the fully turbulent boundary layer) of this anti-kidney vortex film-cooling and compared them to a corresponding physical experiment. The present work analyzes the simulated flow field in detail, beginning in the plenum (inside the blade or endwall) through the holes up to the mixture with the hot boundary layer. To identify the vortical structures found in the mean flow and in the instantaneous flow, we mostly use the λ 2 criterion and the line integral convolution (LIC) technique indicating sectional streamlines. The flow regions (coolant plenum, holes, and boundary layer) are studied subsequently and linked to each other. To track the anti-kidney vortex throughout the boundary layer, we propose two criteria which are based on vorticity and on LIC results. This enables us to associate the jet vortices with the cooling effectiveness at the wall, which is the key feature of film cooling.

  17. Numerical prediction of film cooling effectiveness over flat plate using variable turbulent prandtl number closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochrymiuk, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations were performed to predict the film cooling effectiveness on the fiat plate with a three- dimensional discrete-hole film cooling arrangement. The effects of basic geometrical characteristics of the holes, i.e. diameter D, length L and pitch S/D were studied. Different turbulent heat transfer models based on constant and variable turbulent Prandtl number approaches were considered. The variability of the turbulent Prandtl number Pr t in the energy equation was assumed using an algebraic relation proposed by Kays and Crawford, or employing the Abe, Kondoh and Nagano eddy heat diffusivity closure with two differential transport equations for the temperature variance k θ and its destruction rate ɛ θ . The obtained numerical results were directly compared with the data that came from an experiment based on Transient Liquid Crystal methodology. All implemented models for turbulent heat transfer performed sufficiently well for the considered case. It was confirmed, however, that the two- equation closure can give a detailed look into film cooling problems without using any time-consuming and inherently unsteady models.

  18. Experimental investigation of film cooling flow induced by shaped holes on a turbine blade.

    PubMed

    Barthet, S; Bario, F

    2001-05-01

    The present study is the second half of a piece of work carried out in collaboration with SNECMA. It investigates shaped hole film cooling, numerically and experimentally. The aim of this paper is the experimental analysis of shaped hole film cooling on a large scale turbine blade (1.4 m chord). The test section is a large scale turbine inlet guide vane cascade. The test airfoil is equipped with a row of nine 50 degrees sloped shaped holes. They are located on the suction side at 20% of the curvilinear length of the blade from the stagnation point. The inlet film cooling hole diameter is 12 mm. The jet flow is heated to 55 degrees C above the crossflow temperature. Velocity and temperature field measurements have been done to obtain mean and fluctuating values. The results are compared to those obtained by Béral on the same experimental apparatus and in the same test conditions, for a row of cylindrical holes. PMID:11460642

  19. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Spanwise angled injection from multiple rows of holes. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckey, D. W.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The stagnation region of a cylinder in a cross flow was used in experiments conducted with both a single row and multiple rows of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio with a freestream to wall temperature ratio approximately equal to 1.7 and R(eD) = 90,000. Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, 58.7 deg from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d(o) = 5 and 10. Three multiple row configurations were also investigated. Data are presented for a uniform blowing distribution and for a nonuniform blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply. The data for local Stanton Number reduction demonstrated a lack of lateral spreading by the coolant jets. Heat flux levels larger than those without film cooling were observed directly behind the coolant holes as the blowing ratio exceeded a particular value. The data were spanwise averaged to illustrate the influence of injection location, blowing ratio and hole spacing. The large values of blowing ratio for the blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply resulted in heat flux levels behind the holes in excess of the values without film cooling. An increase in freestream turbulence intensity from 4.4 to 9.5 percent had a negligible effect on the film cooling performance.

  20. Redesigning a Film-Cooled Airfoil Trailing Edge using MRI Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Michael; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2011-11-01

    Trailing edges of modern gas turbine blades are film cooled through cutback slots on the airfoil pressure surface. The slots are spanwise divided, forming rectangular wall jets separated by tapered lands. The 3D wall jets mix rapidly with the mainstream flow reducing the cooling effectiveness. Experiments were conducted to document the 3D mean velocity and coolant concentration fields on a baseline configuration using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in a water flow with Re = 110,000 based on airfoil chord length. Critical flow features causing rapid mixing were identified: a separation bubble behind the slot lip, and a pair of strong longitudinal vortices formed just downstream of the slot breakout. The geometry was modified to improve film cooling surface effectiveness obtained from the concentration field. The first redesign modified the slot lip and land shapes to minimize the slot lip separation bubble size and reduce 3D effects. The other redesigns modified the land shape to reduce the strength of the longitudinal vortices. These latter two designs produced a substantial reduction in the mixing rate of the coolant jet with the mainstream flow, improving the cooling system performance. The highly detailed concentration and velocity fields available with MRI-based experiments can be used to understand the flow physics and derive significant system improvements. This work was generously supported by GE Aviation under the GE-USA program and the Army Research Office.

  1. Atomic long-range order effects on Curie temperature and adiabatic spin-wave dynamics in strained Fe-Co alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2016-08-01

    The strained Fe-Co alloy in body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure has raised considerable interest due to its giant uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. On the basis of the classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian with ab initio interatomic exchange interactions, we perform a theoretical study of fundamental finite temperature magnetic properties of Fe1 -xCox alloy films as a function of three variables: chemical composition 0.3 ≤x ≤0.8 , bct geometry [a ,c (a )] arising from in-plane strain and associated out-of-plane relaxation, and atomic long-range order (ALRO). The Curie temperatures TC(x ,a ) obtained from Monte Carlo simulations display a competition between a pronounced dependence on tetragonality, strong ferromagnetism in the Co-rich alloy, and the beginning instability of ferromagnetic order in the Fe-rich alloy when c /a →√{2 } . Atomic ordering enhances TC and arises mainly due to different distributions of atoms in neighboring coordination shells rather than altering exchange interactions significantly. We investigate the ordering effect on the shape of the adiabatic spin-wave spectrum for selected pairs (x ,a ) . Our results indicate that long-wavelength acoustic spin-wave excitations show dependencies on x , a , and ALRO similar to those of TC. The directional anisotropy of the spin-wave stiffness d (x ,a ) peaks in narrow ranges of composition and tetragonality. ALRO exhibits a strong effect on d for near equiconcentration Fe-Co. We also discuss our findings in the context of employing Fe-Co as perpendicular magnetic recording medium.

  2. Experimental results for film cooling in 2-D supersonic flow including coolant delivery pressure, geometry, and incident shock effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, George C.; Nowak, Robert J.; Holden, Michael S.; Baker, N. R.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to establish some design parameters important to a supersonic film cooling system in a scramjet engine. A simple non-combusting two-dimensional flow configuration was used to isolate the film cooling phenomena. Parameters investigated include coolant delivery pressure, slot height and lip thickness, and incident shock location and strength. Design guidelines for use in engineering and trade studies are presented.

  3. A mechanistic approach to the development of chemical solutions for fouling of cooling tower film fills

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.; Yorke, M.A.; Donlan, R.M.; Gibbon, D.L.; McClung, B.

    1995-02-01

    Since the 1980`s reported incidents of cooling tower film fill fouling have continually increased and many utilities have sought chemical treatment solution for their fouling problems. Specialty chemical companies have been called upon to research the problems and to provide programs and products that address this pressing issue. The process of surface fouling of high efficiency film fill is a complex problem due to the multiple components involved in the fouling. An in depth understanding of the problem is necessary to determine effective treatment approaches. This study defines the mechanisms of film fill fouling by examination of microorganisms, silt particles and inorganic minerals in the fouling process. The investigation of chemical treatment approaches for the effective control of fouling based on the fouling mechanisms also are discussed.

  4. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II - Adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Film Cooling with Tangential Slot Injection in a LOX/CH4 Subscale Rocket Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Richard; Suslov, Dmitry I.; Haidn, Oskar J.

    Within the frame of a broader activity towards research into the application of methane in cryogenic liquid rocket engines, the efficiency of film cooling was studied in a LOX/CH4 fired subscale sized model combustor. Aiming at booster as well as upper stage applications, the combustion pressure levels have been varied between 4 MPa and 7 MPa. The effectiveness of the ambient temperature film was determined in axial and circumferential directions by measuring temperature gradients in the copper liner material. The experiments revealed remarkable circumferential differences of the film cooling efficiency which remain existent far downstream. However, circumferential film cooling varieties are more pronounced at close proximity of the point of film coolant injection.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Effects of Flow Control Devices Upon Flat-Plate Film Cooling Performance.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hirokazu; Funazaki, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Ryota; Takahashi, Daichi

    2014-06-01

    This study deals with the experimental and numerical studies of the effect of flow control devices (FCDs) on the film cooling performance of a circular cooling hole on a flat plate. Two types of FCDs with different heights are examined in this study, where each of them is mounted to the flat plate upstream of the cooling hole by changing its lateral position with respect to the hole centerline. In order to measure the film effectiveness as well as heat transfer downstream of the cooling hole with upstream FCD, a transient method using a high-resolution infrared camera is adopted. The velocity field downstream of the cooling hole is captured by 3D laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Furthermore, the aerodynamic loss associated with the cooling hole with/without FCD is measured by a total pressure probe rake. The experiments are carried out at blowing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 1.0. In addition, numerical simulations are also made to have a better understanding of the flow field. LES approach is employed to solve the flow field and visualize the vortex structure around the cooling hole with FCD. When a taller FCD is mounted to the plate, the film effectiveness tends to increase due to the vortex structure generated by the FCD. As FCD is laterally shifted from the centerline, the film effectiveness increases, while the lift-off of cooling air is also promoted when FCD is put on the center line. PMID:25278646

  7. A detailed analysis of film-cooling physics: Part 1 -- Streamwise injection with cylindrical holes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, D.K.; Leylek, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    A previously documented systematic computational methodology is implemented and applied to a jet-in-crossflow problem in order to document all of the pertinent flow physics associated with a film-cooling flowfield. Numerical results are compared to experimental data for the case of a row of three-dimensional, inclined jets with length-to-diameter ratios similar to a realistic film-cooling application. A novel vorticity-based approach is included in the analysis of the flow physics. Particular attention has been paid to the downstream coolant structures and to the source and influence of counterrotating vortices in the crossflow region. It is shown that the vorticity in the boundary layers within the film hole is primarily responsible for this secondary motion. Important aspects of the study include: (1) a systematic treatment of the key numerical issues, including accurate computational modeling of the physical problem, exact geometry and high-quality grid generation techniques, higher-order numerical discretization, and accurate evaluation of turbulence model performance; (2) vorticity-based analysis and documentation of the physical mechanisms of jet-crossflow interaction and their influence on film-cooling performance; (3) a comparison of computational results to experimental data; and (4) comparison of results using a two-layer model near-wall treatment versus generalized wall functions. Solution of the steady, time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were obtained for all cases using an unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching code with multigrid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing acceleration techniques.

  8. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Film Cooling Configuration with a Micro-ramp Vortex Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Aaron; Pratap Vanka, S.

    2010-11-01

    A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of an inclined turbulent jet interacting with a cross-flow in a film cooling configuration is performed. The inclined turbulent jet represents the coolant flow and the cross-flow represents the hot combustion gases. In this configuration, it is known that the coolant jet tends to lift off the wall that is to be cooled, thus decreasing heat transfer effectiveness. The micro-ramp vortex generator is placed downstream of the coolant jet and is used to modify the trajectory of the coolant jet such that it remains closer to the wall, thus enhancing heat transfer. The purpose of this study is to examine the micro-ramp's effect on both the flowfield and heat transfer of the film cooling problem. The coolant jet is inclined at an angle of 35 degrees to the freestream, the blowing ratio is 1.5, and the Reynolds number based on the jet diameter and freestream cross-flow velocity is 8000. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically using a 3D finite volume solver (CU-FLOW) implemented on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU).

  9. Superlattice-based thin-film thermoelectric modules with high cooling fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Bulman, Gary; Barletta, Phil; Lewis, Jay; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Manno, Michael; Bar-Cohen, Avram; Yang, Bao

    2016-01-01

    In present-day high-performance electronic components, the generated heat loads result in unacceptably high junction temperatures and reduced component lifetimes. Thermoelectric modules can, in principle, enhance heat removal and reduce the temperatures of such electronic devices. However, state-of-the-art bulk thermoelectric modules have a maximum cooling flux qmax of only about 10 W cm−2, while state-of-the art commercial thin-film modules have a qmax <100 W cm−2. Such flux values are insufficient for thermal management of modern high-power devices. Here we show that cooling fluxes of 258 W cm−2 can be achieved in thin-film Bi2Te3-based superlattice thermoelectric modules. These devices utilize a p-type Sb2Te3/Bi2Te3 superlattice and n-type δ-doped Bi2Te3−xSex, both of which are grown heteroepitaxially using metalorganic chemical vapour deposition. We anticipate that the demonstration of these high-cooling-flux modules will have far-reaching impacts in diverse applications, such as advanced computer processors, radio-frequency power devices, quantum cascade lasers and DNA micro-arrays. PMID:26757675

  10. Superlattice-based thin-film thermoelectric modules with high cooling fluxes.

    PubMed

    Bulman, Gary; Barletta, Phil; Lewis, Jay; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Manno, Michael; Bar-Cohen, Avram; Yang, Bao

    2016-01-01

    In present-day high-performance electronic components, the generated heat loads result in unacceptably high junction temperatures and reduced component lifetimes. Thermoelectric modules can, in principle, enhance heat removal and reduce the temperatures of such electronic devices. However, state-of-the-art bulk thermoelectric modules have a maximum cooling flux qmax of only about 10 W cm(-2), while state-of-the art commercial thin-film modules have a qmax <100 W cm(-2). Such flux values are insufficient for thermal management of modern high-power devices. Here we show that cooling fluxes of 258 W cm(-2) can be achieved in thin-film Bi2Te3-based superlattice thermoelectric modules. These devices utilize a p-type Sb2Te3/Bi2Te3 superlattice and n-type δ-doped Bi2Te3-xSex, both of which are grown heteroepitaxially using metalorganic chemical vapour deposition. We anticipate that the demonstration of these high-cooling-flux modules will have far-reaching impacts in diverse applications, such as advanced computer processors, radio-frequency power devices, quantum cascade lasers and DNA micro-arrays. PMID:26757675

  11. Superlattice-based thin-film thermoelectric modules with high cooling fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulman, Gary; Barletta, Phil; Lewis, Jay; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Manno, Michael; Bar-Cohen, Avram; Yang, Bao

    2016-01-01

    In present-day high-performance electronic components, the generated heat loads result in unacceptably high junction temperatures and reduced component lifetimes. Thermoelectric modules can, in principle, enhance heat removal and reduce the temperatures of such electronic devices. However, state-of-the-art bulk thermoelectric modules have a maximum cooling flux qmax of only about 10 W cm-2, while state-of-the art commercial thin-film modules have a qmax <100 W cm-2. Such flux values are insufficient for thermal management of modern high-power devices. Here we show that cooling fluxes of 258 W cm-2 can be achieved in thin-film Bi2Te3-based superlattice thermoelectric modules. These devices utilize a p-type Sb2Te3/Bi2Te3 superlattice and n-type δ-doped Bi2Te3-xSex, both of which are grown heteroepitaxially using metalorganic chemical vapour deposition. We anticipate that the demonstration of these high-cooling-flux modules will have far-reaching impacts in diverse applications, such as advanced computer processors, radio-frequency power devices, quantum cascade lasers and DNA micro-arrays.

  12. Ultra-Low Fatigue Quaternary TiNi-Based Films for Elastocaloric Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, C.; Ossmer, H.; Zamponi, C.; Kohl, M.; Quandt, E.

    2016-03-01

    Elastocaloric applications require superelastic shape memory materials which show high fatigue resistance, adjustable transformation temperatures, short heat transfer times, and large elastocaloric effect sizes. Ti-rich TiNiCu films are known for their high functional and structural stability of several million cycles without any degradation, accompanied by a small hysteresis caused by the good crystallographic compatibility of austenite and martensite phase. Still, for the application of TiNiCu as an elastocaloric cooling agent, transformation temperature adjustment is necessary. Quaternary Co and Fe alloying is found to reduce the transformation temperature by 42 and 22 K at.%-1, respectively, while maintaining high transformation enthalpies of 7.9 J g-1 for Ti54.7Ni30.7Cu12.3Co2.3 films. Furthermore, this specific alloy shows a 25 % larger coefficient of performance compared to binary TiNi films. Combined with the high fatigue resistance, the small transformation strain of 1.6 %, and the operational temperature range of ~50 K, this material is a very attractive candidate for elastocaloric cooling applications.

  13. Development of liquid-film tracking models for analysis of AP-600 passive containment cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.G.; Sha, W.T.; Chen, Y.S.

    1993-10-01

    The AP-600, an advanced pressurized water reactor, utilizes a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove heat released inside the containment vessel following postulated design-base accidents (DBAS) such as a main-steam-line break or loss-of-coolant accident. The containment vessel consists of a vertical cylindrical shell and is capped at both top and bottom by a dome that is also a body of revolution with a meridian cross section in the shape of a semiellipse with a horizontal major axis. During a DBA, heat released to the interior of the steel containment vessel is removed by evaporation of a continuously flowing thin liquid film on the outside surface of the vessel, thus lowering the temperature of the steel vessel wall so that steam condenses on its inside surface. The external liquid film is formed by flooding water at top of the ellipsoidal dome. Evaporation of the falling liquid film is enhanced by buoyancy-driven flows of moist air in an annular space outside the steel containment vessel. To ensure PCCS performance, it is necessary to predict both the evaporating film on the outside surface of the vessel and the condensate film on its inside. To this end, two liquid-film tracking models for time-dependent flows (a simplified model and a comprehensive model) have been developed and implemented in the COMMIX code. COMMIX is a general-purpose, time-dependent, multidimensional computer code for thermal hydraulic analysis of single- or multicomponent engineering systems. It solves a system of conservation equations of continuities for up to six species, mixture momentum, and mixture energy, and a k-{epsilon} two-equation turbulent model. A unique feature of the COMMIX code is its porous-media formulation, which represents the first unified approach to thermal-hydraulic analysis. The tracking models discussed in this report compute the liquid-film thickness, its mean velocity, and its temperature on both sides of the steel containment vessel.

  14. Influence of turbulators in blade cooling passages on film hole discharge coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, H.-P.; Taege, J.; Haselbach, F.; Zhu, Huiren

    2004-08-01

    This paper details the results of a joint project between Rolls-Royce Deutschland (RRD) and the Northwestern Polytechnical University of China (NWPU). The objective of the project was the determination of the influence of turbulators in turbine blade cooling passages on film hole discharge coefficients (Cd coefficients). A large-scale plexiglas model was used by the NWPU to measure the turbulator influence on Cd coefficients for a wide range of different geometrical parameters, Reynolds numbers and cooling flow off take ratios. RRD specified the comprehensive test matrix and analysed the test data. The CFD code FLUENT was used by RRD for numerical simulation of the test cases with the main objective to support the interpretation of observed trends. Both, experimental and numerical results will be presented in this paper for a selection of test configurations.

  15. Paramagnetic relaxation and Wohlleben effect in field-cooled Nb thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Terentiev, A.; Watkins, D.B.; De Long, L.E.; Morgan, D.J.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1999-07-01

    The {open_quotes}Wohlleben effect{close_quotes} (paramagnetic Meissner effect) is found in uniform applied magnetic fields only above a threshold value H{sub 0}{approx}10{sup 2}&hthinsp;Oe for field-cooled Nb films of thickness less than 1000 {Angstrom}. The initial diamagnetic magnetization observed upon field cooling to fixed temperatures just below T{sub c} gives way to a logarithmic time relaxation toward paramagnetic values comparable to the critical state magnetization over a period of several hours (normalized rate S{approx}0.1), implying that the development of the paramagnetic state is moderated by fast flux creep processes. Small field gradients {approx}10{endash}20 mOe/cm are found to influence the occurrence of the effect for applied fields H{lt}H{sub 0}. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. The influence of film cooling on the efficiency of an annular nozzle guide vane cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Day, C.R.B.; Oldfield, M.L.G.; Lock, G.D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of aerofoil surface film cooling on the aerodynamic efficiency of an annular cascade of transonic nozzle guide vanes. A dense foreign gas (SF{sub 6}/Ar mixture) is used to simulate engine representative coolant-to-mainstream density ratios under ambient conditions. The flowfield measurements have been obtained using a four-hole pyramid probe in a short duration blowdown facility that correctly models engine Reynolds and Mach numbers, as well as the inlet turbulence intensity. The use of foreign gas coolant poses specific challenges not present in an air-cooled cascade, and this paper addresses two. First, a novel method for the determination of mass flow from pneumatic probe data in a heterogeneous gas environment is presented that eliminates the need to measure concentration in order to determine loss. Second, the authors argue on the grounds of dimensionless similarity that momentum flux ratio is to be preferred to blowing rate for the correct parameterization of film cooling studies with varying coolant densities. Experimental results are presented as area traverse maps, from which values for loss have been calculated. It is shown that air and foreign gas at the same momentum flux ratio give very similar results, and that the main difference between cooled and uncooled configurations is an increase in wake width. Interestingly, it is shown that an increase in the momentum flux ratio above the design value with foreign gas coolant reduces the overall loss compared with the design value. The data have been obtained both for purposes of design and for CFD code validation.

  17. Full-coverage film cooling on flat, isothermal surfaces: Data and predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, M. E.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The heat transfer and fluid mechanics characteristics of full-coverage film cooling were investigated. The results for flat, isothermal plates for three injection geometries (normal, slant, and compound angle) are summarized and data concerning the spanwise distribution of the heat transfer coefficient within the blowing region are presented. Data are also presented for two different numbers of rows of holes (6 and 11). The experimental results summarized can be predicted with a two dimensional boundary layer code, STANCOOL, by providing descriptors of the injection parameters as inputs.

  18. Ceramic coating effect on liner metal temperatures of film-cooled annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Wear, J. D.; Liebert, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the effect of a ceramic coating on the average metal temperatures of full annular, film cooled combustion chamber liner. The investigation was conducted at pressures from 0.50 to 0.062. At all test conditions, experimental results indicate that application of a ceramic coating will result in significantly lower wall temperatures. In a simplified heat transfer analysis, agreement between experimental and calculated liner temperatures was achieved. Simulated spalling of a small portion of the ceramic coating resulted in only small increases in liner temperature because of the thermal conduction of heat from the hotter, uncoated liner metal.

  19. Simulation of Cold Flow in a Truncated Ideal Nozzle with Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, K. E.; Ruf, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flow transients during rocket start-up and shut-down can lead to significant side loads on rocket nozzles. The capability to estimate these side loads computationally can streamline the nozzle design process. Towards this goal, the flow in a truncated ideal contour (TIC) nozzle has been simulated using RANS and URANS for a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) aimed to match a series of cold flow experiments performed at the NASA MSFC Nozzle Test Facility. These simulations were performed with varying turbulence model choices and for four approximations of the supersonic film injection geometry, each of which was created with a different simplification of the test article geometry. The results show that although a reasonable match to experiment can be obtained with varying levels of geometric fidelity, the modeling choices made do not fully represent the physics of flow separation in a TIC nozzle with film cooling.

  20. A systematic computational methodology applied to a three-dimensional film-cooling flowfield

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, D.K.; Leylek, J.H.

    1997-10-01

    Numerical results are presented for a three-dimensional discrete-jet in crossflow problem typical of a realistic film-cooling application in gas turbines. Key aspects of the study include: (1) application of a systematic computational methodology that stresses accurate computational model of the physical problem, including simultaneous, fully elliptic solution of the crossflow, film-hole, and plenum regions; high-quality three-dimensional unstructured grid generation techniques, which have yet to be documented for this class of problems; the use of a high-order discretization scheme to reduce numerical errors significantly; and effective turbulence modeling; (2) a three-way comparison of results to both code validation quality experimental data and a previously documented structured grid simulation; and (3) identification of sources of discrepancy between predicted and measured results, as well as recommendations to alleviate these discrepancies. Solutions were obtained with a multiblock, unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code with multigrid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing type acceleration techniques. The computational methodology was applied to the validation test case of a row of discrete jets on a flat plate with a streamwise injection angle of 35 deg, and two film-hole length-to-diameter ratios of 3.5 and 1.75. The density ratio for all cases was 2.0, blowing ratio was varied from 0.5 to 2.0, and free-stream turbulence intensity was 2%. The results demonstrate that the prescribed computational methodology yields consistently more accurate solutions for this class of problems than previous attempts published in the open literature. Sources of disagreement between measured and computed results have been identified, and recommendations made for future prediction of film-cooling problems.

