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Sample records for adiabatic local density

  1. Density functional theory beyond the linear regime: Validating an adiabatic local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Helbig, N.; Fuks, J. I.; Verstraete, M. J.; Marques, M. A. L.; Tokatly, I. V.; Rubio, A.

    2011-03-15

    We present a local density approximation (LDA) for one-dimensional (1D) systems interacting via the soft-Coulomb interaction based on quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Results for the ground-state energies and ionization potentials of finite 1D systems show excellent agreement with exact calculations obtained by exploiting the mapping of an N-electron system in d dimensions onto a single electron in Nxd dimensions, properly symmetrized by the Young diagrams. We conclude that 1D LDA is of the same quality as its three-dimensional (3D) counterpart, and we infer conclusions about 3D LDA. The linear and nonlinear time-dependent responses of 1D model systems using LDA, exact exchange, and the exact solution are investigated and show very good agreement in both cases, except for the well-known problem of missing double excitations. Consequently, the 3D LDA is expected to be of good quality beyond the linear response. In addition, the 1D LDA should prove useful in modeling the interaction of atoms with strong laser fields, where this specific 1D model is often used.

  2. Adiabatic shear bands localization in materials undergoing deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, P. N.; Kudryashov, N. A.; Muratov, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the adiabatic shear banding phenomenon in composite materials undergoing the high speed shear deformations. The mathematical model of adiabatic shear banding in thermo-visco-plastic material is given. New two step numerical algorithm which is based on the Courant-Isaacson-Rees scheme that allows one to simulate fully localized plastic flow from initial stage of localization is proposed. To test this numerical algorithm we use three benchmark problems. The testing results show the accuracy and efficiency of proposed algorithm. The features of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites are studied. The existence of characteristic depth of localization in composites is shown. Influence of initial temperature distribution on the processes of adiabatic shear bands formation in composites is considered.

  3. Non-locality, adiabaticity, thermodynamics and electron energy probability functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, Roderick; Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Takahashi, Kazunori

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties are revisited for electrons that are governed by nonlocal electron energy probability functions in a plasma of low collisionality. Measurements in a laboratory helicon double layer experiment have shown that the effective electron temperature and density show a polytropic correlation with an index of γe = 1 . 17 +/- 0 . 02 along the divergent magnetic field, implying a nearly isothermal plasma (γe = 1) with heat being brought into the system. However, the evolution of electrons along the divergent magnetic field is essentially an adiabatic process, which should have a γe = 5 / 3 . The reason for this apparent contradiction is that the nearly collisionless plasma is very far from local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electrons behave nonlocally. The corresponding effective electron enthalpy has a conservation relation with the potential energy, which verifies that there is no heat transferred into the system during the electron evolution. The electrons are shown in nonlocal momentum equilibrium under the electric field and the gradient of the effective electron pressure. The convective momentum of ions, which can be assumed as a cold species, is determined by the effective electron pressure and the effective electron enthalpy is shown to be the source for ion acceleration. For these nearly collisionless plasmas, the use of traditional thermodynamic concepts can lead to very erroneous conclusions regarding the thermal conductivity.

  4. The calculation of adiabatic-connection curves from full configuration-interaction densities: two-electron systems.

    PubMed

    Teale, A M; Coriani, S; Helgaker, T

    2009-03-14

    The Lieb formulation of density-functional theory is briefly reviewed and its straightforward generalization to arbitrary electron-electron interaction strengths discussed, leading to the introduction of density-fixed and potential-fixed adiabatic connections. An iterative scheme for the calculation of the Lieb functionals under the appropriate constraints is outlined following the direct optimization approach of Wu and Yang [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 2498 (2003)]. First- and second-order optimization schemes for the calculation of accurate adiabatic-connection integrands are investigated and compared; the latter is preferred both in terms of computational efficiency and accuracy. The scheme is applicable to systems of any number of electrons. However, to determine the accuracy that may be achieved, the present work focuses on two-electron systems for which a number of simplifications may be exploited. The procedure is applied to the helium isoelectronic series and the H(2) molecule. The resulting adiabatic-connection curves yield the full configuration-interaction exchange-correlation energies extrapolated to the basis-set limit. The relationship between the Kohn-Sham and natural orbitals as functions of the electron-electron interaction strength is explored in detail for H(2). The accuracy with which the exchange-correlation contributions to the modified local potential can be determined is discussed. The new accurate adiabatic-connection curves are then compared with some recently investigated approximate forms calculated using accurate full configuration-interaction input data. This study demonstrates that the adiabatic-connection integrand may be determined accurately and efficiently, providing important insights into the link between the Kohn-Sham and traditional quantum-chemical treatments of the exchange-correlation problem in electronic-structure theory.

  5. Electronic non-adiabatic states: towards a density functional theory beyond the Born–Oppenheimer approximation

    PubMed Central

    Gidopoulos, Nikitas I.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-01-01

    A novel treatment of non-adiabatic couplings is proposed. The derivation is based on a theorem by Hunter stating that the wave function of the complete system of electrons and nuclei can be written, without approximation, as a Born–Oppenheimer (BO)-type product of a nuclear wave function, X(R), and an electronic one, ΦR(r), which depends parametrically on the nuclear configuration R. From the variational principle, we deduce formally exact equations for ΦR(r) and X(R). The algebraic structure of the exact nuclear equation coincides with the corresponding one in the adiabatic approximation. The electronic equation, however, contains terms not appearing in the adiabatic case, which couple the electronic and the nuclear wave functions and account for the electron–nuclear correlation beyond the BO level. It is proposed that these terms can be incorporated using an optimized local effective potential. PMID:24516183

  6. Localization and adiabatic pumping in a generalized Aubry-André-Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangli; Ghosh, Somnath; Chong, Y. D.

    2015-01-01

    A generalization of the Aubry-André-Harper (AAH) model is developed, containing a tunable phase shift between on-site and off-diagonal modulations. A localization transition can be induced by varying just this phase, keeping all other model parameters constant. The complete localization phase diagram is obtained. Unlike the original AAH model, the generalized model can exhibit a transition between topologically trivial band structures and topologically nontrivial band structures containing protected boundary states. These boundary states can be pumped across the system by adiabatic variations in the phase shift parameter. The model can also be used to demonstrate the phenomenon of adiabatic pumping breakdown due to localization.

  7. Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Borovsky, Joseph E; Denton, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

  8. The density variance-Mach number relation in isothermal and non-isothermal adiabatic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, C. A.; Federrath, C.; Sutherland, R. S.

    2015-08-01

    The density variance-Mach number relation of the turbulent interstellar medium is relevant for theoretical models of the star formation rate, efficiency, and the initial mass function of stars. Here we use high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations with grid resolutions of up to 10243 cells to model compressible turbulence in a regime similar to the observed interstellar medium. We use FYRIS ALPHA, a shock-capturing code employing a high-order Godunov scheme to track large density variations induced by shocks. We investigate the robustness of the standard relation between the logarithmic density variance (σ _s^2) and the sonic Mach number M of isothermal interstellar turbulence, in the non-isothermal regime. Specifically, we test ideal gases with diatomic molecular (γ = 7/5) and monatomic (γ = 5/3) adiabatic indices. A periodic cube of gas is stirred with purely solenoidal forcing at low wavenumbers, leading to a fully developed turbulent medium. We find that as the gas heats in adiabatic compressions, it evolves along the relationship in the density variance-Mach number plane, but deviates significantly from the standard expression for isothermal gases. Our main result is a new density variance-Mach number relation that takes the adiabatic index into account: σ _s^2=ln (1+b^2 M^{(5γ +1)/3}) and provides good fits for b M≲ 1. A theoretical model based on the Rankine-Hugoniot shock jump conditions is derived, σ _s^2 = ln {1 + (γ +1)b^2{M}^2/[(γ -1)b^2{M}^2+2]}, and provides good fits also for b M>1. We conclude that this new relation for adiabatic turbulence may introduce important corrections to the standard relation, if the gas is not isothermal (γ ≠ 1).

  9. Consistent schemes for non-adiabatic dynamics derived from partial linearized density matrix propagation.

    PubMed

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F

    2012-12-14

    Powerful approximate methods for propagating the density matrix of complex systems that are conveniently described in terms of electronic subsystem states and nuclear degrees of freedom have recently been developed that involve linearizing the density matrix propagator in the difference between the forward and backward paths of the nuclear degrees of freedom while keeping the interference effects between the different forward and backward paths of the electronic subsystem described in terms of the mapping Hamiltonian formalism and semi-classical mechanics. Here we demonstrate that different approaches to developing the linearized approximation to the density matrix propagator can yield a mean-field like approximate propagator in which the nuclear variables evolve classically subject to Ehrenfest-like forces that involve an average over quantum subsystem states, and by adopting an alternative approach to linearizing we obtain an algorithm that involves classical like nuclear dynamics influenced by a quantum subsystem state dependent force reminiscent of trajectory surface hopping methods. We show how these different short time approximations can be implemented iteratively to achieve accurate, stable long time propagation and explore their implementation in different representations. The merits of the different approximate quantum dynamics methods that are thus consistently derived from the density matrix propagator starting point and different partial linearization approximations are explored in various model system studies of multi-state scattering problems and dissipative non-adiabatic relaxation in condensed phase environments that demonstrate the capabilities of these different types of approximations for treating non-adiabatic electronic relaxation, bifurcation of nuclear distributions, and the passage from nonequilibrium coherent dynamics at short times to long time thermal equilibration in the presence of a model dissipative environment.

  10. Adiabatic approximation in time-dependent reduced-density-matrix functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Requist, Ryan; Pankratov, Oleg

    2010-04-15

    With the aim of describing real-time electron dynamics, we introduce an adiabatic approximation for the equation of motion of the one-body reduced density matrix (one-matrix). The eigenvalues of the one-matrix, which represent the occupation numbers of single-particle orbitals, are obtained from the constrained minimization of the instantaneous ground-state energy functional rather than from their dynamical equations. The performance of the approximation vis-a-vis nonadiabatic effects is assessed in real-time simulations of a two-site Hubbard model. Due to Landau-Zener-type transitions, the system evolves into a nonstationary state with persistent oscillations in the observables. The amplitude of the oscillations displays a strongly nonmonotonic dependence on the strength of the electron-electron interaction and the rate of variation of the external potential. We interpret an associated resonance behavior in the phase of the oscillations in terms of 'scattering' with spectator energy levels. To clarify the motivation for the minimization condition, we derive a sequence of energy functionals E{sub v}{sup (n)}, for which the corresponding sequence of minimizing one-matrices is asymptotic to the exact one-matrix in the adiabatic limit.

  11. Relating normal vibrational modes to local vibrational modes with the help of an adiabatic connection scheme.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2012-08-28

    Information on the electronic structure of a molecule and its chemical bonds is encoded in the molecular normal vibrational modes. However, normal vibrational modes result from a coupling of local vibrational modes, which means that only the latter can provide detailed insight into bonding and other structural features. In this work, it is proven that the adiabatic internal coordinate vibrational modes of Konkoli and Cremer [Int. J. Quantum Chem. 67, 29 (1998)] represent a unique set of local modes that is directly related to the normal vibrational modes. The missing link between these two sets of modes are the compliance constants of Decius, which turn out to be the reciprocals of the local mode force constants of Konkoli and Cremer. Using the compliance constants matrix, the local mode frequencies of any molecule can be converted into its normal mode frequencies with the help of an adiabatic connection scheme that defines the coupling of the local modes in terms of coupling frequencies and reveals how avoided crossings between the local modes lead to changes in the character of the normal modes.

  12. Communication: Partial linearized density matrix dynamics for dissipative, non-adiabatic quantum evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2011-11-01

    An approach for treating dissipative, non-adiabatic quantum dynamics in general model systems at finite temperature based on linearizing the density matrix evolution in the forward-backward path difference for the environment degrees of freedom is presented. We demonstrate that the approach can capture both short time coherent quantum dynamics and long time thermal equilibration in an application to excitation energy transfer in a model photosynthetic light harvesting complex. Results are also presented for some nonadiabatic scattering models which indicate that, even though the method is based on a "mean trajectory" like scheme, it can accurately capture electronic population branching through multiple avoided crossing regions and that the approach offers a robust and reliable way to treat quantum dynamical phenomena in a wide range of condensed phase applications.

  13. Diabatic-At-Construction Method for Diabatic and Adiabatic Ground and Excited States Based on Multistate Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Grofe, Adam; Qu, Zexing; Truhlar, Donald G; Li, Hui; Gao, Jiali

    2017-03-14

    We describe a diabatic-at-construction (DAC) strategy for defining diabatic states to determine the adiabatic ground and excited electronic states and their potential energy surfaces using the multistate density functional theory (MSDFT). The DAC approach differs in two fundamental ways from the adiabatic-to-diabatic (ATD) procedures that transform a set of preselected adiabatic electronic states to a new representation. (1) The DAC states are defined in the first computation step to form an active space, whose configuration interaction produces the adiabatic ground and excited states in the second step of MSDFT. Thus, they do not result from a similarity transformation of the adiabatic states as in the ATD procedure; they are the basis for producing the adiabatic states. The appropriateness and completeness of the DAC active space can be validated by comparison with experimental observables of the ground and excited states. (2) The DAC diabatic states are defined using the valence bond characters of the asymptotic dissociation limits of the adiabatic states of interest, and they are strictly maintained at all molecular geometries. Consequently, DAC diabatic states have specific and well-defined physical and chemical meanings that can be used for understanding the nature of the adiabatic states and their energetic components. Here we present results for the four lowest singlet states of LiH and compare them to a well-tested ATD diabatization method, namely the 3-fold way; the comparison reveals both similarities and differences between the ATD diabatic states and the orthogonalized DAC diabatic states. Furthermore, MSDFT can provide a quantitative description of the ground and excited states for LiH with multiple strongly and weakly avoided curve crossings spanning over 10 Å of interatomic separation.

  14. Path integral density matrix dynamics: A method for calculating time-dependent properties in thermal adiabatic and non-adiabatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habershon, Scott

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new approach for calculating quantum time-correlation functions and time-dependent expectation values in many-body thermal systems; both electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic cases can be treated. Our approach uses a path integral simulation to sample an initial thermal density matrix; subsequent evolution of this density matrix is equivalent to solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, which we perform using a linear expansion of Gaussian wavepacket basis functions which evolve according to simple classical-like trajectories. Overall, this methodology represents a formally exact approach for calculating time-dependent quantum properties; by introducing approximations into both the imaginary-time and real-time propagations, this approach can be adapted for complex many-particle systems interacting through arbitrary potentials. We demonstrate this method for the spin Boson model, where we find good agreement with numerically exact calculations. We also discuss future directions of improvement for our approach with a view to improving accuracy and efficiency.

  15. Statistical mechanics of Roskilde liquids: Configurational adiabats, specific heat contours, and density dependence of the scaling exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicholas P.; Bøhling, Lasse; Veldhorst, Arno A.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2013-11-14

    We derive exact results for the rate of change of thermodynamic quantities, in particular, the configurational specific heat at constant volume, C{sub V}, along configurational adiabats (curves of constant excess entropy S{sub ex}). Such curves are designated isomorphs for so-called Roskilde liquids, in view of the invariance of various structural and dynamical quantities along them. The slope of the isomorphs in a double logarithmic representation of the density-temperature phase diagram, γ, can be interpreted as one third of an effective inverse power-law potential exponent. We show that in liquids where γ increases (decreases) with density, the contours of C{sub V} have smaller (larger) slope than configurational adiabats. We clarify also the connection between γ and the pair potential. A fluctuation formula for the slope of the C{sub V}-contours is derived. The theoretical results are supported with data from computer simulations of two systems, the Lennard-Jones fluid, and the Girifalco fluid. The sign of dγ/dρ is thus a third key parameter in characterizing Roskilde liquids, after γ and the virial-potential energy correlation coefficient R. To go beyond isomorph theory we compare invariance of a dynamical quantity, the self-diffusion coefficient, along adiabats and C{sub V}-contours, finding it more invariant along adiabats.

  16. The local dark matter density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.

    2014-06-01

    I review current efforts to measure the mean density of dark matter near the Sun. This encodes valuable dynamical information about our Galaxy and is also of great importance for ‘direct detection’ dark matter experiments. I discuss theoretical expectations in our current cosmology; the theory behind mass modelling of the Galaxy; and I show how combining local and global measures probes the shape of the Milky Way dark matter halo and the possible presence of a ‘dark disc’. I stress the strengths and weaknesses of different methodologies and highlight the continuing need for detailed tests on mock data—particularly in the light of recently discovered evidence for disequilibria in the Milky Way disc. I collate the latest measurements of ρdm and show that, once the baryonic surface density contribution Σb is normalized across different groups, there is remarkably good agreement. Compiling data from the literature, I estimate Σb = 54.2 ± 4.9 M⊙pc-2, where the dominant source of uncertainty is in the H i gas contribution. Assuming this contribution from the baryons, I highlight several recent measurements of ρdm in order of increasing data complexity and prior, and, correspondingly, decreasing formal error bars. Comparing these measurements with spherical extrapolations from the Milky Way’s rotation curve, I show that the Milky Way is consistent with having a spherical dark matter halo at R0 ˜ 8 kpc. The very latest measures of ρdm based on ˜10 000 stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey appear to favour little halo flattening at R0, suggesting that the Galaxy has a rather weak dark matter disc, with a correspondingly quiescent merger history. I caution, however, that this result hinges on there being no large systematics that remain to be uncovered in the SDSS data, and on the local baryonic surface density being Σb ˜ 55 M⊙pc-2. I conclude by discussing how the new Gaia satellite will be transformative. We will obtain much tighter

  17. Excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces by time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Jun; Suzuki, Takahiro; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to calculate excited-state nuclear forces on adiabatic potential-energy surfaces (APES) from linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory within a real-space framework. The Casida ansatz, which has been validated for computing first-order nonadiabatic couplings in previous studies, was applied to the calculation of the excited-state forces. Our method is validated by the consistency of results in the lower excited states, which reproduce well those obtained by the numerical derivative of each APES. We emphasize the usefulness of this technique by demonstrating the excited-state molecular-dynamics simulation.

  18. Detailed measurements of local heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic wall temperature beneath an array of impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Van Treuren, K.W.; Wang, Z.; Ireland, P.T.; Jones, T.V. . Dept. of Engineering Science)

    1994-07-01

    A transient method of measuring the local heat transfer under an array of impinging jets has been developed. The use of a temperature-sensitive coating consisting of three encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystal materials has allowed the calculation of both the local adiabatic wall temperature and the local heat transfer coefficient over the complete surface of the target plate. The influence of the temperature of the plate through which the impingment gas flows on the target plate heat transfer has been quantified. Results are presented for a single in-line array configuration over a range of jet Reynolds numbers.

  19. Local Atomic Density of Microporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, Wojtek; Contescu, Cristian I.; Llobet, Anna; Gallego, Nidia C.; Egami, Takeskhi

    2012-07-12

    We investigated the structure of two disordered carbons: activated carbon fibers (ACF) and ultramicroporous carbon (UMC). These carbons have highly porous structure with large surface areas and consequently low macroscopic density that should enhance adsorption of hydrogen. We used the atomic pair distribution function to probe the local atomic arrangements. The results show that the carbons maintain an in-plane local atomic structure similar to regular graphite, but the stacking of graphitic layers is strongly disordered. Although the local atomic density of these carbons is lower than graphite, it is only {approx}20% lower and is much higher than the macroscopic density due to the porosity of the structure. For this reason, the density of graphene sheets that have optimum separation for hydrogen adsorption is lower than anticipated.

  20. Dynamical exchange-correlation potentials beyond the local density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Vignale, Giovanni

    2006-03-01

    Approximations for the static exchange-correlation (xc) potential of density functional theory (DFT) have reached a high level of sophistication. By contrast, time-dependent xc potentials are still being treated in a local (although velocity-dependent) approximation [G. Vignale, C. A. Ullrich and S. Conti, PRL 79, 4879 (1997)]. Unfortunately, one of the assumptions upon which the dynamical local approximation is based appears to break down in the important case of d.c. transport. Here we propose a new approximation scheme, which should allow a more accurate treatment of molecular transport problems. As a first step, we separate the exact adiabatic xc potential, which has the same form as in the static theory and can be treated by a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) or a meta-GGA. In the second step, we express the high-frequency limit of the xc stress tensor (whose divergence gives the xc force density) in terms of the exact static xc energy functional. Finally, we develop a perturbative scheme for the calculation of the frequency dependence of the xc stress tensor in terms of the ground-state Kohn-Sham orbitals and eigenvalues.

  1. Entropy density of an adiabatic relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate star

    SciTech Connect

    Khaidir, Ahmad Firdaus; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Yusof, Norhasliza

    2015-04-24

    Inspired by recent works, we investigate how the thermodynamics parameters (entropy, temperature, number density, energy density, etc) of Bose-Einstein Condensate star scale with the structure of the star. Below the critical temperature in which the condensation starts to occur, we study how the entropy behaves with varying temperature till it reaches its own stability against gravitational collapse and singularity. Compared to photon gases (pressure is described by radiation) where the chemical potential, μ is zero, entropy of photon gases obeys the Stefan-Boltzmann Law for a small values of T while forming a spiral structure for a large values of T due to general relativity. The entropy density of Bose-Einstein Condensate is obtained following the similar sequence but limited under critical temperature condition. We adopt the scalar field equation of state in Thomas-Fermi limit to study the characteristics of relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate under varying temperature and entropy. Finally, we obtain the entropy density proportional to (σT{sup 3}-3T) which obeys the Stefan-Boltzmann Law in ultra-relativistic condition.

  2. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  3. Limits on the local dark matter density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbari, Silvia; Read, Justin I.; Lake, George

    2011-09-01

    We revisit systematics in determining the local dark matter density ρdm from the vertical motion of stars in the solar neighbourhood. Using a simulation of a Milky Way like galaxy, we determine the data quality required to detect ρdm at its expected local value. We introduce a new method for recovering ρdm that uses moments of the Jeans equations, combined with a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique, to marginalize over the unknown parameters. Given sufficiently good data, we show that our method can recover the correct local dark matter density even in the face of disc inhomogeneities, non-isothermal tracers and a non-separable distribution function. We illustrate the power of our technique by applying it to Hipparcos data. We first make the assumption that the A- and F-star tracer populations are isothermal. This recovers ρdm= 0.003+0.009- 0.007 M⊙ pc-3 (ρdm= 0.11+0.34- 0.27 GeV cm-3, with 90 per cent confidence), consistent with previous determinations. However, the vertical dispersion profile of these tracers is poorly known. If we assume instead a non-isothermal profile similar to that of the blue disc stars from SDSS DR-7 recently measured, we obtain a fit with a very similar χ2 value, but with ρdm= 0.033+0.008- 0.009 M⊙ pc-3 (ρdm= 1.25+0.30- 0.34 GeV cm-3 with 90 per cent confidence). This highlights that it is vital to measure the vertical dispersion profile of the tracers to recover an unbiased estimate of ρdm.

  4. Quasi-local approximation of non-local exchange-correlation kernels in the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu

    The adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem (ACFDT) is a formal theoretical framework to treat van der Waals (vdW) dispersion interactions. Under the random phase approximation (RPA), it yields the correct asymptotic behavior at large distances, but the short-range correlation is overestimated. It has been demonstrated that non-local exchange-correlation kernels can systematically correct the errors of RPA for homogenous electron gas. However, direct extension of non-local kernels derived from the electron gas model to inhomogeneous systems raises several issues. In addition to the high computational expense, the non-local kernels worsen the rare gas dimer binding curve as compared to RPA. In this study, we propose a quasi-local approximation of the non-local kernel in order to address these issues. This research used resources of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, which is a U.S. DOE Office of Science Facility, at Brookhaven National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-SC0012704.

  5. Statistical density modification using local pattern matching

    DOEpatents

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-01-23

    A computer implemented method modifies an experimental electron density map. A set of selected known experimental and model electron density maps is provided and standard templates of electron density are created from the selected experimental and model electron density maps by clustering and averaging values of electron density in a spherical region about each point in a grid that defines each selected known experimental and model electron density maps. Histograms are also created from the selected experimental and model electron density maps that relate the value of electron density at the center of each of the spherical regions to a correlation coefficient of a density surrounding each corresponding grid point in each one of the standard templates. The standard templates and the histograms are applied to grid points on the experimental electron density map to form new estimates of electron density at each grid point in the experimental electron density map.

  6. Constructing diabatic states from adiabatic states: Extending generalized Mulliken-Hush to multiple charge centers with Boys localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Yeganeh, Sina; Cave, Robert J.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2008-12-01

    This article shows that, although Boys localization is usually applied to single-electron orbitals, the Boys method itself can be applied to many electron molecular states. For the two-state charge-transfer problem, we show analytically that Boys localization yields the same charge-localized diabatic states as those found by generalized Mulliken-Hush theory. We suggest that for future work in electron transfer, where systems have more than two charge centers, one may benefit by using a variant of Boys localization to construct diabatic potential energy surfaces and extract electronic coupling matrix elements. We discuss two chemical examples of Boys localization and propose a generalization of the Boys algorithm for creating diabatic states with localized spin density that should be useful for Dexter triplet-triplet energy transfer.

  7. Constructing diabatic states from adiabatic states: extending generalized Mulliken-Hush to multiple charge centers with boys localization.

    PubMed

    Subotnik, Joseph E; Yeganeh, Sina; Cave, Robert J; Ratner, Mark A

    2008-12-28

    This article shows that, although Boys localization is usually applied to single-electron orbitals, the Boys method itself can be applied to many electron molecular states. For the two-state charge-transfer problem, we show analytically that Boys localization yields the same charge-localized diabatic states as those found by generalized Mulliken-Hush theory. We suggest that for future work in electron transfer, where systems have more than two charge centers, one may benefit by using a variant of Boys localization to construct diabatic potential energy surfaces and extract electronic coupling matrix elements. We discuss two chemical examples of Boys localization and propose a generalization of the Boys algorithm for creating diabatic states with localized spin density that should be useful for Dexter triplet-triplet energy transfer.

  8. GENERAL: Direct implementation of a scalable non-local multi-qubit controlled phase gate via optical fibres and adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yao-Xiang; Lin, Xiu-Min; Lin, Gong-Wei; Chen, Li-Bo; Huang, Xiu-Hua

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a direct implementation scheme of the non-local multi-qubit controlled phase gate by using optical fibres and adiabatic passage. The smaller operation number for implementing the multi-qubit controlled phase gate and needlessness for addressing individually save physical resource and lower the difficulties of experiment. Meanwhile, the scheme is immune from some decoherence effects such as the atomic spontaneous emission and fibre loss. In principle, it is scalable.

  9. Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) and Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TD-DFT): MBPT Insights About What Is Missing In, and Corrections To, the TD-DFT Adiabatic Approximation.

    PubMed

    Casida, Mark E; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    In their famous paper, Kohn and Sham formulated a formally exact density-functional theory (DFT) for the ground-state energy and density of a system of N interacting electrons, albeit limited at the time by certain troubling representability questions. As no practical exact form of the exchange-correlation (xc) energy functional was known, the xc-functional had to be approximated, ideally by a local or semilocal functional. Nowadays, however, the realization that Nature is not always so nearsighted has driven us up Perdew's Jacob's ladder to find increasingly nonlocal density/wavefunction hybrid functionals. Time-dependent (TD-) DFT is a younger development which allows DFT concepts to be used to describe the temporal evolution of the density in the presence of a perturbing field. Linear response (LR) theory then allows spectra and other information about excited states to be extracted from TD-DFT. Once again the exact TD-DFT xc-functional must be approximated in practical calculations and this has historically been done using the TD-DFT adiabatic approximation (AA) which is to TD-DFT very similar to what the local density approximation (LDA) is to conventional ground-state DFT. Although some of the recent advances in TD-DFT focus on what can be done within the AA, others explore ways around the AA. After giving an overview of DFT, TD-DFT, and LR-TD-DFT, this chapter focuses on many-body corrections to LR-TD-DFT as one way to build hybrid density-functional/wavefunction methodology for incorporating aspects of nonlocality in time not present in the AA.

  10. Microstructural characteristics of adiabatic shear localization in a metastable beta titanium alloy deformed at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Hongyi; Zeng, Weidong; Wang, Gui; Kent, Damon; Dargusch, Matthew

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural evolution and grain refinement within adiabatic shear bands in the Ti6554 alloy deformed at high strain rates and elevated temperatures have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve, indicating that the initiation of adiabatic shear bands does not lead to the loss of load capacity for the Ti6554 alloy. The outer region of the shear bands mainly consists of cell structures bounded by dislocation clusters. Equiaxed subgrains in the core area of the shear band can be evolved from the subdivision of cell structures or reconstruction and transverse segmentation of dislocation clusters. It is proposed that dislocation activity dominates the grain refinement process. The rotational recrystallization mechanism may operate as the kinetic requirements for it are fulfilled. The coexistence of different substructures across the shear bands implies that the microstructural evolution inside the shear bands is not homogeneous and different grain refinement mechanisms may operate simultaneously to refine the structure. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The microstructure within the adiabatic shear band was characterized by TEM. • No stress drops were observed in the corresponding stress–strain curve. • Dislocation activity dominated the grain refinement process. • The kinetic requirements for rotational recrystallization mechanism were fulfilled. • Different grain refinement mechanisms operated simultaneously to refine the structure.

  11. Semiconductor adiabatic qubits

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Witzel, Wayne; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Ganti, Anand; Landahl, Andrew J.; Lilly, Michael; Nguyen, Khoi Thi; Bishop, Nathaniel; Carr, Stephen M.; Bussmann, Ezra; Nielsen, Erik; Levy, James Ewers; Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-12-27

    A quantum computing device that includes a plurality of semiconductor adiabatic qubits is described herein. The qubits are programmed with local biases and coupling terms between qubits that represent a problem of interest. The qubits are initialized by way of a tuneable parameter, a local tunnel coupling within each qubit, such that the qubits remain in a ground energy state, and that initial state is represented by the qubits being in a superposition of |0> and |1> states. The parameter is altered over time adiabatically or such that relaxation mechanisms maintain a large fraction of ground state occupation through decreasing the tunnel coupling barrier within each qubit with the appropriate schedule. The final state when tunnel coupling is effectively zero represents the solution state to the problem represented in the |0> and |1> basis, which can be accurately read at each qubit location.

  12. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  13. Local mammographic density as a predictor of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Mayu; Harkness, Elaine F.; Chen, Xin; Moschidis, Emmanouil; Bydder, Megan; Gadde, Soujanya; Lim, Yit Y.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Evans, Gareth D.; Howell, Anthony; Stavrinos, Paula; Wilson, Mary; Astley, Susan M.

    2015-03-01

    High overall mammographic density is associated with both an increased risk of developing breast cancer and the risk of cancer being masked. We compared local density at cancer sites in diagnostic images with corresponding previous screening mammograms (priors), and matched controls. VolparaTM density maps were obtained for 54 mammograms showing unilateral breast cancer and their priors which had been previously read as normal. These were each matched to 3 controls on age, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy usage, body mass index and year of prior. Local percent density was computed in 15mm square regions at lesion sites and similar locations in the corresponding images. Conditional logistic regression was used to predict case-control status. In diagnostic and prior images, local density was increased at the lesion site compared with the opposite breast (medians 21.58%, 9.18%, p<0.001 diagnostic; 18.82%, 9.45%, p <0.001 prior). Women in the highest tertile of local density in priors were more likely to develop cancer than those in the lowest tertile (OR 42.09, 95% CI 5.37-329.94). Those in the highest tertile of VolparaTM gland volume were also more likely to develop cancer (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.30-6.42). Local density is increased where cancer will develop compared with corresponding regions in the opposite breast and matched controls, and its measurement could enhance computer-aided mammography.

  14. Introducing constricted variational density functional theory in its relaxed self-consistent formulation (RSCF-CV-DFT) as an alternative to adiabatic time dependent density functional theory for studies of charge transfer transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Seth, Mike; Ziegler, Tom

    2014-05-14

    We have applied the relaxed and self-consistent extension of constricted variational density functional theory (RSCF-CV-DFT) for the calculation of the lowest charge transfer transitions in the molecular complex X-TCNE between X = benzene and TCNE = tetracyanoethylene. Use was made of functionals with a fixed fraction (α) of Hartree-Fock exchange ranging from α = 0 to α = 0.5 as well as functionals with a long range correction (LC) that introduces Hartree-Fock exchange for longer inter-electronic distances. A detailed comparison and analysis is given for each functional between the performance of RSCF-CV-DFT and adiabatic time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. It is shown that in this particular case, all functionals afford the same reasonable agreement with experiment for RSCF-CV-DFT whereas only the LC-functionals afford a fair agreement with experiment using TDDFT. We have in addition calculated the CT transition energy for X-TCNE with X = toluene, o-xylene, and naphthalene employing the same functionals as for X = benzene. It is shown that the calculated charge transfer excitation energies are in as good agreement with experiment as those obtained from highly optimized LC-functionals using adiabatic TDDFT. We finally discuss the relation between the optimization of length separation parameters and orbital relaxation in the RSCF-CV-DFT scheme.

  15. Localized density matrix minimization and linear-scaling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Rongjie; Lu, Jianfeng

    2016-06-01

    We propose a convex variational approach to compute localized density matrices for both zero temperature and finite temperature cases, by adding an entry-wise ℓ1 regularization to the free energy of the quantum system. Based on the fact that the density matrix decays exponentially away from the diagonal for insulating systems or systems at finite temperature, the proposed ℓ1 regularized variational method provides an effective way to approximate the original quantum system. We provide theoretical analysis of the approximation behavior and also design convergence guaranteed numerical algorithms based on Bregman iteration. More importantly, the ℓ1 regularized system naturally leads to localized density matrices with banded structure, which enables us to develop approximating algorithms to find the localized density matrices with computation cost linearly dependent on the problem size.

  16. The multi-configurational adiabatic electron transfer theory and its invariance under transformations of charge density basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Chudinov, G. E.; Newton, M. D.

    1994-02-01

    The continuum multi-configurational dynamical theory of electron transfer (ET) reactions in a chemical solute immersed in a polar solvent is developed. The solute wave function is represented as a CI expansion. The corresponding decomposition of the solute charge density generates a set of dynamical variables, the discrete medium coordinates. A new expression for the free energy surface in terms of these coordinates is derived. The stochastic equations of motion derived earlier are shown to be invariant under unitary transformations of orbitals used to build the CI expansion provided the latter is complete over the corresponding orbital subspace, and also under general linear transformations of the bases employed in expanding the charge density. The interrelation between the present general treatment and the reduced theory applied previously in terms of the two-level ET model is investigated. Finally, the explicit expression for the screening potential of medium electrons is derived in the electronic Born-Oppenheimer approximation (fast (slow) electronic timescale for solvent (solute)). The theory leads to a self-consistent scheme for practical calculations of rate constants for ET reactions involving complex solutes. Illustrative test calculations for two-level ET systems are presented, and the importance of proper boundary conditions for realistic molecular cavities is demonstrated.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the polarized radio emission of the adiabatic SNRs in ISM with nonuniform distribution of density and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, Oleh; Bandiera, Rino; Beshley, Vasyl; Orlando, Salvatore; Miceli, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Polarized radio emission has been mapped with great details in several Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). The polarization of synchrotron emission contains a wealth of information but has not yet been exploited to the extent it deserves. We have developed a numerical method to model the maps of the Stokes parameters for SNRs during their adiabatic phase of evolution, in either a uniform or a non-uniform environment. The method consists in the following steps. 1. A 3-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamical structure of the SNR is simulated, taking into account the interstellar magnetic field, and a possible gradient of the ISM density and/or of the ambient magnetic field. 2. The acceleration of particles at the forward shock and their evolution downstream are modelled. 3. The generation and dissipation of the turbulent component of magnetic field has been calculated everywhere in the SNR, taking into account its interaction with the accelerated particles. 4. Our generalization of the classical synchrotron theory, to include both the ordered and the disordered components of magnetic field, is used to model the emission. 5. The internal Faraday rotation of the polarization plane is considered. 6. Finally, 2-D maps are derived, for different orientations of the SNR with respect to the observer. We present details of the model, as well as some results of the numerical simulations.

  18. Local and Total Density Measurements in Ice Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Broughton, Howard; Sims, James J.; Bleeze, Brian; Gaines, Vatanna

    2005-01-01

    Preliminary measurements of local and total densities inside ice shapes were obtained from ice shapes grown in the NASA Glenn Research Tunnel for a range of glaze ice, rime ice, and mixed phase ice conditions on a NACA 0012 airfoil at 0 angle of attack. The ice shapes were removed from the airfoil and a slice of ice 3 mm thick was obtained using a microtome. The resulting samples were then x-rayed to obtain a micro-radiography, the film was digitized, and image processing techniques were used to extract the local and total density values.

