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Sample records for adiabatic ionization energy

  1. Difluorocarbene studied with threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES): measurement of the first adiabatic ionization energy (AIE) of CF(2).

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Eypper, Marie; Lee, Edmond P F; Stranges, Stefano; Mok, Daniel K W; Chau, Foo-tim; King, George C; Dyke, John M

    2008-01-01

    The first photoelectron band of difluorocarbene CF(2), has been studied by threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectroscopy. CF(2) was prepared by microwave discharge of a flowing mixture of hexafluoropropene, C(3)F(6), and argon. A vibrationally resolved band was observed in which at least twenty-two components were observed. In the first PE band of CF(2), the adiabatic ionization energy differs significantly from the vertical ionization energy because, for the ionization CF(2) (+) (X(2)A(1))+e(-) <-- CF(2) (X(1)A(1)), there is an increase in the FCF bond angle (by approximately 20 degrees ) and a decrease in the C--F bond length (by approximately 0.7 A). The adiabatic component was not observed in the experimental TPE spectrum. However, on comparing this spectrum with an ab initio/Franck-Condon simulation of this band, using results from high-level ab initio calculations, the structure associated with the vibrational components could be assigned. This led to alignment of the experimental TPE spectrum and the computed Franck-Condon envelope, and a determination of the first adiabatic ionization energy of CF(2) as (11.362+/-0.005) eV. From the assignment of the vibrational structure, values were obtained for the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of the symmetric stretching mode (nu(1)') and symmetric bending mode (nu(2)') in CF(2) (+) (X(2)A(1)). PMID:19006171

  2. The Adiabatic Ionization Energy and Triplet T1 Energy of Jet-Cooled Keto-Amino Cytosine.

    PubMed

    Lobsiger, Simon; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase cytosine exists in five different tautomer/rotamer forms 1, 2a, 2b, 3a, and 3b. We determine the threshold ionization energy (IE) of the keto-amino tautomer 1 as 8.73 ± 0.02 eV, using resonant two-photon ionization mass spectrometry in a supersonic molecular beam via the (1)ππ* excited state. This is the first IE threshold measurement for the biologically relevant tautomer 1. The IE of the thermal gas-phase mixture of cytosine has been measured as 8.60 ± 0.05 eV by Kostko et al. using single-photon VUV photoionization [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 2860]. Given the tautomer distribution and ionization energies calculated in that work, our determination of the keto-amino tautomer IE implies that the IE measured by Kostko et al. is dominated by the enol-amino tautomers 2a and 2b. Upon excitation of keto-amino cytosine to its (1)ππ* state, relaxation occurs to a lower-lying long-lived state. The IE threshold measured via this state places its energy about 0.69 eV below the (1)ππ* state, in good agreement with the triplet T1 energy of keto-amino cytosine calculated by several high-level ab initio methods. The identification of keto-amino cytosine T1 is the basis for characterizing the intersystem crossing rates into and the photochemical reactions of this long-lived state.

  3. Energy efficiency of adiabatic superconductor logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic superconductor logic (ASL), including adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic, exhibits high energy efficiency because its bit energy can be decreased below the thermal energy through adiabatic switching operations. In the present paper, we present the general scaling laws of ASL and compare the energy efficiency of ASL with those of other energy-efficient logics. Also, we discuss the minimum energy-delay product (EDP) of ASL at finite temperature. Our study shows that there is a maximum temperature at which the EDP can reach the quantum limit given by ħ/2, which is dependent on the superconductor material and the Josephson junction quality, and that it is reasonable to operate ASL at cryogenic temperatures in order to achieve an EDP that approaches ħ/2.

  4. Superequilibrium ionization during adiabatic expansion of a relaxing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, O. V.; Zhdanok, S. A.; Soloukhin, R. I.; Fomin, N. A.

    1980-08-01

    A superequilibrium method for the generation of a weakly ionized plasma in a molecular gas is proposed; the method involves the production of a superequilibrium electron density in a thermally excited and vibrationally frozen molecular gas during expansion in supersonic flow. Experimental results are presented for the case of nitrogen. This method has applications in molecular and laser physics, including preionization in a fast-flow gas-discharge laser, and the study of energy losses in gasdynamic lasers.

  5. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  6. Non-adiabatic imprints on the electron wave packet in strong field ionization with circular polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zielinski, A.; Landsman, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The validity of the adiabatic approximation in strong field ionization under typical experimental conditions has recently become a topic of great interest. Experimental results have been inconclusive, in part, due to the uncertainty in experimental calibration of intensity. Here we turn to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, where all the laser parameters are known exactly. We find that the centre of the electron momentum distribution (typically used for calibration of elliptically and circularly polarized light) is sensitive to non-adiabatic effects, leading to intensity shifts in experimental data that can significantly affect the interpretation of results. On the other hand, the transverse momentum spread in the plane of polarization is relatively insensitive to such effects, even in the Keldysh parameter regime approaching γ ≈ 3. This suggests the transverse momentum spread in the plane of polarization as a good alternative to the usual calibration method, particularly for experimental investigation of non-adiabatic effects using circularly polarized light.

  7. Band gaps, ionization potentials, and electron affinities of periodic electron systems via the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, Egor; Betzinger, Markus; Blügel, Stefan; Görling, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    An approach to calculate fundamental band gaps, ionization energies, and electron affinities of periodic electron systems is explored. Starting from total energies obtained with the help of the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) theorem, these physical observables are calculated according to their basic definition by differences of the total energies of the N -, (N -1 ) -, and (N +1 ) -electron system. The response functions entering the ACFD theorem are approximated here by the direct random phase approximation (dRPA). For a set of prototypical semiconductors and insulators it is shown that even with this quite drastic approximation the resulting band gaps are very close to experiment and of a similar quality to those from the computationally more involved G W approximation. By going beyond the dRPA in the future the accuracy of the calculated band gaps may be significantly improved further.

  8. Quantum adiabatic evolution with energy degeneracy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    A classical-kind phase-space formalism is developed to address the tiny intrinsic dynamical deviation from what is predicted by Wilczek-Zee theorem during quantum adiabatic evolution on degeneracy levels. In this formalism, the Hilbert space and the aggregate of degenerate eigenstates become the classical-kind phase space and a high-dimensional subspace in the phase space, respectively. Compared with the previous analogous study by a different method, the current result is qualitatively different in that the first-order deviation derived here is always perpendicular to the degeneracy subspace. A tripod-scheme Hamiltonian with two degenerate dark states is employed to illustrate the adiabatic deviation with degeneracy levels.

  9. Excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection

    SciTech Connect

    Rebolini, Elisa Toulouse, Julien Savin, Andreas; Teale, Andrew M.; Helgaker, Trygve

    2014-07-28

    We present a study of the variation of total energies and excitation energies along a range-separated adiabatic connection. This connection links the non-interacting Kohn–Sham electronic system to the physical interacting system by progressively switching on the electron–electron interactions whilst simultaneously adjusting a one-electron effective potential so as to keep the ground-state density constant. The interactions are introduced in a range-dependent manner, first introducing predominantly long-range, and then all-range, interactions as the physical system is approached, as opposed to the conventional adiabatic connection where the interactions are introduced by globally scaling the standard Coulomb interaction. Reference data are reported for the He and Be atoms and the H{sub 2} molecule, obtained by calculating the short-range effective potential at the full configuration-interaction level using Lieb's Legendre-transform approach. As the strength of the electron–electron interactions increases, the excitation energies, calculated for the partially interacting systems along the adiabatic connection, offer increasingly accurate approximations to the exact excitation energies. Importantly, the excitation energies calculated at an intermediate point of the adiabatic connection are much better approximations to the exact excitation energies than are the corresponding Kohn–Sham excitation energies. This is particularly evident in situations involving strong static correlation effects and states with multiple excitation character, such as the dissociating H{sub 2} molecule. These results highlight the utility of long-range interacting reference systems as a starting point for the calculation of excitation energies and are of interest for developing and analyzing practical approximate range-separated density-functional methodologies.

  10. Adiabatic corrections to density functional theory energies and wave functions.

    PubMed

    Mohallem, José R; Coura, Thiago de O; Diniz, Leonardo G; de Castro, Gustavo; Assafrão, Denise; Heine, Thomas

    2008-09-25

    The adiabatic finite-nuclear-mass-correction (FNMC) to the electronic energies and wave functions of atoms and molecules is formulated for density-functional theory and implemented in the deMon code. The approach is tested for a series of local and gradient corrected density functionals, using MP2 results and diagonal-Born-Oppenheimer corrections from the literature for comparison. In the evaluation of absolute energy corrections of nonorganic molecules the LDA PZ81 functional works surprisingly better than the others. For organic molecules the GGA BLYP functional has the best performance. FNMC with GGA functionals, mainly BLYP, show a good performance in the evaluation of relative corrections, except for nonorganic molecules containing H atoms. The PW86 functional stands out with the best evaluation of the barrier of linearity of H2O and the isotopic dipole moment of HDO. In general, DFT functionals display an accuracy superior than the common belief and because the corrections are based on a change of the electronic kinetic energy they are here ranked in a new appropriate way. The approach is applied to obtain the adiabatic correction for full atomization of alcanes C(n)H(2n+2), n = 4-10. The barrier of 1 mHartree is approached for adiabatic corrections, justifying its insertion into DFT. PMID:18537228

  11. Ionization energies of argon clusters: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echt, O.; Fiegele, T.; Rümmele, M.; Probst, M.; Matt-Leubner, S.; Urban, J.; Mach, P.; Leszczynski, J.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2005-08-01

    We have measured appearance energies of Arn+,n⩽30, by electron impact of gas phase clusters. Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed to determine the adiabatic and vertical ionization energies of argon clusters up to n =4 and 6, respectively. The experimental appearance energy of the dimer ion approaches, under suitable cluster source conditions, the adiabatic ionization energy. The agreement with values obtained by photoionization and threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) spectra demonstrates that autoionizing Rydberg states are accessible by electron impact. Appearance energies of larger clusters, though, exceed the TPEPICO values by about 0.5 eV.

  12. High Energy Signatures of POST Adiabatic Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telezhinsky, Igor; Hnatyk, Bohdan

    Between the well-known adiabatic and radiative stages of the Supernova remnant (SNR) evolution there is, in fact, a transition stage with a duration comparable to the duration of adiabatic one. Physical existence of the transition stage is motivated by cooling of some part of the downstream hot gas with formation of a thin cold shell that is joined to a shell of swept up interstellar medium (ISM). We give an approximate analytical method for full hydrodynamical description of the transition stage. On its base we investigate the evolution of X-ray and γ-ray radiation during this stage. It is shown that formation of a dense shell during the transition stage is accompanied by the decrease of X-ray luminosity because of hot gas cooling and increase of gamma-ray flux according to the increase of target proton density and CR energy in the newly born shell. The role of nonuniformity of ISM and its influence on the high energy fluxes from the SNRs is also discussed.

  13. Adiabatic principles in atom-diatom collisional energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hovingh, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This work describes the application of numerical methods to the solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation for non-reactive atom-diatom collisions in which only one of the degrees of freedom has been removed. The basic method involves expanding the wave function in a basis set in two of the diatomic coordinates in a body-fixed frame (with respect to the triatomic complex) and defining the coefficients in that expansion as functions on a grid in the collision coordinate. The wave function is then propagated in time using a split operator method. The bulk of this work is devoted to the application of this formalism to the study of internal rotational predissociation in NeHF, in which quasibound states of the triatom predissociate through the transfer of energy from rotation of the diatom into translational energy in the atom-diatom separation coordinate. The author analyzes the computed time dependent wave functions to calculate the lifetimes for several quasibound states; these are in agreement with time independent quantum calculations using the same potential. Moreover, the time dependent behavior of the wave functions themselves sheds light on the dynamics of the predissociation processes. Finally, the partial cross sections of the products in those processes is determined with multiple exit channels. These show strong selectivity in the orbital angular momentum of the outgoing fragments, which the author explains with an adiabatic channel interpretation of the wave function's dynamics. The author also suggests that the same formalism might profitably be used to investigate the quantum dynamics of [open quotes]quasiresonant vibration-rotation transfer[close quotes], in which remarkably strong propensity rules in certain inelastic atom-diatom collision arise from classical adiabatic invariance theory.

  14. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov- Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs. PMID:26916031

  15. Singularity of the time-energy uncertainty in adiabatic perturbation and cycloids on a Bloch sphere.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco; Kais, Sabre

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic perturbation is shown to be singular from the exact solution of a spin-1/2 particle in a uniformly rotating magnetic field. Due to a non-adiabatic effect, its quantum trajectory on a Bloch sphere is a cycloid traced by a circle rolling along an adiabatic path. As the magnetic field rotates more and more slowly, the time-energy uncertainty, proportional to the length of the quantum trajectory, calculated by the exact solution is entirely different from the one obtained by the adiabatic path traced by the instantaneous eigenstate. However, the non-adiabatic Aharonov-Anandan geometric phase, measured by the area enclosed by the exact path, approaches smoothly the adiabatic Berry phase, proportional to the area enclosed by the adiabatic path. The singular limit of the time-energy uncertainty and the regular limit of the geometric phase are associated with the arc length and arc area of the cycloid on a Bloch sphere, respectively. Prolate and curtate cycloids are also traced by different initial states outside and inside of the rolling circle, respectively. The axis trajectory of the rolling circle, parallel to the adiabatic path, is shown to be an example of transitionless driving. The non-adiabatic resonance is visualized by the number of cycloid arcs. PMID:26916031

  16. Energy-Efficient and Secure S-Box circuit using Symmetric Pass Gate Adiabatic Logic

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinesh; Mohammad, Azhar; Singh, Vijay; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2016-01-01

    Differential Power Analysis (DPA) attack is considered to be a main threat while designing cryptographic processors. In cryptographic algorithms like DES and AES, S-Box is used to indeterminate the relationship between the keys and the cipher texts. However, S-box is prone to DPA attack due to its high power consumption. In this paper, we are implementing an energy-efficient 8-bit S-Box circuit using our proposed Symmetric Pass Gate Adiabatic Logic (SPGAL). SPGAL is energy-efficient as compared to the existing DPAresistant adiabatic and non-adiabatic logic families. SPGAL is energy-efficient due to reduction of non-adiabatic loss during the evaluate phase of the outputs. Further, the S-Box circuit implemented using SPGAL is resistant to DPA attacks. The results are verified through SPICE simulations in 180nm technology. SPICE simulations show that the SPGAL based S-Box circuit saves upto 92% and 67% of energy as compared to the conventional CMOS and Secured Quasi-Adiabatic Logic (SQAL) based S-Box circuit. From the simulation results, it is evident that the SPGAL based circuits are energy-efficient as compared to the existing DPAresistant adiabatic and non-adiabatic logic families. In nutshell, SPGAL based gates can be used to build secure hardware for lowpower portable electronic devices and Internet-of-Things (IoT) based electronic devices.

  17. Electronic structure and spectroscopy of nucleic acid bases: Ionization energies, ionization-induced structural changes, and photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Dolgikh, Stanislav; Landau, Arie; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2010-08-02

    We report high-level ab initio calculations and single-photon ionization mass spectrometry study of ionization of adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C) and guanine (G). For thymine and adenine, only the lowest-energy tautomers were considered, whereas for cytosine and guanine we characterized five lowest-energy tautomeric forms. The first adiabatic and several vertical ionization energies were computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for ionization potentials with single and double substitutions. Equilibrium structures of the cationic ground states were characterized by DFT with the {omega}B97X-D functional. The ionization-induced geometry changes of the bases are consistent with the shapes of the corresponding molecular orbitals. For the lowest-energy tautomers, the magnitude of the structural relaxation decreases in the following series G > C > A > T, the respective relaxation energies being 0.41, 0.32, 0.25 and 0.20 eV. The computed adiabatic ionization energies (8.13, 8.89, 8.51-8.67 and 7.75-7.87 eV for A,T,C and G, respectively) agree well with the onsets of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves (8.20 {+-} 0.05, 8.95 {+-} 0.05, 8.60 {+-} 0.05 and 7.75 {+-} 0.05 eV). Vibrational progressions for the S{sub 0}-D{sub 0} vibronic bands computed within double-harmonic approximation with Duschinsky rotations are compared with previously reported experimental photoelectron spectra.

  18. Transient Particle Energies in Shortcuts to Adiabatic Expansions of Harmonic Traps.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yang-Yang; Chen, Xi; Muga, J G

    2016-05-19

    The expansion of a harmonic potential that holds a quantum particle may be realized without any final particle excitation but much faster than adiabatically via "shortcuts to adiabaticity" (STA). While ideally the process time can be reduced to zero, practical limitations and constraints impose minimal finite times for the externally controlled time-dependent frequency protocols. We examine the role of different time-averaged energies (total, kinetic, potential, nonadiabatic) and of the instantaneous power in characterizing or selecting different protocols. Specifically, we prove a virial theorem for STA processes, set minimal energies (or times) for given times (or energies), and discuss their realizability by means of Dirac impulses or otherwise.

  19. Transient Particle Energies in Shortcuts to Adiabatic Expansions of Harmonic Traps.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yang-Yang; Chen, Xi; Muga, J G

    2016-05-19

    The expansion of a harmonic potential that holds a quantum particle may be realized without any final particle excitation but much faster than adiabatically via "shortcuts to adiabaticity" (STA). While ideally the process time can be reduced to zero, practical limitations and constraints impose minimal finite times for the externally controlled time-dependent frequency protocols. We examine the role of different time-averaged energies (total, kinetic, potential, nonadiabatic) and of the instantaneous power in characterizing or selecting different protocols. Specifically, we prove a virial theorem for STA processes, set minimal energies (or times) for given times (or energies), and discuss their realizability by means of Dirac impulses or otherwise. PMID:26237328

  20. Composite electron propagator methods for calculating ionization energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ionization energies of molecules may be determined efficiently with composite electron-propagator (CEP) techniques. These methods estimate the results of a calculation with an advanced correlation method and a large basis set by performing a series of more tractable calculations in which large basis sets are used with simpler approximations and small basis sets are paired with more demanding correlation techniques. The performance of several CEP methods, in which diagonal, second-order electron propagator results with large basis sets are combined with higher-order results obtained with smaller basis sets, has been tested for the ionization energies of closed-shell molecules from the G2 set. Useful compromises of accuracy and computational efficiency employ complete-basis-set extrapolation for second-order results and small basis sets in third-order, partial third-order, renormalized partial-third order, or outer valence Green's function calculations. Analysis of results for vertical as well as adiabatic ionization energies leads to specific recommendations on the best use of regular and composite methods. Results for 22 organic molecules of interest in the design of photovoltaic devices, benzo[a]pyrene, Mg-octaethylporphyrin, and C60 illustrate the capabilities of CEP methods for calculations on large molecules.

  1. Composite electron propagator methods for calculating ionization energies.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Dolgounitcheva, O; Zakrzewski, V G; Ortiz, J V

    2016-06-14

    Accurate ionization energies of molecules may be determined efficiently with composite electron-propagator (CEP) techniques. These methods estimate the results of a calculation with an advanced correlation method and a large basis set by performing a series of more tractable calculations in which large basis sets are used with simpler approximations and small basis sets are paired with more demanding correlation techniques. The performance of several CEP methods, in which diagonal, second-order electron propagator results with large basis sets are combined with higher-order results obtained with smaller basis sets, has been tested for the ionization energies of closed-shell molecules from the G2 set. Useful compromises of accuracy and computational efficiency employ complete-basis-set extrapolation for second-order results and small basis sets in third-order, partial third-order, renormalized partial-third order, or outer valence Green's function calculations. Analysis of results for vertical as well as adiabatic ionization energies leads to specific recommendations on the best use of regular and composite methods. Results for 22 organic molecules of interest in the design of photovoltaic devices, benzo[a]pyrene, Mg-octaethylporphyrin, and C60 illustrate the capabilities of CEP methods for calculations on large molecules. PMID:27305999

  2. The effect of microhydration on ionization energies of thymine

    SciTech Connect

    Khistyev, Kirill; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kamarchik, Eugene; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2011-01-03

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the effect of microhydration on ionization energies (IEs) of thymine is presented. The experimental IEs are derived from photoionization efficiency curves recorded using tunable synchrotron VUV radiation. The onsets of the PIE curves are 8.85+-0.05, 8.60+-0.05, 8.55+-0.05, and 8.40+-0.05 eV for thymine, thymine mono-, di-, and tri-hydrates, respectively. The computed (EOM-IP-CCSD/cc-pVTZ) AIEs are 8.90, 8.51, 8.52, and 8.35 eV for thymine and the lowest isomers of thymine mono-, di-, and tri-hydrates. Due to large structural relaxation, the Franck-Condon factors for the 0<-- 0 transitions are very small shifting the apparent PIE onsets to higher energies. Microsolvation strongly affects IEs of thymine -- addition of each water molecule reduces the first vertical IE by 0.10-0.15 eV. The adiabatic IE decreases even more (up to 0.4 eV). The magnitude of the effect varies for different ionized states and for different isomers. For the ionized states that are localized on thymine the dominant contribution to the IE reduction is the electrostatic interaction between the delocalized positive charge on thymine and the dipole moment of the water molecule.

  3. Conceptual design and engineering studies of adiabatic compressed air energy storage (CAES) with thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, M. J.

    1981-11-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a conceptual engineering design and evaluation study and to develop a design for an adiabatic CAES system using water-compensated hard rock caverns for compressed air storage. The conceptual plant design was to feature underground containment for thermal energy storage and water-compensated hard rock caverns for high pressure air storage. Other design constraints included the selection of turbomachinery designs that would require little development and would therefore be available for near-term plant construction and demonstration. The design was to be based upon the DOE/EPRI/PEPCO-funded 231 MW/unit conventional CAES plant design prepared for a site in Maryland. This report summarizes the project, its findings, and the recommendations of the study team; presents the development and optimization of the plant heat cycle and the selection and thermal design of the thermal energy storage system; discusses the selection of turbomachinery and estimated plant performance and operational capability; describes the control system concept; and presents the conceptual design of the adiabatic CAES plant, the cost estimates and economic evaluation, and an assessment of technical and economic feasibility. Particular areas in the plant design requiring further development or investigation are discussed. It is concluded that the adiabatic concept appears to be the most attractive candidate for utility application in the near future. It is operationally viable, economically attractive compared with competing concerns, and will require relatively little development before the construction of a plant can be undertaken. It is estimated that a utility could start the design of a demonstration plant in 2 to 3 years if research regarding TES system design is undertaken in a timely manner. (LCL)

  4. Electrostatic energy, potential energy, and energy dissipation for a width-variable capacitor system during adiabatic charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Shunji; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Matsuno, Shun-ichi

    2007-02-01

    This paper considers the energy consumed by charging and discharging a width-variable capacitor. The capacitor with plate distance d is coupled with repulsive mechanical potential energy, which is proportional to 1/dn. In this capacitor model, there is a stable point between attractive electrical force and repulsive mechanical force. All energies, including the electrostatic energy, potential energy, and energy dissipation, are proportional not to the ordinary value V2 but to V2/(n-1)+2, where V is the abrupt power supply voltage. We apply N-stepwise adiabatic charging to the width-variable capacitor system. It is shown that the energy consumption after charging and discharging (or recycling) can be 1/N times smaller than that of the conventional abrupt operation. By increasing the step number N, the adiabatic operation can ideally charge and discharge the width-variable capacitor system with absolutely no energy dissipation, although the voltage dependence of energies is quite different from the usual one. Adiabatic charging is very promising for realizing dissipationless operation in the proposed system.

  5. The ionization energy of C2.

    PubMed

    Krechkivska, O; Bacskay, G B; Welsh, B A; Nauta, K; Kable, S H; Stanton, J F; Schmidt, T W

    2016-04-14

    Resonant two-photon threshold ionization spectroscopy is employed to determine the ionization energy of C2 to 5 meV precision, about two orders of magnitude more precise than the previously accepted value. Through exploration of the ionization threshold after pumping the 0-3 band of the newly discovered 4(3)Πg ← a(3)Πu band system of C2, the ionization energy of the lowest rovibronic level of the a(3)Πu state was determined to be 11.791(5) eV. Accounting for spin-orbit and rotational effects, we calculate that the ionization energy of the forbidden origin of the a(3)Πu state is 11.790(5) eV, in excellent agreement with quantum thermochemical calculations which give 11.788(10) eV. The experimentally derived ionization energy of X(1)Σg(+) state C2 is 11.866(5) eV. PMID:27083719

  6. The ionization energy of C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechkivska, O.; Bacskay, G. B.; Welsh, B. A.; Nauta, K.; Kable, S. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Schmidt, T. W.

    2016-04-01

    Resonant two-photon threshold ionization spectroscopy is employed to determine the ionization energy of C2 to 5 meV precision, about two orders of magnitude more precise than the previously accepted value. Through exploration of the ionization threshold after pumping the 0-3 band of the newly discovered 43Πg←a3Πu band system of C2, the ionization energy of the lowest rovibronic level of the a3Πu state was determined to be 11.791(5) eV. Accounting for spin-orbit and rotational effects, we calculate that the ionization energy of the forbidden origin of the a3Πu state is 11.790(5) eV, in excellent agreement with quantum thermochemical calculations which give 11.788(10) eV. The experimentally derived ionization energy of X1Σg+ state C2 is 11.866(5) eV.

  7. Mid-range adiabatic wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A. Vitanov, N.V.

    2012-09-15

    A technique for efficient mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils via a mediator coil is proposed. By varying the coil frequencies, three resonances are created: emitter-mediator (EM), mediator-receiver (MR) and emitter-receiver (ER). If the frequency sweeps are adiabatic and such that the EM resonance precedes the MR resonance, the energy flows sequentially along the chain emitter-mediator-receiver. If the MR resonance precedes the EM resonance, then the energy flows directly from the emitter to the receiver via the ER resonance; then the losses from the mediator are suppressed. This technique is robust against noise, resonant constraints and external interferences. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer via a mediator coil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils.

  8. Non-adiabatic corrections to the quasiparticle self-energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylenko, Oleksiy V.; Dolgov, Oleg V.; Losyakov, Vladimir V.

    1996-02-01

    High T c superconductors and fullerenes seem to be characterized by very small bandwidths of the order of phonon frequencies. This may imply a breakdown of Migdal's theorem for the electron self-energy. There are two different approaches to the problem. The gauge-invariant self-consistent method proposed by Y. Takada includes many vertex corrections using the Ward identity. The other method by C. Grimaldi, L. Pietronero and S. Strässler (GPS) based on Migdal's idea uses the first correction to the unit vertex. These two approaches have been compared and the main results are the following: 1) Takada's method for the self-energy gives incorrect order in the Migdal parameter λΩ ph /ɛ F , 2) in GPS's method the momentum cut-off offered by the authors cannot be used as a free parameter, and 3) there is a possible instability which can be ascribed to appearing of polaron states.

  9. Transient energy excitation in shortcuts to adiabaticity for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Muga, J. G.

    2010-11-15

    We study for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator the transient energy excitation in speed-up processes ('shortcuts to adiabaticity') designed to reproduce the initial populations at some predetermined final frequency and time. We provide lower bounds and examples. Implications for the limits imposed to the process times and for the principle of unattainability of the absolute zero, in a single expansion or in quantum refrigerator cycles, are drawn.

  10. Zero-point energy, tunnelling, and vibrational adiabaticity in the Mu + H2 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Fleming, Donald G.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic substitution of muonium for hydrogen provides an unparalleled opportunity to deepen our understanding of quantum mass effects on chemical reactions. A recent topical review in this journal of the thermal and vibrationally state-selected reaction of Mu with H2 raises a number of issues that are addressed here. We show that some earlier quantum mechanical calculations of the Mu + H2 reaction, which are highlighted in this review, and which have been used to benchmark approximate methods, are in error by as much as 19% in the low-temperature limit. We demonstrate that an approximate treatment of the Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction that was used in some recent studies is not valid for treating the vibrationally state-selected reaction. We also discuss why vibrationally adiabatic potentials that neglect bend zero-point energy are not a useful analytical tool for understanding reaction rates, and why vibrationally non-adiabatic transitions cannot be understood by considering tunnelling through vibrationally adiabatic potentials. Finally, we present calculations on a hierarchical family of potential energy surfaces to assess the sensitivity of rate constants to the quality of the potential surface.

  11. An energy-efficient, adiabatic electrode stimulator with inductive energy recycling and feedback current regulation.

    PubMed

    Arfin, Scott K; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel energy-efficient electrode stimulator. Our stimulator uses inductive storage and recycling of energy in a dynamic power supply. This supply drives an electrode in an adiabatic fashion such that energy consumption is minimized. It also utilizes a shunt current-sensor to monitor and regulate the current through the electrode via feedback, thus enabling flexible and safe stimulation. Since there are no explicit current sources or current limiters, wasteful energy dissipation across such elements is naturally avoided. The dynamic power supply allows efficient transfer of energy both to and from the electrode and is based on a DC-DC converter topology that we use in a bidirectional fashion in forward-buck or reverse-boost modes. In an exemplary electrode implementation intended for neural stimulation, we show how the stimulator combines the efficiency of voltage control and the safety and accuracy of current control in a single low-power integrated-circuit built in a standard .35 μm CMOS process. This stimulator achieves a 2x-3x reduction in energy consumption as compared to a conventional current-source-based stimulator operating from a fixed power supply. We perform a theoretical analysis of the energy efficiency that is in accord with experimental measurements. This theoretical analysis reveals that further improvements in energy efficiency may be achievable with better implementations in the future. Our electrode stimulator could be widely useful for neural, cardiac, retinal, cochlear, muscular and other biomedical implants where low power operation is important.

  12. An energy-efficient, adiabatic electrode stimulator with inductive energy recycling and feedback current regulation.

    PubMed

    Arfin, Scott K; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel energy-efficient electrode stimulator. Our stimulator uses inductive storage and recycling of energy in a dynamic power supply. This supply drives an electrode in an adiabatic fashion such that energy consumption is minimized. It also utilizes a shunt current-sensor to monitor and regulate the current through the electrode via feedback, thus enabling flexible and safe stimulation. Since there are no explicit current sources or current limiters, wasteful energy dissipation across such elements is naturally avoided. The dynamic power supply allows efficient transfer of energy both to and from the electrode and is based on a DC-DC converter topology that we use in a bidirectional fashion in forward-buck or reverse-boost modes. In an exemplary electrode implementation intended for neural stimulation, we show how the stimulator combines the efficiency of voltage control and the safety and accuracy of current control in a single low-power integrated-circuit built in a standard .35 μm CMOS process. This stimulator achieves a 2x-3x reduction in energy consumption as compared to a conventional current-source-based stimulator operating from a fixed power supply. We perform a theoretical analysis of the energy efficiency that is in accord with experimental measurements. This theoretical analysis reveals that further improvements in energy efficiency may be achievable with better implementations in the future. Our electrode stimulator could be widely useful for neural, cardiac, retinal, cochlear, muscular and other biomedical implants where low power operation is important. PMID:23852740

  13. Ionization Energy: Implications of Preservice Teachers' Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel; Taber, Keith S.

    2009-01-01

    The results from a study to explore pre-service teachers' understanding of ionization energy, a topic that features in A-level (grade 11 and 12) chemistry courses. in Singapore , is described. A previous study using a two-tier multiple choice diagnostic test has shown that Singapore A-level students have considerable difficulty understanding the…

  14. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  15. Calibration-quality adiabatic potential energy surfaces for H3+ and its isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Alijah, Alexander; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Mizus, Irina I.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Szidarovszky, Tamás; Császár, Attila G.

    2012-05-01

    Calibration-quality ab initio adiabatic potential energy surfaces (PES) have been determined for all isotopologues of the molecular ion H_3^+. The underlying Born-Oppenheimer electronic structure computations used optimized explicitly correlated shifted Gaussian functions. The surfaces include diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections computed from the accurate electronic wave functions. A fit to the 41 655 ab initio points is presented which gives a standard deviation better than 0.1 cm-1 when restricted to the points up to 6000 cm-1 above the first dissociation asymptote. Nuclear motion calculations utilizing this PES, called GLH3P, and an exact kinetic energy operator given in orthogonal internal coordinates are presented. The ro-vibrational transition frequencies for H_3^+, H2D+, and HD_2^+ are compared with high resolution measurements. The most sophisticated and complete procedure employed to compute ro-vibrational energy levels, which makes explicit allowance for the inclusion of non-adiabatic effects, reproduces all the known ro-vibrational levels of the H_3^+ isotopologues considered to better than 0.2 cm-1. This represents a significant (order-of-magnitude) improvement compared to previous studies of transitions in the visible. Careful treatment of linear geometries is important for high frequency transitions and leads to new assignments for some of the previously observed lines. Prospects for further investigations of non-adiabatic effects in the H_3^+ isotopologues are discussed. In short, the paper presents (a) an extremely accurate global potential energy surface of H_3^+ resulting from high accuracy ab initio computations and global fit, (b) very accurate nuclear motion calculations of all available experimental line data up to 16 000 cm-1, and (c) results suggest that we can predict accurately the lines of H_3^+ towards dissociation and thus facilitate their experimental observation.

  16. Non-classical role of potential energy in adiabatic quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arnab

    2009-12-01

    Adiabatic quantum annealing is a paradigm of analog quantum computation, where a given computational job is converted to the task of finding the global minimum of some classical potential energy function and the search for the global potential minimum is performed by employing external kinetic quantum fluctuations and subsequent slow reduction (annealing) of them. In this method, the entire potential energy landscape (PEL) may be accessed simultaneously through a delocalized wave-function, in contrast to a classical search, where the searcher has to visit different points in the landscape (i.e., individual classical configurations) sequentially. Thus in such searches, the role of the potential energy might be significantly different in the two cases. Here we discuss this in the context of searching of a single isolated hole (potential minimum) in a golf-course type gradient free PEL. We show, that the quantum particle would be able to locate the hole faster if the hole is deeper, while the classical particle of course would have no scope to exploit the depth of the hole. We also discuss the effect of the underlying quantum phase transition on the adiabatic dynamics.

  17. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  18. Benchmark theoretical study of the ionization energies, electron affinities and singlet-triplet energy gaps of azulene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene and perylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huzak, M.; Hajgató, B.; Deleuze, M. S.

    2012-10-01

    The vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet energy gaps, electron affinities and ionization energies of azulene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene, and perylene are computed by applying the principles of a focal point analysis onto a series of single-point calculations at the level of Hartree-Fock theory, second-, third-, and fourth-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, as well as coupled cluster theory including single, double and perturbative triple excitations, in conjunction with correlation consistent basis sets of improving quality. Results are supplemented with an extrapolation to the limit of an asymptotically complete basis set. According to our best estimates, azulene, phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene, and perylene exhibit adiabatic singlet-triplet energy gaps of 1.79, 2.92, 2.22, 2.79 and 1.71 eV, respectively. In the same order, the corresponding adiabatic electron affinities (EAs) amount to 0.71, -0.08, -0.40, 0.24, and 0.87 eV, whereas benchmark values equal to 7.43, 8.01, 7.48, 7.66 and 7.15 eV, are found for the adiabatic ionization energies.

  19. Zero-point energy, tunneling, and vibrational adiabaticity in the Mu + H2 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Fleming, Donald G.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-09

    Abstract: Isotopic substitution of muonium for hydrogen provides an unparalleled opportunity to deepen our understanding of quantum mass effects on chemical reactions. A recent topical review [Aldegunde et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3169 (2013)] of the thermal and vibrationally-stateselected reaction of Mu with H2 raises a number of issues that are addressed here. We show that some earlier quantum mechanical calculations of the Mu + H2 reaction, which are highlighted in this review and which have been used to benchmark approximate methods, are in error by as much as 19% in the low-temperature limit. We demonstrate that an approximate treatment of the Born–Oppenheimer diagonal correction that was used in some recent studies is not valid for treating the vibrationally-state-selected reaction. We also discuss why vibrationally adiabatic potentials that neglect bend zero-point energy are not a useful analytical tool for understanding reaction rates and why vibrationally nonadiabatic transitions cannot be understood by considering tunneling through vibrationally adiabatic potentials. Finally, we present calculations on a hierarchical family of potential energy surfaces to assess the sensitivity of rate constants to the quality of the potential surface.

  20. Crushing runtimes in adiabatic quantum computation with Energy Landscape Manipulation (ELM): Application to Quantum Factoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nike; Tanburn, Richard; Lunt, Oliver

    We introduce two methods for speeding up adiabatic quantum computations by increasing the energy between the ground and first excited states. Our methods are even more general. They can be used to shift a Hamiltonian's density of states away from the ground state, so that fewer states occupy the low-lying energies near the minimum, hence allowing for faster adiabatic passages to find the ground state with less risk of getting caught in an undesired low-lying excited state during the passage. Even more generally, our methods can be used to transform a discrete optimization problem into a new one whose unique minimum still encodes the desired answer, but with the objective function's values forming a different landscape. Aspects of the landscape such as the objective function's range, or the values of certain coefficients, or how many different inputs lead to a given output value, can be decreased *or* increased. One of the many examples for which these methods are useful is in finding the ground state of a Hamiltonian using NMR. We apply our methods to an AQC algorithm for integer factorization, and the first method reduces the maximum runtime in our example by up to 754%, and the second method reduces the maximum runtime of another example by up to 250%.

  1. Nonlinear ionization mechanism dependence of energy absorption in diamond under femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Cong; Jiang Lan; Li Xin; Wang Feng; Yuan Yanping; Lu Yongfeng

    2013-04-14

    We present first-principles calculations for nonlinear photoionization of diamond induced by the intense femtosecond laser field. A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional theory with the adiabatic local-density approximation is applied to describe the laser-material interactions in the Kohn-Sham formalism with the self-interaction correction. For a certain laser wavelength, the intensity dependence of energy absorption on multiphoton and/or tunnel ionization mechanisms is investigated, where laser intensity regions vary from 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the effect of laser wavelength on energy absorption at certain ionization mechanism is discussed when the Keldysh parameter is fixed. Theoretical results show that: (1) at the fixed laser wavelength, the relationship between the energy absorption and laser intensity shows a good fit of E = c{sub M}I{sup N} (N is the number of photons absorbed to free from the valence band) when multiphoton ionization dominates; (2) while when tunnel ionization becomes significant, the relationship coincides with the expression of E = c{sub T}I{sup n} (n < N).

  2. Alchemical Free Energy Differences in Flexible Molecules from Thermodynamic Integration or Free Energy Perturbation Combined with Driven Adiabatic Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cuendet, Michel A; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2012-10-01

    Alchemical free energy simulations are commonly used to calculate relative binding or solvation free energies in molecular systems. The convergence of alchemical free energy calculations is often hampered by inefficient sampling of the conformational degrees of freedom, which remain trapped in metastable substates. Here, we show that thermodynamic integration (TI) or free energy perturbation (FEP) can be combined with the recent driven adiabatic free energy dynamics (dAFED) method, in order to enhance conformational sampling along a set of chosen collective variables. The resulting TI-dAFED or FEP-dAFED methods are validated on a two-dimensional analytical problem. The ability of these methods to provide accurate free energy differences for realistic molecular systems is demonstrated by calculating the enantiomerization free energy of the alanine dipeptide in explicit solvent.

  3. Representing Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces Coupled by Conical Intersections in their Full Dimensionality Using Coupled Quasi-Diabatic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarkony, David

    2015-03-01

    The construction of fit single state potential energy surfaces (PESs), analytic representations of ab initio electronic energies and energy gradients, is now well established. These single state PESs, which are essential for accurate quantum dynamics and have found wide application in more approximate quasi-classical treatments, have revolutionized adiabatic dynamics. The situation for nonadiabatic processes involving dissociative and large amplitude motion is less sanguine. In these cases, compared to single electronic state dynamics, both the electronic structure data and the representation are more challenging to determine. We describe the recent development and applications of algorithms that enable description of multiple adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces coupled by conical intersections in their full dimensionality using coupled quasi-diabatic states. These representations are demonstrably quasi-diabatic, provide accurate representations of conical intersection seams and can smooth out the discontinuities in electronic structure energies due to changing active orbital spaces that routinely afflict global multistate representations.

  4. Einstein-Maxwell Dirichlet walls, negative kinetic energies, and the adiabatic approximation for extreme black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Kelly, William R.; Marolf, Donald

    2015-10-01

    The gravitational Dirichlet problem—in which the induced metric is fixed on boundaries at finite distance from the bulk—is related to simple notions of UV cutoffs in gauge/gravity duality and appears in discussions relating the low-energy behavior of gravity to fluid dynamics. We study the Einstein-Maxwell version of this problem, in which the induced Maxwell potential on the wall is also fixed. For flat walls in otherwise asymptotically flat spacetimes, we identify a moduli space of Majumdar-Papapetrou-like static solutions parametrized by the location of an extreme black hole relative to the wall. Such solutions may be described as balancing gravitational repulsion from a negative-mass image source against electrostatic attraction to an oppositely signed image charge. Standard techniques for handling divergences yield a moduli space metric with an eigenvalue that becomes negative near the wall, indicating a region of negative kinetic energy and suggesting that the Hamiltonian may be unbounded below. One may also surround the black hole with an additional (roughly spherical) Dirichlet wall to impose a regulator whose physics is more clear. Negative kinetic energies remain, though new terms do appear in the moduli space metric. The regulator dependence indicates that the adiabatic approximation may be ill-defined for classical extreme black holes with Dirichlet walls.

  5. Effects of non-adiabatic coupling in photofragmentation of CO(2) using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmasena, Kushlani Chandima

    1997-07-01

    We observed Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) spectra of nf2ΠΩ Rydberg states of CO2 for n=4 to 8. In addition, we also did a laser power dependence study of these states for n=5 to 7. We compared our results to two other studies by Johnson and coworkers and Dobber and coworkers. In the present study we observed that dissociation rate increased with increasing frequency. Also, we observed a clear difference in rates of dissociation for the two spin-orbit components of each nf state. This difference was not consistent, in some states the /Omega=1/2 component dissociated more while in the others /Omega=3/2 dissociated more. When comparing with Dobber and coworkers' REMPI-Photoelectron Spectra (REMPI-PES), a good correlation between the observed symmetric vibrational progressions and our dissociation rates was noticed. We also found that these rates stayed remarkably constant for different powers of the laser even though the production of CO+ ions required more photons than CO2+ ions. From this observation we came to the conclusion that the two-photon transition was saturated. What was surprising was, the amount of CO2+ ions observed despite the fact that the two-photon transition X 2Πg/to/to[ C]2Σg+ was saturated. The observed ratio of CO+/CO2+ ratio never was lower than 6. These observations led us to believe that CO+ ions were predominantly made by predissociation rather than direct dissociation. We propose that the two- photon transition is X 2Πg/to/to[ C]2Σg+ followed by predissociation of the C2ΣG+ state. In our model, predissociation must occur through a potential barrier in the C2Σg+ state which is on the order of an electron volt above the dissociation limit. We estimated the mean lifetime of this state to be about 600 psec by using the ratio of CO+/CO2+ from our spectra. This model explains two other phenomena observed in REMPI spectra. First is the observation of increased dissociation with increasing principal quantum number in the

  6. Precision measurements of ionization and dissociation energies by extrapolation of Rydberg series: from H2 to larger molecules.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, D; Beyer, M; Merkt, F

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments are reviewed which have led to the determination of the ionization and dissociation energies of molecular hydrogen with a precision of 0.0007 cm(-)1 (8 mJ/mol or 20 MHz) using a procedure based on high-resolution spectroscopic measurements of high Rydberg states and the extrapolation of the Rydberg series to the ionization thresholds. Molecular hydrogen, with only two protons and two electrons, is the simplest molecule with which all aspects of a chemical bond, including electron correlation effects, can be studied. Highly precise values of its ionization and dissociation energies provide stringent tests of the precision of molecular quantum mechanics and of quantum-electrodynamics calculations in molecules. The comparison of experimental and theoretical values for these quantities enable one to quantify the contributions to a chemical bond that are neglected when making the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, i.e. adiabatic, nonadiabatic, relativistic, and radiative corrections. Ionization energies of a broad range of molecules can now be determined experimentally with high accuracy (i.e. about 0.01 cm(-1)). Calculations at similar accuracies are extremely challenging for systems containing more than two electrons. The combination of precision measurements of molecular ionization energies with highly accurateab initio calculations has the potential to provide, in future, fully reliable sets of thermochemical quantities for gas-phase reactions. PMID:23967701

  7. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  8. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-11-15

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  9. Two-color resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization and zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy of jet-cooled indan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yonggang; Kong, Wei

    2005-06-01

    We report studies of supersonically cooled indan using two-color resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization and two-color zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. With the aid of ab initio and density-functional calculations, vibrational modes of the first electronically excited state of the neutral species and those of the cation have been assigned, and the adiabatic ionization energy has been determined to be 68458±5cm-1. Similar to the ground state and the first electronically excited state of the neutral molecule, the ground state of the cation is also proven to be nonplanar, with an estimated barrier of 213cm-1 and a puckering angle of 15.0°. These conclusions will be discussed in comparison with a previous study of an indan derivative 1,3-benzodioxole.

  10. Plasmadynamics and ionization kinetics of thermionic energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, J.L. Jr.; Lam, S.H.