  1. A detailed analysis of film-cooling physics: Part I -- Streamwise injection with cylindrical holes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, D.K.; Leylek, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    A previously documented systematic computational methodology is implemented and applied to a jet-in-crossflow problem in order to document all of the pertinent flow physics associated with a film-cooling flowfield. Numerical results are compared to experimental data for the case of a row of three-dimensional, inclined jets with length-to-diameter ratios similar to a realistic film-cooling application. A novel vorticity-based approach is included in the analysis of the flow physics. Particular attention has been paid to the downstream coolant structures and to the source and influence of counterrotating vortices in the crossflow region. It is shown that the vorticity in the boundary layers within the film hole is primarily responsible for this secondary motion. Important aspects of the study include: (1) a systematic treatment of the key numerical issues, including accurate computational modeling of the physical problem, exact geometry and the high-quality grid generation techniques, higher-order numerical discretization and accurate evaluation of turbulence model performance; (2) vorticity-based analysis and documentation of the physical mechanisms of jet-crossflow interaction and their influence on film-cooling performance; (3) a comparison of computational results to experimental data; and (4) comparison of results using a two-layer model near-wall treatment versus generalized wall functions. Solution of the steady, time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were obtained for all cases using an unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching code with multigrid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing acceleration techniques. For the case using the two-layer model, the solution was obtained with an implicit, pressure-correction solver with multigrid. The three-dimensional test case was examined for two different film-hole length-to-diameter ratios of 1.75 and 3.5, and three different blowing ratios, from 0.5 to 2.0. All of the simulations had a density

  2. Full Coverage Shaped Hole Film Cooling in an Accelerating Boundary Layer with High Free-Stream Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Forrest E.; Kingery, Joseph E.

    2015-06-17

    Full coverage shaped-hole film cooling and downstream heat transfer measurements have been acquired in the accelerating flows over a large cylindrical leading edge test surface. The shaped holes had an 8° lateral expansion angled at 30° to the surface with spanwise and streamwise spacings of 3 diameters. Measurements were conducted at four blowing ratios, two Reynolds numbers and six well documented turbulence conditions. Film cooling measurements were acquired over a four to one range in blowing ratio at the lower Reynolds number and at the two lower blowing ratios for the higher Reynolds number. The film cooling measurements were acquired at a coolant to free-stream density ratio of approximately 1.04. The flows were subjected to a low turbulence condition (Tu = 0.7%), two levels of turbulence for a smaller sized grid (Tu = 3.5%, and 7.9%), one turbulence level for a larger grid (8.1%), and two levels of turbulence generated using a mock aero-combustor (Tu = 9.3% and 13.7%). Turbulence level is shown to have a significant influence in mixing away film cooling coverage progressively as the flow develops in the streamwise direction. Effectiveness levels for the aero-combustor turbulence condition are reduced to as low as 20% of low turbulence values by the furthest downstream region. The film cooling discharge is located close to the leading edge with very thin and accelerating upstream boundary layers. Film cooling data at the lower Reynolds number, show that transitional flows have significantly improved effectiveness levels compared with turbulent flows. Downstream effectiveness levels are very similar to slot film cooling data taken at the same coolant flow rates over the same cylindrical test surface. However, slots perform significantly better in the near discharge region. These data are expected to be very useful in grounding computational predictions of full coverage shaped hole film cooling with elevated turbulence levels and acceleration. IR

  3. Film Cooled Recession of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Test Development, CFD Modeling and Experimental Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Sakowski, Barbara A.; Fisher, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. However, the environmental stability of Si-based ceramics in high pressure, high velocity turbine engine combustion environment is of major concern. The water vapor containing combustion gas leads to accelerated oxidation and corrosion of the SiC based ceramics due to the water vapor reactions with silica (SiO2) scales forming non-protective volatile hydroxide species, resulting in recession of the ceramic components. Although environmental barrier coatings are being developed to help protect the CMC components, there is a need to better understand the fundamental recession behavior of in more realistic cooled engine component environments.In this paper, we describe a comprehensive film cooled high pressure burner rig based testing approach, by using standardized film cooled SiCSiC disc test specimen configurations. The SiCSiC specimens were designed for implementing the burner rig testing in turbine engine relevant combustion environments, obtaining generic film cooled recession rate data under the combustion water vapor conditions, and helping developing the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) film cooled models and performing model validation. Factors affecting the film cooled recession such as temperature, water vapor concentration, combustion gas velocity, and pressure are particularly investigated and modeled, and compared with impingement cooling only recession data in similar combustion flow environments. The experimental and modeling work will help predict the SiCSiC CMC recession behavior, and developing durable CMC systems in complex turbine engine operating conditions.

  4. Investigation of heat transfer with film cooling to a flat plate in a shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgelewicz, Scott A.

    1989-12-01

    The heat transfer occurring through turbulent boundary layers in modern gas turbines is not well understood. The heat transferred to a flat plate though a turbulent boundary layer presents many similarities without the complex flow patterns. The gas used in this study was air. The flow behind a passing shock wave in a shock tube was used to simulate the high temperature ratio flows found in gas turbines. Highly responsive heat flux gages were used to measure the temperature history of a flat plate exposed to the flow. High speed digital recorders were used to sample and store the information. Heat transfer rates were determined from temperature history using a computer program and a quadrature method. The temperature history was numerically averaged to filter out noise effects before it was used to calculate the heat flux. It was found that low shock Mach numbers produced measured heat flux rates that were predictable by theory. At higher Mach numbers the rounded leading edge of the plate produced reflections that increased the measured heat flux as the Mach number increased; but theory, dependent on incident shock Mach number, underpredicted these actual values. Film cooling flows were then studied under the same flow conditions. Ratios of heat transfer coefficients with blowing ratios of approximately two to three produced the best agreement with correlations. The effects of free stream turbulence on the heat flux with film cooling were also briefly studied.

  5. Transient Three-Dimensional Side Load Analysis of Out-of-Round Film Cooled Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Lin, Jeff; Ruf, Joe; Guidos, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of nozzle out-of-roundness on the transient startup side loads. The out-of-roundness could be the result of asymmetric loads induced by hardware attached to the nozzle, asymmetric internal stresses induced by previous tests and/or deformation, such as creep, from previous tests. The rocket engine studied encompasses a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and a film cooled nozzle extension with film coolant distributed from a turbine exhaust manifold. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet history based on an engine system simulation. Transient startup computations were performed with the out-of-roundness achieved by four degrees of ovalization of the nozzle: one perfectly round, one slightly out-of-round, one more out-of-round, and one significantly out-of-round. The computed side load physics caused by the nozzle out-of-roundness and its effect on nozzle side load are reported and discussed.

  6. Turbine vane gas film cooling with injection in the leading edge region from a single row of spanwise angled holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecuyer, M. R.; Hanus, G. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of gas film cooling was conducted on a 3X size model turbine vane. Injection in the leading edge region was from a single row of holes angled in a spanwise direction. Measurements of the local heat flux downstream from the row of coolant holes, both with and without film coolant flow, were used to determine the film cooling performance presented in terms of the Stanton number ratio. Results for a range of coolant blowing ratio, M = 0 to 2.0, indicate a reduction in heat flux of up to 15 to 30 percent at a point 10 to 11 hole diameters downstream from injection. An optimum coolant blowing ratio corresponds to a coolant-to-freestream velocity ratio in the range of 0.5. The shallow injection angle resulted in superior cooling performance for injection closest to stagnation, while the effect of injection angle was insignificant for injection further from stagnation.

  7. Detailed measurements of local heat transfer coefficient in the entrance to normal and inclined film cooling holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, D.R.H.; Byerley, A.R.; Ireland, P.T.; Wang, Z.; Jones, T.V.; Kohler, S.T.

    1996-04-01

    The local heat transfer inside the entrance to large-scale models of film cooling holes has been measured using the transient heat transfer technique. The method employs temperature-sensitive liquid crystals to measure the surface temperature of large-scale perspex models. Full distributions of local Nusselt number were calculated based on the cooling passage centerline gas temperature ahead of the cooling hole. The circumferentially averaged Nusselt number was also calculated based on the local mixed bulk driving gas temperature to aid interpretation of the results, and to broaden the potential application of the data. Data are presented for a single film cooling hole inclined at 90 and 150 deg to the coolant duct wall. Both holes exhibited entry length heat transfer levels that were significantly lower than those predicted by entry length data in the presence of crossflow. The reasons for the comparative reduction are discussed in terms of the interpreted flow field.

  8. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  9. Film cooling on a convex wall: Heat transfer and hydrodynamic measurements for full and partial coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furuhama, K.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    Turbine-blade cooling is an important issue for high-efficiency turbine engines, and discrete-hole injection is widely used as a cooling method. In the present study, detailed measurements were made of the heat transfer and hydrodynamics of a film-cooled flow on a convex wall, both for full and partial coverage. Two important parameters were altered: the blowing ratio, m, and the number of rows of injection holes. Three values of m were tested: m = 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6. In the blown region, m = 0.4 results in the lowest Stanton numbers of the three blowing ratios tested. This indicates that the value of m = 0.4 is near optimum on the convex wall from the point of view of cooling effect by injection. In the recovery region, Stanton numbers gradually approach the no injection values. Although the heat-transfer behavior during recovery from injection looks relatively complicated, the behavior of Stanton number can be explained in terms of two mechanisms: recovery from the thermal effect of injection and recovery from the turbulence augmentation. This interpretation of the data is supported by the hydrodynamic and temperture-profile measurements. For partial blowing cases, the data follow the full-coverage values inside the blown region. In the unblown region, both in the curved and in the flat plate, the effect of the number of blown rows is clearly seen. Hydrodynamic boundary-layer profiles were measured with the aid of a triple hot-water probe. Three mean-velocity components and six turbulence quantities were simultaneously measured, and inside the blown region strong three-dimensionality was observed.

  10. As-grown Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films by reactive coevaporation with oxygen plasma cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, M.; Akoh, H.; Takada, S.

    1989-10-01

    We have developed a new fabrication process of as-grown Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films using a reactive coevaporation method specially with the rf-plasma cooling in the low oxygen pressure of 0.4 mTorr. By this O2 plasma cooling process, the transition temperature Tc is improved from 40 to 81 K for the film with a thickness of 1000 Å. The x-ray diffraction analysis shows that the activated oxygen species generated by the rf plasma make Y-Ba-Cu-O films oxidize sufficiently even in the low pressure of oxygen. In addition, we have studied the thickness dependence of Tc for as-grown films with various thicknesses of 60-2000 Å.

  11. As-grown Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films by reactive coevaporation with oxygen plasma cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, M.; Akoh, H.; Takada, S. )

    1989-10-15

    We have developed a new fabrication process of as-grown Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films using a reactive coevaporation method specially with the rf-plasma cooling in the low oxygen pressure of 0.4 mTorr. By this O{sub 2} plasma cooling process, the transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}} is improved from 40 to 81 K for the film with a thickness of 1000 A. The x-ray diffraction analysis shows that the activated oxygen species generated by the rf plasma make Y-Ba-Cu-O films oxidize sufficiently even in the low pressure of oxygen. In addition, we have studied the thickness dependence of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} for as-grown films with various thicknesses of 60--2000 A.

  12. The prediction of nozzle performance and heat transfer in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engines with transpiration cooling, film cooling, and high area ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Hoffman, Joe D.

    1993-11-01

    An advanced engineering computational model has been developed to aid in the analysis and design of hydrogen/oxygen chemical rocket engines. The complete multi-species, chemically reacting and diffusing Navier-Stokes equations are modelled, finite difference approach that is tailored to be conservative in an axisymmetric coordinate system for both the inviscid and viscous terms. Demonstration cases are presented for a 1030:1 area ratio nozzle, a 25 lbf film cooled nozzle, and transpiration cooled plug-and-spool rocket engine. The results indicate that the thrust coefficient predictions of the 1030:1 nozzle and the film cooled nozzle are within 0.2 to 0.5 percent, respectively, of experimental measurements when all of the chemical reaction and diffusion terms are considered. Further, the model's predictions agree very well with the heat transfer measurements made in all of the nozzle test cases. The Soret thermal diffusion term is demonstrated to have a significant effect on the predicted mass fraction of hydrogen along the wall of the nozzle in both the laminar flow 1030:1 nozzle and the turbulent plug-and-spool rocket engine analysis cases performed. Further, the Soret term was shown to represent a significant fraction of the diffusion fluxes occurring in the transpiration cooled rocket engine.

  13. The Prediction of Nozzle Performance and Heat Transfer in Hydrogen/Oxygen Rocket Engines with Transpiration Cooling, Film Cooling, and High Area Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Hoffman, Joe D.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced engineering computational model has been developed to aid in the analysis of chemical rocket engines. The complete multispecies, chemically reacting and diffusing Navier-Stokes equations are modelled, including the Soret thermal diffusion and Dufour energy transfer terms. Demonstration cases are presented for a 1030:1 area ratio nozzle, a 25 lbf film-cooled nozzle, and a transpiration-cooled plug-and-spool rocket engine. The results indicate that the thrust coefficient predictions of the 1030:1 nozzle and the film-cooled nozzle are within 0.2 to 0.5 percent, respectively, of experimental measurements. Further, the model's predictions agree very well with the heat transfer measurements made in all of the nozzle test cases. It is demonstrated that thermal diffusion has a significant effect on the predicted mass fraction of hydrogen along the wall of the nozzle and was shown to represent a significant fraction of the diffusion fluxes occurring in the transpiration-cooled rocket engine.

  14. The prediction of nozzle performance and heat transfer in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engines with transpiration cooling, film cooling, and high area ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacynski, Kenneth J.; Hoffman, Joe D.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced engineering computational model has been developed to aid in the analysis and design of hydrogen/oxygen chemical rocket engines. The complete multi-species, chemically reacting and diffusing Navier-Stokes equations are modelled, finite difference approach that is tailored to be conservative in an axisymmetric coordinate system for both the inviscid and viscous terms. Demonstration cases are presented for a 1030:1 area ratio nozzle, a 25 lbf film cooled nozzle, and transpiration cooled plug-and-spool rocket engine. The results indicate that the thrust coefficient predictions of the 1030:1 nozzle and the film cooled nozzle are within 0.2 to 0.5 percent, respectively, of experimental measurements when all of the chemical reaction and diffusion terms are considered. Further, the model's predictions agree very well with the heat transfer measurements made in all of the nozzle test cases. The Soret thermal diffusion term is demonstrated to have a significant effect on the predicted mass fraction of hydrogen along the wall of the nozzle in both the laminar flow 1030:1 nozzle and the turbulent plug-and-spool rocket engine analysis cases performed. Further, the Soret term was shown to represent a significant fraction of the diffusion fluxes occurring in the transpiration cooled rocket engine.

  15. Adiabatically driven Brownian pumps.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Shapochkina, Irina V; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2013-07-01

    We investigate a Brownian pump which, being powered by a flashing ratchet mechanism, produces net particle transport through a membrane. The extension of the Parrondo's approach developed for reversible Brownian motors [Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998)] to adiabatically driven pumps is given. We demonstrate that the pumping mechanism becomes especially efficient when the time variation of the potential occurs adiabatically fast or adiabatically slow, in perfect analogy with adiabatically driven Brownian motors which exhibit high efficiency [Rozenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 041116 (2012)]. At the same time, the efficiency of the pumping mechanism is shown to be less than that of Brownian motors due to fluctuations of the number of particles in the membrane. PMID:23944411

  16. Effects of wake and shock passing on the heat transfer to a film cooled transonic turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, M. J.

    An attempt is made to further the understanding of film cooling process in an engine environment. The environment in a gas turbine is unsteady. A source of unsteadiness, the cutting of nozzle guide vane (NGV) wakes and shock waves by the rotor, was modeled experimentally. The influence of the unsteady wakes and shock waves on the heat transfer to a film cooled rotor blade was studied for five film cooling configurations using a rotating bar apparatus in front of a 2-D cascade. Heat transfer measurements were made using thin film gauges placed at the mid-span of the test blade. Schlieren photography was used to study the behavior of the coolant film and the movement of the unsteady shock waves and wakes. The effect of simulated NGV wake passing observed on the uncooled airfoil is to promote an intermittent transition of the suction surface. The effect of the wake on the turbulent pressure surface is small. With injection on the suction surface, the film acts as a boundary layer trip which offsets the rise in heat transfer due to the wake. The simulated NGV trailing edge shock wave had a dramatic effect on the suction surface heat transfer.

  17. Transient Three-Dimensional Side Load Analysis of Out-of-Round Film Cooled Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Lin, Jeff; Ruf, Joe; Guidos, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of nozzle out-of-roundness on the transient startup side loads at a high altitude, with an anchored computational methodology. The out-of-roundness could be the result of asymmetric loads induced by hardware attached to the nozzle, asymmetric internal stresses induced by previous tests, and deformation, such as creep, from previous tests. The rocket engine studied encompasses a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and a film cooled nozzle extension with film coolant distributed from a turbine exhaust manifold. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet history based on an engine system simulation. Transient startup computations were performed with the out-of-roundness achieved by four different degrees of ovalization: one perfectly round, one slightly out-of-round, one more out-of-round, and one significantly out-of-round. The results show that the separation-line-jump is the peak side load physics for the round, slightly our-of-round, and more out-of-round cases, and the peak side load increases as the degree of out-of-roundness increases. For the significantly out-of-round nozzle, however, the peak side load reduces to comparable to that of the round nozzle and the separation line jump is not the peak side load physics. The counter-intuitive result of the significantly out-of-round case is found to be related to a side force reduction mechanism that splits the effect of the separation-line-jump into two parts, not only in the circumferential direction and most importantly in time.

  18. Transient Three-Dimensional Side Load Analysis of a Film Cooled Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Guidos, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Transient three-dimensional numerical investigations on the side load physics for an engine encompassing a film cooled nozzle extension and a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber, were performed. The objectives of this study are to identify the three-dimensional side load physics and to compute the associated aerodynamic side load using an anchored computational methodology. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and a transient inlet history based on an engine system simulation. Ultimately, the computational results will be provided to the nozzle designers for estimating of effect of the peak side load on the nozzle structure. Computations simulating engine startup at ambient pressures corresponding to sea level and three high altitudes were performed. In addition, computations for both engine startup and shutdown transients were also performed for a stub nozzle, operating at sea level. For engine with the full nozzle extension, computational result shows starting up at sea level, the peak side load occurs when the lambda shock steps into the turbine exhaust flow, while the side load caused by the transition from free-shock separation to restricted-shock separation comes at second; and the side loads decreasing rapidly and progressively as the ambient pressure decreases. For the stub nozzle operating at sea level, the computed side loads during both startup and shutdown becomes very small due to the much reduced flow area.

  19. Investigation of Minimum Film boiling Phenomena on Fuel Rods Under Blowdown Cooling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen M. Bajorek; Michael Gawron; Timothy Etzel; Lucas Peterson

    2003-06-30

    Blowdon cooling heat transfer is an important process that occurs early in a hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor. During blowdown, the flow through the hot assembly is a post-critical heat flux dispersed droplet flow. The heat transfer mechanisms that occur in blowdown cooling are complex and depend on droplet and heated surface interaction. In a safety analysis, it is of considerable importance to determine the thermal-hydraulic conditions leading to the minimum film boiling temperature, Tmin. A flow boiling rig for measurement of blowdown cooling heat transfer and quench phenomena on a nuclear fuel rod simulator was designed and constructed for operation at up to 12.4 MPa. The test section consisted of a concentric annulus, with a 9.5 mm OD nuclear fuel rod simulator at the center. The rod was contained within a 0.85 mm thick, 19 mm OD 316 stainless steel tube, forming the flow channel. Two types of rods were tested; one type was sheathed with Inconel 600 while the other was clad with Zircaloy-2. Water was injected into the test section at the top of the heated length through an injection header. This header was an annular sign that fit around the fuel rod simulator and within the stainless steel tube. Small spacers aligned the injection header and prevented contract with either the heater rod or the tube. A series of small diameter holes at the bottom of the header caused the formation of droplets that became entrained with the steam flow. The test section design was such that quench would take place on the rod, and not along the channel outer annulus.

  20. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  1. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Solutions to Flat Plate Film Cooling Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Shyam, Vikram; Hah, Chunill

    2011-01-01

    The predictions of several Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions for a baseline film cooling geometry are analyzed and compared with experimental data. The Fluent finite volume code was used to perform the computations with the realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. The film hole was angled at 35 to the crossflow with a Reynolds number of 17,400. Multiple length-to-diameter ratios (1.75 and 3.5) as well as momentum flux ratios (0.125 and 0.5) were simulated with various domains, boundary conditions, and grid refinements. The coolant to mainstream density ratio was maintained at 2.0 for all scenarios. Computational domain and boundary condition variations show the ability to reduce the computational cost as compared to previous studies. A number of grid refinement and coarsening variations are compared for further insights into the reduction of computational cost. Liberal refinement in the near hole region is valuable, especially for higher momentum jets that tend to lift-off and create a recirculating flow. A lack of proper refinement in the near hole region can severely diminish the accuracy of the solution, even in the far region. The effects of momentum ratio and hole length-to-diameter ratio are also discussed.

  2. Aerothermal shape optimization for a double row of discrete film cooling holes on the suction surface of a turbine vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ayoubi, Carole; Ghaly, Wahid; Hassan, Ibrahim

    2015-10-01

    A multiple-objective optimization is implemented for a double row of staggered film holes on the suction surface of a turbine vane. The optimization aims to maximize the film cooling performance, which is assessed using the cooling effectiveness, while minimizing the corresponding aerodynamic loss, which is measured with a mass-averaged total pressure coefficient. Three geometric variables defining the hole shape are optimized: the conical expansion angle, compound angle and length to diameter ratio of the non-diffused portion of the hole. The optimization employs a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm coupled with an artificial neural network to generate the Pareto front. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations are employed to construct the neural network and investigate the aerodynamic and thermal optimum solutions. The optimum designs exhibit improved performance in comparison to the reference design. The optimization methodology allowed investigation into the impact of varying the geometric variables on the cooling effectiveness and the aerodynamic loss.

  3. Heat transfer process under a film-cooled surface with presence of weak swirling flow in the mainstream

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.S.; Kung, T.L.; Gau, C.

    2007-11-15

    Experiments have been performed in a relatively large circular pipe to study and obtain the heat transfer data over a film-cooled surface, with the presence of weak swirling flow in the mainstream. The swirling flow is generated by a flat-vaned swirler situated upstream. A cooling film is injected from an annular slot formed by the pipe wall and the circular cover plate. The radial temperature distribution measurements at several axial locations were used to infer the film jet structure and the rate of mixing of the film jet with the swirling flow. The nondimensional parameters governing the heat transfer process under the film are derived from the system of governing equations. Experiments demonstrate that the swirl number, increasing with turbulence intensity and swirl velocity in the mainstream, can rapidly destroy the film jet structure and enhance the heat transfer process. During the course of the experiments, the blowing parameter ranged from 0.5 to 2 and the swirl number ranged from 0 to 0.6. Correlations for the Nusselt number which account for the effect of swirling flow are presented. (author)

  4. A numerical investigation of new film cooling hole configuration at the leading edge of asymmetrical turbine blade: part A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabed, Mustapha

    2013-04-01

    The focus of the first part of this numerical study is to investigate the effects of two new configurations: (1) slot with cylindrical end and (2) slot with median cylindrical hole, generated by the combination between two film cooling configurations: cylindrical hole and uniform slot. Computational results are presented for a row of coolant injection holes on each side of an asymmetrical turbine blade model near the leading edge. For each configuration, three values of the radius are taken: R = 0.4, R = 0.8 and R = 1.2. The six cases simulations, thus obtained, are conducted for the same density ratio of 1.0 and the same inlet plenum pressure. A new parameter, Rc, is defined to measure the rate of blade coverage by the film cooling. Results show that, at the pressure side; for the two new configurations, the six studied cases exceed the case baseline in cooling effectiveness term with the best result obtained for R = 0.8 (case 2). For the suction side, only configurations with R = 0.4 (cases 1 and 4) provide an increase of film effectiveness compared to the case baseline. The following configuration: Cases 1 or 4 at the suction side and case 2 at the pressure side, gets the best thermal protection because of their higher coverage and strong cooling effectiveness.

  5. Transient Side Load Analysis of Out-of-Round Film-Cooled Nozzle Extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Lin, Jeff; Ruf, Joe; Guidos, Mike

    2012-01-01

    There was interest in understanding the impact of out-of-round nozzle extension on the nozzle side load during transient startup operations. The out-of-round nozzle extension could be the result of asymmetric internal stresses, deformation induced by previous tests, and asymmetric loads induced by hardware attached to the nozzle. The objective of this study was therefore to computationally investigate the effect of out-of-round nozzle extension on the nozzle side loads during an engine startup transient. The rocket engine studied encompasses a regeneratively cooled chamber and nozzle, along with a film cooled nozzle extension. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation, and transient inlet boundary flow properties derived from an engine system simulation. Six three-dimensional cases were performed with the out-of-roundness achieved by three different degrees of ovalization, elongated on lateral y and z axes: one slightly out-of-round, one more out-of-round, and one significantly out-of-round. The results show that the separation line jump was the primary source of the peak side loads. Comparing to the peak side load of the perfectly round nozzle, the peak side loads increased for the slightly and more ovalized nozzle extensions, and either increased or decreased for the two significantly ovalized nozzle extensions. A theory based on the counteraction of the flow destabilizing effect of an exacerbated asymmetrical flow caused by a lower degree of ovalization, and the flow stabilizing effect of a more symmetrical flow, created also by ovalization, is presented to explain the observations obtained in this effort.

  6. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  7. Entanglement and adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrensmeier, D.

    2006-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation provides an alternative approach to quantum computation using a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The time evolution of entanglement during the adiabatic quantum search algorithm is studied, and its relevance as a resource is discussed.

  8. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-01-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  9. Analysis of metal temperature and coolant flow with a thermal-barrier coating on a full-coverage-film-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    The potential benefits of combining full-coverage film cooling with a thermal-barrier coating were investigated analytically for sections on the suction and pressure sides a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine vane. Metal and ceramic coating temperatures were calculated as a function of coating thickness and coolant flow. With a thermal-barrier coating, the coolant flows required for the chosen sections were half those of an uncoated design, and the metal outer temperatures were simultaneously reduced by over 111 K (200 F). For comparison, transpiration cooling was also investigated. Full-coverage film cooling of a coated vane required more coolant flow than did transpiration cooling.