  19. High density three-dimensional localization microscopy across large volumes

    PubMed Central

    Legant, Wesley R.; Shao, Lin; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Brown, Timothy A.; Milkie, Daniel E.; Avants, Brian B.; Lavis, Luke D.; Betzig, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Extending three-dimensional (3D) single molecule localization microscopy away from the coverslip and into thicker specimens will greatly broaden its biological utility. However, localizing molecules in 3D with high precision in such samples, while simultaneously achieving the extreme labeling densities required for high resolution of densely crowded structures is challenging due to the limitations both of conventional imaging modalities and of conventional labeling techniques. Here, we combine lattice light sheet microscopy with newly developed, freely diffusing, cell permeable chemical probes with targeted affinity towards either DNA, intracellular membranes, or the plasma membrane. We use this combination to perform high localization precision, ultra-high labeling density, multicolor localization microscopy in samples up to 20 microns thick, including dividing cells and the neuromast organ of a zebrafish embryo. We also demonstrate super-resolution correlative imaging with protein specific photoactivable fluorophores, providing a mutually compatible, single platform alternative to correlative light-electron microscopy over large volumes. PMID:26950745

  20. Local density variation of gold nanoparticles in aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, F.; Shirazian, F.; Shahsavari, R.; Khoei, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles are widely used in diagnosing cancer, imaging, and identification of therapeutic methods due to their particular quantum characteristics. This research presents different types of aqueous models and potentials used in TIP3P, to study the effect of the particle size and density of Au clusters in aquatic environments; so it can be useful to facilitate future investigation of the interaction of proteins with Au nanoparticles. The EAM potential is used to model the structure of gold clusters. It is observed that in the systems with identical gold/water density and different cluster radii, gold particles are distributed in aqueous environment almost identically. Thus, Au particles have identical local densities, and the root mean square displacement (RMSD) increases with a constant slope. However in systems with constant cluster radii and different gold/water densities, Au particle dispersion increases with density; as a result, the local density decreases and the RMSD increases with a larger slope. In such systems, the larger densities result in more blunted second peaks in gold-gold radial distribution functions, owing to more intermixing of the clusters and less FCC crystalline features at longer range, a mechanism that is mediated by the competing effects of gold-water and gold-gold interactions.

  1. Non-local crime density estimation incorporating housing information

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, J. T.; Mohler, G. O.; Bertozzi, A. L.; Brantingham, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Given a discrete sample of event locations, we wish to produce a probability density that models the relative probability of events occurring in a spatial domain. Standard density estimation techniques do not incorporate priors informed by spatial data. Such methods can result in assigning significant positive probability to locations where events cannot realistically occur. In particular, when modelling residential burglaries, standard density estimation can predict residential burglaries occurring where there are no residences. Incorporating the spatial data can inform the valid region for the density. When modelling very few events, additional priors can help to correctly fill in the gaps. Learning and enforcing correlation between spatial data and event data can yield better estimates from fewer events. We propose a non-local version of maximum penalized likelihood estimation based on the H1 Sobolev seminorm regularizer that computes non-local weights from spatial data to obtain more spatially accurate density estimates. We evaluate this method in application to a residential burglary dataset from San Fernando Valley with the non-local weights informed by housing data or a satellite image. PMID:25288817

  2. Non-local crime density estimation incorporating housing information.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, J T; Mohler, G O; Bertozzi, A L; Brantingham, P J

    2014-11-13

    Given a discrete sample of event locations, we wish to produce a probability density that models the relative probability of events occurring in a spatial domain. Standard density estimation techniques do not incorporate priors informed by spatial data. Such methods can result in assigning significant positive probability to locations where events cannot realistically occur. In particular, when modelling residential burglaries, standard density estimation can predict residential burglaries occurring where there are no residences. Incorporating the spatial data can inform the valid region for the density. When modelling very few events, additional priors can help to correctly fill in the gaps. Learning and enforcing correlation between spatial data and event data can yield better estimates from fewer events. We propose a non-local version of maximum penalized likelihood estimation based on the H(1) Sobolev seminorm regularizer that computes non-local weights from spatial data to obtain more spatially accurate density estimates. We evaluate this method in application to a residential burglary dataset from San Fernando Valley with the non-local weights informed by housing data or a satellite image.

  3. Galactoseismology and the Local Density of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Banik, Nilanjan; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-08-10

    We model vertical breathing mode perturbations in the Milky Way's stellar disc and study their effects on estimates of the local dark matter density, surface density, and vertical force. Evidence for these perturbations, which involve compression and expansion of the Galactic disc perpendicular to its midplane, come from the SEGUE, RAVE, and LAMOST surveys. We show that their existence may lead to systematic errors of $10\\%$ or greater in the vertical force $K_z(z)$ at $|z|=1.1\\,{\\rm kpc}$. These errors translate to $\\gtrsim 25\\%$ errors in estimates of the local dark matter density. Using different mono-abundant subpopulations as tracers offers a way out: if the inferences from all tracers in the Gaia era agree, then the dark matter determination will be robust. Disagreement in the inferences from different tracers will signal the breakdown of the unperturbed model and perhaps provide the means for determining the nature of the perturbation.

  4. The difficulty of measuring the local dark matter density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessman, F. V.

    2015-07-01

    The analysis of the vertical velocity dispersion of disc stars in the local Milky Way is the most direct astronomical means of estimating the local dark matter density, ρDM. Current estimates for ρDM based on the mid-plane dynamic density use a local baryonic correction that ignores the non-local effects of spiral structure and significantly underestimates the amount of dynamically relevant gas now known to be present in the ISM; the additional gas plus the remaining uncertainties make it practically impossible to measure ρDM from mid-plane kinematics alone. The sampling of inhomogeneous tracer populations with different scale-heights and scale-lengths results in a systematic increase in the observed dispersion gradients and changes in the nominal density distributions that, if not properly considered, can be misinterpreted as a sign of more dark matter. If the disc gravity is modelled locally using an infinite disc, the local variation in the vertical gravity due to the globally exponential disc components results in an underestimation of the baryonic contribution by as much as ~40%. Given only the assumptions of stationarity, an axially and vertically symmetric disc, doubly exponential tracer and mass-component density profiles, a phenomenologically justified model for the cross-dispersion component σRz, and a realistic model for gz(z), it is possible to solve the full vertical Jeans equation analytically for the vertical dispersion σz(z) and hence test the robustness of previous attempts at measuring ρDM. When the model parameters for σRz are estimated from SEGUE G dwarf star data, it is still not possible to explain the difference in behaviour seen in the simple thick- and thin-disc datasets reported by Buedenbender et al. (2014, MNRAS, submitted). Rather than being a fundamental problem with the kinematical model, this effect appears to be a further sign of the difficulty of defining and handling kinematically homogeneous tracer populations.

  5. A fast doubly hybrid density functional method close to chemical accuracy using a local opposite spin ansatz

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Igor Ying; Xu, Xin; Jung, Yousung

    2011-01-01

    We develop and validate the XYGJ-OS functional, based on the adiabatic connection formalism and Görling-Levy perturbation theory to second order and using the opposite-spin (OS) ansatz combined with locality of electron correlation. XYGJ-OS with local implementation scales as N3 with an overall accuracy of 1.28 kcal/mol for thermochemistry, bond dissociation energies, reaction barrier heights, and nonbonded interactions, comparable to that of 1.06 kcal/mol for the accurate coupled-cluster based G3 method (scales as N7) and much better than many popular density functional theory methods: B3LYP (4.98), PBE0 (4.36), and PBE (12.10). PMID:22114187

  6. A fast doubly hybrid density functional method close to chemical accuracy using a local opposite spin ansatz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Igor Ying; Xu, Xin; Jung, Yousung; Goddard, William A

    2011-12-13

    We develop and validate the XYGJ-OS functional, based on the adiabatic connection formalism and Görling-Levy perturbation theory to second order and using the opposite-spin (OS) ansatz combined with locality of electron correlation. XYGJ-OS with local implementation scales as N(3) with an overall accuracy of 1.28 kcal/mol for thermochemistry, bond dissociation energies, reaction barrier heights, and nonbonded interactions, comparable to that of 1.06 kcal/mol for the accurate coupled-cluster based G3 method (scales as N(7)) and much better than many popular density functional theory methods: B3LYP (4.98), PBE0 (4.36), and PBE (12.10).

  7. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  8. A novel determination of the local dark matter density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Ullio, Piero

    2010-08-01

    We present a novel study on the problem of constructing mass models for the Milky Way, concentrating on features regarding the dark matter halo component. We have considered a variegated sample of dynamical observables for the Galaxy, including several results which have appeared recently, and studied a 7- or 8-dimensional parameter space - defining the Galaxy model - by implementing a Bayesian approach to the parameter estimation based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. The main result of this analysis is a novel determination of the local dark matter halo density which, assuming spherical symmetry and either an Einasto or an NFW density profile is found to be around 0.39 GeV cm-3 with a 1-σ error bar of about 7%; more precisely we find a ρDM(R0) = 0.385±0.027 GeV cm-3 for the Einasto profile and ρDM(R0) = 0.389±0.025 GeV cm-3 for the NFW. This is in contrast to the standard assumption that ρDM(R0) is about 0.3 GeV cm-3 with an uncertainty of a factor of 2 to 3. A very precise determination of the local halo density is very important for interpreting direct dark matter detection experiments. Indeed the results we produced, together with the recent accurate determination of the local circular velocity, should be very useful to considerably narrow astrophysical uncertainties on direct dark matter detection.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR HAVING LOCALIZED AREAS OF HIGH THERMAL NEUTRON DENSITIES

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1958-06-01

    A nuclear reactor for the irradiation of materials designed to provide a localized area of high thermal neutron flux density in which the materials to be irradiated are inserted is described. The active portion of the reactor is comprised of a cubicle graphite moderator of about 25 feet in length along each axis which has a plurality of cylindrical channels for accommodatirg elongated tubular-shaped fuel elements. The fuel elements have radial fins for spacing the fuel elements from the channel walls, thereby providing spaces through which a coolant may be passed, and also to serve as a heatconductirg means. Ducts for accommnodating the sample material to be irradiated extend through the moderator material perpendicular to and between parallel rows of fuel channels. The improvement is in the provision of additional fuel element channels spaced midway between 2 rows of the regular fuel channels in the localized area surrounding the duct where the high thermal neutron flux density is desired. The fuel elements normally disposed in the channels directly adjacent the duct are placed in the additional channels, and the channels directly adjacent the duct are plugged with moderator material. This design provides localized areas of high thermal neutron flux density without the necessity of providing additional fuel material.

  10. Local shear texture formation in adiabatic shear bands by high rate compression of high manganese TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, P.; Mao, W. M.; Cui, F. E.

    2015-04-01

    Local shear textures in ASBs of high manganese TRIP steels under high rate straining are determined and the influences of initial microstructure is analyzed using EBSD technique. It is seen that even at the presence of majority of two types of martensite before deformation, ASB is preferred to evolve in austenite, rather than in martenite, due to reverse transformation. Ultrafine grains of thress phases due to dynamic recrystallization are formed and all show shear textures. The less ε-martensite in ASB is distributed as islands and its preferred orientation can be found to originate from the variants in matrix. The grain orientation rotation around ASB in multi-phase alloy reveals significant influence of α'- martensite on texture in ASB. The mechanism of local texture formation in ASB of high manganese TRIP steel is proposed in terms of the interaction of early TRIP and later reverse transformation.

  11. Optimizing Adiabaticity in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermause, Jonathan; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    We demonstrate the utility of Berry's superadiabatic formalism for numerically finding control sequences that implement quasi-adiabatic unitary transformations. Using an iterative interaction picture, we design a shortcut to adiabaticity that reduces the time required to perform an adiabatic inversion pulse in liquid state NMR. We also show that it is possible to extend our scheme to two or more qubits to find adiabatic quantum transformations that are allowed by the control algebra, and demonstrate a two-qubit entangling operation in liquid state NMR. We examine the pulse lengths at which the fidelity of these adiabatic transitions break down and compare with the quantum speed limit.

  12. Local Available Potential Energy in Simulations of Stratified Turbulence with Uniform and Non-uniform Ambient Density Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portwood, Gavin; de Bruyn Kops, Stephen; Turbulence Simulation Laboratory Team

    2015-11-01

    In stratified flows, the maximum amount of potential energy that can be converted to kinetic energy is the difference between the potential energy in the instantaneous flow and that in the flow if the fluid parcels were adiabatically sorted to produce the lowest energy configuration. Lorentz (1955) defines this global quantity as available potential energy (APE). Holliday and McIntyre (1981) introduces the concept of local available potential energy (Ea) associated with a fluid parcel, and Molemaker and McWilliams (2010) develop the transport for this quantity for a viscous, Boussinesq fluid. Here, we characterize Ea in simulations of a vortex street with uniform and non-uniform stabilizing ambient density gradients. In pseudo-spectral direct numerical simulations resolved on up to 4096 × 2048 × 2048 grid points, we find that the majority of APE is due to fluid parcels displaced a small distance, relative to the buoyancy length scale, from their locations in the sorted density field. By computing each term in the transport equation for Ea, we observe by how much Ea of a fluid parcel changes in time due to local dipycnal mixing, and by how much global mixing alters the position of the local parcel in the sorted density field. This work is funded by DoD HPCMP though Frontier Project FPCFD-FY14-007 and the Office of Naval Research via grant N00014-15-1-2248.

  13. Galactoseismology and the local density of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Dodelson, Scott

    2017-02-01

    We model vertical breathing mode perturbations in the Milky Way's stellar disc and study their effects on estimates of the local dark matter density, surface density, and vertical force. Evidence for these perturbations, which involve compression and expansion of the Galactic disc perpendicular to the mid-plane, comes from three different surveys of stellar kinematics within a few kiloparsecs of the Sun. We show that their existence may lead to systematic errors of 10 per cent or greater in the vertical force Kz(z) at |z| = 1.1 kpc. These errors translate to ≳ 25 per cent errors in estimates of the local dark matter density. Using different mono-abundant subpopulations as tracers offers a way out: if the inferences from all tracers in the Gaia era agree, then the dark matter determination will be robust. Disagreement in the inferences from different tracers will signal the breakdown of the unperturbed model and perhaps provide the means for determining the nature of the perturbation.

  14. Range Separation and Local Hybridization in Density Functional Theory†

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Kohn–Sham density functional theory has become a standard method for modeling energetic, spectroscopic, and chemical reactivity properties of large molecules and solids. Density functional theory provides a rigorous theoretical framework for modeling the many-body exchange-correlation effects that dominate the computational cost of traditional wave function approaches. The advent of hybrid exchange-correlation functionals which incorporate a fraction of nonlocal exact exchange has solidified the prominence of density functional theory within computational chemistry. Hybrids provide accurate treatments of properties such as thermochemistry and molecular geometry. But they also exhibit some rather spectacular failures, and often contain multiple empirical parameters. This article reviews our work on developing novel exchange-correlation functionals that build upon the successes of global hybrids. We focus on more flexible functional forms, including local and range-separated hybrid functionals, constructed to obey known exact constraints and (ideally) to incorporate a minimum of empirical parametrization. The article places our work within the context of some other new approximate density functionals and discusses prospects for future work. PMID:19006280

  15. Local density approximation for a perturbative equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Astrakharchik, G. E.

    2005-12-15

    Knowledge of a series expansion of the equation of state provides a deep insight into the physical nature of a quantum system. Starting from a generic 'perturbative' equation of state of a homogeneous ultracold gas we make predictions for the properties of the gas in the presence of harmonic confinement. The local density approximation is used to obtain the chemical potential, total and release energies, Thomas-Fermi size, and density profile of a trapped system in three-, two-, and one-dimensional geometries. The frequencies of the lowest breathing modes are calculated using scaling and sum-rule approaches and could be used in an experiment as a high-precision tool for obtaining the expansion terms of the equation of state. The derived formalism is applied to dilute Bose and Fermi gases in different dimensions and to integrable one-dimensional models. The physical meaning of the expansion terms in a number of systems is discussed.

  16. The local density of optical states of a metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Lunnemann, Per; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2016-01-01

    While metamaterials are often desirable for near-field functions, such as perfect lensing, or cloaking, they are often quantified by their response to plane waves from the far field. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the local density of states near lattices of discrete magnetic scatterers, i.e., the response to near field excitation by a point source. Based on a pointdipole theory using Ewald summation and an array scanning method, we can swiftly and semi-analytically evaluate the local density of states (LDOS) for magnetoelectric point sources in front of an infinite two-dimensional (2D) lattice composed of arbitrary magnetoelectric dipole scatterers. The method takes into account radiation damping as well as all retarded electrodynamic interactions in a self-consistent manner. We show that a lattice of magnetic scatterers evidences characteristic Drexhage oscillations. However, the oscillations are phase shifted relative to the electrically scattering lattice consistent with the difference expected for reflection off homogeneous magnetic respectively electric mirrors. Furthermore, we identify in which source-surface separation regimes the metasurface may be treated as a homogeneous interface, and in which homogenization fails. A strong frequency and in-plane position dependence of the LDOS close to the lattice reveals coupling to guided modes supported by the lattice. PMID:26868601

  17. Global and local curvature in density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Ioannidis, Efthymios I.; Kulik, Heather J.

    2016-08-01

    Piecewise linearity of the energy with respect to fractional electron removal or addition is a requirement of an electronic structure method that necessitates the presence of a derivative discontinuity at integer electron occupation. Semi-local exchange-correlation (xc) approximations within density functional theory (DFT) fail to reproduce this behavior, giving rise to deviations from linearity with a convex global curvature that is evidence of many-electron, self-interaction error and electron delocalization. Popular functional tuning strategies focus on reproducing piecewise linearity, especially to improve predictions of optical properties. In a divergent approach, Hubbard U-augmented DFT (i.e., DFT+U) treats self-interaction errors by reducing the local curvature of the energy with respect to electron removal or addition from one localized subshell to the surrounding system. Although it has been suggested that DFT+U should simultaneously alleviate global and local curvature in the atomic limit, no detailed study on real systems has been carried out to probe the validity of this statement. In this work, we show when DFT+U should minimize deviations from linearity and demonstrate that a "+U" correction will never worsen the deviation from linearity of the underlying xc approximation. However, we explain varying degrees of efficiency of the approach over 27 octahedral transition metal complexes with respect to transition metal (Sc-Cu) and ligand strength (CO, NH3, and H2O) and investigate select pathological cases where the delocalization error is invisible to DFT+U within an atomic projection framework. Finally, we demonstrate that the global and local curvatures represent different quantities that show opposing behavior with increasing ligand field strength, and we identify where these two may still coincide.

  18. Velocity analysis with local event slopes related probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lu, Wenkai; Zhang, Yingqiang

    2015-12-01

    Macro velocity model plays a key role in seismic imaging and inversion. The performance of traditional velocity analysis methods is degraded by multiples and amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) anomalies. Local event slopes, containing the subsurface velocity information, have been widely used to accomplish common time-domain seismic processing, imaging and velocity estimation. In this paper, we propose a method for velocity analysis with probability density function (PDF) related to local event slopes. We first estimate local event slopes with phase information in the Fourier domain. An adaptive filter is applied to improve the performance of slopes estimator in the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situation. Second, the PDF is approximated with the histogram function, which is related to attributes derived from local event slopes. As a graphical representation of the data distribution, the histogram function can be computed efficiently. By locating the ray path of the first arrival on the semblance image with straight-ray segments assumption, automatic velocity picking is carried out to establish velocity model. Unlike local event slopes based velocity estimation strategies such as averaging filters and image warping, the proposed method does not make the assumption that the errors of mapped velocity values are symmetrically distributed or that the variation of amplitude along the offset is slight. Extension of the method to prestack time-domain migration velocity estimation is also given. With synthetic and field examples, we demonstrate that our method can achieve high resolution, even in the presence of multiples, strong amplitude variations and polarity reversals.

  19. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems.

    PubMed

    Wild, Dominik S; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-10-07

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  20. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  1. Adiabatic Betatron deceleration of ionospheric charged particles: a new explanation for (i) the rapid outflow of ionospheric O ions, and for (ii) the increase of plasma mass density observed in magnetospheric flux tubes during main phases of geomagnetic s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Joseph; Pierrard, Viviane; Darrouzet, Fabien

    2013-04-01

    Using European arrays of magnetometers and the cross-phase analysis to determine magnetic field line resonance frequencies, it has been found by Kale et al. (2009) that the plasma mass density within plasmaspheric flux tubes increased rapidly after the SSC of the Hallowe'en 2003 geomagnetic storms. These observations tend to confirm other independent experimental results, suggesting that heavy ion up-flow from the ionosphere is responsible for the observed plasma density increases during main phases of geomagnetic storms. The aim of our contribution is to point out that, during main phases, reversible Betatron effect induced by the increase of the southward Dst-magnetic field component (|Δ Bz|), diminishes slightly the perpendicular kinetic energy (W?) of charged particles spiraling along field lines. Furthermore, due to the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant (μ = Wm/ Bm) the mirror points of all ionospheric ions and electrons are lifted up to higher altitudes i.e. where the mirror point magnetic field (Bm) is slightly smaller. Note that the change of the mirror point altitude is given by: Δ hm = -1/3 (RE + hm) Δ Bm / Bm. It is independent of the ion species and it does not depend of their kinetic energy. The change of kinetic energy is determined by: Δ Wm = Wm Δ Bm / Bm. Both of these equations have been verified numerically by Lemaire et al. (2005; doi: 10.1016/S0273-1177(03)00099-1) using trajectory calculations in a simple time-dependant B-field model: i.e. the Earth's magnetic dipole, plus an increasing southward B-field component: i.e. the Dst magnetic field whose intensity becomes more and more negative during the main phase of magnetic storms. They showed that a variation of Bz (or Dst) by more than - 50 nT significantly increases the mirror point altitudes by more than 100 km which is about equal to scale height of the plasma density in the topside ionosphere where particles are almost collisionless (see Fig. 2 in Lemaire et al., 2005

  2. Adiabatic Deformation and Strain Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    4,1978, p. 180·184. 17. TURLEY , D. M. The Nature of the White Erching Surface Layers Produced During Reaming Ulrra-High Strength Steel. Mater. Sci...Ducker 1 AFFDL/FES, J. Hodges 1 AFFDL/TST, Library Air Force Test and Eva luation Cente r, Kir tland Air Force Base , NM 87115 ATTN: AFTEC-JT No

  3. Local density approximation in site-occupation embedding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjean, Bruno; Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Robert, Vincent; Fromager, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Site-occupation embedding theory (SOET) is a density-functional theory (DFT)-based method which aims at modelling strongly correlated electrons. It is in principle exact and applicable to model and quantum chemical Hamiltonians. The theory is presented here for the Hubbard Hamiltonian. In contrast to conventional DFT approaches, the site (or orbital) occupations are deduced in SOET from a partially-interacting system consisting of one (or more) impurity site(s) and non-interacting bath sites. The correlation energy of the bath is then treated implicitly by means of a site-occupation functional. In this work, we propose a simple impurity-occupation functional approximation based on the two-level (2L) Hubbard model which is referred to as two-level impurity local density approximation (2L-ILDA). Results obtained on a prototypical uniform 8-site Hubbard ring are promising. The extension of the method to larger systems and more sophisticated model Hamiltonians is currently in progress.

  4. Correction of localized shape errors on optical surfaces by altering the localized density of surface or near-surface layers

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, John S.; Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude

    2005-01-18

    Figure errors are corrected on optical or other precision surfaces by changing the local density of material in a zone at or near the surface. Optical surface height is correlated with the localized density of the material within the same region. A change in the height of the optical surface can then be caused by a change in the localized density of the material at or near the surface.

  5. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  6. Density functional theory calculations on rhodamine B and pinacyanol chloride. Optimized ground state, dipole moment, vertical ionization potential, adiabatic electron affinity and lowest excited triplet state.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Juan C; Selsby, Ronald G

    2013-01-01

    The ground state configuration of the gas phase cationic dyes pinacyanol chloride and rhodamine B are optimized with HF/6-311 + G(2d,2p) method and basis set. B3PW91/6-311 + G(2df,2p) functional and basis set is used to calculate the Mulliken atom charge distribution, total molecular energy, the dipole moment, the vertical ionization potential, the adiabatic electron affinity and the lowest excited triplet state, the last three as an energy difference between separately calculated open shell and ground states. The triplet and extra electron states are optimized to find the relaxation energy. In the ground state optimization of both dyes the chloride anion migrates to a position near the center of the chromophore. For rhodamine B the benzoidal group turns perpendicular to the chromophore plane. For both dyes, the LUMO is mostly of π character associated with the aromatic part of the molecule containing the chromophore. The highest occupied MOs consist of three almost degenerate eigenvectors involving the chloride anion coordinated with σ electrons in the molecular framework. The fourth highest MO is of π character. For both molecules in the gas phase ionization process the chloride anion loses the significant fraction of electric charge. In electron capture, the excess charge goes mainly on the dye cation.

  7. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  8. Light scattering, field localization and local density of states in co-axial plasmonic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Nate; Dal Negro, Luca

    2010-07-19

    Based on analytical scattering theory, we develop a multipolar expansion method to investigate systematically the near-field enhancement, far-field scattering and Local Density of States (LDOS) spectra in concentric metal-insulator-metal (MIM) cylindrical nanostructures, or coaxial plasmonic nanowires (CPNs). We demonstrate that these structures support distinctive plasmonic resonances with strongly reduced scattering in the far-field zone and significant electric field enhancement in deep sub-wavelength dielectric regions. Additionally, we study systematically the effects of geometrical parameters and dielectric index on the near-field and far-field plasmonic response of CPNs in the visible and near infrared spectral range. Finally, we demonstrate that CPNs provide a convenient approach for engineering strong (almost three orders of magnitude) LDOS enhancement in sub-wavelength dielectric gaps at multiple frequencies. These results enable the engineering of multiband optical detectors and CPNs-based light emitters with simultaneously enhanced excitation and emission rates for nanoplasmonics.

  9. On the Role of Prior Probability in Adiabatic Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Yang, Liping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the role of prior probability on the efficiency of quantum local adiabatic search algorithm. The following aspects for prior probability are found here: firstly, only the probabilities of marked states affect the running time of the adiabatic evolution; secondly, the prior probability can be used for improving the efficiency of the adiabatic algorithm; thirdly, like the usual quantum adiabatic evolution, the running time for the case of multiple solution states where the number of marked elements are smaller enough than the size of the set assigned that contains them can be significantly bigger than that of the case where the assigned set only contains all the marked states.

  10. Shear Faulting and Adiabatic Heating: Experimental Results from Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, N.; Schulson, E. M.; Renshaw, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Ice exhibits two distinct modes of shear faulting (Golding et al. Acta Materialia, 2010;58:5043), namely frictional or Coulombic (C) faulting under moderate levels of confinement and non-frictional or plastic (P) faulting under high levels of confinement. The mechanisms governing C-faulting have previously been discussed in connection with the comb-crack model (Renshaw & Schulson Nature, 2001;412:897). Here we examine the physical process[es] that trigger P-faulting. Systematic experiments on laboratory grown granular and columnar polycrystalline ice loaded triaxially under a high degree of confinement at -10 oC to -40 oC at applied strain rates 10-5 s-1 to 10-1 s-1 trace the micro-mechanical evolution of P-faulting. Terminal failure is characterized by a sudden brittle-like loss in load bearing capacity, the development of a narrow shear band, comprised of recrystallized grains and oriented on a plane of maximum shear, and localized heating. Possible mechanisms considered to account for the localization include: 1) adiabatic heating, 2) localized material softening through a reduction in dislocation density caused by dynamic recrystallization and 3) a transition from power-law creep to grain-size-dependent diffusional creep as a result of grain refinement caused by dynamic recrystallization. Our results indicate that, although recrystallization develops dynamically during loading, microstructural development does not significantly affect shear localization in ice. Nor does it affect the character of the fault. The minimum levels of deformation required to generate faulting are found to be consistent with those predicted for adiabatic shear instability. The present observations suggest that under specific conditions adiabatic heating, rather than dynamic recrystallization, may lead to material instability and shear faulting.

  11. Stability Analysis and Stabilization of Nonlinear Systems via Locally Defined Density Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masubuchi, Izumi

    This paper considers local stability analysis of nonlinear systems with deriving a positively invariant set based on the Rantzer's stability theory by using density functions. We define a notion of locally defined density functions around an equilibrium that give monotonously increasing positive measures near the equilibrium of a nonlinear system. Under certain assumptions, it is shown that some level set of a locally defined density function is a positively invariant set where almost all of the system trajectories converge to the equilibrium. We also mention an SOS (sum-of-squares) formulation for synthesis of a nonlinear gain via locally defined density functions.

  12. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudenz, Kristen L.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. This approach consists of two quantum phases, with some amount of classical preprocessing to set up the quantum problems. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. All quantum processing is strictly limited to two-qubit interactions so as to ensure physical feasibility. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation, with a specific example of the learning phase applied to a problem of interest in flight control systems. Beyond this example, the algorithm can be used to attack a broad class of anomaly detection problems.

  13. Energy decomposition analysis in an adiabatic picture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuezhi; Horn, Paul R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-02-22

    Energy decomposition analysis (EDA) of electronic structure calculations has facilitated quantitative understanding of diverse intermolecular interactions. Nevertheless, such analyses are usually performed at a single geometry and thus decompose a "single-point" interaction energy. As a result, the influence of the physically meaningful EDA components on the molecular structure and other properties are not directly obtained. To address this gap, the absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO)-EDA is reformulated in an adiabatic picture, where the frozen, polarization, and charge transfer energy contributions are defined as energy differences between the stationary points on different potential energy surfaces (PESs), which are accessed by geometry optimizations at the frozen, polarized and fully relaxed levels of density functional theory (DFT). Other molecular properties such as vibrational frequencies can thus be obtained at the stationary points on each PES. We apply the adiabatic ALMO-EDA to different configurations of the water dimer, the water-Cl(-) and water-Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes, metallocenes (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+)), and the ammonia-borane complex. This method appears to be very useful for unraveling how physical effects such as polarization and charge transfer modulate changes in molecular properties induced by intermolecular interactions. As an example of the insight obtained, we find that a linear hydrogen bond geometry for the water dimer is preferred even without the presence of polarization and charge transfer, while the red shift in the OH stretch frequency is primarily a charge transfer effect; by contrast, a near-linear geometry for the water-chloride hydrogen bond is achieved only when charge transfer is allowed.

  14. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of {approx} {+-}22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than {approx} 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance {approx} 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance {approx} 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  15. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  16. Dynamics of localized particles from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, J.; Brader, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental assumption of the dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) of colloidal systems is that a grand-canonical free-energy functional may be employed to generate the thermodynamic driving forces. Using one-dimensional hard rods as a model system, we analyze the validity of this key assumption and show that unphysical self-interactions of the tagged particle density fields, arising from coupling to a particle reservoir, are responsible for the excessively fast relaxation predicted by the theory. Moreover, our findings suggest that even employing a canonical functional would not lead to an improvement for many-particle systems, if only the total density is considered. We present several possible schemes to suppress these effects by incorporating tagged densities. When applied to confined systems, we demonstrate, using a simple example, that DDFT necessarily leads to delocalized tagged particle density distributions, which do not respect the fundamental geometrical constraints apparent in Brownian dynamics simulation data. The implication of these results for possible applications of DDFT to treat the glass transition are discussed.

  17. Local protein/gene density measurements using SMI microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Udo J.; Baddeley, David; Cremer, Christoph

    2006-04-01

    Spatially Modulated Illumination (SMI) microscopy was applied to determine changes of the local refractive index at discrete fluorescently labeled sites within the cell nucleus. We present measurements on polymerase II complexes, where we found a variation of the local refractive index of 1.38 - 1.55 (standard deviation interval) throughout the nucleus. This variability is not correlated to the accumulations and the extensions of the polymerase II complexes, which have been determined in a previous experiment.1 Local protein accumulations such as adherent transcriptionally active proteins could possibly contribute to such variations, as could also different compactions of the DNA fiber. Altogether, we present a method to precisely obtain a map of the local refractive index inside of cell nuclei, which provides another contrasting mechanism for visualizing sub cellular structures.

  18. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mukaida, Kyohei E-mail: jinno@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  19. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  20. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  1. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  2. Density functional theory with alternative spin densities: application to magnetic systems with localized spins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jiménez, Angel J; Pérez-Jordá, José M; Illas, Francesc

    2004-01-01

    A new method to improve the excess spin density obtained from unrestricted Hartree-Fock wave functions in terms of natural orbitals is proposed. Using this modified excess spin density to evaluate the correlation energy by means of density functionals leads to large improvements in the computed magnetic coupling constants of several materials without need to modify the exchange contribution. This is important because it reconciles the density functional theory description with the one provided by multi-determinant wave functions. Using the present approach, the leading contribution to the magnetic coupling constant arises from electron correlation effects. The performance of the new method is illustrated on various materials including high-critical-temperature superconductors parent compounds.

  3. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  4. Local densities connect spatial ecology to game, multilevel selection and inclusive fitness theories of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Tekwa, Edward W; Gonzalez, Andrew; Loreau, Michel

    2015-09-07

    Cooperation plays a crucial role in many aspects of biology. We use the spatial ecological metrics of local densities to measure and model cooperative interactions. While local densities can be found as technical details in current theories, we aim to establish them as central to an approach that describes spatial effects in the evolution of cooperation. A resulting local interaction model neatly partitions various spatial and non-spatial selection mechanisms. Furthermore, local densities are shown to be fundamental for important metrics of game theory, multilevel selection theory and inclusive fitness theory. The corresponding metrics include structure coefficients, spatial variance, contextual covariance, relatedness, and inbreeding coefficient or F-statistics. Local densities serve as the basis of an emergent spatial theory that draws from and brings unity to multiple theories of cooperation.

  5. An association of magnetospheric whistler dispersion characteristics with changes in local plasma density.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Chappell, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    We use OGO 5 measurements made within the plasmapause on May 15, 1969, to investigate the possible association between changes in lightning whistler dispersion characteristics and local density fluctuations. It is shown that groups of whistlers with relatively constant dispersions tended to be detected in regions where the local ion concentration was significantly enhanced. It is assumed that these local density fluctuations represent characteristics of large-scale field-aligned variations. The results are then compared with ray refraction estimates appropriate for low-frequency whistler mode propagation (wave components with frequencies comparable to the local lower hybrid frequency) in a nonuniform medium.

  6. Adaptive partitioning by local density-peaks: An efficient density-based clustering algorithm for analyzing molecular dynamics trajectories.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Zhu, Lizhe; Sheong, Fu Kit; Wang, Wei; Huang, Xuhui

    2017-01-30

    We present an efficient density-based adaptive-resolution clustering method APLoD for analyzing large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. APLoD performs the k-nearest-neighbors search to estimate the density of MD conformations in a local fashion, which can group MD conformations in the same high-density region into a cluster. APLoD greatly improves the popular density peaks algorithm by reducing the running time and the memory usage by 2-3 orders of magnitude for systems ranging from alanine dipeptide to a 370-residue Maltose-binding protein. In addition, we demonstrate that APLoD can produce clusters with various sizes that are adaptive to the underlying density (i.e., larger clusters at low-density regions, while smaller clusters at high-density regions), which is a clear advantage over other popular clustering algorithms including k-centers and k-medoids. We anticipate that APLoD can be widely applied to split ultra-large MD datasets containing millions of conformations for subsequent construction of Markov State Models. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Density Functional Theory for Excited States in a Quasi Local Density Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-10

    In the present note we develop a quasi-local approximation for M Exc, closely related to the LDA for thermal ensembles. As shown by Theophllou4 ), the...the equt-ensemble and corresponding KS ensemble are equal, S. However, the relations between entropy and temperature are different for interacting...and C() Ss(e) - T de’ (non-interacting) (18) 0 * .*.’ . with unequal heat capacities C and Cs. In general, referring to the tableau, S and 6 are related

  8. On Adiabatic Pair Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickl, Peter; Dürr, Detlef

    2008-08-01

    We give here a rigorous proof of the well known prediction of pair creation as it arises from the Dirac equation with an external time dependent potential. Pair creation happens with probability one if the potential changes adiabatically in time and becomes overcritical, which means that an eigenvalue curve (as a function of time) bridges the gap between the negative and positive spectral continuum. The potential can be thought of as being zero at large negative and large positive times. The rigorous treatment of this effect has been lacking since the pioneering work of Beck, Steinwedel and Süßmann [1] in 1963 and Gershtein and Zeldovich [8] in 1970.