    1982-02-01

    To reduce the plasma arc-drop, thermionic energy conversion is studied with both analytical and numerical tools. Simplifications are made in both the plasmadynamic and ionization-recombination theories. These are applied to a scheme proposed presently using laser irradiation to enhance the ionization kinetics of the thermionic plasma and thereby reduce the arc-drop. It is also predicted that it is possible to generate the required laser light from a thermionic-type cesium plasma. The analysis takes advantage of theoretical simplifications derived for the ionization-recombination kinetics. It is shown that large laser ionization enhancements can occur and that collisional cesium recombination lasing is expected. To complement the kinetic theory, a numerical method is developed to solve the thermionic plasma dynamics. To combine the analysis of ionization-recombination kinetics with the plasma dynamics of thermionic conversion, a finite difference computer program is constructed. It is capable of solving for both unsteady and steady thermionic converter behavior including possible laser ionization enhancement or atomic recombination lasing. A proposal to improve thermionic converter performance using laser radiation is considered. In this proposed scheme, laser radiation impinging on a thermionic plasma enhances the ionization process thereby raising the plasma density and reducing the plasma arc-drop. A source for such radiation may possibly be a cesium recombination laser operating in a different thermionic converter. The possibility of this being an energy efficient process is discussed. (WHK)

  11. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco; Sorella, Sandro; Casula, Michele

    2015-06-01

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π∗ (1La) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the 1La excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral 1La excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  12. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco Casula, Michele; Sorella, Sandro

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π{sup ∗} ({sup 1}L{sub a}) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  13. Theoretical Prediction of the Ionization Energies of the C₄H₇ Radicals: 1-Methylallyl, 2-Methylallyl, Cyclopropylmethyl, and Cyclobutyl Radicals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Kai Chung; Zheng, Wenxu; Wong, Ning-Bew; Li, Wai-kee

    2007-10-15

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ionization energies (IEs) for the 1-methylallyl, 2-methylallyl, cyclopropylmethyl, and cyclobutyl radicals have been calculated by the wave function based ab initio CCSD(T)/CBS approach, which involves the approximation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit at the coupled cluster level with single and double excitations plus quasiperturbative triple excitation [CCSD(T)]. The zero-point vibrational energy correction, the core-valence electronic correction, and the scalar relativistic effect correction are included in these calculations. The present CCSD(T)/CBS results are then compared with the IEs determined in the photoelectron experiment by Schultz et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106, 7336 (1984)] The predicted IE value (7.881 eV) of 2-methylallyl radical is found to compare very favorably with the experimental value of 7.90±0.02 eV. Two ionization transitions for cis-1-methylallyl and trans-1-methylallyl radicals have been considered here. The comparison between the predicted IE values and the previous measurements shows that the photoelectron peak observed by Schultz et al. likely corresponds to the adiabatic ionization transition for the trans-1-methylallyl radical to form trans-1-methylallyl cation. Although a precise IE value for the cyclopropylmethyl radical has not been directly determined, the experimental value deduced indirectly using other known energetic data is found to be in good accord with the present CCSD(T)/ CBS prediction. We expect that the Franck-Condon factor for ionization transition of c-C₄H₇ →bicyclobutonium is much less favorable than that for ionization transition of c-C₄H₇ →planar-C₄H₇ +, and the observed IE in the previous

  14. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  15. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  16. Ab initio ground and the first excited adiabatic and quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces of H + + CO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, D. X. F.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-08-01

    Ab initio global adiabatic as well as quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces for the ground and the first excited electronic states of the H + + CO system have been computed as a function of the Jacobi coordinates ( R, r, γ) using Dunning's cc-pVTZ basis set at the internally contracted multi-reference (single and double) configuration interaction level of accuracy. In addition, nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements arising from radial motion, mixing angle and coupling potential have been computed using the ab initio procedure [Simah et al. (1999) [66

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Ionization Energy Lowering in Water Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2004-01-01

    In studying various interstellar and solar system ice analogs, we have recently found that upon vacuum ultraviolet photolysis, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) frozen in water ice at low temperatures are easily ionized and indefinitely stabilized as trapped ions (Gudipati; Gudipati & Allamandola). Here we report the first experimental study that shows that PAH ionization energy is significantly lowered in PAH/H2O ices, in agreement with recent theoretical work (Woon & Park). The ionization energy (IE) of the PAH studied here, quaterrylene (C40H20, IE = 6.11 eV), is lowered by up to 2.11 eV in water ice. PAH ionization energy reduction in low-temperature water ice substantially expands the astronomical regions in which trapped ions and electrons may be important. This reduction in ionization energy should also hold for other types of trapped species in waterrich interstellar, circumstellar, and solar system ices. Subject headings: ISM: clouds - methods: laboratory - molecular processes - radiation mechanisms: nonthermal -ultraviolet: ISM - ultraviolet: solar system

  18. Ab initio adiabatic and quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces of lowest four electronic states of the H++O2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, F. George D.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-10-01

    Ab initio global adiabatic and quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces of lowest four electronic (1-4 A3″) states of the H++O2 system have been computed in the Jacobi coordinates (R,r,γ) using Dunning's cc-pVTZ basis set at the internally contracted multireference (single and double) configuration interaction level of accuracy, which are relevant to the dynamics studies of inelastic vibrational and charge transfer processes observed in the scattering experiments. The computed equilibrium geometry parameters of the bound [HO2]+ ion in the ground electronic state and other parameters for the transition state for the isomerization process, HOO+⇌OOH+ are in good quantitative agreement with those available from the high level ab initio calculations, thus lending credence to the accuracy of the potential energy surfaces. The nonadiabatic couplings between the electronic states have been analyzed in both the adiabatic and quasidiabatic frameworks by computing the nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements and the coupling potentials, respectively. It is inferred that the dynamics of energy transfer processes in the scattering experiments carried out in the range of 9.5-23 eV would involve all the four electronic states.

  19. Non-Adiabatic Mechanism for Photosynthetic Energy Transfer and All-Optical Determination of Concentration using Femtosecond Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vivek

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the fundamental physics of light-harvesting in both, natural and artificial systems is key for the development of efficient light-harvesting technologies. My thesis addresses the following topics, i.) the mechanism underlying the remarkably efficient electronic energy transfer in natural light harvesting antennas, ii.) a femtosecond time-resolved photonumeric technique to quantitatively characterize transient chemical species. This talk will concentrate on the first project, while briefly touching the key ideas of the second project. Light harvesting antennas use a set of closely spaced pigment molecules held in a controlled relative geometry by a protein. It is shown that in certain antenna proteins the excited state electronic energy gaps between the pigments are resonant with a quantum of pigment vibrational energy. With such a vibrational-electronic resonance, anti-correlated motions between the pigments lead to a strong coupling between the electronic and nuclear motions, that is, breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, over a wide range of pigment vibrational motions. It is shown that the 2D spectroscopic signatures of the resulting unavoidable nested non-adiabatic energy funnel on the excited states of photosynthetic antennas are consistent with all the reported 2D signatures of long-lived coherent oscillations, including the ones that are not explained by prior models of excited state electronic energy transfer. Extensions that account for both resonant and near-resonant pigment vibrations suggest that photosynthetic energy transfer presents a novel design in which electronic energy transfer proceeds non-adiabatically through clusters of vibrations with frequencies distributed around electronic energy gaps. I will also briefly talk about our experiments demonstrating quantitative time-resolved measurement of absolute number of excited state molecules. Based on these measurements, an all-optical technique that simultaneously determines

  20. Dissociative Ionization Mechanism and Appearance Energies in Adipic Acid Revealed by Imaging Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence, Selective Deuteration, and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Heringa, Maarten F; Slowik, Jay G; Prévôt, André S H; Baltensperger, Urs; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras

    2016-05-26

    Adipic acid, a model compound for oxygenated organic aerosol, has been studied at the VUV beamline of the Swiss Light Source. Internal energy selected cations were prepared by threshold photoionization using vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy (iPEPICO). The threshold photoelectron spectrum yields a vertical ionization energy (IE) of 10.5 eV, significantly above the calculated adiabatic IE of 8.6 eV. The cationic minimum is accessible after vertical ionization by H-transfer from one of the γ-carbons to a carbonyl oxygen and is sufficiently energetic to decay by water loss at the ionization onset. The slope of the breakdown curves, quantum chemical calculations, and selective deuteration of the carboxylic hydrogens establish the dissociative photoionization mechanism. After ionization, one γ-methylene hydrogen and the two carboxylic hydrogens are randomized prior to H2O loss. On the basis of the deuteration degree in the H2O + CO-loss product at higher energies, a direct water-loss channel without complete randomization also exists. The breakdown diagram and center of gravity of the H2O + CO-loss peak were modeled to obtain 0 K appearance energies of 10.77, 10.32, and 11.53 eV for H2O + CO loss, CH2COOH loss, and H2O + CH2COOH loss from adipic acid. These agree well with the CBS-QB3 calculated values of 10.68, 10.45, and 11.57 eV, respectively, which shows that threshold photoionization can yield energetics data as long as the dissociation is statistical, even when the parent ion cannot be observed. The results can be used as a starting point for a deeper understanding of the ionization and low-energy fragmentation of organic aerosol components. PMID:27100102

  1. Trends in Ionization Energy of Transition-Metal Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    A rationale for the difference in the periodic trends in the ionization energy of the transition-metal elements versus the main-group elements is presented. The difference is that in the transition-metal elements, the electrons enter an inner-shell electron orbital, while in the main-group elements, the electrons enter an outer-shell electron…

  2. Determination of ionization energies of small silicon clusters with vacuum?ultraviolet (VUV) radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Leone, Stephen R.; Duncan, Michael A.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-09-23

    In this work we report on single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of small silicon clusters (n=1-7) produced via laser ablation of Si. The adiabatic ionization energies (AIE) are extracted from experimental photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves with the help of Frank?Condon simulations, used to interpret the shape and onset of the PIE curves. The obtained AIEs are (all energies are in eV): Si (8.13+-0.05), Si2 (7.92+-0.05), Si3 (8.12+-0.05), Si4 (8.2+-0.1), Si5 (7.96+-0.07), Si6 (7.8+-0.1), and Si7 (7.8+-0.1). Most of the experimental AIE values are in good agreement with ab initio electronic structure calculations. To explain observed deviations between the experimental and theoretical AIEs for Si4 and Si6, a theoretical search of different isomers of these species is performed. Electronic structure calculations aid in the interpretation of the a2PIu state of Si2+ dimer in the PIE spectrum. Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations are performed to reveal the energies of electronically excited states in the cations for a number of Si clusters.

  3. Average local ionization energy generalized to correlated wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Staroverov, Viktor N.

    2014-08-28

    The average local ionization energy function introduced by Politzer and co-workers [Can. J. Chem. 68, 1440 (1990)] as a descriptor of chemical reactivity has a limited utility because it is defined only for one-determinantal self-consistent-field methods such as the Hartree–Fock theory and the Kohn–Sham density-functional scheme. We reinterpret the negative of the average local ionization energy as the average total energy of an electron at a given point and, by rewriting this quantity in terms of reduced density matrices, arrive at its natural generalization to correlated wavefunctions. The generalized average local electron energy turns out to be the diagonal part of the coordinate representation of the generalized Fock operator divided by the electron density; it reduces to the original definition in terms of canonical orbitals and their eigenvalues for one-determinantal wavefunctions. The discussion is illustrated with calculations on selected atoms and molecules at various levels of theory.

  4. Low-energy electron-impact ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Schow, E.; Hazlett, K.; Childers, J. G.; Medina, C.; Vitug, G.; Khakoo, M. A.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.

    2005-12-15

    Normalized doubly differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of helium at low energies are presented. The data are taken at the incident electron energies of 26.3, 28.3, 30.3, 32.5, 34.3, 36.5, and 40.7 eV and for scattering angles of 10 deg. -130 deg. The measurements involve the use of the moveable target method developed at California State University Fullerton to accurately determine the continuum background in the energy-loss spectra. Normalization of experimental data is made on a relative scale to well-established experimental differential cross sections for excitation of the n=2 manifold of helium and then on an absolute scale to the well-established total ionization cross sections of Shah et al. [J. Phys. B 21, 2751 (1988)]. Comparisons are made with available experimental data and the results of the convergent close-coupling theory.

  5. Effect of the corrected ionization potential and spatial distribution on the angular and energy distribution in tunnel ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, V. M.; Miladinović, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory, we consider the angular and energy distribution of outgoing electrons due to ionization by a circularly polarized electromagnetic field. A correction of the ground ionization potential by the ponderomotive and Stark shift is incorporated in both distributions. Spatial dependence is analyzed.

  6. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Neels, Alice

    2015-07-01

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  7. Vertical Ionization Energies of Adenine and 9-Methyl Adenine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgounitcheva, O.; Zakrzewski, V. G.; Ortiz, J. V.

    2009-07-01

    Vertical ionization energies of 9-H adenine and 9-methyl adenine have been calculated with the following, ab initio, electron propagator methods: the outer valence Green's function (OVGF), partial third-order theory (P3), and the third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction, or ADC(3). Basis set effects have been systematically examined. All methods predict near degeneracy in the π2-n1 and π3-n2 pairs of cationic, adenine final states and larger splittings of the corresponding, cationic states of 9-methyl adenine. P3 results for adenine predict the following order of the first six final states: π1, n1, π2, n2, π3, n3. Coupled-cluster calculations on the first three cationic states of adenine confirm these predictions. OVGF and ADC(3) calculations reverse the order of the second and third states and of the fourth and fifth states. All results confirm previous interpretations of experiments in which the second and third spectral bands correspond to the aforementioned pairs of final states and disagree with a recent reassignment based on time-resolved photoelectron spectra. Lower ionization energies and larger splittings in the methylated molecule are interpreted in terms of phase relationships in the Dyson orbitals. ADC(3) results confirm the qualitative validity of the one-electron approximation for the first six final states of both molecules and disclose its inadequacies for higher ionization energies.

  8. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  9. Numerical Investigation of the effect of adiabatic section location on thermal performance of a heat pipe network with the application in thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Tiari, Saeed; Qiu, Songgang

    2015-11-01

    Latent heat thermal energy storage systems benefits from high energy density and isothermal storing process. However, the low thermal conductivity of the phase change material leads to prolong the melting or solidification time. Using a passive device such as heat pipes is required to enhance the heat transfer and to improve the efficiency of the system. In the present work, the performance of a heat pipe network specifically designed for a thermal energy storage system is studied numerically. The network includes a primary heat pipe, which transfers heat received from solar receiver to the heat engine. The excess heat is simultaneously delivered to charge the phase change material via secondary heat pipes. The primary heat pipe composed of a disk shape evaporator, an adiabatic section and a disk shape condenser. The adiabatic section can be either located at the center or positioned outward to the surrounding of the container. Here, the effect of adiabatic section position on thermal performance of the system is investigated. It was concluded that displacing the adiabatic section outwards dramatically increases the average temperatures of the condensers and reduces the thermal resistance of heat pipes.

  10. DNA lesion can facilitate base ionization: vertical ionization energies of aqueous 8-oxoguanine and its nucleoside and nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Palivec, Vladimír; Pluhařová, Eva; Unger, Isaak; Winter, Bernd; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-01

    8-Oxoguanine is one of the key products of indirect radiation damage to DNA by reactive oxygen species. Here, we describe ionization of this damaged nucleobase and the corresponding nucleoside and nucleotide in aqueous phase, modeled by the nonequilibrium polarizable continuum model, establishing their lowest vertical ionization energies of 6.8-7.0 eV. We thus confirm that 8-oxoguanine has even lower ionization energy than the parental guanine, which is the canonical nucleobase with the lowest ionization energy. Therefore, it can act as a trap for the cationic hole formed by ionizing radiation and thus protect DNA from further radiation damage. We also model using time-dependent density functional theory and measure by liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy the valence photoelectron spectrum of 8-oxoguanine in water. We show that the calculated higher lying ionization states match well the experiment which, however, is not sensitive enough to capture the electron signal corresponding to the lowest ionization process due to the low solubility of 8-oxoguanine in water.

  11. Ion energies in high power impulse magnetron sputtering with and without localized ionization zones

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuchen; Tanaka, Koichi; Liu, Jason; Anders, André

    2015-03-23

    High speed imaging of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has revealed that ionization is localized in moving ionization zones but localization disappears at high currents for high yield targets. This offers an opportunity to study the effect ionization zones have on ion energies. We measure that ions have generally higher energies when ionization zones are present, supporting the concept that these zones are associated with moving potential humps. We propose that the disappearance of ionization zones is caused by an increased supply of atoms from the target which cools electrons and reduces depletion of atoms to be ionized.

  12. Electronic resonance with anticorrelated pigment vibrations drives photosynthetic energy transfer outside the adiabatic framework

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vivek; Peters, William K.; Jonas, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The delocalized, anticorrelated component of pigment vibrations can drive nonadiabatic electronic energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting antennas. In femtosecond experiments, this energy transfer mechanism leads to excitation of delocalized, anticorrelated vibrational wavepackets on the ground electronic state that exhibit not only 2D spectroscopic signatures attributed to electronic coherence and oscillatory quantum energy transport but also a cross-peak asymmetry not previously explained by theory. A number of antennas have electronic energy gaps matching a pigment vibrational frequency with a small vibrational coordinate change on electronic excitation. Such photosynthetic energy transfer steps resemble molecular internal conversion through a nested intermolecular funnel. PMID:23267114

  13. Efficient near-field wireless energy transfer using adiabatic system variations

    DOEpatents

    Hamam, Rafif E; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-16

    Disclosed is a method for transferring energy wirelessly including transferring energy wirelessly from a first resonator structure to an intermediate resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the first resonator structure and the intermediate resonator structure is .kappa..sub.1B, transferring energy wirelessly from the intermediate resonator structure to a second resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the intermediate resonator structure and the second resonator structure is .kappa..sub.B2, and during the wireless energy transfers, adjusting at least one of the coupling rates .kappa..sub.1B and .kappa..sub.B2 to reduce energy accumulation in the intermediate resonator structure and improve wireless energy transfer from the first resonator structure to the second resonator structure through the intermediate resonator structure.

  14. Efficient near-field wireless energy transfer using adiabatic system variations

    DOEpatents

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljacic, Marin

    2013-01-29

    Disclosed is a method for transferring energy wirelessly including transferring energy wirelessly from a first resonator structure to an intermediate resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the first resonator structure and the intermediate resonator structure is .kappa..sub.1B, transferring energy wirelessly from the intermediate resonator structure to a second resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the intermediate resonator structure and the second resonator structure is .kappa..sub.B2, and during the wireless energy transfers, adjusting at least one of the coupling rates .kappa..sub.1B and .kappa..sub.B2 to reduce energy accumulation in the intermediate resonator structure and improve wireless energy transfer from the first resonator structure to the second resonator structure through the intermediate resonator structure.

  15. IONS (ANURADHA): Ionization states of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Chakraborti, R.; Cowsik, R.; Durgaprasad, N.; Kajarekar, P. J.; Singh, R. K.; Vahia, M. N.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutt, N.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    IONS (ANURADHA), the experimental payload designed specifically to determine the ionization states, flux, composition, energy spectra and arrival directions of low energy (10 to 100 MeV/amu) anomalous cosmic ray ions of helium to iron in near-Earth space, had a highly successful flight and operation Spacelab-3 mission. The experiment combines the accuracy of a highly sensitive CR-39 nuclear track detector with active components included in the payload to achieve the experimental objectives. Post-flight analysis of detector calibration pieces placed within the payload indicated no measurable changes in detector response due to its exposure in spacelab environment. Nuclear tracks produced by alpha-particles, oxygen group and Fe ions in low energy anomalous cosmic rays were identified. It is calculated that the main detector has recorded high quality events of about 10,000 alpha-particles and similar number of oxygen group and heavier ions of low energy cosmic rays.

  16. Efficient Ionization Investigation for Flow Control and Energy Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Kamhawi, Hani; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2009-01-01

    Nonequilibrium ionization of air by nonthermal means is explored for hypersonic vehicle applications. The method selected for evaluation generates a weakly ionized plasma using pulsed nanosecond, high-voltage discharges sustained by a lower dc voltage. These discharges promise to provide a means of energizing and sustaining electrons in the air while maintaining a nearly constant ion/neutral molecule temperature. This paper explores the use of short approx.5 nsec, high-voltage approx.12 to 22 kV, repetitive (40 to 100 kHz) discharges in generating a weakly ionized gas sustained by a 1 kV dc voltage in dry air at pressures from 10 to 80 torr. Demonstrated lifetimes of the sustainer discharge current approx.10 to 25 msec are over three orders of magnitude longer than the 5 nsec pulse that generates the electrons. This life is adequate for many high speed flows, enabling the possibility of exploiting weakly ionized plasma phenomena in flow-fields such as those in hypersonic inlets, combustors, and nozzles. Results to date are obtained in a volume of plasma between electrodes in a bell jar. The buildup and decay of the visible emission from the pulser excited air is photographed on an ICCD camera with nanosecond resolution and the time constants for visible emission decay are observed to be between 10 to 15 nsec decreasing as pressure increases. The application of the sustainer voltage does not change the visible emission decay time constant. Energy consumption as indicated by power output from the power supplies is 194 to 669 W depending on pulse repetition rate.

  17. The /A 1 Sigma +/ - /X 1 Sigma +/ system of the isotopic lithium hydrides - The molecular constants, potential energy curves, and their adiabatic corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, C. R.; Stwalley, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    The molecular constants and their adiabatic corrections have been determined for the (A 1 Sigma +) - (X 1 Sigma +) system of the isotopic lithium hydrides: (Li-6)H, (Li-7)H, (Li-6)D, and (Li-7)D. Using a fully quantum mechanical variational method, the potential energy curves (IPA potentials) are determined. Extending the variational method, we have obtained for the first time adiabatic corrections of potential energy curves from isotopic spectroscopic data. A significant difference between the potential energy curves of the lithium hydrides and the lithium deuterides has been observed. When Li-6 was replaced by Li-7, a significant difference was only observed for the (A 1 Sigma +) state, but not for the (X 1 Sigma +) state.

  18. Analysis of hyperspherical adiabatic curves of helium: A classical dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonović, N. S.; Solov'ev, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    The hyperspherical adiabatic curves (adiabatic eigenenergies as functions of the hyperradius R) of helium for zero total angular momentum are analyzed by studying the underlying classical dynamics which in the adiabatic treatment reduces to constrained two-electron motion on a hypersphere. This dynamics supports five characteristic classical configurations which can be represented by five types of short periodic orbits: the frozen planet (FP), the inverted frozen planet (IFP), the asymmetric stretch (AS), the asynchronous (ASC), and the Langmuir periodic orbit (PO). These POs are considered as fundamental modes of the two-electron motion on a hypersphere which, after quantization, give five families of so-called adiabatic lines (adiabatic energies related to these POs as functions of R). It is found that multiplets, each of them consisting of adiabatic curves which converge to the same ionization threshold, are at large values of R delimited from the bottom and from the top by the adiabatic lines which are related to the IFP and stable AS POs and to the FP PO, respectively. At smaller values of R, where the AS PO becomes unstable, the curves move to the area between the ASC (bottom) and AS (top) lines by crossing the latter. Therefore, at different values of R the lower limiting line of the multiplet is related to the three types of PO (IFP, AS, and ASC), which are all stable in the negative-energy part of this line. As a consequence, the quantum states of helium in principle are not related individually to a single classical configuration on the hypersphere. In addition, it is demonstrated that “unstable parts” of adiabatic lines (the so-called diabatic curves) determine the positions and type of avoided and hidden crossings between hyperspherical adiabatic curves. Two clearly visible classes of avoided crossings are related to the AS and ASC POs. In addition, a number of avoided crossings of the adiabatic curves is observed at the positions where the

  19. On the representation of coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces using quasi-diabatic Hamiltonians: A distributed origins expansion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Yarkony, David R.

    2012-05-01

    In two previous papers we have introduced a method to generate coupled quasi-diabatic Hamiltonians (Hd) that are capable of representing adiabatic energies, energy gradients, and derivative couplings over a wide range of geometries including seams of conical intersection. In this work, two new synergistic features are introduced. Firstly, the functional form of Hd is generalized. Rather than requiring there to be a low energy point of high symmetry to serve as the unique origin, functions centered on points distributed in nuclear coordinate space are used in the polynomials that comprise the matrix elements in Hd. The use of functions with distributed origins, allows reproduction of the ab initio data with lower order expansions, and offers the possibility of describing multichannel dissociation. The fitting algorithm is combined with a three-step procedure in which the domain of Hd is extended from a core set of nuclear configurations to a region of nuclear coordinate space appropriate for nuclear dynamics, with a prescribed accuracy. This significant extension of the domain of definition compared to our original work, which is facilitated by the distributed origin approach, is achieved largely through the use of surface hopping trajectories. The 1,21A states of NH3, which provide an archetypical example of nonadiabatic dynamics, are used to demonstrate the utility of this approach. The representation describes 21 points on the 11A-21A seam of conical intersection and their local topography flawlessly and on the entire domain, the electronic structure data is represented to an accuracy of 77.00 (46.90) cm-1, as measured by the root mean square (mean unsigned) error for energies lower than 50 000 cm-1. This error is a factor of 10 lower than that of the most accurate representation of high quality ab initio data, on a comparable domain, previously reported for this system.

  20. Above-threshold ionization for very low electron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, W.; Milošević, D. B.

    2015-08-01

    The rescattering term of the ionization amplitude in the strong-field approximation is analyzed for very low electron energy and emission in arbitrary direction, first in terms of the classical simple-man model and then in the quantum-mechanical quantum-orbit expansion of the strong-field-approximation amplitude. Particular orbits can be associated with particular patterns in the velocity map. The different roles of forward and backscattering are investigated. In addition to known features such as the LES and the fork, a characteristic and pronounced V structure in the velocity map is identified, which has been observed in recent experiments (2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 063424).

  1. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kočišek, J. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz; Slavíček, P. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar{sup +} and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ∼28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar{sup +}* and water opens leading to new products Ar{sub n}H{sup +} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +}. On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sub 2}{sup 2+} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 2+} ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent.

  2. High field - low energy muon ionization cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham; Palmer, Robert B.; Neuffer, David

    2015-09-01

    Muon beams are generated with large transverse and longitudinal emittances. In order to achieve the low emittances required by a muon collider, within the short lifetime of the muons, ionization cooling is required. Cooling schemes have been developed to reduce the muon beam 6D emittances to ≈300 μ m -rad in transverse and ≈1 - 1.5 mm in longitudinal dimensions. The transverse emittance has to be further reduced to ≈50 - 25 μ m -rad with an upper limit on the longitudinal emittance of ≈76 mm in order to meet the high-energy muon collider luminosity requirements. Earlier studies of the transverse cooling of low energy muon beams in high field magnets showed a promising performance, but did not include transverse or longitudinal matching between the stages. In this study we present the first complete design of the high field-low energy ionization cooling channel with transverse and longitudinal matching. The channel design was based on strong focusing solenoids with fields of 25-30 T and low momentum muon beam starting at 135 MeV /c and gradually decreasing. The cooling channel design presented here is the first to reach ≈50 micron scale emittance beam. We present the channel's optimized design parameters including the focusing solenoid fields, absorber parameters and the transverse and longitudinal matching.

  3. Electron impact ionization of 5- and 6-chlorouracil: appearance energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denifl, S.; Ptasinska, S.; Gstir, B.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2004-03-01

    Electron impact ionization of the gas phase modified DNA/RNA bases 5- and 6-ClU was studied using a crossed electron/neutral beams technique in combination with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. 5- and 6-ClU belong to the class of halouracils which are used in radiation therapy to increase the effect of ionizing radiation to tumours, when they are incorporated into cancer tissue. Besides determining the mass spectra for both molecules at the electron energy of 70 eV, the ionization efficiency curves for each parent ion and the most abundant fragment ions were measured near the threshold and the corresponding appearance energies (AEs) were derived using an iterative, non-linear least square fitting procedure using the Marquart-Levenberg algorithm based on the Wannier threshold law. The most abundant cations observed in mass spectra have a threshold value of AE ((C3H2ClNO)+/5-ClU)=11.12+/-0.03 eV and AE ((C3H2NO)+/6-ClU)=12.06+/-0.03 eV. The present AE value for the parent ion of 5-ClU AE((5-ClU)+/5-ClU)=9.38+/-0.05 eV is in fair agreement with previous calculations at the B3LYP level of theory. The AE((6-ClU)+/6-ClU)=9.71+/-0.05 eV is 0.33 eV higher than that for 5-ClU.

  4. A discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometric study of the FO(X 2 Pi i) radical. Photoionization efficiency spectrum and ionization energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Kuo, Szu-Cherng; Klemm, R. Bruce; Monks, Paul S.; Stief, Louis J.

    1994-01-01

    Photoionization efficiency spectra of FO were measured over the wavelength range 80.0-100.0 nm and in the ionization threshold region, 94.0-100.0 nm, using a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer apparatus coupled to a synchrotron radiation source. FO was generated by the reaction of F2P atoms with NO3 and via a F2O2 discharge. A value of 12.78 +/- 0.03 eV was obtained for the adiabatic ionization energy of FO from photoion thresholds which corresponds to FO(+)(X 3 Sigma -) from FO(X 2 Pi i). These results, which are the first to be obtained by direct Photo-ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) measurements, corroborate those of a photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) study; however, the ionization energy determined here is free from interferences due to other species which complicated the PES measurement. A value of 109.5 +/- 8.0 kJ/mol for Delta f H 0 298(FO) is computed from the present value of IE(FO) and a previous appearance energy measurement, and a value for the proton affinity of FO is calculated to be 511.5 +/- 10.0 kJ/mol.

  5. Theoretical prediction of the ionization energies of the C4H7 radicals: 1-methylallyl, 2-methylallyl, cyclopropylmethyl, and cyclobutyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kai-Chung; Zheng, Wenxu; Wong, Ning-Bew; Li, Wai-Kee

    2007-10-21

    The ionization energies (IEs) for the 1-methylallyl, 2-methylallyl, cyclopropylmethyl, and cyclobutyl radicals have been calculated by the wave function based ab initio CCSD(T)/CBS approach, which involves the approximation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit at the coupled cluster level with single and double excitations plus quasiperturbative triple excitation [CCSD(T)]. The zero-point vibrational energy correction, the core-valence electronic correction, and the scalar relativistic effect correction are included in these calculations. The present CCSD(T)/CBS results are then compared with the IEs determined in the photoelectron experiment by Schultz et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106, 7336 (1984)] The predicted IE value (7.881 eV) of 2-methylallyl radical is found to compare very favorably with the experimental value of 7.90+/-0.02 eV. Two ionization transitions for cis-1-methylallyl and trans-1-methylallyl radicals have been considered here. The comparison between the predicted IE values and the previous measurements shows that the photoelectron peak observed by Schultz et al. likely corresponds to the adiabatic ionization transition for the trans-1-methylallyl radical to form trans-1-methylallyl cation. Although a precise IE value for the cyclopropylmethyl radical has not been directly determined, the experimental value deduced indirectly using other known energetic data is found to be in good accord with the present CCSD(T)/CBS prediction. We expect that the Franck-Condon factor for ionization transition of c-C4H7-->bicyclobutonium is much less favorable than that for ionization transition of c-C4H7-->planar-C4H7+, and the observed IE in the previous photoelectron experiment is likely due to the ionization transition for c-C4H7-->planar-C4H7+. Based on our CCSD(T)/CBS prediction, the ionization transition of c-C4H7-->bicyclobutonium with an IE value around 6.92 eV should be taken as the adiabatic ionization transition for the cyclobutyl radical. The present

  6. Calculation of reaction energies and adiabatic temperatures for waste tank reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, L.L.

    1995-10-01

    Continual concern has been expressed over potentially hazardous exothermic reactions that might occur in Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. These tanks contain many different oxidizable compounds covering a wide range of concentrations. The chemical hazards are a function of several interrelated factors, including the amount of energy (heat) produced, how fast it is produced, and the thermal absorption and heat transfer properties of the system. The reaction path(s) will determine the amount of energy produced and kinetics will determine the rate that it is produced. The tanks also contain many inorganic compounds inert to oxidation. These compounds act as diluents and can inhibit exothermic reactions because of their heat capacity and thus, in contrast to the oxidizable compounds, provide mitigation of hazardous reactions. In this report the energy that may be released when various organic and inorganic compounds react is computed as a function of the reaction-mix composition and the temperature. The enthalpy, or integrated heat capacity, of these compounds and various reaction products is presented as a function of temperature; the enthalpy of a given mixture can then be equated to the energy release from various reactions to predict the maximum temperature which may be reached. This is estimated for several different compositions. Alternatively, the amounts of various diluents required to prevent the temperature from reaching a critical value can be estimated. Reactions taking different paths, forming different products such as N{sub 2}O in place of N{sub 2} are also considered, as are reactions where an excess of caustic is present. Oxidants other than nitrate and nitrite are considered briefly.

  7. Cosmic ray composition measurements and high energy ionization spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, J. F.; Ormes, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Element abundances of cosmic rays Li through Si with energy above 0.8 GeV/amu were measured on a balloon borne instrument containing a total absorption ionization spectrometer. Statistical techniques were used to analyze the five measurements of each particle to determine its charge and energy. The technique allows a determination of systematic errors to be made. Corrections for Landau fluctuations, spark chamber inefficiency, and background particles were included. Comparison with other published results is made. Differences in the shape of the spectrum determined from measurements of different workers indicate that the absolute intensity is still known to only plus or minus 15% between 2 and 10 GV/c rigidity.

  8. Calculation of reaction energies and adiabatic temperatures for waste tank reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, L.L.

    1993-03-01

    Continual concern has been expressed over potentially hazardous exothermic reactions that might occur in underground Hanford waste tanks. These tanks contain many different oxidizable compounds covering a wide range of concentrations. Several may be in concentrations and quantities great enough to be considered a hazard in that they could undergo rapid and energetic chemical reactions with nitrate and nitrite salts that are present. The tanks also contain many inorganic compounds inert to oxidation. In this report the computed energy that may be released when various organic and inorganic compounds react is computed as a function of the reaction mix composition and the temperature. The enthalpy, or integrated heat capacity, of these compounds and various reaction products is presented as a function of temperature, and the enthalpy of a given mixture can then be equated to the energy release from various reactions to predict the maximum temperature that may be reached. This is estimated for several different compositions. Alternatively, the amounts of various diluents required to prevent the temperature from reaching a critical value can be estimated.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet ionization of pure He nanodroplets: mass-correlated photoelectron imaging, Penning ionization, and electron energy-loss spectra.

    PubMed

    Buchta, D; Krishnan, S R; Brauer, N B; Drabbels, M; O'Keeffe, P; Devetta, M; Di Fraia, M; Callegari, C; Richter, R; Coreno, M; Prince, K C; Stienkemeier, F; Ullrich, J; Moshammer, R; Mudrich, M

    2013-08-28

    The ionization dynamics of pure He nanodroplets irradiated by Extreme ultraviolet radiation is studied using Velocity-Map Imaging PhotoElectron-PhotoIon COincidence spectroscopy. We present photoelectron energy spectra and angular distributions measured in coincidence with the most abundant ions He(+), He2(+), and He3(+). Surprisingly, below the autoionization threshold of He droplets, we find indications for multiple excitation and subsequent ionization of the droplets by a Penning-like process. At high photon energies we observe inelastic collisions of photoelectrons with the surrounding He atoms in the droplets.

  10. Topology of the Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces for theResonance States of the Water Anion

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-04-15

    The potential energy surfaces corresponding to the long-lived fixed-nuclei electron scattering resonances of H{sub 2}O relevant to the dissociative electron attachment process are examined using a combination of ab initio scattering and bound-state calculations. These surfaces have a rich topology, characterized by three main features: a conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} Feshbach resonance states; charge-transfer behavior in the OH ({sup 2}{Pi}) + H{sup -} asymptote of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} resonances; and an inherent double-valuedness of the surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 2} state the C{sub 2v} geometry, arising from a branch-point degeneracy with a {sup 2}B{sub 2} shape resonance. In total, eight individual seams of degeneracy among these resonances are located.

  11. Accurate potential energy functions, non-adiabatic and spin-orbit couplings in the ZnH(+) system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guiying; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Haifeng; Yan, Bing

    2016-03-01

    A high-level ab initio calculation on the ZnH(+) cation has been carried out with the multi-reference configuration interaction method plus Davison correction (MRCI+Q). The scalar relativistic effect is included by using the Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) method. The calculated potential energy curves (PECs) of the 7 Λ-S states are associated with the dissociation limits of Zn(+)((2)Sg)+H((2)Sg), Zn((1)Sg)+H(+)((1)Sg), and Zn(+)((2)Pu)+H((2)Sg), respectively (The Λ-S state is labeled as (2S+1)Λ, in which Λ is the quantum number for the projection along the internuclear axis of the total electronic orbital angular momentum and S is the total electron spin). The spectroscopic constants of the bound states are determined and in good agreement with the available theoretical and experimental results. The permanent dipole moments (PDMs) of Λ-S states and the spin-orbit (SO) matrix elements between Λ-S states are also computed. The results show that the abrupt changes of the PDMs and SO matrix elements come into being for the reason of the avoided crossing between the states with the same symmetry. In addition, the non-adiabatic couplings matrix elements between Λ-S states are also evaluated. Finally, the spin-orbit couplings (SOCs) for the low-lying states are considered with Breit-Pauli operator. The SOC effect makes the 7 Λ-S states of the ZnH(+) cation split into 12 Ω states (Ω=Λ+Sz, in which Sz is projection of the total electron spin S along the internuclear Z-axis). For the (3)0(+) state, the two energy minima exhibit in the potential, which could be attributed to the formation of the new avoided crossing point. The transition dipole moments (TDMs), Franck-Condon factors, and the radiative lifetimes of the selected transitions (2)0(+)-X0(+), (3)0(+)-X0(+), (2)1-X0(+) and (3)1-X0(+) have been reported.

  12. Accurate potential energy functions, non-adiabatic and spin-orbit couplings in the ZnH+ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guiying; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Haifeng; Yan, Bing

    2016-03-01

    A high-level ab initio calculation on the ZnH+ cation has been carried out with the multi-reference configuration interaction method plus Davison correction (MRCI + Q). The scalar relativistic effect is included by using the Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) method. The calculated potential energy curves (PECs) of the 7 Λ-S states are associated with the dissociation limits of Zn+(2Sg) + H(2Sg), Zn(1Sg) + H+(1Sg), and Zn+(2Pu) + H(2Sg), respectively (The Λ-S state is labeled as 2S + 1Λ, in which Λ is the quantum number for the projection along the internuclear axis of the total electronic orbital angular momentum and S is the total electron spin). The spectroscopic constants of the bound states are determined and in good agreement with the available theoretical and experimental results. The permanent dipole moments (PDMs) of Λ-S states and the spin-orbit (SO) matrix elements between Λ-S states are also computed. The results show that the abrupt changes of the PDMs and SO matrix elements come into being for the reason of the avoided crossing between the states with the same symmetry. In addition, the non-adiabatic couplings matrix elements between Λ-S states are also evaluated. Finally, the spin-orbit couplings (SOCs) for the low-lying states are considered with Breit-Pauli operator. The SOC effect makes the 7 Λ-S states of the ZnH+ cation split into 12 Ω states (Ω = Λ + Sz, in which Sz is projection of the total electron spin S along the internuclear Z-axis). For the (3)0+ state, the two energy minima exhibit in the potential, which could be attributed to the formation of the new avoided crossing point. The transition dipole moments (TDMs), Franck-Condon factors, and the radiative lifetimes of the selected transitions (2)0+-X0+, (3)0+-X0+, (2)1-X0+ and (3)1-X0+ have been reported.

  13. Studies in Chaotic adiabatic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzynski, C.

    1994-01-01

    Chaotic adiabatic dynamics refers to the study of systems exhibiting chaotic evolution under slowly time-dependent equations of motion. In this dissertation the author restricts his attention to Hamiltonian chaotic adiabatic systems. The results presented are organized around a central theme, namely, that the energies of such systems evolve diffusively. He begins with a general analysis, in which he motivates and derives a Fokker-Planck equation governing this process of energy diffusion. He applies this equation to study the {open_quotes}goodness{close_quotes} of an adiabatic invariant associated with chaotic motion. This formalism is then applied to two specific examples. The first is that of a gas of noninteracting point particles inside a hard container that deforms slowly with time. Both the two- and three-dimensional cases are considered. The results are discussed in the context of the Wall Formula for one-body dissipation in nuclear physics, and it is shown that such a gas approaches, asymptotically with time, an exponential velocity distribution. The second example involves the Fermi mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays. Explicit evolution equations are obtained for the distribution of cosmic ray energies within this model, and the steady-state energy distribution that arises when this equation is modified to account for the injection and removal of cosmic rays is discussed. Finally, the author re-examines the multiple-time-scale approach as applied to the study of phase space evolution under a chaotic adiabatic Hamiltonian. This leads to a more rigorous derivation of the above-mentioned Fokker-Planck equation, and also to a new term which has relevance to the problem of chaotic adiabatic reaction forces (the forces acting on slow, heavy degrees of freedom due to their coupling to light, fast chaotic degrees).

  14. Electron impact ionization of CHF2Cl: Unusual ordering of ionization energies for parent and fragment ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicman, P.; Gluch, K.; Pelc, A.; Sailer, W.; Matt-Leubner, S.; Scheier, P.; Matejcik, S.; Lukac, P.; Robertson, W. D.; Compton, R. N.; Märk, T. D.

    2003-12-01

    Electron impact ionization of the chlorodifluoromethane molecule is studied using crossed beams of high-resolution electrons and an effusive molecular beam of CHF2Cl. Ionization energies (IEs) for many positive ions from CHF2Cl (CHF2Cl+,CF2Cl+,CHFCl+,CFCl+,CHF2+,CF2+,HCl+,Cl+,CF+,CH+,F+ C+) are determined from a careful examination of the threshold behavior of the ionization cross sections. Reaction pathways for the dissociative ionization products are suggested using known thermodynamic quantities. Surprisingly, it is observed that the ionization threshold for the parent positive ion IE(CHF2Cl+/CHF2Cl)=12.50(±0.05) eV lies above that for the fragment ions CHF2+, CHFCl+, and CF+ [IE(CHF2+/CHF2Cl)=12.24(±0.03) eV, IE(CHFCl+/CHF2Cl)=12.3(±0.05) eV, and IE(CF+/CHF2Cl)=11.5(±0.1) eV]. Experiments using a three sector field BEE mass spectrometer provide evidence for the existence of two states of the parent CHF2Cl+ ion, one exhibiting a short lifetime of about 2 μs and another parent ion state which appears to be stable on the time scale of the experiment (>20 μs) with an IE of 12.50 eV.

  15. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  16. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  17. Elementary examples of adiabatic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1990-04-01

    Simple classical one-dimensional systems subject to adiabatic (gradual) perturbations are examined. The first examples are well known: the adiabatic invariance of the product Eτ of energy E and period τ for the simple pendulum and for the simple harmonic oscillator. Next, the adiabatic invariants of the vertical bouncer are found—a ball bouncing elastically from the floor of a rising elevator having slowly varying velocity and acceleration. These examples lead to consideration of adiabatic invariance for one-dimensional systems with potentials of the form V=axn, with a=a(t) slowly varying in time. Then, the horizontal bouncer is considered—a mass sliding on a smooth floor, bouncing back and forth between two impenetrable walls, one of which is slowly moving. This example is generalized to a particle in a bound state of a general potential with one slowly moving ``turning point.'' Finally, circular motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field slowly varying in time under three different configurations is considered: (a) a free particle in a uniform field; (b) a free particle in a nonuniform ``betatron'' field; and (c) a particle constrained to a circular orbit in a uniform field.

  18. Characterisation of a TES-Based X-ray Microcalorimeter in the Energy Range from 150 to 1800 eV Using an Adiabatic Demagnetisation Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardi, L.; Takei, Y.; van der Kuur, J.; de Korte, P. A. J.; Hoevers, H. F. C.; Boersma, D.; Bruijn, M.; Mels, W.; Ridder, M. L.; Takken, D.; van Weers, H.

    2008-04-01

    We characterised a TES-based X-ray microcalorimeter in an adiabatic demagnetisation refrigerator (ADR) using synchrotron radiation. The detector response and energy resolution was measured at the beam-line in the PTB radiometry laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II in the range from 200 to 1800 eV. We present and discuss the results of the energy resolution measurements as a function of energy, beam intensity and detector working point. The measured energy resolution ranges between 1.5 to 2.1 eV in the investigated energy range and is weakly dependent on the detector set point. A first analysis shows a count-rate capability, without considerable loss of performance, of about 500 counts per second.

  19. Low-energy backscattering quantum orbits in above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, D. B.

    2016-09-01

    Using the quantum–orbit formalism we consider the influence of the backward-scattering quantum orbits on the low-energy above-threshold ionization spectra. It is shown that the corresponding ionization rate exhibits sharp peaks for electron energies ≲ 0.1 {U}{{P}} ({U}{{P}} is the electron ponderomotive energy) at the same places where the forward-scattering-induced low-energy structures appear. The corresponding incident rescattering electron velocities are very small. Semiclassical expressions for the positions of these peaks as functions of {U}{{P}} and the ionization potential are derived.

  20. Isothermal and Adiabatic Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNairy, William W.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the working of the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus, a useful tool for measuring the pressure, temperature, and volume of a variety of gases undergoing compressions and expansions. Describes the adaptation of this apparatus to perform isothermal measurements and discusses the theory behind the adiabatic and isothermal processes. (JRH)

  1. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae; Kwon, Chan Ho

    2014-11-01

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73,570 ± 6 cm(-1) (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ((2)A2), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C(2v) symmetry through the C-N axis.

  2. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  3. Decomposition reaction of the veterinary antibiotic ciprofloxacin using electron ionizing energy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Kyeong-Bo; Lee, Geon-Hwi; Hwang, Seon Ah

    2014-12-01

    The application of electron ionizing energy for degrading veterinary antibiotic ciprofloxacin (CFX) in aqueous solution was elucidated. The degradation efficiency of CFX after irradiation with electron ionizing energy was 38% at 1 kGy, 80% at 5kGy, and 97% at 10 kGy. Total organic carbon of CFX in aqueous solution after irradiation with electron ionizing energy decreased 2% at 1 kGy, 18% at 5 kGy, and 53% at 10 kGy. The CFX degradation products after irradiation with electron ionizing energy were CFX1 ([M+H] m/z 330), CFX2 ([M+H] m/z 314), and CFX3 ([M+H] m/z 263). CFX1 had an F atom substituted with OH and CFX2 was expected to originate from CFX via loss of F or H2O. CFX3 was expected to originate from CFX via loss of the piperazynilic ring. Among the several radicals, hydrate electron (eaq(-)) is expected to play an important role in degradation of veterinary antibiotic during irradiation with electron ionizing energy. The toxicity of the degraded products formed during irradiation with electron ionizing energy was evaluated using microbes such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Bacillus subtilis, and the results revealed that the toxicity decreased with irradiation. These results demonstrate that irradiation technology using electron ionizing energy is an effective was to remove veterinary antibiotics from an aquatic ecosystem. PMID:25016427

  4. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  5. Ionized impurity induced photocarrier generation in organic energy conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Z. D.

    1982-07-01

    The present study has the objective to investigate the influence of the discrete nature of ionized impurities in a Schottky barrier on the field dependent carrier generation of an organic photovoltaic cell. Attention is given to the influence of the local ionized impurity field on the carrier generation, compared to the influence of the average field in the barrier. It is assumed that exciton dissociation into electron-hole pairs can be adequately described as a function of the local electric field. The proposal is made that thermal regeneration of ionized impurities can lead to continuous charge production based on the proposed mechanism. The study has been motivated by a significant discrepancy observed between the measured and calculated carrier generation efficiencies in x-metal-free phthalocyanine photovoltaic cells. The proposed mechanism of ionized impurity-assisted carrier generation offers an explanation for the observed enhancement in x-metal-free phthalocyanine photovoltaic cells.

  6. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  7. Dependence of Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (DMCPS) Dissociation on Ionized Energy by Using Quadrupole Mass Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Ye, Chao; Ning, Zhaoyuan

    2010-12-01

    Dependence of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (DMCPS) organosilicon dissociation on ionized energy in the energy range of 25 eV to 70 eV is investigated by using a quadrupole mass spectrometry At the ionized energy below 55 eV, the dissociation of DMCPS is dominant. As the ionized energy is above 55 eV, the DMCPS dissociation achieves the maximum cross section, while the fragments from the DMCPS dissociation can further dissociate, which leads to a different ingredient of fragments. At the lower ionized energy of 25 eV, the main fragments are SiOC2H5+, SiCH+, Si+, O2+ and CH3+ ions, which shows an important effect on the SiCOH low-k film deposition.

  8. Mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy of 4-aminobenzonitrile cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L. C. L.; Lin, J. L.; Tzeng, W. B.

    2000-11-01

    Mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) and two-color resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) methods were used to investigate the ionic properties of 4-aminobenzonitrile (4-ABN). The adiabatic ionization energy of this molecule was determined to be 66 493±4 cm -1 by the MATI spectroscopy and 66 494±7 cm -1 by the two-color R2PI spectroscopy. The active vibrations of the 4-ABN cation include the in-plane ring deformation, CC stretching, C-CN stretching, and CH bending motions. The present experimental results are well supported by our ab initio and density functional theory calculations.