  10. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Blade - Effect of Hole Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Rigby, David L.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-block, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to study the within-hole and near-hole physics in relation to heat transfer on a film-cooled blade. The flow domain consists of the coolant flow through the plenum and hole-pipes for the three staggered rows of shower-head holes on the VK1 rotor, and the main flow over the blade. A multi-block grid is generated that is nearly orthogonal to the various surfaces. It may be noted that for the VK1 rotor the shower-head holes are inclined at 30 deg. to the spanwise direction, and are normal to the streamwise direction on the blade. Wilcox's k-omega turbulence model is used. The present study provides a much better comparison for the heat transfer coefficient at the blade mid-span with the experimental data than an earlier analysis wherein coolant velocity and temperature distributions were specified at the hole exits rather than extending the computational domain into the hole-pipe and plenum. Details of the distributions of coolant velocity, temperature, k and omega at the hole exits are also presented.

  11. Heat Transfer on a Film-Cooled Blade: Effect of Hole Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Rigby, David L.

    1999-01-01

    A multiblock, three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the within-hole and near-hole physics in relation to heat transfer on a film-cooled blade. The flow domain consists of the coolant flow through the plenum and hole-pipes for the three staggered rows of shower-head holes on the VKI rotor, and the main flow over the blade. A multiblock grid is generated that is nearly orthogonal to the various surfaces. It may be noted that for the VKI rotor the shower-head holes are inclined at 30 deg to the spanwise direction, and are normal to the streamwise direction on the blade. Wilcox's k-omega turbulence model is used. The present study provides a much better comparison for the span-averaged heat transfer coefficient on the blade surface with the experimental data than an earlier analysis wherein coolant velocity and temperature distributions were specified at the hole exits rather than extending the computational domain into the hole-pipe and plenum. Details of the distributions of coolant velocity, temperature, k and omega at the hole exits are also presented.

  12. Unsteady numerical simulation of hot streak/blades interaction and film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weilin; Ji, Lucheng; Xiao, Yunhan

    2010-10-01

    Deeply research on management and application of hot streak is an important way to breakthrough technique obstacle of aero engine hot components. Numerical method is a useful instrument to investigate the correlative problems. Firstly the paper developed independently three dimensional unsteady parallel computational code-MpiTurbo based on Fortran 90 and MPI at Linux operating system. Then unsteady numerical simulation was carried out to investigate impacts of the factors, which included circumferential locations of hot streak and clocking positions of blade rows, on the thermal environment of a 1+1 counter-rotating turbine. The results clearly indicated that clocking positions of hot streak/blade row and blade row/blade row had great influence on the time-averaged temperature distribution of the third blade row. Therefore, it can be effective for improving thermal environment of turbine to optimize blade parameters and clocking positions. Lastly film cooling layout was designed by the repetitious steady simulation based on source term method. And the flow structure detail was given by the unsteady simulation.

  13. Detached Eddy Simulation of Film Cooling over a GE Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Subrata

    2005-01-01

    The detached eddy simulation of film cooling has been utilized for a proprietary GE plate-pipe configuration. The blowing ratio was 2.02, the velocity ratio was 1.26, and the temperature ratio was 1.61. Results indicate that the mixing processes downstream of the hole are highly anisotropic. DES solution shows its ability to depict the dynamic nature of the flow and capture the asymmetry present in temperature and velocity distributions. Further, comparison between experimental and DES time-averaged effectiveness is satisfactory. Numerical values of span-averaged effectiveness show better prediction of the experimental values at downstream locations than a steady state Glenn HT solution. While the DES method shows obvious promise, there are several issues that need further investigation. Despite an accurate prediction in the hole vicinity, the simulation still falls short in the region x = 10d to 100d. This should be investigated. Also the model used flat plate. Actual turbine blade should be modeled in the future if additional finding is available.

  14. Prediction of engine performance and wall erosion due to film cooling for the 'fast track' ablative thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts have been made at the Propulsion Laboratory (MSFC) to design and develop new liquid rocket engines for small-class launch vehicles. Emphasis of the efforts is to reduce the engine development time with the use of conventional designs while meeting engine reliability criteria. Consequently, the engine cost should be reduced. A demonstrative ablative thrust chamber, called 'fast-track', has been built. To support the design of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber, predictions of the wall temperature and ablation erosion rate of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber have been performed using the computational fluid dynamics program REFLEQS (Reactive Flow Equation Solver). The analysis is intended to assess the amount of fuel to be used for film cooling so that the erosion rate of the chamber ablation does not exceed its allowable limit. In addition, the thrust chamber performance loss due to an increase of the film cooling is examined.

  15. FORTRAN program for calculating coolant flow and metal temperatures of a full-coverage-film-cooled vane or blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program that calculates the coolant flow and the metal temperatures of a full-coverage-film-cooled vane or blade was developed. The analysis was based on compressible, one-dimensional fluid flow and on one-dimensional heat transfer and treats the vane or blade shell as a porous wall. The calculated temperatures are average values for the shell outer-surface area associated with each film-cooling hole row. A thermal-barrier coating may be specified on the shell outer surface, and centrifugal effects can be included for blade calculations. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 and is operational on a UNIVAC 1100/42 computer. The method of analysis, the program input, the program output, and two sample problems are provided.

  16. Effect of plenum crossflow on heat (mass) transfer near and within the entrance of film cooling holes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Cho, H.H.; Jabbari, M.Y.

    1997-10-01

    Convective heat/mass transfer near and within the entrance region of film cooling holes supplied with air from an internal duct (plenum) behind the cooling holes has been measured using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The experiments are conducted for duct Reynolds number, based on the duct inlet flow condition, of 1,800 to 13,500, which results in a range of hole Reynolds numbers of 8000 to 30,000, close to actual engine operating conditions. The flow entering the hole can be considered a combination of flow along a 90 deg tube bend and a sudden contraction duct flow. The flow separates at the inner corner and a secondary flow is induced by the centrifugal force associated with the streamline curvature. The mass transfer coefficient for the duct wall (surface of film-cooled plate) with a cooling hole is three to five times higher than for a fully developed duct flow. With a smaller duct, the overall transfer coefficient on the hole entrance surface increases due to the higher duct Reynolds numbers, but the flow has less secondary flow effects within the smaller space. Generally, transfer coefficients on the hole entrance surface are largely unaffected by the duct end presence, but the transfer coefficient is larger downstream for a short distance from the center of the last hole to the duct end. In tests with multiple film cooling holes, the flow at the first hole is more of a curved duct flow (strong secondary flow) and the flow at the last hole is more of a sink-like flow. At the middle hole, the flow is a combination of both flows. The mass transfer rates on the inner hole surfaces are found to be the same for holes with corresponding positions relative to the duct end, although the total number of open holes is different.

  17. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Neels, Alice

    2015-07-01

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  18. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  19. Determination of thermal load in film cooled bipropellant thrust chambers by an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckel, J. N.; Savonov, R. I.; Patire, H.

    2013-03-01

    A method to obtain the heat load on the internal wall of a rocket thrust chamber using an inverse problem approach is described. According to the "classical" approach, the heat load on the internal wall of the chamber is assumed as the product of a heat transfer coefficient and the temperature difference of adiabatic wall temperature and local wall surface temperature. The time-dependent temperature distribution of the external wall of the thruster chamber is used to obtain empirical curve fittings to the temperature profile of the near wall flow field (adiabatic wall temperature) and the heat transfer coefficient profile. The applicability of the method is verified by applying it to three different problems; a model problem, an analytical solution, and a set of experimental data.

  20. Cold-air annular-cascade investigation of aerodynamic performance of cooled turbine vanes. 2: Trailing-edge ejection, film cooling, and transpiration cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of four different cooled vane configurations was experimentally determined in a full-annular cascade at a primary- to coolant-total-temperature ratio of 1.0. The vanes were tested over a range of coolant flow rates and pressure ratios. Overall vane efficiencies were obtained and compared, where possible, with the results obtained in a four-vane, annular-sector cascade. The vane efficiency and exit flow conditions as functions of radial position were also determined and compared with solid (uncooled) vane results.

  1. Heat transfer to a full-coverage film-cooled surface with 30 degree slant-hole injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, M. E.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer behavior was studied in a turbulent boundary layer with full coverage film cooling through an array of discrete holes and with injection 30 deg to the wall surface in the downstream direction. Stanton numbers were measured for a staggered hole pattern with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 5 and 10, an injection mass flux ratio range of 0.1 to 1.3, and a range of Reynolds number Re sub x of 150,000 to 5 million. Air was used as the working fluid, and the mainstream velocity varied from 9.8 to 34.2 m/sec (32 to 112 ft/sec). The data were taken for secondary injection temperature equal to the wall temperature and also equal to the mainstream temperature. The data may be used to obtain Stanton number as a continuous function of the injectant temperature by use of linear superposition theory. The heat transfer coefficient is defined on the basis of a mainstream-to-wall temperature difference. This definition permits direct comparison of performance between film cooling and transpiration cooling. A differential prediction method was developed to predict the film cooling data base. The method utilizes a two-dimensional boundary layer program with routines to model the injection process and turbulence augmentation. The program marches in the streamwise direction, and when a row of holes is encountered, it stops and injects fluid into the boundary layer. The turbulence level is modeled by algebraically augmenting the mixing length, with the augmentation keyed to a penetration distance for the injected fluid.

  2. A Computational Study for the Utilization of Jet Pulsations in Gas Turbine Film Cooling and Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartuzova, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the second part of a three-part final report of research performed under an NRA cooperative Agreement contract. The first part is NASA/CR-2012-217415. The third part is NASA/CR-2012-217417. Jets have been utilized in various turbomachinery applications in order to improve gas turbines performance. Jet pulsation is a promising technique because of the reduction in the amount of air removed from compressor. In this work two areas of pulsed jets applications were computationally investigated using the commercial code Fluent (ANSYS, Inc.); the first one is film cooling of High Pressure Turbine (HPT) blades and second one is flow separation control over Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoil using Vortex Generator Jets (VGJ). Using pulsed jets for film cooling purposes can help to improve the effectiveness and thus allow higher turbine inlet temperature. Effects of the film hole geometry, blowing ratio and density ratio of the jet, pulsation frequency and duty cycle of blowing on the film cooling effectiveness were investigated. As for the low-pressure turbine (LPT) stages, the boundary layer separation on the suction side of airfoils can occur due to strong adverse pressure gradients. The problem is exacerbated as airfoil loading is increased. Active flow control could provide a means for minimizing separation under conditions where it is most severe (low Reynolds number), without causing additional losses under other conditions (high Reynolds number). The effects of the jet geometry, blowing ratio, density ratio, pulsation frequency and duty cycle on the size of the separated region were examined in this work. The results from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation computational approaches were compared with the experimental data.

  3. Large external ΔT and cooling power densities in thin-film Bi2Te3-superlattice thermoelectric cooling devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulman, G. E.; Siivola, E.; Shen, B.; Venkatasubramanian, R.

    2006-09-01

    Experimental I-V-Tc-ΔT data of thin-film superlattice thermoelectric modules is used to determine the internal ΔT, cross-plane Seebeck coefficient, effective thermal interface resistance, device ZT, and Qmax. We demonstrate 55K of external cooling at 300K (Tc_min=244.8K), with an estimated heat pumping capacity of 128W /cm2. The average ZT300 for the best superlattice devices is 0.75, compared to 0.66 for a bulk BixSb2-xTe3/Bi2SexTe3-x device. Our model indicates a significantly higher internal ΔT occurs across the active thermoelectric element, which was verified using buried thermocouples.

  4. Turbine Vane External Heat Transfer. Volume 1: Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Surface Heat Transfer Distributions with Leading Edge Showerhead Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, E. R.; Wilson, M. D.; Hylton, L. D.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes was summarized. A two dimensional linear cascade (previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils) was used to examine the effect of leading edge shower head film cooling on downstream heat transfer. The data were used to develop and evaluate analytical models. Modifications to the two dimensional boundary layer model are described. The results were used to formulate and test an effective viscosity model capable of predicting heat transfer phenomena downstream of the leading edge film cooling array on both the suction and pressure surfaces, with and without mass injection.

  5. Turbulent boundary layer on a full-coverage film-cooled surface: An experimental heat transfer study with normal injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choe, H.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer behavior was studied in a turbulent boundary layer with full-coverage film cooling through an array of discrete holes and with injection normal to the wall surface. Stanton numbers were measured for a staggered hole pattern with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 5 and 10, an injection mass flux ratio range of 0.1 to 1.0, and a range of Reynolds number 170 thousand to 5 million. Air was used as the working fluid with the mainstream velocity varied from .14 to 33.5 m/sec (30 to 110 ft/sec). The data were taken for secondary injection temperatures equal to the wall temperature and also equal to the mainstream temperature. By use of linear superposition theory, the data may be used to obtain Stanton number as a continuous function of the injectant temperature. The heat transfer coefficient is defined on the basis of a mainstream-to-wall temperature difference. This difinition permits direct comparison of performance between film cooling and transpiration cooling.

  6. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  7. Fabrication and Optimization of Brush-Printed n-type Bi2Te3 Thick Films for Thermoelectric Cooling Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Zhao, Wen-yu; Zhou, Hong-yu; Mu, Xin; He, Dan-qi; Zhu, Wan-ting; Wei, Ping; Wu, Han; Zhang, Qing-jie

    2016-03-01

    A simple, efficient and rapid brush-printing method has been developed for preparation of n-type Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 films approximately 100-150 μm thick. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and four-point probe measurements were used to characterize the crystal structure, composition, microstructure, and electrical properties of the films. The results showed that all the n-type Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 thick films were composed of single-phase Bi2Te2.7Se0.3; the grains in the films were randomly distributed in the low-temperature-annealed samples and predominantly oriented along the (00 l) plane in samples annealed at temperatures >673 K. σ and the absolute value of α first increased substantially with increasing the annealing temperature in the range 573-673 K then decreased when the annealing temperature was increased further. The dependence of σ and α on annealing temperature may be reasonably explained on the basis of the change in the microstructure induced by annealing. The performance of a prototype cooling device containing n-type Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 thick films was evaluated for temperature differences produced by use of different DC currents.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of axisymmetric plume and base flow of film/dump cooled rocket nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Film/dump cooling a rocket nozzle with fuel rich gas, as in the National Launch System (NLS) Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), adds potential complexities for integrating the engine with the vehicle. The chief concern is that once the film coolant is exhausted from the nozzle, conditions may exist during flight for the fuel-rich film gases to be recirculated to the vehicle base region. The result could be significantly higher base temperatures than would be expected from a regeneratively cooled nozzle. CFD analyses were conduced to augment classical scaling techniques for vehicle base environments. The FDNS code with finite rate chemistry was used to simulate a single, axisymmetric STME plume and the NLS base area. Parallel calculations were made of the Saturn V S-1 C/F1 plume base area flows. The objective was to characterize the plume/freestream shear layer for both vehicles as inputs for scaling the S-C/F1 flight data to NLS/STME conditions. The code was validated on high speed flows with relevant physics. This paper contains the calculations for the NLS/STME plume for the baseline nozzle and a modified nozzle. The modified nozzle was intended to reduce the fuel available for recirculation to the vehicle base region. Plumes for both nozzles were calculated at 10kFT and 50kFT.

  9. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, R. D.; Richards, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators have been built and installed in small portable liquid helium cryostats to test the feasibility of this method of cooling infrared bolometric detectors to temperatures below 0.3 K. Performance has been achieved which suggests that bolometer temperatures of 0.2 K can be maintained for periods of approximately 60 hours. Applications to sensitive infrared detection from ground-based telescopes and space satellites are discussed. Design data are given which permit the evaluation of refrigerator performance for a variety of design parameters.

  10. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  11. Swept-slot film-cooling effectiveness in hypersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement results are presented for the surface equilibrium temperature downstream of swept slots, with sonic tangential air injection into a thick hypersonic turbulent boundary layer. These results are compared with unswept slot results for cooling effectiveness.

  12. The HAWC and SAFIRE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; Behr, Jason; Kunes, Evan; Hait, Tom; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High-Resolution Airborne Wide-band Camera (HAWC) and Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) are far-infrared experiments which will fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. HAWC's detectors will operate at 0.2 Kelvin, while those of SAFIRE will be at 0.1 Kelvin. Each instrument will include an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to cool its detector stage from the liquid helium bath temperature (HAWC's at 4.2 Kelvin and SAFIRE's pumped to about 1.3 Kelvin) to its operating temperature. Except for the magnets used to achieve the cooling and a slight difference in the heat switch design, the two ADRs are nearly identical. We describe the ADR design and present the results of performance testing.

  13. Heat and Mass Transfer Analysis of Dehumidifiers Using Adiabatic Transient Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Maclaine-Cross, I. L.; Pesaran, A. A.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic step transient data were obtained for two dehumidifier test matrices, using parallel plates with crushed silica gel and staggered parallel strips coated with microbead silica gel. The data were analyzed using the statistical moments method and combined heat and mass transfer analogy theory. The analysis showed that the average overall Nusselt number in both matrices was about 40% to 50% lower than laminar flow predictions. The average overall Nusselt number for the microbead staggered matrix was about 85% larger than that of the crushed silica-gel parallel-plate matrix. The Nusselt number/friction factor Reynolds number ratio (Nu/fRe) of the microbead, staggered parallel-strip matrix was about 28% larger than that of the crushed silica-gel parallel-plate matrix. These results were explained by the presence of a stagnant gas film. The results showed that compact, high-performance, rotary dehumidifiers for desiccant cooling systems are possible and economical.

  14. Internal-liquid-film-cooling Experiments with Air-stream Temperatures to 2000 Degrees F. in 2- and 4-inch-diameter Horizontal Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, George R; Abramson, Andrew E; Sloop, John L

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the effectiveness of liquid-cooling films on the inner surfaces of tubes containing flowing hot air. Experiments were made in 2- and 4-inch-diameter straight metal tubes with air flows at temperatures from 600 degrees to 2000 degrees F. and diameter Reynolds numbers from 2.2 to 14 x 10(5). The film coolant, water, was injected around the circumference at a single axial position on the tubes at flow rates from 0.02 to .24 pound per second per foot of tube circumference (0.8 to 12 percent of the air flow). Liquid-coolant films were established and maintained around and along the tube wall in concurrent flow with the hot air. The results indicated that, in order to film cool a given surface area with as little coolant flow as possible, it may be necessary to limit the flow of coolant introduced at a single axial position and to introduce it at several axial positions. The flow rate of inert coolant required to maintain liquid-film cooling over a given area of tube surface can be estimated when the gas-flow conditions are known by means of a generalized plot of the film-cooling data.

  15. Kibble-Zurek mechanism beyond adiabaticity: Finite-time scaling with critical initial slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yingyi; Yin, Shuai; Hu, Qijun; Zhong, Fan

    2016-01-01

    The Kibble-Zurek mechanism demands an initial adiabatic stage before an impulse stage to have a frozen correlation length that generates topological defects in a cooling phase transition. Here we study such a driven critical dynamics but with an initial condition that is near the critical point and that is far away from equilibrium. In this case, there is no initial adiabatic stage at all and thus adiabaticity is broken. However, we show that there again exists a finite length scale arising from the driving that divides the evolution into three stages. A relaxation-finite-time-scaling-adiabatic scenario is then proposed in place of the adiabatic-impulse-adiabatic scenario of the original Kibble-Zurek mechanism. A unified scaling theory, which combines finite-time scaling with critical initial slip, is developed to describe the universal behavior and is confirmed with numerical simulations of a two-dimensional classical Ising model.

  16. Effects of non-axisymmetric endwall contouring and film cooling on the passage flowfield in a linear turbine cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensch, Amy E.; Thole, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    The time-resolved flowfield is measured in the passage of a linear turbine cascade to show the effects of endwall film cooling and non-axisymmetric endwall contouring on the passage secondary flows. A particle image velocimetry system is used in three measurement planes: the plane at the exit of the passage and two streamwise planes along the blade suction side. In the downstream half of the passage, the passage vortex moves away from the endwall toward the midspan, but closely follows the profile of the blade suction side. The secondary velocity vectors and vorticity fields in the passage exit plane indicate the large size of the passage vortex. The measured velocities in the streamwise measurement planes reveal the trajectory of the passage vortex as well as steep gradients in the direction normal to the blade surface. The passage vortex can also be identified by elevated flow unsteadiness as reported by turbulent kinetic energy levels. When passage film cooling is added, the size of the passage vortex, secondary velocities, and exit plane turbulent kinetic energy are all increased. Endwall contouring has the opposite effect, reducing the passage vortex size, the secondary velocities, and exit plane turbulent kinetic energy.

  17. Comparison of Two-Equation Turbulence Models for Prediction of Heat Transfer on Film-Cooled Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Ameri, Ali A.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute the heat transfer coefficient on two film-cooled turbine blades, namely, the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes, including three rows on the shower head and the C3X vane with nine rows of holes, including five rows on the shower head. Predictions of heat transfer coefficient at the blade surface using three two-equation turbulence model specifically, Coakley's q-omega model, Chien's k-epsilon model and Wilcox's k-omega model with Menter's modifications, have been compared with the experimental data of Camci and Arts for the VKI rotor, and of Hylton et al. for the C3X vane along with predictions using the Baldwin-Lomar (B-L) model taken from Garg and Gaugler. It is found that for the cases considered here the two equation models predict the blade heat transfer somewhat better than the B-L model except immediately downstream of the film-cooled holes on the suction surface of the VKI rotor, and over most of the suction surface of the C3X vane. However, all two-equation models require 40% more computer core than the B-L model for solution, and while the q-omega and k-epsilon models need 40% more computer time than the B-L model the k-omega model requires at least 65% more time because of the slower rate of convergence. It is found that the heat transfer coefficient exhibit a strong spanwise as well as streamwise variation for both blades and all turbulence models.

  18. An experimental investigation of film cooling effectiveness for slots of various exit geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslim, M. E.; Spring, S. D.; Mehlman, B. P.

    1990-07-01

    The effect different slot geometries have on film effectiveness in the vicinity of slot breakout region is studied. Four different slot lip thickness to height ratios (t/s) and three different slot width to height ratios (w/s) are tested over a blowing ratio range of 0 to 1.3. All geometries are tested at a constant density ratio of 1.4. Slot surface film effectiveness measurements are made over a range of downstream surface distance to slot ratios of 0 to 15. Five different density ratios, spanning the typical engine operating range, are tested for one geometry to determine the effect of density ratio on film effectiveness. The results show that film effectiveness is highly sensitive to t/s but not significantly sensitive to either w/s or density ratio, and that an optimum injection angle of 8.5 deg exists for nondimensionalized downstream distance values less than 60.

  19. What makes gambling cool? Images of agency and self-control in fiction films.

    PubMed

    Egerer, Michael; Rantala, Varpu

    2015-03-01

    The study is a qualitative film analysis. It seeks to determine the semiotic and cinematic structures that make gambling appealing in films based on analysis of 72 film scenes from 28 narrative fiction films made from 1922 to 2003 about gambling in North American and West European mainstream cinema. The main game types include card games, casino games, and slot machines. The theme of self-control and competence was identified as being central to gambling's appeal. These images are strongly defined by gender. The study was funded by ELOMEDIA, financed by the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture as well as the Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies. The limitations of the study are noted. PMID:25544108

  20. Flow visualization of film cooling with spanwise injection from a small array of holes and compound-angle injection from a large array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a smooth, flat plate was studied for two configurations: (1) spanwise injection through a four hole staggered array; and (2) compound angle injection through a 49 hole staggered array. The ratio of boundary layer thicknesses to hole diameter and the Reynolds number were typical of gas turbine film cooling applications. Streaklines showing the motion of the injected air were obtained by photographing small, neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles that followed the flow field.

  1. Hydrogen film cooling with incident and swept-shock interactions in a Mach 6.4 nitrogen free stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, George C.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium as the coolant. Tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel with a nitrogen flow field to preclude combustion of the hydrogen coolant gas. A two-dimensional highly instrumented model developed in a previous test series was used. Parameters investigated included coolant mass flow rate, coolant gas, local free-stream Reynolds number, incident oblique shock strength, and a swept oblique shock. Both gases were highly effective coolants in undisturbed flow; however, both incident and swept shocks degraded that effectiveness.