  9. Local density of optical states of an asymmetric waveguide grating at photonic band gap resonant wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatas, Husin; Sumaryada, Tony I.; Ahmad, Faozan

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of local density of optical states (LDOS) at photonic band gap resonant wavelength of an asymmetric waveguide grating based on Green's function formulation. It is found that the LDOS of the considered structure exhibits different characteristics in its localization between the upper and lower resonant wavelengths of the corresponding photonic band gap edges.

  10. A Tomographic Method for the Reconstruction of Local Probability Density Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivathanu, Y. R.; Gore, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    A method of obtaining the probability density function (PDF) of local properties from path integrated measurements is described. The approach uses a discrete probability function (DPF) method to infer the PDF of the local extinction coefficient from measurements of the PDFs of the path integrated transmittance. The local PDFs obtained using the method are compared with those obtained from direct intrusive measurements in propylene/air and ethylene/air diffusion flames. The results of this comparison are good.

  11. Packing microstructure and local density variations of experimental and computational pebble beds

    SciTech Connect

    Auwerda, G. J.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D.; Van Der Hagen, T. H. J. J.

    2012-07-01

    In pebble bed type nuclear reactors the fuel is contained in graphite pebbles, which form a randomly stacked bed with a non-uniform packing density. These variations can influence local coolant flow and power density and are a possible cause of hotspots. To analyse local density variations computational methods are needed that can generate randomly stacked pebble beds with a realistic packing structure on a pebble-to-pebble level. We first compare various properties of the local packing structure of a computed bed with those of an image made using computer aided X-ray tomography, looking at properties in the bulk of the bed and near the wall separately. Especially for the bulk of the bed, properties of the computed bed show good comparison with the scanned bed and with literature, giving confidence our method generates beds with realistic packing microstructure. Results also show the packing structure is different near the wall than in the bulk of the bed, with pebbles near the wall forming ordered layers similar to hexagonal close packing. Next, variations in the local packing density are investigated by comparing probability density functions of the packing fraction of small clusters of pebbles throughout the bed. Especially near the wall large variations in local packing fractions exists, with a higher probability for both clusters of pebbles with low (<0.6) and high (>0.65) packing fraction, which could significantly affect flow rates and, together with higher power densities, could result in hotspots. (authors)

  12. Towards improved local hybrid functionals by calibration of exchange-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V. E-mail: martin.kaupp@tu-berlin.de; Kaupp, Martin E-mail: martin.kaupp@tu-berlin.de

    2014-11-28

    A new approach for the calibration of (semi-)local and exact exchange-energy densities in the context of local hybrid functionals is reported. The calibration functions are derived from only the electron density and its spatial derivatives, avoiding spatial derivatives of the exact-exchange energy density or other computationally unfavorable contributions. The calibration functions fulfill the seven more important out of nine known exact constraints. It is shown that calibration improves substantially the definition of a non-dynamical correlation energy term for generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based local hybrids. Moreover, gauge artifacts in the potential-energy curves of noble-gas dimers may be corrected by calibration. The developed calibration functions are then evaluated for a large range of energy-related properties (atomization energies, reaction barriers, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomic energies) of three sets of local hybrids, using a simple one-parameter local-mixing. The functionals are based on (a) local spin-density approximation (LSDA) or (b) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation, and on (c) Becke-88 (B88) exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlation. While the uncalibrated GGA-based functionals usually provide very poor thermochemical data, calibration allows a dramatic improvement, accompanied by only a small deterioration of reaction barriers. In particular, an optimized BLYP-based local-hybrid functional has been found that is a substantial improvement over the underlying global hybrids, as well as over previously reported LSDA-based local hybrids. It is expected that the present calibration approach will pave the way towards new generations of more accurate hyper-GGA functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities.

  13. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Xue, Longjian

    2015-05-28

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol-gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 10(7) μm(3) are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media.

  14. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  15. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  16. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  17. Non-adiabatic perturbations in Ricci dark energy model

    SciTech Connect

    Karwan, Khamphee; Thitapura, Thiti E-mail: nanodsci2523@hotmail.com

    2012-01-01

    We show that the non-adiabatic perturbations between Ricci dark energy and matter can grow both on superhorizon and subhorizon scales, and these non-adiabatic perturbations on subhorizon scales can lead to instability in this dark energy model. The rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes on subhorizon scales always occur when the equation of state parameter of dark energy starts to drop towards -1 near the end of matter era, except that the parameter α of Ricci dark energy equals to 1/2. In the case where α = 1/2, the rapidly growing non-adiabatic modes disappear when the perturbations in dark energy and matter are adiabatic initially. However, an adiabaticity between dark energy and matter perturbations at early time implies a non-adiabaticity between matter and radiation, this can influence the ordinary Sachs-Wolfe (OSW) effect. Since the amount of Ricci dark energy is not small during matter domination, the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is greatly modified by density perturbations of dark energy, leading to a wrong shape of CMB power spectrum. The instability in Ricci dark energy is difficult to be alleviated if the effects of coupling between baryon and photon on dark energy perturbations are included.

  18. Self-consistent-field calculations of atoms and ions using a modified local-density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, D.A.; Albritton, J.R.; Wilson, B.G.; Alley, W.E. )

    1994-07-01

    Local-density-approximation calculations of atomic structure are useful for the description of atoms and ions in plasmas. The large number of different atomic configurations that exist in typical plasmas leads one to consider the expression of total energies in terms of a Taylor series in the orbital occupation numbers. Two schemes for computing the second derivative Taylor-series coefficients are given; the second, and better one, uses the linear response method developed by Zangwill and Soven [Phys. Rev. A 21, 1561 (1980)] for the calculation of optical response in atoms. A defect in the local-density approximation causes some second derivatives involving Rydberg orbitals to be infinite. This is corrected by using a modified local-density approximation that had previously been proposed [Phys. Rev. B 2, 244 (1970)].

  19. Dissecting the roles of local packing density and longer-range effects in protein sequence evolution.

    PubMed

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Wilke, Claus O

    2016-06-01

    What are the structural determinants of protein sequence evolution? A number of site-specific structural characteristics have been proposed, most of which are broadly related to either the density of contacts or the solvent accessibility of individual residues. Most importantly, there has been disagreement in the literature over the relative importance of solvent accessibility and local packing density for explaining site-specific sequence variability in proteins. We show that this discussion has been confounded by the definition of local packing density. The most commonly used measures of local packing, such as contact number and the weighted contact number, represent the combined effects of local packing density and longer-range effects. As an alternative, we propose a truly local measure of packing density around a single residue, based on the Voronoi cell volume. We show that the Voronoi cell volume, when calculated relative to the geometric center of amino-acid side chains, behaves nearly identically to the relative solvent accessibility, and each individually can explain, on average, approximately 34% of the site-specific variation in evolutionary rate in a data set of 209 enzymes. An additional 10% of variation can be explained by nonlocal effects that are captured in the weighted contact number. Consequently, evolutionary variation at a site is determined by the combined effects of the immediate amino-acid neighbors of that site and effects mediated by more distant amino acids. We conclude that instead of contrasting solvent accessibility and local packing density, future research should emphasize on the relative importance of immediate contacts and longer-range effects on evolutionary variation. Proteins 2016; 84:841-854. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Workshop on the Detection, Classification, Localization and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics - 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Using Passive Acoustics - 2015 John A. Hildebrand Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD La Jolla...classification, localization and density estimation of marine mammals using passive acoustics , and by doing so advance the state of the art in this field...Passive Acoustics was organized and held at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) in July 2015. The objective of ONR support for the

  1. Fast forward to the classical adiabatic invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher; Deffner, Sebastian; Patra, Ayoti; Subaşı, Yiǧit

    2017-03-01

    We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under nonadiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian H =p2/2 m +U (q ,t ) in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action I0, we construct a so-called fast-forward potential energy function VFF(q ,t ) that, when added to H , guides all trajectories with initial action I0 to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant J (q ,p ,t ) whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  2. Kathu Townlands: A High Density Earlier Stone Age Locality in the Interior of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Steven J. H.; Lukich, Vasa; Chazan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Kathu Townlands is a high density Earlier Stone Age locality in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa. Here we present the first detailed information on this locality based on analysis of a sample of lithic material from excavations by P. Beaumont and field observations made in the course of fieldwork in 2013. The results confirm the remarkably high artefact density at Kathu Townlands and do not provide evidence consistent with high energy transport as a mechanism of site formation, suggesting that Kathu Townlands was the site of intensive exploitation of highly siliceous outcroppings of banded iron formation. The results presented here provide a first step towards understanding this complex locality and point to the need for further research and the importance of preserving this locality in the face of intensive and rapid development. PMID:25058317

  3. Evolution of the critical points with the density of bosons under local three-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, C. A.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2014-12-01

    We study the quantum phase transition in the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model with three-body local interactions for densities ρ = 2, 3, 4 and 5 by implementing the Density Matrix Renormalization Group method. This system shows two types of phases. One phase is incompressible (corresponding to the Mott insulator state) and the other compressible (the superfluid state). The critical points found correspond to a value of the hopping parameter for which the gap energy is equal to zero. We found that the critical point increases slowly as the density of the system increases.

  4. Method for Determining Local Current Density in 2G HTS Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bludova, A. I.

    Practically important problem is to determine the density and direction of 2G HTS induced currents at each point on the tape in order to examine its local deviations. This problem is resolved indirectly by spatial measurement of generated magnetic field with a scanning Hall sensor at a given height above the tape surface. Current density is subsequently determined by the Biot-Savart law inversion in Fourier domain. Tikhonov regularization is used in order to increase precision. Method is verified with the model current density reconstruction. Optimal calculation parameters and resulting precision are described.

  5. Positive density-dependent reproduction regulated by local kinship and size in an understorey tropical tree

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Antonio R.; Pope, Nathaniel; Jha, Shalene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Global pollinator declines and continued habitat fragmentation highlight the critical need to understand reproduction and gene flow across plant populations. Plant size, conspecific density and local kinship (i.e. neighbourhood genetic relatedness) have been proposed as important mechanisms influencing the reproductive success of flowering plants, but have rarely been simultaneously investigated. Methods We conducted this study on a continuous population of the understorey tree Miconia affinis in the Forest Dynamics Plot on Barro Colorado Island in central Panama. We used spatial, reproductive and population genetic data to investigate the effects of tree size, conspecific neighbourhood density and local kinship on maternal and paternal reproductive success. We used a Bayesian framework to simultaneously model the effects of our explanatory variables on the mean and variance of maternal viable seed set and siring success. Key Results Our results reveal that large trees had lower proportions of viable seeds in their fruits but sired more seeds. We documented differential effects of neighbourhood density and local kinship on both maternal and paternal reproductive components. Trees in more dense neighbourhoods produced on average more viable seeds, although this positive density effect was influenced by variance-inflation with increasing local kinship. Neighbourhood density did not have significant effects on siring success. Conclusions This study is one of the first to reveal an interaction among tree size, conspecific density and local kinship as critical factors differentially influencing maternal and paternal reproductive success. We show that both maternal and paternal reproductive success should be evaluated to determine the population-level and individual traits most essential for plant reproduction. In addition to conserving large trees, we suggest the inclusion of small trees and the conservation of dense patches with low kinship as

  6. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations using electron microscopy: Light-localization properties of biological cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen

    2010-12-13

    We report a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of heterogeneous optical dielectric media, including nanomaterials and biological cells, by quantifying their nanoscale light-localization properties. Transmission electron microscope images of the media are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. Light-localization properties are studied by the statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. We validated IPR analysis using nanomaterials as models of disordered systems fabricated from dielectric nanoparticles. As an example, we then applied such analysis to distinguish between cells with different degrees of aggressive malignancy.

  7. 6th International workshop on the Detection, Classification, Localization and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Classification, Localization and Density Estimation of Marine Mammals Dr Douglas Gillespie Sea Mammal Research Unit, Scottish Oceans Institute...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of St Andrews, Scottish Oceans Institute,Sea Mammal

  8. What determines large scale galaxy clustering: halo mass or local density?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Arnau; Hoffmann, Kai; Jiménez, Noelia; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    Using a dark matter simulation we show how halo bias is determined by local density and not by halo mass. This is not totally surprising as, according to the peak-background split model, local matter density (bar δ) is the property that constrains bias at large scales. Massive haloes have a high clustering because they reside in high density regions. Small haloes can be found in a wide range of environments which differentially determine their clustering amplitudes. This contradicts the assumption made by standard halo occupation distribution (HOD) models that bias and occupation of haloes is determined solely by their mass. We show that the bias of central galaxies from semi-analytic models of galaxy formation as a function of luminosity and colour is therefore not correctly predicted by the standard HOD model. Using bar δ (of matter or galaxies) instead of halo mass, the HOD model correctly predicts galaxy bias. These results indicate the need to include information about local density and not only mass in order to correctly apply HOD analysis in these galaxy samples. This new model can be readily applied to observations and has the advantage that, in contrast with the dark matter halo mass, the galaxy density can be directly observed.

  9. Coral reef degradation is not correlated with local human population density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, John F.; Valdivia, Abel

    2016-07-01

    The global decline of reef-building corals is understood to be due to a combination of local and global stressors. However, many reef scientists assume that local factors predominate and that isolated reefs, far from human activities, are generally healthier and more resilient. Here we show that coral reef degradation is not correlated with human population density. This suggests that local factors such as fishing and pollution are having minimal effects or that their impacts are masked by global drivers such as ocean warming. Our results also suggest that the effects of local and global stressors are antagonistic, rather than synergistic as widely assumed. These findings indicate that local management alone cannot restore coral populations or increase the resilience of reefs to large-scale impacts. They also highlight the truly global reach of anthropogenic warming and the immediate need for drastic and sustained cuts in carbon emissions.

  10. Coral reef degradation is not correlated with local human population density

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, John F.; Valdivia, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The global decline of reef-building corals is understood to be due to a combination of local and global stressors. However, many reef scientists assume that local factors predominate and that isolated reefs, far from human activities, are generally healthier and more resilient. Here we show that coral reef degradation is not correlated with human population density. This suggests that local factors such as fishing and pollution are having minimal effects or that their impacts are masked by global drivers such as ocean warming. Our results also suggest that the effects of local and global stressors are antagonistic, rather than synergistic as widely assumed. These findings indicate that local management alone cannot restore coral populations or increase the resilience of reefs to large-scale impacts. They also highlight the truly global reach of anthropogenic warming and the immediate need for drastic and sustained cuts in carbon emissions. PMID:27435659

  11. Coral reef degradation is not correlated with local human population density.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John F; Valdivia, Abel

    2016-07-20

    The global decline of reef-building corals is understood to be due to a combination of local and global stressors. However, many reef scientists assume that local factors predominate and that isolated reefs, far from human activities, are generally healthier and more resilient. Here we show that coral reef degradation is not correlated with human population density. This suggests that local factors such as fishing and pollution are having minimal effects or that their impacts are masked by global drivers such as ocean warming. Our results also suggest that the effects of local and global stressors are antagonistic, rather than synergistic as widely assumed. These findings indicate that local management alone cannot restore coral populations or increase the resilience of reefs to large-scale impacts. They also highlight the truly global reach of anthropogenic warming and the immediate need for drastic and sustained cuts in carbon emissions.

  12. Local electric dipole moments for periodic systems via density functional theory embedding

    SciTech Connect

    Luber, Sandra

    2014-12-21

    We describe a novel approach for the calculation of local electric dipole moments for periodic systems. Since the position operator is ill-defined in periodic systems, maximally localized Wannier functions based on the Berry-phase approach are usually employed for the evaluation of local contributions to the total electric dipole moment of the system. We propose an alternative approach: within a subsystem-density functional theory based embedding scheme, subset electric dipole moments are derived without any additional localization procedure, both for hybrid and non-hybrid exchange–correlation functionals. This opens the way to a computationally efficient evaluation of local electric dipole moments in (molecular) periodic systems as well as their rigorous splitting into atomic electric dipole moments. As examples, Infrared spectra of liquid ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate are presented, which are commonly employed as solvents in Lithium ion batteries.

  13. In Silico Investigation of Angiogenesis with Growth and Stress Generation Coupled to Local Extracellular Matrix Density

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lowell T.; Hoying, James B.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical interactions during angiogenesis, i.e., traction applied by neovessels to the extracellular matrix and the corresponding deformation, are important regulators of growth and neovascularization. We have previously designed, implemented, and validated a coupled model of angiogenesis in which a discrete microvessel growth model interacts with a continuous finite element mesh through the application of local remodeling sprout stresses (Edgar et al. in Biomech Model Mechanobiol, 2014). However, the initial implementation of this framework does not take matrix density into account when determined these remodeling stresses and is therefore insufficient for the study of angiogenesis within heterogeneous matrix environments such as those found in vivo. The objective of this study was to implement sensitivity to matrix density in the active stress generation within AngioFE in order to allow the study of angiogenic growth within a heterogeneous density environment. We accomplished this by scaling active sprout stresses relative to local matrix density using a scaling factor previously determined from experimental data. We then exercised the new functionality of the model by simulating angiogenesis within four different scenarios: homogeneous density, a narrow gap model, and matrix density gradient, and a construct subjected to repeated loading/unloading and preconditioning. These numerical experiments predicted heterogeneous matrix density in the initially homogeneous case, the closure and alignment of microvessels along a low-density gap, the formation of a unique cap-like structure during angiogenesis within a density gradient, and the alignment of microvessels in the absence of applied load due to preconditioning. The result of these in silico investigations demonstrate how matrix heterogeneity affects neovascularization and matrix deformation and provides a platform for studying angiogenesis in complicated and multi-faceted mechanical environments that

  14. Local environment and density-dependent feedbacks determine population growth in a forest herb.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Johan P; Ostergård, Hannah; Ehrlén, Johan

    2014-12-01

    Linking spatial variation in environmental factors to variation in demographic rates is essential for a mechanistic understanding of the dynamics of populations. However, we still know relatively little about such links, partly because feedbacks via intraspecific density make them difficult to observe in natural populations. We conducted a detailed field study and investigated simultaneous effects of environmental factors and the intraspecific density of individuals on the demography of the herb Lathyrus vernus. In regression models of vital rates we identified effects associated with spring shade on survival and growth, while density was negatively correlated with these vital rates. Density was also negatively correlated with average individual size in the study plots, which is consistent with self-thinning. In addition, average plant sizes were larger than predicted by density in plots that were less shaded by the tree canopy, indicating an environmentally determined carrying capacity. A size-structured integral projection model based on the vital rate regressions revealed that the identified effects of shade and density were strong enough to produce differences in stable population sizes similar to those observed in the field. The results illustrate how the local environment can determine dynamics of populations and that intraspecific density may have to be more carefully considered in studies of plant demography and population viability analyses of threatened species. We conclude that demographic approaches incorporating information about both density and key environmental factors are powerful tools for understanding the processes that interact to determine population dynamics and abundances.

  15. Local gene density predicts the spatial position of genetic loci in the interphase nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Murmann, Andrea E.; Gao Juntao; Encinosa, Marissa; Peter, Marcus E.; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter . E-mail: m.macleod@dkfz.de; Rowley, Janet D.

    2005-11-15

    Specific chromosomal translocations are hallmarks of many human leukemias. The basis for these translocation events is poorly understood, but it has been assumed that spatial positioning of genes in the nucleus of hematopoietic cells is a contributing factor. Analysis of the nuclear 3D position of the gene MLL, frequently involved in chromosomal translocations and five of its translocation partners (AF4, AF6, AF9, ENL and ELL), and two control loci revealed a characteristic radial distribution pattern in all hematopoietic cells studied. Genes in areas of high local gene density were found positioned towards the nuclear center, whereas genes in regions of low gene density were detected closer to the nuclear periphery. The gene density within a 2 Mbp window was found to be a better predictor for the relative positioning of a genomic locus within the cell nucleus than the gene density of entire chromosomes. Analysis of the position of MLL, AF4, AF6 and AF9 in cell lines carrying chromosomal translocations involving these genes revealed that the position of the normal genes was different from that of the fusion genes, and this was again consistent with the changes in local gene density within a 2 Mbp window. Thus, alterations in gene density directly at translocation junctions could explain the change in the position of affected genes in leukemia cells.

  16. Reduced dyes enhance single-molecule localization density for live superresolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Lina; Benke, Alexander; Reymond, Luc; Lukinavičius, Gražvydas; Manley, Suliana

    2014-03-17

    Cell-permeable rhodamine dyes are reductively quenched by NaBH4 into a non-fluorescent leuco-rhodamine form. Quenching is reversible, and their fluorescence is recovered when the dyes are oxidized. In living cells, oxidation occurs spontaneously, and can result in up to ten-fold higher densities of single molecule localizations, and more photons per localization as compared with unmodified dyes. These two parameters directly impact the achievable resolution, and we see a significant improvement in the quality of live-cell point-localization super-resolution images taken with reduced dyes. These improvements carry over to increase the density of trajectories for single-molecule tracking experiments.

  17. Halo WD Local Space Density from the GSC-II-based Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, D.; Bucciarelli, B.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Lattanzi, M. G.; McLean, B.; Smart, R. L.; Spagna, A.

    2007-09-01

    Microlensing experiments (Alcock et al. 2000) have suggested that a significant part of the dark halo of the Milky Way could be composed of matter in the form of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs). Cool ancient white dwarfs (WDs) are the natural candidates. Here we present the results of the GSC2 survey of halo WDs, including a description of the WD sample, and a derivation of the local space density of halo WDs by means of an accurate kinematic analysis. The local space density of these objects is shown to be only about ˜ 10-5M⊙pc-3, corresponding to 0.1%--0.2% of the local dark matter.

  18. Local chiral symmetry and charge-density waves in one-dimensional conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakita, B.; Shizuya, K.

    1990-09-01

    Symmetry-related features of charge-density-wave transport phenomena are studied using a non-mean-field effective Lagrangian approach. It is pointed out that a local chiral symmetry (based on the Kač-Moody algebra) emerges in the low-energy structure of one-dimensional electron-phonon systems. From this symmetry follow directly power-law correlations of both electrons and phonons. The Peierls instability is suppressed owing to one-dimensional fluctuations. Still the charge-density wave arises and the chiral anomaly can account for acceleration of a sliding charge-density wave along with a phonon-drag effect. The problem of pinning of charge-density waves is discussed in relation to explicit breakings of the chiral symmetry.

  19. Density and localized states' impact on amorphous carbon electron transport mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caicedo-Dávila, S.; Lopez-Acevedo, O.; Velasco-Medina, J.; Avila, A.

    2016-12-01

    This work discusses the electron transport mechanisms that we obtained as a function of the density of amorphous carbon (a-C) ultra-thin films. We calculated the density of states (total and projected), degree of electronic states' localization, and transmission function using the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions method. We generated 25 sample a-C structures using ab-initio molecular dynamics within the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. We identified three transport regimes as a function of the density, varying from semimetallic in low-density samples ( ≤2.4 g/cm3) to thermally activated in high-density ( ≥2.9 g/cm3) tetrahedral a-C. The middle-range densities (2.4 g/cm3 ≤ρ≤ 2.9 g/cm3) are characterized by resonant tunneling and hopping transport. Our findings offer a different perspective from the tight-binding model proposed by Katkov and Bhattacharyya [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 183712 (2013)], and agree with experimental observations in low-dimensional carbon systems [see S. Bhattacharyya, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 21 (2007)]. Identifying transport regimes is crucial to the process of understanding and applying a-C thin film in electronic devices and electrode coating in biosensors.

  20. Local and Landscape Correlates of Spider Activity Density and Species Richness in Urban Gardens.

    PubMed

    Otoshi, Michelle D; Bichier, Peter; Philpott, Stacy M

    2015-08-01

    Urbanization is a major threat to arthropod biodiversity and abundance due to reduction and loss of suitable natural habitat. Green spaces and small-scale agricultural areas may provide habitat and resources for arthropods within densely developed cities. We studied spider activity density (a measure of both abundance and degree of movement) and diversity in urban gardens in Santa Cruz, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties in central California, USA. We sampled for spiders with pitfall traps and sampled 38 local site characteristics for 5 mo in 19 garden sites to determine the relative importance of individual local factors. We also analyzed 16 landscape variables at 500-m and 1-km buffers surrounding each garden to determine the significance of landscape factors. We identified individuals from the most common families to species and identified individuals from other families to morphospecies. Species from the families Lycosidae and Gnaphosidae composed 81% of total adult spider individuals. Most of the significant factors that correlated with spider activity density and richness were local rather than landscape factors. Spider activity density and richness increased with mulch cover and flowering plant species, and decreased with bare soil. Thus, changes in local garden management have the potential to promote diversity of functionally important spiders in urban environments.

  1. Bounds on the local energy density of holographic CFTs from bulk geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Sebastian; Hickling, Andrew; Wiseman, Toby

    2016-11-01

    The stress tensor is a basic local operator in any field theory; in the context of AdS/CFT, it is the operator which is dual to the bulk geometry itself. Here we exploit this feature by using the bulk geometry to place constraints on the local energy density in static states of holographic (2+1)-dimensional CFTs living on a closed (but otherwise generally curved) spatial geometry. We allow for the presence of a marginal scalar deformation, dual to a massless scalar field in the bulk. For certain vacuum states in which the bulk geometry is well-behaved at zero temperature, we find that the bulk equations of motion imply that the local energy density integrated over specific boundary domains is negative. In the absence of scalar deformations, we use the inverse mean curvature flow to show that if the CFT spatial geometry has spherical topology but non-constant curvature, the local energy density must be positive somewhere. This result extends to other topologies, but only for certain types of vacuum; in particular, for a generic toroidal boundary, the vacuum’s bulk dual must be the zero-temperature limit of a toroidal black hole.

  2. Plasma Density Effects on Toroidal Flow Stabilization of Edge Localized Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2016-10-01

    Recent EAST experiments have demonstrated mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) with toroidal rotation flow in higher collisionality regime, suggesting potential roles of plasma density. In this work, the effects of plasma density on the toroidal flow stabilization of the high- n edge localized modes have been extensively studied in linear calculations for a circular-shaped limiter H-mode tokamak, using the initial-value extended MHD code NIMROD. In the single MHD model, toroidal flow has a weak stabilizing effects on the high- n modes. Such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced with the increase in plasma density. Furthermore, our calculations show that the enhanced stabilization of high- n modes from toroidal flow with higher edge plasma density persists in the 2-fluid MHD model. These findings may explain the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation in higher collisionality regime due to the enhancement of plasma density obtained in EAST experiment. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China under Grant Nos. 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program and the President International Fellowship Initiative of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Phototactic number-density flux in the localized bioconvection of Euglena gracilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Erika; Suematsu, Nobuhiko; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori; Izumi, Shunsuke; Iima, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Euglena gracilis is a unicellular phototactic flagellate; it escapes from light sources if the light intensity is higher than 200 W/m2 (negative phototaxis). When the suspension of E. gracilis is illuminated from the bottom by strong light, bioconvection patterns are generated. In the case of E. gracilis, the patterns can be spatially localized. The localization mechanism has not been clarified. We report experimental results related to the localization mechanism. In particular, we experimentally measured the strength of the phototaxis in the lateral direction as well as vertical direction. We prepared a thin container in which the suspension is included, and gave the linearly-changing light intensity. We found the number density gets a peak at a particular light intensity, which never happens if the suspension has the vertical phototaxis only. Further, we succeeded in getting the function representing lateral phototaxis. The relationship between the measured functions and the localized convection cells will be also reported.

  4. On stress collapse in adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. W.; Walter, J. W.

    T HE DYNAMICS of adiabatic shear band formation is considered making use of a simplified thermo/visco/plastic flow law. A new numerical solution is used to follow the growth of a perturbation from initiation, through early growth and severe localization, to a slowly varying terminal configuration. Asymptotic analyses predict the early and late stage patterns, but the timing and structure of the abrupt transition to severe localization can only be studied numerically, to date. A characteristic feature of the process is that temperature and plastic strain rate begin to localize immediately, but only slowly, whereas the stress first evolves almost as if there were no perturbation, but then collapses rapidly when severe localization occurs.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR A ∼300 MEGAPARSEC SCALE UNDER-DENSITY IN THE LOCAL GALAXY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R. C.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2013-09-20

    Galaxy counts and recent measurements of the luminosity density in the near-infrared have indicated the possibility that the local universe may be under-dense on scales of several hundred megaparsecs. The presence of a large-scale under-density in the local universe could introduce significant biases into the interpretation of cosmological observables, and, in particular, into the inferred effects of dark energy on the expansion rate. Here we measure the K-band luminosity density as a function of redshift to test for such a local under-density. For our primary sample in this study, we select galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey and use spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Survey (GAMA), and other redshift surveys to generate a K-selected catalog of ∼35, 000 galaxies that is ∼95% spectroscopically complete at K{sub AB} < 16.3 (K{sub AB} < 17 in the GAMA fields). To complement this sample at low redshifts, we also analyze a K-selected sample from the 2M++ catalog, which combines Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry with redshifts from the 2MASS redshift survey, the Six-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, and the SDSS. The combination of these samples allows for a detailed measurement of the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.2 (radial distances D ∼ 50-800 h{sub 70}{sup -1} Mpc). We find that the overall shape of the z = 0 rest-frame K-band luminosity function (M*-5log (h{sub 70}) = –22.15 ± 0.04 and α = –1.02 ± 0.03) appears to be relatively constant as a function of environment and distance from us. We find a local (z < 0.07, D < 300 h{sub 70}{sup -1} Mpc) luminosity density that is in good agreement with previous studies. Beyond z ∼ 0.07, we detect a rising luminosity density that reaches a value of roughly ∼1.5 times higher than that measured locally at z > 0.1. This suggests that the

  6. SCDM-k: Localized orbitals for solids via selected columns of the density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Anil; Lin, Lin; Ying, Lexing

    2017-04-01

    The recently developed selected columns of the density matrix (SCDM) method (Damle et al. 2015, [16]) is a simple, robust, efficient and highly parallelizable method for constructing localized orbitals from a set of delocalized Kohn-Sham orbitals for insulators and semiconductors with Γ point sampling of the Brillouin zone. In this work we generalize the SCDM method to Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with k-point sampling of the Brillouin zone, which is needed for more general electronic structure calculations for solids. We demonstrate that our new method, called SCDM-k, is by construction gauge independent and a natural way to describe localized orbitals. SCDM-k computes localized orbitals without the use of an optimization procedure, and thus does not suffer from the possibility of being trapped in a local minimum. Furthermore, the computational complexity of using SCDM-k to construct orthogonal and localized orbitals scales as O (Nlog ⁡ N) where N is the total number of k-points in the Brillouin zone. SCDM-k is therefore efficient even when a large number of k-points are used for Brillouin zone sampling. We demonstrate the numerical performance of SCDM-k using systems with model potentials in two and three dimensions.

  7. Modeling photo-bleaching kinetics to map local variations in rod rhodopsin density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehler, M.; Dobrosotskaya, J.; King, E. J.; Czaja, W.; Bonner, R. F.

    2011-03-01

    Localized rod photoreceptor and rhodopsin losses have been observed in post mortem histology both in normal aging and in age-related maculopathy. We propose to noninvasively map local rod rhodopsin density through analysis of the brightening of the underlying lipofuscin autofluorescence (LAF) in confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) imaging sequences starting in the dark adapted eye. The detected LAF increases as rhodopsin is bleached (time constant ~ 25sec) by the average retinal irradiance of the cSLO 488nm laser beam. We fit parameters of analytical expressions for the kinetics of rhodopsin bleaching that Lamb validated using electroretinogram recordings in human. By performing localized (~ 100μm) kinetic analysis, we create high resolution maps of the rhodopsin density. This new noninvasive imaging and analysis approach appears well-suited for measuring localized changes in the rod photoreceptors and correlating them at high spatial resolution with localized pathological changes of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) seen in steady-state LAF images.

  8. Exact density functional and wave function embedding schemes based on orbital localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hégely, Bence; Nagy, Péter R.; Ferenczy, György G.; Kállay, Mihály

    2016-08-01

    Exact schemes for the embedding of density functional theory (DFT) and wave function theory (WFT) methods into lower-level DFT or WFT approaches are introduced utilizing orbital localization. First, a simple modification of the projector-based embedding scheme of Manby and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 18A507 (2014)] is proposed. We also use localized orbitals to partition the system, but instead of augmenting the Fock operator with a somewhat arbitrary level-shift projector we solve the Huzinaga-equation, which strictly enforces the Pauli exclusion principle. Second, the embedding of WFT methods in local correlation approaches is studied. Since the latter methods split up the system into local domains, very simple embedding theories can be defined if the domains of the active subsystem and the environment are treated at a different level. The considered embedding schemes are benchmarked for reaction energies and compared to quantum mechanics (QM)/molecular mechanics (MM) and vacuum embedding. We conclude that for DFT-in-DFT embedding, the Huzinaga-equation-based scheme is more efficient than the other approaches, but QM/MM or even simple vacuum embedding is still competitive in particular cases. Concerning the embedding of wave function methods, the clear winner is the embedding of WFT into low-level local correlation approaches, and WFT-in-DFT embedding can only be more advantageous if a non-hybrid density functional is employed.

  9. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, Andres S.; Torres, F. Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (Nσ), the quantity χ = (Nσ - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions.

  10. The local projection in the density functional theory plus U approach: A critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Chao; Chen, Ze-Hua; Jiang, Hong

    2016-04-14

    Density-functional theory plus the Hubbard U correction (DFT + U) method is widely used in first-principles studies of strongly correlated systems, as it can give qualitatively (and sometimes, semi-quantitatively) correct description of energetic and structural properties of many strongly correlated systems with similar computational cost as local density approximation or generalized gradient approximation. On the other hand, the DFT + U approach is limited both theoretically and practically in several important aspects. In particular, the results of DFT + U often depend on the choice of local orbitals (the local projection) defining the subspace in which the Hubbard U correction is applied. In this work we have systematically investigated the issue of the local projection by considering typical transition metal oxides, β-MnO2 and MnO, and comparing the results obtained from different implementations of DFT + U. We found that the choice of the local projection has significant effects on the DFT + U results, which are more significant for systems with stronger covalent bonding (e.g., MnO2) than those with more ionic bonding (e.g., MnO). These findings can help to clarify some confusion arising from the practical use of DFT + U and may also provide insights for the development of new first-principles approaches beyond DFT + U.

  11. Ionization potentials of cobalt and nickel ions in the local-spin-density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, S. ); Kestner, N.R. )

    1990-06-15

    In this article we report on the ionization potentials of all configurations of the Co{sup {ital n}+} and Ni{sup {ital n}+} ions obtained via transition-state calculations using local-spin-density (LSD) potentials. The calculations were performed numerically with and without modifications of the local exchange potential for fractional occupation numbers. When the exchange potential is corrected for noninteger occupation numbers, a more consistent picture of the ionization process is obtained than that given by the LSD Kohn-Sham exchange. The agreement with experimental results is also significantly improved.

  12. Storm time impulsive enhancements of energetic oxygen due to adiabatic acceleration of preexisting warm oxygen in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keika, Kunihiro; Seki, Kanako; Nosé, Masahito; Machida, Shinobu; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Mitchell, Donald G.; Gkioulidou, Matina; Turner, Drew; Spence, Harlan; Larsen, Brian A.

    2016-08-01

    We examine enhancements of energetic (>50 keV) oxygen ions observed by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on board the Van Allen Probes spacecraft in the inner magnetosphere (L ~ 6) at 22-23 h magnetic local time (MLT) during an injection event of the 6 June 2013 storm. Simultaneous observations by two Van Allen Probes spacecraft located close together (~0.5 RE) indicate that particle injections occurred in the premidnight sector (< ~24 h MLT). We also examine the evolution of the proton and oxygen energy spectra at L ~ 6 during the injection event. The spectral slope did not significantly change during the storm. The oxygen phase space density (PSD) was shifted toward higher PSD in a wide range of the first adiabatic invariant. The spectral evolution manifests the characteristics of adiabatic acceleration and density increase of oxygen ions. Warm (0.1-10 keV) oxygen measured by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) instrument was enhanced prior to the storm mostly in magnetic field-aligned directions. The most reasonable scenario of this event is that warm oxygen ions that preexisted in the inner magnetosphere were picked up and adiabatically transported and accelerated by spatially localized, temporarily impulsive electric fields.

  13. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  14. Generation of localized magnetic moments in the charge-density-wave state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akzyanov, Ramil S.; Rozhkov, Alexander V.