  9. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxe, M.; Hagmann, C.; Jovanovic, I.; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T. H.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, S.; Sorensen, P.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. Detection of CENNS could offer benefits for detection of supernova and solar neutrinos in astrophysics, or for detection of antineutrinos for nuclear reactor monitoring and nuclear nonproliferation. One challenge with detecting CENNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CENNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. While a measurement of the nuclear recoil ionization yield in liquid argon in the keV energy range has been recently reported, a corresponding model for low-energy ionization yield in liquid argon does not exist. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The model consists of two distinct components: (1) simulation of the atomic collision cascade with production of ionization, and (2) the thermalization and drift of ionization electrons in an applied electric field including local recombination. As an application of our results we report updated estimates of detectable ionization in liquid argon from CENNS at a nuclear reactor.

  10. Modeling heavy ion ionization energy loss at low and intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.L.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The needs of contemporary accelerator and space projects led to significant efforts made to include description of heavy ion interactions with matter in general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. This paper deals with an updated model of heavy ion ionization energy loss developed previously for the MARS code. The model agrees well with experimental data for various projectiles and targets including super-heavy ions in low-Z media.

  11. Electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Kunitski, M; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Schmidt, L Ph H; Jahnke, T; Magrakvelidze, M; Madsen, C B; Madsen, L B; Thumm, U; Dörner, R

    2013-07-12

    We report experimental observation of the energy sharing between electron and nuclei in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2 by strong laser fields. The absorbed photon energy is shared between the ejected electron and nuclei in a correlated fashion, resulting in multiple diagonal lines in their joint energy spectrum governed by the energy conservation of all fragment particles.

  12. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-11-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  13. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  14. Double electron ionization in Compton scattering of high energy photons by helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1995-08-01

    The cross section for double-electron ionization of two-electron atoms and ions in Compton scattering of high energy photons is calculated. It is demonstrated that its dependence on the incoming photon frequency is the same as that for single-electron ionization. The ratio of {open_quotes}double-to-single{close_quotes} ionization in Compton scattering was found to be energy independent and almost identical with the corresponding value for photoionization. For the He atom it is 1.68%. This surprising result deserves experimental verification.

  15. The Symmetrical Quasi-Classical Model for Electronically Non-Adiabatic Processes Applied to Energy Transfer Dynamics in Site-Exciton Models of Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Stephen J; Miller, William H

    2016-03-01

    In a recent series of papers, it has been illustrated that a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model applied to the Meyer-Miller (MM) classical vibronic Hamiltonian provides an excellent description of a variety of electronically non-adiabatic benchmark model systems for which exact quantum results are available for comparison. In this paper, the SQC/MM approach is used to treat energy transfer dynamics in site-exciton models of light-harvesting complexes, and in particular, the well-known 7-state Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) complex. Again, numerically "exact" results are available for comparison, here via the hierarchical equation of motion (HEOM) approach of Ishizaki and Fleming, and it is seen that the simple SQC/MM approach provides very reasonable agreement with the previous HEOM results. It is noted, however, that unlike most (if not all) simple approaches for treating these systems, because the SQC/MM approach presents a fully atomistic simulation based on classical trajectory simulation, it places no restrictions on the characteristics of the thermal baths coupled to each two-level site, e.g., bath spectral densities (SD) of any analytic functional form may be employed as well as discrete SD determined experimentally or from MD simulation (nor is there any restriction that the baths be harmonic), opening up the possibility of simulating more realistic variations on the basic site-exciton framework for describing the non-adiabatic dynamics of photosynthetic pigment complexes. PMID:26761191

  16. Ab initio adiabatic and quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces of H+ + CO system: A study of the ground and the first three excited electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheer, V. C.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    The global ground and first three excited electronic state adiabatic as well as the corresponding quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces is reported as a function of nuclear geometries in the Jacobi coordinates ( R → , r → , γ ) using Dunning's cc-pVTZ basis set at the internally contracted multi-reference (single and double) configuration interaction level of accuracy. Nonadiabatic couplings, arising out of relative motion of proton and the vibrational motion of CO, are also reported in terms of coupling potentials. The quasidiabatic potential energy surfaces and the coupling potentials have been obtained using the ab initio procedure [Simah et al., J. Chem. Phys. 111, 4523 (1999)] for the purpose of dynamics studies.

  17. Methods of Calculating Ionization Energies of Multielectron (Five or More) Isoelectronic Atomic Ions

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously used simple empirical equations to reproduce the literature values of the ionization energies of isoelectronic sequences of up to four electrons which gave very good agreement. We reproduce here a kinetic energy expression with corrections for relativity and Lamb shift effects which give excellent agreement with the literature values. These equations become more complex as the number of electrons in the system increases. Alternative simple quadratic expressions for calculating ionization energies of multielectron ions are discussed. A set of coefficients when substituted into a simple expression produces very good agreement with the literature values. Our work shows that Slater's rules are not appropriate for predicting trends or screening constants. This work provides very strong evidence that ionization energies are not functions of complete squares, and when calculating ionization energies electron transition/relaxation has to be taken into account. We demonstrate clearly that for particular isoelectronic sequences, the ionizing electrons may occupy different orbitals and in such cases more than one set of constants are needed to calculate the ionization energies. PMID:23766674

  18. Adiabatic invariance of oscillons/I -balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takeda, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    Real scalar fields are known to fragment into spatially localized and long-lived solitons called oscillons or I -balls. We prove the adiabatic invariance of the oscillons/I -balls for a potential that allows periodic motion even in the presence of non-negligible spatial gradient energy. We show that such a potential is uniquely determined to be the quadratic one with a logarithmic correction, for which the oscillons/I -balls are absolutely stable. For slightly different forms of the scalar potential dominated by the quadratic one, the oscillons/I -balls are only quasistable, because the adiabatic charge is only approximately conserved. We check the conservation of the adiabatic charge of the I -balls in numerical simulation by slowly varying the coefficient of logarithmic corrections. This unambiguously shows that the longevity of oscillons/I -balls is due to the adiabatic invariance.

  19. Hierarchical theory of quantum adiabatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gong, Jiangbin; Wu, Biao

    2014-12-01

    Quantum adiabatic evolution is a dynamical evolution of a quantum system under slow external driving. According to the quantum adiabatic theorem, no transitions occur between nondegenerate instantaneous energy eigenstates in such a dynamical evolution. However, this is true only when the driving rate is infinitesimally small. For a small nonzero driving rate, there are generally small transition probabilities between the energy eigenstates. We develop a classical mechanics framework to address the small deviations from the quantum adiabatic theorem order by order. A hierarchy of Hamiltonians is constructed iteratively with the zeroth-order Hamiltonian being determined by the original system Hamiltonian. The kth-order deviations are governed by a kth-order Hamiltonian, which depends on the time derivatives of the adiabatic parameters up to the kth-order. Two simple examples, the Landau-Zener model and a spin-1/2 particle in a rotating magnetic field, are used to illustrate our hierarchical theory. Our analysis also exposes a deep, previously unknown connection between classical adiabatic theory and quantum adiabatic theory.

  20. Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-10-28

    Ionization threshold energies of Al{sub n} (n = 32-95) nanoclusters are determined by laser ionization of free neutral metal clusters thermalized to several temperatures in the range from 65 K to 230 K. The photoion yield curves of cold clusters follow a quadratic energy dependence above threshold, in agreement with the Fowler law of surface photoemission. Accurate data collection and analysis procedures make it possible to resolve very small (few parts in a thousand) temperature-induced shifts in the ionization energies. Extrapolation of the data to the bulk limit enables a determination of the thermal shift of the polycrystalline metal work function, found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction based on the influence of thermal expansion. Small clusters display somewhat larger thermal shifts, reflecting their greater susceptibility to thermal expansion. Ionization studies of free size-resolved nanoclusters facilitate understanding of the interplay of surface, electronic, and lattice properties under contamination-free conditions.

  1. The effect of pi-stacking, h-bonding, and electrostatic interactions on the ionization energies of nucleic acid bases: adenine-adenine, thymine-thymine and adenine-thymine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-09-02

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the ionized dimers of thymine and adenine, TT, AA, and AT, is presented. Adiabatic and vertical ionization energies(IEs) for monomers and dimers as well as thresholds for the appearance of the protonated species are reported and analyzed. Non-covalent interactions stronglyaffect the observed IEs. The magnitude and the nature of the effect is different for different isomers of the dimers. The computations reveal that for TT, the largestchanges in vertical IEs (0.4 eV) occur in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric pi- stacked isomers, whereas in the lowest-energy symmetric h-bonded dimer the shiftin IEs is much smaller (0.1 eV). The origin of the shift and the character of the ionized states is different in asymmetric h-bonded and symmetric stacked isomers. Inthe former, the initial hole is localized on one of the fragments, and the shift is due to the electrostatic stabilization of the positive charge of the ionized fragment by thedipole moment of the neutral fragment. In the latter, the hole is delocalized, and the change in IE is proportional to the overlap of the fragments' MOs. The shifts in AAare much smaller due to a less effcient overlap and a smaller dipole moment. The ionization of the h-bonded dimers results in barrierless (or nearly barrierless) protontransfer, whereas the pi-stacked dimers relax to structures with the hole stabilized by the delocalization or electrostatic interactions.

  2. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments.

  3. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments. PMID:27636472

  4. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments.

  5. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  6. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  7. Treatment of Electronic Energy Level Transition and Ionization Following the Particle-Based Chemistry Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A new method of treating electronic energy level transitions as well as linking ionization to electronic energy levels is proposed following the particle-based chemistry model of Bird. Although the use of electronic energy levels and ionization reactions in DSMC are not new ideas, the current method of selecting what level to transition to, how to reproduce transition rates, and the linking of the electronic energy levels to ionization are, to the author s knowledge, novel concepts. The resulting equilibrium temperatures are shown to remain constant, and the electronic energy level distributions are shown to reproduce the Boltzmann distribution. The electronic energy level transition rates and ionization rates due to electron impacts are shown to reproduce theoretical and measured rates. The rates due to heavy particle impacts, while not as favorable as the electron impact rates, compare favorably to values from the literature. Thus, these new extensions to the particle-based chemistry model of Bird provide an accurate method for predicting electronic energy level transition and ionization rates in gases.

  8. Ionization energies of K2X (X=F, Cl, Br, I) clusters.

    PubMed

    Veličković, S R; Veljković, F M; Perić-Grujić, A A; Radak, B B; Veljković, M V

    2011-08-30

    The electronic structure and properties of dipotassiummonohalides are important for understanding the unique physical and chemical behavior of M(n)X systems. In the present study, K(2) X (here X=F, Cl, Br, I) clusters were generated in the vapor over salts of the corresponding potassium halide, using a magnetic sector thermal ionization mass spectrometer. The ionization energies obtained for K(2)F, K(2)Cl, K(2)Br, and K(2)I molecules were 3.82 ± 0.1 eV, 3.68 ± 0.1 eV, 3.95 ± 0.1 eV, and 3.92 ± 0.1, respectively. These experimental values of ionization energies for K(2) X (X=F, Br, and I) are presented for the first time. The ionization energy of K(2)Cl determined by thermal ionization corresponds to previous results obtained by photoionization mass spectrometry, and it agrees with the theoretical ionization energy calculated by the ab initio method. The presently obtained results support previous theoretical predictions that the excess electron in dipotassiummonohalide clusters is delocalized over two potassium atoms, which is characteristic for F-center clusters.

  9. Determination of Energy-Transfer Distributions in Ionizing Ion-Molecule Collisions.

    PubMed

    Maclot, S; Delaunay, R; Piekarski, D G; Domaracka, A; Huber, B A; Adoui, L; Martín, F; Alcamí, M; Avaldi, L; Bolognesi, P; Díaz-Tendero, S; Rousseau, P

    2016-08-12

    The ionization and fragmentation of the nucleoside thymidine in the gas phase has been investigated by combining ion collision with state-selected photoionization experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. The comparison between the mass spectra measured in both types of experiments allows us to accurately determine the distribution of the energy deposited in the ionized molecule as a result of the collision. The relation of two experimental techniques and theory shows a strong correlation between the excited states of the ionized molecule with the computed dissociation pathways, as well as with charge localization or delocalization. PMID:27563959

  10. Determination of Energy-Transfer Distributions in Ionizing Ion-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Piekarski, D. G.; Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A.; Adoui, L.; Martín, F.; Alcamí, M.; Avaldi, L.; Bolognesi, P.; Díaz-Tendero, S.; Rousseau, P.

    2016-08-01

    The ionization and fragmentation of the nucleoside thymidine in the gas phase has been investigated by combining ion collision with state-selected photoionization experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. The comparison between the mass spectra measured in both types of experiments allows us to accurately determine the distribution of the energy deposited in the ionized molecule as a result of the collision. The relation of two experimental techniques and theory shows a strong correlation between the excited states of the ionized molecule with the computed dissociation pathways, as well as with charge localization or delocalization.

  11. Spectroscopic evidence for the coexistence of tetragonal and trigonal minima within the exited state adiabatic potential energy surfaces of hexachlorotellurate and -selenate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremers, C.; Degen, J.

    1998-11-01

    Coexistence of Jahn-Teller minima resulting from the coupling to different accepting modes within the adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) is not possible within the framework of linear vibronic coupling theory. For the lowest exited triplet state 3T1u of inorganic complexes with s2 electronic ground-state configuration, such a coexistence, due to quadratic coupling effects, is discussed. As a direct experimental evidence two vibronic progressions with different accepting modes in the emission spectra resulting from a single electronic state are observed in the emission spectra of the title compounds. The observation of vibronic finestructure in the emission spectra of [TeCl6]2- is reported for the first time.

  12. An improved quasi-diabatic representation of the 1, 2, 3(1)A coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces of phenol in the full 33 internal coordinates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Malbon, Christopher L; Yarkony, David R

    2016-03-28

    In a recent work we constructed a quasi-diabatic representation, H(d), of the 1, 2, 3(1)A adiabatic states of phenol from high level multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction electronic structure data, energies, energy gradients, and derivative couplings. That H(d) accurately describes surface minima, saddle points, and also regions of strong nonadiabatic interactions, reproducing the locus of conical intersection seams and the coordinate dependence of the derivative couplings. The present work determines the accuracy of H(d) for describing phenol photodissociation. Additionally, we demonstrate that a modest energetic shift of two diabats yields a quantifiably more accurate H(d) compared with experimental energetics. The analysis shows that in favorable circumstances it is possible to use single point energies obtained from the most reliable electronic structure methods available, including methods for which the energy gradients and derivative couplings are not available, to improve the quality of a global representation of several coupled potential energy surfaces. Our data suggest an alternative interpretation of kinetic energy release measurements near λphot ∼ 248 nm.

  13. An improved quasi-diabatic representation of the 1, 2, 31A coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces of phenol in the full 33 internal coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Malbon, Christopher L.; Yarkony, David R.

    2016-03-01

    In a recent work we constructed a quasi-diabatic representation, Hd, of the 1, 2, 31A adiabatic states of phenol from high level multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction electronic structure data, energies, energy gradients, and derivative couplings. That Hd accurately describes surface minima, saddle points, and also regions of strong nonadiabatic interactions, reproducing the locus of conical intersection seams and the coordinate dependence of the derivative couplings. The present work determines the accuracy of Hd for describing phenol photodissociation. Additionally, we demonstrate that a modest energetic shift of two diabats yields a quantifiably more accurate Hd compared with experimental energetics. The analysis shows that in favorable circumstances it is possible to use single point energies obtained from the most reliable electronic structure methods available, including methods for which the energy gradients and derivative couplings are not available, to improve the quality of a global representation of several coupled potential energy surfaces. Our data suggest an alternative interpretation of kinetic energy release measurements near λphot ˜ 248 nm.

  14. Energy balance for a sonoluminescence bubble yields a measure of ionization potential lowering.

    PubMed

    Kappus, B; Bataller, A; Putterman, S J

    2013-12-01

    Application of energy conservation between input sound and the microplasma which forms at the moment of sonoluminescence places bounds on the process, whereby the gas is ionized. Detailed pulsed Mie scattering measurements of the radius versus time for a xenon bubble in sulfuric acid provide a complete characterization of the hydrodynamics and minimum radius. For a range of emission intensities, the blackbody spectrum emitted during collapse matches the minimum bubble radius, implying opaque conditions are attained. This requires a degree of ionization >36%. Analysis reveals only 2.1±0.6  eV/atom of energy available during light emission. In order to unbind enough charge, collective processes must therefore reduce the ionization potential by at least 75%. We interpret this as evidence that a phase transition to a highly ionized plasma is occurring during sonoluminescence.

  15. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  16. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. CNNS is a flavor-blind interaction, which offers potential benefits for its use in nonproliferation (nuclear reactor monitoring) and astrophysics (supernova and solar neutrinos) applications. One challenge with detecting CNNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CNNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils are predicted to result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. This ratio of nuclear- and electron-induced ionization, known as the nuclear quenching factor, is unknown at energies typical for CNNS interactions in liquid xenon (LXe) and liquid argon (LAr), detector media being considered for CNNS detection. While there have been recent measurements [1] of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in LAr, there is no universal model for nuclear quenching and ionization yield. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The local ionization yield of a recoiling atom in the medium is calculated first. The ejected electrons are subsequently tracked in the electric field resulting from both the local electric charges and the externally applied drift field. The dependence of the ionization yield on the drift electric field is obtained by combining the calculated ionization yield for the initial collision cascade with the electron escape probability. An updated estimate of the CNNS signal expected in a LAr detector operated near a nuclear power reactor is presented.

  17. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of {approx} {+-}22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than {approx} 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance {approx} 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance {approx} 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  18. Generalized average local ionization energy and its representations in terms of Dyson and energy orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohut, Sviataslau V.; Cuevas-Saavedra, Rogelio; Staroverov, Viktor N.

    2016-08-01

    Ryabinkin and Staroverov [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084107 (2014)] extended the concept of average local ionization energy (ALIE) to correlated wavefunctions by defining the generalized ALIE as I ¯ ( r ) = - ∑ j λ j | f j ( r ) | 2 / ρ ( r ) , where λj are the eigenvalues of the generalized Fock operator and fj(r) are the corresponding eigenfunctions (energy orbitals). Here we show that one can equivalently express the generalized ALIE as I ¯ ( r ) = ∑ k I k | d k ( r ) | 2 / ρ ( r ) , where Ik are single-electron removal energies and dk(r) are the corresponding Dyson orbitals. The two expressions for I ¯ ( r ) emphasize different physical interpretations of this quantity; their equivalence enables one to calculate the ALIE at any level of ab initio theory without generating the computationally expensive Dyson orbitals.

  19. Generalized average local ionization energy and its representations in terms of Dyson and energy orbitals.

    PubMed

    Kohut, Sviataslau V; Cuevas-Saavedra, Rogelio; Staroverov, Viktor N

    2016-08-21

    Ryabinkin and Staroverov [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084107 (2014)] extended the concept of average local ionization energy (ALIE) to correlated wavefunctions by defining the generalized ALIE as Ī(r)=-∑jλj|fj(r)|(2)/ρ(r), where λj are the eigenvalues of the generalized Fock operator and fj(r) are the corresponding eigenfunctions (energy orbitals). Here we show that one can equivalently express the generalized ALIE as Ī(r)=∑kIk|dk(r)|(2)/ρ(r), where Ik are single-electron removal energies and dk(r) are the corresponding Dyson orbitals. The two expressions for Ī(r) emphasize different physical interpretations of this quantity; their equivalence enables one to calculate the ALIE at any level of ab initio theory without generating the computationally expensive Dyson orbitals. PMID:27544093

  20. Monte Carlo calculation of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, Chen; Shuming, Peng; Dan, Meng; Yuehong, He; Heyi, Wang

    2014-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements has been theoretically studied using Monte Carlo code MCNP 5. The influence of many factors, including carrier gas, chamber size, wall materials and gas pressure, has been evaluated in the simulations. It is found that β rays emitted by tritium deposit much more energy into chambers flowing through with argon than with deuterium in them, as much as 2.7 times higher at pressure 100 Pa. As chamber size gets smaller, energy deposition decreases sharply. For an ionization chamber of 1 mL, β rays deposit less than 1% of their energy at pressure 100 Pa and only 84% even if gas pressure is as high as 100 kPa. It also indicates that gold plated ionization chamber results in the highest deposition ratio while aluminum one leads to the lowest. In addition, simulations were validated by comparison with experimental data. Results show that simulations agree well with experimental data.

  1. Electron-impact ionization of helium with large energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2006-09-15

    We consider the recently measured case of 730 eV electron-impact ionization of the ground state of helium with 205 and 500 eV coplanar outgoing electrons by Catoire et al. [J. Phys. B 39, 2827 (2006)]. These measurements, which are on a relative scale, show some unexpected structure and variation from the second-order distorted-wave Born approximation R-matrix and Brauner-Briggs-Klar theories. Using the convergent close-coupling method we provide an improved agreement with experiment, but some discrepancies still remain.

  2. Ionization damage in NPN transistors caused by lower energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingji; Xiao, Jingdong; Liu, Chaoming; Zhao, Zhiming; Geng, Hongbin; Lan, Mujie; Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu

    2010-09-01

    Electrical degradation of two type NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) with different emitter sizes was examined under exposures of 70 and 110 keV electrons. Base and collector currents as a function of base-emitter voltage were in-situ measured during exposure. Experimental results show that both the 70 and 110 keV electrons produce an evident ionization damage to the NPN BJTs. With increasing fluence, collector currents of the NPN BJTs hardly change in the whole range of base-emitter voltage from 0 to 1.2 V, while base currents increase in a gradually mitigative trend. Base currents vary more at lower base-emitter voltages than at higher ones for a given fluence. The change in the reciprocal of current gain at a fixed base-emitter voltage of 0.65 V increases non-linearly at lower fluences and tends to be gradually saturated at higher fluences. Sensitivity to ionization damage increases for BJTs with an emitter having a larger perimeter-to-area ratio.

  3. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  4. Entanglement and adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrensmeier, D.

    2006-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation provides an alternative approach to quantum computation using a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The time evolution of entanglement during the adiabatic quantum search algorithm is studied, and its relevance as a resource is discussed.

  5. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  6. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  7. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule.

    PubMed

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10(-12) at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10(-7) cm(-1), which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels. PMID:25494728

  8. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    DOE PAGES

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to comparemore » internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.« less

  9. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.

  10. Ionization energy shift of characteristic K x-ray lines from high-Z materials for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Słabkowska, K.; Szymańska, E.; Polasik, M.; Pereira, N. R.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Seely, J. F.; Weber, B. V.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    The energy of the characteristic x-rays emitted by high atomic number atoms in a plasma that contains energetic electrons depends on the atom's ionization. For tungsten, the ionization energy shift of the L-lines has recently been used to diagnose the plasma's ionization; the change in energy of a K-line has been measured for iridium and observed for ytterbium. Here, we present detailed computations of the ionization energy shift to K-lines of these and an additional element, dysprosium; for these atoms, some K-lines nearly coincide in energy with K-edges of slightly lower Z atoms so that a change in transmission behind a K-edge filter betrays a change in energy. The ionization energy shift of such high-energy K-lines may enable a unique diagnostic when the plasma is inside an otherwise opaque enclosure such as hohlraums used on the National Ignition Facility.

  11. Observation of rotamers of m-aminobenzoic acid: Zero kinetic energy photoelectron and hole-burning resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yonggang; Wu, Chengyin; Kong, Wei

    2004-11-01

    We report studies of supersonically cooled m-aminobenzoic acid using two-color resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and two-color zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. Two conformers have been identified and characterized using the hole-burning method in the REMPI experiment. With the aid of ab initio and density functional calculations, vibrational modes of the first electronically excited state (S1) of the neutral species and those of the ground state cation (D0) have been assigned, and the adiabatic ionization potentials have been determined for both conformers. The REMPI spectra are dominated by in-plane motions of the substituents and ring deformation modes. A propensity of Δv=0, where Δv is the change in vibrational quantum number from the S1 to the D0 state, is observed in the ZEKE spectra. The origin of this behavior is discussed in the context of electron back donation from the two substituents in the excited state and in the cationic state. Comparisons of these results with those of p-aminobenzoic acid will be analyzed.

  12. Multiphoton laser ionization for energy conversion in barium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Y.; Kokaj, J.; Afrousheh, K.; Mathew, J.; Nair, R.; Pichler, G.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied the ion detection of barium atoms in special heated ovens with a tungsten rod in the middle of the stainless steel tube. The tungsten rod was heated indirectly by the oven body heaters. A bias voltage between the cell body and the tungsten rod of 9 V was used to collect electrons, after the barium ions had been created. However, we could collect the electrons even without the bias voltage, although with ten times less efficiency. We studied the conditions for the successful bias-less thermionic signal detection using excimer/dye laser two-photon excitation of Rydberg states below and above the first ionization limit (two-photon wavelength at 475.79 nm). We employed a hot-pipe oven and heat-pipe oven (with inserted mesh) in order to generate different barium vapor distributions inside the oven. The thermionic signal increased by a factor of two under heat-pipe oven conditions.

  13. Electron-impact ionization of helium for equal-energy-sharing kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Stelbovics, A.T.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.V.; Bartschat, K.

    2005-05-15

    The close-coupling approach to electron-helium single ionization is analyzed and several ways of defining the scattering amplitudes are determined, for both equal- and unequal-energy outgoing electrons. Nevertheless, the various definitions all lead to the same cross section. The convergent close-coupling (CCC) method with Laguerre (CCC-L) and box-based (CCC-B) target functions is applied to calculate electron-impact ionization of helium for the cases where the two outgoing electrons have equal energy. Excellent absolute agreement with experiment is obtained for all available cases of comparison.

  14. Ionization of Water Clusters is Mediated by Exciton Energy Transfer from Argon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Amir; Ahmed, Musahid

    2012-01-25

    The exciton energy deposited in an argon cluster, (Arn ,< n=20>) using VUV radiation is transferred to softly ionize doped water clusters, ((H2O)n, n=1-9) leading to the formation of non-fragmented clusters. Following the initial excitation, electronic energy is channeled to ionize the doped water cluster while evaporating the Ar shell, allowing identification of fragmented and complete water cluster ions. Examination of the photoionization efficiency curve shows that cluster evaporation from excitons located above 12.6 eV are not enough to cool the energized water cluster ion, and leads to their dissociation to (H2O)n-2H+ (protonated) clusters.

  15. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-02-01

    In the graph isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and transforms G →G'. If yes, then G and G' are said to be isomorphic; otherwise they are nonisomorphic. The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. In this paper we present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI and which also provides an approach to determining all automorphisms of a given graph. We show how the GI problem can be converted to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate the algorithm's quantum dynamics and show that it correctly (i) distinguishes nonisomorphic graphs; (ii) recognizes isomorphic graphs and determines the permutation(s) that connect them; and (iii) finds the automorphism group of a given graph G. We then discuss the GI quantum algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing how it can be leveraged to give a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of the NP-complete subgraph isomorphism problem. The computational complexity of an adiabatic quantum algorithm is largely determined by the minimum energy gap Δ (N) separating the ground and first-excited states in the limit of large problem size N ≫1. Calculating Δ (N) in this limit is a fundamental open problem in adiabatic quantum computing, and so it is not possible to determine the computational complexity of adiabatic quantum algorithms in general, nor consequently, of the specific adiabatic quantum algorithms presented here. Adiabatic quantum computing has been shown to be equivalent to the circuit model of quantum computing, and so development of adiabatic quantum algorithms continues to be of great interest.

  16. Electron wavepacket dynamics in highly quasi-degenerate coupled electronic states: A theory for chemistry where the notion of adiabatic potential energy surface loses the sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2012-12-01

    We develop a theory and the method of its application for chemical dynamics in systems, in which the adiabatic potential energy hyper-surfaces (PES) are densely quasi-degenerate to each other in a wide range of molecular geometry. Such adiabatic electronic states tend to couple each other through strong nonadiabatic interactions. Technically, therefore, it is often extremely hard to accurately single out the individual PES in those systems. Moreover, due to the mutual nonadiabatic couplings that may spread wide in space and due to the energy-time uncertainty relation, the notion of the isolated and well-defined potential energy surface should lose the sense. On the other hand, such dense electronic states should offer a very interesting molecular field in which chemical reactions to proceed in characteristic manners. However, to treat these systems, the standard theoretical framework of chemical reaction dynamics, which starts from the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and ends up with quantum nuclear wavepacket dynamics, is not very useful. We here explore this problem with our developed nonadiabatic electron wavepacket theory, which we call the phase-space averaging and natural branching (PSANB) method [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 134109 (2008)], 10.1063/1.2987302, or branching-path representation, in which the packets are propagated in time along the non-Born-Oppenheimer branching paths. In this paper, after outlining the basic theory, we examine using a one-dimensional model how well the PSANB method works with such densely quasi-degenerate nonadiabatic systems. To do so, we compare the performance of PSANB with the full quantum mechanical results and those given by the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) method, which is known to be one of the most reliable and flexible methods to date. It turns out that the PSANB electron wavepacket approach actually yields very good results with far fewer initial sampling paths. Then we apply the

  17. Electron wavepacket dynamics in highly quasi-degenerate coupled electronic states: a theory for chemistry where the notion of adiabatic potential energy surface loses the sense.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2012-12-14

    We develop a theory and the method of its application for chemical dynamics in systems, in which the adiabatic potential energy hyper-surfaces (PES) are densely quasi-degenerate to each other in a wide range of molecular geometry. Such adiabatic electronic states tend to couple each other through strong nonadiabatic interactions. Technically, therefore, it is often extremely hard to accurately single out the individual PES in those systems. Moreover, due to the mutual nonadiabatic couplings that may spread wide in space and due to the energy-time uncertainty relation, the notion of the isolated and well-defined potential energy surface should lose the sense. On the other hand, such dense electronic states should offer a very interesting molecular field in which chemical reactions to proceed in characteristic manners. However, to treat these systems, the standard theoretical framework of chemical reaction dynamics, which starts from the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and ends up with quantum nuclear wavepacket dynamics, is not very useful. We here explore this problem with our developed nonadiabatic electron wavepacket theory, which we call the phase-space averaging and natural branching (PSANB) method [T. Yonehara and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 134109 (2008)], or branching-path representation, in which the packets are propagated in time along the non-Born-Oppenheimer branching paths. In this paper, after outlining the basic theory, we examine using a one-dimensional model how well the PSANB method works with such densely quasi-degenerate nonadiabatic systems. To do so, we compare the performance of PSANB with the full quantum mechanical results and those given by the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) method, which is known to be one of the most reliable and flexible methods to date. It turns out that the PSANB electron wavepacket approach actually yields very good results with far fewer initial sampling paths. Then we apply the electron wavepacket

  18. Radical ions with nearly degenerate ground state: correlation between the rate of spin-lattice relaxation and the structure of adiabatic potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Borovkov, V I; Beregovaya, I V; Shchegoleva, L N; Potashov, P A; Bagryansky, V A; Molin, Y N

    2012-09-14

    Paramagnetic spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) in radical cations (RCs) of the cycloalkane series in liquid solution was studied and analyzed from the point of view of the correlation between the relaxation rate and the structure of the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) of the RCs. SLR rates in the RCs formed in x-ray irradiated n-hexane solutions of the cycloalkanes studied were measured with the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in the recombination fluorescence of spin-correlated radical ion pairs. Temperature and, for some cycloalkanes, magnetic field dependences of the relaxation rate were determined. It was found that the conventional Redfield theory of the paramagnetic relaxation as applied to the results on cyclohexane RC, gave a value of about 0.2 ps for the correlation time of the perturbation together with an unrealistically high value of 0.1 T in field units for the matrix element of the relaxation transition. The PES structure was obtained with the DFT quantum-chemical calculations. It was found that for all of the cycloalkanes RCs considered, including low symmetric alkyl-substituted ones, the adiabatic PESes were surfaces of pseudorotation due to avoided crossing. In the RCs studied, a correlation between the SLR rate and the calculated barrier height to the pseudorotation was revealed. For RCs with a higher relaxation rate, the apparent activation energies for the SLR were similar to the calculated heights of the barrier. To rationalize the data obtained it was assumed that the vibronic states degeneracy, which is specific for Jahn-Teller active cyclohexane RC, was approximately kept in the RCs of substituted cycloalkanes for the vibronic states with the energies above and close to the barrier height to the pseudorotation. It was proposed that the effective spin-lattice relaxation in a radical with nearly degenerate low-lying vibronic states originated from stochastic crossings of the vibronic levels that occur due to fluctuations of

  19. Energy and angle differential cross sections for the electron-impact double ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James P; Pindzola, M S; Robicheaux, F

    2008-01-01

    Energy and angle differential cross sections for the electron-impact double ionization of helium are calculated using a non-perturbative time-dependent close-coupling method. Collision probabilities are found by projection of a time evolved nine dimensional coordinate space wave function onto fully antisymmetric products of spatial and spin functions representing three outgoing Coulomb waves. At an incident energy of 106 eV, we present double energy differential cross sections and pentuple energy and angle differential cross sections. The pentuple energy and angle differential cross sections are found to be in relative agreement with the shapes observed in recent (e,3e) reaction microscope experiments. Integration of the differential cross sections over all energies and angles yields a total ionization cross section that is also in reasonable agreement with absolute crossed-beams experiments.

  20. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, J; Norman, P; Aksela, H; Agren, H

    2011-08-01

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of ∼4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  1. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Niskanen, J.; Norman, P.; Aksela, H.; Aagren, H.

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of {approx}4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  2. The frozen orbital approximation for calculating ionization energies with application to propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolfgang; Nager, Christoph; Rosmus, Pavel

    1980-09-01

    In the frozen orbital approximation (FOA), the influence of reorganization on correlation contributions to ionization energies is neglected. It is particularly useful in calculations for large molecules because of the advantage that only one integral transformation is required for the calculation of all ionic states. In connection with the concept of independent orbital correlation contributions, the dimensions of the CI matrices can be drastically reduced. The method is applied to the calculation of the valence ionization energies of propane, and compared to more rigorous ab initio results and a recent calculation in which inner valence shell contributions to electron correlation are neglected. The ordering of the first three ionizations in the photoelectron spectrum of propane, which has not been definitively assigned, is shown to be 2B1(2b1),2A1(6a1) and 2B2(4b2), in agreement with Koopmans' theorem.

  3. Field-dependent molecular ionization and excitation energies: Implications for electrically insulating liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davari, N.; Åstrand, P.-O.; Unge, M.; Lundgaard, L. E.; Linhjell, D.

    2014-03-01

    The molecular ionization potential has a relatively strong electric-field dependence as compared to the excitation energies which has implications for electrical insulation since the excited states work as an energy sink emitting light in the UV/VIS region. At some threshold field, all the excited states of the molecule have vanished and the molecule is a two-state system with the ground state and the ionized state, which has been hypothesized as a possible origin of different streamer propagation modes. Constrained density-functional theory is used to calculate the field-dependent ionization potential of different types of molecules relevant for electrically insulating liquids. The low singlet-singlet excitation energies of each molecule have also been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. It is shown that low-energy singlet-singlet excitation of the type n → π* (lone pair to unoccupied π* orbital) has the ability to survive at higher fields. This type of excitation can for example be found in esters, diketones and many color dyes. For alkanes (as for example n-tridecane and cyclohexane) on the other hand, all the excited states, in particular the σ → σ* excitations vanish in electric fields higher than 10 MV/cm. Further implications for the design of electrically insulating dielectric liquids based on the molecular ionization potential and excitation energies are discussed.

  4. Stability conditions for exact-exchange Kohn-Sham methods and their relation to correlation energies from the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Bleiziffer, Patrick Schmidtel, Daniel; Görling, Andreas

    2014-11-28

    The occurrence of instabilities, in particular singlet-triplet and singlet-singlet instabilities, in the exact-exchange (EXX) Kohn-Sham method is investigated. Hessian matrices of the EXX electronic energy with respect to the expansion coefficients of the EXX effective Kohn-Sham potential in an auxiliary basis set are derived. The eigenvalues of these Hessian matrices determine whether or not instabilities are present. Similar as in the corresponding Hartree-Fock case instabilities in the EXX method are related to symmetry breaking of the Hamiltonian operator for the EXX orbitals. In the EXX methods symmetry breaking can easily be visualized by displaying the local multiplicative exchange potential. Examples (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and the polyyne C{sub 10}H{sub 2}) for instabilities and symmetry breaking are discussed. The relation of the stability conditions for EXX methods to approaches calculating the Kohn-Sham correlation energy via the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) theorem is discussed. The existence or nonexistence of singlet-singlet instabilities in an EXX calculation is shown to indicate whether or not the frequency-integration in the evaluation of the correlation energy is singular in the EXX-ACFD method. This method calculates the Kohn-Sham correlation energy through the ACFD theorem theorem employing besides the Coulomb kernel also the full frequency-dependent exchange kernel and yields highly accurate electronic energies. For the case of singular frequency-integrands in the EXX-ACFD method a regularization is suggested. Finally, we present examples of molecular systems for which the self-consistent field procedure of the EXX as well as the Hartree-Fock method can converge to more than one local minimum depending on the initial conditions.

  5. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mukaida, Kyohei E-mail: jinno@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  6. Towards fault tolerant adiabatic quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Lidar, Daniel A

    2008-04-25

    I show how to protect adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) against decoherence and certain control errors, using a hybrid methodology involving dynamical decoupling, subsystem and stabilizer codes, and energy gaps. Corresponding error bounds are derived. As an example, I show how to perform decoherence-protected AQC against local noise using at most two-body interactions.

  7. Demystifying Introductory Chemistry. Part 3: Ionization Energies, Electronegativity, Polar Bonds, and Partial Charges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, James; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Shows how ionization energies provide a convenient method for obtaining electronegativity values that is simpler than the conventional methods. Demonstrates how approximate atomic charges can be calculated for polar molecules and how this method of determining electronegativities may lead to deeper insights than are typically possible for the…

  8. Relating polarizability to volume, ionization energy, electronegativity, hardness, moments of momentum, and other molecular properties

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, Shamus A.; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2014-08-21

    Semiquantitative relationships between the mean static dipole polarizability and other molecular properties such as the volume, ionization energy, electronegativity, hardness, and moments of momentum are explored. The relationships are tested using density functional theory computations on the 1641 neutral, ground-state, organic molecules in the TABS database. The best polarizability approximations have median errors under 5%.

  9. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture/Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-09-01

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed noncontact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect material ablated by a 355 nm UV laser in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appears to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the `softness' of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. In this work, a series of benzylpyridinium salts were employed as thermometer ions to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation/liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. These data, along with results from the analysis the biological molecules bradykinin and angiotensin III indicated that the ions or their fragments formed directly by UV laser ablation that survive the liquid capture/electrospray ionization process were likely to be an extremely small component of the total ion signal observed. Instead, the preponderate neutral molecules, clusters, and particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream, then electrosprayed, were the principal source of the ion signal observed. Thus, the electrospray ionization process used controls the overall `softness' of this technique.

  10. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, N. F.; Xavier, M.; Vivolo, V.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition.

  11. Communication: MULTIMODE calculations of low-lying vibrational states of NO3 using an adiabatic potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homayoon, Zahra; Bowman, Joel M.

    2014-10-01

    A semi-global, permutationally invariant potential energy surface for NO3 is constructed from a subset of roughly 5000 Multi-State CASPT2 calculations (MS-CAS(17e,13o)PT2/aug-cc-pVTZ) reported by Morokuma and co-workers [H. Xiao, S. Maeda, and K. Morokuma, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2600 (2012)]. The PES, with empirical adjustments to modify the energies of two fundamentals and a hot-band transition, is used in full-dimensional vibrational self-consistent field/virtual state configuration interaction calculations using the code MULTIMODE. Vibrational energies and assignments are given for the fundamentals and low-lying combination states, including two that have been the focus of some controversy. Energies of a number of overtone and combinations are shown to be in good agreement with experiment and previous calculations using a model vibronic Hamiltonian [C. S. Simmons, T. Ichino, and J. F. Stanton, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 1946 (2012)]. Notably, the fundamental v3 is calculated to be at 1099 cm-1 in accord with the prediction from the vibronic analysis, although roughly 30 cm-1 higher. The state at 1493 cm-1 is assigned as v3 + v4, which is also in agreement with the vibronic analysis and some experiments. Vibrational energies for 15NO3 are also presented and these are also in good agreement with experiment.

  12. ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E.

    2013-04-01

    This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

  13. Use of thin ionization calorimeters for measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Ormes, J. S.; Schmidt, W. K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of performing measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra with a thin ionization calorimeter was investigated. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine whether energy response fluctuations would cause measured spectra to be different from the primary spectra. First, Gaussian distributions were assumed for the calorimeter energy resolutions. The second method employed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of cascades from an isotropic flux of protons. The results show that as long as the energy resolution does not change significantly with energy, the spectral indices can be reliably determined even for sigma sub e/e = 50%. However, if the energy resolution is strongly energy dependent, the measured spectra do not reproduce the true spectra. Energy resolutions greatly improving with energy result in measured spectra that are too steep, while resolutions getting much worse with energy cause the measured spectra to be too flat.

  14. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of drugs in the thermal and hyperthermal energy range -- a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Amirav, Aviv; Fujü, Toshihiro

    1995-12-01

    Thermal and hyperthermal surface ionization (SI) mass spectra of nicotine, caffeine and lidocaine were obtained using a rhenium oxide surface. Thermal surface ionization was studied on an oxidized surface positioned inside an electron impact ion source, while hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) was obtained upon seeding the compounds into a hydrogen or helium supersonic molecular beam that scattered from the rhenium oxide surface. Both HSI and SI provide rich, informative and complementary mass spectral information. The results indicate that SI follows thermal dissociation processes on the surface prior to the desorption of the ion, while in HSI no thermal equilibrium is established and the ionization process is impulsive, followed by mostly unimolecular ion dissociation. HSI mass spectra are similar to electron impact mass spectra in the fragment ion masses, but the observed relative intensities are different. HSI is a softer ionization method compared to SI, and enables the degree of ion fragmentation to be tuned so that it can be minimized to a low level at low molecular kinetic energy. In SI, limited control over the degree of fragmentation is possible through the surface temperature. The analytical mass spectrometric applications of SI and HSI are briefly mentioned.

  15. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n, f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    DOE PAGES

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verriere, M.

    2016-05-13

    Here, accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics.

  16. Collision-energy-resolved penning ionization electron spectroscopy of glycine with He(2(3)S) metastable atoms: conformational isomers in collisional ionization.

    PubMed

    Yamakita, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Koichi

    2009-10-01

    Conformationally dependent ionization of the simplest amino acid, glycine, is studied by Penning ionization electron spectroscopy with velocity-resolved metastable He*(2(3)S) atoms. The observed He I ultraviolet photoelectron and Penning ionization electron spectra are reproduced by superimposed theoretical spectra, assuming thermal distributions of conformers. The conformations of amino acids are determined by analyzing the observed Penning ionization cross sections, peak shifts, and collision energy dependences of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS). The Penning ionization cross sections are governed by collisionally accessible exterior electron densities. When the amino and carbonyl groups are exposed to He* access, the nonbonding orbitals of N (n(N)) and O atoms (n(O)) give rise to strong bands. The observed negative peak shifts and negative CEDPICS for the n(N) and n(O) orbitals suggest the presence of attractive interactions around their electron distributions. The most attractive wells are estimated to be approximately 400 meV in the direction of the n(N) orbitals by ab initio model calculations. A conformer possessing dual hydrogen bonds contributes predominantly to the spectra.

  17. On the accuracy of density functional theory and wave function methods for calculating vertical ionization energies

    SciTech Connect

    McKechnie, Scott; Booth, George H.; Cohen, Aron J.; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-05-21

    The best practice in computational methods for determining vertical ionization energies (VIEs) is assessed, via reference to experimentally determined VIEs that are corroborated by highly accurate coupled-cluster calculations. These reference values are used to benchmark the performance of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function methods: Hartree-Fock theory, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and Electron Propagator Theory (EPT). The core test set consists of 147 small molecules. An extended set of six larger molecules, from benzene to hexacene, is also considered to investigate the dependence of the results on molecule size. The closest agreement with experiment is found for ionization energies obtained from total energy difference calculations. In particular, DFT calculations using exchange-correlation functionals with either a large amount of exact exchange or long-range correction perform best. The results from these functionals are also the least sensitive to an increase in molecule size. In general, ionization energies calculated directly from the orbital energies of the neutral species are less accurate and more sensitive to an increase in molecule size. For the single-calculation approach, the EPT calculations are in closest agreement for both sets of molecules. For the orbital energies from DFT functionals, only those with long-range correction give quantitative agreement with dramatic failing for all other functionals considered. The results offer a practical hierarchy of approximations for the calculation of vertical ionization energies. In addition, the experimental and computational reference values can be used as a standardized set of benchmarks, against which other approximate methods can be compared.

  18. On the accuracy of density functional theory and wave function methods for calculating vertical ionization energies.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Scott; Booth, George H; Cohen, Aron J; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2015-05-21

    The best practice in computational methods for determining vertical ionization energies (VIEs) is assessed, via reference to experimentally determined VIEs that are corroborated by highly accurate coupled-cluster calculations. These reference values are used to benchmark the performance of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function methods: Hartree-Fock theory, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and Electron Propagator Theory (EPT). The core test set consists of 147 small molecules. An extended set of six larger molecules, from benzene to hexacene, is also considered to investigate the dependence of the results on molecule size. The closest agreement with experiment is found for ionization energies obtained from total energy difference calculations. In particular, DFT calculations using exchange-correlation functionals with either a large amount of exact exchange or long-range correction perform best. The results from these functionals are also the least sensitive to an increase in molecule size. In general, ionization energies calculated directly from the orbital energies of the neutral species are less accurate and more sensitive to an increase in molecule size. For the single-calculation approach, the EPT calculations are in closest agreement for both sets of molecules. For the orbital energies from DFT functionals, only those with long-range correction give quantitative agreement with dramatic failing for all other functionals considered. The results offer a practical hierarchy of approximations for the calculation of vertical ionization energies. In addition, the experimental and computational reference values can be used as a standardized set of benchmarks, against which other approximate methods can be compared.

  19. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  20. Kinematic origin for near-zero energy structures in mid-IR strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisanty, Emilio; Ivanov, Misha

    2016-05-01

    We propose and discuss a kinematic mechanism underlying the recently discovered ‘near-zero energy structure’ in the photoionization of atoms in strong mid-infrared laser fields, based on trajectories which revisit the ion at low velocities exactly analogous to the series responsible for low-energy structures. The different scaling of the new series, as E∼ {I}p2/{U}p, suggests that the near-zero energy structure can be lifted to higher energies, where it can be better resolved and studied, using harder targets with higher ionization potential.

  1. The energy distribution cross section in threshold electron-atom impact ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.

    1974-01-01

    The flatness of the energy differential cross section in impact ionization is derived analytically in the Wannier theory. However it is shown that the Wannier zone is confined to a region of the order E/5 is less than or equal to epsilon is less than or equal to 4E/5, where E is the available energy and epsilon is the energy of the electrons. By contrasting the known results of photoionization and photodetachment, one can cogently argue that in the complementary region where electrons share their energy very unequally the cross section rises to a value independent of E, and that this region determines the form of the threshold law.

  2. On the influence of low-energy ionizing radiation on the amino acid molecule: proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuliene, Jelena; Romanova, Liudmila; Vukstich, Vasyl; Papp, Alexander; Shkurin, Serhiy; Baliulyte, Laura; Snegursky, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    New data on the electron-impact fragmentation of the amino acid proline molecule are presented as being related to the formation of the ionized products due to the influence of low-energy ionizing radiation on the above molecule. An extensive DFT-theory based on the theoretical approach enabled the main pathways of the proline molecules fragmentation to be elucidated. A series of the produced fragments have been identified. The absolute appearance energies for some of them have been both measured experimentally and calculated theoretically. The data of the experimental studies and theoretical calculations are compared and analyzed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Low-Energy Interactions related to Atmospheric and Extreme Conditions", edited by S. Ptasinska, M. Smialek-Telega, A. Milosavljevic, B. Sivaraman.