  2. Effect of turbulence intensity on cross-injection film cooling at a stepped or smooth endwall of a gas turbine vane passage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pey-Shey; Tsai, Shen-Ta; Jhuo, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with a film cooling technique applicable to the protection of the endwalls of a gas turbine vane. In the experiments, cross-injection coolant flow from two-row, paired, inclined holes with nonintersecting centerlines was utilized. The test model is a scaled two-half vane. The levels of turbulence intensity used in the experiments are T.I. = 1.8%, 7%, and 12%. Other parameters considered in the film cooling experiments include three inlet Reynolds numbers (9.20 × 10(4), 1.24 × 10(5), and 1.50 × 10(5)), three blowing ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0), and three endwall conditions (smooth endwall and stepped endwall with forward-facing or backward-facing step). Thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) technique with steady-state heat transfer experiments was used to obtain the whole-field film cooling effectiveness. Results show that, at low turbulence intensity, increasing Reynolds number decreases the effectiveness in most of the vane passage. There is no monotonic trend of influence by Reynolds number at high turbulence intensity. The effect of blowing ratio on the effectiveness has opposite trends at low and high turbulence levels. Increasing turbulent intensity decreases the effectiveness, especially near the inlet of the vane passage. With a stepped endwall, turbulence intensity has only mild effect on the film cooling effectiveness. PMID:24592153

  3. Effect of Turbulence Intensity on Cross-Injection Film Cooling at a Stepped or Smooth Endwall of a Gas Turbine Vane Passage

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shen-Ta; Jhuo, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with a film cooling technique applicable to the protection of the endwalls of a gas turbine vane. In the experiments, cross-injection coolant flow from two-row, paired, inclined holes with nonintersecting centerlines was utilized. The test model is a scaled two-half vane. The levels of turbulence intensity used in the experiments are T.I. = 1.8%, 7%, and 12%. Other parameters considered in the film cooling experiments include three inlet Reynolds numbers (9.20 × 104, 1.24 × 105, and 1.50 × 105), three blowing ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0), and three endwall conditions (smooth endwall and stepped endwall with forward-facing or backward-facing step). Thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) technique with steady-state heat transfer experiments was used to obtain the whole-field film cooling effectiveness. Results show that, at low turbulence intensity, increasing Reynolds number decreases the effectiveness in most of the vane passage. There is no monotonic trend of influence by Reynolds number at high turbulence intensity. The effect of blowing ratio on the effectiveness has opposite trends at low and high turbulence levels. Increasing turbulent intensity decreases the effectiveness, especially near the inlet of the vane passage. With a stepped endwall, turbulence intensity has only mild effect on the film cooling effectiveness. PMID:24592153

  4. Impingement cooling with film coolant extraction in the airfoil leading edge regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liguo; Li, Zhaohui

    An extensive experimental study is conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of arrays of air jets impinging on perforated target surfaces in turbine blade leading edge regions by six large-scale models. The relations of pressure loss and Nusselt number to jet Reynolds number are obtained in a wide range of parameter combinations of interest in cooled airfoil practice for various models, respectively. These parameter combinations are covered in a test matrix, including combinations of variations in jet Reynolds number, airfoil leading edge curvature radius-to-diameter ratio, jet pitch-to-diameter ratio, and jet impingement gap-to-diameter ratio.

  5. Highly c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr, Ti)O₃ thin films on si wafer prepared by fast cooling immediately after sputter deposition.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shinya; Hanzawa, Hiroaki; Wasa, Kiyotaka; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    2014-09-01

    We successfully developed sputter deposition technology to obtain a highly c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) thin film on a Si wafer by fast cooling (~-180°C/min) of the substrate after deposition. The c-axis orientation ratio of a fast-cooled film was about 90%, whereas that of a slow-cooled (~-40°C/min) film was only 10%. The c-axis-oriented monocrystalline Pb(Zr0.5, Ti0.5)O3 films showed reasonably large piezoelectric coefficients, e(31,f) = ~-11 C/m(2), with remarkably small dielectric constants, ϵ(r) = ~220. As a result, an excellent figure of merit (FOM) was obtained for piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) such as a piezoelectric gyroscope. This c-axis orientation technology on Si will extend industrial applications of PZT-based thin films and contribute further to the development of piezoelectric MEMS. PMID:25167155

  6. Design of the PIXIE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark Oliver; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a teslescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: 1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and 2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 millwatts, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 milliwatts. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 microwatts. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  7. Design of the PIXIE adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a telescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: (1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and (2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 mW, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 mW. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 μW. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  8. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  9. Flow control of an elongated jet in cross-flow: Film cooling effectiveness enhancement using surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audier, P.; Fénot, M.; Bénard, N.; Moreau, E.

    2016-02-01

    The case presented here deals with plasma flow control applied to a cross-flow configuration, more specifically to a film cooling system. The ability of a plasma dielectric barrier discharge actuator for film cooling effectiveness enhancement is investigated through an experimental set-up, including a film injection from an elongated slot into a thermally uniform cross-flow. Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry and infrared-thermography measurements are performed for three different blowing ratios of M = 0.4, 0.5, and 1. Results show that the effectiveness can be increased when the discharge is switched on, as predicted by the numerical results available in literature. Whatever the blowing ratio, the actuator induces a deflection of the jet flow towards the wall, increases its momentum, and delays its diffusion in the cross-flow.

  10. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of a film/dump-cooled rocket nozzle plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Prediction of convective base heating rates for a new launch vehicle presents significant challenges to analysts concerned with base environments. The present effort seeks to augment classical base heating scaling techniques via a detailed investigation of the exhaust plume shear layer of a single H2/O2 Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Use of fuel-rich turbine exhaust to cool the STME nozzle presented concerns regarding potential recirculation of these gases to the base region with attendant increase in the base heating rate. A pressure-based full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with finite rate chemistry is used to predict plumes for vehicle altitudes of 10 kft and 50 kft. Levels of combustible species within the plume shear layers are calculated in order to assess assumptions made in the base heating analysis.

  11. Axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics analysis of a film/dump-cooled rocket nozzle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-06-01

    Prediction of convective base heating rates for a new launch vehicle presents significant challenges to analysts concerned with base environments. The present effort seeks to augment classical base heating scaling techniques via a detailed investigation of the exhaust plume shear layer of a single H2/O2 Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Use of fuel-rich turbine exhaust to cool the STME nozzle presented concerns regarding potential recirculation of these gases to the base region with attendant increase in the base heating rate. A pressure-based full Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with finite rate chemistry is used to predict plumes for vehicle altitudes of 10 kft and 50 kft. Levels of combustible species within the plume shear layers are calculated in order to assess assumptions made in the base heating analysis.

  12. Numerical investigation of impact of relative humidity on droplet accumulation and film cooling on compressor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugarin, Luz Irene

    During the summer, high inlet temperatures affect the power output of gas turbine systems. Evaporative coolers have gained popularity as an inlet cooling method for these systems. Wet compression has been one of the common evaporative cooling methods implemented to increase power output of gas turbine systems due to its simple installation and low cost. This process involves injection of water droplets into the continuous phase of compressor to reduce the temperature of the flow entering the compressor and in turn increase the power output of the whole gas turbine system. This study focused on a single stage rotor-stator compressor model with varying inlet temperature between 300K and 320K, as well as relative humidity between 0% and 100%. The simulations are carried out using the commercial CFD tool ANSYS: FLUENT. The study modeled the interaction between the two phases including mass and heat transfer, given different inlet relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with k-epsilon turbulence model were applied as well as the droplet coalescence and droplet breakup model considered in the simulation. Sliding mesh theory was implemented to simulate the compressor movement in 2-D. The interaction between the blade and droplets were modeled to address all possible interactions; which include: stick spread, splash, or rebound and compared to an interaction of only reflect. The goal of this study is to quantify the relation between RH, inlet temperature, overall heat transfer coefficient, and the heat transferred from the droplets to the blades surface. The result of this study lead to further proof that wet compression yields higher pressure ratios and lower temperatures in the domain under all of the cases. Additionally, droplet-wall interaction has an interesting effect on the heat transfer coefficient at the compressor blades.

  13. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  14. Transpiration and film cooling boundary layer computer program. Volume 2: Computer program and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    A finite difference turbulent boundary layer computer program which allows for mass transfer wall cooling and equilibrium chemistry effects is presented. The program is capable of calculating laminar or turbulent boundary layer solutions for an arbitrary ideal gas or an equilibrium hydrogen oxygen system. Either two dimensional or axisymmetric geometric configurations may be considered. The equations are solved, in nondimension-alized physical coordinates, using the implicit Crank-Nicolson technique. The finite difference forms of the conservation of mass, momentum, total enthalpy and elements equations are linearized and uncoupled, thereby generating easily solvable tridiagonal sets of algebraic equations. A detailed description of the computer program, as well as a program user's manual is provided. Detailed descriptions of all boundary layer subroutines are included, as well as a section defining all program symbols of principal importance. Instructions are then given for preparing card input to the program and for interpreting the printed output. Finally, two sample cases are included to illustrate the use of the program.

  15. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  16. Adiabatic dynamics of magnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolaou, N.

    1994-03-01

    We formulate a reasonably detailed adiabatic conjecture concerning the dynamics of skew deflection of magnetic vortices in a field gradient, which is expected to be valid at sufficiently large values of the winding number. The conjecture is consistent with the golden rule used to describe the dynamics of realistic magnetic bubbles and is verified here numerically within the 2-D isotropic Heisenberg model.

  17. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  18. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  19. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics. PMID:25494733

  20. Studies in Chaotic adiabatic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzynski, C.

    1994-01-01

    Chaotic adiabatic dynamics refers to the study of systems exhibiting chaotic evolution under slowly time-dependent equations of motion. In this dissertation the author restricts his attention to Hamiltonian chaotic adiabatic systems. The results presented are organized around a central theme, namely, that the energies of such systems evolve diffusively. He begins with a general analysis, in which he motivates and derives a Fokker-Planck equation governing this process of energy diffusion. He applies this equation to study the {open_quotes}goodness{close_quotes} of an adiabatic invariant associated with chaotic motion. This formalism is then applied to two specific examples. The first is that of a gas of noninteracting point particles inside a hard container that deforms slowly with time. Both the two- and three-dimensional cases are considered. The results are discussed in the context of the Wall Formula for one-body dissipation in nuclear physics, and it is shown that such a gas approaches, asymptotically with time, an exponential velocity distribution. The second example involves the Fermi mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays. Explicit evolution equations are obtained for the distribution of cosmic ray energies within this model, and the steady-state energy distribution that arises when this equation is modified to account for the injection and removal of cosmic rays is discussed. Finally, the author re-examines the multiple-time-scale approach as applied to the study of phase space evolution under a chaotic adiabatic Hamiltonian. This leads to a more rigorous derivation of the above-mentioned Fokker-Planck equation, and also to a new term which has relevance to the problem of chaotic adiabatic reaction forces (the forces acting on slow, heavy degrees of freedom due to their coupling to light, fast chaotic degrees).

  1. Application of computational fluid dynamics to the design of the film cooled STME subscale nozzle for the National Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    The status of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations for the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) film/dump cooled nozzle design is presented, with an emphasis on the timely impact of CFD on the design of the sub-scale nozzle coolant system. The following aspects of the sub-scale coolant delivery system were analyzed with CFD: 1) a design trade study of a mechanical flow splitting device for uniform distribution of the subsonic cavity flow, 2) a design trade study of the subsonic cavity lip to achieve film integrity, and 3) an analysis of the primary flow interaction with the core/secondary coolant streams. All design calculations were performed with the Generalized Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP), a 3-D, multi-block, generalized Navier-Stokes code capable of solving with frozen, finite-rate or equilibrium chemical kinetics. The initial design of the subsonic cavity flow used square posts to distribute the sonic orifice jets into a uniform flow. Calculations for this design indicated that an unacceptable mal-distribution of film occurred. Design modifications involving curved and slotted posts were computed in an effort to uniformly distribute the secondary coolant flow. Analysis of these configurations showed that although the flowfield improved in uniformity, it was still unacceptable, especially at higher feed pressures. Results from these studies were then incorporated into a design that resulted in the insertion of a porous metal ring into the subsonic cavity. Subsequent water flow model studies showed that this concept was successful in uniformly distributing flow exiting the cavity. In addition to the design of the subsonic cavity, CFD was also used to analyze the secondary coolant lip and the primary flow interaction with the core/secondary coolant streams. A series of calculations were first performed to modify the subsonic cavity lip contour. The flow over the modified lip was then computed simultaneously with the primary injectors to

  2. Method of adiabatic modes in research of smoothly irregular integrated optical waveguides: zero approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A A; Sevast'yanov, L A; Sevast'yanov, A L

    2014-02-28

    We consider the application of the method of adiabatic waveguide modes for calculating the propagation of electromagnetic radiation in three-dimensional (3D) irregular integrated optical waveguides. The method of adiabatic modes takes into account a three-dimensional distribution of quasi-waveguide modes and explicit ('inclined') tangential boundary conditions. The possibilities of the method are demonstrated on the example of numerical research of two major elements of integrated optics: a waveguide of 'horn' type and a thin-film generalised waveguide Luneburg lens by the methods of adiabatic modes and comparative waveguides. (integral optical waveguides)

  3. Development of the Glenn Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Phillip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations that are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminar/turbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes that take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) code and applied to film-cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30deg holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and two blowing ratios of 0.5 and 1.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  4. Development of the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Phillip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations that are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminar/turbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes that take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) code and applied to film-cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30deg holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and two blowing ratios of 0.5 and 1.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  5. Development of the Glenn-HT Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Philip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations which are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminarturbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes which take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-HT code and applied to film cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30 holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and four blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  6. Robust adiabatic sum frequency conversion.

    PubMed

    Suchowski, Haim; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav; Oron, Dan; Arie, Ady; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-07-20

    We discuss theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the robustness of the adiabatic sum frequency conversion method. This technique, borrowed from an analogous scheme of robust population transfer in atomic physics and nuclear magnetic resonance, enables the achievement of nearly full frequency conversion in a sum frequency generation process for a bandwidth up to two orders of magnitude wider than in conventional conversion schemes. We show that this scheme is robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and of the incoming light. These include the crystal temperature, the frequency of the incoming field, the pump intensity, the crystal length and the angle of incidence. Also, we show that this extremely broad bandwidth can be tuned to higher or lower central wavelengths by changing either the pump frequency or the crystal temperature. The detailed study of the properties of this converter is done using the Landau-Zener theory dealing with the adiabatic transitions in two level systems. PMID:19654679

  7. Adiabaticity in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    We provide a rigorous generalization of the quantum adiabatic theorem for open systems described by a Markovian master equation with time-dependent Liouvillian L (t ) . We focus on the finite system case relevant for adiabatic quantum computing and quantum annealing. Adiabaticity is defined in terms of closeness to the instantaneous steady state. While the general result is conceptually similar to the closed-system case, there are important differences. Namely, a system initialized in the zero-eigenvalue eigenspace of L (t ) will remain in this eigenspace with a deviation that is inversely proportional to the total evolution time T . In the case of a finite number of level crossings, the scaling becomes T-η with an exponent η that we relate to the rate of the gap closing. For master equations that describe relaxation to thermal equilibrium, we show that the evolution time T should be long compared to the corresponding minimum inverse gap squared of L (t ) . Our results are illustrated with several examples.

  8. Fastest Effectively Adiabatic Transitions for a Collection of Harmonic Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Frank; Salamon, Peter; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2016-05-19

    We discuss fastest effectively adiabatic transitions (FEATs) for a collection of noninteracting harmonic oscillators with shared controllable real frequencies. The construction of such transitions is presented for given initial and final equilibrium states, and the dependence of the minimum time control on the interval of achievable frequencies is discussed. While the FEAT times and associated FEAT processes are important in their own right as optimal controls, the FEAT time is an added feature which provides a measure of the quality of a shortcut to adiabaticity (STA). The FEAT time is evaluated for a previously reported experiment, wherein a cloud of Rb atoms is cooled following a STA recipe that took about twice as long as the FEAT speed limit, a time efficiency of 50%. PMID:26811863

  9. Numerical and experimental analysis of a thin liquid film on a rotating disk related to development of a spacecraft absorption cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, Amir; Swanson, Theodore D.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical and experimental analysis of a thin liquid film on a rotating and a stationary disk related to the development of an absorber unit for a high capacity spacecraft absorption cooling system, is described. The creation of artificial gravity by the use of a centrifugal field was focused upon in this report. Areas covered include: (1) One-dimensional computation of thin liquid film flows; (2) Experimental measurement of film height and visualization of flow; (3) Two-dimensional computation of the free surface flow of a thin liquid film using a pressure optimization method; (4) Computation of heat transfer in two-dimensional thin film flow; (5) Development of a new computational methodology for the free surface flows using a permeable wall; (6) Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a thin film in the presence and absence of gravity; and (7) Comparison of theoretical prediction and experimental data. The basic phenomena related to fluid flow and heat transfer on rotating systems reported here can also be applied to other areas of space systems.

  10. Fundamental Study of a Jet-in-Cross-Flow Interacting with a Vortex Generator for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul; Rigby, David; Heidmann, James

    2009-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented on the effectiveness of a vortex generator (VG) in preventing lift-off of a jet-in-cross-flow (JICF). The study is pertinent to film-cooling applications and its relevance to NASA programs is first briefly discussed. In the experiment, the jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20deg to the free-stream. The effect of a triangular, ramp-shaped VG is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flow-field properties are obtained for a case in which the height of the VG and the diameter of the orifice are comparable to the approach boundary layer thickness. The VG produces a streamwise vortex pair with vorticity magnitude three times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the JICF alone. Such a VG appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. The effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys ten diameters downstream from the orifice. Results over a range of jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (1

  11. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  12. A Multi-Stage Continuous-Duty Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Blumenstock, K. A.; Canavan, E. R.; DiPirro, M. J.; Tuttle, J. G.; Voellmer, G. M.; Yeager, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    The design for a multi-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that can provide continuous cooling at very low temperatures is presented. The ADR is being developed for use in x-ray, IR and sub-millimeter space astronomy missions which will employ large format detector arrays operating at 50 mK and lower and which may dissipate up to 10 microwatts. It is also being designed to reject heat slowly to a relatively warm heat sink (in the 6-10 K range), so that future missions may use mechanical cryocoolers instead of liquid helium for pre-cooling. The continuous nature of the device gives it a much higher cooling power per unit mass, allowing it to be much smaller and lighter than existing ADRs with comparable performance. Design details are discussed along with prototype test results.

  13. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  14. Turbulent Density Variations in Non-Adiabatic Interstellar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, J. C.; Conley, Alex

    1998-05-01

    Analyses of radio scintillation measurements have demonstrated (e.g., Rickett, ARAA, 28, 561, 1990) the existence of ubiquitous turbulent density fluctuations in the interstellar medium. Higdon (ApJ, 309, 342, 1986) and Goldreich and Sridhar (ApJ, 438, 763 1995) have modeled successfully these density variations as entropy structures distorted by convection in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows. However, the interstellar medium is a heterogeneous non-adiabatic fluid whose thermal properties result ( Field, ApJ, 142, 531 1965) from a balance of heating and cooling rates. The effect of the non-adiabatic nature of interstellar fluids on the properties of turbulent cascades to small scales has not been considered previously. We find that in thermally stable fluids that the required balance of heating and cooling decreases the amplitudes of entropy structures independently of their spatial scale. Consequently, we show that if the time scale for turbulent flows to cascade to small scales is significantly greater than the cooling time of an interstellar fluid, the generation of turbulent denisty density variations at large wave numbers is greatly suppressed. Such results constrain possible values for the turbulent outer scale in models of interstellar turbulent flows.

  15. Full-coverage film cooling heat transfer study: Summary of data for normal-hole injection and 30 deg slant-hole injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, M. E.; Choe, H.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer to a full coverage film cooled turbulent boundary layer over a flat surface was studied. The surface consisted of a discrete hole test section containing 11 rows of holes spaced 5 diameters apart in a staggered array and an instrumented recovery region. Ten diameter spacing was also studied by plugging appropriate holes. Two test sections were used, one having holes normal to the surface and the other having holes angled 30 deg to the surface in the downstream direction. Stanton number data were obtained both in the full coverage region and in the downstream recovery region for a range of blowing ratios, or mass flux ratios, from 0 to 1.3. Initial conditions at the upstream edge of the blowing region were varied from 500 to 5000 for momentum thickness Reynolds number and from 100 to 1800 for enthalpy thickness Reynolds number. The range of Reynolds numbers based on hole diameter and mainstream velocity was 6000 to 22000. Initial boundary layer thicknesses range from 0.5 to 2.0 hole diameters. Air was used as the working fluid. The data were taken for the secondary injection temperature equal to the wall temperature and also equal to the mainstream temperature. Superposition was then used to obtain Stanton number as a continuous function of the injectant temperature. The heat transfer coefficient was defined on the basis of a mainstream-to-wall temperature difference. This definition permits direct comparison of performance between film cooling and transpiration cooling.

  16. Sisyphus cooling of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul; Kim, Geena; Joshi, Trinity; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Tiarks, Daniel; Müller, Holger

    2014-02-01

    Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a wide range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 μK, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single-photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency-locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali-metal species.

  17. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  18. Hydrogen film cooling of a small hydrogen-oxygen thrust chamber and its effect on erosion rates of various ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N.; Roberts, W. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine what arrangement of film-coolant-injection orifices should be used to decrease the erosion rates of small, high temperature, high pressure ablative thrust chambers without incurring a large penalty in combustion performance. All of the film cooling was supplied through holes in a ring between the outer row of injector elements and the chamber wall. The best arrangement, which had twice the number of holes as there were outer row injection elements, was also the simplest. The performance penalties, presented as a reduction in characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, were 0.8 and 2.8 percentage points for the 10 and 20 percent cooling flows, respectively, The best film-coolant injector was then used to obtain erosion rates for 19 ablative materials. The throat erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 2.5 with a 10 percent coolant flow. Only the more expensive silica phenolic materials had low enough erosion rates to be considered for use in the nozzle throat. However, some of the cheaper materials might qualify for use in other areas of small nozzles with large throat diameters where the higher erosion rates are more acceptable.

  19. The problem of cooling an air-cooled cylinder on an aircraft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brevoort, M J; Joyner, U T

    1941-01-01

    An analysis of the cooling problem has been to show by what means the cooling of an air-cooled aircraft engine may be improved. Each means of improving cooling is analyzed on the basis of effectiveness in cooling with respect to power for cooling. The altitude problem is analyzed for both supercharged and unsupercharged engines. The case of ground cooling is also discussed. The heat-transfer process from the hot gases to the cylinder wall is discussed on the basis of the fundamentals of heat transfer and thermodynamics. Adiabatic air-temperature rise at a stagnation point in compressible flow is shown to depend only on the velocity of flow.

  20. Steam bottoming cycle for an adiabatic diesel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, E.; Demler, R.; Krepchin, I.; Walker, D.

    1984-03-01

    A study of steam bottoming cycles using adiabatic diesel engine exhaust heat projected substantial performance and economic benefits for long haul trucks. A parametric analysis of steam cycle and system component variables, system cost, size and performance was conducted. An 811 K/6.90 MPa state-of-the-art reciprocating expander steam system with a monotube boiler and radiator core condenser was selected for preliminary design. When applied to a NASA specified turbo-charged adiabatic diesel the bottoming system increased the diesel output by almost 18%. In a comparison of the costs of the diesel with bottoming system (TC/B) and a NASA specified turbocompound adiabatic diesel with after-cooling with the same total output, the annual fuel savings less the added maintenance cost was determined to cover the increased initial cost of the TC/B system in a payback period of 2.3 years. Also during this program steam bottoming system freeze protection strategies were developed, technological advances required for improved system reliability were considered and the cost and performance of advanced systems were evaluated.

  1. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the externally cooled liquid lying over a thin vapor film coating the wall of a horizontal plane heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V. V.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2016-06-01

    The linear instability of a vapor film formed at the surface of a flat horizontal heater surrounded by an externally cooled liquid is investigated in the presence of a gravitational field. Consideration is given to the case when the stationary base state is characterized by the heat fluxes balanced at the interface between the two media. The critical value of the heat flux required for the complete suppression of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by the phase transition has been evaluated mainly in the absence of the natural convection in the liquid layer and is found to be different from the known data obtained by approximate approaches. The case of the instability suppression in the system when long-wave disturbances have the longest lifetime is described. It has been shown that the media pressure influence on the phase transition, revealed in thin vapor films, can markedly increase the growth rate of long-wave disturbances and prevent their suppression.

  2. Resistive switching properties of epitaxial BaTiO(3-δ) thin films tuned by after-growth oxygen cooling pressure.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yooun; Kan, Daisuke; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Seidel, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BaTiO3-δ, i.e. oxygen-deficient barium titanate (BaTiO3), thin films grown on GdScO3(110) substrates with SrRuO3 conductive electrodes by pulsed laser deposition are studied by X-ray diffraction and conductive AFM to characterize their structure and nanoscale electronic properties. Bias- and time-dependent resistive switching measurements reveal a strong dependence on the oxygen vacancy concentration, which can be tuned by after-growth oxygen cooling conditions of thin films. The results indicate that the resistive switching properties of BaTiO3-δ can be enhanced by controlling oxygen deficiency and provide new insight for potential non-volatile resistive random-access memory (RRAM) applications. PMID:26603263

  3. Effect of cooling-hole geometry on aerodynamic performance of a film-cooled turbine vane tested with cold air in a two-dimensional cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, J. F.; Stabe, R. G.; Moffitt, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the orientation and cooling-hole size on turbine-vane aerodynamic losses was evaluated. The contribution of individual vane regions to the overall effect was also investigated. Test configurations were based upon a representative configuration having 45 spanwise rows of holes spaced about the entire vane profile. Nominal hole diameters of 0.0254 and 0.0356 cm and nominal hole orientations of 35 deg, 45 deg, and 55 deg from the local vane surface and 0 deg, 45 deg, and 90 deg from the main-stream flow direction were investigated. Flow conditions and aerodynamic losses were determined by vane-exit surveys of total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle.