    2015-08-01

    We propose a mechanism explaining the generation of localized magnetic moments in charge-density-wave compounds. Our model Hamiltonian describes an Anderson impurity placed in a host material exhibiting the charge-density wave. There is a region of the model's parameter space, where even weak Coulomb repulsion on the impurity site is able to localize the magnetic moment on the impurity. The phase diagram of a single impurity at T = 0 is mapped. To establish the connection with experiment, the thermodynamic properties of a random impurity ensemble is studied. Magnetic susceptibility of the ensemble diverges at low temperature; heat capacity as a function of the magnetic field demonstrates pronounced low field peak. Both features are consistent with experiments on orthorhombic TaS3 and blue bronze.

  15. Universal dynamics of density correlations at the transition to the many-body localized state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzejewski, M.; Herbrych, J.; Prelovšek, P.

    2016-12-01

    Within one-dimensional disordered models of interacting fermions, we perform a numerical study of several dynamical density correlations, which can serve as hallmarks of the transition to the many-body localized state. The results confirm that density-wave correlations exhibit quite an abrupt change with increasing disorder, with a nonvanishing long-time value characteristic for the nonergodic phase. In addition, our results reveal a logarithmic variation of correlations in time in a wide time window, which we can bring in connection with the anomalous behavior of the dynamical conductivity near the transition. Our results support the view that the transition to many-body localization can be characterized by universal dynamical exponents.

  16. Reformulating time-dependent density functional theory with non-orthogonal localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Weihai; Yang, Weitao

    2010-01-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has broad application in the study of electronic response, excitation and transport. To extend such application to large and complex systems, we develop a reformulation of TDDFT equations in terms of non-orthogonal localized molecular orbitals (NOLMOs). NOLMO is the most localized representation of electronic degrees of freedom and has been used in ground state calculations. In atomic orbital (AO) representation, the sparsity of NOLMO is transferred to the coefficient matrix of molecular orbitals (MOs). Its novel use in TDDFT here leads to a very simple form of time propagation equations which can be solved with linear-scaling effort. We have tested the method for several long-chain saturated and conjugated molecular systems within the self-consistent charge density-functional tight-binding method (SCC-DFTB) and demonstrated its accuracy. This opens up pathways for TDDFT applications to large bio- and nano-systems.

  17. Scanning single quantum emitter fluorescence lifetime imaging: quantitative analysis of the local density of photonic states.

    PubMed

    Schell, Andreas W; Engel, Philip; Werra, Julia F M; Wolff, Christian; Busch, Kurt; Benson, Oliver

    2014-05-14

    Their intrinsic properties render single quantum systems as ideal tools for quantum enhanced sensing and microscopy. As an additional benefit, their size is typically on an atomic scale that enables sensing with very high spatial resolution. Here, we report on utilizing a single nitrogen vacancy center in nanodiamond for performing three-dimensional scanning-probe fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. By measuring changes of the single emitter's lifetime, information on the local density of optical states is acquired at the nanoscale. Three-dimensional ab initio discontinuous Galerkin time-domain simulations are used in order to verify the results and to obtain additional insights. This combination of experiment and simulations to gather quantitative information on the local density of optical states is of direct relevance for the understanding of fundamental quantum optical processes as well as for the engineering of novel photonic and plasmonic devices.

  18. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Finzel, Kati

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  19. Transverse isospin response function of asymmetric nuclear matter from a local isospin density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipparini, Enrico; Pederiva, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The time dependent local isospin density approximation (TDLIDA) has been extended to the study of the transverse isospin response function in nuclear matter with an arbitrary neutron-proton asymmetry parameter ξ . The energy density functional has been chosen in order to fit existing accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations with a density dependent potential. The evolution of the response with ξ in the Δ Tz=±1 channels is quite different. While the strength of the Δ Tz=+1 channel disappears rather quickly by increasing the asymmetry, the Δ Tz=-1 channel develops a stronger and stronger collective mode that in the regime typical of neutron star matter at β equilibrium almost completely exhausts the excitation spectrum of the system. The neutrino mean free paths obtained from the TDLIDA responses are strongly dependent on ξ and on the presence of collective modes, leading to a sizable difference with respect to the prediction of the Fermi gas model.

  20. Typical density of states as an order parameter for the Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Ka-Ming; Moore, Conrad; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The typical medium theory and its recently proposed extensions for models with off-diagonal disorder and multiple bands are significant progress towards the study of localization phenomenon in real materials. The fundamental assumption of these methods is that the typical density of states can be treated as an order parameter. However, its justifications in lattice model is largely lacking. This is predominantly due to two factors. First, the lattice sizes amenable for exact diagonalization is rather limited. Second, the small lattice sizes lead to a very sensitive dependence on the broadening factor. In this work, we use the kernel polynomial method to perform simulation for large system sizes. By adapting the method for the study of criticality, we find that the typical density of states has a well defined finite size scaling behavior. In particular, from the kurtosis, Binder ratio, of the distribution of the density of states for different lattice sizes, we find a clear crossing to identify the critical point. This provides further support that the typical density of states can be used as an order parameter for the localization transition.

  1. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng Mattsson, Ann E.; Armiento, Rickard

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu–O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  2. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Hao, Feng; Armiento, Rickard; Mattsson, Ann E

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu-O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  3. Parallel and Low-Order Scaling Implementation of Hartree-Fock Exchange Using Local Density Fitting.

    PubMed

    Köppl, Christoph; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-07-12

    Calculations using modern linear-scaling electron-correlation methods are often much faster than the necessary reference Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations. We report a newly implemented HF program that speeds up the most time-consuming step, namely, the evaluation of the exchange contributions to the Fock matrix. Using localized orbitals and their sparsity, local density fitting (LDF), and atomic orbital domains, we demonstrate that the calculation of the exchange matrix scales asymptotically linearly with molecular size. The remaining parts of the HF calculation scale cubically but become dominant only for very large molecular sizes or with many processing cores. The method is well parallelized, and the speedup scales well with up to about 100 CPU cores on multiple compute nodes. The effect of the local approximations on the accuracy of computed HF and local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory energies is systematically investigated, and default values are established for the parameters that determine the domain sizes. Using these values, calculations for molecules with hundreds of atoms in combination with triple-ζ basis sets can be carried out in less than 1 h, with just a few compute nodes. The method can also be used to speed up density functional theory calculations with hybrid functionals that contain HF exchange.

  4. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving for trapped-ion displacement in phase space

    PubMed Central

    An, Shuoming; Lv, Dingshun; del Campo, Adolfo; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    The application of adiabatic protocols in quantum technologies is severely limited by environmental sources of noise and decoherence. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving constitute a powerful alternative that speed up time-evolution while mimicking adiabatic dynamics. Here we report the experimental implementation of counterdiabatic driving in a continuous variable system, a shortcut to the adiabatic transport of a trapped ion in phase space. The resulting dynamics is equivalent to a ‘fast-motion video' of the adiabatic trajectory. The robustness of this protocol is shown to surpass that of competing schemes based on classical local controls and Fourier optimization methods. Our results demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity provide a robust speedup of quantum protocols of wide applicability in quantum technologies. PMID:27669897

  5. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R. Krishnan . E-mail: kuttyk@nei.nih.gov; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-07-14

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P{sup 27}KKRKAP{sup 276}) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting.

  6. Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nuclear Targeting: The Effect of Nanoparticle Size and Nuclear Localization Sequence Density.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Breitinger, Hans G; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-12-07

    Many recently discovered therapeutic proteins exert their main function in the nucleus, thus requiring both efficient uptake and correct intracellular targeting. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted interest as protein delivery vehicles due to their biocompatibility and ability to escape the endosomes offering high potential for nuclear delivery. Molecular entry into the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complexes, the efficiency of which is dependent on NP size and the presence of nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes (S-NPs ≈ 25 nm; L-NP ≈ 150 nm) were formulated, and they were modified with different densities of the octapeptide NLS CPKKKRKV (S-NPs, 0.25, 0.5, 2.0 NLS/nm(2); L-NPs, 0.6, 0.9, 2 NLS/nm(2)). Unmodified and NLS-tagged NPs were evaluated for their protein loading capacity, extent of cell association, cell uptake, cell surface binding, and finally nuclear delivery efficiency in L929 fibroblasts. To avoid errors generated with cell fractionation and nuclear isolation protocols, nuclear delivery was assessed in intact cells utilizing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorometry and microscopy. Although L-NPs showed ≈10-fold increase in protein loading per NP when compared to S-NPs, due to higher cell association and uptake S-NPs showed superior protein delivery. NLS exerts a size and density dependent effect on nanoparticle uptake and surface binding, with a general reduction in NP cell surface binding and an increase in cell uptake with the increase in NLS density (up to 8.4-fold increase in uptake of High-NLS-L-NPs (2 NLS/nm(2)) compared to unmodified L-NPs). However, for nuclear delivery, unmodified S-NPs show higher nuclear localization rates when compared to NLS modified NPs (up to 5-fold by FRET microscopy). For L-NPs an intermediate NLS density (0.9 NLS/nm(2)) seems to provide highest nuclear localization (3.7-fold increase in nuclear delivery compared to High

  7. The Floquet Adiabatic Theorem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Phillip; Bukov, Marin; D'Alessio, Luca; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Davidson, Shainen; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2015-03-01

    The existance of the adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems has been the subject of an active debate with different articles reaching opposite conclusions over the years. In this talk we clarify the situation by deriving a systematic expansion in the time-derivatives of a slow parameter for the occupation probabilities of the Floque states. Our analysis shows that the in a certain limit the transition between Floquet eigenstates are suppressed and it is possible to define an adiabatic theorem for Floquet systems. Crucially we observe however that the conditions for adiabaticity in ordinary and Floquet systems are different and that this difference can become important when the amplitude of the periodic driving is large. We illustrate our results with specific examples of a periodically driven harmonic oscillator and cold atoms in optical lattices which are relevant in current experiments.

  8. Adiabatic losses in Stirling refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauwens, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Stirling cycle has been used very effectively in cryocoolers; but efficiencies relative to the Carnot limit are typically observed to peak for absolute temperature ratios of about two, which makes it less suitable for low-life refrigeration. The adiabatic loss appears to be responsible for poor performance at small temperature differences. In this paper, adiabatic losses are evaluated, for a temperature ratio of 2/3, taking into account the effect of phase angle between pistons, of volume ratio, of the distribution of the dead volume necessary to reduce the volume ratio, and of the distribution of displacement between expansion and compression spaces. The study is carried out numerically, using an adiabatic Stirling engine model in which cylinder flow is assumed to be stratified. Results show that the best location for the cylinder dead volume is on the compression side. Otherwise, all strategies used to trade off refrigeration for coefficient of performance are found to be roughly equivalent.

  9. Evaluation of iris functional capillary density in experimental local and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arora, N; Islam, S; Wafa, K; Zhou, J; Toguri, J T; Cerny, V; Lehmann, C

    2017-04-01

    The ocular microcirculation represents an important target to treat inflammatory diseases of eye, where impairment of microvascular blood flow plays key role as, for example, in anterior uveitis. To evaluate novel interventions targeting the microcirculation, appropriate and reliable tools to study this particular microvascular bed are needed. Intravital microscopy (IVM) belongs to several methods allowing evaluation of microcirculation experimentally, even in small animals. The aim of our study was to examine the iridial microcirculation (IMIC) in uveitis induced by local or systemic endotoxin administration in rats and mice by IVM and to propose new parameters to quantify the changes within the IMIC. Systemic inflammation was induced in rats by intravenous endotoxin administration, control group received normal saline intravenously. Local inflammation was induced in mice by intravitreal endotoxin administration, the control group received normal saline intravitreally. IVM of IMIC was performed in animals receiving systemic endotoxin prior injection and 1 and 2 h afterwards, respectively, in animals receiving intravitreal endotoxin/saline prior local injection and 5 h afterwards. Obtained video recordings were analyzed off-line. Functional capillary density (FCD) and dysfunctional capillary density (DCD) were evaluated for description of IMIC, and calculation of FCD/DCD ratio was performed. In systemic inflammation, FCD was significantly decreased compared to control animals. In local inflammation, the number of functional capillaries in the IMIC was significantly reduced following the endotoxin challenge. Analysis of the DCD revealed a significant increase in capillaries with reduced perfusion after intravitreal endotoxin administration and right shift of the FCD/DCD ratio was observed after endotoxin local injection. Detecting and quantifying changes in IMIC during systemic or local inflammation in experimental animals by IVM was feasible. Therefore, IVM of the

  10. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  11. The formation of multiple adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Wright, T. W.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2006-07-01

    In a previous paper, Zhou et al. [2006. A numerical methodology for investigating adiabatic shear band formation. J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 54, 904-926] developed a numerical method for analyzing one-dimensional deformation of thermoviscoplastic materials. The method uses a second order algorithm for integration along characteristic lines, and computes the plastic flow after complete localization with high resolution and efficiency. We apply this numerical scheme to analyze localization in a thermoviscoplastic material where multiple shear bands are allowed to form at random locations in a large specimen. As a shear band develops, it unloads neighboring regions and interacts with other bands. Beginning with a random distribution of imperfections, which might be imagined as arising qualitatively from the microstructure, we obtain the average spacing of shear bands through calculations and compare our results with previously existing theoretical estimates. It is found that the spacing between nucleating shear bands follows the perturbation theory due to Wright and Ockendon [1996. A scaling law for the effect of inertia on the formation of adiabatic shear bands. Int. J. Plasticity 12, 927-934], whereas the spacing between mature shear bands is closer to that predicted by the momentum diffusion theory of Grady and Kipp [1987. The growth of unstable thermoplastic shear with application to steady-wave shock compression in solids. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 35, 95-119]. Scaling laws for the dependence of band spacing on material parameters differ in many respects from either theory.

  12. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  13. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiawei; Qi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins. Method In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC), based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID), of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification. Results Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC). Conclusions LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods. PMID:26125187

  14. Where Does the Density Localize? Convergent Behavior for Global Hybrids, Range Separation, and DFT+U.

    PubMed

    Gani, Terry Z H; Kulik, Heather J

    2016-12-13

    Approximate density functional theory (DFT) suffers from many-electron self-interaction error, otherwise known as delocalization error, that may be diagnosed and then corrected through elimination of the deviation from exact piecewise linear behavior between integer electron numbers. Although paths to correction of energetic delocalization error are well-established, the impact of these corrections on the electron density is less well-studied. Here, we compare the effect on density delocalization of DFT+U (i.e., semilocal DFT augmented with a Hubbard U correction), global hybrid tuning, and range-separated hybrid tuning on a diverse test set of 32 transition metal complexes and observe the three methods to have qualitatively equivalent effects on the ground state density. Regardless of valence orbital diffuseness (i.e., from 2p to 5p), ligand electronegativity (i.e., from Al to O), basis set (i.e., plane wave versus localized basis set), metal (i.e., Ti, Fe, Ni), and spin state, or tuning method, we consistently observe substantial charge loss at the metal and gain at ligand atoms (∼0.3-0.5 e or more). This charge loss at the metal is preferentially from the minority spin, leading to increasing magnetic moment as well. Using accurate wave function theory references, we observe that a minimum error in partial charges and magnetic moments occurs at higher tuning parameters than typically employed to eliminate energetic delocalization error. These observations motivate the need to develop multifaceted approximate-DFT error correction approaches that separately treat density delocalization and energetic errors to recover both correct density and orbital energy-derived properties.

  15. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  16. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  17. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  18. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  19. Computation of local exchange coefficients in strongly interacting one-dimensional few-body systems: local density approximation and exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchukov, Oleksandr V.; Eriksen, Emil H.; Midtgaard, Jonatan M.; Kalaee, Alex A. S.; Fedorov, Dmitri V.; Jensen, Aksel S.; Zinner, Nikolaj T.

    2016-02-01

    One-dimensional multi-component Fermi or Bose systems with strong zero-range interactions can be described in terms of local exchange coefficients and mapping the problem into a spin model is thus possible. For arbitrary external confining potentials the local exchanges are given by highly non-trivial geometric factors that depend solely on the geometry of the confinement through the single-particle eigenstates of the external potential. To obtain accurate effective Hamiltonians to describe such systems one needs to be able to compute these geometric factors with high precision which is difficult due to the computational complexity of the high-dimensional integrals involved. An approach using the local density approximation would therefore be a most welcome approximation due to its simplicity. Here we assess the accuracy of the local density approximation by going beyond the simple harmonic oscillator that has been the focus of previous studies and consider some double-wells of current experimental interest. We find that the local density approximation works quite well as long as the potentials resemble harmonic wells but break down for larger barriers. In order to explore the consequences of applying the local density approximation in a concrete setup we consider quantum state transfer in the effective spin models that one obtains. Here we find that even minute deviations in the local exchange coefficients between the exact and the local density approximation can induce large deviations in the fidelity of state transfer for four, five, and six particles.

  20. Is local alcohol outlet density related to alcohol-related morbidity and mortality in Scottish cities?

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, E.A.; Hill, S.E.; Mitchell, R.; Pearce, J.; Shortt, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption may be influenced by the local alcohol retailing environment. This study is the first to examine neighbourhood alcohol outlet availability (on- and off-sales outlets) and alcohol-related health outcomes in Scotland. Alcohol-related hospitalisations and deaths were significantly higher in neighbourhoods with higher outlet densities, and off-sales outlets were more important than on-sales outlets. The relationships held for most age groups, including those under the legal minimum drinking age, although were not significant for the youngest legal drinkers (18–25 years). Alcohol-related deaths and hospitalisations were higher in more income-deprived neighbourhoods, and the gradient in deaths (but not hospitalisations) was marginally larger in neighbourhoods with higher off-sales outlet densities. Efforts to reduce alcohol-related harm should consider the potentially important role of the alcohol retail environment. PMID:25840352

  1. The dipole moment of the spin density as a local indicator for phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, D.; Schmitz-Antoniak, C.; Warland, A.; Darbandi, M.; Haldar, S.; Bhandary, S.; Eriksson, O.; Sanyal, B.; Wende, H.

    2014-01-01

    The intra-atomic magnetic dipole moment - frequently called 〈Tz〉 term - plays an important role in the determination of spin magnetic moments by x-ray absorption spectroscopy for systems with nonspherical spin density distributions. In this work, we present the dipole moment as a sensitive monitor to changes in the electronic structure in the vicinity of a phase transiton. In particular, we studied the dipole moment at the Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites of magnetite as an indicator for the Verwey transition by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and density functional theory. Our experimental results prove that there exists a local change in the electronic structure at temperatures above the Verwey transition correlated to the known spin reorientation. Furthermore, it is shown that measurement of the dipole moment is a powerful tool to observe this transition in small magnetite nanoparticles for which it is usually screened by blocking effects in classical magnetometry. PMID:25041757

  2. Studies on plasmon characteristics and the local density of states of Au and Ag based nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, M.; Biju, V.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the conductive properties and the local density of states of chemically pure Au, Ag, Ag@Au core-shell and Au-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles is technologically important. Herein, the I-V characteristics and the density of states derived from scanning tunneling microscopy measurements made under atmospheric conditions is reported. The nanoparticles in thin film form used in this study were prepared by laser ablation in water followed by drop and evaporation. The morphology of the surface of the nanostructures was observed from optimizing tunneling current in each case. The monometallic Au and Ag particles shows almost similar current characteristics as well as discrete energy states but the slope of I-V characteristics was different for bimetallic structures. An attempt has also been made to compare the current measurements done in the nanoscale with the surface plasmon characteristics.

  3. Edge-localized-mode--induced transport of impurity density, energy, and momentum.

    PubMed

    Wade, M R; Burrell, K H; Leonard, A W; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B

    2005-06-10

    High temporal and spatial resolution measurements of impurity dynamics associated with an edge-localized mode (ELM) indicate that the ELM perturbation consists of two distinct parts: a rapid (< 300 micros) expulsion of impurity density at the time of the instability followed by a slower time scale (< 1 ms) decrease in the ion temperature. While the density perturbation remains nearly constant over a wide range of plasma collisionality, the temperature perturbation decreases as the collisionality increases. Analysis of the radial electric field E(r) evolution indicates that the E(r) well normally present in H-mode plasmas is modified strongly by the ELM and that the size of the temperature perturbation is correlated with the associated change in the E x B shear.

  4. Evolution of the local packing density in a sheared granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; van Hecke, Martin; Sakaie, Ken

    2005-11-01

    The local particle packing density, η, in a bed of poppy seeds sheared in a vertical, split-bottom cylindrical container is measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Wide shear zones away from the wall are generated when a thin concentric disk at the bottom of the cylinder, and with radius less than the cylinder radius, is rotated slowly. Experiments reveal that, initially, a shear band forms at the outer edge of the disk which decreases in radius with decreasing depth. Material near the shear zone dilates with a corresponding decrease in η of about 15%. The radial extent of the dilated region increases approximately logarithmically with increasing rotation in shallow layers. In relatively deep layers, the shear zone is at first entirely below the free surface, but with further rotation grows vertically creating a low η core. We discuss the relation between the previously reported universal velocity profiles across the shear zone and the spatial and temporal evolution of the packing density.

  5. Gradient corrections to the local-density approximation for trapped superfluid Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Csordas, Andras; Almasy, Orsolya; Szepfalusy, Peter

    2010-12-15

    Two species superfluid Fermi gas is investigated on the BCS side up to the Feshbach resonance. Using the Greens's function technique gradient corrections are calculated to the generalized Thomas-Fermi theory including Cooper pairing. Their relative magnitude is found to be measured by the small parameter (d/R{sub TF}){sup 4}, where d is the oscillator length of the trap potential and R{sub TF} is the radial extension of the density n in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. In particular, at the Feshbach resonance the universal corrections to the local density approximation are calculated and a universal prefactor {kappa}{sub W}=7/27 is derived for the von Weizsaecker-type correction {kappa}{sub W}(({h_bar}/2{pi}){sup 2}/2m)({nabla}{sup 2}n{sup 1/2}/n{sup 1/2}).

  6. The dipole moment of the spin density as a local indicator for phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, D; Schmitz-Antoniak, C; Warland, A; Darbandi, M; Haldar, S; Bhandary, S; Eriksson, O; Sanyal, B; Wende, H

    2014-07-21

    The intra-atomic magnetic dipole moment - frequently called ⟨Tz⟩ term - plays an important role in the determination of spin magnetic moments by x-ray absorption spectroscopy for systems with nonspherical spin density distributions. In this work, we present the dipole moment as a sensitive monitor to changes in the electronic structure in the vicinity of a phase transiton. In particular, we studied the dipole moment at the Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) sites of magnetite as an indicator for the Verwey transition by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and density functional theory. Our experimental results prove that there exists a local change in the electronic structure at temperatures above the Verwey transition correlated to the known spin reorientation. Furthermore, it is shown that measurement of the dipole moment is a powerful tool to observe this transition in small magnetite nanoparticles for which it is usually screened by blocking effects in classical magnetometry.

  7. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, the dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.

  8. Local ionospheric electron density reconstruction from simultaneous ground-based GNSS and ionosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankov, S. M.; Warnant, R.; Stegen, K.

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the LIEDR (Local Ionospheric Electron Density Reconstruction) system is to acquire and process data from simultaneous ground-based GNSS TEC and digital ionosonde measurements, and subsequently to deduce the vertical electron density distribution in the local ionosphere. LIEDR is primarily designed to operate in real time for service applications, and, if sufficient data from solar and geomagnetic observations are available, to provide short-term forecast as well. For research applications and further development of the system, a post-processing mode of operation is also envisaged. In essence, the reconstruction procedure consists in the following. The high-precision ionosonde measurements are used for directly obtaining the bottom part of the electron density profile. The ionospheric profiler for the lower side (i.e. below the density peak height, hmF2) is based on the Epstein layer functions using the known values of the critical frequencies, foF2 and foE, and the propagation factor, M3000F2. The corresponding bottom-side part of the total electron content is calculated from this profile and is then subtracted from the GPS TEC value in order to obtain the unknown portion of the TEC in the upper side (i.e. above the hmF2). Ionosonde data, together with the simultaneously-measured TEC and empirically obtained O+/H+ ion transition level values, are all required for the determination of the topside electron density scale height. The topside electron density is considered as a sum of the constituent oxygen and hydrogen ion densities with unknown vertical scale heights. The latter are calculated by solving a system of transcendental equations that arise from the incorporation of a suitable ionospheric profiler (Chapman, Epstein, or Exponential) into formulae describing ionospheric conditions (plasma quasi-neutrality, ion transition level). Once the topside scale heights are determined, the construction of the vertical electron density distribution in the

  9. Existence of minimizers for Kohn-Sham within the local spin density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontier, David

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to extend the work by Anantharaman and Cancès (2009 Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré (C) 26 2425-55) and prove the existence of minimizers for the spin-polarized Kohn-Sham model in the presence of a magnetic field within the local spin density approximation. We show that for any magnetic field that vanishes at infinity, the existence of minimizers is ensured for neutral or positively charged systems. The proof relies on classical concentration-compactness techniques.

  10. Electron affinities for rare gases and some actinides from local-spin-density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Wrinn, M.C.; Whitehead, M.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The negative ions of the rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and some actinides (Pu, Am, Bk, Cf, and Es) have been calculated self-consistently by the generalized exchange local-spin-density-functional theory with self-interaction correction and correlation. The electron affinities were obtained as the differences between the statistical total energies of the negative ions and neutral atoms; the electron affinities were positive around several millirydbergs. Consequently, the negative ions are predicted stable for the rare gases and actinides.

  11. Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator analysis of the PSCz local Universe: density field and cosmic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano-Díaz, Emilio; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2007-11-01

    We apply the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) to reconstruct and analyse the matter distribution and cosmic velocity flows in the local Universe on the basis of the PSCz galaxy survey. The prime objective of this study is the production of optimal resolution 3D maps of the volume-weighted velocity and density fields throughout the nearby universe, the basis for a detailed study of the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web at each level probed by underlying galaxy sample. Fully volume-covering 3D maps of the density and (volume-weighted) velocity fields in the cosmic vicinity, out to a distance of 150h-1Mpc, are presented. Based on the Voronoi and Delaunay tessellation defined by the spatial galaxy sample, DTFE involves the estimate of density values on the basis of the volume of the related Delaunay tetrahedra and the subsequent use of the Delaunay tessellation as natural multidimensional (linear) interpolation grid for the corresponding density and velocity fields throughout the sample volume. The linearized model of the spatial galaxy distribution and the corresponding peculiar velocities of the PSCz galaxy sample, produced by Branchini et al., forms the input sample for the DTFE study. The DTFE maps reproduce the high-density supercluster regions in optimal detail, both their internal structure as well as their elongated or flattened shape. The corresponding velocity flows trace the bulk and shear flows marking the region extending from the Pisces-Perseus supercluster, via the Local Superclusters, towards the Hydra-Centaurus and the Shapley concentration. The most outstanding and unique feature of the DTFE maps is the sharply defined radial outflow regions in and around underdense voids, marking the dynamical importance of voids in the local Universe. The maximum expansion rate of voids defines a sharp cut-off in the DTFE velocity divergence probability distribution function. We found that on the basis of this cut-off DTFE manages to consistently

  12. Digital waveguide adiabatic passage part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Jesse A.; Steel, M. J.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  13. Local calibrated bone mineral density in the mandible presented using a color coding scheme.

    PubMed

    Homolka, P; Beer, A; Birkfellner, W; Gahleitner, A; Nowotny, R; Bergmann, H

    2001-11-01

    Calibrated information on bone mineral density (BMD) may be used in dental implantology to measure "bone quality". It can be used to estimate the expected primary implant stability preoperatively and to guide the surgeon in selecting optimum implant types and operation techniques. Using a preoperative dental computed tomography (Dental-CT) scan, all of this information can be obtained without additional examinations and thus without additional X-ray exposure of the patient. In contrast to bone mineral determination in other body regions, local BMD values are important in the jaw bone. Therefore, a regimen where color-coded information on local bone mineralization is superimposed on Dental-CT images is proposed using the original CT volumes as well as reformatted views.

  14. Self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density calculations for rare earth materials

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Temmerman, W.M.; Szotek, Z.; Laegsgaard, J.; Winter, H.

    2000-04-20

    The ab initio self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation is discussed with emphasis on the ability to describe localized f-electron states in rare earth solids. Two methods for minimizing the SIC-LSD total energy functional are discussed, one using a unified Hamiltonian for all electron states, thus having the advantages of Bloch's theorem, the other one employing an iterative scheme in real space. Results for cerium and cerium compounds as well as other rare earths are presented. For the cerium compounds the onset of f-electron delocalization can be accurately described, including the intricate isostructural phase transitions in elemental cerium and CeP. In Pr and Sm the equilibrium lattice constant and zero temperature equation of state is greatly improved in comparison with the LSD results.

  15. Effect of Oxidation on Localized Heat Generation and Dielectric Breakdown of Low-Density Polyethylene Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurimoto, Takao; Nagao, Masayuki; Kosaki, Masamitsu

    1995-12-01

    The effect of oxidation on localized heat generation and dielectric breakdown in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film was studied by thermography. In the non-McKeown-type epoxy-free electrode system, localized heat generation of LDPE film leading to dielectric breakdown increased and breakdown strength decreased upon oxidation. In the McKeown-type specimen, however, the breakdown strength of oxidized LDPE film is higher than that of an unoxidized one. It is considered that enhancement of the thermal process is a major factor of breakdown in the epoxy-free electrode system and that homo-space charge and/or electron scattering effect is dominant in the McKeown type specimen.

  16. Influence of the local-spin-density correlation functional on the stability of bcc ferromagnetic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Clougherty, D. P.; MacLaren, J. M.; Albers, R. C.; Wang, C. S.

    1991-10-01

    The influence of local-spin-dependent correlation effects on the predicted stable ground-state phase of iron is reexamined with use of general-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave calculations. Differences in the form of the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair (VWN) local-spin-density functional used in previous studies are noted, since in previous studies significant additional approximations were made with respect to those of Vosko, Wilk, and Nusan [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)] and of MacLaren, Clougherty, and Albers [Phys. Rev. B 42, 3205 (1990)]. While the results of previous linear muffin-tin orbital calculations using the VWN functional predict a bcc ferromagnetic ground state, the present calculations show that the VWN spin-correlation effects fail to stabilize a bcc ground state. Considerable sensitivity to the form of the spin interpolation is found.

  17. Resolving phase information of the optical local density of state with scattering near-field probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R.; Vincent, R.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically discuss the link between the phase measured using a scattering optical scanning near-field microscopy (s-SNOM) and the local density of optical states (LDOS). A remarkable result is that the LDOS information is directly included in the phase of the probe. Therefore by monitoring the spatial variation of the trans-scattering phase, we locally measure the phase modulation associated with the probe and the optical paths. We demonstrate numerically that a technique involving two-phase imaging of a sample with two different sized tips should allow to obtain the image the pLDOS. For this imaging method, numerical comparison with extinction probe measurement shows crucial qualitative and quantitative improvement.

  18. Micromagnetic model for studies on Magnetic Tunnel Junction switching dynamics, including local current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Skowroński, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    We present a model introducing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a Slonczewski's Spin-Transfer-Torque (STT) component in order to take into account spin polarized current influence on the magnetization dynamics, which was developed as an Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework extension. We implement the following computations: magnetoresistance of vertical channels is calculated from the local spin arrangement, local current density is used to calculate the in-plane and perpendicular STT components as well as the Oersted field, which is caused by the vertical current flow. The model allows for an analysis of all listed components separately, therefore, the contribution of each physical phenomenon in dynamic behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) magnetization is discussed. The simulated switching voltage is compared with the experimental data measured in MTJ nanopillars.

  19. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  20. Cohesion and promotion energies in the transition metals: Implications of the local-density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, R. E.; Fernando, G. W.; Weinert, M.; Wang, Y. J.; Davenport, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    The accuracy of the local-density (LDA) or local-spin-density (LSDA) approximations when applied to transition metals is of great concern. Estimates of the cohesive energy compare the total energy of the solid with that of the free atom. This involves chosing the reference state of the free atom which, as a rule, will not be the free atom's ground state in LDA or LSDA. Comparing one reference state versus another, e.g., the dn-1s vs dn-2s2 for a transition metal, corresponds to calculating an s-d promotion energy Δ, which may be compared with experiment. Gunnarsson and Jones (GJ) [Phys. Rev. B 31, 7588 (1985)] found for the 3d row that the calculated Δ displayed systematic errors which they attributed to a difference in error within the LSDA in the treatment of the coupling of the outer-core electrons with the d versus non-d valence electrons. This study has been extended to relativistic calculations for the 3d, 4d, and 5d rows and for other promotions. The situation is more complicated than suggested by GJ, and its implications for cohesive energy estimates will be discussed.

  1. Floral herbivory increases with inflorescence size and local plant density in Digitalis purpurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletvold, Nina; Grindeland, John M.

    2008-07-01

    Insect herbivores search for their host plants in heterogeneous environments, and the efficiency of host location may be influenced by plant architecture and abundance. In this study, we ask how plant and habitat characteristics traditionally thought to attract pollinators are related to attack rates by floral herbivores. Patterns of floral herbivory by the moth larva Eupithecia pulchellata were studied in relation to inflorescence size and local plant density in two years in a natural population of the facultative biennial Digitalis purpurea. Overall levels of herbivory were low, 84% of the infested plants lost less than 10% of their flowers. Only 9% of the plants lost more than 20% of their flowers. Probability of herbivory at the plant level increased strongly with inflorescence height, and it was considerably higher in dense patches compared to sparse ones. There was no effect of local plant density on the functional relationship between inflorescence size and probability of herbivory. Both number and proportion of damaged flowers per plant increased with inflorescence height. The results suggest that E. pulchellata is attracted to dense patches and large individuals of D. purpurea, and that negative effects of herbivory increase with plant size. This implies diminishing returns for investment in more flowers in D. purpurea, and indicates that herbivory may select for smaller flowering size and flower number in this monocarpic species.

  2. Electron Temperature and Density in Local Helicity Injection and High betat Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlossberg, David J.

    Tokamak startup in a spherical torus (ST) and an ST-based fusion nuclear science facility can greatly benefit from using non-inductive methods. The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment has developed a non-inductive startup technique using local helicity injection (LHI). Electron temperature, T e(r), and density, ne( r), profiles during LHI are unknown. These profiles are critical for understanding both the physics of the injection and relaxation mechanisms, as well as for extrapolating this technique to larger devices. A new Thomson scattering system has been designed, installed, and used to characterize Te(r, t) and ne(r, t) during LHI. The diagnostic leverages new technology in image intensified CCD cameras, high-efficiency diffraction gratings, and reliable Nd:YAG lasers. Custom systems for stray light mitigation, fast shuttering, and precision timing have been developed and implemented. The overall system provides a low-maintenance, economic, and effective means to explore novel physics regimes in Pegasus. Electron temperature and density profiles during LHI have been measured for the first time. Results indicate Te(r) peaked in the core of plasmas, and sustained while plasmas are coupled to injection drive. Electron densities also peak near the core of the tokamak, up to local values of n e ˜ 1.5 x 1019 m -3. A comparison of Te( r, t) has been made between discharges with dominant drive voltage from induction versus helicity injection. In both cases Te ( r, t) profiles remain peaked, with values for Te ,max > 150 eV in dominantly helicity-driven plasmas using high-field side LHI. Sustained values of betat ˜ 100% have been demonstrated in a tokamak for the first time. Plasmas are created and driven entirely non-solenoidally, and exhibit MHD stability. Measured temperature and density profiles are used to constrain magnetic equilibrium reconstructions, which calculate 80% < betat < 100% throughout a toroidal field ramp-down. For a continued decrease in the toroidal

  3. Classification of metal-oxide bonded interactions based on local potential- and kinetic-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David; Crawford, T Daniel; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy; Downs, R. T.

    2006-02-28

    A classification of the HF bonded interactions comprising a large number of molecules has been proposed by Espinosa et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 5529 (2002)] based on the ratio |V(rc)|/G(rc) where |V(rc)| is the magnitude of the local potential energy density and G(rc) is the local kinetic density evaluated at the bond critical points, rc. A calculation of the ratio for the MO bonded interactions comprising a relatively large number of molecules and earth materials, together with the constraints imposed by the values of Ñ2ρ(rc) and the local electronic energy density H(rc) = G(rc) + V(rc) in the HF study, yielded the same classification for the oxides as found for the fluorides. This is true despite the different trends of the bond critical point and local energy properties with the bond length displayed by the HF and MO bonded interactions. LiO, NaO and MgO bonded interactions classify as closed shell ionic bonds, BeO, AlO, SiO, BO and PO bonded interactions classify as bonds of intermediate character and NO bonded interactions classify as shared covalent bonds. CO and SO bonded interactions classify as both intermediate and covalent bonded interactions. The CO triple bonded interaction classifies as a bond of intermediate character and the CO single bonded interaction classifies as a covalent bond whereas their H(rc) value indicates that they are both covalent bonds. The |V(rc)|/G(rc) ratios for the BeO, AlO and SiO bonded interactions indicate that they have a substantial component of ionic character despite their classification as bonds of intermediate character. The trend between |V(rc)|/G(rc) and the character of the bonded interaction is consistent with trends expected from electronegativity considerations. The connection between the net charges and the experimental SiO bond length evaluated for the Si and O atoms comprising two orthosilicates are examined in terms of the |V(rc)|/G(rc) values.