  3. X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Sokolov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The main purpose of this work is to provide reference data on X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid Ar to the studies in the field of Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) for rare-event and other experiments, based on liquid Ar detectors. We present the results of two related researches. First, the X-ray recombination coefficients in the energy range of 10-1000 keV and ionization yields at different electric fields, between 0.6 and 2.3 kV/cm, are determined in liquid Ar based on the results of a dedicated experiment. Second, the energy spectra of pulsed X-rays in liquid Ar in the energy range of 15-40 keV, obtained in given experiments including that with the two-phase CRAD, are interpreted and compared to those calculated using a computer program, to correctly determine the absorbed X-ray energy. The X-ray recombination coefficients and ionization yields have for the first time been presented for liquid Ar in systematic way.

  4. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  5. Electron ionization and dissociation of aliphatic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Shchukin, P.; Kočíšek, J.; Matejčík, Š.

    2012-09-01

    We present experimental and theoretical study of electron ionization and dissociative ionization to the gas phase amino acids valine, leucine, and isoleucine. A crossed electron/molecular beams technique equipped with quadrupole mass analyzer has been applied to measure mass spectra and ion efficiency curves for formation of particular ions. From experimental data the ionization energies of the molecules and the appearance energies of the fragment ions were determined. Ab initio calculations (Density Functional Theory and G3MP2 methods) were performed in order to calculate the fragmentation paths and interpret the experimental data. The experimental ionization energies of parent molecules [P]+ 8.91 ± 0.05, 8.85 ± 0.05, and 8.79 ± 0.05 eV and G3MP2 ionization energies (adiabatic) of 8.89, 8.88, and 8.81 eV were determined for valine, leucine, and isoleucine, respectively, as well as the experimental and theoretical threshold energies for dissociative ionization channels. The comparison of experimental data with calculations resulted in identification of the ions as well as the neutral fragments formed in the dissociative reactions. Around 15 mass/charge ratio fragments were identified from the mass spectra by comparison of experimental appearance energies with calculated reaction enthalpies for particular dissociative reactions.

  6. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  7. ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TWO-ELECTRON IONIZATION OF HELIUM IN AN INTENSE LASER FIELD.

    SciTech Connect

    LAFON,R.; CHALOUPKA,J.L.; SHEEHY,B.; DIMAURO,L.F.; PAUL,P.M.; AGOSTINI,P.; KULANDER,K.C.

    2000-09-24

    It is well known that a neutral atom interacting with a strong laser field will ionize at sufficiently high intensity even for photon energies well below the ionization threshold. When the required number of photons becomes very large, this process is best described by the suppression of the Coulomb barrier by the laser's oscillating electric field, allowing the electron to tunnel into the continuum. As the laser intensity is increased, more tightly bound electrons may be successively liberated by this mechanism. Such a sequential multiple ionization, long accepted as a reasonable approach to the formidable problem of a multielectron atom interacting nonperturbatively with an intense electromagnetic field, provides fair estimates of the various charge state appearance intensities while the tunneling rates are in excellent agreement with single ionization yields. However, more accurate measurements revealed systematic and very large deviations from the tunneling rates: near appearance intensity under standard experimental conditions, the observed double ion yield is several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the sequential rate. It soon became clear that electrons could not be considered as independent and that electron-electron correlation had to be taken into account. Dynamic correlations have been considered in several theories. First qualitatively in the shakeoff model; then empirically through the e-2e cross-section in the quantum/classical three-step model (tunnel ionization, acceleration by the oscillating electric field and e-2e recollision with the ion); recently through the so-called intense field many-body-S-matrix theory and a purely empirical model of collective tunnel ionization. The validity of these ideas has been examined using numerical models. The measurement of total ion yields over a dynamic range exceeding ten orders of magnitude, a major breakthrough made possible by the availability of high-repetition rate lasers at the beginning of

  8. Ionization efficiency study for low energy nuclear recoils in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, D.; Wei, W.-Z.; Mei, D.-M.; Zhang, C.

    2013-08-01

    We used the internal conversion (E0 transition) of germanium-72 to indirectly measure the low energy nuclear recoils of germanium. Together with a reliable Monte Carlo package, in which we implement the internal conversion process, the data was compared to the Lindhard (k = 0.159) and Barker-Mei models. A shape analysis indicates that both models agree well with data in the region of interest within 4%. The most probable value (MPV) of the nuclear recoils obtained from the shape analysis is 17.5 ± 0.12 (sys) ±0.035 (stat) keV with an average path-length of 0.014 μm.

  9. Quantum Computational Calculations of the Ionization Energies of Acidic and Basic Amino Acids: Aspartate, Glutamate, Arginine, Lysine, and Histidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, C. P.; Andrianarijaona, M.; Lee, Y. S.; Andrianarijaona, V.

    An extensive knowledge of the ionization energies of amino acids can provide vital information on protein sequencing, structure, and function. Acidic and basic amino acids are unique because they have three ionizable groups: the C-terminus, the N-terminus, and the side chain. The effects of multiple ionizable groups can be seen in how Aspartate's ionizable side chain heavily influences its preferred conformation (J Phys Chem A. 2011 April 7; 115(13): 2900-2912). Theoretical and experimental data on the ionization energies of many of these molecules is sparse. Considering each atom of the amino acid as a potential departing site for the electron gives insight on how the three ionizable groups affect the ionization process of the molecule and the dynamic coupling between the vibrational modes. In the following study, we optimized the structure of each acidic and basic amino acid then exported the three dimensional coordinates of the amino acids. We used ORCA to calculate single point energies for a region near the optimized coordinates and systematically went through the x, y, and z coordinates of each atom in the neutral and ionized forms of the amino acid. With the calculations, we were able to graph energy potential curves to better understand the quantum dynamic properties of the amino acids. The authors thank Pacific Union College Student Association for providing funds.

  10. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  11. VUV photofragmentation of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide dimer below ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Cerovski, Viktor Z.; Ranković, Miloš Lj.; Canon, Francis; Nahon, Laurent; Giuliani, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    The experimental investigation of 5-8 eV photons induced dissociation of the leucine-enkephalin (Leu-Enk) peptide dimer, performed by coupling a linear ion trap with a synchrotron beamline, in combination with the tandem mass spectrometry, has been reported. The present work extends the existing results on Leu-Enk VUV-induced dissociation to lower sub-ionization photon energy range. The measured tandem mass spectra show that even at the photon energies below the ionization threshold, VUV irradiation of the protonated Leu-Enk dimer precursor can lead to a rich fragmentation pattern, including peptide sequence ions and neutral losses. The photodissociation yields of selected ionic fragments reveal the absorption bands at about 6.7-7.1 eV (185-175 nm). The experimental results have been supported by theoretical description of the [2Leu-Enk + H]+ precursors, optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G( d, p) level of DFT.

  12. Precision Measurement of the Ionization and Dissociation Energies of H_2, HD and D_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprecher, Daniel; Liu, Jinjun; Merkt, Frédéric; Jungen, Christian; Ubachs, Wim

    2010-06-01

    The ionization and dissociation energies of H_2, HD and D_2 are benchmark quantities in molecular quantum mechanics. Comparison between experimental and theoretical values for these quantities has a long history starting with the early measurement of Beutler and the calculations of James and Coolidge. Transition wave numbers from the EF ^1Σ g^+ (v=0,N=0,1) state to selected np Rydberg states (n ≈ 60) below the X+ ^2Σ^+u (v^+=0,N^+=0,1)} ionization threshold have been measured in H_2, HD and D_2 at a precision better than 10 MHz (0.0003 cm-1). Combining the results with previous experimental and theoretical data for other energy level intervals, the ionization and dissociation energies of H_2, HD and D_2 could be determined at an absolute accuracy of better than 20 MHz. These new results represent an improvement over previous experimental results by more than one order of magnitude and the most precise values of dissociation and ionization energies measured to date in a molecular system. The results therefore offer the opportunity of a comparison with theoretical values. In particular they will be compared to the latest ab initio calculations which include nonadiabatic, relativistic and radiative effects. The comparison indicates that relativistic and radiative quantum electrodynamics corrections of order up to α^4 are needed to account for the experimental results. H. Beutler, Z. Phys. Chem. 29, 315 (1935) H. M. James and A. S. Coolidge, J. Chem. Phys. 1, 825 (1933) J. Liu, E. J. Salumbides, U. Hollenstein, J. C. J. Koelemeij, K. S. E. Eikema, W. Ubachs, and F. Merkt, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 174306 (2009) J. Liu, D. Sprecher, Ch. Jungen, W. Ubachs, and F. Merkt, submitted to J. Chem. Phys. K. Piszczatowski, G. Łach, M. Przybytek, J. Komasa, K. Pachucki, and B. Jeziorski, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 3039 (2009)

  13. Ionized cluster beam technology for material science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Toshinori

    1997-06-01

    The most suitable kinetic energy range of ionized materials in film formation and epitaxial growth is from a few eV to a few hundreds eV, especially, less than about 100eV, when ions are used as a host. The main roles of ions in film formation are the effects due to their kinetic energy and the electronic charge effects which involve the effect to active film formation and the effect acceleration of chemical reactions. Therefore, it is important to develope the technology to transport large volume of a flux of ionized particles with an extremely low incident energy without any troubles due to the space charge effects and charge up problems on the surface. This is the exact motivation for us to have been developing the Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) technology since 1972. By ICB technology materials (actually wide varieties of materials such as metal, semiconductor, magnetic material, insulator, organic material, etc.) are vaporized and ejected through a small hole nozzle into a high vacuum, where the vaporized material condenses into clusters with loosely coupled atoms with the sizes about from 100 to a few 1000 atoms (mainly 100-2000 atoms) by supercondensation phenomena due to the adiabatic expansion in this evaporation process through a small hole nozzle. In the ICB technology an atom in each cluster is ionized by irradiated by electron shower, and the ionized clusters are accelerated by electric field onto a substrate. The ionized clusters with neutral clusters impinged onto a substrate are spreaded separately into atoms migrating over the substrate, so that the surface migration energy of the impinged atoms, that is, surface diffusion energy are controlled by an incident energy of a cluster. In this report the theoretical and also experimental results of ICB technology are summarized.

  14. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  15. Voyager 1 in the Local Interstellar Medium: Cosmic-ray Energy Density and Ionization Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B. C.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.; Johannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the energy spectra of cosmic ay nuclei and electrons in the local interstellar medium (LISM) from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem on Voyager 1 (V1). We use four models of the local interstellar spectra of nuclei and one of electrons that are constrained by the observations to compute the energy density and ionization rate of atomic H in the LISM above 3 MeV for electrons and protons and above 3 MeV/nuc for nuclei with Z > 1. We find that the total cosmic-ray energy density is in the range 0.82-0.97 eV/cm3, which includes a contribution of 0.023 eV/cm3 from electrons. We find the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic H to be in the range 1.45-1.58 x 10-17 s-1, which is a factor of more than 10 below the cosmic-ray ionization rate in diffuse interstellar clouds based on astrochemistry methods. We discuss possible reasons for this difference. Voyager data analysis is supported by NASA Grant NNN12AA012. GALPROP development is supported by NASA Grants NNX13AC47G and NNX10AE78G.

  16. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam Chakhmachi, Amir; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  17. Spectrum and ionization rate of low-energy Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Biman B.; Gupta, Nayantara; Biermann, Peter L.

    2012-09-01

    We consider the rate of ionization of diffuse and molecular clouds in the interstellar medium by Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in order to constrain its low-energy spectrum. We extrapolate the GCR spectrum obtained from PAMELA at high energies (≥200 GeV nucleon-1) and a recently derived GCR proton flux at 1-200 GeV from observations of gamma-rays from molecular clouds, and find that the observed average Galactic ionization rate can be reconciled with this GCR spectrum if there is a low-energy cut-off for protons at 10-100 MeV. We also identify the flattening below a few GeV as being due to (a) decrease of the diffusion coefficient and dominance of convective loss at low energy and (b) the expected break in energy spectrum for a constant spectral index in momentum. We show that the inferred CR proton spectrum of ? for Ekin≤ few GeV is consistent with a power-law spectrum in momentum p-2.45± 0.4, which we identify as the spectrum at source. Diffusion loss at higher energies then introduces a steepening by E-α with α˜ 1/3, making it consistent with high-energy measurements.

  18. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  19. Studies of 4-CHLORO-2-FLUOROANISOLE by Two-Color Resonant Two-Photon Mass-Analyzed Threshold Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pei-Ying; Tzeng, Wen-Bih

    2016-06-01

    We applied the two-color resonant two-photon mass analyzed threshold ionization technique to record the cation spectra of 4-chloro-2-fluoroanisole by ionizing via five intermediate vibronic levels. The excitation and adiabatic ionization energies were determined to be 35 227, and 67 218 wn, respectively. Spectral analysis and theoretical calculation suggest that the geometry of the aromatic ring of the neutral species in the S1 state is non-planar, but that of the cation in the D0 state is planar.

  20. Nonadiabatic dynamics of floppy hydrogen bonded complexes: the case of the ionized ammonia dimer.

    PubMed

    Chalabala, Jan; Slavíček, Petr

    2016-07-27

    In the case of the ammonia dimer, we address the following questions: how ultrafast ionization dynamics is controlled by hydrogen bonding and whether we can control the products via selective ionization of a specific electron. We use quantum chemical calculations and ab initio non-adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations to model the femtosecond dynamics of the ammonia dimer upon ionization. The role of nuclear quantum effects and thermal fluctuations in predicting the structure of the dimer is emphasized; it is shown that the minimum energy and vibrationally averaged structures are rather different. The ground state structure subsequently controls the ionization dynamics. We describe reaction pathways, electronic population transfers and reaction yields with respect to ionization from different molecular orbitals. The simulations showed that the ionized ammonia dimer is highly unstable and its decay rate is primarily driven by the position of the electron hole. In the case of ground state ionization (i.e. the HOMO electron is ionized), the decay is likely to be preceded by a proton transfer (PT) channel yielding NH4(+) and NH2˙ fragments. The PT is less intense and slower compared with the ionized water dimer. After ionizing deeper lying electrons, mainly NH3(+)˙ and NH3 fragments are formed. Overall, our results show that the ionization dynamics of the ammonia and water dimers differ due to the nature of the hydrogen bond in these systems. PMID:27402376

  1. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  2. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGES

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  3. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  4. Influence of energy pooling and ionization on physical features of a diode-pumped alkali laser.

    PubMed

    An, Guofei; Wang, You; Han, Juhong; Cai, He; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, a diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) has become one of the most hopeful candidates to achieve the high power performance. A series of models have been established to analyze the DPAL's kinetic process and most of them were based on the algorithms in which only the ideal 3-level system was considered. In this paper, we developed a systematic model by taking into account the influence of excitation of neutral alkali atoms to even-higher levels and their ionization on the physical features of a static DPAL. The procedures of heat transfer and laser kinetics were combined together in our theoretical model. By using such a theme, the continuous temperature and number density distribution have been evaluated in the transverse section of a cesium vapor cell. The calculated results indicate that both energy pooling and ionization play important roles during the lasing process. The conclusions might deepen the understanding of the kinetic mechanism of a DPAL.

  5. The energy and momentum input of supernova explosions in structured and ionized molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the early impact of single and binary supernova (SN) explosions on dense gas clouds with three-dimensional, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations. The effect of cloud structure, radiative cooling and ionizing radiation from the progenitor stars on the net input of kinetic energy, fkin = Ekin/ESN, thermal energy, ftherm = Etherm/ESN, and gas momentum, fP = P/PSN, to the interstellar medium (ISM) is tested. For clouds with bar{n} = 100cm^{-3}, the momentum generating Sedov and pressure-driven snowplough phases are terminated early (∝0.01 Myr) and radiative cooling limits the coupling to ftherm ˜ 0.01, fkin ˜ 0.05, and fP ˜ 9, significantly lower than for the case without cooling. For pre-ionized clouds, these numbers are only increased by ˜50 per cent, independent of the cloud structure. This only suffices to accelerate ˜5 per cent of the cloud to radial velocities ≳30 km s-1. A second SN might enhance the coupling efficiencies if delayed past the Sedov phase of the first explosion. Such very low coupling efficiencies cast doubts on many subresolution models for SN feedback, which are, in general, validated a posteriori. Ionizing radiation appears not to significantly enhance the coupling of SNe to the surrounding gas as it drives the ISM into inert dense shells and cold clumps, a process which is unresolved in galaxy-scale simulations. Our results indicate that the momentum input of SNe in ionized, structured clouds is larger (more than a factor of 10) than the corresponding momentum yield of the progenitor's stellar winds.

  6. Spectrum and energy levels of five-times ionized zirconium (Zr VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph; Lindsay, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    We carried out a new analysis of the spectrum of five-times-ionized zirconium Zr VI. For this we used sliding-spark discharges together with normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs to observe the spectrum from 160 to 2000 Å. These observations showed that the analysis of this spectrum by Khan et al (1985 Phys. Scr. 31 837) contained a significant number of incorrect energy levels. We have now classified ˜420 lines as transitions between 23 even-parity levels 73 odd-parity levels. The 4s24p5, 4s4p6, 4s24p44d, 5s, 5d, 6s configurations are now complete, although a few levels of 4s24p45d are tentative. We determined Ritz-type wavelengths for ˜135 lines from the optimized energy levels. The uncertainties range from 0.0003 to 0.0020 Å. Hartree-Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels were used to interpret the observed configurations. Oscillator strengths for all classified lines were calculated with the fitted parameters. The results are compared with values for the level energies, percentage compositions, and transition probabilities from recent ab initio theoretical calculations. The ionization energy was revised to 777 380 ± 300 cm-1 (96.38 ± 0.04 eV).

  7. Ionization energies of W I-LXXIV and critical compilation of spectra and energy levels of Ga I-XXX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, Alexander; Reader, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    Both tungsten and gallium are important materials for fusion energy research. In this work, a semi-empirical method is used to determine ionization energies (IE) of multiply charged W ions [A.E. Kramida, J. Reader, Ionization Energies of Tungsten Ions: W^2+ through W^71+, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables, 2006, in press]. The method is based on Hartree-Fock calculations of electron binding energies with empirical scale factors. Relative uncertainties vary from 1.7 % for W III^ to 0.015 % for W LXXII. Combined with previously known experimental or theoretical IE values for W I-II and LXXIII-LXXIV, these new semiempirical results allow us to build a complete table of IEs of tungsten in all stages of ionization. For gallium, all available experimental data on wavelengths and energy levels are critically compiled and evaluated [T. Shirai, J. Reader, A.E. Kramida, J. Sugar, Spectral Data for Gallium: Ga I through Ga XXXI, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 2006, in press]. Such data exist for spectra Ga I-VII, XIII-XXVI, and XXX. For Li-like Ga XXIX through H-like Ga XXXI, theoretical data on energy levels and line wavelengths are compiled. For Ga I-III, XV-XX, XXIII-XXVI, and XXX, radiative transition probabilities are included where available. The ground state configuration and term and a value of IE are included for each ion. This work was supported in part by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy.

  8. KANTBP: A program for computing energy levels, reaction matrix and radial wave functions in the coupled-channel hyperspherical adiabatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Abrashkevich, A. G.; Amaya-Tapia, A.; Kaschiev, M. S.; Larsen, S. Y.; Vinitsky, S. I.

    2007-10-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program is presented which calculates energy values, reaction matrix and corresponding radial wave functions in a coupled-channel approximation of the hyperspherical adiabatic approach. In this approach, a multi-dimensional Schrödinger equation is reduced to a system of the coupled second-order ordinary differential equations on the finite interval with homogeneous boundary conditions of the third type. The resulting system of radial equations which contains the potential matrix elements and first-derivative coupling terms is solved using high-order accuracy approximations of the finite-element method. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the energy values and reaction matrix for an exactly solvable 2D-model of three identical particles on a line with pair zero-range potentials. Program summaryProgram title: KANTBP Catalogue identifier: ADZH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4224 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 232 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: Intel Xeon EM64T, Alpha 21264A, AMD Athlon MP, Pentium IV Xeon, Opteron 248, Intel Pentium IV Operating system: OC Linux, Unix AIX 5.3, SunOS 5.8, Solaris, Windows XP RAM: depends on (a) the number of differential equations; (b) the number and order of finite-elements; (c) the number of hyperradial points; and (d) the number of eigensolutions required. Test run requires 30 MB Classification: 2.1, 2.4 External routines: GAULEG and GAUSSJ [W.H. Press, B.F. Flanery, S.A. Teukolsky, W.T. Vetterley, Numerical Recipes: The Art of Scientific Computing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1986] Nature of problem: In the hyperspherical adiabatic

  9. Communication: Importance of rotationally inelastic processes in low-energy Penning ionization of CHF3.

    PubMed

    Jankunas, Justin; Jachymski, Krzysztof; Hapka, Michał; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2016-06-14

    Low energy reaction dynamics can strongly depend on the internal structure of the reactants. The role of rotationally inelastic processes in cold collisions involving polyatomic molecules has not been explored so far. Here we address this problem by performing a merged-beam study of the He((3)S1)+CHF3 Penning ionization reaction in a range of collision energies E/kB = 0.5-120 K. The experimental cross sections are compared with total reaction cross sections calculated within the framework of quantum defect theory. We find that the broad range of collision energies combined with the relatively small rotational constants of CHF3 makes rotationally inelastic collisions a crucial player in the total reaction dynamics. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is only obtained if the energy-dependent probability for rotational excitation is included in the calculations, in stark contrast to previous experiments where classical scaling laws were able to describe the results. PMID:27305989

  10. Communication: Importance of rotationally inelastic processes in low-energy Penning ionization of CHF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankunas, Justin; Jachymski, Krzysztof; Hapka, Michał; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Low energy reaction dynamics can strongly depend on the internal structure of the reactants. The role of rotationally inelastic processes in cold collisions involving polyatomic molecules has not been explored so far. Here we address this problem by performing a merged-beam study of the He(3S1)+CHF3 Penning ionization reaction in a range of collision energies E/kB = 0.5-120 K. The experimental cross sections are compared with total reaction cross sections calculated within the framework of quantum defect theory. We find that the broad range of collision energies combined with the relatively small rotational constants of CHF3 makes rotationally inelastic collisions a crucial player in the total reaction dynamics. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is only obtained if the energy-dependent probability for rotational excitation is included in the calculations, in stark contrast to previous experiments where classical scaling laws were able to describe the results.

  11. Communication: Importance of rotationally inelastic processes in low-energy Penning ionization of CHF3.

    PubMed

    Jankunas, Justin; Jachymski, Krzysztof; Hapka, Michał; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2016-06-14

    Low energy reaction dynamics can strongly depend on the internal structure of the reactants. The role of rotationally inelastic processes in cold collisions involving polyatomic molecules has not been explored so far. Here we address this problem by performing a merged-beam study of the He((3)S1)+CHF3 Penning ionization reaction in a range of collision energies E/kB = 0.5-120 K. The experimental cross sections are compared with total reaction cross sections calculated within the framework of quantum defect theory. We find that the broad range of collision energies combined with the relatively small rotational constants of CHF3 makes rotationally inelastic collisions a crucial player in the total reaction dynamics. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is only obtained if the energy-dependent probability for rotational excitation is included in the calculations, in stark contrast to previous experiments where classical scaling laws were able to describe the results.

  12. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; LaBel, K. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Swanson, Scot E.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Van Deusen, Stuart B.; Sexton, Frederick W.; Martinez, Marino J.; Gordon, M. S.

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data from 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.

  13. Hardness assurance for proton direct ionization-induced SEEs using a high-energy proton beam

    DOE PAGES

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Dodd, Paul E.; Doyle, Barney Lee; Trinczek, M.; Blackmore, E. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Reed, R. A.; Pellish, J. A.; et al

    2014-11-06

    The low-energy proton energy spectra of all shielded space environments have the same shape. This shape is easily reproduced in the laboratory by degrading a high-energy proton beam, producing a high-fidelity test environment. We use this test environment to dramatically simplify rate prediction for proton direct ionization effects, allowing the work to be done at high-energy proton facilities, on encapsulated parts, without knowledge of the IC design, and with little or no computer simulations required. Proton direct ionization (PDI) is predicted to significantly contribute to the total error rate under the conditions investigated. Scaling effects are discussed using data frommore » 65-nm, 45-nm, and 32-nm SOI SRAMs. These data also show that grazing-angle protons will dominate the PDI-induced error rate due to their higher effective LET, so PDI hardness assurance methods must account for angular effects to be conservative. As a result, we show that this angular dependence can be exploited to quickly assess whether an IC is susceptible to PDI.« less

  14. Distributions of deposited energy and ionization clusters around ion tracks studied with Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Hilgers, Gerhard; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    The Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) was extended to study the patterns of energy deposition at sub-micrometer distance from individual ion tracks. Dose distributions for low-energy 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O ions measured in several experiments are well described by the model in a broad range of radial distances, from 0.5 to 3000 nm. Despite the fact that such distributions are characterized by long tails, a dominant fraction of deposited energy (∼80%) is confined within a radius of about 10 nm. The probability distributions of clustered ionization events in nanoscale volumes of water traversed by 1H, 2H, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, and 12C ions are also calculated. A good agreement of calculated ionization cluster-size distributions with the corresponding experimental data suggests that the extended MCHIT can be used to characterize stochastic processes of energy deposition to sensitive cellular structures.

  15. KANTBP 2.0: New version of a program for computing energy levels, reaction matrix and radial wave functions in the coupled-channel hyperspherical adiabatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Abrashkevich, A. G.

    2008-11-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program for calculating energy values, reaction matrix and corresponding radial wave functions in a coupled-channel approximation of the hyperspherical adiabatic approach is presented. In this approach, a multi-dimensional Schrödinger equation is reduced to a system of the coupled second-order ordinary differential equations on a finite interval with homogeneous boundary conditions: (i) the Dirichlet, Neumann and third type at the left and right boundary points for continuous spectrum problem, (ii) the Dirichlet and Neumann type conditions at left boundary point and Dirichlet, Neumann and third type at the right boundary point for the discrete spectrum problem. The resulting system of radial equations containing the potential matrix elements and first-derivative coupling terms is solved using high-order accuracy approximations of the finite element method. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the reaction matrix and radial wave functions for 3D-model of a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field. This version extends the previous version 1.0 of the KANTBP program [O. Chuluunbaatar, A.A. Gusev, A.G. Abrashkevich, A. Amaya-Tapia, M.S. Kaschiev, S.Y. Larsen, S.I. Vinitsky, Comput. Phys. Commun. 177 (2007) 649-675]. Program summaryProgram title: KANTBP Catalogue identifier: ADZH_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZH_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 20 403 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 147 563 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 Computer: Intel Xeon EM64T, Alpha 21264A, AMD Athlon MP, Pentium IV Xeon, Opteron 248, Intel Pentium IV Operating system: OC Linux, Unix AIX 5.3, SunOS 5.8, Solaris, Windows XP RAM: This depends on the

  16. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  17. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$ and $^{12}C$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.

  18. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed formore » $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $$\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$$ and $$^{12}C$$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.« less

  19. Additions to the spectrum and energy levels and critical compilation of doubly ionized boron, B III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.; Ryabtsev, A. N.; Ekberg, J. O.; Kink, I.; Mannervik, S.; Martinson, I.

    2008-08-01

    We have undertaken the study of the Li-like spectrum of doubly ionized boron, B III. The spectroscopic data have been obtained with beam-foil spectroscopy and high-resolution spark spectroscopy. The experimental work was combined with theoretical calculations using ab initio and semi-empirical techniques. About 50 new transitions have been observed, and most of the previously known lines have been measured with improved accuracy. We have also critically evaluated all previous and recent data for this spectrum. Complete data on wavelengths and energy levels based on this analysis are tabulated.

  20. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  1. COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Kerber, Florian

    2012-10-15

    We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

  2. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ˜0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-2 Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (PD2) and helium partial pressure (PHe) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if PD2 > 10-6 Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if PHe/PD2 > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  3. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-06-20

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using the method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. Lastly, the corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.

  4. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    DOE PAGES

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-06-20

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using themore » method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. Lastly, the corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.« less

  5. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-09-01

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using the method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. The corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.

  6. Mass separation of deuterium and helium with conventional quadrupole mass spectrometer by using varied ionization energy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaowei; Hu, Jiansheng; Wan, Zhao; Wu, Jinhua; Wang, Houyin; Cao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Deuterium pressure in deuterium-helium mixture gas is successfully measured by a common quadrupole mass spectrometer (model: RGA200) with a resolution of ∼0.5 atomic mass unit (AMU), by using varied ionization energy together with new developed software and dedicated calibration for RGA200. The new software is developed by using MATLAB with the new functions: electron energy (EE) scanning, deuterium partial pressure measurement, and automatic data saving. RGA200 with new software is calibrated in pure deuterium and pure helium 1.0 × 10(-6)-5.0 × 10(-2) Pa, and the relation between pressure and ion current of AMU4 under EE = 25 eV and EE = 70 eV is obtained. From the calibration result and RGA200 scanning with varied ionization energy in deuterium and helium mixture gas, both deuterium partial pressures (P(D2)) and helium partial pressure (P(He)) could be obtained. The result shows that deuterium partial pressure could be measured if P(D2) > 10(-6) Pa (limited by ultimate pressure of calibration vessel), and helium pressure could be measured only if P(He)/P(D2) > 0.45, and the measurement error is evaluated as 15%. This method is successfully employed in EAST 2015 summer campaign to monitor deuterium outgassing/desorption during helium discharge cleaning.

  7. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  8. Adiabatic rotation, quantum search, and preparation of superposition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, M. Stewart

    2007-06-01

    We introduce the idea of using adiabatic rotation to generate superpositions of a large class of quantum states. For quantum computing this is an interesting alternative to the well-studied “straight line” adiabatic evolution. In ways that complement recent results, we show how to efficiently prepare three types of states: Kitaev’s toric code state, the cluster state of the measurement-based computation model, and the history state used in the adiabatic simulation of a quantum circuit. We also show that the method, when adapted for quantum search, provides quadratic speedup as other optimal methods do with the advantages that the problem Hamiltonian is time independent and that the energy gap above the ground state is strictly nondecreasing with time. Likewise the method can be used for optimization as an alternative to the standard adiabatic algorithm.

  9. Cross sections for ionization of tetrahydrofuran by protons at energies between 300 and 3000 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingjie; Rudek, Benedikt; Bennett, Daniel; de Vera, Pablo; Bug, Marion; Buhr, Ticia; Baek, Woon Yong; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rabus, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Double-differential cross sections for ionization of tetrahydrofuran by protons with energies from 300 to 3000 keV were measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt ion accelerator facility. The electrons emitted at angles between 15∘ and 150∘ relative to the ion-beam direction were detected with an electrostatic hemispherical electron spectrometer. Single-differential and total ionization cross sections have been derived by integration. The experimental results are compared to the semiempirical Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht model as well as to the recently reported method based on the dielectric formalism. The comparison to the latter showed good agreement with experimental data in a broad range of emission angles and energies of secondary electrons. The scaling property of ionization cross sections for tetrahydrofuran was also investigated. Compared to molecules of different size, the ionization cross sections of tetrahydrofuran were found to scale with the number of valence electrons at large impact parameters.

  10. Theoretical study of γ-aminobutyric acid conformers: Intramolecular interactions and ionization energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke-Dong; Wang, Mei-Ting; Meng, Ju

    2014-10-01

    Allowing for all combinations of internal single-bond rotamers, 1,296 unique trial structures of γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) are obtained. All of these structures are optimized at the M06-2X level of theory and a total of 68 local minimal conformers are found. The nine low-lying conformers are used for further studies. According to the calculated relative Gibbs free energies at M06-2X level of theory, we find that the dispersion is important for the relative energy of GABA. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds and hyperconjugative interaction and their effects on the conformational stability are studied. The results show that both of them have great influence on the conformers. The vertical ionization energies (VIE) are calculated and match the experimental data well. The results show that the neutral GABA in the gas phase is a multi-conformer system and at least four conformations exist.

  11. Determination of Formation and Ionization Energies of Charged Defects in Two-Dimensional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Han, Dong; Li, Xian-Bin; Xie, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Nian-Ke; Tian, Wei Quan; West, Damien; Sun, Hong-Bo; Zhang, S. B.

    2015-05-01

    We present a simple and efficient approach to evaluate the formation energy and, in particular, the ionization energy (IE) of charged defects in two-dimensional (2D) systems using the supercell approximation. So far, first-principles results for such systems can scatter widely due to the divergence of the Coulomb energy with vacuum dimension, denoted here as Lz . Numerous attempts have been made in the past to fix the problem under various approximations. Here, we show that the problem can be resolved without any such assumption, and a converged IE can be obtained by an extrapolation of the asymptotic IE expression at large Lz (with a fixed lateral area S ) back to the value at Lz=0 . Application to defects in monolayer boron nitride reveal that defects in 2D systems can be unexpectedly deep, much deeper than the bulk.

  12. S-model calculations for high-energy-electron-impact double ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasaneo, G.; Mitnik, D. M.; Randazzo, J. M.; Ancarani, L. U.; Colavecchia, F. D.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the double ionization of helium by high-energy electron impact is studied. The corresponding four-body Schrödinger equation is transformed into a set of driven equations containing successive orders in the projectile-target interaction. The transition amplitude obtained from the asymptotic limit of the first-order solution is shown to be equivalent to the familiar first Born approximation. The first-order driven equation is solved within a generalized Sturmian approach for an S-wave (e,3e) model process with high incident energy and small momentum transfer corresponding to published measurements. Two independent numerical implementations, one using spherical and the other hyperspherical coordinates, yield mutual agreement. From our ab initio solution, the transition amplitude is extracted, and single differential cross sections are calculated and could be taken as benchmark values to test other numerical methods in a previously unexplored energy domain.

  13. The threshold photoelectron spectrum of cyanovinylacetylene leads to an upward revision of the ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmeier, Fabian; Lang, Melanie; Fischer, Ingo; Hemberger, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Cyanovinylacetylene C5H3N was investigated by threshold photoelectron spectroscopy. The ionization energy (IE) was determined to be 10.04 eV. This value constitutes an upward revision of the earlier value of 9.33 eV. For both stereoisomers (trans and cis) computations predict very similar IEs and spectra. At 11.08 eV and 11.17 eV excited cationic states are observed. For the precursor 3-bromopyridine an IE of 9.34 eV was obtained. The appearance energy AE0K (3-bromopyridine, 3-pyridyl+) was determined to be 11.71 eV and a bond dissociation energy of the Csbnd Br bond in the 3-bromopyridine cation of 229 kJ mol-1 was derived.

  14. Direct Determination of the Ionization Energies of PtC, PtO, and PtO2 with VUVRadiation

    SciTech Connect

    Citir, Murat; Metz, Ricardo B.; Belau, Leonid; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-07-21

    Photoionization efficiency curves were measured for gas-phase PtC, PtO, and PtO2 using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at the Advanced Light Source. The molecules were prepared by laser ablation of a platinum tube, followed by reaction with CH4 or N2O and supersonic expansion. These measurements providethe first directly measured ionization energy for PtC, IE(PtC) = 9.45 +- 0.05 eV. The direct measurement also gives greatly improved ionization energies for the platinum oxides, IE(PtO) = 10.0 +- 0.1 eV and IE(PtO2) = 11.35 +- 0.05 eV. The ionization energy connects the dissociation energies of the neutral and cation, leading to greatly improved 0 K bond dissociation energies for the neutrals: D0(Pt-C) = 5.95 +- 0.07 eV, D0(Pt-O)= 4.30 +- 0.12 eV, and D0(OPt-O) = 4.41 +- 0.13 eV, as well as enthalpies of formation for the gas-phase molecules Delta H0 f,0(PtC(g)) = 701 +- 7 kJ/mol, Delta H0f,0(PtO(g)) = 396 +- 12 kJ/mol, and Delta H0f,0(PtO2(g)) = 218 +- 11 kJ/mol. Much of the error in previous Knudsen cell measurements of platinum oxide bond dissociation energies is due to the use of thermodynamic second law extrapolations. Third law values calculated using statistical mechanical thermodynamic functions are in much better agreement with values obtained from ionization energies and ion energetics. These experiments demonstrate that laser ablation production with direct VUV ionization measurements is a versatile tool to measure ionization energies and bond dissociation energies for catalytically interesting species such as metal oxides and carbides.

  15. Non-adiabatic dark fluid cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S.; Velten, H.E.S.; Zimdahl, W. E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2009-06-01

    We model the dark sector of the cosmic substratum by a viscous fluid with an equation of state p = −ζΘ, where Θ is the fluid-expansion scalar and ζ is the coefficient of bulk viscosity for which we assume a dependence ζ∝ρ{sup ν} on the energy density ρ. The homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics coincides with that of a generalized Chaplygin gas with equation of state p = −A/ρ{sup α}. The perturbation dynamics of the viscous model, however, is intrinsically non-adiabatic and qualitatively different from the Chaplygin-gas case. In particular, it avoids short-scale instabilities and/or oscillations which apparently have ruled out unified models of the Chaplygin-gas type. We calculate the matter power spectrum and demonstrate that the non-adiabatic model is compatible with the data from the 2dFGRS and the SDSS surveys. A χ{sup 2}-analysis shows, that for certain parameter combinations the viscous-dark-fluid (VDF) model is well competitive with the ΛCDM model. These results indicate that non-adiabatic unified models can be seen as potential contenders for a General-Relativity-based description of the cosmic substratum.

  16. Spectrum and energy levels of quadruply-ionized molybdenum (Mo V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph; Tauheed, Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    The spectrum of quadruply-ionized molybdenum Mo V was observed from 200 to 4700 Å with sliding spark discharges on 10.7 m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs. The existing analyses of this spectrum (Tauheed et al 1985 Phys. Scr. 31 369; Cabeza et al 1986 Phys. Scr. 34 223) were extended to include the 5s2, 5p2, 5s5d, 5s6s, 4d5f, and 4d5g configurations as well as the missing 3H6 level of 4d4f and about 75 levels of the core-excited configuration 4p54d3. The values of the 4d5d 1S0, 5s5p 1P1, and 4d6p 3P0 levels were revised. There are now about 900 lines classified as transitions between 66 even parity and 191 odd parity energy levels. Of these, about 600 lines and 130 levels are new. From the optimized energy level values, Ritz-type wavelengths were determined for about 380 lines, with uncertainties varying from 0.0003 to 0.002 Å. The observed configurations were theoretically interpreted by means of Hartree-Fock calculations and least-squares fits of the energy parameters to the observed levels. The fitted parameters were used to calculate oscillator strengths for all classified lines. A few unclassified lines and undesignated levels are also given. An improved value for the ionization energy was obtained by combining the observed energy of the 4d5g configuration with an ab initio calculation of its term value. The adopted value is 438 900 ± 150 cm-1 (54.417 ± 0.019 eV).

  17. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C. E-mail: melott@ku.edu

    2010-05-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV. An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV–1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

  18. Low-energy ionization cooling of ions for beta beam sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    Rubbia et al.[1] have recently suggested that multiturn passage of a low-energy ion beam (v/c {approx_equal} 0.1) through a low-Z target can be used in the production of ions useable for beta-beam sources and that ionization cooling techniques can increase the circulating beam lifetime and thus enhance that production. Some parameters in their initial discussion are somewhat optimistic, and the conditions for 3-D cooling are not completely developed. In the present paper we reconsider some features of the scenarios and suggest some variations that may be more practical. While 3-D cooling is possible at these energies, mixing of longitudinal motion with both horizontal and vertical motion is necessary to obtain simultaneous cooling in all dimensions; we suggest lattice variations that would be needed. Direct and reverse kinematics are described and explored.

  19. Energy-Dependent Ionization States of Shock-Accelerated Particles in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.; Ng, C. K.; Tylka, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the range of possible energy dependence of the ionization states of ions that are shock-accelerated from the ambient plasma of the solar corona. If acceleration begins in a region of moderate density, sufficiently low in the corona, ions above about 0.1 MeV/amu approach an equilibrium charge state that depends primarily upon their speed and only weakly on the plasma temperature. We suggest that the large variations of the charge states with energy for ions such as Si and Fe observed in the 1997 November 6 event are consistent with stripping in moderately dense coronal. plasma during shock acceleration. In the large solar-particle events studied previously, acceleration occurs sufficiently high in the corona that even Fe ions up to 600 MeV/amu are not stripped of electrons.

  20. Flux and energy analysis of species in hollow cathode magnetron ionized physical vapor deposition of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Ko, E.; Dulkin, A.; Park, K. J.; Fields, S.; Leeser, K.; Meng, L.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-12-01

    To meet the stringent requirements of interconnect metallization for sub-32 nm technologies, an unprecedented level of flux and energy control of film forming species has become necessary to further advance ionized physical vapor deposition technology. Such technology development mandates improvements in methods to quantify the metal ion fraction, the gas/metal ion ratio, and the associated ion energies in the total ion flux to the substrate. In this work, a novel method combining planar Langmuir probes, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and gridded energy analyzer (GEA) custom instrumentation is developed to estimate the plasma density and temperature as well as to measure the metal ion fraction and ion energy. The measurements were conducted in a Novellus Systems, Inc. Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCMTM) physical vapor deposition source used for deposition of Cu seed layer for 65-130 nm technology nodes. The gridded energy analyzer was employed to measure ion flux and ion energy, which was compared to the collocated planar Langmuir probe data. The total ion-to-metal neutral ratio was determined by the QCM combined with GEA. The data collection technique and the corresponding analysis are discussed. The effect of concurrent resputtering during the deposition process on film thickness profile is also discussed.

  1. Flux and energy analysis of species in hollow cathode magnetron ionized physical vapor deposition of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Ko, E.; Dulkin, A.; Park, K. J.; Fields, S.; Leeser, K.; Meng, L.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-12-15

    To meet the stringent requirements of interconnect metallization for sub-32 nm technologies, an unprecedented level of flux and energy control of film forming species has become necessary to further advance ionized physical vapor deposition technology. Such technology development mandates improvements in methods to quantify the metal ion fraction, the gas/metal ion ratio, and the associated ion energies in the total ion flux to the substrate. In this work, a novel method combining planar Langmuir probes, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and gridded energy analyzer (GEA) custom instrumentation is developed to estimate the plasma density and temperature as well as to measure the metal ion fraction and ion energy. The measurements were conducted in a Novellus Systems, Inc. Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCM{sup TM}) physical vapor deposition source used for deposition of Cu seed layer for 65-130 nm technology nodes. The gridded energy analyzer was employed to measure ion flux and ion energy, which was compared to the collocated planar Langmuir probe data. The total ion-to-metal neutral ratio was determined by the QCM combined with GEA. The data collection technique and the corresponding analysis are discussed. The effect of concurrent resputtering during the deposition process on film thickness profile is also discussed.

  2. Extended adiabatic blast waves and a model of the soft X-ray background. [interstellar matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.; Anderson, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical approximation is generated which follows the development of an adiabatic spherical blast wave in a homogeneous ambient medium of finite pressure. An analytical approximation is also presented for the electron temperature distribution resulting from coulomb collisional heating. The dynamical, thermal, ionization, and spectral structures are calculated for blast waves of energy E sub 0 = 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs in a hot low-density interstellar environment. A formula is presented for estimating the luminosity evolution of such explosions. The B and C bands of the soft X-ray background, it is shown, are reproduced by such a model explosion if the ambient density is about .000004 cm, the blast radius is roughly 100 pc, and the solar system is located inside the shocked region. Evolution in a pre-existing cavity with a strong density gradient may, it is suggested, remove both the M band and OVI discrepancies.

  3. Photoelectron angular distributions of H ionization in low energy regime: Comparison between different potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shu-Na; Liang, Hao; Peng, Liang-You; Jiang, Hong-Bing

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the low energy part of the photoelectron spectra in the tunneling ionization regime by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrdinger equation for different atomic potentials at various wavelengths. We find that the shift of the first above-threshold ionization (ATI) peak is closely related to the interferences between electron wave packets, which are controlled by the laser field and largely independent of the potential. By gradually changing the short-range potential to the long-range Coulomb potential, we show that the long-range potential’s effect is mainly to focus the electrons along the laser’s polarization and to generate the spider structure by enhancing the rescattering process with the parent ion. In addition, we find that the intermediate transitions and the Rydberg states have important influences on the number and the shape of the lobes near the threshold. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11322437 and 11574010) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922402).

  4. Adiabatic computation: A toy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Mosseri, Rémy

    2006-10-01

    We discuss a toy model for adiabatic quantum computation which displays some phenomenological properties expected in more realistic implementations. This model has two free parameters: the adiabatic evolution parameter s and the α parameter, which emulates many-variable constraints in the classical computational problem. The proposed model presents, in the s-α plane, a line of first-order quantum phase transition that ends at a second-order point. The relation between computation complexity and the occurrence of quantum phase transitions is discussed. We analyze the behavior of the ground and first excited states near the quantum phase transition, the gap, and the entanglement content of the ground state.

  5. Adiabatic computation: A toy model

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Mosseri, Remy

    2006-10-15

    We discuss a toy model for adiabatic quantum computation which displays some phenomenological properties expected in more realistic implementations. This model has two free parameters: the adiabatic evolution parameter s and the {alpha} parameter, which emulates many-variable constraints in the classical computational problem. The proposed model presents, in the s-{alpha} plane, a line of first-order quantum phase transition that ends at a second-order point. The relation between computation complexity and the occurrence of quantum phase transitions is discussed. We analyze the behavior of the ground and first excited states near the quantum phase transition, the gap, and the entanglement content of the ground state.

  6. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  7. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  8. New ab initio adiabatic potential energy surfaces and bound state calculations for the singlet ground X˜ 1A1 and excited C˜ 1B2(21A') states of SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.; Kumar, Praveen; Poirier, Bill; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2016-05-01

    We report new and more accurate adiabatic potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the ground X˜ 1A1 and electronically excited C˜ 1B2(21A') states of the SO2 molecule. Ab initio points are calculated using the explicitly correlated internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction (icMRCI-F12) method. A second less accurate PES for the ground X ˜ state is also calculated using an explicitly correlated single-reference coupled-cluster method with single, double, and non-iterative triple excitations [CCSD(T)-F12]. With these new three-dimensional PESs, we determine energies of the vibrational bound states and compare these values to existing literature data and experiment.

  9. Adiabatic Floquet model for the optical response in femtosecond filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Michael; Brée, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    The standard model of femtosecond filamentation is based on phenomenological assumptions which suggest that the ionization-induced carriers can be treated as a homogeneous, uncorrelated plasma according to the Drude model, while the nonlinear response of the bound carriers is responsible for the all-optical Kerr effect. Here, we demonstrate that the additional plasma generated at a multiphoton resonance dominates the saturation of the nonlinear refractive index. Since resonances are not captured by the standard model, we propose a modification of the latter in which ionization enhancements can be accounted for by an ionization rate obtained from non-Hermitian Floquet theory. In the adiabatic regime of long pulse envelopes, this augmented standard model is in excellent agreement with direct quantum mechanical simulations. Since our proposal maintains the structure of the standard model, it can be easily incorporated into existing codes for the numerical simulation of femtosecond filaments.