  4. Adiabatic many-body state preparation and information transfer in quantum dot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Umer; Bayat, Abolfazl; Mancini, Stefano; Bose, Sougato

    2015-04-01

    Quantum simulation of many-body systems are one of the most interesting tasks of quantum technology. Among them is the preparation of a many-body system in its ground state when the vanishing energy gap makes the cooling mechanisms ineffective. Adiabatic theorem, as an alternative to cooling, can be exploited for driving the many-body system to its ground state. In this paper, we study two most common disorders in quantum dot arrays, namely exchange coupling fluctuations and hyperfine interaction, in adiabatic preparation of ground state in such systems. We show that the adiabatic ground-state preparation is highly robust against those disorder effects making it a good analog simulator. Moreover, we also study the adiabatic quantum information transfer, using singlet-triplet states, across a spin chain. In contrast to ground-state preparation the transfer mechanism is highly affected by disorder and in particular, the hyperfine interaction is very destructive for the performance. This suggests that for communication tasks across such arrays adiabatic evolution is not as effective and quantum quenches could be preferable.

  5. Degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory: Foundations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigolin, Gustavo; Ortiz, Gerardo

    2014-08-01

    We present details and expand on the framework leading to the recently introduced degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 170406 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.170406], and on the formulation of the degenerate adiabatic theorem, along with its necessary and sufficient conditions [given in Phys. Rev. A 85, 062111 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.062111]. We start with the adiabatic approximation for degenerate Hamiltonians that paves the way to a clear and rigorous statement of the associated degenerate adiabatic theorem, where the non-Abelian geometric phase (Wilczek-Zee phase) plays a central role to its quantitative formulation. We then describe the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory, whose zeroth-order term is the degenerate adiabatic approximation, in its full generality. The parameter in the perturbative power-series expansion of the time-dependent wave function is directly associated to the inverse of the time it takes to drive the system from its initial to its final state. With the aid of the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory we obtain rigorous necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. Finally, to illustrate the power and wide scope of the methodology, we apply the framework to a degenerate Hamiltonian, whose closed-form time-dependent wave function is derived exactly, and also to other nonexactly solvable Hamiltonians whose solutions are numerically computed.

  6. Shortcut to adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Alan C.; Silva, Raphael D.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a shortcut to the adiabatic gate teleportation model of quantum computation. More specifically, we determine fast local counterdiabatic Hamiltonians able to implement teleportation as a universal computational primitive. In this scenario, we provide the counterdiabatic driving for arbitrary n -qubit gates, which allows to achieve universality through a variety of gate sets. Remarkably, our approach maps the superadiabatic Hamiltonian HSA for an arbitrary n -qubit gate teleportation into the implementation of a rotated superadiabatic dynamics of an n -qubit state teleportation. This result is rather general, with the speed of the evolution only dictated by the quantum speed limit. In particular, we analyze the energetic cost for different Hamiltonian interpolations in the context of the energy-time complementarity.

  7. Quantum gates with controlled adiabatic evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hen, Itay

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a class of quantum adiabatic evolutions that we claim may be interpreted as the equivalents of the unitary gates of the quantum gate model. We argue that these gates form a universal set and may therefore be used as building blocks in the construction of arbitrary "adiabatic circuits," analogously to the manner in which gates are used in the circuit model. One implication of the above construction is that arbitrary classical boolean circuits as well as gate model circuits may be directly translated to adiabatic algorithms with no additional resources or complexities. We show that while these adiabatic algorithms fail to exhibit certain aspects of the inherent fault tolerance of traditional quantum adiabatic algorithms, they may have certain other experimental advantages acting as quantum gates.

  8. On a Nonlinear Model in Adiabatic Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Song-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study a kind of nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution in quantum search problem. As will be seen here, for this problem, there always exists a possibility that this nonlinear model can successfully solve the problem, while the linear model can not. Also in the same setting, when the overlap between the initial state and the final stare is sufficiently large, a simple linear adiabatic evolution can achieve O(1) time efficiency, but infinite time complexity for the nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution is needed. This tells us, it is not always a wise choice to use nonlinear interpolations in adiabatic algorithms. Sometimes, simple linear adiabatic evolutions may be sufficient for using. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61402188 and 61173050. The first author also gratefully acknowledges the support from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2014M552041

  9. A Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for Use with Mechanical Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P.; Abbondante, N.; Canavan, E.; DiPirro, M.; Grabowski, M.; Hirsch, M.; Jackson, M.; Tuttle, J.

    2000-01-01

    We have begun developing an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) which can produce continuous cooling at temperatures of 50 mK or lower, with high cooling power (goal of 10 PW). The design uses multiple stages to cascade heat from a continuously-cooled stage up to a heat sink. The serial arrangement makes it possible to add stages to extend the operating range to lower temperature, or to raise the heat rejection temperature. Compared to conventional single-shot ADRS, this system achieves higher cooling power per unit mass and is able to reject its heat at a more uniform rate. For operation with a mechanical cryocooler, this latter feature stabilizes the heat sink temperature and allows both the ADR and cryocooler to operate more efficiently. The ADR is being designed to operate with a heat sink as warm as 10-12 K to make it compatible with a wide variety of mechanical coolers as part of a versatile, cryogen-free low temperature cooling system. A two-stage system has been constructed and a proof-of-principle demonstration was conducted at 100 mK. Details of the design and test results, as well as the direction of future work, are discussed.

  10. Progress in the Development of a Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; King, Todd; Tuttle, James; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the development of a continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (CADR). Continuous operation avoids the constraints of long hold times and short recycle times that lead to the generally large mass of single-shot ADRs, allowing us to achieve an order of magnitude larger cooling power per unit mass. Our current design goal is 10 micro W of cooling at 50 mK using a 6-10 K heat sink. The estimated mass is less than 10 kg, including magnetic shielding of each stage. The relatively high heat rejection capability allows it to operate with a mechanical cryocooler as part of a cryogen-free, low temperature cooling system. This has the advantages of long mission life and reduced complexity and cost. We have assembled a three-stage CADR and have demonstrated continuous cooling using a superfluid helium bath as the heat sink. The temperature stability is 8 micro K rms or better over the entire cycle, and the cooling power is 2.5 micro W at 60 mK rising to 10 micro W at 100 mK.

  11. Adiabatic Compression of Oxygen: Real Fluid Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    The adiabatic compression of oxygen has been identified as an ignition source for systems operating in enriched oxygen atmospheres. Current practice is to evaluate the temperature rise on compression by treating oxygen as an ideal gas with constant heat capacity. This paper establishes the appropriate thermodynamic analysis for the common occurrence of adiabatic compression of oxygen and in the process defines a satisfactory equation of state (EOS) for oxygen. It uses that EOS to model adiabatic compression as isentropic compression and calculates final temperatures for this system using current approaches for comparison.

  12. Multisurface Adiabatic Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Tibor; Yosa Reyes, Juvenal; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Adiabatic reactive molecular dynamics (ARMD) simulation method is a surface-crossing algorithm for modeling chemical reactions in classical molecular dynamics simulations using empirical force fields. As the ARMD Hamiltonian is time dependent during crossing, it allows only approximate energy conservation. In the current work, the range of applicability of conventional ARMD is explored, and a new multisurface ARMD (MS-ARMD) method is presented, implemented in CHARMM and applied to the vibrationally induced photodissociation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the gas phase. For this, an accurate global potential energy surface (PES) involving 12 H2SO4 and 4 H2O + SO3 force fields fitted to MP2/6-311G++(2d,2p) reference energies is employed. The MS-ARMD simulations conserve total energy and feature both intramolecular H-transfer reactions and water elimination. An analytical treatment of the dynamics in the crossing region finds that conventional ARMD can approximately conserve total energy for limiting cases. In one of them, the reduced mass of the system is large, which often occurs for simulations of solvated biomolecular systems. On the other hand, MS-ARMD is a general approach for modeling chemical reactions including gas-phase, homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic catalytic reactions while conserving total energy in atomistic simulations. PMID:26580356

  13. Differential ablator-fuel adiabat tuning in indirect-drive implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O. S.; Clark, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a design adjustment to the high foot laser pulse [T. R. Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.055002] that is predicted to lower the fuel adiabat, increase compression and neutron production, but maintain similar ablation front growth. This is accomplished by lowering the laser power between the first and the second pulses (the "trough") so that the first shock remains strong initially but decays as it transits the ablator and enters the capsule fuel in a process similar to direct-drive "adiabat shaping" [S. E. Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2298 (2000), 10.1063/1.874063]. Integrated hohlraum simulations show that hohlraum cooling is sufficient to launch decaying shocks with adequate symmetry control, suggesting that adiabat shaping may be possible with indirect-drive implosions. Initial experiments show the efficacy of this technique.

  14. An infrared pyroelectric detector improved by cool isostatic pressing with cup-shaped PZT thick film on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q. X.; Wu, C. G.; Luo, W. B.; Chen, C.; Cai, G. Q.; Sun, X. Y.; Qian, D. P.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we presented a new pyroelectric detector with back to back silicon cups and micro-bridge structure. The PZT thick film shaped in the front cup was directly deposited with designed pattern by electrophoresis deposition (EPD). Pt/Ti Metal film, which was fabricated by standard photolithography and lift-off technology, was sputtered to connect the top electrode and the bonding pad. The cold isostatic press (CIP) treatment could be applied to improve the pyroelectric properties of PZT thick film. The infrared (IR) properties the CIP-optimized detector were measured. The voltage responsivity (RV) was 4.5 × 102 V/W at 5.3 Hz, the specific detectivity (D*) was greater than 6.34 × 108 cm Hz1/2 W-1 (frequency > 110 Hz), and the thermal time constant was 51 ms, respectively.

  15. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  16. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  17. An Adiabatic Architecture for Linear Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.; Götze, J.

    2005-05-01

    Using adiabatic CMOS logic instead of the more traditional static CMOS logic can lower the power consumption of a hardware design. However, the characteristic differences between adiabatic and static logic, such as a four-phase clock, have a far reaching influence on the design itself. These influences are investigated in this paper by adapting a systolic array of CORDIC devices to be implemented adiabatically. We present a means to describe adiabatic logic in VHDL and use it to define the systolic array with precise timing and bit-true calculations. The large pipeline bubbles that occur in a naive version of this array are identified and removed to a large degree. As an example, we demonstrate a parameterization of the CORDIC array that carries out adaptive RLS filtering.

  18. General conditions for quantum adiabatic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Comparat, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Adiabaticity occurs when, during its evolution, a physical system remains in the instantaneous eigenstate of the Hamiltonian. Unfortunately, existing results, such as the quantum adiabatic theorem based on a slow down evolution [H({epsilon}t),{epsilon}{yields}0], are insufficient to describe an evolution driven by the Hamiltonian H(t) itself. Here we derive general criteria and exact bounds, for the state and its phase, ensuring an adiabatic evolution for any Hamiltonian H(t). As a corollary, we demonstrate that the commonly used condition of a slow Hamiltonian variation rate, compared to the spectral gap, is indeed sufficient to ensure adiabaticity but only when the Hamiltonian is real and nonoscillating (for instance, containing exponential or polynomial but no sinusoidal functions)

  19. Adiabatic invariance of oscillons/I -balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takeda, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    Real scalar fields are known to fragment into spatially localized and long-lived solitons called oscillons or I -balls. We prove the adiabatic invariance of the oscillons/I -balls for a potential that allows periodic motion even in the presence of non-negligible spatial gradient energy. We show that such a potential is uniquely determined to be the quadratic one with a logarithmic correction, for which the oscillons/I -balls are absolutely stable. For slightly different forms of the scalar potential dominated by the quadratic one, the oscillons/I -balls are only quasistable, because the adiabatic charge is only approximately conserved. We check the conservation of the adiabatic charge of the I -balls in numerical simulation by slowly varying the coefficient of logarithmic corrections. This unambiguously shows that the longevity of oscillons/I -balls is due to the adiabatic invariance.

  20. Using electron-tunneling refrigerators to cool electrons, membranes, and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathan A.

    Many cryogenic devices require temperatures near 100 mK for optimal performance, such as thin-film, superconducting detectors. Examples include the submillimeter SCUBA camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, high-resolution X-ray sensors for semiconductor defect analysis, and a planned satellite to search for polarization in the cosmic microwave background. The cost, size, and complexity of refrigerators used to reach 100 mK (dilution and adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators) are significant and alternative technologies are desirable. We demonstrate work on developing a new option for cooling detectors to 100 mK bath temperatures. Solid-state refrigerators based on Normal metal/Insulator/Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions can provide cooling from pumped 3He bath temperatures (˜300 mK) to 100 mK. The cooling mechanism is the preferential tunneling of the highest energy (hottest) electrons from the normal metal through the biased tunnel junctions into the superconductor. When NIS refrigerators are combined with a micro-machined membrane, both the electrons and phonons of the membrane can be cooled. We have developed NIS-cooled membranes with both large temperature reductions and large cooling powers. We have shown the first cooling of a bulk material by cooling a neutron transmutation doped (NTD) thermistor. The fabrication of NIS refrigerators can be integrated with existing detector technology. For the first time, we have successfully integrated NIS refrigerators with both mm-wave and X-ray detectors. In particular, we have cooled X-ray detectors by more than 100 mK and have achieved a resolution of <10 eV at 6 keV at a bath temperature 85 mK above the transition temperature of the detector. The use of integrated NIS refrigerators makes the remarkable performance of cryogenic detectors available from 300 mK platforms. We have also performed preliminary work towards building a general-purpose cooling platform for microelectronics devices on separate

  1. Microtextured Surfaces for Turbine Blade Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can exceed the blade and disk material limits by 600 F or more, necessitating both internal and film cooling schemes in addition to the use of thermal barrier coatings. Internal convective cooling is inadequate in many blade locations, and both internal and film cooling approaches can lead to significant performance penalties in the engine. Micro Cooling Concepts, Inc., has developed a turbine blade cooling concept that provides enhanced internal impingement cooling effectiveness via the use of microstructured impingement surfaces. These surfaces significantly increase the cooling capability of the impinging flow, as compared to a conventional untextured surface. This approach can be combined with microchannel cooling and external film cooling to tailor the cooling capability per the external heating profile. The cooling system then can be optimized to minimize impact on engine performance.

  2. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  3. Analysis of heat-transfer tests of an impingement-convection- and film-cooled vane in a cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Gauntner, D. J.; Livingood, J. N. B.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental flow and heat transfer data obtained for an air-cooled turbine vane tested in a static cascade at gas temperatures and pressures to 1644 K (2500 F) and 31 N/cm2 (45 psia), respectively, are presented. Average and local vane temperatures were correlated in several ways. Calculated and measured coolant flows and vane temperatures are compared. Potential allowable increases in gas temperature are also discussed.

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of a Film Cooling Flow Injected from an Inclined Discrete Cylindrical Hole into a Crossflow with Zero-Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Shyam, Vikram

    2012-01-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed of a high blowing ratio (M = 1.7) film cooling flow with density ratio of unity. Mean results are compared with experimental data to show the degree of fidelity achieved in the simulation. While the trends in the LES prediction are a noticeable improvement over Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) predictions, there is still a lack a spreading on the underside of the lifted jet. This is likely due to the inability of the LES to capture the full range of influential eddies on the underside of the jet due to their smaller structure. The unsteady structures in the turbulent coolant jet are also explored and related to turbulent mixing characteristics

  5. Phase change in liquid face seals. II - Isothermal and adiabatic bounds with real fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. F.; Chao, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical studies of phase change effects in parallel and tapered liquid face seals are presented. An isothermal and adiabatic model of low Reynolds number flow are considered by numerical integration of the descriptive equations for a real fluid, and its thermodynamic properties are calculated for each step, using a computer program for the steam tables or fluid thermodynamic properties. It was shown that for low leakage rate the isothermal model is more accurate and for high leakage rates the adiabatic model is more accurate; that both models yield the same conclusions regarding stability; and that the transient of collapse is described by the adiabatic model which predicts a catastrophic collapse and then either failure or explosive return to a larger film thickness value. Finally, it is shown that converging seals may become unstable and the mass leakage rate is reduced significantly below the all liquid value when boiling occurs.

  6. Water-Film Cooling of an 80 deg Total-Angle Cone at a Mach Number of 2 for Airstream Total Temperatures up to 3,000 deg R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Howard S.

    1959-01-01

    Film-cooling tests, with water as the coolant, were made on an 80 deg total-angle cone in a Mach number 2 free jet at sea-level pressure. The tests were made at free-stream total temperatures from 1,500 deg R to 3,000 deg R and at free-stream Reynolds numbers per foot from 8 x 10(exp 6) to 3 x 10(exp 6). The tests showed that the downstream end of the model became very hot if the coolant rate was too small to cover the complete model with a water film. This water film was fairly symmetrical when the model was at zero angle of attack but was very asymmetrical when the model was at an angle of attack of 5 deg. A comparison with results of a previous transpiration-cooling test showed that, with water as the coolant, transpiration cooling was at least 2.5 times as efficient as the film cooling of the present tests.

  7. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-02-01

    In the graph isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and transforms G →G'. If yes, then G and G' are said to be isomorphic; otherwise they are nonisomorphic. The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. In this paper we present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI and which also provides an approach to determining all automorphisms of a given graph. We show how the GI problem can be converted to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate the algorithm's quantum dynamics and show that it correctly (i) distinguishes nonisomorphic graphs; (ii) recognizes isomorphic graphs and determines the permutation(s) that connect them; and (iii) finds the automorphism group of a given graph G. We then discuss the GI quantum algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing how it can be leveraged to give a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of the NP-complete subgraph isomorphism problem. The computational complexity of an adiabatic quantum algorithm is largely determined by the minimum energy gap Δ (N) separating the ground and first-excited states in the limit of large problem size N ≫1. Calculating Δ (N) in this limit is a fundamental open problem in adiabatic quantum computing, and so it is not possible to determine the computational complexity of adiabatic quantum algorithms in general, nor consequently, of the specific adiabatic quantum algorithms presented here. Adiabatic quantum computing has been shown to be equivalent to the circuit model of quantum computing, and so development of adiabatic quantum algorithms continues to be of great interest.

  8. Degradation of thermal barrier coatings on an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) simulated film-cooled turbine vane pressure surface due to particulate fly ash deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kevin

    Coal synthesis gas (syngas) can introduce contaminants into the flow of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) industrial gas turbine which can form molten deposits onto components of the first stage of a turbine. Research is being conducted at West Virginia University (WVU) to study the effects of particulate deposition on thermal barrier coatings (TBC) employed on the airfoils of an IGCC turbine hot section. WVU had been working with U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to simulate deposition on the pressure side of an IGCC turbine first stage vane to study the effects on film cooling. To simulate the particulate deposition, TBC coated, angled film-cooled test articles were subjected to accelerated deposition injected into the flow of a combustor facility with a pressure of approximately 4 atm and a gas temperature of 1560 K. The particle characteristics between engine conditions and laboratory are matched using the Stokes number and particulate loading. To investigate the degradation on the TBC from the particulate deposition, non-destructive evaluations were performed using a load-based multiple-partial unloading micro-indentation technique and were followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) examinations. The micro-indentation technique used in the study was developed by Kang et al. and can quantitatively evaluate the mechanical properties of materials. The indentation results found that the Young's Modulus of the ceramic top coat is higher in areas with deposition formation due to the penetration of the fly ash. The increase in the modulus of elasticity has been shown to result in a reduction of strain tolerance of the 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) TBC coatings. The increase in the Young's modulus of the ceramic top coat is due to the stiffening of the YSZ columnar microstructure from the cooled particulate fly ash. SEM evaluation was used to

  9. Magneto-optical cooling of atoms.

    PubMed

    Raizen, Mark G; Budker, Dmitry; Rochester, Simon M; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2014-08-01

    We propose an alternative method to laser cooling. Our approach utilizes the extreme brightness of a supersonic atomic beam, and the adiabatic atomic coilgun to slow atoms in the beam or to bring them to rest. We show how internal-state optical pumping and stimulated optical transitions, combined with magnetic forces, can be used to cool the translational motion of atoms. This approach does not rely on momentum transfer from photons to atoms, as in laser cooling. We predict that our method can surpass laser cooling in terms of flux of ultracold atoms and phase-space density, with lower required laser power. PMID:25078213

  10. Salt pill design and fabrication for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; McCammon, Dan

    2014-07-01

    The performance of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is critically dependent on the design and construction of the salt pills that produce cooling. In most cases, the primary goal is to obtain the largest cooling capacity at the low temperature end of the operating range. The realizable cooling capacity depends on a number of factors, including refrigerant mass, and how efficiently it absorbs heat from the various instrument loads. The design and optimization of “salt pills” for ADR systems depend not only on the mechanical, chemical and thermal properties of the refrigerant, but also on the range of heat fluxes that the salt pill must accommodate. Despite the fairly wide variety of refrigerants available, those used at very low temperature tend to be hydrated salts that require a dedicated thermal bus and must be hermetically sealed, while those used at higher temperature - greater than about 0.5 K - tend to be single- or poly-crystals that have much simpler requirements for thermal and mechanical packaging. This paper presents a summary of strategies and techniques for designing, optimizing and fabricating salt pills for both low- and mid-temperature applications.

  11. Salt Pill Design and Fabrication for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Mccammon, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The performance of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is critically dependent on the design and construction of the salt pills that produce cooling. In most cases, the primary goal is to obtain the largest cooling capacity at the low temperature end of the operating range. The realizable cooling capacity depends on a number of factors, including refrigerant mass, and how efficiently it absorbs heat from the various instrument loads. The design and optimization of "salt pills" for ADR systems depend not only on the mechanical, chemical and thermal properties of the refrigerant, but also on the range of heat fluxes that the salt pill must accommodate. Despite the fairly wide variety of refrigerants available, those used at very low temperature tend to be hydrated salts that require a dedicated thermal bus and must be hermetically sealed, while those used at higher temperature - greater than about 0.5 K - tend to be single-­- or poly-­-crystals that have much simpler requirements for thermal and mechanical packaging. This paper presents a summary of strategies and techniques for designing, optimizing and fabricating salt pills for both low-­- and mid-­-temperature applications.

  12. Properties of a two stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, H.; Ueda, S.; Arai, R.; Li, J.; Saito, A. T.; Nakagome, H.; Numazawa, T.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, many space missions using cryogenic temperatures are being planned. In particular, high resolution sensors such as Transition Edge Sensors need very low temperatures, below 100 mK. It is well known that the adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is one of most useful tools for producing ultra-low temperatures in space because it is gravity independent. We studied a continuous ADR system consisting of 4 stages and demonstrated it could provide continuous temperatures around 100 mK. However, there was some heat leakage from the power leads which resulted in reduced cooling power. Our efforts to upgrade our ADR system are presented. We show the effect of using the HTS power leads and discuss a cascaded Carnot cycle consisting of 2 ADR units.

  13. Trapping ultracold atoms in a time-averaged adiabatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Gildemeister, M.; Nugent, E.; Sherlock, B. E.; Kubasik, M.; Sheard, B. T.; Foot, C. J.

    2010-03-15

    We report an experimental realization of ultracold atoms confined in a time-averaged, adiabatic potential (TAAP). This trapping technique involves using a slowly oscillating ({approx}kHz) bias field to time-average the instantaneous potential given by dressing a bare magnetic potential with a high-frequency ({approx}MHz) magnetic field. The resultant potentials provide a convenient route to a variety of trapping geometries with tunable parameters. We demonstrate the TAAP trap in a standard time-averaged orbiting potential trap with additional Helmholtz coils for the introduction of the radio frequency dressing field. We have evaporatively cooled 5x10{sup 4} atoms of {sup 87}Rb to quantum degeneracy and observed condensate lifetimes of longer than 3 s.

  14. Multiphoton Raman Atom Optics with Frequency-Swept Adiabatic Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David; Kinast, Joseph; Stoner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Light-pulse atom interferometry is a promising candidate for future inertial navigators, gravitational wave detectors, and measurements of fundamental physical constants. The sensitivity of this technique, however, is often limited by the small momentum separations created between interfering atom wave packets (typically ~ 2 ℏk) . We address this issue using light-pulse atom optics derived from stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). In experiments, these Raman ARP atom optics have generated up to 30 ℏk photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive atom interferometer, thereby enhancing the phase shift per unit acceleration by a factor of 15. Since this approach forgoes evaporative cooling and velocity selection, it could enable large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates, while also lowering the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty.

  15. Passive gas-gap heat switch for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor); Di Pirro, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A passive gas-gap heat switch for use with a multi-stage continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The passive gas-gap heat switch turns on automatically when the temperature of either side of the switch rises above a threshold value and turns off when the temperature on either side of the switch falls below this threshold value. One of the heat switches in this multistage process must be conductive in the 0.25? K to 0.3? K range. All of the heat switches must be capable of switching off in a short period of time (1-2 minutes), and when off to have a very low thermal conductance. This arrangement allows cyclic cooling cycles to be used without the need for separate heat switch controls.

  16. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  17. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  18. Symmetry-Protected Quantum Adiabatic Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Dominic J.; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2014-03-01

    An essential development in the history of computing was the invention of the transistor as it allowed logic circuits to be implemented in a robust and modular way. The physical characteristics of semiconductor materials were the key to building these devices. We aim to present an analogous development for quantum computing by showing that quantum adiabatic transistors (as defined by Flammia et al.) are built upon the essential qualities of symmetry-protected (SP) quantum ordered phases in one dimension. Flammia et al. and Renes et al. have demonstrated schemes for universal adiabatic quantum computation using quantum adiabatic transistors described by interacting spin chain models with specifically chosen Hamiltonian terms. We show that these models can be understood as specific examples of the generic situation in which all SP phases lead to quantum computation on encoded edge degrees of freedom by adiabatically traversing a symmetric phase transition into a trivial symmetric phase. This point of view is advantageous as it allows us to readily see that the computational properties of a quantum adiabatic transistor arise from a phase of matter rather than due to carefully tuned interactions.