  4. Electronic viscosity in a quantum well: A test for the local-density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Vignale, Giovanni

    2007-07-01

    In the local-density approximation (LDA) for electronic time-dependent current-density-functional theory, many-body effects are described in terms of the viscoelastic constants of the homogeneous three-dimensional electron gas. In this paper, we critically examine the applicability of the three-dimensional LDA to the calculation of the viscous damping of one-dimensional collective oscillations of angular frequency ω in a quasi-two-dimensional quantum well. We calculate the effective viscosity ζ(ω) from perturbation theory in the screened Coulomb interaction and compare it with the commonly used three-dimensional LDA viscosity Y(ω) . Significant differences are found. At low frequency, Y(ω) is dominated by a shear term, which is absent in ζ(ω) . At high frequency, ζ(ω) and Y(ω) exhibit different power-law behaviors ( ω-3 and ω-5/2 , respectively), reflecting different spectral densities of electron-hole excitations in two and three dimensions. These findings demonstrate the need for better approximations for the exchange-correlation stress tensor in specific systems where the use of the three-dimensional functionals may lead to unphysical results.

  5. Comparison between the vorticity expansion approximation and the local density approximation of the current-density functional theory from the viewpoint of sum rules.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, K; Higuchi, M

    2007-09-12

    We compare the vorticity expansion approximation (VEA) with the local density approximation (LDA) of the current-density functional theory from the viewpoint of sum rules. The VEA formulae satisfy all sum rules which are derived from uniform and nonuniform coordinate scaling properties, while the LDA formulae do not satisfy at least about a third of the sum rules. The validity of the VEA formula is thus confirmed successfully.

  6. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  7. Broadband enhancement of local density of states using silicon-compatible hyperbolic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Inampudi, Sandeep; Capretti, Antonio; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Minoru; Dal Negro, Luca

    2015-06-15

    Light emitting silicon quantum dots by colloidal synthesis were uniformly spin-coated into a 20 nm-thick film and deposited atop a hyperbolic metamaterial of alternating TiN and SiO{sub 2} sub-wavelength layers. Using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy as a function of the emission wavelength in partnership with rigorous electromagnetic modeling of dipolar emission, we demonstrate enhanced Local Density of States and coupling to high-k modes in a broad spectral range. These findings provide an alternative approach for the engineering of novel Si-compatible broadband sources that leverage the control of radiative transitions in hyperbolic metamaterials and the flexibility of the widespread Si platform.

  8. Site-specific structural constraints on protein sequence evolutionary divergence: local packing density versus solvent exposure.

    PubMed

    Yeh, So-Wei; Liu, Jen-Wei; Yu, Sung-Huan; Shih, Chien-Hua; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Echave, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Protein sequences evolve under selection pressures imposed by functional and biophysical requirements, resulting in site-dependent rates of amino acid substitution. Relative solvent accessibility (RSA) and local packing density (LPD) have emerged as the best candidates to quantify structural constraint. Recent research assumes that RSA is the main determinant of sequence divergence. However, it is not yet clear which is the best predictor of substitution rates. To address this issue, we compared RSA and LPD with site-specific rates of evolution for a diverse data set of enzymes. In contrast with recent studies, we found that LPD measures correlate better than RSA with evolutionary rate. Moreover, the independent contribution of RSA is minor. Taking into account that LPD is related to backbone flexibility, we put forward the possibility that the rate of evolution of a site is determined by the ease with which the backbone deforms to accommodate mutations.

  9. A New Simplified Local Density Model for Adsorption of Pure Gases and Binary Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanzadeh, M.; Dehghani, M. R.; Feyzi, F.; Behzadi, B.

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption modeling is an important tool for process simulation and design. Many theoretical models have been developed to describe adsorption data for pure and multicomponent gases. The simplified local density (SLD) approach is a thermodynamic model that can be used with any equation of state and offers some predictive capability with adjustable parameters for modeling of slit-shaped pores. In previous studies, the SLD model has been utilized with the Lennard-Jones potential function for modeling of fluid-solid interactions. In this article, we have focused on application of the Sutherland potential function in an SLD-Peng-Robinson model. The advantages and disadvantages of using the new potential function for adsorption of methane, ethane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and three binary mixtures on two types of activated carbon are illustrated. The results have been compared with previous models. It is shown that the new SLD model can correlate adsorption data for different pressures and temperatures with minimum error.

  10. Directional Local Density of States of Classical and Quantum Propagating Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthel, Martin; Jiang, Quanbo; Pham, Aline; Bellessa, Joel; Genet, Cyriaque; Huant, Serge; Drezet, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally introduce the concept of the local density of states (LDOS) associated with propagative surface plasmons (PSPs) launched along a structured thin gold film (a concept we call PSP LDOS). The alternative method couples a near-field optical microscope, in either the classical or the quantum regime of excitation, to a far-field leakage-radiation microscope. This method allows for selecting and collecting a very narrow portion of the directional SP wave vectors, thereby offering sufficient resolution to probe the collimation efficiency of a SP beam for a source near the focal point of a Bragg parabolic reflector. We are able to build and image the PSP LDOS in a fully integrated quantum SP launcher by depositing a diamond nanocrystal hosting nitrogen-vacancy centers at the focal point of the mirror. Our demonstration of the PSP LDOS with quantized SPs offers alternative prospects in the field of quantum plasmonics.

  11. Local Density of States in One-dimensional Photonic Crystals and Sinusoidal Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatchenko, V. A.; Tsikalov, D. S.

    We have calculated the local density of states (LDOS) for four Brillouin zones of a superlattice for a plane source depending on its location relative to the change in the profile of dielectricpermeability ɛ(z) of the superlattice. It is shown that the LDOS for the cases of sinusoidal and rectangular profiles of ɛ(z) are close to each other in the first and second Brillouin zones, and sharp differences between them appear beginning with the third zone. Radical changes in the LDOS occur in a rectangular superlattice with different thicknesses of adjacent layers. In this case, the function LDOS has a sharp jump at the edges of the allowed bands in the transition from one layer to another. The effects studied theoretically in this paper, can be detected and studied experimentally by the intensively developing currently methods of nanooptics.

  12. Towards a Density Functional Theory Exchange-Correlation Functional able to describe localization/delocalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wills, John M.

    2013-03-01

    The inability to computationally describe the physics governing the properties of actinides and their alloys is the poster child of failure of existing Density Functional Theory exchange-correlation functionals. The intricate competition between localization and delocalization of the electrons, present in these materials, exposes the limitations of functionals only designed to properly describe one or the other situation. We will discuss the manifestation of this competition in real materials and propositions on how to construct a functional able to accurately describe properties of these materials. I addition we will discuss both the importance of using the Dirac equation to describe the relativistic effects in these materials, and the connection to the physics of transition metal oxides. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Determination of Local Densities in Accreted Ice Samples Using X-Rays and Digital Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Howard; Sims, James; Vargas, Mario

    1996-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel ice shapes, similar to those which develop in-flight icing conditions, were formed on an airfoil. Under cold room conditions these experimental samples were carefully removed from the airfoil, sliced into thin sections, and x-rayed. The resulting microradiographs were developed and the film digitized using a high resolution scanner to extract fine detail in the radiographs. A procedure was devised to calibrate the scanner and to maintain repeatability during the experiment. The techniques of image acquisition and analysis provide accurate local density measurements and reveal the internal characteristics of the accreted ice with greater detail. This paper will discuss the methodology by which these samples were prepared with emphasis on the digital imaging techniques.

  14. Many-body localization and transition by density matrix renormalization group and exact diagonalization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. P.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-07-01

    A many-body localized (MBL) state is a new state of matter emerging in a disordered interacting system at high-energy densities through a disorder-driven dynamic phase transition. The nature of the phase transition and the evolution of the MBL phase near the transition are the focus of intense theoretical studies with open issues in the field. We develop an entanglement density matrix renormalization group (En-DMRG) algorithm to accurately target highly excited states for MBL systems. By studying the one-dimensional Heisenberg spin chain in a random field, we demonstrate the accuracy of the method in obtaining energy eigenstates and the corresponding statistical results of quantum states in the MBL phase. Based on large system simulations by En-DMRG for excited states, we demonstrate some interesting features in the entanglement entropy distribution function, which is characterized by two peaks: one at zero and another one at the quantized entropy S =ln2 with an exponential decay tail on the S >ln2 side. Combining En-DMRG with exact diagonalization simulations, we demonstrate that the transition from the MBL phase to the delocalized ergodic phase is driven by rare events where the locally entangled spin pairs develop power-law correlations. The corresponding phase diagram contains an intermediate or crossover regime, which has power-law spin-z correlations resulting from contributions of the rare events. We discuss the physical picture for the numerical observations in this regime, where various distribution functions are distinctly different from results deep in the ergodic and MBL phases for finite-size systems. Our results may provide new insights for understanding the phase transition in such systems.

  15. Index Theory and Adiabatic Limit in QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzycki, Jarosław

    2013-08-01

    The paper has the form of a proposal concerned with the relationship between the three mathematically rigorous approaches to quantum field theory: (1) local algebraic formulation of Haag, (2) Wightman formulation and (3) the perturbative formulation based on the microlocal renormalization method. In this project we investigate the relationship between (1) and (3) and utilize the known relationships between (1) and (2). The main goal of the proposal lies in obtaining obstructions for the existence of the adiabatic limit ( confinement problem in the phenomenological standard model approach). We extend the method of deformation of Dütsch and Fredenhagen (in the Bordeman-Waldmann sense) and apply Fedosov construction of the formal index—an analog of the index for deformed symplectic manifolds, generalizing the Atiyah-Singer index. We present some first steps in realization of the proposal.

  16. Cs diffusion in local Taiwan laterite with different solution concentration, pH and packing density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    In this work we used an "in-diffusion" method to study the effects of pH, solution concentration and packing density on Cs diffusion by packing local Taiwan laterite (LTL) into modified capillary columns with 5mm diameter. These packed columns were first pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater (GW) for 3 weeks. The diffusion experiments were then carried out at ambient condition for 2 weeks. Our experimental results showed that the Cs diffusion profile fits Fick's second law very well in given experimental conditions, indicating the validity of modified capillary column method. Generally speaking, Cs diffusion in LTL decreases as the pH increases and as Cs concentration decreases. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D(a)) increases from 5.52 x 10(-12) (10(-7)M) to 2.18 x 10(-11) (10(-3)M)m(2)/s, while the effective diffusion coefficient (D(e)) shows slight variation as the Cs concentration changes. Both the derived D(a) and D(e) values decrease as the pH increases, implying that the diffusion mechanisms of Cs nuclide in alkaline and acid environment are different. In addition, our results show that Cs diffusion is unaffected by the given packing density, indicating the interlaminary space is not the major determinant of Cs adsorption and diffusion in LTL.

  17. Mineral Nutritional Yield and Nutrient Density of Locally Adapted Wheat Genotypes under Organic Production

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Ascarrunz, Sergio Daniel; Larsson, Hans; Prieto-Linde, Maria Luisa; Johansson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to investigate the nutritional yield, nutrient density, stability, and adaptability of organically produced wheat for sustainable and nutritional high value food production. This study evaluated the nutritional yield of four minerals (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Mg) in 19 wheat genotypes, selected as being locally adapted under organic agriculture conditions. The new metric of nutritional yield was calculated for each genotype and they were evaluated for stability using the Additive Main effects and Multiplicative Interaction (AMMI) stability analysis and for genotypic value, stability, and adaptability using the Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP procedure). The results indicated that there were genotypes suitable for production under organic agriculture conditions with satisfactory yields (>4000 kg·ha−1). Furthermore, these genotypes showed high nutritional yield and nutrient density for the four minerals studied. Additionally, since these genotypes were stable and adaptable over three environmentally different years, they were designated “balanced genotypes” for the four minerals and for the aforementioned characteristics. Selection and breeding of such “balanced genotypes” may offer an alternative to producing nutritious food under low-input agriculture conditions. Furthermore, the type of evaluation presented here may also be of interest for implementation in research conducted in developing countries, following the objectives of producing enough nutrients for a growing population. PMID:28231184

  18. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; ...

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, themore » dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.« less

  19. Blu-ray-sensitive localized surface plasmon resonance for high-density optical memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shencheng; Zhang, Xintong; Han, Qiang; Liu, Shuangyan; Han, Xiuxiu; Liu, Yichun

    2016-11-01

    Tunable spectrum-response is desired for efficient photo-energy transformation. Blu-ray (~405 nm) and polarization sensitive Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite films are thus fascinating in application of fast-response and high-density optical memory device. The Ag/TiO2 film has the ability of replicating hologram based on optical coherence by laser-stimulated dissolution of Ag nanoparticles (NPs). The rate and efficiency of the dissolution are supposed to be enhanced by introducing uniform and small-sized Ag NPs in TiO2 nanoporous films. However, no effective methods have been proposed to resolve this issue by now. Here, we develop a simple method of thermal-reduction to obtain high-density, space-dispersed and extremely small-sized Ag NPs in TiO2 nanoporous films pretreated with tannic acid. The film shows both high and narrow absorbance band centered at ~405 nm. Diffraction efficiency of the blu-ray holographic storage in the Ag/TiO2 film is improved by one order of magnitude compared to the traditional UV-reduced sample. Based on such properties, polarization-multiplexing holograms are able to be written at 405 nm and readout with little crosstalk. This work provides effective solutions for sensitizing localized surface plasmon resonance at near-UV region, extending the growth range of Ag NPs in the volume of TiO2, and resultantly, realizing high-density optical memory.

  20. Blu-ray-sensitive localized surface plasmon resonance for high-density optical memory

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shencheng; Zhang, Xintong; Han, Qiang; Liu, Shuangyan; Han, Xiuxiu; Liu, Yichun

    2016-01-01

    Tunable spectrum-response is desired for efficient photo-energy transformation. Blu-ray (~405 nm) and polarization sensitive Ag/TiO2 nanocomposite films are thus fascinating in application of fast-response and high-density optical memory device. The Ag/TiO2 film has the ability of replicating hologram based on optical coherence by laser-stimulated dissolution of Ag nanoparticles (NPs). The rate and efficiency of the dissolution are supposed to be enhanced by introducing uniform and small-sized Ag NPs in TiO2 nanoporous films. However, no effective methods have been proposed to resolve this issue by now. Here, we develop a simple method of thermal-reduction to obtain high-density, space-dispersed and extremely small-sized Ag NPs in TiO2 nanoporous films pretreated with tannic acid. The film shows both high and narrow absorbance band centered at ~405 nm. Diffraction efficiency of the blu-ray holographic storage in the Ag/TiO2 film is improved by one order of magnitude compared to the traditional UV-reduced sample. Based on such properties, polarization-multiplexing holograms are able to be written at 405 nm and readout with little crosstalk. This work provides effective solutions for sensitizing localized surface plasmon resonance at near-UV region, extending the growth range of Ag NPs in the volume of TiO2, and resultantly, realizing high-density optical memory. PMID:27819328

  1. First-principles local density approximation + U and generalized gradient approximation + U study of plutonium oxides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2008-02-28

    The electronic structure and properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 have been studied from first principles by the all-electron projector-augmented-wave method. The local density approximation+U and the generalized gradient approximation+U formalisms have been used to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion among the localized Pu 5f electrons. We discuss how the properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 are affected by the choice of U as well as the choice of exchange-correlation potential. Also, oxidation reaction of Pu2O3, leading to formation of PuO2, and its dependence on U and exchange-correlation potential have been studied. Our results show that by choosing an appropriate U, it is promising to correctly and consistently describe structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3, which enable the modeling of redox process involving Pu-based materials possible.

  2. Effect of wind and local density on the subtidal circulation of the inner Scotian Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jinyu; Thompson, Keith R.; Cong, Liangzi; Smith, Peter C.; Lawrence, Don J.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive oceanographic data set was collected over the inner Scotian Shelf in February 1996. Hydrographic observations reveal that the water properties had typical wintertime distributions characterized by a two-layer system: relatively cold and fresh surface water overlying a warmer and saltier bottom water. The moored current measurements imply a persistent southwestward surface-intensified flow, consistent with previous studies. We follow Thompson and Sheng (J. Geophys. Res. 102 (1997) 24 987) and use a linear statistical model to hindcast the time-varying shelf response to local wind and remotely generated free waves propagating along the shelf. The wind is assumed to be spatially uniform and equal to that observed at Sable Island. The remote forcing is represented by subtidal sea level observations at Halifax after removal of local wind and density effects. Sable Island stress, on average, accounts for about 25% of the subtidal current variance. Sable Island wind and Halifax sea level together account for about 50% of the variance. The vertical shears in the mean alongshore currents agree reasonably well with the thermal wind relationship, indicating the importance of baroclinic effects during this period

  3. Seizure Onset Zone Localization from Ictal High-Density EEG in Refractory Focal Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Staljanssens, Willeke; Strobbe, Gregor; Holen, Roel Van; Birot, Gwénaël; Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vulliémoz, Serge; van Mierlo, Pieter

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery is the most efficient treatment option for patients with refractory epilepsy. Before surgery, it is of utmost importance to accurately delineate the seizure onset zone (SOZ). Non-invasive EEG is the most used neuroimaging technique to diagnose epilepsy, but it is hard to localize the SOZ from EEG due to its low spatial resolution and because epilepsy is a network disease, with several brain regions becoming active during a seizure. In this work, we propose and validate an approach based on EEG source imaging (ESI) combined with functional connectivity analysis to overcome these problems. We considered both simulations and real data of patients. Ictal epochs of 204-channel EEG and subsets down to 32 channels were analyzed. ESI was done using realistic head models and LORETA was used as inverse technique. The connectivity pattern between the reconstructed sources was calculated, and the source with the highest number of outgoing connections was selected as SOZ. We compared this algorithm with a more straightforward approach, i.e. selecting the source with the highest power after ESI as the SOZ. We found that functional connectivity analysis estimated the SOZ consistently closer to the simulated EZ/RZ than localization based on maximal power. Performance, however, decreased when 128 electrodes or less were used, especially in the realistic data. The results show the added value of functional connectivity analysis for SOZ localization, when the EEG is obtained with a high-density setup. Next to this, the method can potentially be used as objective tool in clinical settings.

  4. Adiabatic approximation and fluctuations in exciton-polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovska, Nataliya; Matuszewski, Michał

    2015-07-01

    We study the relation between the models commonly used to describe the dynamics of nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensates, namely the ones described by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, and by the open-dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation including a separate equation for the reservoir density. In particular, we focus on the validity of the adiabatic approximation and small density fluctuations approximation that allow one to reduce the coupled condensate-reservoir dynamics to a single partial differential equation. We find that the adiabatic approximation consists of three independent analytical conditions that have to be fulfilled simultaneously. By investigating stochastic versions of the two corresponding models, we verify that the breakdown of these approximations can lead to discrepancies in correlation lengths and distributions of fluctuations. Additionally, we consider the phase diffusion and number fluctuations of a condensate in a box, and show that self-consistent description requires treatment beyond the typical Bogoliubov approximation.

  5. Theory of Adiabatic Fountain Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of "Adiabatic Fountain Resonance" with superfluid ^4{He} is clarified. In this geometry a film region between two silicon wafers bonded at their outer edge opens up to a central region with a free surface. We find that the resonance in this system is not a Helmholtz resonance as claimed by Gasparini et al., but in fact is a fourth sound resonance. We postulate that it occurs at relatively low frequency because the thin silicon wafers flex appreciably from the pressure oscillations of the sound wave.

  6. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  7. Fate of the Bose insulator in the limit of strong localization and low Cooper-pair density in ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollen, S. M.; Fernandes, G. E.; Xu, J. M.; Valles, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    A Bose insulator composed of a low density of strongly localized Cooper pairs develops at the two-dimensional superconductor to insulator transition (SIT) in a number of thin film systems. Investigations of ultrathin amorphous PbBi films far from the SIT described here provide evidence that the Bose insulator gives way to a second insulating phase with decreasing film thickness. At a critical film thickness dc the magnetoresistance changes sign from positive, as expected for boson transport, to negative, as expected for fermion transport, signs of local Cooper-pair phase coherence effects on transport vanish, and the transport activation energy exhibits a kink. Below dc pairing fluctuation effects remain visible in the high-temperature transport while the activation energy continues to rise. These features show that Cooper pairing persists and suggest that the localized unpaired electron states involved in transport are interspersed among regions of strongly localized Cooper pairs in this strongly localized, low Cooper-pair density phase.

  8. Ultrafast adiabatic second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Asaf; Levanon, Assaf; Katz, Mordechai; Suchowski, Haim

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a generalization of the adiabatic frequency conversion method for an efficient conversion of ultrashort pulses in the full nonlinear regime. Our analysis takes into account dispersion as well as two-photon processes and Kerr effect, allowing complete analysis of any three waves with arbitrary phase mismatched design and any nonlinear optical process. We use this analysis to design an efficient and robust second harmonic generation, the most widely used nonlinear process for both fundamental and applied research. We experimentally show that such design not only allows for very efficient conversion of various of ultrashort pulses, but is also very robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and the incoming light. These include variation of more than 100 °C in the crystal temperature, a wide bandwidth of up to 75 nm and a chirp variation of 300 fs to 3.5 ps of the incoming pulse. Also, we show the dependency of the adiabatic second harmonic generation design on the pump intensity and the crystal length. Our study shows that two photon absorption plays a critical role in such high influence nonlinear dynamics, and that it must be considered in order to achieve agreement with experimental results.

  9. Ultrafast adiabatic second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Asaf; Levanon, Assaf; Katz, Mordechai; Suchowski, Haim

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a generalization of the adiabatic frequency conversion method for an efficient conversion of ultrashort pulses in the full nonlinear regime. Our analysis takes into account dispersion as well as two-photon processes and Kerr effect, allowing complete analysis of any three waves with arbitrary phase mismatched design and any nonlinear optical process. We use this analysis to design an efficient and robust second harmonic generation, the most widely used nonlinear process for both fundamental and applied research. We experimentally show that such design not only allows for very efficient conversion of various of ultrashort pulses, but is also very robust to variations in the parameters of both the nonlinear crystal and the incoming light. These include variation of more than 100 °C in the crystal temperature, a wide bandwidth of up to 75 nm and a chirp variation of 300 fs to 3.5 ps of the incoming pulse. Also, we show the dependency of the adiabatic second harmonic generation design on the pump intensity and the crystal length. Our study shows that two photon absorption plays a critical role in such high influence nonlinear dynamics, and that it must be considered in order to achieve agreement with experimental results.

  10. Adiabatic modulation of cnoidal wave by Kuznetsov - Ma soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. A.; Petnikova, V. M.; Shuvalov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of nonlinear interaction of a cnoidal wave (a “fast” component of vector light field) with localized in time and periodic in space control signal in the form of Kuznetsov-Ma soliton (a "slow" component of the same field) is analytically solved in the adiabatic approximation. The conditions which must be fulfilled for stable propagation of the obtained solution with amplitude and frequency modulation are determined.

  11. Calculations with the quasirelativistic local-spin-density-functional theory for high-Z atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Whitehead, M.A.

    1988-10-01

    The generalized-exchange local-spin-density-functional theory (LSD-GX) with relativistic corrections of the mass velocity and Darwin terms has been used to calculate statistical total energies for the neutral atoms, the positive ions, and the negative ions for high-Z elements. The effect of the correlation and relaxation correction on the statistical total energy is discussed. Comparing the calculated results for the ionization potentials and electron affinities for the atoms (atomic number Z from 37 to 56 and 72 to 80) with experiment, shows that for the atoms rubidium to barium both the LSD-GX and the quasirelativistic LSD-GX, with self-interaction correction, Gopinathan, Whitehead, and Bogdanovic's Fermi-hole parameters (Phys. Rev. A 14, 1 (1976)), and Vosko, Wilk, and Nusair's correlation correction (Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)), are very good methods for calculating ionization potentials and electron affinities. For the atoms hafnium to mercury the relativistic effect has to be considered.

  12. Enhanced gas adsorption on graphitic substrates via defects and local curvature: A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Debosruti; Wood, Brandon C.; Bhide, Shreyas Y.; Ayappa, K. Ganapathy; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2014-03-24

    Using van-der-Waals-corrected density functional theory calculations, we explore the possibility of engineering the local structure and morphology of high-surface-area graphene-derived materials to improve the uptake of methane and carbon dioxide for gas storage and sensing. We test the sensitivity of the gas adsorption energy to the introduction of native point defects, curvature, and the application of strain. The binding energy at topological point defect sites is inversely correlated with the number of missing carbon atoms, causing Stone–Wales defects to show the largest enhancement with respect to pristine graphene (~20%). Improvements of similar magnitude are observed at concavely curved surfaces in buckled graphene sheets under compressive strain, whereas tensile strain tends to weaken gas binding. Trends for CO2 and CH4 are similar, although CO2 binding is generally stronger by ~4 to 5 kJ mol–1. Furthermore, the differential between the adsorption of CO2 and CH4 is much higher on folded graphene sheets and at concave curvatures; this could possibly be leveraged for CH4/CO2 flow separation and gas-selective sensors.

  13. Unitary Thermodynamics from Thermodynamic Geometry II: Fit to a Local-Density Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppeiner, George

    2015-10-01

    Strongly interacting Fermi gasses at low density possess universal thermodynamic properties that have recently seen very precise PVT measurements by a group at MIT. This group determined local thermodynamic properties of a system of ultracold atoms tuned to Feshbach resonance. In this paper, I analyze the MIT data with a thermodynamic theory of unitary thermodynamics based on ideas from critical phenomena. This theory was introduced in the first paper of this sequence and characterizes the scaled thermodynamics by the entropy per particle and the energy per particle Y( z), in units of the Fermi energy. Y( z) is in two segments, separated by a second-order phase transition at : a "superfluid" segment for and a "normal" segment for . For small z, the theory obeys a series where is a constant exponent and () are constant series coefficients. For large z, the theory obeys a perturbation of the ideal gas , where is a constant exponent and () are constant series coefficients. This limiting form for large z differs from the series used in the first paper and was necessary to fit the MIT data. I fit the MIT data by adjusting four free independent theory parameters: . This fit process was augmented by trap integration and comparison with earlier thermal data taken at Duke University. The overall match to both the data sets was good and had , , , scaled critical temperature , where is the Fermi temperature, and Bertsch parameter . I also discuss the virial expansion in the context of this thermodynamic geometric theory.

  14. Localization and Treatment of Unruptured Paraclinoid Aneurysms: A Proton Density MRI-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seon Jin; Shin, Na-Young; Lee, Jae Whan; Huh, Seung Kon

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of proton density magnetic resonance (PD MR) imaging for localization of paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysms. Materials and Methods From April 2014 to April 2015, 76 unruptured paraclinoid aneurysms in 66 patients were evaluated using PD MR and angiography (CT/MR angiography or digital subtraction angiography). The locations (extradural, transdural, intradural) in relation to the distal dural ring (DDR) and projection (superior, inferior/posterior, medial, lateral) of the aneurysms were assessed and compared. Results The most common location of paraclinoid aneurysms was extradural (n = 48, 63.2%), followed by intradural (n = 18, 23.7%), and transdural (n = 10, 13.2%). In the medial projection group (n = 49, 64.5%), 31 were extradural (63.3%), 5 were transdural (10.2%), and 13 were intradural (26.5%). In the inferior/posterior projection group (n = 19, 25.0%), there were 14 extradural (73.7%), 4 transdural (21.0%), and 1 intradural (5.3%). In the superior (n = 4, 5.3%)/lateral (n = 4, 5.3%) projection groups, there were 0/3 extradural (0/75.0%), 1/0 transdural (25.0/0%), and 3/1 intradural (75.0/25.0%). Conclusion PD MR showed sufficient contrast difference to distinguish paraclinoid aneurysms from surrounding dural structures. PMID:26523253

  15. Enhanced gas adsorption on graphitic substrates via defects and local curvature: A density functional theory study

    DOE PAGES

    Dutta, Debosruti; Wood, Brandon C.; Bhide, Shreyas Y.; ...

    2014-03-24

    Using van-der-Waals-corrected density functional theory calculations, we explore the possibility of engineering the local structure and morphology of high-surface-area graphene-derived materials to improve the uptake of methane and carbon dioxide for gas storage and sensing. We test the sensitivity of the gas adsorption energy to the introduction of native point defects, curvature, and the application of strain. The binding energy at topological point defect sites is inversely correlated with the number of missing carbon atoms, causing Stone–Wales defects to show the largest enhancement with respect to pristine graphene (~20%). Improvements of similar magnitude are observed at concavely curved surfaces inmore » buckled graphene sheets under compressive strain, whereas tensile strain tends to weaken gas binding. Trends for CO2 and CH4 are similar, although CO2 binding is generally stronger by ~4 to 5 kJ mol–1. Furthermore, the differential between the adsorption of CO2 and CH4 is much higher on folded graphene sheets and at concave curvatures; this could possibly be leveraged for CH4/CO2 flow separation and gas-selective sensors.« less

  16. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2014-11-01

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (˜1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ˜0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  17. Attosecond time delay in valence photoionization and photorecombination of argon: A time-dependent local-density-approximation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Dixit, Gopal; Ivanov, Misha; Chakraborty, Himadri S.

    2015-06-01

    We determine and analyze the quantum phases and time delays in photoionization and photorecombination of valence 3 p and 3 s electrons of argon using the Kohn-Sham local-density-functional approach. The time-dependent local-density approximation is used to account for the electron correlation. Resulting attosecond Wigner-Smith time delays show very good agreement with the recent experiment on argon that measured the delay in 3 p photorecombination [S. B. Schoun et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 153002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.153002].

  18. Ultrafast Response of the Hubbard Model: Non-adiabatic TDDFT + DMFT versus Non-equilibrium DMFT Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Shree Ram; Turkowski, Volodymyr; Rahman, Talat S.

    We study the ultrafast response of electrons in the one-band Hubbard model to an external laser-pulse perturbation by using the Non-adiabatic Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory + Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (TDDFT +DMFT) approach. The corresponding exchange-correlation kernel (XC) is obtained from the DMFT charge susceptibility by using the Quantum Monte Carlo solver for the impurity problem. Detailed analysis of the time-dependent excited charge density, the Fermi distribution function, and the spatially nonhomogeneous response (metallic domain growth), is performed for different values for the carrier density and local Coulomb repulsion. We compare the results with the corresponding non-equilibrium DMFT solutions, and demonstrate that non-adiabaticity (frequency-dependence) of the XC kernel is important in order to reproduce the non-equilibrium DMFT solution. Also, from the numerical results for the charge susceptibility, we obtain an approximate analytical expression for the XC kernel. Using this kernel, we reveal possible types of ''elementary'' excitations and the dynamics of metallic domain growth in the case of the one-band Hubbard model. Possible generalization of the approach to the multi-orbital case is discussed. Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354.

  19. An interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Bruch, Anton; von Oppen, Felix

    We consider the effect of electron-electron interactions on the performance of an adiabatic quantum motor based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. We model such a device by electrons in a 1d wire coupled to a slowly moving periodic potential associated with the classical mechanical degree of freedom of the motor. This periodic degree of freedom is set into motion by a bias voltage applied to the 1d electron channel. We investigate the Thouless motor with interacting leads modeled as Luttinger liquids. We show that interactions enhance the energy gap opened by the periodic potential and thus the robustness of the Thouless motor against variations in the chemical potential. We show that the motor degree of freedom can be described as a mobile impurity in a Luttinger liquid obeying Langevin dynamics with renormalized coefficients due to interactions, for which we give explicit expressions.

  20. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  1. On the Impact of Localization and Density Control Algorithms in Target Tracking Applications for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Andre N.; Souza, Efren L.; Nakamura, Fabiola G.; Nakamura, Eduardo F.; Rodrigues, Joel J. P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Target tracking is an important application of wireless sensor networks. The networks' ability to locate and track an object is directed linked to the nodes' ability to locate themselves. Consequently, localization systems are essential for target tracking applications. In addition, sensor networks are often deployed in remote or hostile environments. Therefore, density control algorithms are used to increase network lifetime while maintaining its sensing capabilities. In this work, we analyze the impact of localization algorithms (RPE and DPE) and density control algorithms (GAF, A3 and OGDC) on target tracking applications. We adapt the density control algorithms to address the k-coverage problem. In addition, we analyze the impact of network density, residual integration with density control, and k-coverage on both target tracking accuracy and network lifetime. Our results show that DPE is a better choice for target tracking applications than RPE. Moreover, among the evaluated density control algorithms, OGDC is the best option among the three. Although the choice of the density control algorithm has little impact on the tracking precision, OGDC outperforms GAF and A3 in terms of tracking time. PMID:22969329

  2. On the impact of localization and density control algorithms in target tracking applications for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Campos, Andre N; Souza, Efren L; Nakamura, Fabiola G; Nakamura, Eduardo F; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2012-01-01

    Target tracking is an important application of wireless sensor networks. The networks' ability to locate and track an object is directed linked to the nodes' ability to locate themselves. Consequently, localization systems are essential for target tracking applications. In addition, sensor networks are often deployed in remote or hostile environments. Therefore, density control algorithms are used to increase network lifetime while maintaining its sensing capabilities. In this work, we analyze the impact of localization algorithms (RPE and DPE) and density control algorithms (GAF, A3 and OGDC) on target tracking applications. We adapt the density control algorithms to address the k-coverage problem. In addition, we analyze the impact of network density, residual integration with density control, and k-coverage on both target tracking accuracy and network lifetime. Our results show that DPE is a better choice for target tracking applications than RPE. Moreover, among the evaluated density control algorithms, OGDC is the best option among the three. Although the choice of the density control algorithm has little impact on the tracking precision, OGDC outperforms GAF and A3 in terms of tracking time.

  3. Improved beta (local beta >1) and density in electron cyclotron resonance heating on the RT-1 magnetosphere plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.

    2015-05-01

    This study reports the recent progress in improved plasma parameters of the RT-1 device. Increased input power and the optimized polarization of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with an 8.2 GHz klystron produce a significant increase in electron beta, which is evaluated by an equilibrium analysis of the Grad-Shafranov equation. The peak value of the local electron beta βe is found to exceed 1. In the high-beta and high-density regime, the density limit is observed for H, D and He plasmas. The line-averaged density is close to the cutoff density for 8.2 GHz ECRH. When the filling gas pressure is increased, the density limit still exists even in the low-beta region. This result indicates that the density limit is caused by the cutoff density rather than the beta limit. From the analysis of interferometer data, we found that inward diffusion causes a peaked density profile beyond the cutoff density.

  4. Fluctuations of work in nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Suomela, S; Salmilehto, J; Savenko, I G; Ala-Nissila, T; Möttönen, M

    2015-02-01

    We extend the quantum jump method to nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems in a way that allows for an accurate account of the external driving in the system-environment interaction. Using this framework, we construct the corresponding trajectory-dependent work performed on the system and derive the integral fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality for nearly adiabatic driving. We show that such identities hold as long as the stochastic dynamics and work variable are consistently defined. We numerically study the emerging work statistics for a two-level quantum system and find that the conventional diabatic approximation is unable to capture some prominent features arising from driving, such as the continuity of the probability density of work. Our results reveal the necessity of using accurate expressions for the drive-dressed heat exchange in future experiments probing jump time distributions.