  10. Detection of High Energy Cosmic Rays with Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter, ATIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahn, E. J.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Ellison, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.

    2002-01-01

    The author presents preliminary results of the first flight of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC). ATIC is a multiple, long duration balloon flight, investigation for the study of cosmic ray spectra from below 50 GeV to near 100 TeV total energy, using a fully active Bismuth Germanate (BGO) calorimeter. It is equipped with the first large area mosaic of small fully depleted silicon detector pads capable of charge identification of cosmic rays from H to Fe. As a redundancy check for the charge identification and a coarse particle tracking system, three projective layers of x-y scintillator hodoscopes were employed, above, in the center and below a Carbon interaction 'target'.

  11. Ionization Energy Measurements and Spectroscopy of the BeOBe Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, J. M.; Bondybey, V. E.; Heaven, M. C.

    2009-06-01

    The Be_2O^+ cation was observed some fifty years ago in mass spectroscopic studies of vapors above heated beryllium oxide. From temperature and electron energy dependence of the ion abundance, Theard and Hildebrand (JCP 41, 3416 (1964)) deduced a value of -8±10 kcal/mole for the enthalpy of formation of neutral Be_2O in the gas phase. Such strong bonding of the second Be atom to BeO was, at the time, somewhat surprising given the initial view of a double bond in BeO, such that Be donates two electrons and the O atom would have a filled valence shell. More recent electronic structure calculations have shown that the bonding of BeO is intermediate between a single and double bond and thus can form a strong bond with a second Be atom. Calculations have also predicted that the ground electronic state of BeOBe is multi-reference in nature, thus accurate characterization of this molecule can be used to benchmark high-level multiconfigurational theoretical methods. The electronic structure of the BeOBe molecule has been investigated using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) tenchniques in the 27000-33000 cm^{-1} range. The BeOBe molecule has been stabilized in the gas phase using pulsed laser vaporization of Beryllium metal, and subsequent free jet expansion into vacuum. Vibrational progressions assigned to excitations of the symmetric and antisymmetric stretches in the excited state are observed and analyzed. Rotationally resolved spectra are found to exhibit nuclear spin statistics which confirm the ground electronic state of BeOBe has ^1Σ_g^+ symmetry. A BeO bond length of 1.399(3) Angstrom has been determined for the ground state. Photoionization efficiency curves were also recorded to determine an accurate ionization energy for BeOBe of 8.12(1) eV. Comparisons with electronic structure calculations will also be presented.

  12. Electron ionization cross-section calculations for liquid water at high impact energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousis, C.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Hadjidoukas, P.; Nikjoo, H.; Pathak, A.

    2008-04-01

    Cross-sections for the ionization of liquid water is perhaps the most essential set of data needed for modeling electron transport in biological matter. The complexity of ab initio calculations for any multi-electron target has led to largely heuristic semi-empirical models which take advantage elements of the Bethe, dielectric and binary collision theories. In this work we present various theoretical models for calculating total ionization cross-sections (TICSs) for liquid water over the 10 keV-1 MeV electron energy range. In particular, we extend our recent dielectric model calculations for liquid water to relativistic energies using both the appropriate kinematic corrections and the transverse part. Comparisons are made with widely used atomic and molecular TICS models such as those of Khare and co-workers, Kim-Rudd, Deutsch-Märk, Vriens and Gryzinski. The required dipole oscillator strength was provided by our recent optical-data model which is based on the latest experimental data for liquid water. The TICSs computed by the above models differ by up to 40% from the dielectric results. The best agreement (to within ∼10%) was obtained by Khare's original model and an approximate form of Gryzinski's model. In contrast, the binary-encounter-dipole (BED) models of both Kim-Rudd and Khare and co-workers resulted in ∼10-20% higher TICS values, while discrepancies increased to ∼30-40% when their simpler binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) versions were used. Finally, we discuss to what extent the accuracy of the TICS is indicative of the reliability of the underlying differential cross-sections.

  13. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  14. Effect of Grain Boundary Character Distribution on the Adiabatic Shear Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Lihong; Luo, Shuhong; Hu, Haibo; Tang, Tiegang; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-11-01

    The adiabatic shear susceptibility of AISI321 stainless steels with different grain boundary character distributions (GBCDs) was investigated by means of split-Hopkinson pressure bar. The results indicate that the width of the adiabatic shear band of the specimen after thermomechanical processing (TMP) treatment is narrower. The comparison of the stress collapse time, the critical stress, and the adiabatic shear forming energy suggests that the TMP specimens have lower adiabatic shear susceptibility than that of the solution-treated samples under the same loading condition. GBCD and grain size affected the adiabatic shear susceptibility. The high-angle boundary network of the TMP specimens was interrupted or replaced by the special grain boundary, and smaller grain size hindered the adiabatic shearing.

  15. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  16. Indirect dark matter signatures in the cosmic dark ages. II. Ionization, heating, and photon production from arbitrary energy injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-01-01

    Any injection of electromagnetically interacting particles during the cosmic dark ages will lead to increased ionization, heating, production of Lyman-α photons and distortions to the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, with potentially observable consequences. In this paper we describe numerical results for the low-energy electrons and photons produced by the cooling of particles injected at energies from keV to multi-TeV scales, at arbitrary injection redshifts (but focusing on the post-recombination epoch). We use these data, combined with existing calculations modeling the cooling of these low-energy particles, to estimate the resulting contributions to ionization, excitation and heating of the gas, and production of low-energy photons below the threshold for excitation and ionization. We compute corrected deposition-efficiency curves for annihilating dark matter, and demonstrate how to compute equivalent curves for arbitrary energy-injection histories. These calculations provide the necessary inputs for the limits on dark matter annihilation presented in the accompanying paper I, but also have potential applications in the context of dark matter decay or deexcitation, decay of other metastable species, or similar energy injections from new physics. We make our full results publicly available at http://nebel.rc.fas.harvard.edu/epsilon, to facilitate further independent studies. In particular, we provide the full low-energy electron and photon spectra, to allow matching onto more detailed codes that describe the cooling of such particles at low energies.

  17. Internal Energy Deposition for Low Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Post-ionization Mass Spectrometry using Thermometer Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Paul M.; Shi, Fengjian; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    The internal energy of p-substituted benzylpyridinium ions after laser vaporization using low energy, femtosecond duration laser pulses of wavelengths 800 and 1042 nm was determined using the survival yield method. Laser vaporization of dried benzylpyridinium ions from metal slides into a buffered nanospray with 75 μJ, 800 nm laser pulses resulted in a higher extent of fragmentation than conventional nanospray due to the presence of a two-photon resonance fragmentation pathway. Using higher energy 800 nm laser pulses (280 and 505 μJ) led to decreased survival yields for the four different dried benzylpyridinium ions. Analyzing dried thermometer ions with 46.5 μJ, 1042 nm pulse-bursts resulted in little fragmentation and mean internal energy distributions equivalent to nanospray, which is attributable to the absence of a two-photon resonance that occurs with higher energy, 800 nm laser pulses. Vaporization of thermometer ions from solution with either 800 nm or 1042 nm laser pulses resulted in comparable internal energy distributions to nanospray ionization.

  18. Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl and eta5-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl studied by symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation and collision-energy resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Ohno, Koichi

    2010-02-28

    Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl Fe(CO)(5) and eta(5)-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2) have been studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, two-dimensional Penning ionization electron spectroscopy (2D-PIES), and symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations. Theory provided reliable assignments for the complex ionization spectra of these molecules, which have metal-carbonyl bonds. Theoretical ionization energies agreed well with experimental observations and the calculated wave functions could explain the relative intensities of PIES spectra. The collision-energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) was obtained by 2D-PIES. To interpret these CEDPICS, the interaction potentials between the molecules and a Li atom were examined in several coordinates by calculations. The relation between the slope of the CEDPICS and the electronic structure of the ionized states, such as molecular symmetry and the spatial distribution of ionizing orbitals, was analyzed. In Fe(CO)(5), an attractive interaction was obtained for the equatorial CO, while the interaction for the axial CO direction was repulsive. For Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2), the interaction potential in the direction of both Co-C-O and Co-Cp ring was attractive. These anisotropic interactions and ionizing orbital distributions consistently explain the relative slopes of the CEDPICS.

  19. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin-Hu; Ye, Yun-Xiu; Chen, Jian-Ping; Lu, Hai-Jiang; Zhu, Peng-Jia; Jiang, Feng-Jian

    2015-07-01

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at the Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for 12C elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio \\frac{{Δ p}}{p} and 12C elastic cross section are compared without and with radiative energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for 12C elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275083), US Department of Energy contract DE-AC05-84ER-40150 under which Jefferson Science Associates operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Natural Science Foundation of An'hui Educational Committee (KJ2012B179)

  20. Uncovering the Spectral Energy Distribution in Active Galaxies Using High Ionization Mid-Infrared Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Weaver, K. A.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    The shape of the spectral energy distribution of active galaxies in the EUV soft X-ray band (13.6 eV to 1 keV) is uncertain because obscuration by dust and gas can hamper our view of the continuum. To investigate the shape of the spectral energy distribution in this energy band, we have generated a set of photoionization models which reproduce the small dispersion found in correlations between high-ionization mid-infrared emission lines in a sample of hard X-ray selected AGN. Our calculations show that a broken power-law continuum model is sufficient to reproduce the [Ne V]14.32 microns/[Ne III], [Ne V]24.32 microns/[O IV]25.89 micron and [O IV] 25.89 microns/[Ne III] ratios, and does not require the addition of a "big bump" EUV model component. We constrain the EUV-soft X-ray slope, alpha(sub i), to be between 1.5 - 2.0 and derive a best fit of alpha(sub i) approx. 1.9 for Seyfert 1 galaxies, consistent with previous studies of intermediate redshift quasars. If we assume a blue bump model, most sources in our sample have derived temperatures between T(sub BB) = 10(exp 5.18) K to 10(exp 5.7) K, suggesting that the peak of this component spans a large range of energies extending from approx. (Lambda)600 A to > (Lambda)1900 A. In this case, the best fitting peak energy that matches the mid-infrared line ratios of Seyfert 1 galaxies occurs between approx. (Lambda)700-(Lambda)1000 A. Despite the fact that our results do not rule out the presence of an EUV bump, we conclude that our power-law model produces enough photons with energies > 4 Ry to generate the observed amount of mid-infrared emission in our sample of BAT AGN.

  1. Kinetic Energy Release dependence in the Photo Double Ionization of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Th.; Miyabe, S.; Belkacem, A.; McCurdy, C. W.; Lenz, U.; Jahnke, T.; Doerner, R.; Williams, J.; Landers, A.

    2012-06-01

    In the Photo Double Ionization (PDI) of hydrogen molecules with photon energies of 150eV we were able to probe the electronic two particle density as a function of the bond length, i.e. the Kinetic Energy Release (KER) of the ions, and the orientation of the molecular axis with respect to the polarization vector of the incoming ligh. We applied the COLTRIMS technique and measured two electrons and two protons in coincidence. We found a shift in the KER for σ and π transitions. While the KER is lower when the molecular axis is aligned parallel to the linear polarization vector (σ-σ), the KER for a perpendicular orientation (σ-π) is clearly higher by a little more than 1eV. Quantum mechanical ab initio calculations are able to quantify the shift in KER and the ratio for the two different transitions (β-parameter) for a broad range of photon energies (75 to 240eV). These results reflect the dependence of the σ and π amplitudes to the bond length. This shows that a simple KER measurement for horizontal and vertical polarization can be used to extract this information; it makes measuring the β-parameter as a function of KER obsolete.

  2. High Energy Proton Ejection from Hydrocarbon Molecules Driven by Highly Efficient Field Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roither, S.; Xie, X.; Kartashov, D.; Zhang, L.; Schöffler, M.; Xu, H.; Iwasaki, A.; Okino, T.; Yamanouchi, K.; Baltuška, A.; Kitzler, M.

    We report on the ejection of protons with surprisingly high kinetic energies up to 60 eV from a series of polyatomic hydrocarbon molecules exposed to Titanium-Sapphire laser pulses with moderate laser peak intensities of a few 1014 W/cm2. Using multi-particle coincidence imaging we are able to decompose the observed proton energy spectra into the contributions of individual fragmentation channels. It is shown that the molecules can completely fragment into bare atomic ions already at relatively low peak intensities, and that the protons are ejected in a concerted Coulomb explosion from unexpectedly high charge states. We propose that a thus far undescribed process, namely that enhanced ionization (EI) taking place at all C-H bonds in parallel, is responsible for the high charge states and high proton energies. The proposition is successfully tested by using (stretched) few-cycle pulses with a bandwidth limited duration as short as 4.3 fs, for which the C-H nuclear motion is too slow to reach the critical internuclear distance for EI.

  3. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  4. The kinetic energy spectrum of protons produced by the dissociative ionization of H2 by electron impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetic energy spectra of protons resulting from the dissociative ionization of H2 by electron impact have been measured for electron impact energies from threshold (approximately 17 eV) to 160 eV at 90 deg and 30 deg detection angles, using a crossed-beam experimental arrangement. To check reliability, two separate proton energy analysis methods have been employed, i.e., a time-of-flight proton energy analysis and an electrostatic hemispherical energy analyzer. The present results are compared with previous measurements.

  5. Quantitatively identical orientation-dependent ionization energy and electron affinity of diindenoperylene

    SciTech Connect

    Han, W. N.; Yonezawa, K.; Makino, R.; Kato, K.; Hinderhofer, A.; Ueno, N.; Kera, S.; Murdey, R.; Shiraishi, R.; Yoshida, H.; Sato, N.

    2013-12-16

    Molecular orientation dependences of the ionization energy (IE) and the electron affinity (EA) of diindenoperylene (DIP) films were studied by using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. The molecular orientation was controlled by preparing the DIP films on graphite and SiO{sub 2} substrates. The threshold IE and EA of DIP thin films were determined to be 5.81 and 3.53 eV for the film of flat-lying DIP orientation, respectively, and 5.38 and 3.13 eV for the film of standing DIP orientation, respectively. The result indicates that the IE and EA for the flat-lying film are larger by 0.4 eV and the frontier orbital states shift away from the vacuum level compared to the standing film. This rigid energy shift is ascribed to a surface-electrostatic potential produced by the intramolecular polar bond (>C{sup −}-H{sup +}) for standing orientation and π-electron tailing to vacuum for flat-lying orientation.

  6. Relation between molecule ionization energy, film thickness and morphology of two indandione derivatives thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzibovskis, Raitis; Vembris, Aivars; Pudzs, Kaspars

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays most organic devices consist of thin (below 100 nm) layers. Information about the morphology and energy levels of thin films at such thickness is essential for the high efficiency devices. In this work we have investigated thin films of 2-(4-[N,N-dimethylamino]-benzylidene)-indene-1,3-dione (DMABI) and 2-(4-(bis(2-(trityloxy)ethyl)amino)benzylidene)-2H-indene-1,3-dione (DMABI-6Ph). DMABI-6Ph is the same DMABI molecule with attached bulky groups which assist formation of amorphous films from solutions. Polycrystalline structure was obtained for the DMABI thin films prepared by thermal evaporation in vacuum and amorphous structure for the DMABI-6Ph films prepared by spin-coating method. Images taken by SEM showed separate crystals or islands at the thickness of the samples below 100 nm. The ionization energy of the studied compounds was determined using photoemission yield spectroscopy. A vacuum level shift of 0.40 eV was observed when ITO electrode was covered with the thin film of the organic compound. Despite of the same active part of the investigated molecules the ITO/DMABI interface is blocking electrons while ITO/DMABI-6Ph interface is blocking holes.

  7. Numerical studies of the behavior of ionized residual gas in an energy recovering linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöplau, Gisela; van Rienen, Ursula; Meseck, Atoosa

    2015-04-01

    Next generation light sources such as energy recovering linacs (ERLs) are highly sensitive to instabilities due to ionized residual gas, which must be mitigated for successful operation. Vacuum pumps are insufficient for removal of the ions, as the ions are trapped by the beam's electrical potential. Two effective measures are (i) introducing clearing gaps in the bunch train, and (ii) installing clearing electrodes which pull out the trapped ions from the electrical potential of the beam. In this paper, we present numerical studies on the behavior of ion clouds that interact with bunch trains in an ERL taking into account the effects of the clearing gaps and clearing electrodes. We present simulations with different compositions of the residual gas. Simulations are done using the MOEVE PIC Tracking software package developed at Rostock University, which has been upgraded to include the behavior of ion clouds in the environment of additional electromagnetic fields, such as generated by clearing electrodes. The simulations use the parameters of the Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (bERLinPro) to allow for the deduction of appropriate measures for bERLinPro 's design and operation.

  8. Low-energy-spread laser wakefield acceleration using ionization injection with a tightly focused laser in a mismatched plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Zhang, C. J.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Xu, X. L.; Hua, J. F.; Pai, C. H.; Lu, W.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2016-03-01

    An improved ionization injection scheme for laser wakefield acceleration using a tightly focused laser pulse, with intensity near the ionization threshold to trigger the injection in a mismatched plasma channel, has been proposed and examined via 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In this scheme, the key to achieving a very low energy spread is shortening the injection distance through the fast diffraction of the tightly focused laser. Furthermore, the oscillation of the laser envelope in the mismatched plasma channel can induce multiple low-energy-spread injections with an even distribution in both space and energy. The envelope oscillation can also significantly enhance the energy gain of the injected beams compared to the standard non-evolving wake scenario due to the rephasing between the electron beam and the laser wake. A theoretical model has been derived to precisely predict the injection distance, the ionization degree of injection atoms/ions, the electron yield as well as the ionized charge for given laser-plasma parameters, and such expressions can be directly utilized for optimizing the quality of the injected beam. Through 3D PIC simulations, we show that an injection distance as short as tens of microns can be achieved, which leads to ultrashort fs, few pC electron bunches with a narrow absolute energy spread around 2 MeV (rms). Simulations also show that the initial absolute energy spread remains nearly constant during the subsequent acceleration due to the very short bunch length, and this indicates that further acceleration of the electron bunches up to the GeV level may lead to an electron beam with an energy spread well below 0.5%. Such low-energy-spread electron beams may have potential applications for future coherent light sources driven by laser-plasma accelerators.

  9. Two step laser desorption - laser ionization of PAHs. Experimental Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Juan C.; Guerrero, Alfonso; Álvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental setup for the photoionization of PAHs in a cooled molecular beam using laser radiation of 266 nm. Molecular beams was produced by laser desorption of samples using unfocused laser radiation of 522 nm, which was synchronously coupled with ionization laser pulses. At low energies per pulse, <1 mJ, the molecular ionization of PAHs take place in the soft conditions regimen producing a poor molecular dissociation. The R-ToF spectra are mainly characterized by the presence of the parent molecular ion. When buffer gases as Helium were used it helps to avoid the molecular clustering and contributes to the molecular cooling when the adiabatic expansion takes place.

  10. Adiabatic Quantum Computation and the Theory of Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, William; Lloyd, Seth

    2007-03-01

    We present a general approach to determining the asymptotic scaling of adiabatic quantum computational resources (space, time, energy, and precision) on random instances of NP-complete graph theory problems. By utilizing the isomorphisms between certain NP-complete graph theory problems and certain frustrated spin models, we demonstrate that the asymptotic scaling of the minimum spectral gap that determines the asymptotic running time of adiabatic algorithms is itself determined by the presence and character of quantum phase transitions in these frustrated models. Most notably, we draw the conclusion that adiabatic quantum computers based on quantum Ising models are much less likely to be efficient than those based on quantum rotor or Heisenberg models. We then exhibit practical rotor and Heisenberg model based architectures using Josephson junction and quantum dot circuits.

  11. Ionization photophysics and spectroscopy of cyanoacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, Sydney; Champion, Norbert; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Fray, Nicolas; Gaie-Levrel, François; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Bénilan, Yves; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Schwell, Martin

    2014-05-07

    Photoionization of cyanoacetylene was studied using synchrotron radiation over the non-dissociative ionization excitation range 11–15.6 eV, with photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques. The absolute ionization cross-section and spectroscopic aspects of the parent ion were recorded. The adiabatic ionization energy of cyanoacetylene was measured as 11.573 ± 0.010 eV. A detailed analysis of photoelectron spectra of HC{sub 3}N involves new aspects and new assignments of the vibrational components to excitation of the A{sup 2}Σ{sup +} and B{sup 2}Π states of the cation. Some of the structured autoionization features observed in the 11.94 to 15.5 eV region of the total ion yield (TIY) spectrum were assigned to two Rydberg series converging to the B{sup 2}Π state of HC{sub 3}N{sup +}. A number of the measured TIY features are suggested to be vibrational components of Rydberg series converging to the C{sup 2}Σ{sup +} state of HC{sub 3}N{sup +} at ≈17.6 eV and others to valence shell transitions of cyanoacetylene in the 11.6–15 eV region. The results of quantum chemical calculations of the cation electronic state geometries, vibrational frequencies and energies, as well as of the C–H dissociation potential energy profiles of the ground and electronic excited states of the ion, are compared with experimental observations. Ionization quantum yields are evaluated and discussed and the problem of adequate calibration of photoionization cross-sections is raised.

  12. Ionization of highly excited helium atoms in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    van de Water, W.; Mariani, D.R.; Koch, P.M.

    1984-11-01

    We present detailed measurements of ionization of highly excited triplet helium atoms in a static electric field. The atoms were prepared in states with energy E close to the saddle-point threshold E = -2(F(a.u.))/sup 1/2/. The electric field F was sufficiently strong for the states to be characterized by total spin S and absolute value of the magnetic quantum number M/sub L/. For M/sub L/ = 0 states the experiments measured ionization properties of adiabatic states. In another case, Vertical BarM/sub L/Vertical Bar = 2, they predominantly measured those of diabatic states. In both cases the ionization rate was found to be a highly nonmonotonic function of the field strength. The observations are analyzed in terms of a theory of the helium density of states in an electric field. A companion paper (D. A. Harmin, Phys. Rev. A 30, 2413 (1984)) develops in detail the general theory, which uses quantum defects to parametrize the effect of the core interaction. The agreement between measured and calculated ionization curves is good, indicating that the field ionization of a nonhydrogenic atom can now be understood in a detailed, quantitative, and predictive sense.

  13. Intermediate ionization continua for double charge exchange at high impact energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkić, D.ževad

    1993-05-01

    We investigate the problem of two-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by bare nuclei ZP+(ZTe1,e2)i-->(ZPe1,e2)f+ZT at high incident energies, using the four-body formalism of the first- and second-order theories. Our goal is to establish the relative importance of the intermediate ionization continua of the two electrons in comparison with the usual direct path of the double electron transfer. For this purpose we presently introduce the boundary-corrected continuum-intermediate-state (BCIS) approximation, which preserves all the features of two-electron capture as a genuine four-body problem. The proposed second-order theory provides a fully adequate description of the fact that, in an intermediate stage of collision, both electrons move in the field of the two Coulomb centers. The previously devised boundary-corrected first Born (CB1) approximation can be obtained as a further simplification of the BCIS model if the invoked two-electron Coulomb waves are replaced by their long-range logarithmic phase factors defined in terms of the corresponding interaggregate separation R. The BCIS method is implemented on the symmetric resonant double charge exchange in collisions between α particles and He(1s2) at impact energies E>=900 keV. The obtained results for the differential and total cross sections are compared with the available experimental data and satisfactory agreement is recorded. As the incident energy increases, a dramatic improvement is obtained in going from the CB1 to the BCIS approximation, since the latter closely follows the measurement, whereas the former overestimates the observed total cross sections by two orders of magnitude.

  14. Effective ionization coefficients, limiting electric fields, and electron energy distributions in CF3I + CF4 + Ar ternary gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezcan, S. S.; Dincer, M. S.; Bektas, S.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on the effective ionization coefficients, limiting electric fields, electron energy distribution functions, and mean energies in ternary mixtures of (Trifluoroiodomethane) CF3I + CF4 + Ar in the E/N range of 100-700 Td employing a two-term solution of the Boltzmann equation. In the ternary mixture, CF3I component is increased while the CF4 component is reduced accordingly and the 40% Ar component is kept constant. It is seen that the electronegativity of the mixture increases with increased CF3I content and effective ionization coefficients decrease while the limiting electric field values increase. Synergism in the mixture is also evaluated in percentage using the limiting electric field values obtained. Furthermore, it is possible to control the mean electron energy in the ternary mixture by changing the content of CF3I component.

  15. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  16. Near-coincident K-line and K-edge energies as ionization diagnostics for some high atomic number plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Weber, B. V.; Phipps, D. G.; Schumer, J. W.; Seely, J. F.; Carroll, J. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M.

    2012-10-15

    For some high atomic number atoms, the energy of the K-edge is tens of eVs higher than the K-line energy of another atom, so that a few eV increase in the line's energy results in a decreasing transmission of the x-ray through a filter of the matching material. The transmission of cold iridium's Asymptotically-Equal-To 63.287 keV K{alpha}{sub 2} line through a lutetium filter is 7% lower when emitted by ionized iridium, consistent with an energy increase of {Delta}{epsilon} Asymptotically-Equal-To 10{+-}1 eV associated with the ionization. Likewise, the transmission of the K{beta}{sub 1} line of ytterbium through a near-coincident K-edge filter changes depending on plasma parameters that should affect the ionization. Systematic exploration of filter-line pairs like these could become a unique tool for diagnostics of suitable high energy density plasmas.

  17. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of chrysene: a comparison with tetracene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Harthcock, Colin; Kong, Wei

    2012-07-01

    We report the electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of chrysene using resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. As an isomer of tetracene, chrysene contains a kink in the middle of the four fused hexagonal rings, which complicates not just the symmetry but, more importantly, the molecular orbitals and hence vibronic transitions. Incidentally, the two nearby electronically excited states of chrysene have the same symmetry, and vibronic coupling introduces no out-of-plane vibrational modes. As a result, the REMPI spectrum of chrysene contains essentially only in-plane ring deformation modes, similar to that of tetracene. However, density functional calculations using gaussian even after the inclusion of vibronic coupling can only duplicate the observed REMPI spectrum in a qualitative sense, and the agreement is considerably worse than our recent work on a few pericondensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and on tetracene. The ZEKE spectrum of chrysene via the origin band of the intermediate electronic state S(1), however, can be qualitatively reproduced by a straightforward Franck-Condon calculation. The ZEKE spectra from vibrationally excited states of the S(1), on the other hand, demonstrate some degree of mode selectivity: the overall intensity of the ZEKE spectrum can vary by an order of magnitude depending on the vibrational mode of the intermediate state. A scaling factor in the theoretical vibrational frequency for the cation is also needed to compare with the experimental result, unlike tetracene and pentacene.

  18. Electron-impact excitation and ionization of atomic boron at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of electron collisions with neutral boron atoms. The calculations were performed with the B-Spline R-matrix (close-coupling) method, by employing a parallelized version of the associated computer code. Elastic, excitation, and ionization cross sections were obtained for all transitions involving the lowest 11 states of boron, for incident electron energies ranging from threshold to 100 eV. A multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal term-dependent orbitals was used to generate accurate wave functions for the target states. Close-coupling expansions including 13, 51, and 999 physical and pseudo states were set up to check the sensitivity of the predictions to variations in the theoretical model. The cross-section dataset generated in this work is expected to be the most accurate one available today and should be sufficiently comprehensive for most modeling applications involving neutral boron. Work supported by the China Scholarship Council and the United States National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1403245 and PHY-1520970, and by the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031.

  19. Study of genetic effects of high energy radiations with different ionizing capacities on extracellular phages.

    PubMed

    Bresler, S E; Kalinin, V L; Kopylova, Y U; Krivisky, A S; Rybchin, V N; Shelegedin, V N

    1975-07-01

    The inactivating and mutagenic action of high-energy radiations with different ionizing capacities (gamma-rays, protons, alpha-particles and accelerated ions of 12C and 20Ne) was studied by using coliphages lambda11 and SD as subjects. In particular the role of irradiation conditions (broth suspension, pure buffer, dry samples) and of the host functions recA, exrA and polA was investigated. The dose-response curve of induced mutagenesis was studied by measuring the yield of vir mutants in lambda11 and plaque mutants in SD. The following results were obtained. (1) The inactivation kinetics of phages under the action of gamma-rays and protons was first order to a survival of 10(-7). Heavy ions also showed exponential inactivation kinetics to a survival of 10(-4). At higher doses of 20Ne ion bombardment some deviation from one-hit kinetics was observed. For dry samples of phages the dimensions of targets for all types of radiation were approximately proportional to the molecular weights of phage DNA's. For densely ionizing radiation (heavy ions) the inactivating action was 3-5 times weaker than for gamma-rays and protons. (2) Mutagenesis was observed for all types of radiation, but heavy ions were 1-5-2 times less efficient than gamma-rays. For both phages studied the dose-response curve of mutagenesis was non-linear. The dependence on the dose was near to parabolic for lambda11. For SD a plateau or maximum of mutagenesis was observed for the relative number of mutants at a survival of about 10(-4). (3) Host-cell functions recA and exrA were practically indifferent for survival of gamma-irradiated phage lambda11, but indispensable for mutagenesis. Mutation recAI3 abolished induced vir mutations totally and exrA- reduced them significantly. The absence of the function polA had a considerable influence on phage survival, but no effect on vir mutation yield (if compared at the same survival level). (4) In conditions of indirect action of gamma-rays no vir mutations were

  20. Electron-impact dissociative double ionization of N2 and CO: Dependence of transition probability on impact energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A.; Kumar, P.; Banerjee, S. B.; Subramanian, K. P.; Bapat, B.

    2016-04-01

    We present an experimental and computational analysis of dissociative double ionization of N2 and CO molecules under electron impact. Experiments are performed at three energies, viz. 1, 3, and 5 keV, in order to observe the effect of impact energy on the dissociative ionization kinematics. We compare the kinetic energy release (KER) distributions of the charge symmetric dissociation channels of N22 + and CO2 + at these impact energies. An approximately linear trend between the transition energy and the expected KER values is inferred on the basis of the calculated potential energy curves of the dications. Experimentally, the normalized differential KER cross sections for these channels show an increasing trend in the low KER range and a decreasing trend in the high KER range as the electron-impact energy is increased. This observation indicates that the transition probability for excitation to different molecular ion states is not only a function of energy difference between the ground and excited states, but also a complicated function of the impact energy. In addition, nature of the observed trend in the differential KER cross sections differs significantly from their differential transition probability, which are calculated using inelastic collision model for fast-electron-impact case.

  1. Experimental determination of the ionization energy of IO(X{sup 2}/{Pi}{sub 3/2}) and estmations of {Delta}{sub f}H{degree}{sub 0}(IO{sup +}) and PA(IO)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Kuo, S.C.; Klemm, R.B.; Monks, P.S.; Stief, L.; Huie, R.E.

    1996-01-04

    Photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra of IO(X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub i}) were measured over the wavelength range {Lambda} = 115.0-130.0 nm and in the ionization threshold region {Lambda} = 126.0-130.0 nm, using a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer apparatus coupled to a synchrotron radiation source. Iodine oxide was generated by the reactions of O({sup 3}P) atoms with I{sub 2} and CF{sub 3}I. The PIE spectra displayed step-function behaviour. From the half-rise point of the initial step, a value of 9.73{sub 5}{+-}0.01{sub 7} eV was obtained for the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of IO, corresponding to the IO{sup +}(X{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup -}) IMP IO(X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2}) transition. As this appears to be the first experimental determination of IE(IO), a trend analysis has been employed to provide further insight into the experimentally derived value. The separation between the first two steps in the PIE spectrum (which might be perturbed slightly due to autoionization) was used to derive the vibrational spacing of the cation, 1060{+-}160 cm{sup -1}. A Rydberg progression, presumably converging to the excited {sup 1}{Delta} state of the cation, has a convergence limit that lies 0.596 eV above the ground state of the cation. A selected value for the bond dissociation energy of IO leads to a value for the heat of formation of IO, from which estimates are made for the heat of formation of the iodine oxide cation and HOI and the proton affinity of IO. 54 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Hydrodynamic Models of Line-Driven Accretion Disk Winds III: Local Ionization Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereyra, Nicolas Antonio; Kallman, Timothy R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic models of line-driven accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variable systems and calculate wind mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. The models are 2.5-dimensional, include an energy balance condition with radiative heating and cooling processes, and includes local ionization equilibrium introducing time dependence and spatial dependence on the line radiation force parameters. The radiation field is assumed to originate in an optically thick accretion disk. Wind ion populations are calculated under the assumption that local ionization equilibrium is determined by photoionization and radiative recombination, similar to a photoionized nebula. We find a steady wind flowing from the accretion disk. Radiative heating tends to maintain the temperature in the higher density wind regions near the disk surface, rather than cooling adiabatically. For a disk luminosity L (sub disk) = solar luminosity, white dwarf mass M(sub wd) = 0.6 solar mass, and white dwarf radii R(sub wd) = 0.01 solar radius, we obtain a wind mass-loss rate of M(sub wind) = 4 x 10(exp -12) solar mass yr(exp -1) and a terminal velocity of approximately 3000 km per second. These results confirm the general velocity and density structures found in our earlier constant ionization equilibrium adiabatic CV wind models. Further we establish here 2.5D numerical models that can be extended to QSO/AGN winds where the local ionization equilibrium will play a crucial role in the overall dynamics.

  3. A Critical Compilation of Energy Levels, Spectral Lines, and Transition Probabilities of Singly Ionized Silver, Ag II

    PubMed Central

    Kramida, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    All available experimental measurements of the spectrum of the Ag+ ion are critically reviewed. Systematic shifts are removed from the measured wavelengths. The compiled list of critically evaluated wavelengths is used to derive a comprehensive list of energy levels with well-defined uncertainties. Eigenvector compositions and level designations are found in two alternate coupling schemes. Some of the older work is found to be incorrect. A revised value of the ionization energy, 173283(7) cm−1, equivalent to 21.4844(8) eV, is derived from the new energy levels. A set of critically evaluated transition probabilities is given. PMID:26401429

  4. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  5. Adiabatic processes in monatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera-Patiño, Martin E.

    1988-08-01

    A kinetic model is used to predict the temperature evolution of a monatomic ideal gas undergoing an adiabatic expansion or compression at a constant finite rate, and it is then generalized to treat real gases. The effects of interatomic forces are considered, using as examples the gas with the square-well potential and the van der Waals gas. The model is integrated into a Carnot cycle operating at a finite rate to compare the efficiency's rate-dependent behavior with the reversible result. Limitations of the model, rate penalties, and their importance are discussed.

  6. Adiabatic preparation of Floquet condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinisch, Christoph; Holthaus, Martin

    2016-10-01

    We argue that a Bose-Einstein condensate can be transformed into a Floquet condensate, that is, into a periodically time-dependent many-particle state possessing the coherence properties of a mesoscopically occupied single-particle Floquet state. Our reasoning is based on the observation that the denseness of the many-body system's quasienergy spectrum does not necessarily obstruct effectively adiabatic transport. Employing the idealized model of a driven bosonic Josephson junction, we demonstrate that only a small amount of Floquet entropy is generated when a driving force with judiciously chosen frequency and maximum amplitude is turned on smoothly.

  7. Calculations on charge state and energy loss of argon ions in partially and fully ionized carbon plasmas.

    PubMed

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Casas, David; Morales, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The energy loss of argon ions in a target depends on their velocity and charge density. At the energies studied in this work, it depends mostly on the free and bound electrons in the target. Here the random-phase approximation is used for analyzing free electrons at any degeneracy. For the plasma-bound electrons, an interpolation between approximations for low and high energies is applied. The Brandt-Kitagawa (BK) model is employed to depict the projectile charge space distribution, and the stripping criterion of Kreussler et al. is used to determine its equilibrium charge state Q(eq). This latter criterion implies that the equilibrium charge state depends slightly on the electron density and temperature of the plasma. On the other hand, the effective charge Q(eff) is obtained as the ratio between the energy loss of the argon ion and that of the proton for the same plasma conditions. This effective charge Q(eff) is larger than the equilibrium charge state Q(eq) due to the incorporation of the BK charge distribution. Though our charge-state estimations are not exactly the same as the experimental values, our energy loss agrees quite well with the experiments. It is noticed that the energy loss in plasmas is higher than that in the same cold target of about, ∼42-62.5% and increases with carbon plasma ionization. This confirms the well-known enhanced plasma stopping. It is also observed that only a small part of this energy loss enhancement is due to an increase of the argon charge state, namely only ∼2.2 and 5.1%, for the partially and the fully ionized plasma, respectively. The other contribution is connected with a better energy transfer to the free electrons at plasma state than to the bound electrons at solid state of about, ∼38.8-57.4%, where higher values correspond to a fully ionized carbon plasma. PMID:27078472

  8. Differential topology of adiabatically controlled quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, Edmond A.; Rezakhani, Ali T.; Ahmad, Farooq

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that in a controlled adiabatic homotopy between two Hamiltonians, H 0 and H 1, the gap or "anti-crossing" phenomenon can be viewed as the development of cusps and swallow tails in the region of the complex plane where two critical value curves of the quadratic map associated with the numerical range of H 0 + i H 1 come close. The "near crossing" in the energy level plots happens to be a generic situation, in the sense that a crossing is a manifestation of the quadratic numerical range map being unstable in the sense of differential topology. The stable singularities that can develop are identified and it is shown that they could occur near the gap, making those singularities of paramount importance. Various applications, including the quantum random walk, are provided to illustrate this theory.

  9. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  10. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  11. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Edward R.; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A.

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques.

  12. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Edward R; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. On the question of adiabatic invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropol'Skii, Iu. A.

    Some aspects of the construction of adiabadic invariants for dynamic systems with a single degree of freedom are discussed. Adiabatic invariants are derived using classical principles and the method proposed by Djukic (1981). The discussion covers an adiabatic invariant for a dynamic system with slowly varying parameters; derivation of an expression for an adiabatic invariant by the Djukic method for a second-order equation with a variable mass; and derivation of an expression for the adiabatic invariant for a nearly integrable differential equation.

  14. Influence of the ionization-energy losses of high-energy bismuth ions on the development of helium blisters in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Reutov, V. F. Dmitriev, S. N.; Sohatsky, A. S.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2015-10-15

    Understanding the behavior of helium in solids under conditions of intense ionizing radiation is of particular interest in solving many problems of nuclear, fusion, and space materials science and also in microelectronics. The observed effect of suppressing the formation of helium blisters on the surface of helium ion-doped silicon as a result of irradiation with high-energy bismuth ions is reported in this publication. It is suggested that a possible decrease in the concentration of helium atoms in silicon is due to their radiationinduced desorption from the area of doping in terms of the high-impact ionization of bismuth ions.

  15. Penning type of ionizing energy transfer collisions in a Hg-Ar discharge detected by the optogalvanic effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, B. R.; Venkateswarlu, P.; George, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the optogalvanic signals has been investigated in detail in a Hg-argon discharge by irradiating it with an excimer pumped dye laser. The signals at 4510.7, 4596 and 4628.4 A exhibited anomalous behavior. Analysis of the data revealed that the excited Ar and Hg atoms respectively in the 1P1 and 3P1 states participated in energy transfer collisions, causing atomic mercury to excite to an ionized energy state, while simultaneously the argon atom relaxes to its ground state.

  16. Electron ionization of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Simon J.; Price, Stephen D.

    2007-11-01

    Relative partial ionization cross sections and precursor specific relative partial ionization cross sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of C2H2 have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion-ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H2+, C2+, C+/C22+, CH +/C2H22+, CH2+, C2+, and C2H + relative to the formation of C2H2+, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30-200eV. While excellent agreement is found between our data and one set of previously published absolute partial ionization cross sections, some discrepancies exist between the results presented here and two other recent determinations of these absolute partial ionization cross sections. We attribute these differences to the loss of some translationally energetic fragment ions in these earlier studies. Our relative precursor-specific partial ionization cross sections enable us, for the first time, to quantify the contribution to the yield of each fragment ion from single, double, and triple ionization. Analysis shows that at 50eV double ionization contributes 2% to the total ion yield, increasing to over 10% at an ionizing energy of 100eV. From our ion-ion coincidence data, we have derived branching ratios for charge separating dissociations of the acetylene dication. Comparison of our data to recent ab initio/RRKM calculations suggest that close to the double ionization potential C2H22+ dissociates predominantly on the ground triplet potential energy surface (Σg-3) with a much smaller contribution from dissociation via the lowest singlet potential energy surface (Δg1). Measurements of the kinetic energy released in the fragmentation reactions of C2H22+ have been used to obtain precursor state energies for the formation of product ion pairs, and are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data and with theory.

  17. Calculation of intermediate-energy electron-impact ionization of molecular hydrogen and nitrogen using the paraxial approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Serov, Vladislav V.

    2011-12-15

    We have implemented the paraxial approximation followed by the time-dependent Hartree-Fock method with a frozen core for the single impact ionization of atoms and two-atomic molecules. It reduces the original scattering problem to the solution of a five-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Using this method, we calculated the multifold differential cross section of the impact single ionization of the helium atom, the hydrogen molecule, and the nitrogen molecule from the impact of intermediate-energy electrons. Our results for He and H{sub 2} are quite close to the experimental data. Surprisingly, for N{sub 2} the agreement is good for the paraxial approximation combined with first Born approximation but worse for pure paraxial approximation, apparently because of the insufficiency of the frozen-core approximation.

  18. Degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory: Foundations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigolin, Gustavo; Ortiz, Gerardo

    2014-08-01

    We present details and expand on the framework leading to the recently introduced degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 170406 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.170406], and on the formulation of the degenerate adiabatic theorem, along with its necessary and sufficient conditions [given in Phys. Rev. A 85, 062111 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.062111]. We start with the adiabatic approximation for degenerate Hamiltonians that paves the way to a clear and rigorous statement of the associated degenerate adiabatic theorem, where the non-Abelian geometric phase (Wilczek-Zee phase) plays a central role to its quantitative formulation. We then describe the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory, whose zeroth-order term is the degenerate adiabatic approximation, in its full generality. The parameter in the perturbative power-series expansion of the time-dependent wave function is directly associated to the inverse of the time it takes to drive the system from its initial to its final state. With the aid of the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory we obtain rigorous necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. Finally, to illustrate the power and wide scope of the methodology, we apply the framework to a degenerate Hamiltonian, whose closed-form time-dependent wave function is derived exactly, and also to other nonexactly solvable Hamiltonians whose solutions are numerically computed.

  19. Ionization Thresholds of Small Carbon Clusters: Tunable VUVExperiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, Leonid; Wheeler, Steven E.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Ahmed,Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer III, Henry F.; Duncan, Michael A.

    2007-07-31

    Small carbon clusters (Cn, n = 2-15) are produced in amolecular beam by pulsed laser vaporization and studied with vacuumultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. The required VUVradiation in the 8-12 eV range is provided by the Advanced Light Source(ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Mass spectra atvarious ionization energies reveal the qualitative relative abundances ofthe neutral carbon clusters produced. By far the most abundant species isC3. Using the tunability of the ALS, ionization threshold spectra arerecorded for the clusters up to 15 atoms in size. The ionizationthresholds are compared to those measured previously with charge-transferbracketing methods. To interpret the ionization thresholds for differentcluster sizes, new ab initio calculations are carried out on the clustersfor n = 4-10. Geometric structures are optimized at the CCSD(T) levelwith cc-pVTZ (or cc-pVDZ) basis sets, and focal point extrapolations areapplied to both neutral and cation species to determine adiabatic andvertical ionization potentials. The comparison of computed and measuredionization potentials makes it possible to investigate the isomericstructures of the neutral clusters produced in this experiment. Themeasurements are inconclusive for the n = 4-6 species because ofunquenched excited electronic states. However, the data provide evidencefor the prominence of linear structures for the n = 7, 9, 11, 13 speciesand the presence of cyclic C10.

  20. On a Nonlinear Model in Adiabatic Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Song-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study a kind of nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution in quantum search problem. As will be seen here, for this problem, there always exists a possibility that this nonlinear model can successfully solve the problem, while the linear model can not. Also in the same setting, when the overlap between the initial state and the final stare is sufficiently large, a simple linear adiabatic evolution can achieve O(1) time efficiency, but infinite time complexity for the nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution is needed. This tells us, it is not always a wise choice to use nonlinear interpolations in adiabatic algorithms. Sometimes, simple linear adiabatic evolutions may be sufficient for using. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61402188 and 61173050. The first author also gratefully acknowledges the support from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2014M552041

  1. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  2. Measurement of a release adiabat from {approx}8 Mbar in lead using magnetically driven flyer impact

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.D.; Parker, K.; Robinson, C.; Knudson, M.D.

    2004-12-01

    Using magnetically driven aluminium flyers to generate {approx}8 Mbar shocks in lead, which were then transmitted into lower-impedance material samples, points on a lead release adiabat have been measured. The pressure-particle-velocity points were calculated from known sample principal Hugoniots and from shock velocities measured using arrays of fiber-optic active and passive shock breakout diagnostics, and point and line velocity interferometer for a surface of any reflectivity (VISARs). The measured points agree closely with adiabats calculated using models which do not include ionization, or do include it both with, and without, atomic shell effects. Though the data are not sufficient to discriminate between widely different models we may qualitatively identify errors within these models. This is the first attempt to measure a release adiabat from such high pressures.

  3. Attosecond control of dissociative ionization of O{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, W.; Kelkensberg, F.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Dowek, D.; Lucchini, M.; Calegari, F.; De Giovannini, U.; Rubio, A.; Lucchese, R. R.; Kono, H.; Lepine, F.

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that dissociative ionization of O{sub 2} can be controlled by the relative delay between an attosecond pulse train (APT) and a copropagating infrared (IR) field. Our experiments reveal a dependence of both the branching ratios between a range of electronic states and the fragment angular distributions on the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) to IR time delay. The observations go beyond adiabatic propagation of dissociative wave packets on IR-induced quasistatic potential energy curves and are understood in terms of an IR-induced coupling between electronic states in the molecular ion.

  4. New odd-parity high-lying energy levels of the europium atom by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhate, S. G.; Razvi, M. A. N.; Bhale, G. L.; Ahmad, S. A.

    1996-04-01

    Odd-parity energy levels of the neutral europium atom (Eu I) have been investigated by employing both single-colour and two-colour stepwise laser excitation using the technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy in a heat-pipe thermionic diode system. Fifty-two new odd-parity energy levels of Eu I have been found in the energy region 40 575 - 43 410 0953-4075/29/8/009/img1. The J values for most of these new energy levels have been assigned unambiguously. In addition to this, 19 odd levels which were reported earlier, in the region of our present study, have also been investigated; the assignments of J values to nine of these levels have been confirmed and four levels, which had no unique J assignments, have been assigned definite J values.

  5. Electron energy enhancement by frequency chirp of a radially polarized laser pulse during ionization of low-density gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Singh, Kunwar; Arya, Rashmi; Malik, Anil K.; Fisch, N. J.

    2016-11-01

    A scheme is proposed to enhance the energy of the electrons generated during the ionization of low-density krypton ions \\text{K}{{\\text{r}}32+} and argon ions \\text{A}{{\\text{r}}16+} by a radially polarized laser pulse using a negative frequency chirp. If a suitable frequency chirp is introduced then the energy of the electrons increases significantly and scattering decreases. The optimum value of the frequency chirp decreases with laser intensity and as well as spot size. The laser spot size also has an optimum value. The electron energy shows strong initial phase dependence. The scheme can be used to obtain quasi-monoenergetic collimated \\text{MeV}/\\text{GeV} electrons using the right choice of parameters. The chirped radially polarized laser pulse is more efficient than a chirped circularly polarized laser pulse to enhance energy and obtain quasi-monoenergetic electron beams.