  19. A flightworthy ADR for use in the AXAF/XRS. [adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, Aristides T.; Sansebastian, Marcelino; Kunes, Evan S.

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Goddard has undertaken the development of an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) for cooling the detectors of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysical Facility's X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) to the requisite 0.065 K-operation temperature. The XRS ADR's intricate thermal bus system furnished excellent thermal conductance for both the low parasitic heat leak heat switch during the magnetization cycle, and the detectors during low temperature operation. Attention is given to the ADR's operating principles, construction, and suspension system.

  20. Modeling the Thermal Mechanical Behavior of a 300 K Vacuum Vesselthat is Cooled by Liquid Hydrogen in Film Boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.

    2004-05-07

    This report discusses the results from the rupture of a thin window that is part of a 20-liter liquid hydrogen vessel. This rupture will spill liquid hydrogen onto the walls and bottom of a 300 K cylindrical vacuum vessel. The spilled hydrogen goes into film boiling, which removes the thermal energy from the vacuum vessel wall. This report analyzes the transient heat transfer in the vessel and calculates the thermal deflection and stress that will result from the boiling liquid in contact with the vessel walls. This analysis was applied to aluminum and stainless steel vessels.

  1. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Adiabatic approximation for the density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.

    1992-05-01

    An adiabatic approximation for the Liouville density-matrix equation which includes decay terms is developed. The adiabatic approximation employs the eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator. The approximation is valid when there exists a complete set of eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator (i.e., the eigenvectors span the density-matrix space), the time rate of change of the Liouville operator is small, and an auxiliary matrix is nonsingular. Numerical examples are presented involving efficient population transfer in a molecule by stimulated Raman scattering, with the intermediate level of the molecule decaying on a time scale that is fast compared with the pulse durations of the pump and Stokes fields. The adiabatic density-matrix approximation can be simply used to determine the density matrix for atomic or molecular systems interacting with cw electromagnetic fields when spontaneous emission or other decay mechanisms prevail.

  3. Extensive Adiabatic Invariants for Nonlinear Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgilli, Antonio; Paleari, Simone; Penati, Tiziano

    2012-09-01

    We look for extensive adiabatic invariants in nonlinear chains in the thermodynamic limit. Considering the quadratic part of the Klein-Gordon Hamiltonian, by a linear change of variables we transform it into a sum of two parts in involution. At variance with the usual method of introducing normal modes, our constructive procedure allows us to exploit the complete resonance, while keeping the extensive nature of the system. Next we construct a nonlinear approximation of an extensive adiabatic invariant for a perturbation of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model. The fluctuations of this quantity are controlled via Gibbs measure estimates independent of the system size, for a large set of initial data at low specific energy. Finally, by numerical calculations we show that our adiabatic invariant is well conserved for times much longer than predicted by our first order theory, with fluctuation much smaller than expected according to standard statistical estimates.

  4. Anderson localization makes adiabatic quantum optimization fail

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, Boris; Krovi, Hari; Roland, Jérémie

    2010-01-01

    Understanding NP-complete problems is a central topic in computer science (NP stands for nondeterministic polynomial time). This is why adiabatic quantum optimization has attracted so much attention, as it provided a new approach to tackle NP-complete problems using a quantum computer. The efficiency of this approach is limited by small spectral gaps between the ground and excited states of the quantum computer’s Hamiltonian. We show that the statistics of the gaps can be analyzed in a novel way, borrowed from the study of quantum disordered systems in statistical mechanics. It turns out that due to a phenomenon similar to Anderson localization, exponentially small gaps appear close to the end of the adiabatic algorithm for large random instances of NP-complete problems. This implies that unfortunately, adiabatic quantum optimization fails: The system gets trapped in one of the numerous local minima. PMID:20616043

  5. Large magnetocaloric effect and adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration with YbPt2Sn

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dongjin; Gruner, Thomas; Steppke, Alexander; Mitsumoto, Keisuke; Geibel, Christoph; Brando, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization is currently gaining strong interest in searching for alternatives to 3He-based refrigeration techniques for achieving temperatures below 2 K. The main reasons for that are the recent shortage and high price of the rare helium isotope 3He. Here we report the discovery of a large magnetocaloric effect in the intermetallic compound YbPt2Sn, which allows adiabatic demagnetization cooling from 2 K down to 0.2 K. We demonstrate this with a home-made refrigerator. Other materials, for example, paramagnetic salts, are commonly used for the same purpose but none of them is metallic, a severe limitation for low-temperature applications. YbPt2Sn is a good metal with an extremely rare weak magnetic coupling between the Yb atoms, which prevents them from ordering above 0.25 K, leaving enough entropy free for use in adiabatic demagnetization cooling. The large volumetric entropy capacity of YbPt2Sn guarantees also a good cooling power. PMID:26493166

  6. Large magnetocaloric effect and adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration with YbPt2Sn.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dongjin; Gruner, Thomas; Steppke, Alexander; Mitsumoto, Keisuke; Geibel, Christoph; Brando, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization is currently gaining strong interest in searching for alternatives to (3)He-based refrigeration techniques for achieving temperatures below 2 K. The main reasons for that are the recent shortage and high price of the rare helium isotope (3)He. Here we report the discovery of a large magnetocaloric effect in the intermetallic compound YbPt2Sn, which allows adiabatic demagnetization cooling from 2 K down to 0.2 K. We demonstrate this with a home-made refrigerator. Other materials, for example, paramagnetic salts, are commonly used for the same purpose but none of them is metallic, a severe limitation for low-temperature applications. YbPt2Sn is a good metal with an extremely rare weak magnetic coupling between the Yb atoms, which prevents them from ordering above 0.25 K, leaving enough entropy free for use in adiabatic demagnetization cooling. The large volumetric entropy capacity of YbPt2Sn guarantees also a good cooling power. PMID:26493166

  7. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  8. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  9. On black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Han, Yan

    2012-12-01

    In this Letter, we obtain the black hole spectroscopy by combining the black hole property of adiabaticity and the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. This velocity is obtained in the tunneling framework. In particular, we declare, if requiring canonical invariance, the adiabatic invariant quantity should be of the covariant form Iadia = ∮pi dqi. Using it, the horizon area of a Schwarzschild black hole is quantized independently of the choice of coordinates, with an equally spaced spectroscopy always given by ΔA = 8 π lp2 in the Schwarzschild and Painlevé coordinates.

  10. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  11. Adiabatic approximation for nucleus-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.

    2005-10-14

    Adiabatic approximations to few-body models of nuclear scattering are described with emphasis on reactions with deuterons and halo nuclei (frozen halo approximation) as projectiles. The different ways the approximation should be implemented in a consistent theory of elastic scattering, stripping and break-up are explained and the conditions for the theory's validity are briefly discussed. A formalism which links few-body models and the underlying many-body system is outlined and the connection between the adiabatic and CDCC methods is reviewed.

  12. Large-Area Atom Interferometry with Frequency-Swept Raman Adiabatic Passage.

    PubMed

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L; Kinast, Joseph M; Stoner, Richard E

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate light-pulse atom interferometry with large-momentum-transfer atom optics based on stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage. Our atom optics have produced momentum splittings of up to 30 photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive interferometer for laser cooled atoms. We experimentally verify the enhancement of phase shift per unit acceleration and characterize interferometer contrast loss. By forgoing evaporative cooling and velocity selection, this method lowers the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty and enables large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates. PMID:26382675

  13. Reliable spin-transfer torque driven precessional magnetization reversal with an adiabatically decaying pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, D.; Ryan, C. A.; Ohki, T.; Kent, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    We show that a slowly decaying current pulse can lead to nearly deterministic precessional switching in the presence of noise. We consider a biaxial macrospin, with an easy axis in-plane and a hard axis out-of-plane, typical of thin film nanomagnets patterned into asymmetric shapes. Out-of-plane precessional magnetization orbits are excited with a current pulse with a component of spin polarization normal to the film plane. By numerically integrating the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation we show that thermal noise leads to strong dephasing of the magnetization orbits. However, an adiabatically decreasing pulse amplitude overwhelmingly leads to magnetization reversal, with a final state dependent on the pulse polarity. We develop an analytic model to explain this phenomena and to determine the pulse decay time necessary for adiabatic magnetization relaxation and thus deterministic magnetization switching.

  14. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  15. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  16. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  17. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  18. Adiabatic circuits: converter for static CMOS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Amirante, E.; Bargagli-Stoffi, A.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2003-05-01

    Ultra low power applications can take great advantages from adiabatic circuitry. In this technique a multiphase system is used which consists ideally of trapezoidal voltage signals. The input signals to be processed will often come from a function block realized in static CMOS. The static rectangular signals must be converted for the oscillating multiphase system of the adiabatic circuitry. This work shows how to convert the input signals to the proposed pulse form which is synchronized to the appropriate supply voltage. By means of adder structures designed for a 0.13µm technology in a 4-phase system there will be demonstrated, which additional circuits are necessary for the conversion. It must be taken into account whether the data arrive in parallel or serial form. Parallel data are all in one phase and therefore it is advantageous to use an adder structure with a proper input stage, e.g. a Carry Lookahead Adder (CLA). With a serial input stage it is possible to read and to process four signals during one cycle due to the adiabatic 4-phase system. Therefore input signals with a frequency four times higher than the adiabatic clock frequency can be used. This reduces the disadvantage of the slow clock period typical for adiabatic circuits. By means of an 8 bit Ripple Carry Adder (8 bit RCA) the serial reading will be introduced. If the word width is larger than 4 bits the word can be divided in 4 bit words which are processed in parallel. This is the most efficient way to minimize the number of input lines and pads. At the same time a high throughput is achieved.

  19. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-02-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as tq and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rhoE varies as r-omega are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  20. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blastwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1990-05-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  1. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  2. Adiabatic evolution of an irreversible two level system

    SciTech Connect

    Kvitsinsky, A.; Putterman, S. )

    1991-05-01

    The adiabatic dynamics of a two level atom with spontaneous decay is studied. The existence of a complex adiabatic phase shift is established: The real part being the usual Berry's phase. A closed-form expression for this phase and the adiabatic transition amplitudes is obtained. Incorporation of a finite preparation time for the initial state yields a new asymptotic form for the adiabatic transition amplitudes which is significantly different from the standard Landau--Zener--Dykhne formula.

  3. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  4. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  5. Phase relations and adiabats in boiling seafloor geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, James L.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1985-11-01

    Observations of large salinity variations and vent temperatures in the range of 380-400°C suggest that boiling or two-phase separation may be occurring in some seafloor geothermal systems. Consideration of flow rates and the relatively small differences in density between vapors and liquids at the supercritical pressures at depth in these systems suggests that boiling is occurring under closed-system conditions. Salinity and temperature of boiling vents can be used to estimate the pressure-temperature point in the subsurface at which liquid seawater first reached the two-phase boundary. Data are reviewed to construct phase diagrams of coexisting brines and vapors in the two-phase region at pressures corresponding to those of the seafloor geothermal systems. A method is developed for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of the coexisting mixtures, and results are used to construct adiabats from the seafloor to the P-T two-phase boundary. Results for seafloor vents discharging at 2300 m below sea level indicate that a 385°C vent is composed of a brine (7% NaCl equivalent) in equilibrium with a vapor (0.1% NaCl). Brine constitutes 45% by weight of the mixture, and the fluid first boiled at approximately 1 km below the seafloor at 415°C, 330 bar. A 400°C vent is primarily vapor (88 wt.%, 0.044% NaCl) with a small amount of brine (26% NaCl) and first boiled at 2.9 km below the seafloor at 500°C, 520 bar. These results show that adiabatic decompression in the two-phase region results in dramatic cooling of the fluid mixture when there is a large fraction of vapor.

  6. An Alternative to Laser Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Laser cooling has been the standard approach for over thirty years for cooling the translational motion of atoms. While laser cooling is an extremely successful method, it has been limited to a small set of elements in the periodic table. The performance of laser cooling for those elements has saturated in terms of flux of ultra-cold atoms, density, and phase-space density. I report our progress towards the development of an alternative to laser cooling. Our approach relies on magnetic stopping of supersonic beams, an atomic coilgun. A recent advance is the experimental realization of an adiabatic coilgun which preserves phase-space density. Further cooling was demonstrated with a one-way wall, realizing the historic thought experiment of Maxwell's Demon. More recently, we showed how to apply this method to compress atomic phase space with almost no loss of atom number. Our approach is fundamentally different than laser cooling as it does not rely on the momentum of the photon, but rather the photon entropy. I will report on our experimental progress towards this goal, and describe future experiments that will be enabled by this work.

  7. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  8. Adiabatic Far Field Sub-Diffraction Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cang, Hu; Salandrino, Alessandro; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The limited resolution of a conventional optical imaging system stems from the fact that the fine feature information of an object is carried by evanescent waves, which exponentially decay in space thus cannot reach the imaging plane. We introduce here a new concept of adiabatic lens, which utilizes a geometrically conformal surface to mediate the interference of slowly decompressed electromagnetic waves at far field to form images. The decompression is satisfying an adiabatic condition, and by bridging the gap between far field and near field, it allows far field optical systems to project an image of the near field features directly. Using these designs, we demonstrated the magnification can be up to 20 times and it is possible to achieve sub-50nm imaging resolution in visible. Our approach provides a means to extend the domain of geometrical optics to a deep sub-wavelength scale. PMID:26258769

  9. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Thiago V; Bonança, Marcus V S; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. With the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found-quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. Finally, we propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times. PMID:26565209

  10. Arbitrary qudit gates by adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseaux, B.; Guérin, S.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2013-03-01

    We derive an adiabatic technique that implements the most general SU(d) transformation in a quantum system of d degenerate states, featuring a qudit. This technique is based on the factorization of the SU(d) transformation into d generalized quantum Householder reflections, each of which is implemented by a two-shot stimulated Raman adiabatic passage with appropriate static phases. The energy of the lasers needed to synthesize a single Householder reflection is shown to be remarkably constant as a function of d. This technique is directly applicable to a linear trapped ion system with d+1 ions. We implement the quantum Fourier transform numerically in a qudit with d=4 (defined as a quartit) as an example.

  11. Adiabatic Quantum Optimization for Associative Memory Recall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis

    2014-12-01

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  12. Quantum adiabatic evolution with energy degeneracy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    A classical-kind phase-space formalism is developed to address the tiny intrinsic dynamical deviation from what is predicted by Wilczek-Zee theorem during quantum adiabatic evolution on degeneracy levels. In this formalism, the Hilbert space and the aggregate of degenerate eigenstates become the classical-kind phase space and a high-dimensional subspace in the phase space, respectively. Compared with the previous analogous study by a different method, the current result is qualitatively different in that the first-order deviation derived here is always perpendicular to the degeneracy subspace. A tripod-scheme Hamiltonian with two degenerate dark states is employed to illustrate the adiabatic deviation with degeneracy levels.

  13. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. With the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. Finally, we propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  14. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  15. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  16. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  18. Adiabatic Quantization of Andreev Quantum Billiard Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestrov, P. G.; Goorden, M. C.; Beenakker, C. W.

    2003-03-01

    We identify the time T between Andreev reflections as a classical adiabatic invariant in a ballistic chaotic cavity (Lyapunov exponent λ), coupled to a superconductor by an N-mode constriction. Quantization of the adiabatically invariant torus in phase space gives a discrete set of periods Tn, which in turn generate a ladder of excited states ɛnm=(m+1/2)πℏ/Tn. The largest quantized period is the Ehrenfest time T0=λ-1ln(N. Projection of the invariant torus onto the coordinate plane shows that the wave functions inside the cavity are squeezed to a transverse dimension W/(N), much below the width W of the constriction.

  19. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Libor Pittner, Jiří

    2014-06-07

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  20. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions. PMID:25308187

  1. Pulse sequences in photoassociation via adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Dupre, William; Parker, Gregory A.

    2012-07-01

    We perform a detailed study of pulse sequences in a photoassociation via adiabatic passage (PAP) process to transfer population from an ensemble of ultracold atomic clouds to a vibrationally cold molecular state. We show that an appreciable final population of ultracold NaCs molecules can be achieved with optimized pulses in either the ‘counter-intuitive’ (tP > tS) or ‘intuitive’ (tP < tS) PAP pulse sequences, with tP and tS denoting the temporal centers of the pump and Stokes pulses, respectively. By investigating the dependence of the reactive yield on pulse sequences, in a wide range of tP-tS, we show that there is not a fundamental preference to either pulse sequence in a PAP process. We explain this no-sequence-preference phenomenon by analyzing a multi-bound model so that an analogy can be drawn to the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage.

  2. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  3. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  4. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  5. Aspects of adiabatic population transfer and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirplak, Mustafa

    This thesis explores two different questions. The first question we answer is how to restore a given population transfer scenario given that it works efficiently in the adiabatic limit but fails because of lack of intensity and/or short duration. We derive a very simple algorithm to do this and apply it to both toy and realistic models. Two results emerge from this study. While the mathematical existence of the programme is certain it might not always be physically desirable. The restoration of adiabaticity is phase sensitive. The second question that is answered in this thesis is not how to invent new control paradigms, but rather what would happen to them in the presence of stochastic perturbers. We first use a phenomenological model to study the effect of stochastic dephasing on population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. The results of this Monte Carlo calculation are qualitatively explained with a perturbation theoretical result in the dressed state basis. The reliability of our phenomenological model is questioned through a more rigorous hybrid quantal-classical simulation of controlled population transfer in HCl in Ar.

  6. Non-adiabatic effect on quantum pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Chikako

    2014-03-01

    We study quantum pumping for an anharmonic junction model which interacts with two kinds of bosonic environments. We provide an expression for the quantum pumping under a piecewise modulation of environmental temperatures with including non-adiabatic effect under Markovian approximation. The obtained formula is an extension of the one expressed with the geometrical phase(Phys. Rev. Lett. 104,170601 (2010)). This extension shows that the quantum pumping depends on the initial condition of the anharmonic junction just before the modulation, as well as the characteristic environmental parameters such as interaction strength and cut-off frequencies of spectral density other than the conditions of modulation. We clarify that the pumping current including non-adiabatic effect can be larger than that under the adiabatic condition. This means that we can find the optimal condition of the current by adjusting these parameters. (The article has been submitted as http://arxiv.org/submit/848201 and will be appeared soon.) This work is supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) (KAKENHI 25287098).

  7. An adiabatic approximation for grain alignment theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, W. G.

    1997-10-01

    The alignment of interstellar dust grains is described by the joint distribution function for certain `internal' and `external' variables, where the former describe the orientation of the axes of a grain with respect to its angular momentum, J, and the latter describe the orientation of J relative to the interstellar magnetic field. I show how the large disparity between the dynamical time-scales of the internal and external variables - which is typically 2-3 orders of magnitude - can be exploited to simplify calculations of the required distribution greatly. The method is based on an `adiabatic approximation' which closely resembles the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in quantum mechanics. The adiabatic approximation prescribes an analytic distribution function for the `fast' dynamical variables and a simplified Fokker-Planck equation for the `slow' variables which can be solved straightforwardly using various techniques. These solutions are accurate to O(epsilon), where epsilon is the ratio of the fast and slow dynamical time-scales. As a simple illustration of the method, I derive an analytic solution for the joint distribution established when Barnett relaxation acts in concert with gas damping. The statistics of the analytic solution agree with the results of laborious numerical calculations which do not exploit the adiabatic approximation.

  8. An Adiabatic Approximation for Grain Alignment Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, W. G.

    1997-12-01

    The alignment of interstellar dust grains is described by the joint distribution function for certain ``internal'' and ``external'' variables, where the former describe the orientation of a grain's axes with respect to its angular momentum, J, and the latter describe the orientation of J relative to the interstellar magnetic field. I show how the large disparity between the dynamical timescales of the internal and external variables--- which is typically 2--3 orders of magnitude--- can be exploited to greatly simplify calculations of the required distribution. The method is based on an ``adiabatic approximation'' which closely resembles the Born-Oppenheimer approximation in quantum mechanics. The adiabatic approximation prescribes an analytic distribution function for the ``fast'' dynamical variables and a simplified Fokker-Planck equation for the ``slow'' variables which can be solved straightforwardly using various techniques. These solutions are accurate to cal {O}(epsilon ), where epsilon is the ratio of the fast and slow dynamical timescales. As a simple illustration of the method, I derive an analytic solution for the joint distribution established when Barnett relaxation acts in concert with gas damping. The statistics of the analytic solution agree with the results of laborious numerical calculations which do not exploit the adiabatic approximation.

  9. Ion thermal effects on slow mode solitary waves in plasmas with two adiabatic ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Nsengiyumva, F. Hellberg, M. A. Mace, R. L.

    2015-09-15

    Using both the Sagdeev and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) methods, ion thermal effects on slow mode ion acoustic solitons and double layers are investigated in a plasma with two adiabatic positive ion species. It is found that reducing the gap between the two ion thermal speeds by increasing the relative temperature of the cool ions increases the typical soliton/double layer speeds for all values of the ion-ion density ratio and reduces the range in the density ratio that supports double layers. The effect of increasing the relative cool ion temperature on the soliton/double layer amplitudes depends on the relative densities. For lower values of the ion density ratio, an increase in cool ion temperature leads to a significant decrease in soliton/double layer amplitude, so one may find that solitons of all permissible speeds lie within the range of KdV theory.

  10. Advanced liner-cooling techniques for gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Component research for advanced small gas turbine engines is currently underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this program, a basic reverse-flow combustor geometry was being maintained while different advanced liner wall cooling techniques were investigated. Performance and liner cooling effectiveness of the experimental combustor configuration featuring counter-flow film-cooled panels is presented and compared with two previously reported combustors featuring: splash film-cooled liner walls; and transpiration cooled liner walls (Lamilloy).

  11. Method of adiabatic modes in studying problems of smoothly irregular open waveguide structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sevastianov, L. A.; Egorov, A. A.; Sevastyanov, A. L.

    2013-02-15

    Basic steps in developing an original method of adiabatic modes that makes it possible to solve the direct and inverse problems of simulating and designing three-dimensional multilayered smoothly irregular open waveguide structures are described. A new element in the method is that an approximate solution of Maxwell's equations is made to obey 'inclined' boundary conditions at the interfaces between themedia being considered. These boundary conditions take into account the obliqueness of planes tangent to nonplanar boundaries between the media and lead to new equations for coupled vector quasiwaveguide hybrid adiabatic modes. Solutions of these equations describe the phenomenon of 'entanglement' of two linear polarizations of an irregular multilayered waveguide, the appearance of a new mode in an entangled state, and the effect of rotation of the polarization plane of quasiwaveguide modes. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by considering the example of numerically simulating a thin-film generalized waveguide Lueneburg lens.

  12. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  13. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  14. Adiabatic chaos in the spin orbit problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettin, Giancarlo; Guzzo, Massimiliano; Marini, Valerio

    2008-05-01

    We provide evidences that the angular momentum of a symmetric rigid body in a spin orbit resonance can perform large scale chaotic motions on time scales which increase polynomially with the inverse of the oblateness of the body. This kind of irregular precession appears as soon as the orbit of the center of mass is non-circular and the angular momentum of the body is far from the principal directions with minimum (maximum) moment of inertia. We also provide a quantitative explanation of these facts by using the theory of adiabatic invariants, and we provide numerical applications to the cases of the 1:1 and 1:2 spin orbit resonances.

  15. Experimental breaking of an adiabatic invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notte, J.; Fajans, J.; Chu, R.; Wurtele, J. S.

    1993-06-01

    When a cylindrical pure electron plasma is displaced from the center of the trap, it performs a bulk circular orbital motion known as the l=1 diocotron mode. The slow application of a perturbing potential to a patch on the trap wall distorts the orbit into a noncircular closed path. Experiments and a simple theoretical model indicate that the area by the loop is an adiabatic invariant. Detailed studies are made of the breaking of the invariant when perturbations are rapidly applied. When the perturbation is applied with discontinuous time derivatives, the invariant breaking greatly exceeds the predictions of the standard theory for smooth perturbations.

  16. [Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-02-28

    The adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface approximation is not valid for reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between electronic states of reacting species plays a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. This research program initially studies this coupling in (1) selective C-Br bond fission in 1,3- bromoiodopropane, (2) C-S:S-H bond fission branching in CH[sub 3]SH, and (3) competition between bond fission channels and H[sub 2] elimination in CH[sub 3]NH[sub 2].

  17. Adiabatic passage in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, T.; Dietrich, M. R.; Kurz, N.; Shu, G.; Wright, J.; Blinov, B. B.

    2012-02-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) in a trapped barium ion system. RAP is implemented on the transition from the 6S1/2 ground state to the metastable 5D5/2 level by applying a laser at 1.76 μm. We focus on the interplay of laser frequency noise and laser power in shaping the effectiveness of RAP, which is commonly assumed to be a robust tool for high-efficiency population transfer. However, we note that reaching high state transfer fidelity requires a combination of small laser linewidth and large Rabi frequency.

  18. Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for space use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Warner, B. A.; Castles, S.; Breon, S. R.; San Sebastian, M.; Hait, T.