  5. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy L.; Downs, R. T.; Spackman, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net atomic charges were calculated for theoretical electron density distributions, F(r), generated for a variety of Fe and Cu metal-sulfide materials with high- and low-spin Fe atoms in octahedral coordination and high-spin Fe atoms in tetrahedral coordination. The electron density, F(rc), the Laplacian, 32F(rc), the local kinetic energy, G(rc), and the oxidation state of Fe increase as the local potential energy density, V(rc), the Fe-S bond lengths, and the coordination numbers of the Fe atoms decrease. The properties of the bonded interactions for the octahedrally coordinated low-spin Fe atoms for pyrite and marcasite are distinct from those for high-spin Fe atoms for troilite, smythite, and greigite. The Fe-S bond lengths are shorter and the values of F(rc) and 32F(rc) are larger for pyrite and marcasite, indicating that the accumulation and local concentration of F(r) in the internuclear region are greater than those involving the longer, high-spin Fe-S bonded interactions. The net atomic charges and the bonded radii calculated for the Fe and S atoms in pyrite and marcasite are also smaller than those for sulfides with high-spin octahedrally coordinated Fe atoms. Collectively, the Fe-S interactions are indicated to be intermediate in character with the low-spin Fe-S interactions having greater shared character than the highspin interactions. The bond lengths observed for chalcopyrite together with the calculated bond critical point properties are consistent with the formula Cu+Fe3+S2. The bond length is shorter and the F(rc) value is larger for the FeS4 tetrahedron displayed by metastable greigite than those displayed by chalcopyrite and cubanite, consistent with a proposal that the Fe atom in greigite is tetravalent. S-S bond paths exist between each of the surface S atoms of adjacent slabs of FeS6 octahedra comprising the layer sulfide smythite, suggesting that the neutral Fe3S4 slabs are

  6. Theoretical electron density distributions for Fe- and Cu-sulfide earth materials: a connection between bond length, bond critical point properties, local energy densities, and bonded interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, G V; Cox, D F; Rosso, K M; Ross, N L; Downs, R T; Spackman, M A

    2007-03-01

    Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net atomic charges were calculated for theoretical electron density distributions, rho(r), generated for a variety of Fe and Cu metal-sulfide materials with high- and low-spin Fe atoms in octahedral coordination and high-spin Fe atoms in tetrahedral coordination. The electron density, rho(rc), the Laplacian, triangle down2rho(rc), the local kinetic energy, G(rc), and the oxidation state of Fe increase as the local potential energy density, V(rc), the Fe-S bond lengths, and the coordination numbers of the Fe atoms decrease. The properties of the bonded interactions for the octahedrally coordinated low-spin Fe atoms for pyrite and marcasite are distinct from those for high-spin Fe atoms for troilite, smythite, and greigite. The Fe-S bond lengths are shorter and the values of rho(rc) and triangle down2rho(rc) are larger for pyrite and marcasite, indicating that the accumulation and local concentration of rho(r) in the internuclear region are greater than those involving the longer, high-spin Fe-S bonded interactions. The net atomic charges and the bonded radii calculated for the Fe and S atoms in pyrite and marcasite are also smaller than those for sulfides with high-spin octahedrally coordinated Fe atoms. Collectively, the Fe-S interactions are indicated to be intermediate in character with the low-spin Fe-S interactions having greater shared character than the high-spin interactions. The bond lengths observed for chalcopyrite together with the calculated bond critical point properties are consistent with the formula Cu+Fe3+S2. The bond length is shorter and the rho(rc) value is larger for the FeS4 tetrahedron displayed by metastable greigite than those displayed by chalcopyrite and cubanite, consistent with a proposal that the Fe atom in greigite is tetravalent. S-S bond paths exist between each of the surface S atoms of adjacent slabs of FeS6 octahedra comprising the layer sulfide smythite

  7. Start-up of the reversed-field pinch in an adiabatic manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramana, E. J.

    1981-03-01

    Purely adiabatic formation of a reversed-field pinch is examined as a possible means of access to diffuse, stable reversed-field equilibria. Ideal MHD equations describing adiabatic reversed-field pinch formation are solved to obtain the electric fields and plasma density at the wall characteristic of the initial state and the states through which the system must pass adiabatically. It is shown that if the states through which the plasma evolves adiabatically to a final Bessel-function model state decay resistively, the magnetic energy lost is small. The effects of resistive MHD activity analogous to that observed in tokamaks on reversed-field pinch start-up are also considered.

  8. Time-dependent density functional theory for strong-field ionization by circularly polarized pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirilă, Ciprian C.; Lein, Manfred

    2017-03-01

    By applying time-dependent density functional theory to a two-dimensional multielectron atom subject to strong circularly polarized light pulses, we confirm that the ionization of p orbitals with defined angular momentum depends on the sense of rotation of the applied field. A simple ad-hoc modification of the adiabatic local-density exchange-correlation functional is proposed to remedy its unphysical behavior under orbital depletion.

  9. On the basis-set dependence of local and integrated electron density properties: Application of a new computer program for quantum-chemical density analysis.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Anatoliy; Koritsanszky, Tibor; Chodkiewicz, Michal; King, Harry F

    2009-07-15

    A new computer program for post-processing analysis of quantum-chemical electron densities is described. The code can work with Slater- and Gaussian-type basis functions of arbitrary angular momentum. It has been applied to explore the basis-set dependence of the electron density and its Laplacian in terms of local and integrated topological properties. Our analysis, including Gaussian/Slater basis sets up to sextuple/quadruple-zeta order, shows that these properties considerably depend on the choice of type and number of primitives utilized in the wavefunction expansion. Basis sets with high angular momentum (l = 5 or l = 6) are necessary to achieve convergence for local properties of the density and the Laplacian. In agreement with previous studies, atomic charges defined within Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules appear to be much more basis-set dependent than the Hirshfeld's stockholder charges. The former ones converge only at the quadruple-zeta/higher level with Gaussian/Slater functions.

  10. Quantitative measurements of localized density variations in cylindrical tablets using X-ray microtomography.

    PubMed

    Busignies, Virginie; Leclerc, Bernard; Porion, Patrice; Evesque, Pierre; Couarraze, Guy; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2006-08-01

    Direct compaction is a complex process that results in a density distribution inside the tablets which is often heterogeneous. Therefore, the density variations may affect the compact properties. A quantitative analysis of this phenomenon is still lacking. Recently, X-ray microtomography has been successfully used in pharmaceutical development to study qualitatively the impact of tablet shape and break-line in the density of pharmaceutical tablets. In this study, we evaluate the density profile in microcrystalline cellulose (Vivapur 12) compacts obtained at different mean porosity (ranging from 7.7% to 33.5%) using X-ray tomography technique. First, the validity of the Beer-Lambert law is studied. Then, density calibration is performed and density maps of cylindrical tablets are obtained and visualized using a process with colour-scale calibration plot which is explained. As expected, important heterogeneity in density is observed and quantified. The higher densities in peripheral region were particularly investigated and appraised in regard to the lower densities observed in the middle of the tablet. The results also underlined that in the case of pharmaceutical tablets, it is important to differentiate the mechanical properties representative of the total volume tablet and the mechanical properties that only characterize the tablet surface like the Brinell hardness measurements.

  11. Halo-independent tests of dark matter direct detection signals: local DM density, LHC, and thermal freeze-out

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan E-mail: juhg@kth.se E-mail: stefan.vogl@fysik.su.se

    2015-08-01

    From an assumed signal in a Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiment a lower bound on the product of the DM-nucleon scattering cross section and the local DM density is derived, which is independent of the local DM velocity distribution. This can be combined with astrophysical determinations of the local DM density. Within a given particle physics model the bound also allows a robust comparison of a direct detection signal with limits from the LHC. Furthermore, the bound can be used to formulate a condition which has to be fulfilled if the particle responsible for the direct detection signal is a thermal relic, regardless of whether it constitutes all DM or only part of it. We illustrate the arguments by adopting a simplified DM model with a Z' mediator and assuming a signal in a future xenon direct detection experiment.

  12. Halo-independent tests of dark matter direct detection signals: local DM density, LHC, and thermal freeze-out

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan

    2015-08-19

    From an assumed signal in a Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiment a lower bound on the product of the DM-nucleon scattering cross section and the local DM density is derived, which is independent of the local DM velocity distribution. This can be combined with astrophysical determinations of the local DM density. Within a given particle physics model the bound also allows a robust comparison of a direct detection signal with limits from the LHC. Furthermore, the bound can be used to formulate a condition which has to be fulfilled if the particle responsible for the direct detection signal is a thermal relic, regardless of whether it constitutes all DM or only part of it. We illustrate the arguments by adopting a simplified DM model with a Z{sup ′} mediator and assuming a signal in a future xenon direct detection experiment.

  13. Path Integrals for Electronic Densities, Reactivity Indices, and Localization Functions in Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2009-01-01

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr’s quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions – all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems. PMID:20087467

  14. Path integrals for electronic densities, reactivity indices, and localization functions in quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V

    2009-11-10

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr's quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions - all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems.

  15. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic X-ray spectra of two simple, impulsive solar flares are examined together with H alpha, microwave and meter wave radio observations. X-ray spectra of both events were characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung from single temperature plasmas. The symmetry between rise and fall was found to hold for the temperature and emission measure. The relationship between temperature and emission measure was that of an adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion; the adiabatic index of 5/3 indicated that the electron distribution remained isotropic. Observations in H alpha provided further evidence for compressive energy transfer.

  16. Local solvent density augmentation around a solute in supercritical solvent bath: 1. A mechanism explanation and a new phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2005-04-21

    A recently proposed partitioned density functional (DF) approximation (Phys. Rev. E 2003, 68, 061201) and an adjustable parameter-free version of a Lagrangian theorem-based DF approximation (LTDFA: Phys. Lett. A 2003, 319, 279) are combined to propose a DF approximation for nonuniform Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid. Predictions of the present DF approximation for local LJ solvent density inhomogeneity around a large LJ solute particle or hard core Yukawa particle are in good agreement with existing simulation data. An extensive investigation about the effect of solvent bath temperature, solvent-solute interaction range, solvent-solute interaction magnitude, and solute size on the local solvent density inhomogeneity is carried out with the present DF approximation. It is found that a plateau of solvent accumulation number as a function of solvent bath bulk density is due to a coupling between the solvent-solute interaction and solvent correlation whose mathematical expression is a convolution integral appearing in the density profile equation of the DF theory formalism. The coupling becomes stronger as the increasing of the whole solvent-solute interaction strength, solute size relative to solvent size, and the closeness to the critical density and temperature of the solvent bath. When the attractive solvent-solute interaction becomes large enough and the bulk state moves close enough to the critical temperature of the solvent bath, the maximum solvent accumulation number as a function of solvent bath bulk density appears near the solvent bath critical density; the appearance of this maximum is in contrast with a conclusion drawn by a previous investigation based on an inhomogeneous version of Ornstein-Zernike integral equation carried out only for a smaller parameter space than that in the present paper. Advantage of the DFT approach over the integral equation is discussed.

  17. Semiclassical quantization of bound and quasistationary states beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Benderskii, V.A.; Vetoshkin, E.V.; Kats, E.I.

    2004-06-01

    We examine one important (and previously overlooked) aspect of well-known crossing diabatic potentials or Landau-Zener (LZ) problem. We derive the semiclassical quantization rules for the crossing diabatic potentials with localized initial and localized or delocalized final states, in the intermediate energy region, when all four adiabatic states are coupled and should be taken into account. We found all needed connection matrices and present the following analytical results: (i) in the tunneling region, the splittings of vibrational levels are represented as a product of the splitting in the lower adiabatic potential and the nontrivial function depending on the Massey parameter; (ii) in the overbarrier region, we find specific resonances between the levels in the lower and in the upper adiabatic potentials and, in that condition, independent quantizations rules are not correct; (iii) for the delocalized final states (decay lower adiabatic potential), we describe quasistationary states and calculate the decay rate as a function of the adiabatic coupling; and (iv) for the intermediate energy regions, we calculate the energy level quantization, which can be brought into a compact form by using either adiabatic or diabatic basis set (in contrast to the previous results found in the Landau diabatic basis). Applications of the results may concern the various systems; e.g., molecules undergoing conversion of electronic states, radiationless transitions, or isomerization reactions.

  18. A new local density functional for main-group thermochemistry, transition metal bonding, thermochemical kinetics, and noncovalent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2006-11-01

    We present a new local density functional, called M06-L, for main-group and transition element thermochemistry, thermochemical kinetics, and noncovalent interactions. The functional is designed to capture the main dependence of the exchange-correlation energy on local spin density, spin density gradient, and spin kinetic energy density, and it is parametrized to satisfy the uniform-electron-gas limit and to have good performance for both main-group chemistry and transition metal chemistry. The M06-L functional and 14 other functionals have been comparatively assessed against 22 energetic databases. Among the tested functionals, which include the popular B3LYP, BLYP, and BP86 functionals as well as our previous M05 functional, the M06-L functional gives the best overall performance for a combination of main-group thermochemistry, thermochemical kinetics, and organometallic, inorganometallic, biological, and noncovalent interactions. It also does very well for predicting geometries and vibrational frequencies. Because of the computational advantages of local functionals, the present functional should be very useful for many applications in chemistry, especially for simulations on moderate-sized and large systems and when long time scales must be addressed.

  19. Local density probing of atomic gas via cold Li-Ca+ inelastic collisions in an atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Haze, Shinsuke; Fujinaga, Munekazu; Kyuno, Kazuki; Mukaiyama, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in a harmonic trap inevitably has an inhomogeneous density distribution, which makes an atomic gas an ensemble of atoms in different physical phases. Recent technical advances in the determination of local physical quantities in an atomic gas overcome this complexity and make it possible to directly compare experimental results with many-body theories of a homogeneous atomic gas. A laser-cooled ion can be used as a high-spatial resolution probe of physical quantities of an atomic gas. The spatial spread of an ion can be reduced to sub-microns, which is even small enough for the application of the local probe of atoms in optical lattices. In our experiment, we constructed Li and Ca+ ultracold hybrid system and observed inelastic collisions as a loss of ions. The inelastic collision is confirmed to be a charge-exchange process, whose rate depends linearly on the local atomic density. From the measurement of the rate of the charge-exchange, we can reproduce an atomic density profile. This is an important step toward a local probe of physical quantities of atoms with cold ions. In this presentation, we report on the observation of charge-exchange collisions between Li atom and Ca+ ions, and discuss the feasibility of the ions as a probe of the atoms.

  20. Using a magnetized plasma jet colliding with a heavy gas cloud to investigate MIF adiabatic heating and compression mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul; Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Chai, Kil-Byoung; Greig, Amelia; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized inertial fusion (MIF) is based on having an imploding liner adiabatically compress a magnetized plasma to the density and temperature required for thermonuclear fusion. The goal of the Caltech research program is to determine the scaling of the temperature and density increase when an actual experimental plasma is adiabatically compressed. The plasma parameters will be more modest than a fusion-grade configuration, but in compensation, the shot repetition rate will be much higher and the experiments will be non-destructive. The non-destructive feature results from having a high-speed magnetized plasma jet impact a localized heavy gas. From the point of view of an observer in the frame of the magnetized plasma jet, it will look as if the heavy gas is impacting and compressing the magnetized plasma and so, except for some geometrical differences, the configuration is equivalent to a liner impacting and compressing a stationary magnetized plasma. The experiment will be modeled by 3D numerical MHD and PIC codes. (as of approximately September 15).

  1. Local time variation in land/ocean lightning flash density as measured by the World Wide Lightning Location Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Erin H.; Jacobson, Abram R.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Rodger, Craig J.; Dowden, Richard L.

    2007-07-01

    We study local time variation in high peak current lightning over land versus over ocean by using lightning locations from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). Optical lightning data from the photodiode detector on the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite are used to determine the relative detection efficiency of the WWLLN for lightning events by region, as well as over land versus over ocean. We find that the peak lightning flash density varies for the different continents by up to 5 hours in local time. Because the WWLLN measures lightning strokes with large peak currents, the variation in local time of WWLLN-detected strokes suggests a similar variation in local time of transient luminous events (e.g., elves) and their effects on the lower ionosphere.

  2. Some properties of adiabatic blast waves in preexisting cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. P.; Franco, J.

    1981-01-01

    Cox and Anderson (1982) have conducted an investigation regarding an adiabatic blast wave in a region of uniform density and finite external pressure. In connection with an application of the results of the investigation to a study of interstellar blast waves in the very hot, low-density matrix, it was found that it would be desirable to examine situations with a positive radial density gradient in the ambient medium. Information concerning such situations is needed to learn about the behavior of blast waves occurring within preexisting, presumably supernova-induced cavities in the interstellar mass distribution. The present investigation is concerned with the first steps of a study conducted to obtain the required information. A review is conducted of Sedov's (1959) similarity solutions for the dynamical structure of any explosion in a medium with negligible pressure and power law density dependence on radius.

  3. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  4. General conditions for quantum adiabatic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Comparat, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Adiabaticity occurs when, during its evolution, a physical system remains in the instantaneous eigenstate of the Hamiltonian. Unfortunately, existing results, such as the quantum adiabatic theorem based on a slow down evolution [H({epsilon}t),{epsilon}{yields}0], are insufficient to describe an evolution driven by the Hamiltonian H(t) itself. Here we derive general criteria and exact bounds, for the state and its phase, ensuring an adiabatic evolution for any Hamiltonian H(t). As a corollary, we demonstrate that the commonly used condition of a slow Hamiltonian variation rate, compared to the spectral gap, is indeed sufficient to ensure adiabaticity but only when the Hamiltonian is real and nonoscillating (for instance, containing exponential or polynomial but no sinusoidal functions)

  5. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  6. Simulation of periodically focused, adiabatic thermal beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Akylas, T. R.; Barton, T. J.; Field, D. M.; Lang, K. M.; Mok, R. V.

    2012-12-21

    Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K.R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 14, 103102 (2007); J. Zhou, K.R. Samokhvalova and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 15, 023102 (2008)]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  7. Obtaining Highly Excited Eigenstates of Many-Body Localized Hamiltonians by the Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach.

    PubMed

    Khemani, Vedika; Pollmann, Frank; Sondhi, S L

    2016-06-17

    The eigenstates of many-body localized (MBL) Hamiltonians exhibit low entanglement. We adapt the highly successful density-matrix renormalization group method, which is usually used to find modestly entangled ground states of local Hamiltonians, to find individual highly excited eigenstates of MBL Hamiltonians. The adaptation builds on the distinctive spatial structure of such eigenstates. We benchmark our method against the well-studied random field Heisenberg model in one dimension. At moderate to large disorder, the method successfully obtains excited eigenstates with high accuracy, thereby enabling a study of MBL systems at much larger system sizes than those accessible to exact-diagonalization methods.

  8. Probability Density Functions of Floating Potential Fluctuations Due to Local Electron Flux Intermittency in a Linear ECR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Eiki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    An intermittent behavior of local electron flux in a laboratory ECR plasma is statistically analyzed by means of probability density functions (PDFs). The PDF constructed from a time series of the floating potential signal on a Langmuir probe has a fat tail in the negative value side, which reflects the intermittency of the local electron flux. The PDF of the waiting time, which is defined by the time interval between two successive events, is found to exhibit an exponential distribution, suggesting that the phenomenon is characterized by a stationary Poisson process. The underlying Poisson process is also confirmed by the number of events in given time intervals that is Poisson distributed.

  9. Impurity-Induced Local Magnetism and Density of States in the Superconducting State of YBa2Cu3O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazi, S.; Bobroff, J.; Alloul, H.; Le Tacon, M.; Blanchard, N.; Collin, G.; Julien, M. H.; Horvatić, M.; Berthier, C.

    2006-03-01

    O17 NMR is used to probe the local influence of nonmagnetic Zn and magnetic Ni impurities in the superconducting state of optimally doped high TC YBa2Cu3O7. Zn and Ni induce a staggered paramagnetic polarization, similar to that evidenced above TC, with a typical extension ξ=3 cell units for Zn and ξ≥3 for Ni. In addition, Zn is observed to induce a local density of states near the Fermi energy in its neighborhood, which also decays over about 3 cell units. Its magnitude decreases sharply with increasing temperature. This allows direct comparison with the STM observations done in BiSCCO.

  10. Obtaining Highly Excited Eigenstates of Many-Body Localized Hamiltonians by the Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemani, Vedika; Pollmann, Frank; Sondhi, S. L.

    2016-06-01

    The eigenstates of many-body localized (MBL) Hamiltonians exhibit low entanglement. We adapt the highly successful density-matrix renormalization group method, which is usually used to find modestly entangled ground states of local Hamiltonians, to find individual highly excited eigenstates of MBL Hamiltonians. The adaptation builds on the distinctive spatial structure of such eigenstates. We benchmark our method against the well-studied random field Heisenberg model in one dimension. At moderate to large disorder, the method successfully obtains excited eigenstates with high accuracy, thereby enabling a study of MBL systems at much larger system sizes than those accessible to exact-diagonalization methods.

  11. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  12. Interplay between Rashba spin-orbit coupling and adiabatic rotation in a two-dimensional Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doko, E.; Subaşı, A. L.; Iskin, M.

    2017-01-01

    We explore the trap profiles of a two-dimensional atomic Fermi gas in the presence of a Rashba spin-orbit coupling and under an adiabatic rotation. We first consider a noninteracting gas and show that the competition between the effects of Rashba coupling on the local density of single-particle states and the Coriolis effects caused by rotation gives rise to a characteristic ring-shaped density profile that survives at experimentally accessible temperatures. Furthermore, Rashba splitting of the Landau levels gives the density profiles a ziggurat shape in the rapid-rotation limit. We then consider an interacting gas under the BCS mean-field approximation for local pairing, and study the pair-breaking mechanism that is induced by the Coriolis effects on superfluidity, where we calculate the critical rotation frequencies both for the onset of pair breaking and for the complete destruction of superfluidity in the system. In particular, by comparing the results of a fully-quantum-mechanical Bogoliubov-de Gennes approach with those of a semiclassical local-density approximation, we construct extensive phase diagrams for a wide range of parameter regimes in the trap where the aforementioned competition may, e.g., favor an outer normal edge that is completely phase separated from the central superfluid core by vacuum.

  13. Public support for river restoration funding in relation to local river ecomorphology, population density, and mean income

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SchläPfer, Felix; Witzig, Pieter-Jan

    2006-12-01

    In 1997, about 140,000 citizens in 388 voting districts in the Swiss canton of Bern passed a ballot initiative to allocate about 3 million Swiss Francs annually to a canton-wide river restoration program. Using the municipal voting returns and a detailed georeferenced data set on the ecomorphological status of the rivers, we estimate models of voter support in relation to local river ecomorphology, population density, mean income, cultural background, and recent flood damage. Support of the initiative increased with increasing population density and tended to increase with increasing mean income, in spite of progressive taxation. Furthermore, we found evidence that public support increased with decreasing "naturalness" of local rivers. The model estimates may be cautiously used to predict the public acceptance of similar restoration programs in comparable regions. Moreover, the voting-based insights into the distribution of river restoration benefits provide a useful starting point for debates about appropriate financing schemes.

  14. Spatial distribution of limited resources and local density regulation in juvenile Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Finstad, Anders G; Einum, Sigurd; Ugedal, Ola; Forseth, Torbjørn

    2009-01-01

    1. Spatial heterogeneity of resources may influence competition among individuals and thus have a fundamental role in shaping population dynamics and carrying capacity. In the present study, we identify shelter opportunities as a limiting resource for juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Experimental and field studies are combined in order to demonstrate how the spatial distribution of shelters may influence population dynamics on both within and among population scales. 2. In closed experimental streams, fish performance scaled negatively with decreasing shelter availability and increasing densities. In contrast, the fish in open stream channels dispersed according to shelter availability and performance of fish remaining in the streams did not depend on initial density or shelters. 3. The field study confirmed that spatial variation in densities of 1-year-old juveniles was governed both by initial recruit density and shelter availability. Strength of density-dependent population regulation, measured as carrying capacity, increased with decreasing number of shelters. 4. Nine rivers were surveyed for spatial variation in shelter availability and increased shelter heterogeneity tended to decrease maximum observed population size (measured using catch statistics of adult salmon as a proxy). 5. Our studies highlight the importance of small-scale within-population spatial structure in population dynamics and demonstrate that not only the absolute amount of limiting resources but also their spatial arrangement can be an important factor influencing population carrying capacity.

  15. Adiabatic dynamics of an inhomogeneous quantum phase transition: the case of a z>1 dynamical exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziarmaga, Jacek; Rams, Marek M.

    2010-10-01

    We consider an inhomogeneous quantum phase transition across a multicritical point of the XY quantum spin chain. This is an example of a Lifshitz transition with a dynamical exponent z=2. Just like in the case z=1 considered by Dziarmaga and Rams (2010 New J. Phys. 12 055007), when a critical front propagates much faster than the maximal group velocity of quasiparticles vq, then the transition is effectively homogeneous: the density of excitations obeys a generalized Kibble-Zurek mechanism and scales with the sixth root of the transition rate. However, unlike for the case z=1, the inhomogeneous transition becomes adiabatic not below vq but at a lower threshold velocity \\hat{v} , proportional to the inhomogeneity of the transition, where the excitations are suppressed exponentially. Interestingly, the adiabatic threshold \\hat{v} is nonzero despite the vanishing minimal group velocity of low-energy quasiparticles. In the adiabatic regime below \\hat{v} , the inhomogeneous transition can be used for efficient adiabatic quantum state preparation in a quantum simulator: the time required for the critical front to sweep across a chain of N spins adiabatically is merely linear in N, while the corresponding time for a homogeneous transition across the multicritical point scales with the sixth power of N. What is more, excitations after the adiabatic inhomogeneous transition, if any, are brushed away by the critical front to the end of the spin chain.

  16. A Density Functional Theory Examination of the Local Conformational Energetics of Normal and Epigenetically Modified Duplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Olson, Wilma

    2013-03-01

    We report density functional theory calculations of various local regions of duplex DNA, including hydrogen bonded base pairs, stacked nearest-neighbor bases, and sugar-phosphate backbones. Special attention is given to the methylation of 5-cytosine, an epigenetic modification believed to play a key role in eukaryotic gene regulation. Energetically stable molecular conformations are identified and their elastic properties analyzed. Our results are compared with previous ab initio studies and high-resolution crystalline structural data.

  17. Feasibility of using full tensor gradient (FTG) data for detection of local lateral density contrasts during reservoir monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droujinine, Alexander; Vasilevsky, Alexander; Evans, Russ

    2007-06-01

    Three-Dimensional Full Tensor Gradiometry (3-D FTG) acquires ultrasensitive measurements of the Earth's (vector) gravity gradient field. Departures from simple weakening of the field in the vertical direction are due to subsurface variations in density. We have undertaken a numerical examination of the feasibility of using this system for detecting time variations in local lateral density contrasts in subsurface layers during reservoir production monitoring. Our gravity modelling focuses on the value added by taking account of the horizontal components of gravity gradient in imaging local targets. We have studied the sensitivity of these components to model and acquisition parameters. Iterative regularized inversion algorithms that can explain the behaviour of a hydrocarbon reservoir in terms of time-lapse density changes have been described. These algorithms are based on the homotopy method that utilizes the solution space topology. To stabilize the inversion, we have introduced the maximum compactness of anomalous sources along one or more directions. This allows the use of a priori information natural to time-lapse monitoring about the arbitrary shape and spatial locations of the sources. The time-evolving density contrast within the local target zone is recovered by means of an iterative procedure. The treatment of either correlated or random noise fits naturally into this procedure. The final scheme has been illustrated by several examples using synthetic FTG data generated from various density distributions of practical interest. We have considered the effect of model and data uncertainties on the inversion solution. It appears that the iterative process is effective, numerically stable and rapidly convergent in the presence of both random and structural noise. Results show that it is relatively insensitive to the choice of starting model. Appropriate applications include direct monitoring of gas-oil contact and temperature front expansion during steam

  18. Relative Contribution of Matrix Structure, Patch Resources and Management to the Local Densities of Two Large Blue Butterfly Species.

    PubMed

    Kajzer-Bonk, Joanna; Skórka, Piotr; Nowicki, Piotr; Bonk, Maciej; Król, Wiesław; Szpiłyk, Damian; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The type of matrix, the landscape surrounding habitat patches, may determine the distribution and function of local populations. However, the matrix is often heterogeneous, and its various components may differentially contribute to metapopulation processes at different spatial scales, a phenomenon that has rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative importance of matrix composition and spatial scale, habitat quality, and management intensity on the occurrence and density of local populations of two endangered large blue butterflies: Phengaris teleius and P. nausithous. Presence and abundance data were assessed over two years, 2011-12, in 100 local patches within two heterogeneous regions (near Kraków and Tarnów, southern Poland). The matrix composition was analyzed at eight spatial scales. We observed high occupancy rates in both species, regions and years. With the exception of area and isolation, almost all of the matrix components contributed to Phengaris sp. densities. The different matrix components acted at different spatial scales (grassland cover within 4 and 3 km, field cover within 0.4 and 0.3 km and water cover within 4 km radii for P. teleius and P. nausithous, respectively) and provided the highest independent contribution to the butterfly densities. Additionally, the effects of a 0.4 km radius of forest cover and a food plant cover on P. teleius, and a 1 km radius of settlement cover and management intensity on P. nausithous densities were observed. Contrary to former studies we conclude that the matrix heterogeneity and spatial scale rather than general matrix type are of relevance for densities of butterflies. Conservation strategies for these umbrella species should concentrate on maintaining habitat quality and managing matrix composition at the most appropriate spatial scales.

  19. Relative Contribution of Matrix Structure, Patch Resources and Management to the Local Densities of Two Large Blue Butterfly Species

    PubMed Central

    Skórka, Piotr; Nowicki, Piotr; Bonk, Maciej; Król, Wiesław; Szpiłyk, Damian; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The type of matrix, the landscape surrounding habitat patches, may determine the distribution and function of local populations. However, the matrix is often heterogeneous, and its various components may differentially contribute to metapopulation processes at different spatial scales, a phenomenon that has rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative importance of matrix composition and spatial scale, habitat quality, and management intensity on the occurrence and density of local populations of two endangered large blue butterflies: Phengaris teleius and P. nausithous. Presence and abundance data were assessed over two years, 2011–12, in 100 local patches within two heterogeneous regions (near Kraków and Tarnów, southern Poland). The matrix composition was analyzed at eight spatial scales. We observed high occupancy rates in both species, regions and years. With the exception of area and isolation, almost all of the matrix components contributed to Phengaris sp. densities. The different matrix components acted at different spatial scales (grassland cover within 4 and 3 km, field cover within 0.4 and 0.3 km and water cover within 4 km radii for P. teleius and P. nausithous, respectively) and provided the highest independent contribution to the butterfly densities. Additionally, the effects of a 0.4 km radius of forest cover and a food plant cover on P. teleius, and a 1 km radius of settlement cover and management intensity on P. nausithous densities were observed. Contrary to former studies we conclude that the matrix heterogeneity and spatial scale rather than general matrix type are of relevance for densities of butterflies. Conservation strategies for these umbrella species should concentrate on maintaining habitat quality and managing matrix composition at the most appropriate spatial scales. PMID:28005942

  20. Electric Double-Layer Structure in Primitive Model Electrolytes. Comparing Molecular Dynamics with Local-Density Approximations

    DOE PAGES

    Giera, Brian; Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Henson, Neil; ...

    2015-02-27

    We evaluate the accuracy of local-density approximations (LDAs) using explicit molecular dynamics simulations of binary electrolytes comprised of equisized ions in an implicit solvent. The Bikerman LDA, which considers ions to occupy a lattice, poorly captures excluded volume interactions between primitive model ions. Instead, LDAs based on the Carnahan–Starling (CS) hard-sphere equation of state capture simulated values of ideal and excess chemical potential profiles extremely well, as is the relationship between surface charge density and electrostatic potential. Excellent agreement between the EDL capacitances predicted by CS-LDAs and computed in molecular simulations is found even in systems where ion correlations drivemore » strong density and free charge oscillations within the EDL, despite the inability of LDAs to capture the oscillations in the detailed EDL profiles.« less

  1. Electric Double-Layer Structure in Primitive Model Electrolytes. Comparing Molecular Dynamics with Local-Density Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Giera, Brian; Henson, Neil; Kober, Edward M.; Shell, M. Scott; Squires, Todd M.

    2015-02-27

    We evaluate the accuracy of local-density approximations (LDAs) using explicit molecular dynamics simulations of binary electrolytes comprised of equisized ions in an implicit solvent. The Bikerman LDA, which considers ions to occupy a lattice, poorly captures excluded volume interactions between primitive model ions. Instead, LDAs based on the Carnahan–Starling (CS) hard-sphere equation of state capture simulated values of ideal and excess chemical potential profiles extremely well, as is the relationship between surface charge density and electrostatic potential. Excellent agreement between the EDL capacitances predicted by CS-LDAs and computed in molecular simulations is found even in systems where ion correlations drive strong density and free charge oscillations within the EDL, despite the inability of LDAs to capture the oscillations in the detailed EDL profiles.

  2. Do galaxy global relationships emerge from local ones? The SDSS IV MaNGA surface mass density-metallicity relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Law, David; Wake, David; Green, Jenny E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Lane, Richard R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the stellar surface mass density versus gas metallicity (Σ*-Z) relation for more than 500 000 spatially resolved star-forming resolution elements (spaxels) from a sample of 653 disc galaxies included in the SDSS IV MaNGA survey. We find a tight relation between these local properties, with higher metallicities as the surface density increases. This relation extends over three orders of magnitude in the surface mass density and a factor of 4 in metallicity. We show that this local relationship can simultaneously reproduce two well-known properties of disc galaxies: their global mass-metallicity relationship and their radial metallicity gradients. We also find that the Σ*-Z relation is largely independent of the galaxy's total stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR), except at low stellar mass and high sSFR. These results suggest that in the present-day universe local properties play a key role in determining the gas-phase metallicity in typical disc galaxies.

  3. Effects of stocking density on growth performance, carcass yield, and immune status of a local chicken breed.

    PubMed

    Tong, H B; Lu, J; Zou, J M; Wang, Q; Shi, S R

    2012-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of stocking density on growth performance, carcass yield, and immune status of a local chicken breed. In total, 840 one-day-old male Suqin yellow chickens were placed into 4-m(2) cages in groups of 50 (low), 70 (medium), or 90 (high) birds. Each treatment was represented by 4 replicates (cages). The cages measured 2.84 × 1.42 m; half of the area of the cage (2 m(2)) was used from 1 to 28 d and the whole cage was used from 29 to 42 d. Stocking densities were 25, 35, and 45 birds/m(2) from 1 to 28 d and 12.5, 17.5, and 22.5 birds/m(2) from 29 to 42 d (low, medium, and high, respectively). Final production (live bird mass after fasting) per unit area was 14.46, 19.46, and 24.23 kg/m(2), respectively, at 42 d of age. Several immune parameters were evaluated, and the growth performance, carcass yield, and meat quality were determined. Body weight at 28 and 42 d of age was significantly reduced as the stocking density increased (P < 0.05). A depression in daily weight gain was noticed from 1 to 28 d and 1 to 42 d of age, and daily feed intake decreased significantly in each period as density increased (P < 0.05). The feed/gain from 29 to 42 d and from 1 to 42 d of age decreased as density increased (P < 0.05). At 42 d, there was no effect of the stocking density on carcass, eviscerated carcass, breast, and abdominal fat yields (P > 0.05). The thigh yield of chickens in the medium-density group improved significantly (P < 0.05) compared with those of the other 2 groups. The water-loss rate, shear force, and meat color of the muscle were unaffected (P > 0.05) by the stocking density, but pH values increased slightly as density increased. No significant difference was noted in the immunological parameters, but the blood total protein and potassium were significantly affected by stocking density (P < 0.05). The findings of this study suggest that increasing the stocking density advantageously affected feed/gain and

  4. Localization and density of phoretic deutonymphs of the mite Uropoda orbicularis (Parasitiformes: Mesostigmata) on Aphodius beetles (Aphodiidae) affect pedicel length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajerlein, Daria; Witaliński, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    The phoretic stage of Uropodina mites is a deutonymph with developed morphological adaptations for dispersal by insects. Phoretic deutonymphs are able to produce a pedicel, a stalk-like temporary attachment structure that connects the mite with the carrier. The aim of our study was to determine whether localization and density of phoretic deutonymphs on the carrier affect pedicel length. The study was conducted on a common phoretic mite— Uropoda orbicularis (Uropodina) and two aphodiid beetles— Aphodius prodromus and Aphodius distinctus. Our results show that pedicel length is influenced by the localization of deutonymphs on the body of the carrier. The longest pedicels are produced by deutonymphs attached to the upper part of elytra, whereas deutonymphs attached to femora and trochanters of the third pair of legs and the apex of elytra construct the shortest pedicels. In general, deutonymphs attached to more exposed parts of the carrier produce longer pedicels, whereas shorter pedicels are produced when deutonymphs are fixed to non-exposed parts of the carrier. A second factor influencing pedicel length is the density of attached deutonymphs. Mean pedicel length and deutonymph densities were highly correlated: higher deutonymph density leads to the formation of longer pedicels. The cause for this correlation is discussed, and we conclude that pedicel length variability can increase successful dispersal.