  6. Identification of four rotamers of m-methoxystyrene by resonant two-photon ionization and mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanqi; Tzeng, Sheng Yuan; Takahashi, Kaito; Shivatare, Vidya; Zhang, Bing; Tzeng, Wen Bih

    2015-03-28

    We report the vibronic and cation spectra of four rotamers of m-methoxystyrene, recorded by using the two-color resonant two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization techniques. The excitation energies of the S{sub 1}← S{sub 0} electronic transition are found to be 32 767, 32 907, 33 222, and 33 281 cm{sup −1}, and the corresponding adiabatic ionization energies are 65 391, 64 977, 65 114, and 64 525 cm{sup −1} for these isomeric species. Most of the observed active vibrations in the electronically excited S{sub 1} and cationic ground D{sub 0} states involve in-plane ring deformation and substituent-sensitive bending motions. It is found that the relative orientation of the methoxyl with respect to the vinyl group does not influence the vibrational frequencies of the ring-substituent bending modes. The two dimensional potential energy surface calculations support our experimental finding that the isomerization is restricted in the S{sub 1} and D{sub 0} states.

  7. Identification of four rotamers of m-methoxystyrene by resonant two-photon ionization and mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanqi; Tzeng, Sheng Yuan; Shivatare, Vidya; Takahashi, Kaito; Zhang, Bing; Tzeng, Wen Bih

    2015-03-28

    We report the vibronic and cation spectra of four rotamers of m-methoxystyrene, recorded by using the two-color resonant two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization techniques. The excitation energies of the S1← S0 electronic transition are found to be 32 767, 32 907, 33 222, and 33 281 cm(-1), and the corresponding adiabatic ionization energies are 65 391, 64 977, 65 114, and 64 525 cm(-1) for these isomeric species. Most of the observed active vibrations in the electronically excited S1 and cationic ground D0 states involve in-plane ring deformation and substituent-sensitive bending motions. It is found that the relative orientation of the methoxyl with respect to the vinyl group does not influence the vibrational frequencies of the ring-substituent bending modes. The two dimensional potential energy surface calculations support our experimental finding that the isomerization is restricted in the S1 and D0 states.

  8. Hyperspherical partial-wave theory applied to electron-hydrogen-atom ionization calculation for equal-energy-sharing kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Das, J.N.; Paul, S.; Chakrabarti, K.

    2003-04-01

    Hyperspherical partial-wave theory has been applied here in a new way in the calculation of the triple differential cross sections for the ionization of hydrogen atoms by electron impact at low energies for various equal-energy-sharing kinematic conditions. The agreement of the cross section results with the recent absolute measurements of [J. Roeder, M. Baertschy, and I. Bray, Phys. Rev. A 45, 2951 (2002)] and with the latest theoretical results of the ECS and CCC calculations [J. Roeder, M. Baertschy, and I. Bray, Phys. Rev. A (to be published)] for different kinematic conditions at 17.6 eV is very encouraging. The other calculated results, for relatively higher energies, are also generally satisfactory, particularly for large {theta}{sub ab} geometries. In view of the present results, together with the fact that it is capable of describing unequal-energy-sharing kinematics [J. N. Das, J. Phys. B 35, 1165 (2002)], it may be said that the hyperspherical partial-wave theory is quite appropriate for the description of ionization events of electron-hydrogen-type systems. It is also clear that the present approach in the implementation of the hyperspherical partial-wave theory is very appropriate.

  9. Performance analysis of a complete adiabatic logic system driven by the proposed power clock generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Jitendra; Dasgupta, S.

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the energy performance of a complete adiabatic circuit/system including the Power Clock Generator (PCG) at the 90 nm CMOS technology node. The energy performance in terms of the conversion efficiency of the PCG is extensively carried out under the variations of supply voltage, process corner and the driver transistor's width. We propose an energy-efficient singe cycle control circuit based on the two-stage comparator for the synchronous charge recovery sinusoidal power clock generator (PCG). The proposed PCG is used to drive the 4-bit adiabatic Ripple Carry Adder (RCA) and their simulation results are compared with the adiabatic RCA driven by the reported PCG. We have also simulated the logically equivalent static CMOS RCA circuit to compare the energy saving of adiabatic and non-adiabatic logic circuits. In the clock frequency range from 25 MHz to 1GHz, the proposed PCG gives a maximum conversion efficiency of 56.48%. This research work shows how the design of an efficient PCG increases the energy saving of adiabatic logic.

  10. Coherent tunneling by adiabatic process in a four-waveguide optical coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jian; Ma, Rui-Qiong; Duan, Zuo-Liang; Liang, Meng; Zhang, Wen-wen; Dong, Jun

    2016-07-01

    We numerically simulate Schrödinger-like paraxial wave equation of a four-waveguide system. The coherent tunneling by adiabatic passage in a four-waveguide optical coupler is analyzed by borrowing the dressed state theory of coherent atom system. We discuss the optical coupling mechanism and coupling efficiency of light energy in both intuitive and counterintuitive tunneling schemes and analyze the threshold condition from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regimes in intuitive scheme. The results show that this coupler can be used as power splitter under certain conditions.

  11. Complete Cycle Experiments Using the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey D.; Plantak, Mateja

    2014-10-01

    The ability of our society to make informed energy-usage decisions in the future depends partly on current science and engineering students retaining a deep understanding of the thermodynamics of heat engines. Teacher imaginations and equipment budgets can both be taxed in the effort to engage students in hands-on heat engine activities. The experiments described in this paper, carried out using the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus1 (AGLA), quantitatively explore popular complete cycle heat engine processes.

  12. Direct Delta-MBPT(2) method for ionization potentials, electron affinities, and excitation energies using fractional occupation numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Ortiz, J. Vincent

    2013-01-01

    A direct method (D-Delta-MBPT(2)) to calculate second-order ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinities (EAs), and excitation energies is developed. The Delta-MBPT(2) method is defined as the correlated extension of the Delta-HF method. Energy differences are obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to occupation numbers over the appropriate parameter range. This is made possible by writing the second-order energy as a function of the occupation numbers. Relaxation effects are fully included at the SCF level. This is in contrast to linear response theory, which makes the D-Delta-MBPT(2) applicable not only to single excited but also higher excited states. We show the relationship of the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for IPs and EAs to a second-order approximation of the effective Fock-space coupled-cluster Hamiltonian and a second-order electron propagator method. We also discuss the connection between the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for excitation energies and the CIS-MP2 method. Finally, as a proof of principle, we apply our method to calculate ionization potentials and excitation energies of some small molecules. For IPs, the Delta-MBPT(2) results compare well to the second-order solution of the Dyson equation. For excitation energies, the deviation from EOM-CCSD increases when correlation becomes more important. When using the numerical integration technique, we encounter difficulties that prevented us from reaching the Delta-MBPT(2) values. Most importantly, relaxation beyond the Hartree Fock level is significant and needs to be included in future research.

  13. Ab initio approaches for the determination of heavy element energetics: Ionization energies of trivalent lanthanides (Ln = La-Eu)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Charles; Penchoff, Deborah A.; Wilson, Angela K.

    2015-11-21

    An effective approach for the determination of lanthanide energetics, as demonstrated by application to the third ionization energy (in the gas phase) for the first half of the lanthanide series, has been developed. This approach uses a combination of highly correlated and fully relativistic ab initio methods to accurately describe the electronic structure of heavy elements. Both scalar and fully relativistic methods are used to achieve an approach that is both computationally feasible and accurate. The impact of basis set choice and the number of electrons included in the correlation space has also been examined.

  14. A balloon-borne ionization spectrometer with very large aperture for the detection of high energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atallah, K.; Modlinger, A.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A balloon experiment which was used to determine the chemical composition of very high-energy cosmic rays up to and beyond 100 GeV/nucleon is described. The detector had a geometric factor of 1 sq m sr and a total weight on the balloon of 2100 kg. The apparatus consisted of an ionization spectrometer, spark chambers, and plastic scintillation and Cherenkov counters. It was calibrated at CERN up to 24 GeV/c protons and at DESY up to 7 GeV/c electrons. In October 1972 it was flown successfully on a stratospheric balloon.

  15. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds. PMID:21141866

  16. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  17. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadius; vonToussaint, Udo V.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum exitation gap, gmin = O(n2(sup -n/2)), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  18. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Toussaint, U. V.; Timucin, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum excitation gap. g min, = O(n 2(exp -n/2), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to 'the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  19. A validation of a simple model for the calculation of the ionization energies in X-ray laser-cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect

    White, Jeff; Ackad, Edward

    2015-02-15

    The outer-ionization of an electron from a cluster is an unambiguous quantity, while the inner-ionization threshold is not, resulting in different microscopic quantum-classical hybrid models used in laser-cluster interactions. A simple local ionization threshold model for the change in the ionization energy is proposed and examined, for atoms and ions, at distances in between the initial configuration of the cluster to well into the cluster's disintegration. This model is compared with a full Hartree-Fock energy calculation which accounts for the electron correlation effects using the coupled cluster method with single and double excitations with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)). Good agreement is found between the two lending a strong theoretical support to works which rely on such models for the final and transient properties of the laser-cluster interaction.

  20. Adiabat shape Laser Pulses for ablation front instability control and high fuel compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, Jose; Jones, O. S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Macphee, A. G.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    At the end of the NIC campaign a large body of experimental evidence showed that the point-design implosions driven by low-adiabat pulses had a high degree of mix. To reduce instability a high-adiabat (~3 × higher picket drive) design was fielded in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experimental results from this campaign have shown considerable improvement in performance (10 × neutron yields) over the point design with little evidence of mix. However, the adiabat of the implosions may be too high to achieve ignition for the available laser energy. To overcome this difficulty, and to take advantage of the high-picket drives, we have developed hybrid laser pulses that combined the virtue of both designs. These pulses can be thought of achieving adiabat shaping, where the ablator is set in a higher adiabat for instability control, while the fuel is maintained at a lower adiabat favoring higher fuel compression. Using these pulses, recent experiments at the NIF have indeed shown reduced growth rates. In this talk we will present the design of high-yield low-growth DT ignition experiments using these adiabat-shaped pulses. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Non-adiabatic current densities, transitions, and power absorbed by a molecule in a time-dependent electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Anirban; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2015-07-01

    The energy of a molecule subject to a time-dependent perturbation separates completely into adiabatic and non-adiabatic terms, where the adiabatic term reflects the adjustment of the ground state to the perturbation, while the non-adiabatic term accounts for the transition energy [A. Mandal and K. L. C. Hunt, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 164109 (2012)]. For a molecule perturbed by a time-dependent electromagnetic field, in this work, we show that the expectation value of the power absorbed by the molecule is equal to the time rate of change of the non-adiabatic term in the energy. The non-adiabatic term is given by the transition probability to an excited state k, multiplied by the transition energy from the ground state to k, and then summed over the excited states. The expectation value of the power absorbed by the molecule is derived from the integral over space of the scalar product of the applied electric field and the non-adiabatic current density induced in the molecule by the field. No net power is absorbed due to the action of the applied electric field on the adiabatic current density. The work done on the molecule by the applied field is the time integral of the power absorbed. The result established here shows that work done on the molecule by the applied field changes the populations of the molecular states.

  2. Functional representation for the born-oppenheimer diagonal correction and born-huang adiabatic potential energy surfaces for isotopomers of H3.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Steven L; Schwenke, David W; Schatz, George C; Garrett, Bruce C; Peterson, Kirk A

    2009-04-23

    Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations of the Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction (BODC) for H(3) were performed at 1397 symmetry-unique configurations using the Handy-Yamaguchi-Schaefer approach; isotopic substitution leads to 4041 symmetry-unique configurations for the DH(2) mass combination. These results were then fit to a functional form that permits calculation of the BODC for any combination of isotopes. Mean unsigned fitting errors on a test grid of configurations not included in the fitting process were 0.14, 0.12, and 0.65 cm(-1) for the H(3), DH(2), and MuH(2) isotopomers, respectively. This representation can be combined with any Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface (PES) to yield Born-Huang (BH) PESs; herein, we choose the CCI potential energy surface, the uncertainties of which ( approximately 0.01 kcal/mol) are much smaller than the magnitude of the BODC. Fortran routines to evaluate these BH surfaces are provided. Variational transition state theory calculations are presented comparing thermal rate constants for reactions on the BO and BH surfaces to provide an initial estimate of the significance of the diagonal correction for the dynamics. PMID:19290604

  3. A geometric criterion for adiabatic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, T.J. ); Kovacic, G. )

    1994-03-01

    Chaos in adiabatic Hamiltonian systems is a recent discovery and a pervasive phenomenon in physics. In this work, a geometric criterion is discussed based on the theory of action from classical mechanics to detect the existence of Smale horseshoe chaos in adiabatic systems. It is used to show that generic adiabatic planar Hamiltonian systems exhibit stochastic dynamics in large regions of phase space. To illustrate the method, results are obtained for three problems concerning relativistic particle dynamics, fluid mechanics, and passage through resonance, results which either could not be obtained with existing methods, or which were difficult and analytically impractical to obtain with them.

  4. Heating and cooling in adiabatic mixing process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jing; Zou Xubo; Guo Guangcan; Cai Zi

    2010-12-15

    We study the effect of interaction on the temperature change in the process of adiabatic mixing of two components of Fermi gases using the real-space Bogoliubov-de Gennes method. We find that in the process of adiabatic mixing, the competition between the adiabatic expansion and the attractive interaction makes it possible to cool or heat the system depending on the strength of the interaction and the initial temperature of the system. The changes of the temperature in a bulk system and in a trapped system are investigated.

  5. Two-photon double ionization of helium in the region of photon energies 42-50eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2007-03-01

    We report the total integrated cross section (TICS) of two-photon double ionization of helium in the photon energy range from 42to50eV . Our computational procedure relies on a numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation on a square-integrable basis and subsequent projection of this solution on a set of final field-free states describing correlation in the two-electron continuum. Our results suggest that the TICS grows monotonically as a function of photon energy in the region of 42-50eV , possibly reaching a maximum in the vicinity of 50eV . We also present fully resolved triple-differential cross sections for selected photon energies.

  6. Two-photon double ionization of helium in the region of photon energies 42-50 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2007-03-15

    We report the total integrated cross section (TICS) of two-photon double ionization of helium in the photon energy range from 42 to 50 eV. Our computational procedure relies on a numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation on a square-integrable basis and subsequent projection of this solution on a set of final field-free states describing correlation in the two-electron continuum. Our results suggest that the TICS grows monotonically as a function of photon energy in the region of 42-50 eV, possibly reaching a maximum in the vicinity of 50 eV. We also present fully resolved triple-differential cross sections for selected photon energies.

  7. Observation of collisional ionization electron spectra of van der Waals clusters with metastable He*(2 3S) atoms: An evidence for autoionization from superexcited Ar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hideyasu; Maruyama, Ryo; Yamakita, Yoshihiro; Yamakado, Hideo; Misaizu, Fuminori; Ohno, Koichi

    2000-04-01

    Penning ionization electron spectra (PIES) of van der Waals clusters have been observed for the first time by means of a newly developed magnetic bottle electron spectrometer, which is 1000 times more efficient than a conventional PIES apparatus. In the PIES of Ar clusters with He*(2 3S), two bands of Ar 3p hole characters with different ionization energies (IE), band A (IE=ca.15 eV) and band B (IE=ca.13.5 eV), were observed. Band A was assigned to vertical transitions in Franck-Condon regions corresponding to the band in the ultraviolet photoelectron spectra (UPS) of clusters reported by Carnovale et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 1452 (1989)]. Band B, which is an extra band missing in the UPS of clusters, can be ascribed to the autoionization into a stable structure of Arn+ via superexcited states of Arn. Band B can be considered as an adiabatic ionization which is forbidden as a direct ionization. The energy difference of ca. 1.5 eV between the vertical IE for band A and the adiabatic IE for band B was found to agree well with the reported binding energy of the trimer ion core.

  8. Experimental and theoretical triple-differential cross sections for tetrahydrofuran ionized by low-energy 26-eV-electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Esam; Ren, XueGuang; Dorn, Alexander; Ning, Chuangang; Colgan, James; Madison, Don

    2016-06-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of low-energy electron-impact ionization of tetrahydrofuran, which is a molecule of biological interest. The experiments were performed using an advanced reaction microscope specially built for electron-impact ionization studies. The theoretical calculations were performed within the molecular three-body distorted-wave model. Reasonably good agreement is found between experiment and theory.

  9. Metal-sulfur valence orbital interaction energies in metal-dithiolene complexes: determination of charge and overlap interaction energies by comparison of core and valence ionization energy shifts.

    PubMed

    Wiebelhaus, Nicholas J; Cranswick, Matthew A; Klein, Eric L; Lockett, L Tori; Lichtenberger, Dennis L; Enemark, John H

    2011-11-01

    The electronic interactions between metals and dithiolenes are important in the biological processes of many metalloenzymes as well as in diverse chemical and material applications. Of special note is the ability of the dithiolene ligand to support metal centers in multiple coordination environments and oxidation states. To better understand the nature of metal-dithiolene electronic interactions, new capabilities in gas-phase core photoelectron spectroscopy for molecules with high sublimation temperatures have been developed and applied to a series of molecules of the type Cp(2)M(bdt) (Cp = η(5)-cyclopentadienyl, M = Ti, V, Mo, and bdt = benzenedithiolato). Comparison of the gas-phase core and valence ionization energy shifts provides a unique quantitative energy measure of valence orbital overlap interactions between the metal and the sulfur orbitals that is separated from the effects of charge redistribution. The results explain the large amount of sulfur character in the redox-active orbitals and the 'leveling' of oxidation state energies in metal-dithiolene systems. The experimentally determined orbital interaction energies reveal a previously unidentified overlap interaction of the predominantly sulfur HOMO of the bdt ligand with filled π orbitals of the Cp ligands, suggesting that direct dithiolene interactions with other ligands bound to the metal could be significant for other metal-dithiolene systems in chemistry and biology.

  10. Collision dynamics of proton with formaldehyde: Fragmentation and ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Gao, Cong-Zhang; Calvayrac, Florent; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2014-03-28

    Using time-dependent density functional theory, applied to the valence electrons and coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics of the ions, we study the ionization and fragmentation of formaldehyde in collision with a proton. Four different impact energies: 35 eV, 85 eV, 135 eV, and 300 eV are chosen in order to study the energy effect in the low energy region, and ten different incident orientations at 85 eV are considered for investigating the steric effect. Fragmentation ratios, single, double, and total electron ionization cross sections are calculated. For large impact parameters, these results are close to zero irrespective of the incident orientations due to a weak projectile-target interaction. For small impact parameters, the results strongly depend on the collision energy and orientation. We also give the kinetic energy releases and scattering angles of protons, as well as the cross section of different ion fragments and the corresponding reaction channels.

  11. Simulation of periodically focused, adiabatic thermal beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Akylas, T. R.; Barton, T. J.; Field, D. M.; Lang, K. M.; Mok, R. V.

    2012-12-21

    Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K.R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 14, 103102 (2007); J. Zhou, K.R. Samokhvalova and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 15, 023102 (2008)]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  12. Adiabatic Motion of Fault Tolerant Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, David Edward

    This work proposes and analyzes the adiabatic motion of fault tolerant qubits in two systems as candidates for the building blocks of a quantum computer. The first proposal examines a pair of electron spins in double quantum dots, finding that the leading source of decoherence, hyperfine dephasing, can be suppressed by adiabatic rotation of the dots in real space. The additional spin-orbit effects introduced by this motion are analyzed, simulated, and found to result in an infidelity below the error-correction threshold. The second proposal examines topological qubits formed by Majorana zero modes theorized to exist at the ends of semiconductor nanowires coupled to conventional superconductors. A model is developed to design adiabatic movements of the Majorana bound states to produce entangled qubits. Analysis and simulations indicate that these adiabatic operations can also be used to demonstrate entanglement experimentally by testing Bell's theorem.

  13. General conditions for quantum adiabatic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Comparat, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Adiabaticity occurs when, during its evolution, a physical system remains in the instantaneous eigenstate of the Hamiltonian. Unfortunately, existing results, such as the quantum adiabatic theorem based on a slow down evolution [H({epsilon}t),{epsilon}{yields}0], are insufficient to describe an evolution driven by the Hamiltonian H(t) itself. Here we derive general criteria and exact bounds, for the state and its phase, ensuring an adiabatic evolution for any Hamiltonian H(t). As a corollary, we demonstrate that the commonly used condition of a slow Hamiltonian variation rate, compared to the spectral gap, is indeed sufficient to ensure adiabaticity but only when the Hamiltonian is real and nonoscillating (for instance, containing exponential or polynomial but no sinusoidal functions)

  14. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  15. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  16. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  17. AB INITIO SIMULATIONS FOR MATERIAL PROPERTIES ALONG THE JUPITER ADIABAT

    SciTech Connect

    French, Martin; Becker, Andreas; Lorenzen, Winfried; Nettelmann, Nadine; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Redmer, Ronald; Wicht, Johannes

    2012-09-15

    We determine basic thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrogen-helium-water mixtures for the extreme conditions along Jupiter's adiabat via ab initio simulations, which are compiled in an accurate and consistent data set. In particular, we calculate the electrical and thermal conductivity, the shear and longitudinal viscosity, and diffusion coefficients of the nuclei. We present results for associated quantities like the magnetic and thermal diffusivity and the kinematic shear viscosity along an adiabat that is taken from a state-of-the-art interior structure model. Furthermore, the heat capacities, the thermal expansion coefficient, the isothermal compressibility, the Grueneisen parameter, and the speed of sound are calculated. We find that the onset of dissociation and ionization of hydrogen at about 0.9 Jupiter radii marks a region where the material properties change drastically. In the deep interior, where the electrons are degenerate, many of the material properties remain relatively constant. Our ab initio data will serve as a robust foundation for applications that require accurate knowledge of the material properties in Jupiter's interior, e.g., models for the dynamo generation.

  18. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  19. Numerical study of polaron problem in the adiabatic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsiglio, Frank; Li, Zhou; Blois, Cindy; Baillie, Devin

    2010-03-01

    We study the polaron problem in a one dimensional chain and on a two dimensional square lattice. The models we have used are the Holstein model and the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model. By a variational procedure based on the Lanczos method, we are able to examine the polaron problem in the limit when the mass of the ion is very large, i.e. close to the adiabatic limit. It is known that for the Holstein model there is no phase transition [1] for any nonzero phonon energy. It is also known that for the one dimensional Holstein or SSH model there will be long range order [2] (e.g. dimerization) in the adiabatic limit at half-filling. It is then interesting to study the long range order on a two dimensional square lattice in and away from the adiabatic limit. Moreover, recent progress for the single polaron near an impurity (disorder) [3] make it an interesting problem for studying bond length disorder which can change the hopping energy in a specific direction in the Holstein model. Reference: [1] H. Lowen, Phys.Rev.B 37, 8661 (1988) [2] J.E.Hirsch and E. Frandkin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 402 (1982) [3]A.S.Mishchenko et.al Phys.Rev.B 79(2009) 180301(R)

  20. Computational prediction of antibody binding sites on tetracycline antibiotics: electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies on molecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Pankaj; Sukumar, N; Murray, Jane S; Giese, Rossman F; Wood, Troy D

    2009-01-29

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for the analysis of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, and their transformed compounds in environmental water samples. The antibodies employed in ELISA showed high relative affinity for tetracycline, epitetracycline, chlortetracycline, and epichlortetracycline as compared to anhydrotetracycline, epianhydrotetracycline, and anhydrochlortetracycline. The specificity and crossreactivity of these antibodies are discussed in relation to the electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies computed on the molecular surfaces of tetracycline antibiotics and their transformed compounds with an objective of identifying common features as well as differences that may be related to the experimentally observed variation in cross-reactivity values. The computations were performed at both the HF/STO-3G and HF/6-31+G* levels using the Gaussian 98 program. The results in this study are based upon molecular electrostatic potentials and local ionization energies computed on isodensity molecular surfaces. The surface electrostatic potentials are characterized in terms of a group of statistically defined quantities, which include the average deviation, the positive, negative, and total variances, positive and negative surface extrema, and a parameter indicating the degree of electrostatic balance.

  1. Astrophysical fluid simulations of thermally ideal gases with non-constant adiabatic index: numerical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, B.; Mignone, A.; Bodo, G.; Massaglia, S.

    2015-08-01

    Context. An equation of state (EoS) is a relation between thermodynamic state variables and it is essential for closing the set of equations describing a fluid system. Although an ideal EoS with a constant adiabatic index Γ is the preferred choice owing to its simplistic implementation, many astrophysical fluid simulations may benefit from a more sophisticated treatment that can account for diverse chemical processes. Aims: In the present work we first review the basic thermodynamic principles of a gas mixture in terms of its thermal and caloric EoS by including effects like ionization, dissociation, and temperature dependent degrees of freedom such as molecular vibrations and rotations. The formulation is revisited in the context of plasmas that are either in equilibrium conditions (local thermodynamic- or collisional excitation-equilibria) or described by non-equilibrium chemistry coupled to optically thin radiative cooling. We then present a numerical implementation of thermally ideal gases obeying a more general caloric EoS with non-constant adiabatic index in Godunov-type numerical schemes. Methods: We discuss the necessary modifications to the Riemann solver and to the conversion between total energy and pressure (or vice versa) routinely invoked in Godunov-type schemes. We then present two different approaches for computing the EoS. The first employs root-finder methods and it is best suited for EoS in analytical form. The second is based on lookup tables and interpolation and results in a more computationally efficient approach, although care must be taken to ensure thermodynamic consistency. Results: A number of selected benchmarks demonstrate that the employment of a non-ideal EoS can lead to important differences in the solution when the temperature range is 500-104 K where dissociation and ionization occur. The implementation of selected EoS introduces additional computational costs although the employment of lookup table methods (when possible) can

  2. Adiabatic Demagnetization Cooler For Far Infrared Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akio; Yazawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Junya

    1988-11-01

    An small adiabatic demagnetization cooler for an astronomical far infrared detector has been built. Single crystals of manganese ammonium sulphate and chromium potassium alum, were prepared as magnetic substances. The superconducting magnet was indirectly cooled and operated by small current up to 13.3 A, the maximum field being 3.5 T. As a preliminary step, adiabatic demagnetization to zero field was implemented. The lowest temperature obtained was 0.5 K, for 5.0 K initial temperature.

  3. Assessment of small volume ionization chambers as reference dosimeters in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, M.; de Carlan, L.; Delaunay, F.; Donois, M.; Fournier, P.; Ostrowsky, A.; Vouillaume, A.; Bordy, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    LNE-LNHB is involved in a European project aiming at establishing absorbed dose-to-water standards for photon-radiation fields down to 2 × 2 cm2. This requires the calibration of reference ionization chambers of small volume. Twenty-four ionization chambers of eight different types with volume ranging from 0.007 to 0.057 cm3 were tested in a 60Co beam. For each chamber, two major characteristics were investigated: (1) the stability of the measured current as a function of the irradiation time under continuous irradiation. At LNE-LNHB, the variation of the current should be less than ±0.1% in comparison with its first value (over a 16 h irradiation time); (2) the variation of the ionization current with the applied polarizing voltage and polarity. Leakage currents were also measured. Results show that (1) every tested PTW (31015, 31016 and 31014) and Exradin A1SL chambers demonstrate a satisfying stability under irradiation. Other types of chambers have a stability complying with the stability criterion for some or none of them. (2) IBA CC01, IBA CC04 and Exradin A1SL show a proper response as a function of applied voltage for both polarities. PTW, Exradin A14SL and Exradin A16 do not. Only three types of chambers were deemed suitable as reference chambers according to LNE-LNHB requirements and specifications from McEwen (2010 Med. Phys. 37 2179-93): Exradin A1SL chambers (3/3), IBA CC04 (2/3) and IBA CC01 (1/3). The Exradin A1SL type with an applied polarizing voltage of 150 V was chosen as an LNE-LNHB reference chamber type in 2 × 2 cm2 radiation fields.

  4. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M.; Gazdic-Santic, Maja

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  5. Coulomb three-body effects in low-energy impact ionization of H(1{ital s})

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, J.; Rasch, J.; Jung, K.; Whelan, C.T.; Ehrhardt, H.; Allan, R.J.; Walters, H.R. |||

    1996-01-01

    The different kinematical and geometrical arrangements that may be used in ({ital e},2{ital e}) studies are briefly reviewed. The ionization of H(1{ital s}) is considered, and within the confines of a relatively simple theoretical model, it is shown how to define experimental setups where one may extract information on the role of Coulomb three-body effects in the incident and final channels. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for coplanar constant geometry where the focus is primarily on incident channel effects. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  7. Laboratory Measurements of Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairy, W. W.

    1997-04-01

    Adiabatic and isothermal measurements on various of gases are made possible by using the Adiabatic Gas Law apparatus made by PASCO Scientific(Much of this work was published by the author in "The Physics Teacher", vol. 34, March 1996, p. 178-80.). By using a computer interface, undergraduates are able to data for monatomic, diatomic and polyatomic gases for both compression and expansion processes. Designed principally to obtain adiabatic data, the apparatus may be easily modified for use in isothermal processes. The various sets of data are imported into a spreadsheet program where fits may be made to the ideal gas law and the adiabatic gas law. Excellent results are obtained for the natural logarithm of pressure versus the natural logarithm of volume for both the isothermal data (expected slope equal to -1 in all cases) and the adiabatic data (slope equal to -1 times the ratio of specific heats for the particular gas). An overview of the lab procedure used at VMI will be presented along with data obtained for several adiabatic and isothermal processes.

  8. Momentum Distribution of Near-Zero-Energy Photoelectrons in the Strong-Field Tunneling Ionization in the Long Wavelength Limit

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Q. Z.; Ye, D. F.; Fu, L. B.; Han, X. Y.; Liu, J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the ionization dynamics of Argon atoms irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser of a wavelength up to 3100 nm, addressing the momentum distribution of the photoelectrons with near-zero-energy. We find a surprising accumulation in the momentum distribution corresponding to meV energy and a “V”-like structure at the slightly larger transverse momenta. Semiclassical simulations indicate the crucial role of the Coulomb attraction between the escaping electron and the remaining ion at an extremely large distance. Tracing back classical trajectories, we find the tunneling electrons born in a certain window of the field phase and transverse velocity are responsible for the striking accumulation. Our theoretical results are consistent with recent meV-resolved high-precision measurements. PMID:26081971

  9. Adiabatic freezing of long-range quantum correlations in spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar Dhar, Himadri; Rakshit, Debraj; Sen(De, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-06-01

    We consider a process to create quasi-long-range quantum discord between the non-interacting end spins of a quantum spin chain, with the end spins weakly coupled to the bulk of the chain. The process is not only capable of creating long-range quantum correlation but the latter remains frozen, when certain weak end-couplings are adiabatically varied below certain thresholds. We term this phenomenon as adiabatic freezing of quantum correlation. We observe that the freezing is robust to moderate thermal fluctuations and is intrinsically related to the cooperative properties of the quantum spin chain. In particular, we find that the energy gap of the system remains frozen for these adiabatic variations, and moreover, considering the end spins as probes, we show that the interval of freezing can detect the anisotropy transition in quantum XY spin chains. Importantly, the adiabatic freezing of long-range quantum correlations can be simulated with contemporary experimental techniques.

  10. Time-of-flight ERD with a 200 mm2 Si3N4 window gas ionization chamber energy detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julin, Jaakko; Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Low energy heavy ion elastic recoil detection work has been carried out in Jyväskylä since 2009 using home made timing detectors, a silicon energy detector and a timestamping data acquisition setup forming a time-of-flight-energy telescope. In order to improve the mass resolution of the setup a new energy detector was designed to replace the silicon solid state detector, which suffered from radiation damage and had poor resolution for heavy recoils. In this paper the construction and operation of an isobutane filled gas ionization chamber with a 14 × 14 mm2 100 nm thick silicon nitride window are described. In addition to greatly improved energy resolution for heavy ions, the detector is also able to detect hydrogen recoils simultaneously in the energy range of 100-1000 keV. Additionally the detector has position sensitivity by means of timing measurement, which can be performed without compromising the performance of the detector in any other way. The achieved position sensitivity improves the depth resolution near the surface.

  11. Electron energy balance and ionization in the channel of a stationary plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovzorov, A. N.; Pogorelov, A. A.; Svirskiy, E. B.; Smirnov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of numerical simulations of the electron dynamics in the field of the azimuthal and longitudinal waves excited in the channel of a stationary plasma thruster (SPT). The simulations are based on the experimentally determined wave characteristics. The simulation results show that the azimuthal wave displayed as ionization instability enhances electron transport along the thruster channel. It is established that the electron transport rate in the azimuthal wave increases as compared to the rate of diffusion caused by electron scattering from neutral atoms in proportion to the ratio between the times of electron- neutral collisions responsible for ionization and elastic electron scattering, respectively. An expression governing the plasma conductivity is derived with allowance for electron interaction with the azimuthal wave. The Hall parameter, the electron component of the discharge current, and the electron heating power in the thruster channel are calculated for two model SPTs operating with krypton and xenon. The simulation results agree well with the results of experimental studies of these two SPTs.

  12. PFI-ZEKE (Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy) para el estudio de iones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Basterretxea, A. Longarte. F.; Sánchez Rayo, M. N.; Martínez, R.

    Entre las áreas hacia donde ha evolucionado la Química en los últimos años están los estudios de sistemas con especies reactivas de alta energía y los dominados por fuerzas intermoleculares débiles, con energías de unas pocas kcal/mol. En efecto, el estudio de las propiedades de los iones, comenzando por su relación con la molécula neutra de la que procede, la energía de ionización, los estados vibracionales y rotacionales, energías de enlace de Van der Waals entre el ión y una amplia variedad de otras moléculas, sus confórmeros o isómeros y sus reacciones o semi-reacciones químicas están en la raíz de la necesidad de la espectroscopía conocida como PFI-ZEKE, Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy. Entre las aplicaciones que requieren estos conocimientos se encuentran la generación de plasmas para la fabricación de semiconductores, memorias magnéticas, etc, así como los sistemas astrofísicos, la ionosfera terrestre, etc. La espectroscopía ZEKE es una evolución de las de fluorescencia inducida por láser, LIF, ionización multifotónica acrecentada por resonancia, REMPI, con uno y dos colores y acoplada a un sistema de tiempo de vuelo, REMPI-TOF-MS, y las espectroscopías de doble resonancia IR-UV y UV-UV. Sus espectros y la ayuda de cálculos ab inicio permite determinar las energías de enlace de complejos de van der Waals en estados fundamental y excitados, identificar confórmeros e isómeros, obtener energías de ionización experimentales aproximadas (100 cm-1) y otras variables de interés. Al igual que con LIF, REMPI y dobles resonancias, es posible utilizar muestras gaseosas, pero los espectros están muy saturados de bandas y su interpretación es difícil o imposible. Se evitan estas dificultades estudiando las moléculas o complejos en expansiones supersónicas, donde la T de los grados de libertad solo alcanzan unos pocos K. Para realizar experimentos de ZEKE hay que utilizar una propiedad recientemente

  13. Experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy final state electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Sadek; Ozer, Zehra N.; Dogan, Mevlut; Yavuz, Murat; Varol, Onur; Madison, Don

    2016-09-01

    There have been several studies of electron-impact ionization of inert gases for asymmetric final state energy sharing and normally one electron has an energy significantly higher than the other. However, there have been relatively few studies examining equal energy final state electrons. Here we report experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy sharing of the outgoing electrons. Previous experimental results combined with some new measurements are compared with distorted wave born approximation (DWBA) results, DWBA results using the Ward-Macek (WM) approximation for the post collision interaction (PCI), and three-body distorted wave (3DW) which includes PCI without approximation. The results show that it is crucially important to include PCI in the calculation particularly for lower energies and that the WM approximation is valid only for high energies. The 3DW, on the other hand, is in reasonably good agreement with data down to fairly low energies.

  14. Experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy final state electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Sadek; Ozer, Zehra N.; Dogan, Mevlut; Yavuz, Murat; Varol, Onur; Madison, Don

    2016-09-01

    There have been several studies of electron-impact ionization of inert gases for asymmetric final state energy sharing and normally one electron has an energy significantly higher than the other. However, there have been relatively few studies examining equal energy final state electrons. Here we report experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy sharing of the outgoing electrons. Previous experimental results combined with some new measurements are compared with distorted wave born approximation (DWBA) results, DWBA results using the Ward–Macek (WM) approximation for the post collision interaction (PCI), and three-body distorted wave (3DW) which includes PCI without approximation. The results show that it is crucially important to include PCI in the calculation particularly for lower energies and that the WM approximation is valid only for high energies. The 3DW, on the other hand, is in reasonably good agreement with data down to fairly low energies.

  15. Novel developments and applications of the classical adiabatic dynamics technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Lula

    The present work aims to apply and develop modern molecular dynamics techniques based on a novel analysis of the classical adiabatic dynamics approach. In the first part of this thesis, Car-Parrinello ab-initio molecular dynamics, a successful technique based on adiabatic dynamics, is used to study the charge transport mechanism in solid ammonium perchlorate (AP) crystal exposed to an ammonia-rich environment. AP is a solid-state proton conductor composed of NH+4 and ClO-4 units that can undergo a decomposition process at high temperature, leading to its use such as rocket fuel. After computing IR spectra and carefully analysing the dynamics at different temperatures, we found that the charge transport mechanism in the pure crystal is dominated by diffusion of the ammonium ions and that the translational diffusion is strongly coupled to rotational diffusion of the two types of ions present. When the pure ammonium-perchlorate crystal is doped with neutral ammonia, another mechanism comes into play, namely, the Grotthuss proton hopping mechanism via short-lived N2H+7 complexes. In the second part of this thesis, adiabatic dynamics will be used to develop an alternative approach to the calculation of free energy profiles along reaction paths. The new method (AFED) is based on the creation of an adiabatic separation between the reaction coordinate subspace and the remaining degrees of freedom within a molecular dynamics run. This is achieved by associating with the reaction coordinate(s) a high temperature and large mass. These conditions allow the activated process to occur while permitting the remaining degrees of freedom to respond adiabatically. In this limit, by applying a formal multiple time scale Liouville operator factorization, it can be rigorously shown that the free energy profile is obtained directly from the probability distribution of the reaction coordinate subspace and, therefore, no postprocessing of the output data is required. The new method is

  16. Description of ionization in the molecular approach to atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, C.; Jouin, H.; Pons, B.; Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular treatments of atomic collisions have traditionally been restricted to low nuclear velocities because of their failure to reproduce the fall of the capture cross sections at higher velocities. The limitation has recently been seen to be due to their description of ionizing processes. This feature is shown here to be a general one for multicharged ion-atom collisions. Its origin and characteristics are described and illustrated for the prototypical Li{sup 3+}+H(1s) reaction. Ionization appears as a result of the inertia of the electron cloud to adiabatically follow the nuclear motion. This gives rise to nonadiabatic transitions, which represent an ionizing flux whenever the nuclear velocity is high enough that the energy of the traveling molecular orbitals involved is positive in both moving atomic reference frames. Two strongly connected mechanisms appear, corresponding to the relative translational and rotational nuclear motions. Because of the finiteness of the basis, these mechanisms terminate with unphysical trapping effects. While interesting {ital per se}, knowledge of these features is also useful with respect to improving molecular treatments of atomic collisions with the addition of pseudostates. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. The collisional drift mode in a partially ionized plasma. [in the F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kennel, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of the drift instability was examined in several density regimes. Let sub e be the total electron mean free path, k sub z the wave-vector component along the magnetic field, and the ratio of perpendicular ion diffusion to parallel electron streaming rates. At low densities (k sub z lambda 1) the drift mode is isothermal and should be treated kineticly. In the finite heat conduction regime square root of m/M k sub z Lambda sub 1) the drift instability threshold is reduced at low densities and increased at high densities as compared to the isothermal threshold. Finally, in the energy transfer limit (k sub z kambda sub e square root of m/M) the drift instability behaves adiabatically in a fully ionized plasma and isothermally in a partially ionized plasma for an ion-neutral to Coulomb collision frequency ratio.

  18. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  19. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-28

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60 +/- 0.05 eV and 7.6 +/- 0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the protonated cytosine ion (CH(+)) signal at 9.20 +/- 0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH(+) appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  20. Proton affinities and photoelectron spectra of phenylalanine and N-methyl- and N,N-dimethylphenylalanine. Correlation of lone pair ionization energies with proton affinities and implications for N-methylation as a method to effect site specific protonation of peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.; Marzluff, E.M.; Rodgers, M.T.; Beauchamp, J.L. ); Rempe, M.E.; Schwinck, K.F.; Lichtenberger, D.L. )

    1994-06-15

    A Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) technique for measuring gas-phase proton affinities is presented which utilizes collisional dissociation of proton-bound clusters by off-resonance translational excitation. A simplified RRKM analysis relates unimolecular dissociation rates to proton affinities. This technique is used to measure values for the proton affinities of phenylalanine and N-methyl- and N,N-dimethylphenylalanine of 220.3, 223.6, and 224.5 kcal/mol, respectively (relative to the proton affinity of NH[sub 3] = 204.0 kcal/mol). The proton affinity measured for phenylalanine is in excellent agreement with reported literature values. The photoelectron spectra of these three molecules are also presented and analyzed. Assignments of bands to specific ionization processes are aided by comparison with model compounds such as methyl-substituted amines and 2-phenylethylamines. These data are employed to examine the correlation of adiabatic nitrogen lone pair ionization energies with gas-phase proton affinities for phenylalanine, N-methylphenylalanine, and N,N-dimethylphenylalanine in comparison to correlations for other amino acids and selected aliphatic amines. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Comparing multiple exciton generation in quantum dots to impact ionization in bulk semiconductors: implications for enhancement of solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Beard, Matthew C; Midgett, Aaron G; Hanna, Mark C; Luther, Joseph M; Hughes, Barbara K; Nozik, Arthur J

    2010-08-11

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in quantum dots (QDs) and impact ionization (II) in bulk semiconductors are processes that describe producing more than one electron-hole pair per absorbed photon. We derive expressions for the proper way to compare MEG in QDs with II in bulk semiconductors and argue that there are important differences in the photophysics between bulk semiconductors and QDs. Our analysis demonstrates that the fundamental unit of energy required to produce each electron-hole pair in a given QD is the band gap energy. We find that the efficiency of the multiplication process increases by at least 2 in PbSe QDs compared to bulk PbSe, while the competition between cooling and multiplication favors multiplication by a factor of 3 in QDs. We also demonstrate that power conversion efficiencies in QD solar cells exhibiting MEG can greatly exceed conversion efficiencies of their bulk counterparts, especially if the MEG threshold energy can be reduced toward twice the QD band gap energy, which requires a further increase in the MEG efficiency. Finally, we discuss the research challenges associated with achieving the maximum benefit of MEG in solar energy conversion since we show the threshold and efficiency are mathematically related.

  2. Comparing Multiple Exciton Generation in Quantum Dots To Impact Ionization in Bulk Semiconductors: Implications for Enhancement of Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Matthew C.; Midgett, Aaron G.; Hanna, Mark C.; Luther, Joseph M.; Hughes, Barbara K.; Nozik, Arthur J.

    2010-07-26

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in quantum dots (QDs) and impact ionization (II) in bulk semiconductors are processes that describe producing more than one electron-hole pair per absorbed photon. We derive expressions for the proper way to compare MEG in QDs with II in bulk semiconductors and argue that there are important differences in the photophysics between bulk semiconductors and QDs. Our analysis demonstrates that the fundamental unit of energy required to produce each electron-hole pair in a given QD is the band gap energy. We find that the efficiency of the multiplication process increases by at least 2 in PbSe QDs compared to bulk PbSe, while the competition between cooling and multiplication favors multiplication by a factor of 3 in QDs. We also demonstrate that power conversion efficiencies in QD solar cells exhibiting MEG can greatly exceed conversion efficiencies of their bulk counterparts, especially if the MEG threshold energy can be reduced toward twice the QD band gap energy, which requires a further increase in the MEG efficiency. Finally, we discuss the research challenges associated with achieving the maximum benefit of MEG in solar energy conversion since we show the threshold and efficiency are mathematically related.

  3. A VUV photoionization measurement and ab-initio calculation of the ionization energy of gas phase SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Metz, Ricardo B.

    2008-12-05

    In this work we report on the detection and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of gas phase SiO2 generated in situ via laser ablation of silicon in a CO2 molecular beam. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for SiO and SiO2 and ionization energy estimates are revealed from such measurements. A state-to-state ionizationenergy of 12.60 (+-0.05) eV is recorded by fitting two prominent peaks in the PIE curve for the following process: 1SUM O-Si-O --> 2PRODg [O-Si-O]+. Electronic structure calculations aid in the interpretation of the photoionization process and allow for identification of the symmetric stretch of 2PRODg [O-Si-O]+ which is observed in the PIE spectrum to be 0.11 eV (890 cm-1) above the ground state of the cation and agrees with the 892 cm-1 symmetric stretch frequency calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level.

  4. Slalom in complex time: Emergence of low-energy structures in tunnel ionization via complex-time contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisanty, Emilio; Ivanov, Misha

    2016-04-01

    The ionization of atoms by strong, low-frequency fields can generally be described well by assuming that the photoelectron is, after the ionization step, completely at the mercy of the laser field. However, certain phenomena, like the recent discovery of low-energy structures (LESs) in the long-wavelength regime, require the inclusion of the Coulomb interaction with the ion once the electron is in the continuum. We explore the first-principles inclusion of this interaction, known as analytical R -matrix theory, and its consequences on the corresponding quantum orbits. We show that the trajectory must have an imaginary component, and that this causes branch cuts in the complex time plane when the real trajectory revisits the neighborhood of the ionic core. We provide a framework for consistently navigating these branch cuts based on closest-approach times, which satisfy the equation r (t ).v (t )=0 in the complex plane. We explore the geometry of these roots and describe the geometrical structures underlying the emergence of LESs in both the classical and quantum domains.

  5. Computational Calculation Of The Ionization Energies Of The Human Prion Protein By The Coarse-grain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Justin; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    The causes of the misfolding of prion protein -i.e. the transformation of PrPC to PrPSc - have not been clearly elucidated. Many studies have focused on identifying possible chemical conditions, such as pH, temperature and chemical denaturation, that may trigger the pathological transformation of prion proteins (Weiwei Tao, Gwonchan Yoon, Penghui Cao, `` β-sheet-like formation during the mechanical unfolding of prion protein'', The Journal of Chemical Physics, 2015, 143, 125101). Here, we attempt to calculate the ionization energies of the prion protein, which will be able to shed light onto the possible causes of the misfolding. We plan on using the coarse-grain method which allows for a more feasible calculation time by means of approximation. We believe that by being able to approximate the ionization potential, particularly that of the regions known to form stable β-strands of the PrPSc form, the possible sources of denaturation, be it chemical or mechanical, may be narrowed down.

  6. Mysterious dipole synchrotron oscillations during and after adiabatic capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    Strong synchrotron oscillations were observed during and after the 2.5-MHz rf adiabatic capture of a debunched booster batch in the Main Injector. Analysis shows two possible sources for the synchrotron oscillations. One is the frequency drift of the 2.5-MHz rf after the turning off of the 53-MHz rf voltage, thus resulting in an energy mismatch with the debunched beam. The second source is the energy mismatch of the injected booster beam with the frequency of the 53-MHz rf. We have been able to rule out the first possibility.