    1990-01-01

    An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) for space use is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The breadboard ADR operated at 100 mK for 400 minutes. Some significant changes to that ADR, designed to eliminate shortcomings revealed during tests, are reported. To increase thermal contact, the ferric ammonium sulfate crystals were grown directly on gold-plated copper wires which serve as the thermal bus. The thermal link to the X-ray sensors was also markedly improved. To speed up the testing required to determine the best design parameters for the gas gap heat switch, the new heat switch has a modular design and is easy to disassemble.

  19. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r(G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8 , most of which were previously unknown.

  20. Decoherence in a scalable adiabatic quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-15

    We consider the effects of decoherence on Landau-Zener crossings encountered in a large-scale adiabatic-quantum-computing setup. We analyze the dependence of the success probability--i.e., the probability for the system to end up in its new ground state--on the noise amplitude and correlation time. We determine the optimal sweep rate that is required to maximize the success probability. We then discuss the scaling of decoherence effects with increasing system size. We find that those effects can be important for large systems, even if they are small for each of the small building blocks.

  1. Local entanglement generation in the adiabatic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cliche, M.; Veitia, Andrzej

    2010-09-15

    We study entanglement generation in a pair of qubits interacting with an initially correlated system. Using time-independent perturbation theory and the adiabatic theorem, we show conditions under which the qubits become entangled as the joint system evolves into the ground state of the interacting theory. We then apply these results to the case of qubits interacting with a scalar quantum field. We study three different variations of this setup; a quantum field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions, a quantum field interacting with a classical potential, and a quantum field that starts in a thermal state.

  2. Applications of the magnetocaloric effect in single-stage, multi-stage and continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.

    2014-07-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADR), based on the magnetocaloric effect, are solid-state coolers that were the first to achieve cooling well into the sub-kelvin regime. Although supplanted by more powerful dilution refrigerators in the 1960s, ADRs have experienced a revival due to the needs of the space community for cooling astronomical instruments and detectors to temperatures below 100 mK. The earliest of these were single-stage refrigerators using superfluid helium as a heat sink. Their modest cooling power (<1 μW at 60 mK [1]) was sufficient for the small (6 × 6) detector arrays [2], but recent advances in arraying and multiplexing technologies [3] are generating a need for higher cooling power (5-10 μW), and lower temperature (<30 mK). Single-stage ADRs have both practical and fundamental limits to their operating range, as mass grows very rapidly as the operating range is expanded. This has led to the development of new architectures that introduce multi-staging as a way to improve operating range, efficiency and cooling power. Multi-staging also enables ADRs to be configured for continuous operation, which greatly improves cooling power per unit mass. This paper reviews the current field of adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, beginning with a description of the magnetocaloric effect and its application in single-stage systems, and then describing the challenges and capabilities of multi-stage and continuous ADRs.

  3. Applications of the Magnetocaloric Effect in Single-Stage, Multi-Stage and Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADR), based on the magnetocaloric effect, are solid-state coolers that were the first to achieve cooling well into the sub-kelvin regime. Although supplanted by more powerful dilution refrigerators in the 1960s, ADRs have experienced a revival due to the needs of the space community for cooling astronomical instruments and detectors to temperatures below 100 mK. The earliest of these were single-stage refrigerators using superfluid helium as a heat sink. Their modest cooling power (<1 µW at 60 mK[1]) was sufficient for the small (6x6) detector arrays[2], but recent advances in arraying and multiplexing technologies[3] are generating a need for higher cooling power (5-10 µW), and lower temperature (<30 mK). Single-stage ADRs have both practical and fundamental limits to their operating range, as mass grows very rapidly as the operating range is expanded. This has led to the development of new architectures that introduce multi-staging as a way to improve operating range, efficiency and cooling power. Multi-staging also enables ADRs to be configured for continuous operation, which greatly improves cooling power per unit mass. This paper reviews the current field of adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration, beginning with a description of the magnetocaloric effect and its application in single-stage systems, and then describing the challenges and capabilities of multi-stage and continuous ADRs.

  4. Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for use in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingus, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    In this effort, a new design concept for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that is capable of operation in zero gravity has been developed. The design uses a vortex precooler to lower the initial temperature of magnetic salt from the initial space superfluid helium dewar of 1.8 K to 1.1 K. This reduces the required maximum magnetic field from 4 Tesla to 2 Tesla. The laboratory prototype vortex precooler reached a minimum temperature of 0.78 K, and had a cooling power of 1 mW at 1.1 K. A study was conducted to determine the dependence of vortex cooler performance on system element configuration. A superfluid filled capillary heat switch was used in the design. The laboratory prototype ADR reached a minimum temperature of 0.107 K, and maintained temperatures below 0.125 K for 90 minutes. Demagnetization was carried out from a maximum field of 2 T. A soft iron shield was developed that reduced the radial central field to 1 gauss at 0.25 meters.

  5. Method for cooling nanostructures to microkelvin temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A. C.; Schwarzwaelder, K. K.; Bandi, T.; Maradan, D.; Zumbuehl, D. M.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a new scheme aimed at cooling nanostructures to microkelvin temperature based on the well established technique of adiabatic nuclear demagnetization: we attach each device measurement lead to an individual nuclear refrigerator, allowing efficient thermal contact to a microkelvin bath. On a prototype consisting of a parallel network of nuclear refrigerators, temperatures of {approx}1 mK simultaneously on ten measurement leads have been reached upon demagnetization, thus completing the first steps toward ultracold nanostructures.

  6. Geometry of an adiabatic passage at a level crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Cholascinski, Mateusz

    2005-06-15

    We discuss adiabatic quantum phenomena at a level crossing. Given a path in the parameter space which passes through a degeneracy point, we find a criterion which determines whether the adiabaticity condition can be satisfied. For paths that can be traversed adiabatically we also derive a differential equation which specifies the time dependence of the system parameters, for which transitions between distinct energy levels can be neglected. We also generalize the well-known geometric connections to the case of adiabatic paths containing arbitrarily many level-crossing points and degenerate levels.

  7. Geometrical representation of sum frequency generation and adiabatic frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowski, Haim; Oron, Dan; Arie, Ady; Silberberg, Yaron

    2008-12-01

    We present a geometrical representation of the process of sum frequency generation in the undepleted pump approximation, in analogy with the known optical Bloch equations. We use this analogy to propose a technique for achieving both high efficiency and large bandwidth in sum frequency conversion using the adiabatic inversion scheme. The process is analogous with rapid adiabatic passage in NMR, and adiabatic constraints are derived in this context. This adiabatic frequency conversion scheme is realized experimentally using an aperiodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) device, where we achieved high efficiency signal-to-idler conversion over a bandwidth of 140nm .

  8. On the Role of Prior Probability in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Yang, Liping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the role of prior probability on the efficiency of quantum local adiabatic search algorithm. The following aspects for prior probability are found here: firstly, only the probabilities of marked states affect the running time of the adiabatic evolution; secondly, the prior probability can be used for improving the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm; thirdly, like the usual quantum adiabatic evolution, the running time for the case of multiple solution states where the number of marked elements are smaller enough than the size of the set assigned that contains them can be significantly bigger than that of the case where the assigned set only contains all the marked states.

  9. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  10. Nonadiabatic Transitions in Adiabatic Rapid Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Optical forces much larger than the ordinary radiative force can be achieved on a two-level atom by multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage sweeps with counterpropagating light beams. Chirped light pulses drive the atom-laser system up a ladder of dressed state energy sheets on sequential trajectories, thereby decreasing the atomic kinetic energy. Nonadiabatic transitions between the energy sheets must be avoided for this process to be effective. We have calculated the nonadiabatic transition probability for various chirped light pulses numerically. These results were compared to the first Demkov-Kunike model and the well-known Landau-Zener model. In addition, an analytical form of the nonadiabatic transition probability has been found for linearly chirped pulses and an approximate form for generic symmetric finite-time pulses has been found for the entire parameter space using the technique of unitary integration. From this, the asymptotic transition probability in the adiabatic limit was derived. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005). Yu. Demkov and M. Kunike, Vestn. Leningr. Univ. Fis. Khim., 16, 39 (1969); K.-A. Suominen and B. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A45, 374 (1992)

  11. Effect of the Heat Pipe Adiabatic Region.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Taoufik; Jemni, Abdelmajid

    2014-04-01

    The main motivation of conducting this work is to present a rigorous analysis and investigation of the potential effect of the heat pipe adiabatic region on the flow and heat transfer performance of a heat pipe under varying evaporator and condenser conditions. A two-dimensional steady-state model for a cylindrical heat pipe coupling, for both regions, is presented, where the flow of the fluid in the porous structure is described by Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model which accounts for the boundary and inertial effects. The model is solved numerically by using the finite volumes method, and a fortran code was developed to solve the system of equations obtained. The results show that a phase change can occur in the adiabatic region due to temperature gradient created in the porous structure as the heat input increases and the heat pipe boundary conditions change. A recirculation zone may be created at the condenser end section. The effect of the heat transfer rate on the vapor radial velocities and the performance of the heat pipe are discussed. PMID:24895467

  12. Inertial effects in adiabatically driven flashing ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Makhnovskii, Yurii A.; Shapochkina, Irina V.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-05-01

    We study analytically the effect of a small inertial correction on the properties of adiabatically driven flashing ratchets. Parrondo's lemma [J. M. R. Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevE.57.7297] is generalized to include the inertial term so as to establish the symmetry conditions allowing directed motion (other than in the overdamped massless case) and to obtain a high-temperature expansion of the motion velocity for arbitrary potential profiles. The inertial correction is thus shown to enhance the ratchet effect at all temperatures for sawtooth potentials and at high temperatures for simple potentials described by the first two harmonics. With the special choice of potentials represented by at least the first three harmonics, the correction gives rise to the motion reversal in the high-temperature region. In the low-temperature region, inertia weakens the ratchet effect, with the exception of the on-off model, where diffusion is important. The directed motion adiabatically driven by potential sign fluctuations, though forbidden in the overdamped limit, becomes possible due to purely inertial effects in neither symmetric nor antisymmetric potentials, i.e., not for commonly used sawtooth and two-sinusoid profiles.

  13. Equivalence of ideal, isothermal-adiabatic, and complex cycles of gas turbine power plants and determination of the maximum efficiency of their operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    The possibility of ensuring equivalence in operation and efficiency of real cycles with intermediate cooling (heating) and isothermal-adiabatic compressions (expansion) in ideal simple cycles formed on the T- S diagrams in the second stage of real cycles. The possibility of using the equivalence of cycles for determining the maximum efficiency of operation of real cycles is demonstrated.

  14. Adiabatic Mass Loss Model in Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, H. W.

    2012-07-01

    Rapid mass transfer process in the interacting binary systems is very complicated. It relates to two basic problems in the binary star evolution, i.e., the dynamically unstable Roche-lobe overflow and the common envelope evolution. Both of the problems are very important and difficult to be modeled. In this PhD thesis, we focus on the rapid mass loss process of the donor in interacting binary systems. The application to the criterion of dynamically unstable mass transfer and the common envelope evolution are also included. Our results based on the adiabatic mass loss model could be used to improve the binary evolution theory, the binary population synthetic method, and other related aspects. We build up the adiabatic mass loss model. In this model, two approximations are included. The first one is that the energy generation and heat flow through the stellar interior can be neglected, hence the restructuring is adiabatic. The second one is that he stellar interior remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We model this response by constructing model sequences, beginning with a donor star filling its Roche lobe at an arbitrary point in its evolution, holding its specific entropy and composition profiles fixed. These approximations are validated by the comparison with the time-dependent binary mass transfer calculations and the polytropic model for low mass zero-age main-sequence stars. In the dynamical time scale mass transfer, the adiabatic response of the donor star drives it to expand beyond its Roche lobe, leading to runaway mass transfer and the formation of a common envelope with its companion star. For donor stars with surface convection zones of any significant depth, this runaway condition is encountered early in mass transfer, if at all; but for main sequence stars with radiative envelopes, it may be encountered after a prolonged phase of thermal time scale mass transfer, so-called delayed dynamical instability. We identify the critical binary mass ratio for the

  15. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  16. Experimental study of a gas film in a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchkov, E. P.; Lebedev, V. P.; Shishkin, N. E.

    1983-02-01

    An experimental investigation of the mixing of two coaxial flows in a cylindrical channel is described, and the efficiency of the thermal protection (e.e., film cooling) of the adiabatic wall is determined. Angles of twist of the secondary peripheral flow to the main flow were 0.58, and 74 deg. Measurements were made of temperature, the degree of flow turbulence, and the energy spectrum of axial velocity pulsations. It is shown that twist of the peripheral flow leads to a suppression of velocity pulsations in the near-axial zone and to an increase in the length of the potential-flow region. It is shown that generalized temperature profiles transverse to the channel in the presence and in the absence of twist coincide, and that the efficiency of a twisted screen varies along the channel more slowly than that of a nontwisted screen.

  17. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Giraldez, E.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moody, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Widmayer, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  18. Quantum adiabatic algorithm for factorization and its experimental implementation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinhua; Liao, Zeyang; Xu, Nanyang; Qin, Gan; Zhou, Xianyi; Suter, Dieter; Du, Jiangfeng

    2008-11-28

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm capable of factorizing numbers, using fewer qubits than Shor's algorithm. We implement the algorithm in a NMR quantum information processor and experimentally factorize the number 21. In the range that our classical computer could simulate, the quantum adiabatic algorithm works well, providing evidence that the running time of this algorithm scales polynomially with the problem size. PMID:19113467

  19. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  20. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  1. The Adiabatic Invariance of the Action Variable in Classical Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Clive G.; Siklos, Stephen T. C.

    2007-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional classical time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with quasi-periodic orbits. It is well known that such systems possess an adiabatic invariant which coincides with the action variable of the Hamiltonian formalism. We present a new proof of the adiabatic invariance of this quantity and illustrate our arguments by means of…

  2. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  3. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  4. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  5. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    1992-01-01

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  6. Differential topology of adiabatically controlled quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, Edmond A.; Rezakhani, Ali T.; Ahmad, Farooq

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that in a controlled adiabatic homotopy between two Hamiltonians, H 0 and H 1, the gap or "anti-crossing" phenomenon can be viewed as the development of cusps and swallow tails in the region of the complex plane where two critical value curves of the quadratic map associated with the numerical range of H 0 + i H 1 come close. The "near crossing" in the energy level plots happens to be a generic situation, in the sense that a crossing is a manifestation of the quadratic numerical range map being unstable in the sense of differential topology. The stable singularities that can develop are identified and it is shown that they could occur near the gap, making those singularities of paramount importance. Various applications, including the quantum random walk, are provided to illustrate this theory.

  7. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage. PMID:25220698

  8. Entropy in Adiabatic Regions of Convection Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    One of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models is caused by the treatment of convection in stellar envelopes. One-dimensional stellar models often make use of the mixing length or equivalent approximations to describe convection, all of which depend on various free parameters. There have been attempts to rectify this by using 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of stellar convection, and in trying to extract an equivalent mixing length from the simulations. In this Letter, we show that the entropy of the deeper, adiabatic layers in these simulations can be expressed as a simple function of {log}g and {log}{T}{{eff}}, which holds potential for calibrating stellar models in a simple and more general manner.

  9. Symmetry-protected adiabatic quantum transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Dominic J.; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2015-05-01

    Adiabatic quantum transistors (AQT) allow quantum logic gates to be performed by applying a large field to a quantum many-body system prepared in its ground state, without the need for local control. The basic operation of such a device can be viewed as driving a spin chain from a symmetry-protected (SP) phase to a trivial phase. This perspective offers an avenue to generalize the AQT and to design several improvements. The performance of quantum logic gates is shown to depend only on universal symmetry properties of a SP phase rather than any fine tuning of the Hamiltonian, and it is possible to implement a universal set of logic gates in this way by combining several different types of SP matter. Such SP AQTs are argued to be robust to a range of relevant noise processes.

  10. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  11. Geometric Adiabatic Transport in Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevtsov, S.; Wiegmann, P.

    2015-08-01

    We argue that in addition to the Hall conductance and the nondissipative component of the viscous tensor, there exists a third independent transport coefficient, which is precisely quantized. It takes constant values along quantum Hall plateaus. We show that the new coefficient is the Chern number of a vector bundle over moduli space of surfaces of genus 2 or higher and therefore cannot change continuously along the plateau. As such, it does not transpire on a sphere or a torus. In the linear response theory, this coefficient determines intensive forces exerted on electronic fluid by adiabatic deformations of geometry and represents the effect of the gravitational anomaly. We also present the method of computing the transport coefficients for quantum Hall states.

  12. Geometric Adiabatic Transport in Quantum Hall States.

    PubMed

    Klevtsov, S; Wiegmann, P

    2015-08-21

    We argue that in addition to the Hall conductance and the nondissipative component of the viscous tensor, there exists a third independent transport coefficient, which is precisely quantized. It takes constant values along quantum Hall plateaus. We show that the new coefficient is the Chern number of a vector bundle over moduli space of surfaces of genus 2 or higher and therefore cannot change continuously along the plateau. As such, it does not transpire on a sphere or a torus. In the linear response theory, this coefficient determines intensive forces exerted on electronic fluid by adiabatic deformations of geometry and represents the effect of the gravitational anomaly. We also present the method of computing the transport coefficients for quantum Hall states. PMID:26340197

  13. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  14. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment (4)He(1s2s (3)S) + HD(1s(2)) → (4)He(1s(2)) + HD(+)(1s) + e(-) [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings. PMID:26298122

  15. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  16. Adiabatically-tapered fiber mode multiplexers.

    PubMed

    Yerolatsitis, S; Gris-Sánchez, I; Birks, T A

    2014-01-13

    Simple all-fiber three-mode multiplexers were made by adiabatically merging three dissimilar single-mode cores into one multimode core. This was achieved by collapsing air holes in a photonic crystal fiber and (in a separate device) by fusing and tapering separate telecom fibers in a fluorine-doped silica capillary. In each case the LP01 mode and both LP11 modes were individually excited from three separate input cores, with losses below 0.3 and 0.7 dB respectively and mode purities exceeding 10 dB. Scaling to more modes is challenging, but would be assisted by using single-mode fibers with a smaller ratio of cladding to core diameter. PMID:24515021

  17. Evaporative Cooling in a Holographic Atom Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    We present progress on evaporative cooling of Rb-87 atoms in our Holographic Atom Trap (HAT). The HAT is formed by the interference of five intersecting YAG laser beams: atoms are loaded from a vapor-cell MOT into the bright fringes of the interference pattern through the dipole force. The interference pattern is composed of Talbot fringes along the direction of propagation of the YAG beams, prior to evaporative cooling each Talbot fringe contains 300,000 atoms at 50 micro-K and peak densities of 2 x 10(exp 14)/cu cm. Evaporative cooling is achieved through adiabatically decreasing the intensity of the YAG laser. We present data and calculations covering a range of HAT geometries and cooling procedures.

  18. Liquid rocket engine fluid-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A monograph on the design and development of fluid cooled combustion chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines is presented. The subjects discussed are (1) regenerative cooling, (2) transpiration cooling, (3) film cooling, (4) structural analysis, (5) chamber reinforcement, and (6) operational problems.

  19. An integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, T. S.; McCaskey, A. J.; Bennink, R. S.; Billings, J. J.; DʼAzevedo, E. F.; Sullivan, B. D.; Klymko, C. F.; Seddiqi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for AQO called Jade Adiabatic Development Environment (JADE) that provides control over all the steps taken during program synthesis. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously specify the AQO algorithm while allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its potential use for benchmarking AQO programs by the quantum computer science community.

  20. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; McCaskey, Alex; Bennink, Ryan S; Billings, Jay Jay; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Sullivan, Blair D; Klymko, Christine F; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  1. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4739845. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], 10.1063/1.459170, and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  2. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  3. A Continuous Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for Far-IR/Sub-mm Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; King, Todd; Tuttle, James

    2004-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the development of a continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (CADR). Continuous operation avoids the constraints of long hold times and short recycle times that lead to the generally large mass of single-shot ADRs, allowing us to achieve an order of magnitude larger cooling power per unit mass. Our current design goal is 10 microW of cooling at 50 mK using a 6-10 K heat sink. The estimated mass is less than 10 kg, including magnetic shielding of each stage. The relatively high heat rejection capability allows it to operate with a mechanical cryocooler as part of a cryogen-free, low temperature cooling system. This has the advantages of long mission life and reduced complexity and cost. We have assembled a three-stage CADR and have demonstrated continuous cooling using a superfluid helium bath as the heat sink. The temperature stability is 8 microK rms or better over the entire cycle, and the cooling power is 2.5 microW at 60 mK rising to 10 microW at 100 mK.

  4. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  5. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  6. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  7. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  8. Complete population inversion of Bose particles by an adiabatic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Atushi; Cheon, Taksu

    2016-04-01

    We show that an adiabatic cycle excites Bose particles confined in a one-dimensional box. During the adiabatic cycle, a wall described by a δ-shaped potential is applied and its strength and position are slowly varied. When the system is initially prepared in the ground state, namely, in the zero-temperature equilibrium state, the adiabatic cycle brings all Bosons into the first excited one-particle state, leaving the system in a nonequilibrium state. The absorbed energy during the cycle is proportional to the number of Bosons.

  9. Dephasing effects on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in tripod configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarou, C.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2010-09-15

    We present an analytic description of the effects of dephasing processes on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a tripod quantum system. To this end, we develop an effective two-level model. Our analysis makes use of the adiabatic approximation in the weak dephasing regime. An effective master equation for a two-level system formed by two dark states is derived, where analytic solutions are obtained by utilizing the Demkov-Kunike model. From these, it is found that the fidelity for the final coherent superposition state decreases exponentially for increasing dephasing rates. Depending on the pulse ordering and for adiabatic evolution, the pulse delay can have an inverse effect.

  10. Cooling circuit for steam and air-cooled turbine nozzle stage

    DOEpatents

    Itzel, Gary Michael; Yu, Yufeng

    2002-01-01

    The turbine vane segment includes inner and outer walls with a vane extending therebetween. The vane includes leading and trailing edge cavities and intermediate cavities. An impingement plate is spaced from the outer wall to impingement-cool the outer wall. Post-impingement cooling air flows through holes in the outer wall to form a thin air-cooling film along the outer wall. Cooling air is supplied an insert sleeve with openings in the leading edge cavity for impingement-cooling the leading edge. Holes through the leading edge afford thin-film cooling about the leading edge. Cooling air is provided the trailing edge cavity and passes through holes in the side walls of the vane for thin-film cooling of the trailing edge. Steam flows through a pair of intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling of the side walls. Post-impingement steam flows to the inner wall for impingement-cooling of the inner wall and returns the post-impingement cooling steam through inserts in other intermediate cavities for impingement-cooling the side walls of the vane.

  11. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-03-01

    In the Graph Isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and maps G --> G'. If yes (no), then G and G' are said to be isomorphic (non-isomorphic). The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. We present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI, and which provides a novel approach to determining all automorphisms of a graph. The algorithm converts a GI instance to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. Numerical simulation of the algorithm's quantum dynamics shows that it correctly distinguishes non-isomorphic graphs; recognizes isomorphic graphs; and finds the automorphism group of a graph. We also discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation and show how it can be leveraged to solve arbitrary instances of the NP-Complete Sub-Graph Isomorphism problem.

  12. Adiabatic Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant

    2013-03-01

    We are implementing a new platform for adiabatic quantum computation (AQC)[2] based on trapped neutral atoms whose coupling is mediated by the dipole-dipole interactions of Rydberg states. Ground state cesium atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism,[3,4] thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. In collaboration with Lambert Parazzoli, Sandia National Laboratories; Aaron Hankin, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; James Chin-Wen Chou, Yuan-Yu Jau, Peter Schwindt, Cort Johnson, and George Burns, Sandia National Laboratories; Tyler Keating, Krittika Goyal, and Ivan Deutsch, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; and Andrew Landahl, Sandia National Laboratories. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  13. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  14. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  15. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-10-15

    We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.

  16. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Chris; Saffin, Paul M.

    2013-08-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit.

  17. Startup of the RFP in a quasi-adiabatic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Caramana, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    The equations describing the purely adiabatic formation of the reversed-field pinch are solved. This method of formation in principle remedies the problem of flux consumption during the startup phase of this device.

  18. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of tunneling in quantum adiabatic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas T.; van Dam, Wim

    2016-03-01

    We explore to what extent path-integral quantum Monte Carlo methods can efficiently simulate quantum adiabatic optimization algorithms during a quantum tunneling process. Specifically we look at symmetric cost functions defined over n bits with a single potential barrier that a successful quantum adiabatic optimization algorithm will have to tunnel through. The height and width of this barrier depend on n , and by tuning these dependencies, we can make the optimization algorithm succeed or fail in polynomial time. In this article we compare the strength of quantum adiabatic tunneling with that of path-integral quantum Monte Carlo methods. We find numerical evidence that quantum Monte Carlo algorithms will succeed in the same regimes where quantum adiabatic optimization succeeds.

  20. Nonadiabatic transitions in finite-time adiabatic rapid passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2007-06-01

    To apply the adiabatic rapid passage process repetitively [T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 71, 061405(R) (2005)], the nonadiabatic transition probability of a two-level atom subject to chirped light pulses over a finite period of time needs to be calculated. Using a unitary first-order perturbation method in the rotating adiabatic frame, an approximate formula has been derived for such transition probabilities in the entire parameter space of the pulses.