  5. Relativistic blast waves in two dimensions. I - The adiabatic case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate solutions are presented for the dynamical evolution of strong adiabatic relativistic blast waves which result from a point explosion in an ambient gas in which the density varies both with distance from the explosion center and with polar angle in axisymmetry. Solutions are analytical or quasi-analytical for the extreme relativistic case and numerical for the arbitrarily relativistic case. Some general properties of nonplanar relativistic shocks are also discussed, including the incoherence of spherical ultrarelativistic blast-wave fronts on angular scales greater than the reciprocal of the shock Lorentz factor, as well as the conditions for producing blast-wave acceleration.

  6. THE STELLAR NUMBER DENSITY DISTRIBUTION IN THE LOCAL SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD IS NORTH-SOUTH ASYMMETRIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yanny, Brian; Gardner, Susan

    2013-10-17

    We study the number density distribution of a sample of K and M dwarf stars, matched North and South of the Galactic plane within a distance of 2 kpc from the sun, using observations from the Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine distances using the photometric parallax method, and in this context systematic effects exist which could potentially impact the determination of the number density profile with height from the Galactic plane --- and ultimately affect a number density North-South asymmetry. They include: (i) the calibration of the various photometric parallax relations, (ii) the ability to separate dwarfs from giants in our sample, (iii) the role of stellar population differences such as age and metallicity, (iv) the ability to determine the offset of the sun from the Galactic plane, and (v) the correction for reddening from dust in the Galactic plane, though our stars are at high Galactic latitudes. We find the various analyzed systematic effects to have a negligible impact on our observed asymmetry, and using a new and larger sample of stars we confirm and refine the earlier discovery of Widrow et al. of a significant Galactic North-South asymmetry in the stellar number density distribution.

  7. THE STELLAR NUMBER DENSITY DISTRIBUTION IN THE LOCAL SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD IS NORTH-SOUTH ASYMMETRIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yanny, Brian; Gardner, Susan

    2013-11-10

    We study the number density distribution of a sample of K and M dwarf stars, matched north and south of the Galactic plane within a distance of 2 kpc from the Sun, using observations from the Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine distances using the photometric parallax method, and in this context systematic effects exist which could potentially impact the determination of the number density profile with height from the Galactic plane—and ultimately affect a number density north-south asymmetry. They include: (1) the calibration of the various photometric parallax relations, (2) the ability to separate dwarfs from giants in our sample, (3) the role of stellar population differences such as age and metallicity, (4) the ability to determine the offset of the Sun from the Galactic plane, and (5) the correction for reddening from dust in the Galactic plane, though our stars are at high Galactic latitudes. We find the various analyzed systematic effects to have a negligible impact on our observed asymmetry, and using a new and larger sample of stars we confirm and refine the earlier discovery of Widrow et al. of a significant Galactic north-south asymmetry in the stellar number density distribution.

  8. Performance of a local electron density trigger to select extensive air showers at sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, T.; Madani, J.; Ashton, F.

    1985-01-01

    Time coincident voltage pulses in the two closely space (1.6m) plastic scintillators were recorded. Most of the recorded events are expeted to be due to electrons in cosmic ray showers whose core fall at some distance from the detectors. This result is confirmed from a measurement of the frequency distribution of the recorded density ratios of the two scintillators.

  9. Maximization of ICRF power by SOL density tailoring with local gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, P.; Goniche, M.; Bobkov, V.; Lerche, E.; Pinsker, R. I.; Pitts, R. A.; Zhang, W.; Colas, L.; Hosea, J.; Moriyama, S.; Wang, S.-J.; Wukitch, S.; Zhang, X.; Bilato, R.; Bufferand, H.; Guimarais, L.; Faugel, H.; Hanson, G. R.; Kocan, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Petrzilka, V.; Shaw, A.; Stepanov, I.; Sips, A. C. C.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; JET contributors, the; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the DIII-D Team; ITPA ‘Integrated Operation Scenarios' members, the; experts

    2016-04-01

    Experiments have been performed under the coordination of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on several tokamaks, including ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), JET and DIII-D, to characterize the increased Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna loading achieved by optimizing the position of gas injection relative to the RF antennas. On DIII-D, AUG and JET (with the ITER-Like Wall) a 50% increase in the antenna loading was observed when injecting deuterium in ELMy H-mode plasmas using mid-plane inlets close to the powered antennas instead of divertor injection and, with smaller improvement when using gas inlets located at the top of the machine. The gas injection rate required for such improvements (~0.7  ×  1022 el s-1 in AUG, ~1.0  ×  1022 el s-1 in JET) is compatible with the use of this technique to optimize ICRF heating during the development of plasma scenarios and no degradation of confinement was observed when using the mid-plane or top inlets compared with divertor valves. An increase in the scrape-off layer (SOL) density was measured when switching gas injection from divertor to outer mid-plane or top. On JET and DIII-D, the measured SOL density increase when using main chamber puffing is consistent with the antenna coupling resistance increase provided that the distance between the measurement lines of sight and the injection location is taken into account. Optimized gas injection was also found to be beneficial for reducing tungsten (W) sputtering at the AUG antenna limiters, and also to reduce slightly the W and nickel (Ni) content in JET plasmas. Modeling the specific effects of divertor/top/mid-plane injection on the outer mid-plane density was carried out using both the EDGE2D-EIRENE and EMC3-EIRENE plasma boundary code packages; simulations indeed indicate that outer mid-plane gas injection maximizes the density in the mid-plane close to the injection point with qualitative agreement with the AUG SOL density measurements

  10. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  11. Autonomous Bacterial Localization and Gene Expression Based on Nearby Cell Receptor Density

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-22

    density, these cells expressed marker proteins to indicate phenotypic response. Specifically, site-specific synthesis of bacterial quorum sensing ...Escherichia coli; quorum sensing ; synthetic biology Introduction Synthetic biology engenders design-based rewiring of a cell’s genetic circuitry for the...the signal transduction processes of quorum sensing (QS) as a means of inter- and intra-species communication and the coordination of population-based

  12. Adiabatic transport of qubits around a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, David; Moro, Olivia

    2017-03-01

    We consider localized qubits evolving around a black hole following a quantum adiabatic dynamics. We develop a geometric structure (based on fibre bundles) permitting to describe the quantum states of a qubit and the spacetime geometry in a single framework. The quantum decoherence induced by the black hole on the qubit is analysed in this framework (the role of the dynamical and geometric phases in this decoherence is treated), especially for the quantum teleportation protocol when one qubit falls to the event horizon. A simple formula to compute the fidelity of the teleportation is derived. The case of a Schwarzschild black hole is analysed.

  13. Analysis of magnetically immersed electron guns with non-adiabatic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Raparia, Deepak; Ritter, John

    2016-11-08

    Electron diode guns, which have strongly varying magnetic or electric fields in a cathode-anode gap, were investigated in order to generate laminar electron beams with high current density using magnetically immersed guns. By creating a strongly varying radial electric field in a cathode-anode gap of the electron gun, it was demonstrated that the optical properties of the gun can be significantly altered, which allows the generation of a laminar, high-current electron beam with relatively low magnetic field on the cathode. The relatively high magnetic compression of the electron beam achieved by this method is important for producing electron beams with high current density. A similar result can be obtained by inducing a strong variation of the magnetic field in a cathode-anode gap. It was observed that creating a dip in the axial magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap of an adiabatic electron gun has an optical effect similar to guns with strong variation of radial electric field. By analyzing the electron trajectories angles and presenting the results in a gun performance map different geometries of magnetically immersed electron guns with non-adiabatic fields are compared with each other and with a more traditional adiabatic electron gun. Some advantages and limitations of guns with non-adiabatic fields are outlined. In conclusion, the tests results of non-adiabatic electron gun with modified magnetic field are presented.

  14. Analysis of magnetically immersed electron guns with non-adiabatic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; ...

    2016-11-08

    Electron diode guns, which have strongly varying magnetic or electric fields in a cathode-anode gap, were investigated in order to generate laminar electron beams with high current density using magnetically immersed guns. By creating a strongly varying radial electric field in a cathode-anode gap of the electron gun, it was demonstrated that the optical properties of the gun can be significantly altered, which allows the generation of a laminar, high-current electron beam with relatively low magnetic field on the cathode. The relatively high magnetic compression of the electron beam achieved by this method is important for producing electron beams withmore » high current density. A similar result can be obtained by inducing a strong variation of the magnetic field in a cathode-anode gap. It was observed that creating a dip in the axial magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap of an adiabatic electron gun has an optical effect similar to guns with strong variation of radial electric field. By analyzing the electron trajectories angles and presenting the results in a gun performance map different geometries of magnetically immersed electron guns with non-adiabatic fields are compared with each other and with a more traditional adiabatic electron gun. Some advantages and limitations of guns with non-adiabatic fields are outlined. In conclusion, the tests results of non-adiabatic electron gun with modified magnetic field are presented.« less

  15. Analysis of magnetically immersed electron guns with non-adiabatic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Raparia, Deepak; Ritter, John

    2016-11-01

    Electron diode guns, which have strongly varying magnetic or electric fields in a cathode-anode gap, were investigated in order to generate laminar electron beams with high current density using magnetically immersed guns. By creating a strongly varying radial electric field in a cathode-anode gap of the electron gun, it was demonstrated that the optical properties of the gun can be significantly altered, which allows the generation of a laminar, high-current electron beam with relatively low magnetic field on the cathode. The relatively high magnetic compression of the electron beam achieved by this method is important for producing electron beams with high current density. A similar result can be obtained by inducing a strong variation of the magnetic field in a cathode-anode gap. It was observed that creating a dip in the axial magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap of an adiabatic electron gun has an optical effect similar to guns with strong variation of radial electric field. By analyzing the electron trajectories angles and presenting the results in a gun performance map, different geometries of magnetically immersed electron guns with non-adiabatic fields are compared with each other and with a more traditional adiabatic electron gun. Some advantages and limitations of guns with non-adiabatic fields are outlined. The tests' results of a non-adiabatic electron gun with modified magnetic field are presented.

  16. The luminosity-specific Planetary Nebulae density in Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, R. L. M.; Buzzoni, A.; Arnaboldi, M.

    The value of the α ratio, the number of PNe per unit bolometric luminosity in a galaxy, is computed using stellar population synthesis models covering the whole range of Hubble types of galaxies.Model predictions are compared with the PNe counts in the Local Group, which indicate a fairly constant value of α - between 1 and 6 PNe per 10^7 solar luminosities - along the Hubble sequence.

  17. Pyroclastic density currents and local topography as seen with the conveyer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronzo, Domenico M.; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2014-05-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are multiphase flows generated during explosive volcanic eruptions, and they move down the volcano, and over the surrounding topography. The flow-topography interaction can play a fundamental role in the sedimentary processes, and in the resulting deposit facies architecture, as well as can play a dramatic role in the flow behavior, and in the associated volcanic hazard. This paper aims at discussing the PDC-topography interaction theme from the viewpoint of both deposits and flow structure, by accounting for appropriate literature, and revising the concepts in light of the theoretical conveyer model of Doronzo and Dellino (2013) on sedimentation and deposition in particulate density currents. First the effects, then the causes of the flow-topography interaction are discussed, in order to follow the historical development of theme concepts. The discussion is relative in terms of inertial and forced currents, which are defined on the basis of a dimensionless quantity (SD) representing the conservation of mass. Momentum equation relating depositional unit thickness, flow shear velocity, and density contrast shows that the flow is the cause of PDC motion, whereas the density contrast sustains the momentum, and the deposits are the process effect. In particular, the flow structure is described into three parts, flow-substrate boundary zone, boundary layer (lower part), and wake region (upper part) of the current. The facies architecture of PDC deposits, and the volcanic hazard depend on fluid dynamic and hydraulic behavior represented, in light of the conveyer model, by the balance of sedimentation and deposition rates through transport and erosion (“sedimentation-deposition” ratio, SD). This balance acts between flow-substrate boundary zone and boundary layer. The paper discussion mainly applies to small-to-intermediate volume eruptions. Field and modeling examples of Vulcano tuff cone and Colli Albani maar (Italy) constrain the

  18. Exact-exchange spin-density functional theory of Wigner localization and phase transitions in quantum rings.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Thorsten; Siegmund, Marc; Pankratov, Oleg

    2011-08-24

    We apply exact-exchange spin-density functional theory in the Krieger-Li-Iafrate approximation to interacting electrons in quantum rings of different widths. The rings are threaded by a magnetic flux that induces a persistent current. A weak space and spin symmetry breaking potential is introduced to allow for localized solutions. As the electron-electron interaction strength described by the dimensionless parameter r(S) is increased, we observe-at a fixed spin magnetic moment-the subsequent transition of both spin sub-systems from the Fermi liquid to the Wigner crystal state. A dramatic signature of Wigner crystallization is that the persistent current drops sharply with increasing r(S). We observe simultaneously the emergence of pronounced oscillations in the spin-resolved densities and in the electron localization functions indicating a spatial electron localization showing ferrimagnetic order after both spin sub-systems have undergone the Wigner crystallization. The critical r(S)(c) at the transition point is substantially smaller than in a fully spin-polarized system and decreases further with decreasing ring width. Relaxing the constraint of a fixed spin magnetic moment, we find that on increasing r(S) the stable phase changes from an unpolarized Fermi liquid to an antiferromagnetic Wigner crystal and finally to a fully polarized Fermi liquid.

  19. Investigating the effect of solubility and density gradients on local hydrodynamics and drug dissolution in the USP 4 dissolution apparatus.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Deirdre M; Liu, Bo; Corrigan, Owen I

    2011-10-31

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of solubility and related solution density gradients, on hydrodynamics and dissolution rate in a low velocity pulsing flow, in the USP 4 flow-through dissolution apparatus. The paddle apparatus, flow-through apparatus and a free convection system were used in dissolution testing, using benzoic acid (BA) and lactose monohydrate (LM), representing slightly and freely soluble model compounds, respectively. A flow rate of 8 ml min(-1) (22.6 mm diameter cell) was used in the flow-through apparatus. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to analyze the effect of the dissolved compounds on local hydrodynamics. A higher dissolution rate of both BA and LM was obtained in the free convection system compared to the flow-through apparatus, with highest dissolution rate from both compounds in the paddle apparatus. The effect of downward flow arising from natural convection had a significant effect for the more soluble compound, LM, on local fluid velocities, whereas flow reversal induced by the forced convection environment was a significant feature impacting on the hydrodynamics in the BA species transfer simulation. The effect of solution density on local hydrodynamics needs to be considered when selecting dissolution conditions in the USP 4 dissolution apparatus.

  20. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  1. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Development of a Method for Local Electron Temperature and Density Measurements in the Divertor of the JET Tokamak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jupen, C.; Meigs, A.; Bhatia, A. K.; Brezinsek, S.; OMullane, M.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma volume recombination in the divertor, a process in which charged particles recombine to neutral atoms, contributes to plasma detachment and hence cooling at the divertor target region. Detachment has been observed at JET and other tokamaks and is known to occur at low electron temperatures (T(sub e)<1 eV) and at high electron density (n(sub e)>10(exp 20)/m(exp 3)). The ability to measure such low temperatures is therefore of interest for modelling the divertor. In present work we report development of a new spectroscopic technique for investigation of local electron density (n(sub e)) and temperature (T,) in the outer divertor at JET.

  3. Time-Resolved Dynamics in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Significance of Non-locality in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Neepa

    2013-03-01

    The usual approximations in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) have achieved an unprecedented balance between accuracy and efficiency for calculating excitation spectra and response. We show however that these approximations are less successful for time-resolved dynamics beyond the linear response regime. Step and peak structures develop in the exact exchange-correlation potential that have a density-dependence that is non-local both in time and in space, missed by all approximations in use today. The lack of these structures leads to their incorrect predictions of dynamics, such as faster time-scales, and incomplete charge-transfer. [P. Elliott, J.I. Fuks, A. Rubio, N.T. Maitra arXiv:1211.2012; J. I. Fuks, P. Elliott, A. Rubio, N. T. Maitra, arXiv:1211.2849] Support from NSF and DOE is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Local resilience of the 1 T -TiSe2 charge density wave to Ti self-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, B.; Jaouen, T.; Didiot, C.; Razzoli, E.; Monney, G.; Mottas, M.-L.; Vanini, F.; Barreteau, C.; Ubaldini, A.; Giannini, E.; Berger, H.; Bowler, D. R.; Aebi, P.

    2017-02-01

    In Ti-intercalated self-doped 1 T -TiSe2 crystals, the charge density wave (CDW) superstructure induces two nonequivalent sites for Ti dopants. Recently, it has been shown that increasing Ti doping dramatically influences the CDW by breaking it into phase-shifted domains. Here, we report scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy experiments that reveal a dopant-site dependence of the CDW gap. Supported by density functional theory, we demonstrate that the loss of the long-range phase coherence introduces an imbalance in the intercalated-Ti site distribution and restrains the CDW gap closure. This local resilient behavior of the 1 T -TiSe2 CDW reveals an entangled mechanism between CDW, periodic lattice distortion, and induced nonequivalent defects.

  5. Recognition of Fibrotic Infarct Density by the Pattern of Local Systolic-Diastolic Myocardial Electrical Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Amorós-Figueras, Gerard; Jorge, Esther; García-Sánchez, Tomás; Bragós, Ramón; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier; Cinca, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial electrical impedance is a biophysical property of the heart that is influenced by the intrinsic structural characteristics of the tissue. Therefore, the structural derangements elicited in a chronic myocardial infarction should cause specific changes in the local systolic-diastolic myocardial impedance, but this is not known. This study aimed to characterize the local changes of systolic-diastolic myocardial impedance in a healed myocardial infarction model. Six pigs were successfully submitted to 150 min of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion. 4 weeks later, myocardial impedance spectroscopy (1–1000 kHz) was measured at different infarction sites. The electrocardiogram, left ventricular (LV) pressure, LV dP/dt, and aortic blood flow (ABF) were also recorded. A total of 59 LV tissue samples were obtained and histopathological studies were performed to quantify the percentage of fibrosis. Samples were categorized as normal myocardium (<10% fibrosis), heterogeneous scar (10–50%) and dense scar (>50%). Resistivity of normal myocardium depicted phasic changes during the cardiac cycle and its amplitude markedly decreased in dense scar (18 ± 2 Ω·cm vs. 10 ± 1 Ω·cm, at 41 kHz; P < 0.001, respectively). The mean phasic resistivity decreased progressively from normal to heterogeneous and dense scar regions (285 ± 10 Ω·cm, 225 ± 25 Ω·cm, and 162 ± 6 Ω·cm, at 41 kHz; P < 0.001 respectively). Moreover, myocardial resistivity and phase angle correlated significantly with the degree of local fibrosis (resistivity: r = 0.86 at 1 kHz, P < 0.001; phase angle: r = 0.84 at 41 kHz, P < 0.001). Myocardial infarcted regions with greater fibrotic content show lower mean impedance values and more depressed systolic-diastolic dynamic impedance changes. In conclusion, this study reveals that differences in the degree of myocardial fibrosis can be detected in vivo by local measurement of phasic systolic

  6. Revisting the Density Matrix Expansion with Regulated Chiral Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyhdalo, Alexander; Furnstahl, Richard; Bogner, Scott; Schunck, Nicolas; Navarro Perez, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    The density matrix expansion provides a general way to map microscopic interactions to a local functional. Previous density matrix expansion formulations added unregulated chiral long-range potentials to a Skyrme-type functional, which accounted for the short-range contributions. We implement the expansion with new coordinate space regulators using the regulator cutoff as a tool to adiabatically turn on finite-range pion interactions. We discuss `smoking guns' for correct inclusion of 3-body forces, which are implemented in a normal-ordering prescription, and compare to ab initio calculations.

  7. On the Kohn-Sham density response in a localized basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, Dietrich; Koval, Peter

    2009-07-01

    We construct the Kohn-Sham density response function χ0 in a previously described basis of the space of orbital products. The calculational complexity of our construction is O(N2Nω) for a molecule of N atoms and in a spectroscopic window of Nω frequency points. As a first application, we use χ0 to calculate the molecular spectra from the Petersilka-Gossmann-Gross equation. With χ0 as input, we obtain the correct spectra with an extra computational effort that grows also as O(N2Nω) and, therefore, less steeply in N than the O(N3) complexity of solving Casida's equations. Our construction should be useful for the study of excitons in molecular physics and in related areas where χ0 is a crucial ingredient.

  8. Local control theory using trajectory surface hopping and linear-response time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Curchod, Basile F E; Penfold, Thomas J; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of local control theory using nonadiabatic molecular dynamics within the framework of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory is discussed. The method is applied to study the photoexcitation of lithium fluoride, for which we demonstrate that this approach can efficiently generate a pulse, on-the-fly, able to control the population transfer between two selected electronic states. Analysis of the computed control pulse yields insights into the photophysics of the process identifying the relevant frequencies associated to the curvature of the initial and final state potential energy curves and their energy differences. The limitations inherent to the use of the trajectory surface hopping approach are also discussed.

  9. Low frequency dynamics of disordered XY spin chains and pinned density waves: from localized spin waves to soliton tunneling.

    PubMed

    Fogler, Michael M

    2002-05-06

    A long-standing problem of the low-energy dynamics of a disordered XY spin chain is reexamined. The case of a rigid chain is studied, where the quantum effects can be treated quasiclassically. It is shown that, as the frequency decreases, the relevant excitations change from localized spin waves to two-level systems to soliton-antisoliton pairs. The linear-response correlation functions are calculated. The results apply to other periodic glassy systems such as pinned density waves, planar vortex lattices, stripes, and disordered Luttinger liquids.

  10. Quasi-1D van der Waals materials as high current-density local interconnects (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarov, Maxim; Aytan, Ece; Bloodgood, Matthew; Salguero, Tina T.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of interconnect dimensions in combination with the introduction of low-k dielectrics has increased the number of heat dissipation, integration and reliability challenges in modern electronics. As a result, there is a strong need for new materials that have high current-carrying capacity for applications as nanoscale interconnects. In this presentation, we show that quasi-one-dimensional (1D) van der Waals metals such as TaSe3 have excellent breakdown current density exceeding that of 5 MA/cm2. This value is above that currently achievable in conventional copper or aluminum wires. The quasi-1D van der Waals materials are characterized by strong bonds along one dimension and weak van der Waals bonds along two other dimensions. The material for this study was grown by the chemical vapor transport (CVT) method. Both mechanical and chemical exfoliation methods were used to fabricate nanowires with lateral dimensions below 100 nm. The dimensions of the quasi-1D nanowires were verified with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The metal (Ti/Au) contacts for the electrical characterization were deposited using electron beam evaporation (EBE). The measurements were conducted on a number of prototype interconnects with multiple electric contacts to ensure reproducibility. The obtained results suggest that quasi-1D van der Waals metals present a feasible alternative to conventional copper interconnects in terms of the current-carrying capacity and the breakdown current-density. This work was supported, in part, by the SRC and DARPA through STARnet Center for Function Accelerated nanoMaterial Engineering (FAME).

  11. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  12. On black hole spectroscopy via adiabatic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Han, Yan

    2012-12-01

    In this Letter, we obtain the black hole spectroscopy by combining the black hole property of adiabaticity and the oscillating velocity of the black hole horizon. This velocity is obtained in the tunneling framework. In particular, we declare, if requiring canonical invariance, the adiabatic invariant quantity should be of the covariant form Iadia = ∮pi dqi. Using it, the horizon area of a Schwarzschild black hole is quantized independently of the choice of coordinates, with an equally spaced spectroscopy always given by ΔA = 8 π lp2 in the Schwarzschild and Painlevé coordinates.

  13. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  14. Adiabatic cluster-state quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.

    2010-09-15

    Models of quantum computation (QC) are important because they change the physical requirements for achieving universal QC. For example, one-way QC requires the preparation of an entangled ''cluster'' state, followed by adaptive measurement on this state, a set of requirements which is different from the standard quantum-circuit model. Here we introduce a model based on one-way QC but without measurements (except for the final readout), instead using adiabatic deformation of a Hamiltonian whose initial ground state is the cluster state. Our results could help increase the feasibility of adiabatic schemes by using tools from one-way QC.

  15. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τ_{A}(t) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τ_{A}(t) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  16. Markovian quantum master equation beyond adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yuge, Tatsuro; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    By introducing a temporal change time scale τA(t ) for the time-dependent system Hamiltonian, a general formulation of the Markovian quantum master equation is given to go well beyond the adiabatic regime. In appropriate situations, the framework is well justified even if τA(t ) is faster than the decay time scale of the bath correlation function. An application to the dissipative Landau-Zener model demonstrates this general result. The findings are applicable to a wide range of fields, providing a basis for quantum control beyond the adiabatic regime.

  17. A density functional study of strong local magnetism creation on MoS2 nanoribbon by sulfur vacancy.

    PubMed

    Shidpour, Reza; Manteghian, Merhrdad

    2010-08-01

    In this study a low-width MoS(2) ribbon has been used for probing the electronic structure and local magnetic moment near vacancies. A theoretical study with the full-potential Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach (Wien2K code) have shown that when the dimension of MoS(2) is reduced from 2-D to 1-D the nonmagnetic semi-conductor MoS(2) becomes a magnetic conductor. Our study has shown that a vacancy on the S-edge with 50% coverage intensifies the magnetization of the edge of the MoS(2) nanoribbon but such a vacancy on S-edge with 100% coverage causes this magnetic property to disappear. It is concluded that in both of them, there are positive or negative strong gradients of local magnetic moment near the vacancy. This may explain why lattice defects are essential for catalysis processes.

  18. A density functional study of strong local magnetism creation on MoS2 nanoribbon by sulfur vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidpour, Reza; Manteghian, Merhrdad

    2010-08-01

    In this study a low-width MoS2 ribbon has been used for probing the electronic structure and local magnetic moment near vacancies. A theoretical study with the full-potential Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach (Wien2K code) have shown that when the dimension of MoS2 is reduced from 2-D to 1-D the nonmagnetic semi-conductor MoS2 becomes a magnetic conductor. Our study has shown that a vacancy on the S-edge with 50% coverage intensifies the magnetization of the edge of the MoS2 nanoribbon but such a vacancy on S-edge with 100% coverage causes this magnetic property to disappear. It is concluded that in both of them, there are positive or negative strong gradients of local magnetic moment near the vacancy. This may explain why lattice defects are essential for catalysis processes.

  19. Development of a tungsten heavy alloy that fails by an adiabatic shear mechanism. Phase 1. Final report, 1 January-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Kyriacou, C.; Withers, J.C.; Loutfy, R.O.

    1993-04-01

    Kinetic Energy penetrators made from Depleted Uranium (DU) alloys have consistently performed better than equi-density and geometrically similar penetrators made from conventional tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) during ballistic penetration tests into semi-infinite Rolled Homogeneous Armor (RHA) steel targets. The superior penetration behavior of DU penetrators is presently attributed to these penetrators maintaining a chisel nose by failure along adiabatic shear bands which is in contrast to the mushroom head observed in WHA penetrators; the mushroom head decreases the energy density at the target thereby leading to reduced penetration. The radiological hazard of DU combined with chemical corrosion during storage provides an impetus to improving the state-of-the-art in WHA with respect to ballistic penetration behavior. Interestingly, WHA penetrators with DU matrix (instead of the conventional Ni-Fe, Ni-Co, or Ni-Fe-Co matrices) also fail by adiabatic shear indicating that shear localization is probably influenced greatly by matrix material properties. Hence, an investigation into alternative matrix materials for WHA that will support shear localization is warranted.

  20. Predicting Local Dengue Transmission in Guangzhou, China, through the Influence of Imported Cases, Mosquito Density and Climate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Shaowei; Yin, Wenwu; Bi, Peng; Zhang, Honglong; Wang, Chenggang; Liu, Xiaobo; Chen, Bin; Yang, Weizhong; Liu, Qiyong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Each year there are approximately 390 million dengue infections worldwide. Weather variables have a significant impact on the transmission of Dengue Fever (DF), a mosquito borne viral disease. DF in mainland China is characterized as an imported disease. Hence it is necessary to explore the roles of imported cases, mosquito density and climate variability in dengue transmission in China. The study was to identify the relationship between dengue occurrence and possible risk factors and to develop a predicting model for dengue’s control and prevention purpose. Methodology and Principal Findings Three traditional suburbs and one district with an international airport in Guangzhou city were selected as the study areas. Autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis were used to perform univariate analysis to identify possible risk factors, with relevant lagged effects, associated with local dengue cases. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to extract principal components and PCA score was used to represent the original variables to reduce multi-collinearity. Combining the univariate analysis and prior knowledge, time-series Poisson regression analysis was conducted to quantify the relationship between weather variables, Breteau Index, imported DF cases and the local dengue transmission in Guangzhou, China. The goodness-of-fit of the constructed model was determined by pseudo-R2, Akaike information criterion (AIC) and residual test. There were a total of 707 notified local DF cases from March 2006 to December 2012, with a seasonal distribution from August to November. There were a total of 65 notified imported DF cases from 20 countries, with forty-six cases (70.8%) imported from Southeast Asia. The model showed that local DF cases were positively associated with mosquito density, imported cases, temperature, precipitation, vapour pressure and minimum relative humidity, whilst being negatively associated with air pressure, with different time

  1. Evaluating Electronic Couplings for Excited State Charge Transfer Based on Maximum Occupation Method ΔSCF Quasi-Adiabatic States.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzi; Zhang, Yong; Bao, Peng; Yi, Yuanping

    2017-02-14

    Electronic couplings of charge-transfer states with the ground state and localized excited states at the donor/acceptor interface are crucial parameters for controlling the dynamics of exciton dissociation and charge recombination processes in organic solar cells. Here we propose a quasi-adiabatic state approach to evaluate electronic couplings through combining maximum occupation method (mom)-ΔSCF and state diabatization schemes. Compared with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using global hybrid functional, mom-ΔSCF is superior to estimate the excitation energies of charge-transfer states; moreover it can also provide good excited electronic state for property calculation. Our approach is hence reliable to evaluate electronic couplings for excited state electron transfer processes, which is demonstrated by calculations on a typical organic photovoltaic system, oligothiophene/perylenediimide complex.

  2. Localized Delivery of Low-Density Lipoprotein Docosahexaenoic Acid Nanoparticles to the Rat Brain using Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Mulik, Rohit S.; Bing, Chenchen; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; Munaweera, Imalka; Chopra, Rajiv; Corbin, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound exposures in the presence of microbubbles can achieve transient, non-invasive, and localized blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening, offering a method for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) nanoparticles reconstituted with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) could have significant therapeutic value in the brain, since DHA is known to be neuroprotective. BBB opening was achieved using pulsed ultrasound exposures in a localized brain region in normal rats, after which LDL nanoparticles containing the fluorescent probe DiR (1,1′-Dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-Tetramethylindotricarbocyanine Iodide) or DHA were administered intravenously. Fluorescent imaging of brain tissue from rats administered LDL-DiR demonstrated strong localization of fluorescence signal in the exposed hemisphere. LDL-DHA administration produced 2× more DHA in the exposed region of the brain, with a corresponding increase in Resolvin D1 levels, indicating DHA was incorporated into cells and metabolized. Histological evaluation did not indicate any evidence of increased tissue damage in exposed brain regions compared to normal brain. This work demonstrates that localized delivery of DHA to the brain is possible using systemically-administered LDL nanoparticles combined with pulsed focused ultrasound exposures in the brain. This technology could be used in regions of acute brain injury or as a means to target infiltrating tumor cells in the brain. PMID:26790145

  3. The ALFALFA Hα Survey. I. Project Description and The Local Star-formation Rate Density from the Fall Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Sistine, Angela; Salzer, John J.; Sugden, Arthur; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Janowiecki, Steven; Jaskot, Anne E.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2016-06-01

    The ALFALFA Hα survey utilizes a large sample of H i-selected galaxies from the ALFALFA survey to study star formation (SF) in the local universe. ALFALFA Hα contains 1555 galaxies with distances between ˜20 and ˜100 Mpc. We have obtained continuum-subtracted narrowband Hα images and broadband R images for each galaxy, creating one of the largest homogeneous sets of Hα images ever assembled. Our procedures were designed to minimize the uncertainties related to the calculation of the local SF rate density (SFRD). The galaxy sample we constructed is as close to volume-limited as possible, is a robust statistical sample, and spans a wide range of galaxy environments. In this paper, we discuss the properties of our Fall sample of 565 galaxies, our procedure for deriving individual galaxy SF rates, and our method for calculating the local SFRD. We present a preliminary value of log(SFRD[M ⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3]) = -1.747 ± 0.018 (random) ±0.05 (systematic) based on the 565 galaxies in our Fall sub-sample. Compared to the weighted average of SFRD values around z ≈ 2, our local value indicates a drop in the global SFRD of a factor of 10.2 over that lookback time.

  4. Non-equilibrium scale invariance and shortcuts to adiabaticity in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    PubMed Central

    Rohringer, W.; Fischer, D.; Steiner, F.; Mazets, I. E.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Trupke, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for scale invariant behaviour of the excitation spectrum in phase-fluctuating quasi-1d Bose gases after a rapid change of the external trapping potential. Probing density correlations in free expansion, we find that the temperature of an initial thermal state scales with the spatial extension of the cloud as predicted by a model based on adiabatic rescaling of initial eigenmodes with conserved quasiparticle occupation numbers. Based on this result, we demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity for the rapid expansion or compression of the gas do not induce additional heating. PMID:25867640

  5. The HI Content of Galaxies as a Function of Local Density and Large-Scale Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoreen, Henry; Cantwell, Kelly; Maloney, Erin; Cane, Thomas; Brough Morris, Theodore; Flory, Oscar; Raskin, Mark; Crone-Odekon, Mary; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    We examine the HI content of galaxies as a function of environment, based on a catalogue of 41527 galaxies that are part of the 70% complete Arecibo Legacy Fast-ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We use nearest-neighbor methods to characterize local environment, and a modified version of the algorithm developed for the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to classify large-scale environment as group, filament, tendril, or void. We compare the HI content in these environments using statistics that include both HI detections and the upper limits on detections from ALFALFA. The large size of the sample allows to statistically compare the HI content in different environments for early-type galaxies as well as late-type galaxies. This work is supported by NSF grants AST-1211005 and AST-1637339, the Skidmore Faculty-Student Summer Research program, and the Schupf Scholars program.

  6. Evaluation of local density enhancement of microcapsules in artificial blood vessel during exposure to focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Masuda, Kohji; Watarai, Nobuyuki; Taguchi, Yuto; Kato, Toshikazu; Yoshinaga, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Chiba, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    We have proposed a physical DDS (Drug Delivery System) which makes use of microcapsules of μm size, which may contain a specified drug and also are easily affected by ultrasound exposure near their resonant frequency, to release various kinds of medications. These capsules are easily detected and actuated by ultrasound. However, because of the diffusion of capsules after injection into human body, it was difficult to enhance the efficiency of drug delivery. Thus we have considered a method for controlling the density of capsules in flow which uses acoustic radiation force, which moves the capsules to balance flow resistance. We have experimented with trapping microcapsules or microbubbles in flow of an artificial blood vessel. We have evaluated the effect of radiation force by measuring the trapped area of capsules or bubbles for various frequencies, sound pressures, and exposure times of sinusoidal ultrasound. The trapped area of capsules or bubbles increased with sound pressure and exposure time, and decreased with frequency. From those results, we have derived optimal conditions for trapping the capsules or bubbles.

  7. Spatial Localization of Sources in the Rat Subthalamic Motor Region Using an Inverse Current Source Density Method

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Janssen, Marcus L. F.; Zwartjes, Daphne G. M.; Temel, Yasin; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Veltink, Peter H.; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid; Heida, Tjitske

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study we introduce the use of the current source density (CSD) method as a way to visualize the spatial organization of evoked responses in the rat subthalamic nucleus (STN) at fixed time stamps resulting from motor cortex stimulation. This method offers opportunities to visualize neuronal input and study the relation between the synaptic input and the neural output of neural populations. Approach: Motor cortex evoked local field potentials and unit activity were measured in the subthalamic region, with a 3D measurement grid consisting of 320 measurement points and high spatial resolution. This allowed us to visualize the evoked synaptic input by estimating the current source density (CSD) from the measured local field potentials, using the inverse CSD method. At the same time, the neuronal output of the cells within the grid is assessed by calculating post stimulus time histograms. Main results: The CSD method resulted in clear and distinguishable sources and sinks of the neuronal input activity in the STN after motor cortex stimulation. We showed that the center of the synaptic input of the STN from the motor cortex is located dorsal to the input from globus pallidus. Significance: For the first time we have performed CSD analysis on motor cortex stimulation evoked LFP responses in the rat STN as a proof of principle. Our results suggest that the CSD method can be used to gain new insights into the spatial extent of synaptic pathways in brain structures. PMID:27857684

  8. Local density of states and its mesoscopic fluctuations near the transition to a superconducting state in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrov, I. S.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a theory of the local density of states (LDOS) of disordered superconductors, employing the nonlinear sigma-model formalism and the renormalization-group framework. The theory takes into account the interplay of disorder and interaction couplings in all channels, treating the systems with short-range and Coulomb interactions on equal footing. We explore two-dimensional systems that would be Anderson insulators in the absence of interaction and two- or three-dimensional systems that undergo an Anderson transition in the absence of interaction. We evaluate both the average tunneling density of states and its mesoscopic fluctuations which are related to the LDOS multifractality in normal disordered systems. The obtained average LDOS shows a pronounced depletion around the Fermi energy, both in the metallic phase (i.e., above the superconducting critical temperature Tc) and in the insulating phase near the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT). The fluctuations of the LDOS are found to be particularly strong for the case of short-range interactions, especially, in the regime when Tc is enhanced by Anderson localization. On the other hand, the long-range Coulomb repulsion reduces the mesoscopic LDOS fluctuations. However, also in a model with Coulomb interaction, the fluctuations become strong when the systems approach the SIT.