  7. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  8. Impact of electron ionization on the generation of high-order harmonics from molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Brener, S.; Moiseyev, N.; Ivanov, M. V.

    2003-08-01

    When the laser frequency is tuned to be equal to the molecular electronic excitation, high-order harmonics are generated due to the electronic dipole transitions between the corresponding two potential-energy surfaces (PES). A natural, often taken, choice is the PES of the field-free molecular system. In this special choice the ionization phenomenon is not considered. Only the effect of the dissociation is considered. The method we developed enables one to remain within the framework of the 2-PES approximation and yet to include also the ionization effect in the calculations of molecular high-order harmonic generation spectra. In this approach the coupling between the electronic and nuclear motions is taken into consideration by using coupled complex adiabatic PES. As an illustrative numerical example, we calculated the high harmonic generation (HHG) spectra of H{sub 2}{sup +} in a 730-nm laser with the intensity of 8.77x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The inclusion of the ionization in our approach not only enables the electrons to tunnel through the effective static potential barrier, but also apply an asymmetric force which accelerates the electron before ionization takes place. Therefore, indirectly the inclusion of the ionization by the laser field may lead eventually to an enhanced HHG spectra in comparison with the calculated one when the ''natural'' choice of the field-free 2PES is taken.

  9. Double-ionization energies of some n-alkyl isocyanate molecules; studies with double-charge-transfer spectrometry and ab initio propagator theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, M. A.; Griffiths, I. W.; Harris, F. M.; Parry, D. E.

    2003-12-01

    Double-charge-transfer (DCT) collisions of H+, OH+ and F+ 3 keV beam ions with a series of alkyl isocyanate molecules were studied using mass spectrometric techniques. Measurement of the kinetic energies of H- ions so produced enabled the determination of double-ionization energies (DIE) for transitions to singlet doubly ionized states of the target molecules; those for triplet doubly ionized states were obtained similarly from measurements of the kinetic energies of OH- and F- ions. Values up to approximately 40 eV were obtained in most cases and were found to be in close agreement with the predictions of ab initio calculations using propagator theory, also presented here. For n-butyl isocyanate (and by implication heavier molecules in the series) the density of doubly ionized states above 30 eV was both observed and predicted to be too large and featureless for meaningful analysis, so establishing an effective upper limit on molecular size for the current application of these techniques. Significant configuration interaction was predicted for the final doubly ionized states, which justified theoretical analysis with a relatively complex method that accounts well for correlation effects.

  10. Relative Abundances and Energy Spectra of C, N, and 0 as Measured by the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, E. J.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Ellison, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present results on the spectra and the relative abundances of C, N, and 0 nuclei in the cosmic radiation as measured from the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) . The ATIC detector has completed two successful balloon flights from McMurdo, Antarctica lasting a total of more than 35 days. ATIC is designed as a multiple, long duration balloon flight, investigation of the cosmic ray spectra from below 50 GeV to near 100 TeV total energy, using a fully active Bismuth Germanate calorimeter. It is equipped with a large area mosaic of silicon detector pixels capable of charge identification from H to Fe. As a redundancy check for the charge identification and a particle tracking system, three projective layers of x-y scintillator hodoscopes were employed, above, in the middle and below a 0.75 nuclear interaction length graphite target.

  11. K -shell ionization cross sections of Al, Si, S, Ca, and Zn for oxygen ions in the energy range 1. 1--8 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Geretschlaeger, M. ); Smit, Z. ); Steinbauer, E. )

    1992-03-01

    {ital K}-shell ionization cross sections induced by 1.1--8-MeV oxygen ions in Al, Si, S, Ca, and Zn were measured using different target thicknesses. The cross sections for vanishingly thin and for charge-equilibrium targets were obtained by extrapolation. The experimental results are compared to the perturbed stationary-state approximation with energy-loss, Coulomb, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR) cross sections (Brandt and Lapicki, Phys. Rev. A 23, 1717 (1981)), to the modification of the ECPSSR theory (MECPSSR) (Benka, Geretschlaeger, and Paul, J. Phys. (Paris) Colloq. Suppl. 12, C9-251 (1987)), to the theory for direct Coulomb ionization of the 1{ital s}{sigma} molecular orbital (Montenegro and Sigaud, J. Phys. B 18, 299 (1985)), and to several semiclassical approximation codes using either the united atom binding procedure or the variational approach of Andersen {ital et} {ital al}. (Nucl. Instrum. Methods 192, 79 (1982)). The cross sections were also compared to the statistical molecular-orbital theory of inner-shell ionization for (nearly) symmetric atomic collisions (Mittelman and Wilets, Phys. Rev. 154, 12 (1967)). For fast collisions ({xi}{similar to}1), the ionization cross sections are well reproduced by theories for direct Coulomb ionization. For slower collisions ({xi}{lt}1), the experimental cross sections are systematically higher than the direct-ionization values, but they agree satisfactorily with the summed cross sections for direct Coulomb ionization and for molecular-orbital ionization. Best agreement (within a factor of 2) was found for the sums of MECPSSR and statistical cross sections.

  12. Adiabatic approximation for the density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.

    1992-05-01

    An adiabatic approximation for the Liouville density-matrix equation which includes decay terms is developed. The adiabatic approximation employs the eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator. The approximation is valid when there exists a complete set of eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator (i.e., the eigenvectors span the density-matrix space), the time rate of change of the Liouville operator is small, and an auxiliary matrix is nonsingular. Numerical examples are presented involving efficient population transfer in a molecule by stimulated Raman scattering, with the intermediate level of the molecule decaying on a time scale that is fast compared with the pulse durations of the pump and Stokes fields. The adiabatic density-matrix approximation can be simply used to determine the density matrix for atomic or molecular systems interacting with cw electromagnetic fields when spontaneous emission or other decay mechanisms prevail.

  13. Adiabaticity and viscosity in deep mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quareni, F.; Yuen, D. A.; Saari, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been conducted of steady convection with adiabatic and viscous heating for variable viscosity in the Boussinesq limit using the mean-field theory. A strong nonlinear coupling is found between the thermodynamic constants governing adiabatic heating and the rheological parameters. The range of rheological values for which adiabaticity would occur throughout the mantle has been established. Too large an activation volume, greater than 6 cu cm/mol for the cases examined, would produce unreasonably high temperature at the bottom of the mantle (greater than 6000 K) and superadiabatic gradients, especially in the lower mantle. Radiogenic heating plays a profound role in controlling dynamically mantle temperatures. Present values for the averaged mantle heat production would yield objectionably high temperatures in the lower mantle.

  14. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Ionization cross sections of small cationic carbon clusters in high-energy collisions with helium atoms and stability of multiply charged species

    SciTech Connect

    Mezdari, F.; Wohrer-Beroff, K.; Chabot, M.; Martinet, G.; Della Negra, S.; Desesquelles, P.; Hamrita, H.; LePadellec, A.

    2005-09-15

    Single, double, triple, and quadruple ionization cross sections of small cationic carbon clusters C{sub n}{sup +} colliding with helium atoms at a fixed velocity (2.6 atomic units) have been measured. The size ranges from n=1 to n=10 for single to triple ionization, from n=5 to n=10 for the quadruple ionization. The dependence of the cross sections with the cluster size is found to be well reproduced by predictions of the independent atom and electron (IAE) collision model. This extends the applicability of this simple model to higher n values and to a higher ionization degree than previously done [M. Chabot et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 14, 5 (2001)]. The branching ratios of multiply charged C{sub n}{sup q+} clusters remaining intact over a 100 ns time window have been measured (n=3-10, q=2-3). Branching ratios of nonfragmented doubly charged clusters have been interpreted on the basis of calculated internal energies of C{sub n}{sup 2+} due to single ionization of C{sub n}{sup +} clusters using the IAE model. This allowed estimates of the minimum energies required to fragment these C{sub n}{sup 2+} species to be derived.

  16. Ionization cross sections of small cationic carbon clusters in high-energy collisions with helium atoms and stability of multiply charged species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezdari, F.; Wohrer-Béroff, K.; Chabot, M.; Martinet, G.; Della Negrâ, S.; Désesquelles, P.; Hamrita, H.; Lepadellec, A.

    2005-09-01

    Single, double, triple, and quadruple ionization cross sections of small cationic carbon clusters Cn+ colliding with helium atoms at a fixed velocity (2.6 atomic units) have been measured. The size ranges from n=1 to n=10 for single to triple ionization, from n=5 to n=10 for the quadruple ionization. The dependence of the cross sections with the cluster size is found to be well reproduced by predictions of the independent atom and electron (IAE) collision model. This extends the applicability of this simple model to higher n values and to a higher ionization degree than previously done [M. Chabot , Eur. Phys. J. D 14, 5 (2001)]. The branching ratios of multiply charged Cnq+ clusters remaining intact over a 100ns time window have been measured ( n=3-10 , q=2-3 ). Branching ratios of nonfragmented doubly charged clusters have been interpreted on the basis of calculated internal energies of Cn2+ due to single ionization of Cn+ clusters using the IAE model. This allowed estimates of the minimum energies required to fragment these Cn2+ species to be derived.

  17. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  18. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  19. Evaluation of highly ionizing components in high-energy nucleon radiation fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Khan, Ferdous

    1989-01-01

    The data and models for nuclear fragment recoil distribution produced by high-energy nuclear events in tissue are reviewed. Results for linear energy transfer distributions in soft tissue are derived, and a simple model is developed for use in radiation studies and risk estimates.

  20. Photon-energy dependence of single-photon simultaneous core ionization and core excitation in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniato, S.; Selles, P.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Andric, L.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.; Marchenko, T.; Travnikova, O.; Goldsztejn, G.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Céolin, D.; Simon, M.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Penent, F.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the K-2V process corresponding to simultaneous K -shell ionization and K -shell excitation in the C O2 molecule. We define these K-2V states as super shake-up, at variance with the "conventional" K-1v-1V shake-up states. While the nature and evolution with photon energy of the conventional shake-up satellites has been the object of many studies, no such data on a large photon-energy range were previously reported on super shake-up. The C O2 molecule is a textbook example because it exhibits two well-isolated K-2V resonances (with V being 2 πu* and 5 σg* ) with different symmetries resulting from shake-up processes of different origin populated in comparable proportions. The variation of the excitation cross section of these two resonances with photon energy is reported, using two different experimental approaches, which sheds light on the excitation mechanisms. Furthermore, double-core-hole spectroscopy is shown to be able to integrate and even expand information provided by conventional single-core-hole X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) techniques, revealing, for instance, g -g dipole forbidden transitions which are only excited in NEXAFS spectra through vibronic coupling.

  1. Ionization Time and Exit Momentum in Strong-Field Tunnel Ionization.

    PubMed

    Teeny, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H

    2016-02-12

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. The so-called two-step model, which describes the ionization as instantaneous tunneling at the electric field maximum and classical motion afterwards with zero exit momentum, is commonly employed to describe tunnel ionization in adiabatic regimes. In this contribution, we show by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in one dimension and employing a virtual detector at the tunnel exit that there is a nonvanishing positive time delay between the electric field maximum and the instant of ionization. Moreover, we find a nonzero exit momentum in the direction of the electric field. To extract proper tunneling times from asymptotic momentum distributions of ionized electrons, it is essential to incorporate the electron's initial momentum in the direction of the external electric field.

  2. The Effects of the Pauli Exclusion Principle in Determining the Ionization Energies of the Helium Atom and Helium-Like Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    For helium and helium-like ions, we have examined the differences between the values of the ionization energies as calculated from the Bohr theory and those measured in experiments. We find that these differences vary linearly with the atomic number of the system. Using this result, we show how the Bohr model for single-electron systems may be…

  3. Internal energy distribution of peptides in electrospray ionization : ESI and collision-induced dissociation spectra calculation.

    PubMed

    Pak, Alireza; Lesage, Denis; Gimbert, Yves; Vékey, Károly; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2008-04-01

    The internal energy of ions and the timescale play fundamental roles in mass spectrometry. The main objective of this study is to estimate and compare the internal energy distributions of different ions (different nature, degree of freedom 'DOF' and fragmentations) produced in an electrospray source (ESI) of a triple-quadrupole instrument (Quattro I Micromass). These measurements were performed using both the Survival Yield method (as proposed by De Pauw) and the MassKinetics software (kinetic model introduced by Vékey). The internal energy calibration is the preliminary step for ESI and collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra calculation. meta-Methyl-benzylpyridinium ion and four protonated peptides (YGGFL, LDIFSDF, LDIFSDFR and RLDIFSDF) were produced using an electrospray source. These ions were used as thermometer probe compounds. Cone voltages (V(c)) were linearly correlated with the mean internal energy values () carried by desolvated ions. These mean internal energy values seem to be slightly dependent on the size of the studied ion. ESI mass spectra and CID spectra were then simulated using the MassKinetics software to propose an empirical equation for the mean internal energy () versus cone voltage (V(c)) for different source temperatures (T): < E(int) > = [405 x 10(-6) - 480 x 10(-9) (DOF)] V(c)T + E(therm)(T). In this equation, the E(therm)(T) parameter is the mean internal energy due to the source temperature at 0 V(c).

  4. Non-Adiabatic Holonomic Quantum Gates in an atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.; Sjoqvist, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Quantum computation is essentially the implementation of a universal set of quantum gate operations on a set of qubits, which is reliable in the presence of noise. We propose a scheme to perform robust gates in an atomic four-level system using the idea of non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation proposed in [1]. The gates are realized by applying sequences of short laser pulses that drive transitions between the four energy levels in such a way that the dynamical phases vanish. [4pt] [1] E. Sjoqvist, D.M. Tong, B. Hessmo, M. Johansson, K. Singh, arXiv:1107.5127v2 [quant-ph

  5. Adiabatic invariants in stellar dynamics. 2: Gravitational shocking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    A new theory of gravitational shocking based on time-dependent perturbation theory shows that the changes in energy and angular momentum due to a slowly varying disturbance are not exponentially small for stellar dynamical systems in general. It predicts significant shock heating by slowly varying perturbations previously thought to be negligible according to the adiabatic criterion. The theory extends the scenarios traditionally computed only with the impulse approximation and is applicable to a wide class of disturbances. The approach is applied specifically to the problem of disk shocking of star clusters.

  6. Detection of High Energy Cosmic Ray with the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazely, Ali R.

    2003-01-01

    ATIC is a balloon-borne investigation of cosmic ray spectra, from below 50 GeV to near 100 TeV total energy, using a fully active Bismuth Gemmate (BGO) calorimeter. It is equipped with the first large area mosaic of small fully depleted silicon detector pixels capable of charge identification in cosmic rays from H to Fe. As a redundancy check for the charge identification and a coarse particle tracking system, three projective layers of x-y scintillator hodoscopes were employed, above, in the center and below a Carbon interaction 'target'. Very high energy gamma-rays and their energy spectrum may provide insight to the flux of extremely high energy neutrinos which will be investigated in detail with several proposed cubic kilometer scale neutrino observatories in the next decade.

  7. Ionization Energies and Aqueous Redox Potentials of Organic Molecules: Comparison of DFT, Correlated ab Initio Theory and Pair Natural Orbital Approaches.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, Miho; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-05-10

    The calculation of redox potentials involves large energetic terms arising from gas phase ionization energies, thermodynamic contributions, and solvation energies of the reduced and oxidized species. In this work we study the performance of a wide range of wave function and density functional theory methods for the prediction of ionization energies and aqueous one-electron oxidation potentials of a set of 19 organic molecules. Emphasis is placed on evaluating methods that employ the computationally efficient local pair natural orbital (LPNO) approach, as well as several implementations of coupled cluster theory and explicitly correlated F12 methods. The electronic energies are combined with implicit solvation models for the solvation energies. With the exception of MP2 and its variants, which suffer from enormous errors arising at least partially from the poor Hartree-Fock reference, ionization energies can be systematically predicted with average errors below 0.1 eV for most of the correlated wave function based methods studies here, provided basis set extrapolation is performed. LPNO methods are the most efficient way to achieve this type of accuracy. DFT methods show in general larger errors and suffer from inconsistent behavior. The only exception is the M06-2X functional which is found to be competitive with the best LPNO-based approaches for ionization energies. Importantly, the limiting factor for the calculation of accurate redox potentials is the solvation energy. The errors in the predicted solvation energies by all continuum solvation models tested in this work dominate the final computed reduction potential, resulting in average errors typically in excess of 0.3 V and hence obscuring the gains that arise from choosing a more accurate electronic structure method.

  8. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of sequential three-photon triple ionization of neon at 90.5 eV photon energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rouzee, A.; Siu, W.; Huismans, Y.; Johnsson, P.; Gryzlova, E. V.; Fukuzawa, H.; Yamada, A.; Ueda, K.; Louis, E.; Bijkerk, F.; Holland, D. M. P.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-03-15

    Multiple photoionization of neon atoms by a strong 13.7 nm (90.5 eV) laser pulse has been studied at the FLASH free electron laser in Hamburg. A velocity map imaging spectrometer was used to record angle-resolved photoelectron spectra on a single-shot basis. Analysis of the evolution of the spectra with the FEL pulse energy in combination with extensive theoretical calculations allows the ionization pathways that contribute to be assigned, revealing the occurrence of sequential three-photon triple ionization.

  9. Diffuse, Warm Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, L. M.

    2002-05-01

    Over the past decade, new high-sensitivity observations have significantly advanced our knowledge of the diffuse, ionized gas in spiral galaxies. This component of the interstellar medium, often referred to as Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) or Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG), plays an important role in the complex stellar-interstellar matter and energy cycle. In examining the distribution and physical properties of this gas, we learn not only about the conditions of the medium but also about processes providing heating and ionization in the halos of spiral galaxies. For the Milky Way, three new Hα surveys are available providing large sky coverage, arc-minute spatial resolution, and the ability to kinematically resolve this prominent optical emission line. These new, global views show that the Warm Ionized Medium of the Galaxy is ubiquitous as previously suspected, is rich with filamentary structure down to current resolution limits, and can be traced into the halo at large distances from the Galactic plane. Observations of additional optical emission lines are beginning to probe the physical conditions of the WIM. Early results suggest variations in the temperature and ionization state of the gas which are not adequately explained by Lyman continuum stellar photoionization alone. In parallel with this intensive work in the Milky Way have been numerous studies about the diffuse, ionized gas in other spiral galaxies. Here, deep, face-on spiral investigations provide some of the best maps of the global DIG distribution in a galaxy and begin to allow a probe of the local link between star formation and the powering of ionized gas. In addition, ionized gas has been traced out to impressive distances (z > 3 kpc) in edge-on spirals, revealing out large-scale changes in the physical conditions and kinematics of galactic halos.

  10. Evidence for high-energy and low-emittance electron beams using ionization injection of charge in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Welch, E. C.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-03-01

    Ionization injection in a plasma wakefield accelerator was investigated experimentally using two lithium plasma sources of different lengths. The ionization of the helium gas, used to confine the lithium, injects electrons in the wake. After acceleration, these injected electrons are observed as a distinct group from the drive beam on the energy spectrometer. They typically have a charge of tens of pC, an energy spread of a few GeV, and a maximum energy of up to 30 GeV. The emittance of this group of electrons can be many times smaller than the initial emittance of the drive beam. The energy scaling for the trapped charge from one plasma length to the other is consistent with the blowout theory of the plasma wakefield.

  11. Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston.

    PubMed

    Munakata, T; Ogawa, H

    2001-09-01

    Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston are investigated, based on the mass ratio expansion of the master equation for the piston velocity distribution function. Simple theory for piston motion and relaxation of an ideal gas in a cylinder turns out to reproduce our numerical experiments quantitatively.

  12. Adiabatic reversible compression: a molecular view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, E. N.

    2002-07-01

    The adiabatic compression (or expansion) of an ideal gas has been analysed. Using the kinetic theory of gases the usual relation between temperature and volume is obtained, while textbooks follow a thermodynamic approach. In this way we show, once again, the agreement between a macroscopic view (thermodynamics) and a microscopic one (kinetic theory).

  13. Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, Toyonori; Ogawa, Hideki

    2001-09-01

    Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston are investigated, based on the mass ratio expansion of the master equation for the piston velocity distribution function. Simple theory for piston motion and relaxation of an ideal gas in a cylinder turns out to reproduce our numerical experiments quantitatively.

  14. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  15. Time dependence of adiabatic particle number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Robert; Dunne, Gerald V.

    2016-09-01

    We consider quantum field theoretic systems subject to a time-dependent perturbation, and discuss the question of defining a time-dependent particle number not just at asymptotic early and late times, but also during the perturbation. Naïvely, this is not a well-defined notion for such a nonequilibrium process, as the particle number at intermediate times depends on a basis choice of reference states with respect to which particles and antiparticles are defined, even though the final late-time particle number is independent of this basis choice. The basis choice is associated with a particular truncation of the adiabatic expansion. The adiabatic expansion is divergent, and we show that if this divergent expansion is truncated at its optimal order, a universal time dependence is obtained, confirming a general result of Dingle and Berry. This optimally truncated particle number provides a clear picture of quantum interference effects for perturbations with nontrivial temporal substructure. We illustrate these results using several equivalent definitions of adiabatic particle number: the Bogoliubov, Riccati, spectral function and Schrödinger picture approaches. In each approach, the particle number may be expressed in terms of the tiny deviations between the exact and adiabatic solutions of the Ermakov-Milne equation for the associated time-dependent oscillators.

  16. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  17. Adiabatic Mass Parameters for Spontaneous Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Sheikh, J. A.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2009-01-01

    The collective mass tensor derived from the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory, perturbative cranking approximation, and the Gaussian overlap approximation to the generator-coordinate method is discussed. Illustrative calculations are carried out for ^{252}Fm using the nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme interaction SkM* and seniority pairing.

  18. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  19. Assessment of the adiabatic transformability hypothesis in a ball-bouncing task. mbrodel@freewwweb.com.

    PubMed

    Broderick, M P; Pavis, B; Newell, K M

    2000-05-01

    The adiabatic transformability hypothesis for non-conservative, non-rate-limited biological systems put forward by Kugler and Turvey [Kugler PN, Turvey MT (1987) Information, natural law, and the self-assembly of rhythmic movements, Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ] is evaluated in a ball-bouncing task as a function of skill level. We hypothesized that, when a basketball player increases or decreases the frequency of his limb motion in a vertical ball-bouncing task, the transformation should be characterized as adiabatic. Confirmation of this hypothesis would lend support to the body of knowledge that suggests that physical-biological laws guide the behavior of people engaged in motor tasks, including their acquisition of skill. We videotaped and analyzed four participants - two intermediates and two experts - bouncing a ball from various heights, and measured the energy and kinematic relations of the ball and the participants' body segments. The task presents a challenge to certain predictions of the adiabatic hypothesis in evaluating changes in movement velocity (v) or frequency (f), and energy as adiabatic transformations. Among these are the constant relation between kinetic energy (Ek) per cycle and v, constancy of energy dissipated per cycle (Et) over changes in v and Ek, the ratio of Ek to Et per cycle (the "Q" values), and the relation of amplitude to v. From our observations, which are examined in regard to the insights of Kugler and Turvey about the relation of Ehrenfest's adiabatic theorem to biological systems, we confirm the basic adiabatic character of the task in analyzing both the ball alone and the relations of various body segments. In the segmental frame of reference, we found evidence of differences in energy-kinematic relations in the Q values between skill levels.

  20. ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION (ESI) FRAGMENTATIONS AND DIMETHYLDIOXIRANE REACTIVITIES OF THREE DIVERSE LACTAMS HAVING FULL, HALF, AND ZERO RESONANCE ENERGIES

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Kathleen M.; Ashline, David J.; Morgan, Jessica P.; Greenberg, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Three lactams having respectively ~20 kcal/mol, ~10 kcal/mol, and 0 kcal/mol of resonance energy have been subjected to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) as well as to attempted reaction with dimethyldioxirane (DMDO). The ESI/MS for all three lactams are consistent with fragmentation from the N-protonated, rather than the O-protonated tautomer. Each exhibits a unique fragmentation pathway. DFT calculations are employed to provide insights concerning these pathways. N-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinone and 1-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-2-one, the full- and half-resonance lactams, are unreactive with DMDO. The “Kirby lactam” (3,5,7-trimethyl-1-azaadamantan-2-one), has zero resonance energy and reacts rapidly with DMDO to generate a mixture of reaction products. The structure assigned to one of these is the 2,2-dihydroxy-N-oxide, thought to be stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding and buttressing by the methyl substituents. A reasonable pathway to this derivative might involve formation of an extremely labile N-oxide, in a purely formal sense an example of the hithertounknown amide N-oxides, followed by hydration with traces of moisture. PMID:24313276

  1. Determination of absorbed dose in high-energy electron and photon radiation by means of an uncalibrated ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Klevenhagen, S C

    1991-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a dosimetric method based on an ionization chamber which has an uncalibrated sensitive volume but which behaves as a Bragg-Gray cavity in high-energy radiation. The new type of chamber developed in the course of this study has a variable volume and is constructed from water-similar materials. It can be used in a water phantom directly in a beam of a therapy megavoltage machine under clinical conditions. The chamber allows absorbed dose to be determined from first principles, overcoming many of the problems encountered with conventional dosimetry based on calibrated chambers. The study involved an intercomparison of the performance of the new chamber in high-energy electron and photon radiation with the conventional calibrated chambers employed according to the established dosimetry protocols. Good agreement was found between these dosimetric methods and it may therefore be concluded that the method developed in this work can be successfully employed for absolute dosimetry. The new chamber is a promising device for research in various aspects of dosimetry.

  2. Low-Energy Structures in Strong Field Ionization Revealed by Quantum Orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Tian-Min; Popruzhenko, S. V.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Bauer, D.

    2010-12-17

    Experiments on atoms in intense laser pulses and the corresponding exact ab initio solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) yield photoelectron spectra with low-energy features that are not reproduced by the otherwise successful work horse of strong field laser physics: the 'strong field approximation' (SFA). In the semiclassical limit, the SFA possesses an appealing interpretation in terms of interfering quantum trajectories. It is shown that a conceptually simple extension towards the inclusion of Coulomb effects yields very good agreement with exact TDSE results. Moreover, the Coulomb quantum orbits allow for a physically intuitive interpretation and detailed analysis of all low-energy features in the semiclassical regime, in particular, the recently discovered 'low-energy structure' [C. I. Blaga et al., Nature Phys. 5, 335 (2009) and W. Quan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 093001 (2009)].

  3. Energy levels and transition probabilities in doubly-ionized erbium (Er III).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyart, J.-F.; Blaise, J.; Bidelman, W. P.; Cowley, C. R.

    1997-11-01

    The spectrum of Er III reported by Becher (1966) was reanalysed with the support of new predictions of energies and transition probabilities. The number of energy levels was increased from 45 to 115, including two levels of 4f117s and the levels 3F3, 3F2 and 1G4 of the ground configuration 4f12. All 470 classified lines are reported with transition probabilities for most of them. Several of these lines had not yet been attributed to Er III in the spectrum of the star HR 465.

  4. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane

    SciTech Connect

    Sayres, Scott G.; Ross, Matt W.; Castleman, A. W. Jr.

    2010-09-15

    The ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane is examined here with laser intensities ranging between 7x10{sup 12} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} at 624 nm. The ionization potential of silane determined using both multiphoton ionization (MPI) and tunneling ionization (TI) models agrees with the vertical ionization potential of the molecule. In addition, the application of the tunneling ionization model is extended here to the fragments of silane to determine their appearance potentials. MPI values for SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, SiH{sub 2}{sup +}, SiH{sup +}, Si{sup +}, as well as H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are consistent with vertical potentials, whereas the TI measurements are found to be in accord with adiabatic potentials. The tunneling appearance potentials observed for the fragments H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are lower than reported for other techniques. In fact, the appearance potential measurements for these species resulting from silane are lower than their ionization potentials. The fragmentation rate of silane is determined to be nearly 20 times larger than the ionization rate. The main precursor for producing amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, SiH{sub 3}{sup +} is the dominant fragmentation product making up roughly a third of the total ion yield, a substantial increase from other techniques.

  5. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  6. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  7. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  8. Selective excitation in a three-state system using a hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yunheung; Lee, Han-gyeol; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-08-01

    The chirped-pulse interaction in the adiabatic coupling regime induces cyclic permutations of the energy states of a three-level system in the V -type configuration, which process is known as the three-level chirped rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Here we show that a spectral hole in a chirped pulse can turn on or off the level mixing at adiabatic crossing points of this process, reducing the system to an effective two-level system. The given hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic transition enables selective excitation of the three-level system, controlled by the laser intensity and spectral position of the hole, as well as the sign of the chirp parameter. Experiments performed with shaped femtosecond laser pulses and the three lowest energy levels (5 S1 /2 , 5 P1 /2 , and 5 P3 /2 ) of atomic rubidium (Rb) show good agreement with the theoretically analyzed dynamics. The result indicates that our method, when being combined with the ordinary chirped RAP, implements an adiabatic transition between the Raman-coupled excited states. Furthermore, our laser intensity-dependent control may have applications including selective excitations of atoms or ions arranged in space when being used in conjunction with laser beam profile programming.

  9. An (e, 2e + ion) study of low-energy electron-impact ionization and fragmentation of tetrahydrofuran with high mass and energy resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xueguang Pflüger, Thomas; Weyland, Marvin; Baek, Woon Yoon; Rabus, Hans; Ullrich, Joachim; Dorn, Alexander

    2014-10-07

    We study the low-energy (E{sub 0} = 26 eV) electron-impact induced ionization and fragmentation of tetrahydrofuran using a reaction microscope. All three final-state charged particles, i.e., two outgoing electrons and one fragment ion, are detected in triple coincidence such that the momentum vectors and, consequently, the kinetic energies for charged reaction products are determined. The ionic fragments are clearly identified in the experiment with a mass resolution of 1 amu. The fragmentation pathways of tetrahydrofuran are investigated by measuring the ion kinetic energy spectra and the binding energy spectra where an energy resolution of 1.5 eV has been achieved using the recently developed photoemission electron source. Here, we will discuss the fragmentation reactions for the cations C{sub 4}H{sub 8}O{sup +}, C{sub 4}H{sub 7}O{sup +}, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}, CH{sub 3}O{sup +}, CHO{sup +}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 3}{sup +}.

  10. Double-electron capture by highly-ionized atoms isolated at very low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Dreiling, Joan M.; Sahiner, Arda; Tan, Joseph N.

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange with background gases, also known as electron capture processes, is important in the study of comets, controlled fusion energy, anti-matter atoms, and proposed one-electron ions in Rydberg states. However, there are few experiments in the very low energy regime that could be useful for further theoretical development. At NIST, highly-charged ions extracted from an electron-beam ion trap can be isolated with energy < 10 eV in a compact Penning trap. By controlling the background gas pressure and composition, the charge exchange rates can be studied. Fully stripped neon or other ions are held in the trap for varying lengths of time and allowed to interact with different background gases at multiple pressures. The ions are then pulsed to a time-of-flight detector to count the population of each charge state. Analysis using a system of rate equations yields information about the ion cloud expansion and single-electron capture rates. A substantial amount of double-electron capture is also observed. We present the relative rates and discuss the error budget. SFH and JMD were funded by National Research Council Research Associateship Awards during some of this work.

  11. Temperature dependence of electronic eigenenergies in the adiabatic harmonic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncé, S.; Antonius, G.; Gillet, Y.; Boulanger, P.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Marini, A.; Côté, M.; Gonze, X.

    2014-12-01

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon interactions (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is important in many materials. We address it in the adiabatic harmonic approximation, based on first principles (e.g., density-functional theory), from different points of view: directly from atomic position fluctuations or, alternatively, from Janak's theorem generalized to the case where the Helmholtz free energy, including the vibrational entropy, is used. We prove their equivalence, based on the usual form of Janak's theorem and on the dynamical equation. We then also place the Allen-Heine-Cardona (AHC) theory of the renormalization in a first-principles context. The AHC theory relies on the rigid-ion approximation, and naturally leads to a self-energy (Fan) contribution and a Debye-Waller contribution. Such a splitting can also be done for the complete harmonic adiabatic expression, in which the rigid-ion approximation is not required. A numerical study within the density-functional perturbation theory framework allows us to compare the AHC theory with frozen-phonon calculations, with or without the rigid-ion approximation. For the two different numerical approaches without non-rigid-ion terms, the agreement is better than 7 μ eV in the case of diamond, which represent an agreement to five significant digits. The magnitude of the non-rigid-ion terms in this case is also presented, distinguishing specific phonon modes contributions to different electronic eigenenergies.

  12. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  13. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  14. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  15. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons in partially ionized dense semiclassical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N. Shalenov, E. O.; Ramazanov, T. S.

    2015-08-15

    Elastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in a dense semiclassical hydrogen plasma for low impact energies has been studied. Differential scattering cross sections were calculated within the effective model of electron-atom interaction taking into account the effect of screening as well as the quantum mechanical effect of diffraction. The calculations were carried out on the basis of the phase-function method. The influence of the diffraction effect on the Ramsauer–Townsend effect was studied on the basis of a comparison with results made within the effective polarization model of the Buckingham type.

  16. Growth of CdTe on Si(100) surface by ionized cluster beam technique: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araghi, Houshang; Zabihi, Zabiholah; Nayebi, Payman; Ehsani, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    II-VI semiconductor CdTe was grown on the Si(100) substrate surface by the ionized cluster beam (ICB) technique. In the ICB method, when vapors of solid materials such as CdTe were ejected through a nozzle of a heated crucible into a vacuum region, nanoclusters were created by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon. The clusters thus obtained were partially ionized by electron bombardment and then accelerated onto the silicon substrate at 473 K by high potentials. The cluster size was determined using a retarding field energy analyzer. The results of X-ray diffraction measurements indicate the cubic zinc blende (ZB) crystalline structure of the CdTe thin film on the silicon substrate. The CdTe thin film prepared by the ICB method had high crystalline quality. The microscopic processes involved in the ICB deposition technique, such as impact and coalescence processes, have been studied in detail by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation.

  17. Bimolecular recombination reactions: K-adiabatic and K-active forms of the bimolecular master equations and analytic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaderi, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Expressions for a K-adiabatic master equation for a bimolecular recombination rate constant krec are derived for a bimolecular reaction forming a complex with a single well or complexes with multiple well, where K is the component of the total angular momentum along the axis of least moment of inertia of the recombination product. The K-active master equation is also considered. The exact analytic solutions, i.e., the K-adiabatic and K-active steady-state population distribution function of reactive complexes, g(EJK) and g(EJ), respectively, are derived for the K-adiabatic and K-active master equation cases using properties of inhomogeneous integral equations (Fredholm type). The solutions accommodate arbitrary intermolecular energy transfer models, e.g., the single exponential, double exponential, Gaussian, step-ladder, and near-singularity models. At the high pressure limit, the krec for both the K-adiabatic and K-active master equations reduce, respectively, to the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory (high pressure limit expressions). Ozone and its formation from O + O2 are known to exhibit an adiabatic K. The ratio of the K-adiabatic to the K-active recombination rate constants for ozone formation at the high pressure limit is calculated to be ˜0.9 at 300 K. Results on the temperature and pressure dependence of the recombination rate constants and populations of O3 will be presented elsewhere.

  18. Bimolecular recombination reactions: K-adiabatic and K-active forms of the bimolecular master equations and analytic solutions.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Nima

    2016-03-28

    Expressions for a K-adiabatic master equation for a bimolecular recombination rate constant krec are derived for a bimolecular reaction forming a complex with a single well or complexes with multiple well, where K is the component of the total angular momentum along the axis of least moment of inertia of the recombination product. The K-active master equation is also considered. The exact analytic solutions, i.e., the K-adiabatic and K-active steady-state population distribution function of reactive complexes, g(EJK) and g(EJ), respectively, are derived for the K-adiabatic and K-active master equation cases using properties of inhomogeneous integral equations (Fredholm type). The solutions accommodate arbitrary intermolecular energy transfer models, e.g., the single exponential, double exponential, Gaussian, step-ladder, and near-singularity models. At the high pressure limit, the krec for both the K-adiabatic and K-active master equations reduce, respectively, to the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory (high pressure limit expressions). Ozone and its formation from O + O2 are known to exhibit an adiabatic K. The ratio of the K-adiabatic to the K-active recombination rate constants for ozone formation at the high pressure limit is calculated to be ∼0.9 at 300 K. Results on the temperature and pressure dependence of the recombination rate constants and populations of O3 will be presented elsewhere. PMID:27036434

  19. Large-scale relativistic calculations of ionization energies and total binding energies of all atoms and positive atomic ions with nuclear charge Z = 1-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, Alexander; Froese Fischer, Charlotte; Reader, Joseph; Indelicato, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The latest versions of advanced multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock atomic codes, MCDFGME and Grasp2K, are used to calculate ionization energies (IE) and total binding energies of all atomic systems. Comparison with experiment and other benchmark data shows an excellent accuracy achieved in these calculations for H-, He-, and Li-like ions. In particular, our results for H-like ions with Z >2, obtained with the MCDFGME code, are the most accurate available today. For multi-electron ions, we combine the accurate single-configuration MCDFGME calculations with the correlation-difference energy (difference between the multiconfiguration and single-configuration total energies) calculated with Grasp2K. This approach results in a dramatically improved agreement of calculated IEs with experiment (less than 0.7 eV on average) for all systems, excluding those involving open f-shells. The most probable ground states are found for most systems, leaving questionable only about 100 out of total 6105 considered systems.

  20. Multiple ionization of helium and krypton by electron impact close to threshold: appearance energies and Wannier exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denifl, S.; Gstir, B.; Hanel, G.; Feketeova, L.; Matejcik, S.; Becker, K.; Stamatovic, A.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2002-11-01

    We determined appearance energy (AE) values AE(Xn+/X) for the formation of singly (He+) and doubly charged (He2+) He ions and multiply charged Kr ions Krn+ up to n = 6 following electron impact on He and Kr atoms using a high-resolution electron impact ionization mass spectrometer. The data analysis employs an iterative, non-linear least-squares fitting routine, the Marquart-Levenberg algorithm, in conjunction with either a 2-function or a 3-function fit based on a power threshold law. This allows us to extract the relevant AEs and also the corresponding exponents for a Wannier-type power law from the measured near-threshold data. The values of the AEs determined in this work are compared with other available experimental and with spectroscopic AE values and the extracted exponents p are compared with other available experimental data and with the predictions of the various Wannier-type power law models. One observation is particularly noteworthy, namely the fact that none of the available experimental data seem to support the large values of 'p' predicted by the Wannier-Geltman and the generalized Wannier law for n > 3.

  1. Electron impact multiple ionization of neon, argon and xenon atoms close to threshold: appearance energies and Wannier exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gstir, B.; Denifl, S.; Hanel, G.; Rümmele, M.; Fiegele, T.; Cicman, P.; Stano, M.; Matejcik, S.; Scheier, P.; Becker, K.; Stamatovic, A.; Märk, T. D.

    2002-07-01

    We report the results of the experimental determination of the appearance energy values AE(Xn + /X) for the formation of multiply charged Ne, Ar and Xe ions up to n = 4 (Ne), n = 6 (Ar) and n = 8 (Xe) following electron impact on Ne, Ar and Xe atoms using a dedicated high-resolution electron impact ionization mass spectrometer. The data analysis uses the Marquart-Levenberg algorithm, which is an iterative, nonlinear least-squares-fitting routine, in conjunction with either a two-function or a three-function fit based on a power threshold law. This allows us to extract the relevant AEs and corresponding exponents for a Wannier-type power law from the measured near-threshold data. The values of the AEs determined in this work are compared with other available experimental and spectroscopic values of the AEs and the extracted exponents are compared with other available experimental data and with the predictions of the various Wannier-type power law models.

  2. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of jet cooled benzo[a]pyrene from resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Harthcock, Colin; Han, Fangyuan; Kong, Wei

    2011-12-01

    We report zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). Our analysis concentrates on the vibrational modes of the first excited state (S1) and those of the ground cationic state (D0). Similar to pyrene, another peri-condensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon we have investigated, the first two electronically excited states of BaP exhibit extensive configuration interactions. However, the two electronic states are of the same symmetry, hence vibronic coupling does not introduce any out-of-plane modes in the REMPI spectrum, and Franck-Condon analysis is qualitatively satisfactory. The ZEKE spectra from the in-plane modes observed in the REMPI spectrum demonstrate strong propensity in preserving the vibrational excitation of the intermediate state. Although several additional bands in combination with the vibrational mode of the intermediate state are identifiable, they are much lower in intensity. This observation implies that the molecular structure of BaP has a tremendous capability to accommodate changes in charge density. All observed bands of the cation are IR active, establishing the role of ZEKE spectroscopy in mapping out far infrared bands for astrophysical applications.

  3. Computation of the atomic radii through the conjoint action of the effective nuclear charge and the ionization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Gazi, Kamarujjaman; Ghosh, Dulal C.

    2010-08-01

    A new ansatz for computing the absolute radii (r) of the atoms based upon the conjoint action of two periodic properties namely, ionization energy (I) and effective nuclear charge (Zeff ) is proposed as r = a(1/I) + b(1/Zeff ) + c, where a, b and c are constants, determined by regression analysis. The ansatz is invoked to calculate sizes of atoms of 103 elements of the periodic table. In the absence of any benchmark to perform a validity test of any set of atomic size, reliance is upon the 'sine qua non' of a set of atomic size. The express periodicity of periods and groups exhibited by the computed size data, d and f block contraction and the manifest relativistic effect in the sizes of lanthanoids and actinoids, etc. speak volumes for the efficacy of the present method. Furthermore, size data have been linked to compute some physical descriptors of the real world, such as equilibrium internuclear distances of a good number of heteronuclear diatomic molecules as validity test. A comparative study of the theoretical vis-à-vis experimental equilibrium inter-nuclear distances reveals that there is close agreement between the theoretical prediction and experimental determination.

  4. Multiply-ionized atoms isolated at low energy in a unitary Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Joseph N. Hoogerheide, Shannon Fogwell Guise, Nicholas D.; Brewer, Samuel M.

    2015-01-09

    Ions extracted from the EBIT at NIST are slowed and captured in a Penning trap that is made very compact (< 150 cm{sup 3}) by a unitary architecture [1]. Measurements after 1 ms of ion storage indicate that the isolated ions are distributed with 5.5(5) eV of energy spread, which is roughly 2 orders of magnitude lower than expected in the ion source, without implementing any active cooling [2]. Some experiments are discussed. One goal is to produce one-electron ions in high angular momentum states for studying optical transitions between Rydberg states that could potentially enable new tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED) and determinations of fundamental constants [3].

  5. Atomic ionization by intense laser pulses of short duration: Photoelectron energy and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Dondera, M.

    2010-11-15

    We introduce an adequate integral representation of the wave function in the asymptotic region, valid for the stage postinteraction between a one-electron atom and a laser pulse of short duration, as a superposition of divergent radial spherical waves. Starting with this representation, we derive analytic expressions for the energy and angular distributions of the photoelectrons and we show their connection with expressions used before in the literature. Using our results, we propose a method to extract the photoelectron distributions from the time dependence of the wave function at large distances. Numerical results illustrating the method are presented for the photoionization of hydrogenlike atoms from the ground state and several excited states by extreme ultraviolet pulses with a central wavelength of 13.3 nm and several intensities around the value I{sub 0}{approx_equal}3.51x10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Adiabatic theory of the linear hose instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating in resistive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the cold Vlasov beam, the circle-limit of the warm Vlasov beam, the spread-mass model, and the energy-group model of a relativistic electron beam undergoing linear hose instability, are all formally equivalent. Therefore, the circle-orbit beam is the natural starting point for a higher order theory. Introducing the next order in non-circularity the author makes contact with the adiabatic theory for warm beams. The adiabatic theory is founded upon the existence of transverse action invariants that remain sufficiently well-defined, despite the nonaxisymmetric potential and the coupling resonances driven by linear hose instability. The existence of action invariants enables the elimination of a fast variable, analogous to gyro-motion, called vortex-gyration. One problem with adiabatic beam theory is that coupling resonances between the degrees of freedom could destroy the adiabatic invariants upon which the theory rests. KAM theory is employed here to study the destruction of action invariants due to linear hose instability. Nonaxisymmetric adiabatic beams are defined to be those for which KAM tori exist in the transverse phase space. For hose deflections of the magnitude considered in linear theory, KAM tori persist, preventing the destruction of the invariants.

  7. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  8. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  9. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-01

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  10. Adiabatic Heating of Contracting Turbulent Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Goldreich, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Turbulence influences the behavior of many astrophysical systems, frequently by providing non-thermal pressure support through random bulk motions. Although turbulence is commonly studied in systems with constant volume and mean density, turbulent astrophysical gases often expand or contract under the influence of pressure or gravity. Here, we examine the behavior of turbulence in contracting volumes using idealized models of compressed gases. Employing numerical simulations and an analytical model, we identify a simple mechanism by which the turbulent motions of contracting gases "adiabatically heat," experiencing an increase in their random bulk velocities until the largest eddies in the gas circulate over a Hubble time of the contraction. Adiabatic heating provides a mechanism for sustaining turbulence in gases where no large-scale driving exists. We describe this mechanism in detail and discuss some potential applications to turbulence in astrophysical settings.

  11. ADIABATIC HEATING OF CONTRACTING TURBULENT FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brant; Goldreich, Peter

    2012-05-10

    Turbulence influences the behavior of many astrophysical systems, frequently by providing non-thermal pressure support through random bulk motions. Although turbulence is commonly studied in systems with constant volume and mean density, turbulent astrophysical gases often expand or contract under the influence of pressure or gravity. Here, we examine the behavior of turbulence in contracting volumes using idealized models of compressed gases. Employing numerical simulations and an analytical model, we identify a simple mechanism by which the turbulent motions of contracting gases 'adiabatically heat', experiencing an increase in their random bulk velocities until the largest eddies in the gas circulate over a Hubble time of the contraction. Adiabatic heating provides a mechanism for sustaining turbulence in gases where no large-scale driving exists. We describe this mechanism in detail and discuss some potential applications to turbulence in astrophysical settings.

  12. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  13. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  14. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  15. An Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Ionization Energies of Polyynes (H-(C≡C) n -H; n = 1-9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Sun, Bian Jian; Mao Lin, Hong; Chang, Agnes H. H.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-08-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical work on the ionization energies of polyacetylene-organic molecules considered as important building blocks to form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in protoplanetary nebulae such as CRL 618. This set of astrophysical data can be utilized with significant confidence in future astrochemical models of photon-dominated regions and also of the protoplanetary nebulae CRL 618. We recommend ionization energies of polyacetylenes from diacetylene up to heptaacetylene with an experimental accuracy of ±0.05 eV: 10.03 eV (diacetylene), 9.45 eV (triacetylene), 9.08 eV (tetraacetylene), 8.75 eV (pentaacetylene), 8.65 eV (hexaacetylene), and 8.50 eV (heptaacetylene). Further, ionization energies with an accuracy of ±0.1 eV: 8.32 eV (octaacetylene) and 8.24 eV (nonaacetylene), were computed. Implications of these energies to the redox chemistry involved in the multiply charged metal-ion mediated chemistry of hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan are also discussed.