  1. Realization of adiabatic Aharonov-Bohm scattering with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Erik; Almquist, Martin; Mattsson, Ken; Gürkan, Zeynep Nilhan; Hessmo, Björn

    2015-11-01

    The adiabatic Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect is a manifestation of the Berry phase acquired when some slow variables take a planar spin around a loop. While the effect has been observed in molecular spectroscopy, direct measurement of the topological phase shift in a scattering experiment has been elusive in the past. Here, we demonstrate an adiabatic AB effect by explicit simulation of the dynamics of unpolarized very slow neutrons that scatter on a long straight current-carrying wire.

  2. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for non-Hermitian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, S.; Martinez-Garaot, S.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Chen Xi

    2011-08-15

    Adiabatic processes driven by non-Hermitian, time-dependent Hamiltonians may be sped up by generalizing inverse engineering techniques based on counter-diabatic (transitionless driving) algorithms or on dynamical invariants. We work out the basic theory and examples described by two-level Hamiltonians: the acceleration of rapid adiabatic passage with a decaying excited level and of the dynamics of a classical particle on an expanding harmonic oscillator.

  3. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  4. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  5. TiNi-based films for elastocaloric microcooling— Fatigue life and device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossmer, H.; Chluba, C.; Kauffmann-Weiss, S.; Quandt, E.; Kohl, M.

    2016-06-01

    The global trend of miniaturization and concomitant increase of functionality in microelectronics, microoptics, and various other fields in microtechnology leads to an emerging demand for temperature control at small scales. In this realm, elastocaloric cooling is an interesting alternative to thermoelectrics due to the large latent heat and good down-scaling behavior. Here, we investigate the elastocaloric effect due to a stress-induced phase transformation in binary TiNi and quaternary TiNiCuCo films of 20 μm thickness produced by DC magnetron sputtering. The mesoscale mechanical and thermal performance, as well as the fatigue behavior are studied by uniaxial tensile tests combined with infrared thermography and digital image correlation measurements. Binary films exhibit strong features of fatigue, involving a transition from Lüders-like to homogeneous transformation behavior within three superelastic cycles. Quaternary films, in contrast, show stable Lüders-like transformation without any signs of degradation. The elastocaloric temperature change under adiabatic conditions is -15 K and -12 K for TiNi and TiNiCuCo films, respectively. First-of-its-kind heat pump demonstrators are developed that make use of out-of-plane deflection of film bridges. Owing to their large surface-to-volume ratio, the demonstrators reveal rapid heat transfer. The TiNiCuCo-based devices, for instance, generate a temperature difference of 3.5 K within 13 s. The coefficients of performance of the demonstrators are about 3.

  6. Atom cooling by nonadiabatic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Muga, J. G.; Campo, A. del; Ruschhaupt, A.

    2009-12-15

    Motivated by the recent discovery that a reflecting wall moving with a square-root-in-time trajectory behaves as a universal stopper of classical particles regardless of their initial velocities, we compare linear-in-time and square-root-in-time expansions of a box to achieve efficient atom cooling. For the quantum single-atom wave functions studied the square-root-in-time expansion presents important advantages: asymptotically it leads to zero average energy whereas any linear-in-time (constant box-wall velocity) expansion leaves a nonzero residual energy, except in the limit of an infinitely slow expansion. For finite final times and box lengths we set a number of bounds and cooling principles which again confirm the superior performance of the square-root-in-time expansion, even more clearly for increasing excitation of the initial state. Breakdown of adiabaticity is generally fatal for cooling with the linear expansion but not so with the square-root-in-time expansion.

  7. Film ispalators

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Aleksandr V; Stoilov, Yurii Yu

    2002-05-31

    New physical objects, ispalators based on free soap films, exhibit persistent flows of the soap solution in open and closed volumes in air with additions of gases of the C{sub 8}F{sub 18} type (p = 20 Torr) at temperature drops on the films of the order of tenths and hundredths of kelvin. The flows move continuously at a velocity of 5 - 20 cm s{sup -1}. It is found that the parts of an inclined ispalator film show anomalous behaviour upon heating: their weight increases and they move downward over the film, whereas the unheated parts of the film move upward. Continuous radial vortex flows accompanied by the formation and washing of the regions of a thin black film are observed on circular films in closed volumes upon their uniform external cooling by evaporating water for 5 - 10 hours. The rapid flows make film ispalators the efficient heat carriers, which operate at small temperature drops (tenths and hundredths of kelvin) and surpass copper in the amount of thermal energy being transferred. The outlook for the further study and applications of film ispalators for detecting thermal fields and laser radiation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron.

  9. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Simonucci, Stefano; Beccara, Silvio a; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco; Verucchi, Roberto; Iannotta, Salvatore; Dapor, Maurizio; and others

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C{sub 60} collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C{sub 60} impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  10. MICROSTRUCTURE IN ADIABATIC SHEAR BANDS IN A PEARLITIC ULTRAHIGH CARBON STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C K; Lesuer, D R; Sherby, O D

    2003-09-22

    Adiabatic shear bands, obtained in compression deformation at a strain rate of 4000 s{sup -1}, in a pearlitic 1.3%C steel, were investigated. Shear-bands initiated at 55% compression deformation with the width of the band equal to 14 {micro}m. Nano-indentor hardness of the shear band was 11.5 GPa in contrast to the initial matrix hardness of 3.5 GPa. The high strength of the shear band is attributed to its creation from two sequential events. First, large strain deformation, at a high strain rate, accompanied by adiabatic heating, led to phase transformation to austenite. Second, retransformation upon rapid cooling occurred by a divorced eutectoid transformation. The result is a predicted microstructure consisting of nano-size carbide particles within a matrix of fine ferrite grains. It is proposed that the divorced eutectoid transformation occurs in iron-carbon steels during high rate deformation in ball milling, ball drop tests and in commercial wire drawing.

  11. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  12. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  13. Gas-jet and tangent-slot film cooling tests of a 12.5 deg cone at Mach number of 6.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to determine the aerothermal effects of gaseous nitrogen-coolant ejection on a 3-ft base-diameter, 12.5 degree half-angle cone. Free-stream Mach number, total temperature, and unit Reynolds number per foot were 6.7, 3300 deg R, and 1.4 million, respectively. Two coolant ejection noses were tested, an ogive frustum with a forward-facing 0.8-in radius gas-jet tip, and a 3-in radius hemisphere with a 0.243-in high rearward-facing tangent slot. Data include surface pressures and heating rates, shock shapes, and shock-layer profiles; results are compared with no-cooling data obtained with 1-in and 3-in radius solid noses. Surface pressures were reduced with gas-jet ejection but were affected little by tangent-slot ejection. For both gas-jet and tangent-slot ejection, high coolant flow rates reduced heating even far downstream from the region of ejection; however, low coolant rates caused transition to turbulence and increased heating. Shock-layer profiles of pitot pressure, Mach number, and total temperature were reduced for both gas-jet and tangent-slot ejection. Insight into the gas-jet heat-flux mechanisms was obtained by using shock-layer rake data and established, no-cooling, heat-transfer equations.

  14. Filtering of matter-wave vibrational states via spatial adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Loiko, Yu.; Ahufinger, V.; Corbalan, R.; Mompart, J.; Birkl, G.

    2011-03-15

    We discuss the filtering of the vibrational states of a cold atom in an optical trap by chaining this trap with two empty ones and adiabatically controlling the tunneling. Matter-wave filtering is performed by selectively transferring the population of the highest populated vibrational state to the most distant trap while the population of the rest of the states remains in the initial trap. Analytical conditions for two-state filtering are derived and then applied to an arbitrary number of populated bound states. Realistic numerical simulations close to state-of-the-art experimental arrangements are performed by modeling the triple well with time-dependent Poeschl-Teller potentials. In addition to filtering of vibrational states, we discuss applications for quantum tomography of the initial population distribution and engineering of atomic Fock states that, eventually, could be used for tunneling-assisted evaporative cooling.

  15. Partial differential equations constrained combinatorial optimization on an adiabatic quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Rishabh

    Partial differential equation-constrained combinatorial optimization (PDECCO) problems are a mixture of continuous and discrete optimization problems. PDECCO problems have discrete controls, but since the partial differential equations (PDE) are continuous, the optimization space is continuous as well. Such problems have several applications, such as gas/water network optimization, traffic optimization, micro-chip cooling optimization, etc. Currently, no efficient classical algorithm which guarantees a global minimum for PDECCO problems exists. A new mapping has been developed that transforms PDECCO problem, which only have linear PDEs as constraints, into quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) problems that can be solved using an adiabatic quantum optimizer (AQO). The mapping is efficient, it scales polynomially with the size of the PDECCO problem, requires only one PDE solve to form the QUBO problem, and if the QUBO problem is solved correctly and efficiently on an AQO, guarantees a global optimal solution for the original PDECCO problem.

  16. Adiabatic condition and the quantum hitting time of Markov chains

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Ozols, Maris; Roland, Jeremie

    2010-08-15

    We present an adiabatic quantum algorithm for the abstract problem of searching marked vertices in a graph, or spatial search. Given a random walk (or Markov chain) P on a graph with a set of unknown marked vertices, one can define a related absorbing walk P{sup '} where outgoing transitions from marked vertices are replaced by self-loops. We build a Hamiltonian H(s) from the interpolated Markov chain P(s)=(1-s)P+sP{sup '} and use it in an adiabatic quantum algorithm to drive an initial superposition over all vertices to a superposition over marked vertices. The adiabatic condition implies that, for any reversible Markov chain and any set of marked vertices, the running time of the adiabatic algorithm is given by the square root of the classical hitting time. This algorithm therefore demonstrates a novel connection between the adiabatic condition and the classical notion of hitting time of a random walk. It also significantly extends the scope of previous quantum algorithms for this problem, which could only obtain a full quadratic speedup for state-transitive reversible Markov chains with a unique marked vertex.

  17. Elastocaloric effect of Ni-Ti wire for application in a cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tušek, J.; Engelbrecht, K.; Mikkelsen, L. P.; Pryds, N.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the elastocaloric effect of a superelastic Ni-Ti wire to be used in a cooling device. Initially, each evaluated wire was subjected to 400 loading/unloading training cycles in order to stabilize its superelastic behavior. The wires were trained at different temperatures, which lead to different stabilized superelastic behaviors. The stabilized (trained) wires were further tested isothermally (at low strain-rate) and adiabatically (at high strain-rate) at different temperatures (from 312 K to 342 K). We studied the impact of the training temperature and resulting superelastic behavior on the adiabatic temperature changes. The largest measured adiabatic temperature change during loading was 25 K with a corresponding 21 K change during unloading (at 322 K). A special focus was put on the irreversibilities in the adiabatic temperature changes between loading and unloading. It was shown that there are two sources of the temperature irreversibilities: the hysteresis (and related entropy generation) and the temporary residual strain immediately after unloading, respectively. The latter results in the temporary bending of the wire and reduced negative adiabatic temperature change. The paper also shows the impact of the applied strain on the adiabatic temperature changes as well as the distribution of the elastocaloric effect over the wire during loading in the case of two wires trained at different temperatures and the virgin wire, respectively. In the end, we propose guidelines about the required material properties for an efficient elastocaloric cooling device.

  18. Asymmetrically modulating the insulator-metal transition of thermochromic VO2 films upon heating and cooling by mild surface-etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Litao; Xie, Lingli; Chen, Zhang; Gao, Yanfeng; Liu, Xuguang; Yang, Yongzhen; Liang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    The reversible thermochromic insulator-metal transition (IMT) of VO2 is believed to start from suitable nucleating defects, but the role of specific defects during the IMT has remained elusive. In this work, we performed a simple, mild but effective acid etching treatment on pure-phase VO2 films to adjust the surface state of the VO2 particles while leaving the phase composition, crystallinity, grain size, and stoichiometry unchanged. By continuously etching VO2 particles, the poor crystallized layers on the particle surface were removed, and the particle connections became loose, resulting in significant shifts of the IMT toward higher temperatures. In stark contrast, the reversal IMT (i.e., metal-insulator transition, MIT) parameters remained relatively steady during the etching process. These experimental results correlate directly the IMT characteristics with the states (e.g., local defects, stress, and connection) of the particle surface, and further enable us to asymmetrically modulate the IMT parameters, while keeping the MIT (i.e., metal-insulator transition, the reversal of IMT) almost constant. This work illustrates the potential for particle surface engineering in thermochromic VO2 films.

  19. Integrated polarization rotator/converter by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao; Zou, Chang-Ling; Ren, Xi-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-07-15

    We proposed a polarization rotator inspired by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage model from quantum optics, which is composed of a signal waveguide and an ancillary waveguide. The two orthogonal modes in signal waveguide and the oblique mode in ancillary waveguide form a Λ-type three-level system. By controlling the width of signal waveguide and the gap between two waveguides, adiabatic conversion between two orthogonal modes can be realized in the signal waveguide. With such adiabatic passage, polarization conversion is completed within 150 μm length, with the efficiencies over 99% for both conversions between horizontal polarization and vertical polarization. In addition, such a polarization rotator is quite robust against fabrication error, allowing a wide range of tolerances for the rotator geometric parameters. Our work is not only significative to photonic simulations of coherent quantum phenomena with engineered photonic waveguides, but also enlightens the practical applications of these phenomena in optical device designs. PMID:23938558

  20. Adiabatic compressibility of myoglobin. Effect of axial ligand and denaturation.

    PubMed

    Leung, W P; Cho, K C; Lo, Y M; Choy, C L

    1986-03-01

    An ultrasonic technique has been employed to study the adiabatic compressibility of three metmyoglobin derivatives (aquomet-, fluoromet- and azidometmyoglobin) at neutral pH, and aquometmyoglobin as a function of pH in the frequency range of 1-10 MHz at 20 degrees C. No difference was observed in the adiabatic compressibility of the various derivatives. This indicates that the binding of different axial ligands to myoglobin does not affect significantly the conformational fluctuations of the protein. The finding is consistent with the results of the hydrogen exchange rate experiment, indicating that both types of measurements are useful for the study of protein dynamics. Upon acid-induced denaturation, the adiabatic compressibility of myoglobin drops from 5.3 X 10(-12) cm2/dyn to 0.5 X 10(-12) cm2/dyn. Plausible reasons for such a decrease are discussed. PMID:3947645

  1. Effect of dephasing on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.A.; Vitanov, N.V.; Bergmann, K.

    2004-12-01

    This work explores the effect of phase relaxation on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The study is based on the Liouville equation, which is solved analytically in the adiabatic limit. The transfer efficiency of STIRAP is found to decrease exponentially with the dephasing rate; this effect is stronger for shorter pulse delays and weaker for larger delays, since the transition time is found to be inversely proportional to the pulse delay. Moreover, it is found that the transfer efficiency of STIRAP in the presence of dephasing does not depend on the peak Rabi frequencies at all, as long as they are sufficiently large to enforce adiabatic evolution; hence increasing the field intensity cannot reduce the dephasing losses. It is shown also that for any dephasing rate, the final populations of the initial state and the intermediate state are equal. For strong dephasing all three populations tend to (1/3)

  2. Adiabatic Quantum Programming: Minor Embedding With Hard Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Klymko, Christine F; Sullivan, Blair D; Humble, Travis S

    2013-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into the hardware or logical fabric. An essential programming step is the embedding of problem-specific information into the logical fabric to define the quantum computational transformation. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. Our methods are shown to be extensible in fabric growth, linear in time, and quadratic in logical footprint. In addition, we provide methods for accommodating hard faults in the logical fabric without invoking approximations to the original problem. These hard fault-tolerant embedding algorithms are expected to prove useful for benchmarking the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm on existing quantum logical hardware. We illustrate this versatility through numerical studies of embeddabilty versus hard fault rates in square lattices of complete bipartite unit cells.

  3. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential. PMID:22970340

  4. Pressure sensitivity of adiabatic shear banding in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanina, E.; Rittel, D.; Rosenberg, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a dynamic failure mode characterized by large plastic strains in a narrow localized band. ASB occurs at high strain rates (ɛ˙⩾103s-1), under adiabatic conditions leading to a significant temperature rise inside the band [H. Tresca, Annales du Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers 4, (1879); Y. L. Bai and B. Dodd, Adiabatic Shear Localization-Occurrence, Theories, and Applications (Pergamon, Oxford, 1992); M. A. Meyers, Dynamic Behavior of Materials (Wiley, New York, 1994).; and J. J. Lewandowski and L. M. Greer, Nat. Mater. 5, 15 (2006)]. Large hydrostatic pressures are experienced in many dynamic applications involving ASB formation (e.g., ballistic penetration, impact, and machining). The relationship between hydrostatic pressure and ASB development remains an open question, although its importance has been often noted. This letter reports original experimental results indicating a linear relationship between the (normalized) dynamic deformation energy and the (normalized) hydrostatic pressure.

  5. Adiabatic quantum programming: minor embedding with hard faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymko, Christine; Sullivan, Blair D.; Humble, Travis S.

    2013-11-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into an underlying hardware or logical fabric. An essential step is embedding problem-specific information into the quantum logical fabric. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. These methods extend with fabric growth while scaling linearly in time and quadratically in footprint. We also provide methods for handling hard faults in the logical fabric without invoking approximations to the original problem and illustrate their versatility through numerical studies of embeddability versus fault rates in square lattices of complete bipartite unit cells. The studies show that these algorithms are more resilient to faulty fabrics than naive embedding approaches, a feature which should prove useful in benchmarking the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm on existing faulty hardware.

  6. Cooling atoms with a moving one-way barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Schoene, Elizabeth A.; Thorn, Jeremy J.; Steck, Daniel A.

    2010-08-15

    We implement and demonstrate the effectiveness of a cooling scheme using a moving, all-optical, one-way barrier to cool a sample of {sup 87}Rb atoms, achieving nearly a factor of 2 reduction in temperature. The one-way barrier, composed of two focused, Gaussian laser beams, allows atoms incident on one side to transmit, while reflecting atoms incident on the other. The one-way barrier is adiabatically swept through a sample of atoms contained in a far-off-resonant, single-beam, optical dipole trap that forms a nearly harmonic trapping potential. As the barrier moves longitudinally through the potential, atoms become trapped to one side of the barrier with reduced kinetic energy. The adiabatic translation of the barrier leaves the atoms at the bottom of the trapping potential, only minimally increasing their kinetic energy.

  7. Non Adiabatic Evolution of Elliptical Galaxies by Dynamical Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, S. E.; Bertin, G.; Liseikina, T.; Pegoraro, F.

    2007-05-01

    Many astrophysical problems, ranging from structure formation in cosmology to dynamics of elliptical galaxies, refer to slow processes of evolution of essentially collisionless self-gravitating systems. In order to determine the relevant quasi-equilibrium configuration at time t from given initial conditions, it is often argued that such slow evolution may be approximated in terms of adiabatic evolution, for the calculation of which efficient semi--analytical techniques are available. Here we focus on the slow process of evolution, induced by dynamical friction of a host stellar system on a minority component of "satellites", to determine to what extent an adiabatic description might be applied. The study is realized by means of N--body simulations of the evolution of the total system (the stellar system plus the minority component), in a controlled numerical environment. In particular, we compare the evolution from initial to final configurations of the system subject to dynamical friction with that of the same system evolved adiabatically (in the absence of dynamical friction). We consider two classes of galaxy models characterized by significantly different density and pressure anisotropy profiles. We demonstrate that, for the examined process, the evolution driven by dynamical friction is significantly different from the adiabatic case, not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively. The two classes of galaxy models considered in this investigation exhibit generally similar trends in evolution, with one exception: concentrated models reach a final total density profile, in the internal region, shallower than the initial one, while galaxy models with a broad core show the opposite behaviour. The evolution of elliptical galaxies induced by dynamical friction is a slow process but it is not adiabatic. The results of our investigation should be taken as a warning against the indiscriminate use of adiabatic growth prescriptions in studies of the structure of

  8. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  9. Adiabatic invariants, diffusion and acceleration in rigid body dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alexey V.; Mamaev, Ivan S.

    2016-03-01

    The onset of adiabatic chaos in rigid body dynamics is considered. A comparison of the analytically calculated diffusion coefficient describing probabilistic effects in the zone of chaos with a numerical experiment is made. An analysis of the splitting of asymptotic surfaces is performed and uncertainty curves are constructed in the Poincaré-Zhukovsky problem. The application of Hamiltonian methods to nonholonomic systems is discussed. New problem statements are given which are related to the destruction of an adiabatic invariant and to the acceleration of the system (Fermi's acceleration).

  10. Adiabatic Rosen-Zener interferometry with ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Libin; Ye Defa; Lee Chaohong; Zhang Weiping; Liu Jie

    2009-07-15

    We propose a time-domain 'interferometer' based on double-well ultracold atoms through a so-called adiabatic Rosen-Zener process, that is, the barrier between two wells is ramped down slowly, held for a while, and then ramped back. After the adiabatic Rosen-Zener process, we count the particle population in each well. We find that the final occupation probability shows nice interference fringes. The fringe pattern is sensitive to the initial state as well as the intrinsic parameters of the system such as interatomic interaction or energy bias between two wells. The underlying mechanism is revealed and possible applications are discussed.

  11. Quantum dynamics by the constrained adiabatic trajectory method

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, A.; Jolicard, G.; Guerin, S.; Killingbeck, J. P.

    2011-03-15

    We develop the constrained adiabatic trajectory method (CATM), which allows one to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation constraining the dynamics to a single Floquet eigenstate, as if it were adiabatic. This constrained Floquet state (CFS) is determined from the Hamiltonian modified by an artificial time-dependent absorbing potential whose forms are derived according to the initial conditions. The main advantage of this technique for practical implementation is that the CFS is easy to determine even for large systems since its corresponding eigenvalue is well isolated from the others through its imaginary part. The properties and limitations of the CATM are explored through simple examples.

  12. Speeding up Adiabatic Quantum State Transfer by Using Dressed States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksic, Alexandre; Ribeiro, Hugo; Clerk, Aashish A.

    2016-06-01

    We develop new pulse schemes to significantly speed up adiabatic state transfer protocols. Our general strategy involves adding corrections to an initial control Hamiltonian that harness nonadiabatic transitions. These corrections define a set of dressed states that the system follows exactly during the state transfer. We apply this approach to stimulated Raman adiabatic passage protocols and show that a suitable choice of dressed states allows one to design fast protocols that do not require additional couplings, while simultaneously minimizing the occupancy of the "intermediate" level.

  13. Gravitational Chern-Simons and the adiabatic limit

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Brendan

    2010-12-15

    We compute the gravitational Chern-Simons term explicitly for an adiabatic family of metrics using standard methods in general relativity. We use the fact that our base three-manifold is a quasiregular K-contact manifold heavily in this computation. Our key observation is that this geometric assumption corresponds exactly to a Kaluza-Klein Ansatz for the metric tensor on our three-manifold, which allows us to translate our problem into the language of general relativity. Similar computations have been performed by Guralnik et al.[Ann. Phys. 308, 222 (2008)], although not in the adiabatic context.

  14. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchon-Enrich, R.; Benseny, A.; Ahufinger, V.; Greentree, A. D.; Busch, Th; Mompart, J.

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound.

  15. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Menchon-Enrich, R; Benseny, A; Ahufinger, V; Greentree, A D; Busch, Th; Mompart, J

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound. PMID:27245462

  16. Adiabatic fluctuations from cosmic strings in a contracting universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Robert H.; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2009-07-01

    We show that adiabatic, super-Hubble, and almost scale invariant density fluctuations are produced by cosmic strings in a contracting universe. An essential point is that isocurvature perturbations produced by topological defects such as cosmic strings on super-Hubble scales lead to a source term which seeds the growth of curvature fluctuations on these scales. Once the symmetry has been restored at high temperatures, the isocurvature seeds disappear, and the fluctuations evolve as adiabatic ones in the expanding phase. Thus, cosmic strings may be resurrected as a mechanism for generating the primordial density fluctuations observed today.

  17. Quantum Adiabatic Pumping by Modulating Tunnel Phase in Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    In a mesoscopic system, under zero bias voltage, a finite charge is transferred by quantum adiabatic pumping by adiabatically and periodically changing two or more control parameters. We obtained expressions for the pumped charge for a ring of three quantum dots (QDs) by choosing the magnetic flux penetrating the ring as one of the control parameters. We found that the pumped charge shows a steplike behavior with respect to the variance of the flux. The value of the step heights is not universal but depends on the trajectory of the control parameters. We discuss the physical origin of this behavior on the basis of the Fano resonant condition of the ring.

  18. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we have recently proposed a mixed quantum-classical scheme [A. Abedi, F. Agostini, and E. K. U. Gross, Europhys. Lett. 106, 33001 (2014)] to deal with non-adiabatic processes. Here we present a comprehensive description of the formalism, including the full derivation of the equations of motion. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations.

  19. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-12-07

    Based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we have recently proposed a mixed quantum-classical scheme [A. Abedi, F. Agostini, and E. K. U. Gross, Europhys. Lett. 106, 33001 (2014)] to deal with non-adiabatic processes. Here we present a comprehensive description of the formalism, including the full derivation of the equations of motion. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations.

  20. Vapour Pressure and Adiabatic Cooling from Champagne: Slow-Motion Visualization of Gas Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The recent introduction of inexpensive high-speed cameras offers a new experimental approach to many simple but fast-occurring events in physics. In this paper, the authors present two simple demonstration experiments recorded with high-speed cameras in the fields of gas dynamics and thermal physics. The experiments feature vapour pressure effects…