  16. AN EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDY ON THE IONIZATION ENERGIES OF POLYYNES (H-(C{identical_to}C) {sub n} -H; n = 1-9)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Sun Bianjian; Lin Hongmao; Chang, Agnes H. H.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-08-20

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical work on the ionization energies of polyacetylene-organic molecules considered as important building blocks to form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in protoplanetary nebulae such as CRL 618. This set of astrophysical data can be utilized with significant confidence in future astrochemical models of photon-dominated regions and also of the protoplanetary nebulae CRL 618. We recommend ionization energies of polyacetylenes from diacetylene up to heptaacetylene with an experimental accuracy of {+-}0.05 eV: 10.03 eV (diacetylene), 9.45 eV (triacetylene), 9.08 eV (tetraacetylene), 8.75 eV (pentaacetylene), 8.65 eV (hexaacetylene), and 8.50 eV (heptaacetylene). Further, ionization energies with an accuracy of {+-}0.1 eV: 8.32 eV (octaacetylene) and 8.24 eV (nonaacetylene), were computed. Implications of these energies to the redox chemistry involved in the multiply charged metal-ion mediated chemistry of hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan are also discussed.

  17. An Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Ionization Energies of Polyynes (H-(C = C)n-H; n = 1 - 9)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Sun, Bian Jian; Lin, Hong Mao; Chang, Agnes H. H.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-05-17

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical work on the ionization energies of polyacetylene -- organic molecules considered as important building blocks to form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the proto planetary nebulae such as of CRL 618. This set of astrophysical data can be utilized with significant confidence in future astrochemical models of photon-dominated regions and also of the proto planetary nebulae CRL 618. We recommend ionization energies of polyacetylenes from diacetylene up to heptaacetylene with an experimental accuracy of +- 0.05 eV: 10.03 eV (diacetylene), 9.45 eV (triacetylene), 9.08 eV (tetraacetylene), 8.75 eV (pentaacetylene), 8.65 eV (hexaacetylene), and 8.50 eV (heptaacetylene); further, ionization energies and with an accuracy of +- 0.1 eV: 8.32 eV (octaacetylene) and 8.24 eV (nonaacetylene) were computed. Implications of these energies to the redox chemistry involved in the multiply charged metal-ion mediated chemistry of hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan are also discussed.

  18. Study of dust particle charging in weakly ionized inert gases taking into account the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Dyatko, N. A.; Kostenko, A. S.

    2014-11-15

    The charging of dust particles in weakly ionized inert gases at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The conditions under which the gas is ionized by an external source, a beam of fast electrons, are considered. The electron energy distribution function in argon, krypton, and xenon has been calculated for three rates of gas ionization by fast electrons: 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14}, and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −1}. A model of dust particle charging with allowance for the nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function in the region of strong plasma quasi-neutrality violation around the dust particle is described. The nonlocality is taken into account in an approximation where the distribution function is a function of only the total electron energy. Comparative calculations of the dust particle charge with and without allowance for the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function have been performed. Allowance for the nonlocality is shown to lead to a noticeable increase in the dust particle charge due to the influence of the group of hot electrons from the tail of the distribution function. It has been established that the screening constant virtually coincides with the smallest screening constant determined according to the asymptotic theory of screening with the electron transport and recombination coefficients in an unperturbed plasma.

  19. Collisional and Radiative Processes in Adiabatic Deceleration, Deflection, and Off-Axis Trapping of a Rydberg Atom Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Seiler, Ch.; Hogan, S. D.; Schmutz, H.; Agner, J. A.; Merkt, F.

    2011-02-18

    A supersonic beam of Rydberg hydrogen atoms has been adiabatically deflected by 90 deg., decelerated to zero velocity in less than 25 {mu}s, and loaded into an electric trap. The deflection has allowed the suppression of collisions with atoms in the trailing part of the gas pulse. The processes leading to trap losses, i.e., fluorescence to the ground state, and transitions and ionization induced by blackbody radiation have been monitored over several milliseconds and quantitatively analyzed.

  20. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II - Adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point.

  1. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II. Adiabatic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Montesinos, B.; Thomas, J.H.

    1989-02-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point. 15 references.

  2. Towards disentangling coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics in ultrafast non-adiabatic processes

    PubMed

    Blanchet; Lochbrunner; Schmitt; Shaffer; Larsen; Zgierski; Seideman; Stolow

    2000-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is emerging as a new technique for investigating polyatomic excited state dynamics. Due to the sensitivity of photoelectron spectroscopy to both electronic configurations and vibrational dynamics, it is well suited to the study of non-adiabatic processes such as internal conversion, which often occur on sub-picosecond time scales. We discuss the technical requirements for such experiments, including lasers systems, energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometers and new detectors for coincidence experiments. We present a few examples of these methods applied to problems in diatomic wavepacket dynamics and ultrafast non-adiabatic processes in polyatomic molecules.

  3. Pfaffian statistics through adiabatic transport in the 1D coherent state representation.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    Recent work has shown that the low energy sector of certain quantum Hall states is adiabatically connected to simple charge-density-wave patterns that appear, e.g., when the system is deformed into a thin torus. Here it is shown that the patterns emerging in this limit already determine the non-Abelian statistics of the nu=1 Moore-Read state. Aside from the knowledge of these patterns, the method only relies on the principle of adiabatic continuity, the effectively noncommutative geometry in a strong magnetic field, and topological as well as locality arguments.

  4. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  5. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  6. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-02-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  7. Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Paul C. W.

    2004-01-01

    The research at Houston was focused on optimizing the design of superconducting magnets for advanced adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs), assessing the feasibility of using high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets in ADRs in the future, and developing techniques to deposit HTS thin and thick films on high strength, low thermal conductivity substrates for HTS magnet leads. Several approaches have been tested for the suggested superconducting magnets.

  8. Photo-Double Ionization: Threshold Law and Low-Energy Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand

    2008-01-01

    The threshold law for photoejection of two electrons from atoms (PDI) is derived from a modification of the Coulomb-dipole (C-D) theory. The C-D theory applies to two-electron ejection from negative ions (photo-double detachment:PDD). The modification consists of correctly accounting for the fact that in PDI that the two escaping electrons see a Coulomb field, asymptotically no matter what their relative distances from the residual ion are. We find in the contralinear spherically symmetric model that the analytic threshold law Q(E),i. e. the yield of residual ions, to be Qf(E)approaches E + CwE(sup gamma(w)) + CE(sup 5/4)sin[1/2 ln(E + theta)]/ln(E). The first and third terms are beyond the Wannier law. Our threshold law can only be rigorously justified for residual energies less than or equal to 10(exp -3) eV. Nevertheless in the present experimental range (0.1 - 4 eV), the form, even without the second term, can be fitted to experimental results of PDI for He, Li, and Be, in contrast to the Wannier law which has a larger deviation from the data for Li and Be, for both of which the data show signs of modulation.

  9. Photo-Double Ionization: Threshold Law and Low-Energy Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.

    2007-01-01

    The threshold law for photoejection of two electrons from atoms (PDI) is derived from a modification of the Coulomb-dipole (C-D) theory. The C-D theory applies to two-electron ejection from negative ions (photo-double detachment:PDD). The modification consists of correctly accounting for the fact that in PDI that the two escaping electrons see a Coulomb field, asymptotically no matter what their relative distances from the residual ion are. We find in the contralinear spherically symmetric model that the analytic threshold law Q(E), i.e. the yield of residual ions, to be Q Integral of (E) varies as E + (C(sub w) E(sup gamma W)) +CE(sup 5/4) sin [1/2 ln E + phi]/ln(E). The first and third terms are beyond the Wannier law. Our threshold law can only be rigorously justified for residual energies <= 10(exp -3) eV. Nevertheless in the present experimental range (0.1 - 4 eV), the form, even without the second term, can be fitted to experimental results of PDI for He, Li, and Be, in contrast to the Wannier law which has a larger deviation from the data for Li and Be.

  10. Charge exchange transition probability for collisions between unlike ions and atoms within the adiabatic approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple formula for the transition probability for electron exchange between unlike ions and atoms is established within the adiabatic approximation by employing the Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. The formula also involves an adiabatic parameter, introduced by Massey, and thus the difficulties arising from the internal energy defect and the adiabatic approximation are avoided. Specific reactions Li(+++) + H to Li(++) + H(+) and Be(4+) + H to Be(3+) + H(+) are considered as examples. The calculated capture cross section results of the present work are compared with the experimental data and with the calculation of other authors over the velocity range of 10(7) cm/sec to 10(8) cm/sec.

  11. Non-adiabatic effect in quantum pumping for a spin-boson system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kota L.; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2014-11-01

    We clarify the role of non-adiabatic effects in quantum pumping for a spin-boson system. When we sinusoidally control the temperatures of two reservoirs with π /2 phase difference, we find that the pumping current strongly depends on the initial condition, and thus, the current deviates from that predicted by the adiabatic treatment. We also analytically obtain the contribution of non-adiabatic effects in the pumping current proportional to Ω ^3, where Ω is the angular frequency of the temperature control. The validity of the analytic expression is verified by our numerical calculation. Moreover, we extend the steady heat fluctuation theorem to the case for slowly modulated temperatures and large transferred energies.

  12. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  13. Determination of caloric values of agricultural crops and crop waste by Adiabatic Bomb Calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calorific values of agricultural crops and their waste were measured by adiabatic bomb calorimetry. Sustainable farming techniques require that all potential sources of revenue be utilized. A wide variety of biomass is beginning to be used as alternative fuels all over the world. The energy potentia...

  14. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  15. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  16. Cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with energies up to 1 GeV: Analytical formulas

    SciTech Connect

    Bote, David; Salvat, Francesc Jablonski, Aleksander

    2009-11-15

    Analytical formulas are presented for the easy calculation of cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of neutral atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. Each formula contains a number of parameters that are characteristic of the element, the active electron shell and the projectile particle. The values of these parameters were determined by fitting the cross section values in an extensive database that was calculated recently by means of a composite algorithm that combines the distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations. Tables of parameter values are given for all elements, from hydrogen (Z=1) to einsteinium (Z=99). The proposed analytical expressions yield ionization cross sections that agree with those in the numerical database to within about 1%, except for projectiles with near-threshold energies.

  17. Collision-energy-resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of p-benzoquinone: Study of electronic structure and anisotropic interaction with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Okamura, Kohji; Ohno, Koichi

    2004-06-01

    Collision energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) of p-benzoquinone with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms indicates that interaction potentials between p-benzoquinone and He*(2 3S) are highly anisotropic in the studied collision energy range (100-250 meV). Attractive interactions were found around the C=O groups for in-plane and out-of-plane directions, while repulsive interactions were found around CH bonds and the benzenoid ring. Assignment of the first four ionic states of p-benzoquinone and an analogous methyl-substituted compound was examined with CEDPICS and anisotropic distributions of the corresponding two nonbonding oxygen orbitals (nO+,nO-) and two πCC orbitals (πCC+,πCC-). An extra band that shows negative CEDPICS was observed at ca. 7.2 eV in Penning ionization electron spectrum.

  18. Cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with energies up to 1 GeV: Analytical formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bote, David; Salvat, Francesc; Jablonski, Aleksander; Powell, Cedric J.

    2009-11-01

    Analytical formulas are presented for the easy calculation of cross sections for ionization of K, L and M shells of neutral atoms by impact of electrons and positrons with kinetic energies up to 1 GeV. Each formula contains a number of parameters that are characteristic of the element, the active electron shell and the projectile particle. The values of these parameters were determined by fitting the cross section values in an extensive database that was calculated recently by means of a composite algorithm that combines the distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations. Tables of parameter values are given for all elements, from hydrogen (Z=1) to einsteinium (Z=99). The proposed analytical expressions yield ionization cross sections that agree with those in the numerical database to within about 1%, except for projectiles with near-threshold energies.

  19. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  20. FRW-type cosmologies with adiabatic matter creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Germano, A. S. M.; Abramo, L. R. W.

    1996-04-01

    Some properties of cosmological models with matter creation are investigated in the framework of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker line element. For adiabatic matter creation, as developed by Prigogine and co-workers, we derive a simple expression relating the particle number density n and energy density ρ which holds regardless of the matter creation rate. The conditions to generate inflation are discussed and by considering the natural phenomenological matter creation rate ψ=3βnH, where β is a pure number of the order of unity and H is the Hubble parameter, a minimally modified hot big-bang model is proposed. The dynamic properties of such models can be deduced from the standard ones simply by replacing the adiabatic index γ of the equation of state by an effective parameter γ*=γ(1-β). The thermodynamic behavior is determined and it is also shown that ages large enough to agree with observations are obtained even given the high values of H suggested by recent measurements.

  1. Vertical and adiabatic electronic excitations in biphenylene: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, M. E.; Rebentisch, R.; Hohlneicher, G.; Fülscher, M. P.; Serrano-Andrés, L.; Roos, B. O.

    1997-12-01

    The low-lying singlet states of biphenylene have been studied using ab initio methods. Vertical excitation energies were calculated by multiconfigurational perturbation theory (CASPT2), starting from a complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) reference. The geometries of the most important low-lying excited states were individually optimized at the CASSCF level to study the difference between vertical and adiabatic excitations. Extended atomic natural orbital (ANO)-type basis sets were used to calculate state energies. Geometry optimizations were done with smaller ANO-type basis sets. Excitations from the ground state to the 1 1B3g and 1 1B2u excited singlet states lead to pronounced geometry changes which alter the bond alternation pattern. The theoretical results provide a solid basis for the assignment and interpretation of experimental spectra.

  2. Novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron logic

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Naoki Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2014-03-14

    We herein propose the quantum-flux-latch (QFL) as a novel latch for adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic. A QFL is very compact and compatible with AQFP logic gates and can be read out in one clock cycle. Simulation results revealed that the QFL operates at 5 GHz with wide parameter margins of more than ±22%. The calculated energy dissipation was only ∼0.1 aJ/bit, which yields a small energy delay product of 20 aJ·ps. We also designed shift registers using QFLs to demonstrate more complex circuits with QFLs. Finally, we experimentally demonstrated correct operations of the QFL and a 1-bit shift register (a D flip-flop)

  3. Theoretical determinations of ionization potentials of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. F.; Yu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of nine conformers of dopamine in the gas phase are determined using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91 methods and high level ab initio HF method with 6-311++G** basis set, respectively. And the nine stable cationic states have been found in the ionization process of dopamine. Vertical ionization potentials of nine conformers of dopamine are calculated using the older outer-valence Green's function (OVGF) calculations at 6-311++G** basis set. Vibrational frequencies and infrared spectrum intensities of G1b and G1b+ at B3LYP/6-311++G** level are discussed.

  4. The energy spectrum of scattered particles in the K-shell ionization of medium heavy atoms by relativistic electrons and positrons with exchange effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, S.

    2008-08-01

    The energy spectrum of scattered particles in the K-shell ionization of medium to heavy atoms by relativistic electrons and positrons with exchange effects has been calculated for various kinematic conditions. In this calculation, the final state is described by a non-relativistic multiple-scattering wavefunction of Das and Seal (1993a Phys. Rev. A 47 2978; 1998 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 31 2355) multiplied by suitable spinors. Exchange effects in the atomic K-shell ionization of 47Ag atoms by relativistic electrons show better agreement with the available experimental data. The peaks are very similar to those observed in the relativistic K-shell ionization of 47Ag atoms by electrons at 500 keV energy (Schule and Nakel 1982 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 15 L639). Some other theoretical computational results are also presented here for comparison. Experimental verification of the present results for higher incident energies and other theoretical calculations by similar wavefunction theories will be interesting.

  5. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  6. Three-dimensional modeling of ionized gas. II. Spectral energy distributions of massive and very massive stars in stationary and time-dependent modeling of the ionization of metals in H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. A.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Hoffmann, T. L.

    2015-11-01

    Context. H II regions play a crucial role in the measurement of the chemical composition of the interstellar medium and provide fundamental data about element abundances that constrain models of galactic chemical evolution. Discrepancies that still exist between observed emission line strengths and those predicted by nebular models can be partly attributed to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the sources of ionizing radiation used in the models as well as to simplifying assumptions made in nebular modeling. Aims: One of the main influences on the nebular spectra is the metallicity, both nebular and stellar, which shows large variations even among nearby galaxies. Although nebular modeling often involves testing of different nebular metallicities against their influence on the predicted spectra, adequate grids of stellar atmospheres and realistic SEDs for different metallicities are still lacking. This is unfortunate because the influence of stellar metallicity on nebular line strength ratios, via its effect on the SEDs, is of similar importance as variations in the nebular metallicity. To overcome this deficiency we have computed a grid of model atmosphere SEDs for massive and very massive O-type stars covering a range of metallicities from significantly subsolar (0.1 Z⊙) to supersolar (2 Z⊙). Methods: The SEDs have been computed using a state-of-the-art model atmosphere code that takes into account the attenuation of the ionizing flux by the spectral lines of all important elements and the hydrodynamics of the radiatively driven winds and their influence on the SEDs. For the assessment of the SEDs in nebular simulations we have developed a (heretofore not available) 3D radiative transfer code that includes a time-dependent treatment of the metal ionization. Results: Using the SEDs in both 1D and 3D nebular models we explore the relative influence of stellar metallicity, gas metallicity, and inhomogeneity of the gas on the nebular ionization structure

  7. Electronic, structural and vibrational induced effects upon ionization of 2-quinolinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellili, A.; Pan, Y.; Al Mogren, M. M.; Lau, K. C.; Hochlaf, M.

    2016-07-01

    Using first principle methodologies, we characterize the lowest electronic states of 2-quinolinone+ cation. The ground state of this ion is of X˜2A″ nature. We deduce the adiabatic ionization energy of 2-quinolinone to be equal 8.249 eV using the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level and where zero point vibrational energy, core-valence and scalar relativistic effects are taken into account. We examine also the ionization induced structural changes and vibrational shifts and analyze the electron density differences between the neutral and ionic species. These data show that the formation of 2-quinolinone+X˜2A″ from 2-quinolinone affects strongly the HNCO group, whereas the carbon skeletal is perturbed when the upper electronic cationic states are populated. The comparison to 2-pyridone allows the elucidation of the effect of benzene ring fused with this heterocyclic ring. Since quinolones and pyridones are both model systems of DNA bases, these findings might help in understanding the charge redistribution in these biological entities upon ionization.

  8. Electronic, structural and vibrational induced effects upon ionization of 2-quinolinone.

    PubMed

    Bellili, A; Pan, Y; Al Mogren, M M; Lau, K C; Hochlaf, M

    2016-07-01

    Using first principle methodologies, we characterize the lowest electronic states of 2-quinolinone(+) cation. The ground state of this ion is of X˜(2)A(″) nature. We deduce the adiabatic ionization energy of 2-quinolinone to be equal 8.249eV using the explicitly correlated coupled cluster level and where zero point vibrational energy, core-valence and scalar relativistic effects are taken into account. We examine also the ionization induced structural changes and vibrational shifts and analyze the electron density differences between the neutral and ionic species. These data show that the formation of 2-quinolinone(+)X˜(2)A(″) from 2-quinolinone affects strongly the HNCO group, whereas the carbon skeletal is perturbed when the upper electronic cationic states are populated. The comparison to 2-pyridone allows the elucidation of the effect of benzene ring fused with this heterocyclic ring. Since quinolones and pyridones are both model systems of DNA bases, these findings might help in understanding the charge redistribution in these biological entities upon ionization. PMID:27060413

  9. A Measurement of the Adiabatic Cooling Index for Interstellar Helium Pickup Ions in the Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saul, Lukas; Wurz, Peter; Kallenbach, Reinald

    2009-09-01

    Interstellar neutral gas enters the inner heliosphere where it is ionized and becomes the pickup ion population of the solar wind. It is often assumed that this population will subsequently cool adiabatically, like an expanding ideal gas due, to the divergent flow of the solar wind. Here, we report the first independent measure of the effective adiabatic cooling index in the inner heliosphere from SOHO CELIAS measurements of singly charged helium taken during times of perpendicular interplanetary magnetic field. We use a simple adiabatic transport model of interstellar pickup helium ions, valid for the upwind region of the inner heliosphere. The time averaged velocity spectrum of helium pickup ions measured by CELIAS/CTOF is fit to this model with a single free parameter which indicates an effective cooling rate with a power-law index of γ = 1.35 ± 0.2. While this average is consistent with the "ideal-gas" assumption of γ = 1.5, the analysis indicates that such an assumption will not apply in general, and that due to observational constraints further measurements are necessary to constrain the cooling process. Implications are discussed for understanding the transport processes in the inner heliosphere and improving this measurement technique.

  10. A MEASUREMENT OF THE ADIABATIC COOLING INDEX FOR INTERSTELLAR HELIUM PICKUP IONS IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, Lukas; Wurz, Peter; Kallenbach, Reinald

    2009-09-20

    Interstellar neutral gas enters the inner heliosphere where it is ionized and becomes the pickup ion population of the solar wind. It is often assumed that this population will subsequently cool adiabatically, like an expanding ideal gas due, to the divergent flow of the solar wind. Here, we report the first independent measure of the effective adiabatic cooling index in the inner heliosphere from SOHO CELIAS measurements of singly charged helium taken during times of perpendicular interplanetary magnetic field. We use a simple adiabatic transport model of interstellar pickup helium ions, valid for the upwind region of the inner heliosphere. The time averaged velocity spectrum of helium pickup ions measured by CELIAS/CTOF is fit to this model with a single free parameter which indicates an effective cooling rate with a power-law index of gamma = 1.35 +- 0.2. While this average is consistent with the 'ideal-gas' assumption of gamma = 1.5, the analysis indicates that such an assumption will not apply in general, and that due to observational constraints further measurements are necessary to constrain the cooling process. Implications are discussed for understanding the transport processes in the inner heliosphere and improving this measurement technique.

  11. Timescales for adiabatic photodissociation dynamics from the {tilde A} state of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterley, Adam S.; Roberts, Gareth M.; Stavros, Vasilios G.

    2013-07-01

    Photodissociation dynamics after excitation of the {tilde A} state ν'2 = 4 (umbrella) level of ammonia are investigated using ultrafast time-resolved velocity map ion imaging (TR-VMI). These studies extend upon previous TR-VMI measurements [K. L. Wells, G. Perriam, and V. G. Stavros, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 074308 (2009)], 10.1063/1.3072763, which reported the appearance timescales for ground state NH_2 {(tilde X)} + H photoproducts, born from non-adiabatic passage through an {tilde X/tilde A} state conical intersection (CI) at elongated H-NH2 bond distances. In particular, the present work sheds new light on the formation timescales for electronically excited NH_2 {(tilde A)} + H species, generated from NH3 parent molecules that avoid the CI and dissociate adiabatically. The results reveal a step-wise dynamical picture for the production of NH_2 {(tilde A)} + H products, where nascent dissociative flux can become temporarily trapped/impeded around the upper cone of the CI on the {tilde A} state potential energy surface (PES), while on course towards the adiabatic dissociation asymptote - this behavior contrasts the concerted mechanism previously observed for non-adiabatic dissociation into H-atoms associated with ro-vibrationally "cold" NH_2 {(tilde X)}. Initially, non-planar NH3 molecules (species which have the capacity to yield adiabatic photoproducts) are found to evolve out of the vertical Franck-Condon excitation region and towards the CI region of the {tilde A} state PES with a time-constant of 113 ± 46 fs. Subsequently, transient population encircling the CI then progresses to finally form NH_2 {(tilde A)} + H photoproducts from the CI region of the tildeA state PES with a slower time-constant of 415 ± 25 fs. Non-adiabatic dissociation into ro-vibrationally "hot" NH_2 {(tilde X)} radicals together with H-atoms is also evidenced to occur via a qualitatively similar process.

  12. Timescales for adiabatic photodissociation dynamics from the à state of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Chatterley, Adam S; Roberts, Gareth M; Stavros, Vasilios G

    2013-07-21

    Photodissociation dynamics after excitation of the à state ν'2 = 4 (umbrella) level of ammonia are investigated using ultrafast time-resolved velocity map ion imaging (TR-VMI). These studies extend upon previous TR-VMI measurements [K. L. Wells, G. Perriam, and V. G. Stavros, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 074308 (2009)], which reported the appearance timescales for ground state NH2(X̃)+H photoproducts, born from non-adiabatic passage through an X̃/à state conical intersection (CI) at elongated H-NH2 bond distances. In particular, the present work sheds new light on the formation timescales for electronically excited NH2(Ã)+H species, generated from NH3 parent molecules that avoid the CI and dissociate adiabatically. The results reveal a step-wise dynamical picture for the production of NH2(Ã)+H products, where nascent dissociative flux can become temporarily trapped∕impeded around the upper cone of the CI on the à state potential energy surface (PES), while on course towards the adiabatic dissociation asymptote - this behavior contrasts the concerted mechanism previously observed for non-adiabatic dissociation into H-atoms associated with ro-vibrationally "cold" NH2(X̃). Initially, non-planar NH3 molecules (species which have the capacity to yield adiabatic photoproducts) are found to evolve out of the vertical Franck-Condon excitation region and towards the CI region of the à state PES with a time-constant of 113 ± 46 fs. Subsequently, transient population encircling the CI then progresses to finally form NH2(Ã)+H photoproducts from the CI region of the à state PES with a slower time-constant of 415 ± 25 fs. Non-adiabatic dissociation into ro-vibrationally "hot" NH2(X̃) radicals together with H-atoms is also evidenced to occur via a qualitatively similar process. PMID:23883038

  13. Observational tests of non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C. E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br

    2014-10-01

    In a previous paper [1] it was shown that any dark sector model can be mapped into a non-adiabatic fluid formed by two interacting components, one with zero pressure and the other with equation-of-state parameter ω = -1. It was also shown that the latter does not cluster and, hence, the former is identified as the observed clustering matter. This guarantees that the dark matter power spectrum does not suffer from oscillations or instabilities. It applies in particular to the generalised Chaplygin gas, which was shown to be equivalent to interacting models at both background and perturbation levels. In the present paper we test the non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas against the Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae, the position of the first acoustic peak in the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and the linear power spectrum of large scale structures. We consider two different compilations of SNe Ia, namely the Constitution and SDSS samples, both calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and for the power spectrum we use the 2dFGRS catalogue. The model parameters to be adjusted are the present Hubble parameter, the present matter density and the Chaplygin gas parameter α. The joint analysis best fit gives α ≈ - 0.5, which corresponds to a constant-rate energy flux from dark energy to dark matter, with the dark energy density decaying linearly with the Hubble parameter. The ΛCDM model, equivalent to α = 0, stands outside the 3σ confidence interval.

  14. Explanation of the local galactic cosmic ray energy spectra measured by Voyager 1. I. Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Kempf, A.; Webber, W. R. E-mail: ank@tp4.rub.de

    2014-05-20

    Almost exactly 100 yr after the original discovery of cosmic rays, the V1 spacecraft has observed, for the first time, the local interstellar medium energy spectra of cosmic ray H, He, C/O nuclei at nonrelativistic kinetic energies, after leaving the heliosphere modulation region on 2012 August 25. We explain these observations by modeling the propagation of these particles in the local Galactic environment with an updated steady-state spatial diffusion model including all particle momentum losses with the local interstellar gas (Coulomb/ionization, pion production, adiabatic deceleration, and fragmentation interactions). Excellent agreement with the V1 cosmic ray H observations is obtained if the solar system resides within a spatially homogeneous layer of distributed cosmic ray sources injecting the same momentum power law ∝p {sup –s} with s = 2.24 ± 0.12. The best fit to the V1 H observations also provides an estimate of the characteristic break kinetic energy T{sub C} = 116 ± 27 MeV, representing the transition from ionization/Coulomb energy losses at low energies to pion production and adiabatic deceleration losses in a Galactic wind at high energies. As the determined value is substantially smaller than 217 MeV in the absence of adiabatic deceleration, our results prove the existence of a Galactic wind in the local Galactic environment.

  15. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy fine structure of the Cu L2,3 ionization edge in substitutional Cu-Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Cécile; Clair, Sylvain; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph; Bangert, Herwig; Jouffrey, Bernard; Schattschneider, Peter

    2001-04-01

    We present a study of Cu-Ni alloys with different Ni concentrations using electron energy-loss spectroscopy in order to establish a relationship between the Ni concentration and the energy-loss near-edge structures of the Cu L3 ionization edge. The experimental results are compared with ab initio band-structure calculations made with the WIEN97 and TELNES packages. We found excellent agreement between experiment and simulation making use of a supercell for modelling the Cu-Ni alloy. We were able to interpret the evolution of the fine structures in terms of local and global composition.

  16. Determination of ionization fraction and plasma potential in a dc magnetron sputtering system using a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    A diagnostic which combines a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer has been developed to measure the ion-to- neutral ratio and the plasma potential in a commercial dc magnetron sputtering device. Additional features of this sensor include an externally controlled shutter which protects the diagnostic when it is in the chamber, but it is not in use. The diagnostic is mounted on a linear motion feedthrough and embedded in a slot in the wafer chuck to allow for measuring uniformity in deposition and ionization throughout the plane of the wafer. RF power is introduced to ionize the Al particles. Using the quartz crystal microbalance and the gridded energy analyzer, the ion-to-neutral ratio and other parameters are determined. Comparing the total deposition rate with and without a bias that screens out the ions, but leaves the plasma undisturbed, allows for the determination of the ion-to-neutral ratio. By varying the voltage applied to the grids, the plasma potential is measured. For example, a magnetron configuration having a pressure of 35 mtorr, a dc power of 2 kW, and a net rf power of 310{+-}5 W yielded 78{+-}5% ionization and a plasma potential of 35{+-}1 V.

  17. Kinematically complete study of low-energy electron-impact ionization of argon: Internormalized cross sections in three-dimensional kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueguang; Amami, Sadek; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Pflüger, Thomas; Weyland, Marvin; Dorn, Alexander; Madison, Don; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    As a further test of advanced theoretical methods to describe electron-impact single-ionization processes in complex atomic targets, we extended our recent work on Ne (2 p ) ionization [X. Ren, S. Amami, O. Zatsarinny, T. Pflüger, M. Weyland, W. Y. Baek, H. Rabus, K. Bartschat, D. Madison, and A. Dorn, Phys. Rev. A 91, 032707 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.032707] to Ar (3 p ) ionization at the relatively low incident energy of E0=66 eV. The experimental data were obtained with a reaction microscope, which can cover nearly the entire 4 π solid angle for the secondary electron emission. We present experimental data for detection angles of 10, 15, and 20∘ for the faster of the two outgoing electrons as a function of the detection angle of the secondary electron with energies of 3, 5, and 10 eV, respectively. Comparison with theoretical predictions from a B -spline R -matrix (BSR) with pseudostates approach and a three-body distorted-wave (3DW) approach, for detection of the secondary electron in three orthogonal planes as well as the entire solid angle, shows overall satisfactory agreement between experiment and the BSR results, whereas the 3DW approach faces difficulties in predicting some of the details of the angular distributions. These findings are different from our earlier work on Ne (2 p ), where both the BSR and 3DW approaches yielded comparable levels of agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Cluster size dependence of double ionization energy spectra of spin-polarized aluminum and sodium clusters: All-electron spin-polarized GW+T -matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Yoshifumi; Ohno, Kaoru; Solovyev, Igor; Sasaki, Taizo

    2010-04-01

    The double ionization energy (DIE) spectra are calculated for the spin-polarized aluminum and sodium clusters by means of the all-electron spin-polarized GW+T -matrix method based on the many-body perturbation theory. Our method using the one- and two-particle Green’s functions enables us to determine the whole spectra at once in a single calculation. The smaller is the size of the cluster, the larger the difference between the minimal double ionization energy and the twice of the ionization potential. This is because the strong Coulomb repulsion between two holes becomes dominant in small confined geometry. Due to Pauli’s exclusion principle, the parallel spin DIE is close to or smaller than the antiparallel spin DIE except for Na4 that has well-separated highest and second highest occupied molecular-orbital levels calculated by the spin-dependent GW calculation. In this paper, we compare the results calculated for aluminum and sodium clusters and discuss the spin-polarized effect and the cluster size dependence of the resulting spectra in detail.

  19. Shortcut to adiabaticity in spinor condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Arnau; Núñez, David López; Martorell, Joan; De Sarlo, Luigi; Zibold, Tilman; Gerbier, Fabrice; Polls, Artur; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    We devise a method to shortcut the adiabatic evolution of a spin-1 Bose gas with an external magnetic field as the control parameter. An initial many-body state with almost all bosons populating the Zeeman sublevel m =0 is evolved to a final state very close to a macroscopic spin-singlet condensate, a fragmented state with three macroscopically occupied Zeeman states. The shortcut protocol, obtained by an approximate mapping to a harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian, is compared to linear and exponential variations of the control parameter. We find a dramatic speedup of the dynamics when using the shortcut protocol.

  20. On adiabatic perturbations in the ekpyrotic scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Vikman, A. E-mail: Viatcheslav.Mukhanov@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2010-02-01

    In a recent paper, Khoury and Steinhardt proposed a way to generate adiabatic cosmological perturbations with a nearly flat spectrum in a contracting Universe. To produce these perturbations they used a regime in which the equation of state exponentially rapidly changed during a short time interval. Leaving aside the singularity problem and the difficult question about the possibility to transmit these perturbations from a contracting Universe to the expanding phase, we will show that the methods used in Khoury are inapplicable for the description of the cosmological evolution and of the process of generation of perturbations in this scenario.

  1. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  2. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  3. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  4. Local entanglement generation in the adiabatic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cliche, M.; Veitia, Andrzej

    2010-09-15

    We study entanglement generation in a pair of qubits interacting with an initially correlated system. Using time-independent perturbation theory and the adiabatic theorem, we show conditions under which the qubits become entangled as the joint system evolves into the ground state of the interacting theory. We then apply these results to the case of qubits interacting with a scalar quantum field. We study three different variations of this setup; a quantum field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions, a quantum field interacting with a classical potential, and a quantum field that starts in a thermal state.

  5. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, R. D.; Richards, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators have been built and installed in small portable liquid helium cryostats to test the feasibility of this method of cooling infrared bolometric detectors to temperatures below 0.3 K. Performance has been achieved which suggests that bolometer temperatures of 0.2 K can be maintained for periods of approximately 60 hours. Applications to sensitive infrared detection from ground-based telescopes and space satellites are discussed. Design data are given which permit the evaluation of refrigerator performance for a variety of design parameters.

  6. Vibrational dynamics of the bifluoride ion. II. Adiabatic separation and proton dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epa, V. C.; Thorson, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the bifluoride ion FHF-, which exhibits strongly anharmonic and nonseparable vibrations, is studied using the extended ab initio model potential surface described in the first paper of this series. Adiabatic separation of the proton motion from the F-F (ν1) motion forms a zero-order basis for description, although strong coupling of adiabatic states by the ν1 motion is important in higher vibrational levels and must be considered to understand the spectrum. The adiabatic protonic eigenstates at F-F separations R from 3.75 to 6.40 a.u. have been determined using the self-consistent field approximation in prolate spheroidal coordinates to provide a basis set for configuration interaction expansion of the exact eigenstates. 78 SCF eigenstates (21 σg, 21 σu, 21 πu, and 15 πg) were computed by ``exact'' numerical solution of the SCF equations. The adiabatic CI eigenstates are shown to be converged in energy to better than 1.0 cm-1 for the ground state of each symmetry type and usually better than 10 cm-1 for the lowest three to five states, and pass critical tests of accuracy such as the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. The resulting CI potential energy curves closely resemble corresponding SCF energy curves and justify the concept of mode separation even in this very anharmonic system. The adiabatic CI potential energy curves explain most aspects of the dynamics relevant to the IR and Raman spectra of FHF- (e.g., in KHF2), and calculations of ν1 dynamics within the adiabatic approximation suffice to assign most of the observed IR spectrum of KHF2(s) (to about 6000 cm-1). States corresponding qualitatively to modal overtone and combination levels such as 3ν2 and (ν2+2ν3) however exhibit avoided crossings in the neighborhood of the equilibrium configuration and ``Fermi resonance'' involving interactions of two or more such adiabatic states via the ν1 motion must be treated by close-coupling to predict both frequencies and intensities in the

  7. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wei, Chunyang; Guo, Yuyan; Rogers, William J; Sam Mannan, M

    2009-03-15

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified.

  8. Laser-nucleus interactions: The quasi-adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálffy, Adriana; Buss, Oliver; Hoefer, Axel; Weidenmüller, Hans A.

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between nuclei and a strong zeptosecond laser pulse with coherent MeV photons is investigated theoretically. We provide a first semiquantitative study of the quasi-adiabatic regime where the photon absorption rate is comparable to the nuclear equilibration rate. In that regime, multiple photon absorption leads to the formation of a compound nucleus in the so-far unexplored regime of excitation energies several hundred MeV above the yrast line. The temporal dynamics of the process is investigated by means of a set of master equations that account for dipole absorption, stimulated dipole emission, neutron decay, and induced fission in a chain of nuclei. That set is solved numerically by means of state-of-the-art matrix exponential methods also used in nuclear fuel burn-up and radioactivity transport calculations. Our quantitative estimates predict the excitation path and range of nuclei reached by neutron decay and provide relevant information for the layout of future experiments.

  9. Model of TPTC Stirling engine with adiabatic working spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renfroe, D. A.; Counts, M.

    1988-10-01

    A Stirling engine incorporating a phase-changing component of the working fluid has been modeled with the assumption that the compression and expansion space are adiabatic, and that the heat exchanger consists of a cooler, regenerator, and heater of finite size where the fluid follows an idealized temperature profile. Differential equations for the rate of change of mass in any cell and pressure over the entire engine were derived from the energy, continuity, state equations, and Dalton's law. From the simultaneous solution of these equations, all of the information necessary for calculation of power output and efficiency were obtained. Comparison of the results from this model with previous studies shows that the advantage of adding a phase-changing component to the working fluid may have been overstated.

  10. Model of TPTC stirling engine with adiabatic working spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Renfroe, D.A.; Counts, M.

    1988-10-01

    A Stirling engine incorporating a phase-changing component of the working fluid has been modeled with the assumption that the compression and expansion space are adiabatic, and that the heat exchanger consists of a cooler, regenerator, and heater of finite size where the fluid follows an idealized temperature profile. Differential equations for the rate of change of mass in any cell and pressure over the entire engine were derived from the energy, continuity, state equations, and Dalton's law. From the simultaneous solution of these equations, all of the information necessary for calculation of power output and efficiency were obtained. Comparison of the results from this model with previous studies shows that the advantage of adding a phase-changing component to the working fluid may have been overstated.

  11. Pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles with adiabatic focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, R. C.; Shalchi, A.; Dosch, A. E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com

    2014-10-20

    Understanding turbulent transport of charged particles in magnetized plasmas often requires a model for the description of random variations in the particle's pitch angle. The Fokker-Planck coefficient of pitch-angle scattering, which is used to describe scattering parallel to the mean magnetic field, is therefore of central importance. Whereas quasi-linear theory assumes a homogeneous mean magnetic field, such a condition is often not fulfilled, especially for high-energy particles. Here, a new derivation of the quasi-linear approach is given that is based on the unperturbed orbit found for an adiabatically focused mean magnetic field. The results show that, depending on the ratio of the focusing length and the particle's Larmor radius, the Fokker-Planck coefficient is significantly modified but agrees with the classical expression in the limit of a homogeneous mean magnetic field.

  12. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  13. Effect of the Heat Pipe Adiabatic Region.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Taoufik; Jemni, Abdelmajid

    2014-04-01

    The main motivation of conducting this work is to present a rigorous analysis and investigation of the potential effect of the heat pipe adiabatic region on the flow and heat transfer performance of a heat pipe under varying evaporator and condenser conditions. A two-dimensional steady-state model for a cylindrical heat pipe coupling, for both regions, is presented, where the flow of the fluid in the porous structure is described by Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model which accounts for the boundary and inertial effects. The model is solved numerically by using the finite volumes method, and a fortran code was developed to solve the system of equations obtained. The results show that a phase change can occur in the adiabatic region due to temperature gradient created in the porous structure as the heat input increases and the heat pipe boundary conditions change. A recirculation zone may be created at the condenser end section. The effect of the heat transfer rate on the vapor radial velocities and the performance of the heat pipe are discussed. PMID:24895467

  14. Analysis of the (1)A' S1 ← (1)A' S0 and (2)A' D0 ← (1)A' S1 band systems in 1,2-dichloro-4-fluorobenzene by means of resonance-enhanced-multi-photon-ionization (REMPI) and mass-analyzed-threshold-ionization (MATI) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Sascha; Grotemeyer, Jürgen

    2016-03-14

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy have been applied in order to investigate the vibrational structure of 1,2-dichloro-4-fluorobenzene (1,2,4-DCFB) in its first excited state (S1) and the cationic ground state (D0). The selection of the state prior to ionization resulted in MATI spectra with different intensity distributions thus giving access to many vibrational levels. To support the experimental findings, geometry optimizations and frequency analyses at DFT (density functional) and TDDFT (time-dependent density functional) levels of theory have been applied. Additionally, a multidimensional Franck-Condon approach has been used to calculate the vibrational intensities from the DFT calculations. An excellent agreement between simulated and measured REMPI and MATI spectra allowed for a confident assignment of vibrational levels and mechanisms active during excitation and ionization. In order to avoid any ambiguity regarding the assignment of the vibrational bands to normal modes, Duschinsky normal mode analysis has been performed to correlate the ground state (S0) normal modes of 1,2,4-DCFB with the benzene derived Wilson nomenclature. From the REMPI spectra the electronic excitation energy (EE) of 1,2-dichloro-4-fluorobenzene could be determined to be 35 714 ± 2 cm(-1) while the MATI spectra yielded the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of 1,2-dichloro-4-fluorobenzene which could be determined to be 73 332 ± 7 cm(-1).

  15. Non-ionizing energy loss calculations for modeling electron-induced degradation of Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming; Xu, Jing; Huang, Jian-Wei

    2016-09-01

    The lowest energies which make Cu, In, Ga, and Se atoms composing Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) material displaced from their lattice sites are evaluated, respectively. The non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) for electron in CIGS material is calculated analytically using the Mott differential cross section. The relation of the introduction rate (k) of the recombination centers to NIEL is modified, then the values of k at different electron energies are calculated. Degradation modeling of CIGS thin-film solar cells irradiated with various-energy electrons is performed according to the characterization of solar cells and the recombination centers. The validity of the modeling approach is verified by comparison with the experimental data. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11547151).

  16. Thermodynamics Analysis of Refinery Sludge Gasification in Adiabatic Updraft Gasifier

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Reem; Sinnathambi, Chandra M.; Eldmerdash, Usama; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available about the thermodynamic evaluation for biomass gasification process using updraft gasifier. Therefore, to minimize errors, the gasification of dry refinery sludge (DRS) is carried out in adiabatic system at atmospheric pressure under ambient air conditions. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the physical and chemical energy and exergy of product gas at different equivalent ratios (ER). It will also be used to determine whether the cold gas, exergy, and energy efficiencies of gases may be maximized by using secondary air injected to gasification zone under various ratios (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5) at optimum ER of 0.195. From the results obtained, it is indicated that the chemical energy and exergy of producer gas are magnified by 5 and 10 times higher than their corresponding physical values, respectively. The cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies of DRS gasification are in the ranges of 22.9–55.5%, 43.7–72.4%, and 42.5–50.4%, respectively. Initially, all 3 efficiencies increase until they reach a maximum at the optimum ER of 0.195; thereafter, they decline with further increase in ER values. The injection of secondary air to gasification zone is also found to increase the cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies. A ratio of secondary air to primary air of 0.5 is found to be the optimum ratio for all 3 efficiencies to reach the maximum values. PMID:24672368

  17. Thermodynamics analysis of refinery sludge gasification in adiabatic updraft gasifier.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Reem; Sinnathambi, Chandra M; Eldmerdash, Usama; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available about the thermodynamic evaluation for biomass gasification process using updraft gasifier. Therefore, to minimize errors, the gasification of dry refinery sludge (DRS) is carried out in adiabatic system at atmospheric pressure under ambient air conditions. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the physical and chemical energy and exergy of product gas at different equivalent ratios (ER). It will also be used to determine whether the cold gas, exergy, and energy efficiencies of gases may be maximized by using secondary air injected to gasification zone under various ratios (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5) at optimum ER of 0.195. From the results obtained, it is indicated that the chemical energy and exergy of producer gas are magnified by 5 and 10 times higher than their corresponding physical values, respectively. The cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies of DRS gasification are in the ranges of 22.9-55.5%, 43.7-72.4%, and 42.5-50.4%, respectively. Initially, all 3 efficiencies increase until they reach a maximum at the optimum ER of 0.195; thereafter, they decline with further increase in ER values. The injection of secondary air to gasification zone is also found to increase the cold gas, energy, and exergy efficiencies. A ratio of secondary air to primary air of 0.5 is found to be the optimum ratio for all 3 efficiencies to reach the maximum values.

  18. Adiabat Shaping of ICF Capsules Using Ramped Pressure Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marinak, M. M.; Haan, S. W.

    2002-11-01

    Target design of direct-drive ICF capsules has historically involved a compromise between high 1-D (clean) yield and capsule stability. Low-adiabat fuel is desirable to achieve high compression and, hence, high yield. A higher adiabat at the ablation front reduces the growth rate of the Raleigh--Taylor instability due to higher ablation velocity. An optimal target design will take advantage of both by shaping the adiabat of the capsule to allow for high adiabat in the material that is to be ablated and low adiabat in the remaining fuel. We present here a method of adiabat shaping using a low-intensity prepulse followed by laser shutoff before beginning the main drive pulse. This creates a decaying shock with a ramped pressure profile behind it. Since the prepulse is low intensity, the adiabat is not strongly affected by the prepulse. The main shock is then launched up this ramped pressure profile to set the adiabat. Because the main shock sees an increasing pressure profile, the effective strength of the shock decreases as it propagates through the shell, thus creating a smooth adiabat profile from high outer-shell adiabat to low inner-shell adiabat. Results of simulations using 1-D LILAC and 2-D DRACO (LLE), as well as 1-D and 2-D HYDRA (LLNL), are presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460 and by the University of California LLNL under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  20. The infrared photofragmentation of Ar + 2. Evidence of excited state population from dimer and cluster ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, C. A.; Whitaker, B. J.; Knowles, P. J.; Stace, A. J.

    1992-03-01

    Argon dimer ions have been generated via three different techniques: (1) autoionization; (2) vertical ionization of neutral Ar2; (3) ionization and subsequent fragmentation of argon cluster ions. In experiments (2) and (3) the dimers and clusters are formed via the adiabatic expansion of argon in a supersonic beam. In each case Ar+2 ions have been mass selected and subjected to single-photon infrared excitation (912-1094 cm-1) using a line-tunable carbon dioxide laser in a crossed-beam arrangement. Only those Ar+2 ions with internal energies within 1000 cm-1 of a dissociation limit yield Ar+ photofragments, the kinetic energy spread of which has been measured using an electrostatic analyzer. The photofragment kinetic energy spectra of dimer ions formed by autoionization do not exhibit any dependence on the angle of laser polarization; it is proposed that such behavior is due to the presence of a high thermal rotational temperature (500 K). In contrast, the corresponding spectra of Ar+2 formed via vertical ionization, exhibit two quite distinct features, one of which shows a strong dependence on laser polarization angle. Calculations show that the latter behavior is most probably due to photodissociation out of an excited spin-orbit state of Ar+2. A very pronounced increase in Ar+2 infrared photodissociation signal is observed as a function of increasing nozzle stagnation pressure. To account for such behavior it is proposed that, following ionization, argon cluster ions fragment to give dimer ions in excited vibrational/rotational levels both in the electronic ground and an excited spin-orbit state.