  9. Accurate and efficient calculation of van der Waals interactions within density functional theory by local atomic potential approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y Y; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Lee, Kyuho; Zhang, S B

    2008-10-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) in the commonly used local density or generalized gradient approximation fails to describe van der Waals (vdW) interactions that are vital to organic, biological, and other molecular systems. Here, we propose a simple, efficient, yet accurate local atomic potential (LAP) approach, named DFT+LAP, for including vdW interactions in the framework of DFT. The LAPs for H, C, N, and O are generated by fitting the DFT+LAP potential energy curves of small molecule dimers to those obtained from coupled cluster calculations with single, double, and perturbatively treated triple excitations, CCSD(T). Excellent transferability of the LAPs is demonstrated by remarkable agreement with the JSCH-2005 benchmark database [P. Jurecka et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)], which provides the interaction energies of CCSD(T) quality for 165 vdW and hydrogen-bonded complexes. For over 100 vdW dominant complexes in this database, our DFT+LAP calculations give a mean absolute deviation from the benchmark results less than 0.5 kcal/mol. The DFT+LAP approach involves no extra computational cost other than standard DFT calculations and no modification of existing DFT codes, which enables straightforward quantum simulations, such as ab initio molecular dynamics, on biomolecular systems, as well as on other organic systems.

  10. Effect of intravenous pamidronate on bone markers and local bone mineral density in fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Muriel S; Oliveri, Beatriz; Mautalen, Carlos A

    2003-10-01

    Bisphosphonates have proven to be effective in patients with fibrous dysplasia of the bone (FD) as shown by their effect on bone pain, markers of bone turnover, or radiological changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of measuring bone mineral density (BMD) of affected bones to assess the efficacy of bisphosphonate treatment. Seven patients (mean age 26 years) received courses of 180 mg intravenous infusion of pamidronate every 6 months (60 mg/day during 3 days). Clinical symptoms, serum alkaline phosphatase, and urinary C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen were assessed every 3 months. BMD of total skeleton and X-rays of FD areas (FDa) were performed at baseline and at 12 months. BMD of FDa was compared with the contralateral side (CL) using the region of interest program on the total skeleton scan. BMD of total skeleton was normal at baseline. Average BMD of FDa was -11.4% compared with CL, a significantly greater difference than that observed between the left and right sides in healthy controls, -0.7% (P < 0.02). At 12 months bone pain diminished in all patients. Bone turnover markers decreased. Mean total skeleton BMD increased 3.3% (P < 0.02). Subregions of the total skeleton scan presenting FD lesions augmented: arms +9.6% (P < 0.02), legs +4.2%, and pelvis +3.5% (P < 0.05). The increase in mean BMD of FDa was +6.8% compared with +2.6% in CL. No changes were observed on the X-ray. These results indicate that simultaneous determination of markers of bone turnover and BMD of FDa is useful in short-term follow-up to determine the efficacy of intravenous pamidronate.

  11. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  12. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  13. Global effects of local human population density and distance to markets on the condition of coral reef fisheries.

    PubMed

    Cinner, Joshua E; Graham, Nicholas A J; Huchery, Cindy; Macneil, M Aaron

    2013-06-01

    Coral reef fisheries support the livelihoods of millions of people but have been severely and negatively affected by anthropogenic activities. We conducted a systematic review of published data on the biomass of coral reef fishes to explore how the condition of reef fisheries is related to the density of local human populations, proximity of the reef to markets, and key environmental variables (including broad geomorphologic reef type, reef area, and net productivity). When only population density and environmental covariates were considered, high variability in fisheries conditions at low human population densities resulted in relatively weak explanatory models. The presence or absence of human settlements, habitat type, and distance to fish markets provided a much stronger explanatory model for the condition of reef fisheries. Fish biomass remained relatively low within 14 km of markets, then biomass increased exponentially as distance from reefs to markets increased. Our results suggest the need for an increased science and policy focus on markets as both a key driver of the condition of reef fisheries and a potential source of solutions.

  14. Impact of the pedestal plasma density on dynamics of edge localized mode crashes and energy loss scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.

    2014-12-29

    The latest BOUT++ studies show an emerging understanding of dynamics of edge localized mode(ELM) crashes and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELMenergy losses with the world multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT++ simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELMenergy losses vs collisionality via a density scan. Moreover, the linear results demonstrate that as the pedestal collisionality decreases, the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning modes decreases for high n but increases for low n (1 < n < 5), therefore the width of the growth rate spectrum γ(n) becomes narrower and the peak growth shifts to lower n. For nonlinear BOUT++ simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELMenergy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. Finally, the critical trend emerges as a transition (1) linearly from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collisionality with decreasing density and (2) nonlinearly from turbulence spreading dynamics at high collisionality into avalanche-like dynamics at low collisionality.

  15. Impact of the pedestal plasma density on dynamics of edge localized mode crashes and energy loss scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.

    2014-12-15

    The latest BOUT++ studies show an emerging understanding of dynamics of edge localized mode (ELM) crashes and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELM energy losses with the world multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT++ simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELM energy losses vs collisionality via a density scan. Linear results demonstrate that as the pedestal collisionality decreases, the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning modes decreases for high n but increases for low n (1 < n < 5), therefore the width of the growth rate spectrum γ(n) becomes narrower and the peak growth shifts to lower n. Nonlinear BOUT++ simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELM energy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. The critical trend emerges as a transition (1) linearly from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collisionality with decreasing density and (2) nonlinearly from turbulence spreading dynamics at high collisionality into avalanche-like dynamics at low collisionality.

  16. Queuing Theory Based Co-Channel Interference Analysis Approach for High-Density Wireless Local Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Han, Guangjie; Qian, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Increased co-channel interference (CCI) in wireless local area networks (WLANs) is bringing serious resource constraints to today’s high-density wireless environments. CCI in IEEE 802.11-based networks is inevitable due to the nature of the carrier sensing mechanism however can be reduced by resource optimization approaches. That means the CCI analysis is basic, but also crucial for an efficient resource management. In this article, we present a novel CCI analysis approach based on the queuing theory, which considers the randomness of end users’ behavior and the irregularity and complexity of network traffic in high-density WLANs that adopts the M/M/c queuing model for CCI analysis. Most of the CCIs occur when multiple networks overlap and trigger channel contentions; therefore, we use the ratio of signal-overlapped areas to signal coverage as a probabilistic factor to the queuing model to analyze the CCI impacts in highly overlapped WLANs. With the queuing model, we perform simulations to see how the CCI influences the quality of service (QoS) in high-density WLANs. PMID:27563896

  17. Impact of the pedestal plasma density on dynamics of edge localized mode crashes and energy loss scaling

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.

    2014-12-29

    The latest BOUT++ studies show an emerging understanding of dynamics of edge localized mode(ELM) crashes and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELMenergy losses with the world multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT++ simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELMenergy losses vs collisionality via a density scan. Moreover, the linear results demonstrate that as the pedestal collisionality decreases, the growth rate of the peeling-ballooning modes decreases for high n but increases for low n (1 < n < 5), therefore the width of the growth rate spectrum γ(n) becomes narrower and the peak growth shifts to lowermore » n. For nonlinear BOUT++ simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELMenergy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. Finally, the critical trend emerges as a transition (1) linearly from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collisionality with decreasing density and (2) nonlinearly from turbulence spreading dynamics at high collisionality into avalanche-like dynamics at low collisionality.« less

  18. Queuing Theory Based Co-Channel Interference Analysis Approach for High-Density Wireless Local Area Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Han, Guangjie; Qian, Yujie

    2016-08-23

    Increased co-channel interference (CCI) in wireless local area networks (WLANs) is bringing serious resource constraints to today's high-density wireless environments. CCI in IEEE 802.11-based networks is inevitable due to the nature of the carrier sensing mechanism however can be reduced by resource optimization approaches. That means the CCI analysis is basic, but also crucial for an efficient resource management. In this article, we present a novel CCI analysis approach based on the queuing theory, which considers the randomness of end users' behavior and the irregularity and complexity of network traffic in high-density WLANs that adopts the M/M/c queuing model for CCI analysis. Most of the CCIs occur when multiple networks overlap and trigger channel contentions; therefore, we use the ratio of signal-overlapped areas to signal coverage as a probabilistic factor to the queuing model to analyze the CCI impacts in highly overlapped WLANs. With the queuing model, we perform simulations to see how the CCI influences the quality of service (QoS) in high-density WLANs.

  19. Construction of the adiabatic connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    1996-12-01

    Two models for the change in the λ-dependent exchange-correlation energy upon atomization ΔExc, λ = Exc λatoms - Exc λmolecule are proposed, where E xc,λ = <ψ λ| V̂ee|λ λ> - ʃ d3r d3r' p(r)p(r')/2|r - r'| . The wavefunction ψλ yields the ground-state density ϱ adn mininizes T̂ + λ V̂ee. These models ( ΔExc,λmodel) make use of the exact Ex and generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) to Exc. The construction of the simplest model is verified by calculating the exact d ΔExc, λ/d λ| λ=0 from density functional pertubation theory and comparing it to d ΔExc, λmodel/d λ| λ=0 . For systems with strong static correlations, explicit inclusion of d ΔExc, λ/d λ| λ=0 further improves the approximation to ΔExc, λ. Atomization energies calculated from ΔExc, λmodel show a significant improvement over GGA.

  20. Adiabatic and Non-adiabatic quenches in a Spin-1 Bose Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is observed in a wide range of phenomena. We have studied the dynamics of a spin-1 ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic quenches through a QPT. At the quantum critical point (QCP), finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, which makes an adiabatic quench possible through the QPT. We experimentally demonstrate such a quench, which is forbidden at the mean field level. For faster quenches through the QCP, the vanishing energy gap causes the reaction timescale of the system to diverge, preventing the system from adiabatically following the ground state. We measure the temporal evolution of the spin populations for different quench speeds and determine the exponents characterizing the scaling of the onset of excitations, which are in good agreement with the predictions of Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  1. Fixed-point adiabatic quantum search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Alexander M.; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-point quantum search algorithms succeed at finding one of M target items among N total items even when the run time of the algorithm is longer than necessary. While the famous Grover's algorithm can search quadratically faster than a classical computer, it lacks the fixed-point property—the fraction of target items must be known precisely to know when to terminate the algorithm. Recently, Yoder, Low, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 210501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.210501] gave an optimal gate-model search algorithm with the fixed-point property. Previously, it had been discovered by Roland and Cerf [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042308 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.042308] that an adiabatic quantum algorithm, operating by continuously varying a Hamiltonian, can reproduce the quadratic speedup of gate-model Grover search. We ask, can an adiabatic algorithm also reproduce the fixed-point property? We show that the answer depends on what interpolation schedule is used, so as in the gate model, there are both fixed-point and non-fixed-point versions of adiabatic search, only some of which attain the quadratic quantum speedup. Guided by geometric intuition on the Bloch sphere, we rigorously justify our claims with an explicit upper bound on the error in the adiabatic approximation. We also show that the fixed-point adiabatic search algorithm can be simulated in the gate model with neither loss of the quadratic Grover speedup nor of the fixed-point property. Finally, we discuss natural uses of fixed-point algorithms such as preparation of a relatively prime state and oblivious amplitude amplification.

  2. Adiabatic circuits: converter for static CMOS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Amirante, E.; Bargagli-Stoffi, A.; Schmitt-Landsiedel, D.

    2003-05-01

    Ultra low power applications can take great advantages from adiabatic circuitry. In this technique a multiphase system is used which consists ideally of trapezoidal voltage signals. The input signals to be processed will often come from a function block realized in static CMOS. The static rectangular signals must be converted for the oscillating multiphase system of the adiabatic circuitry. This work shows how to convert the input signals to the proposed pulse form which is synchronized to the appropriate supply voltage. By means of adder structures designed for a 0.13µm technology in a 4-phase system there will be demonstrated, which additional circuits are necessary for the conversion. It must be taken into account whether the data arrive in parallel or serial form. Parallel data are all in one phase and therefore it is advantageous to use an adder structure with a proper input stage, e.g. a Carry Lookahead Adder (CLA). With a serial input stage it is possible to read and to process four signals during one cycle due to the adiabatic 4-phase system. Therefore input signals with a frequency four times higher than the adiabatic clock frequency can be used. This reduces the disadvantage of the slow clock period typical for adiabatic circuits. By means of an 8 bit Ripple Carry Adder (8 bit RCA) the serial reading will be introduced. If the word width is larger than 4 bits the word can be divided in 4 bit words which are processed in parallel. This is the most efficient way to minimize the number of input lines and pads. At the same time a high throughput is achieved.

  3. Extra-pair paternity in the socially monogamous white stork (Ciconia ciconia) is fairly common and independent of local density.

    PubMed

    Turjeman, Sondra Feldman; Centeno-Cuadros, Alejandro; Eggers, Ute; Rotics, Shay; Blas, Julio; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Kaatz, Michael; Jeltsch, Florian; Wikelski, Martin; Nathan, Ran

    2016-06-22

    Although many birds are socially monogamous, most (>75%) studied species are not strictly genetically monogamous, especially under high breeding density. We used molecular tools to reevaluate the reproductive strategy of the socially monogamous white stork (Ciconia ciconia) and examined local density effects. DNA samples of nestlings (Germany, Spain) were genotyped and assigned relationships using a two-program maximum likelihood classification. Relationships were successfully classified in 79.2% of German (n = 120) and 84.8% of Spanish (n = 59) nests. For each population respectively, 76.8% (n = 73) and 66.0% (n = 33) of nests contained only full-siblings, 10.5% (n = 10) and 18.0% (n = 9) had half-siblings (at least one nestling with a different parent), 3.2% (n = 3) and 10.0% (n = 5) had unrelated nestlings (at least two nestlings, each with different parents), and 9.5% (n = 9) and 6.0% (n = 3) had "not full-siblings" (could not differentiate between latter two cases). These deviations from strict monogamy place the white stork in the 59(th) percentile for extra-pair paternity among studied bird species. Although high breeding density generally increases extra-pair paternity, we found no significant association with this species' mating strategies. Thus although genetic monogamy is indeed prominent in the white stork, extra-pair paternity is fairly common compared to other bird species and cannot be explained by breeding density.

  4. Extra-pair paternity in the socially monogamous white stork (Ciconia ciconia) is fairly common and independent of local density

    PubMed Central

    Turjeman, Sondra Feldman; Centeno-Cuadros, Alejandro; Eggers, Ute; Rotics, Shay; Blas, Julio; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Kaatz, Michael; Jeltsch, Florian; Wikelski, Martin; Nathan, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Although many birds are socially monogamous, most (>75%) studied species are not strictly genetically monogamous, especially under high breeding density. We used molecular tools to reevaluate the reproductive strategy of the socially monogamous white stork (Ciconia ciconia) and examined local density effects. DNA samples of nestlings (Germany, Spain) were genotyped and assigned relationships using a two-program maximum likelihood classification. Relationships were successfully classified in 79.2% of German (n = 120) and 84.8% of Spanish (n = 59) nests. For each population respectively, 76.8% (n = 73) and 66.0% (n = 33) of nests contained only full-siblings, 10.5% (n = 10) and 18.0% (n = 9) had half-siblings (at least one nestling with a different parent), 3.2% (n = 3) and 10.0% (n = 5) had unrelated nestlings (at least two nestlings, each with different parents), and 9.5% (n = 9) and 6.0% (n = 3) had “not full-siblings” (could not differentiate between latter two cases). These deviations from strict monogamy place the white stork in the 59th percentile for extra-pair paternity among studied bird species. Although high breeding density generally increases extra-pair paternity, we found no significant association with this species’ mating strategies. Thus although genetic monogamy is indeed prominent in the white stork, extra-pair paternity is fairly common compared to other bird species and cannot be explained by breeding density. PMID:27328982

  5. Effect of Magnetic Field Gradient on Plasma Detachment Induced by Breaking of Adiabatic Plasma Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, K. S.; Kim, June Young; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-10-01

    A magnetic field gradient that is a variation in the magnetic field around the ion flow has been investigated as a primary parameter for ion detachment in the magnetic nozzle geometries. Some scale lengths of magnetic field are controlled by two solenoid coils outside the diffusion chamber of a ECR-driven linear plasma device. The axial and radial profiles of the plasma potential and electron temperature are measured by a Langmuir probe array for the various magnetic field configurations in the downstream. The local adiabaticity, strong constant magnetic moment, is satisfied with a linear relationship between the change in effective electron temperature and the change in plasma potential in the low magnetic field gradient. Whereas, with an increasing non-homogeneity of the magnetic field in the direction of the flow, the breaking of adiabatic plasma expansion is identified to measure the nonlinear process which is the variation for an adiabatic exponent. Such the loss of adiabaticity is also explained in terms of non-adiabaticity parameter i.e. degree of demagnetization. This research was supported by National R&D Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (Nos. 2014M1A7A1A02030165 and 2014M1A7A1A03045367).

  6. Geometric phase of an atom inside an adiabatic radio-frequency potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; You, L.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the geometric phase of an atom inside an adiabatic radio-frequency (rf) potential created from a static magnetic field (B field) and a time-dependent rf field. The spatial motion of the atomic center of mass is shown to give rise to a geometric phase, or Berry's phase, in the adiabatically evolving atomic hyperfine spin along the local B field. This phase is found to depend on both the static B field along the semiclassical trajectory of the atomic center of mass and an effective magnetic field consisting of the total B field, including the oscillating rf field. Specific calculations are provided for several recent atom interferometry experiments and proposals utilizing adiabatic rf potentials.

  7. Carrier-density dependence of photoluminescence from localized states in InGaN/GaN quantum wells in nanocolumns and a thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Shimosako, N. Inose, Y.; Satoh, H.; Kinjo, K.; Nakaoka, T.; Oto, T.; Kishino, K.; Ema, K.

    2015-11-07

    We have measured and analyzed the carrier-density dependence of photoluminescence (PL) spectra and the PL efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells in nanocolumns and in a thin film over a wide excitation range. The localized states parameters, such as the tailing parameter, density and size of the localized states, and the mobility edge density are estimated. The spectral change and reduction of PL efficiency are explained by filling of the localized states and population into the extended states around the mobility edge density. We have also found that the nanocolumns have a narrower distribution of the localized states and a higher PL efficiency than those of the film sample although the In composition of the nanocolumns is higher than that of the film.

  8. Resource variability, aggregation and direct density dependence in an open context: the local regulation of an African elephant population.

    PubMed

    Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Fritz, Hervé; Valeix, Marion; Murindagomo, Felix; Clobert, Jean

    2008-01-01

    1. An emerging perspective in the study of density dependence is the importance of the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of resources. Although this is well understood in temperate ungulates, few studies have been conducted in tropical environments where both food and water are limiting resources. 2. We studied the regulation of one of the world's largest elephant populations in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. The study period started in 1986 when the population was released from culling. Using census data we investigated changes in elephant abundance with respect to rainfall and density across the entire park and across waterholes. 3. The population more than doubled since culling stopped. The population increased continuously during the first 6 years, and then fluctuated widely at about 30,000 individuals. Immigration processes must have been involved in the increase of the population size. 4. Population growth rates were negatively related to previous population density by a convex relationship, and negatively related to the ratio of previous population density on annual rainfall by a linear relationship. However, only this latter model (i.e. assuming a fluctuating carrying capacity related to annual rainfall) produced realistic dynamics. Overall, population decreased during dry years when the elephant density was high. 5. During dry years there were fewer waterholes retaining water during the dry season and consequently elephant numbers at waterholes increased, while their aggregation level across waterholes decreased. On the long-run elephant numbers increased only at the less crowded waterholes. 6. We suggest that the interaction between population size and the available foraging range determined by the number of active waterholes during the dry season controls the park population. 7. Our results emphasize the need to understand how key-resource areas cause resource-based aggregation, which ultimately influences the strength of density dependence. More

  9. The effect of adiabaticity on strongly quenched Bose Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Kain, Ben

    2015-05-01

    We study the properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate following a deep quench to a large scattering length during which the condensate fraction nc changes with time. We construct a closed set of equations that highlight the role of the adiabaticity or equivalently, dnc/dt, the rate change of nc, which is to induce an (imaginary) effective interaction between quasiparticles. We show analytically that such a system supports a steady state characterized by a constant condensate density and a steady but periodically changing momentum distribution, whose time average is described exactly by the generalized Gibbs ensemble. We discuss how the nc -induced effective interaction, which cannot be ignored on the grounds of the adiabatic approximation for modes near the gapless Goldstone mode, can significantly affect condensate populations and Tan's contact for a Bose gas that has undergone a deep quench. In particular, we find that even when the Bose gas is quenched to unitarity, nc(t) does not completely deplete, approaching, instead, to a steady state with a finite condensate fraction. ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; KITP, University of Santa Barbara.

  10. Highly parallel implementation of non-adiabatic Ehrenfest molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Yosuke; Schleife, Andre; Draeger, Erik; Anisimov, Victor; Correa, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    While the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation tremendously lowers computational effort, many questions in modern physics, chemistry, and materials science require an explicit description of coupled non-adiabatic electron-ion dynamics. Electronic stopping, i.e. the energy transfer of a fast projectile atom to the electronic system of the target material, is a notorious example. We recently implemented real-time time-dependent density functional theory based on the plane-wave pseudopotential formalism in the Qbox/qb@ll codes. We demonstrate that explicit integration using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme is very suitable for modern highly parallelized supercomputers. Applying the new implementation to systems with hundreds of atoms and thousands of electrons, we achieved excellent performance and scalability on a large number of nodes both on the BlueGene based ``Sequoia'' system at LLNL as well as the Cray architecture of ``Blue Waters'' at NCSA. As an example, we discuss our work on computing the electronic stopping power of aluminum and gold for hydrogen projectiles, showing an excellent agreement with experiment. These first-principles calculations allow us to gain important insight into the the fundamental physics of electronic stopping.

  11. Adiabatic cooling of the artificial Porcupine plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruizhin, Iu. Ia.; Treumann, R. A.; Bauer, O. H.; Moskalenko, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the plasma density obtained during the interaction of the artificial plasma jet, fired into the ionosphere with the body of the Porcupine main payload, have been analyzed for times when there was a well-developed wake effect. Using wake theory, the maximum temperature of the quasi-neutral xenon ion beam has been determined for an intermediate distance from the ion beam source when the beam has left the diamagnetic region but is still much denser than the ionospheric background plasma. The beam temperature is found to be about 4 times less than the temperature at injection. This observation is very well explained by adiabatic cooling of the beam during its initial diamagnetic and current-buildup phases at distances r smaller than 10 m. Outside this region, the beam conserves the temperature achieved. The observation proves that the artificial plasma jet passes through an initial gas-like diamagnetic phase restricted to the vicinity of the beam source, where it expands adiabatically. Partial cooling also takes place outside the diamagnetic region where the beam current still builds up. The observations also support a recently developed current-closure model of the quasi-neutral ion beam.

  12. The Adiabatic Contraction of Dark Matter Halos in Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesseit, R.; Burkert, A.; Naab, T.

    The flatness of rotation curves in the outer parts of galaxies led to the postulation of a dark component to compensate for the missing mass. The origin of this component is still unknown. Bahcall & Soneira first pointed out in 1985 that a unique ratio for disk to halo mass is needed to produce the flat and featureless rotation curves in agreement with observations. They called this the disk-halo conspiracy. To explain this conspiracy Blumenthal et al. proposed that an adiabtically forming baryonic disk can influence the density structure of its surrounding dark halo. They assumed that the time scale of the baryonic infall is very slow such and the change of mass inside the orbit of a dark matter particle is neglegible. They further assumed that the dark matter particles revolve on circular orbits and are dissipationless. In this case their radial action integral is an adiabatic invariant during the contraction. Blumenthal et al. could find the final density profile of the dark matter, if the final distribution of the baryonic matter is known, through an iterative algorithm. We tested the above assumptions using collisionless N-body simulations. We set up a dark matter halo with a Hernquist density profile and analytically added the potential of an exponential disk. Initially the disk had a very large scale length compared to the halo scale length. During the simulation we reduced the sclae length of the disk and followed the evolution of the dark component. We examined different contraction speeds as well as different combinations of disk mass and scale lenght. We find that the theoretical prediction for the adiabatic contraction is

  13. Combined local-density and dynamical mean field theory calculations for the compressed lanthanides Ce, Pr, and Nd

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, A K

    2005-03-30

    This paper reports calculations for compressed Ce (4f{sup 1}), Pr (4f{sup 2}), and Nd (4f{sup 3}) using a combination of the local-density approximation (LDA) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), or LDA+DMFT. The 4f moment, spectra, and the total energy among other properties are examined as functions of volume and atomic number for an assumed face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. These materials are seen to be strongly localized at ambient pressure and for compressions up through the experimentally observed fcc phases ({gamma} phase for Ce), in the sense of having fully formed Hund's rules moments and little 4f spectral weight at the Fermi level. Subsequent compression for all three lanthanides brings about significant deviation of the moments from their Hund's rules values, a growing Kondo resonance at the fermi level, an associated softening in the total energy, and quenching of the spin orbit since the Kondo resonance is of mixed spin-orbit character while the lower Hubbard band is predominantly j = 5/2. while the most dramatic changes for Ce occur within the two-phase region of the {gamma}-{alpha} volume collapse transition, as found in earlier work, those for Pr and Nd occur within the volume range of the experimentally observed distorted fcc (dfcc) phase, which is therefore seen here as transitional and not part of the localized trivalent lanthanide sequence. The experimentally observed collapse to the {alpha}-U structure in Pr occurs only on further compression, and no such collapse is found in Nd. These lanthanides start closer to the localized limit for increasing atomic number, and so the theoretical signatures noted above are also offset to smaller volume as well, which is possibly related to the measured systematics of the size of the volume collapse being 15%, 9%, and none for Ce, Pr, and Nd, respectively.

  14. Diabatic Versus Adiabatic Calculation of Torsion-Vibration Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hougen, Jon T.

    2013-06-01

    The introductory part of this talk will deal briefly with two historical topics: (i) use of the words adiabatic, nonadiabatic, and diabatic in thermodynamics and quantum mechanics, and (ii) application of diabatic and adiabatic ideas to vibrational energy level calculations for a pair of diatomic-molecule potential energy curves exhibiting an avoided crossing. The main part of the talk will be devoted to recent work with Li-Hong Xu and Ron Lees on how ab initio projected frequency calculations for small-amplitude vibrations along the large-amplitude internal rotation path in methanol can best be used to help guide experimental assignments and fits in the IR vibrational spectrum. The three CH stretching vibrations for CH_{3}OH can conveniently be represented as coefficients multiplying three different types of basis vibrations, i.e., as coefficients of: (i) the local mode C-H_i bond displacements δr_{i} for hydrogens H_{1}, H_{2} and H_{3} of the methyl top, (ii) symmetrized linear combinations of the three δr_{i} of species A_{1} oplus E in the permutation-inversion group G_{6} = C_{3v} appropriate for methanol, or (iii) symmetrized linear combinations of the three δr_{i} of species 2A_{1} oplus A_{2} in the permutation-inversion group G_{6}. In this talk, we will focus on diabatic and adiabatic computations for the A_{1} oplus E basis vibrations of case (ii) above. We will briefly explain how Jahn-Teller-like and Renner-Teller-like torsion-vibration interaction terms occurring in the potential energy expression in the diabatic calculation become torsion-vibration Coriolis interaction terms occurring in the kinetic energy expression of the adiabatic calculations, and also show how, for algebraically solvable parameter choices, the same energy levels are obtained from either calculation. A final conclusion as to which approach is computationally superior for the numerical data given in a quantum chemistry output file has not yet been arrived at.

  15. Nonequilibrium quantum relaxation across a localization-delocalization transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roósz, Gergő; Divakaran, Uma; Rieger, Heiko; Iglói, Ferenc

    2014-11-01

    We consider the one-dimensional X X model in a quasiperiodic transverse field described by the Harper potential, which is equivalent to a tight-binding model of spinless fermions with a quasiperiodic chemical potential. For weak transverse field (chemical potential), h localized for h >hc . We study the nonequilibrium relaxation of the system by applying two protocols: a sudden change of h (quench dynamics) and a slow change of h in time (adiabatic dynamics). For a quench into the delocalized (localized) phase, the entanglement entropy grows linearly (saturates) and the order parameter decreases exponentially (has a finite limiting value). For a critical quench the entropy increases algebraically with time, whereas the order parameter decreases with a stretched exponential. The density of defects after an adiabatic field change through the critical point is shown to scale with a power of the rate of field change and a scaling relation for the exponent is derived.

  16. Schedule path optimization for adiabatic quantum computing and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lishan; Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2016-04-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing and optimization have garnered much attention recently as possible models for achieving a quantum advantage over classical approaches to optimization and other special purpose computations. Both techniques are probabilistic in nature and the minimum gap between the ground state and first excited state of the system during evolution is a major factor in determining the success probability. In this work we investigate a strategy for increasing the minimum gap and success probability by introducing intermediate Hamiltonians that modify the evolution path between initial and final Hamiltonians. We focus on an optimization problem relevant to recent hardware implementations and present numerical evidence for the existence of a purely local intermediate Hamiltonian that achieve the optimum performance in terms of pushing the minimum gap to one of the end points of the evolution. As a part of this study we develop a convex optimization formulation of the search for optimal adiabatic schedules that makes this computation more tractable, and which may be of independent interest. We further study the effectiveness of random intermediate Hamiltonians on the minimum gap and success probability, and empirically find that random Hamiltonians have a significant probability of increasing the success probability, but only by a modest amount.

  17. Enhanced Diffusion Weighting Generated by Selective Adiabatic Pulse Trains

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ziqi; Bartha, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical description and experimental validation of the enhanced diffusion weighting generated by selective adiabatic full passage (AFP) pulse trains is provided. Six phantoms (Ph-1 to Ph-6) were studied on a 4T Varian/Siemens whole body MRI system. Phantoms consisted of 2.8 cm diameter plastic tubes containing a mixture of 10 μm ORGASOL polymer beads and 2 mM Gd-DTPA dissolved in 5% agar (Ph-1) or nickel(II) ammonium sulphate hexahydrate doped (56.3 mM – 0.8 mM) water solutions (Ph-2 to Ph-6). A customized localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) sequence containing slice selective AFP pulse trains and pulsed diffusion gradients applied in the phase encoding direction was used to measure 1H2O diffusion. The b-value associated with the LASER sequence was derived using the Bloch-Torrey equation. The apparent diffusion coefficients measured by LASER were comparable to those measured by a conventional pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) sequence for all phantoms. Image signal intensity increased in Ph-1 and decreased in Ph-2 – Ph-6 as AFP pulse train length increased while maintaining a constant echo-time. These experimental results suggest that such AFP pulse trains can enhance contrast between regions containing microscopic magnetic susceptibility variations and homogeneous regions in which dynamic dephasing relaxation mechanisms are dominant. PMID:17600741

  18. Influence of disorder on the local density of states in high- T(c) superconducting thin films

    PubMed

    Cren; Roditchev; Sacks; Klein; Moussy; Deville-Cavellin; Lagues

    2000-01-03

    Using a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope in the spectroscopic mode, we find that the disorder in a Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) thin film modifies dramatically the quasiparticle local density of states. Small, but well-defined superconducting regions, coexisting with dominating semiconducting areas, show well-pronounced gap structures, similar to those observed previously in high-quality single crystals. Surprisingly, between these two regions, the detailed shape of the quasiparticle spectrum is virtually identical to the pseudogap previously observed at temperatures T>T(c), or in the vortex core, at 4.2 K. Thus, the role of the disorder in destroying the superconducting phase is comparable to that of the magnetic field or thermal fluctuations.

  19. Local density of states, spectrum, and far-field interference of surface plasmon polaritons probed by cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttge, M.; Vesseur, E. J. R.; Koenderink, A. F.; Polman, A.; Lezec, H. J.; Atwater, H. A.; Garcia de Abajo, F. J.

    2009-03-15

    The surface plasmon polariton (SPP) field intensity in the vicinity of gratings patterned in an otherwise planar gold surface is spatially resolved using cathodoluminescence (CL). A detailed theoretical analysis is presented that successfully explains the measured CL signal based upon interference of transition radiation directly generated by electron impact and SPPs launched by the electron and outcoupled by the grating. The measured spectral dependence of the SPP yield per incoming electron is in excellent agreement with rigorous electromagnetic calculations. The CL emission is shown to be similar to that of a dipole oriented perpendicular to the surface and situated at the point of electron impact, which allows us to establish a solid connection between the CL signal and the photonic local density of states associated to the SPPs.

  20. Observation of a multimode plasma response and its relationship to density pumpout and edge-localized mode suppression

    DOE PAGES

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Haskey, S. R.; ...

    2015-03-12

    Density pumpout and edge-localized mode (ELM) suppression by applied n=2 magnetic fields in low collisionality DIII-D plasmas are shown to be correlated with the magnitude of the plasma response driven on the high field side (HFS) of the magnetic axis, but not the low-field side (LFS) midplane. These distinct responses are a direct measurement of a multi-modal magnetic plasma response, with each structure preferentially excited by a different n=2 applied spectrum and preferentially detected on the LFS or HFS. Ideal and resistive MHD calculations find that the LFS measurement is primarily sensitive to excitation of stable kink modes, while themore » HFS measurement is primarily sensitive to resonant currents (whether fully shielding or partially penetrated). Lastly, the resonant currents are themselves strongly modified by kink excitation, with the optimal applied field pitch for pumpout and ELM suppression significantly differing from equilibrium field-alignment.« less

  1. Large-scale, high-density (up to 512 channels) recording of local circuits in behaving animals

    PubMed Central

    Berényi, Antal; Somogyvári, Zoltán; Nagy, Anett J.; Roux, Lisa; Long, John D.; Fujisawa, Shigeyoshi; Stark, Eran; Leonardo, Anthony; Harris, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring representative fractions of neurons from multiple brain circuits in behaving animals is necessary for understanding neuronal computation. Here, we describe a system that allows high-channel-count recordings from a small volume of neuronal tissue using a lightweight signal multiplexing headstage that permits free behavior of small rodents. The system integrates multishank, high-density recording silicon probes, ultraflexible interconnects, and a miniaturized microdrive. These improvements allowed for simultaneous recordings of local field potentials and unit activity from hundreds of sites without confining free movements of the animal. The advantages of large-scale recordings are illustrated by determining the electroanatomic boundaries of layers and regions in the hippocampus and neocortex and constructing a circuit diagram of functional connections among neurons in real anatomic space. These methods will allow the investigation of circuit operations and behavior-dependent interregional interactions for testing hypotheses of neural networks and brain function. PMID:24353300

  2. Semianalytical quasi-normal mode theory for the local density of states in coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structures.

    PubMed

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper; Gregersen, Niels

    2015-12-15

    We present and validate a semianalytical quasi-normal mode (QNM) theory for the local density of states (LDOS) in coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity-waveguide structures. By means of an expansion of the Green's function on one or a few QNMs, a closed-form expression for the LDOS is obtained, and for two types of two-dimensional PhCs, with one and two cavities side-coupled to an extended waveguide, the theory is validated against numerically exact computations. For the single cavity, a slightly asymmetric spectrum is found, which the QNM theory reproduces, and for two cavities, a nontrivial spectrum with a peak and a dip is found, which is reproduced only when including both the two relevant QNMs in the theory. In both cases, we find relative errors below 1% in the bandwidth of interest.

  3. Observation of a multimode plasma response and its relationship to density pumpout and edge-localized mode suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Haskey, S. R.; Logan, N. C.; Strait, E. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; King, J. D.; Lanctot, M. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J. -K.; Shafer, M. W.; Tobias, B. J.

    2015-03-12

    Density pumpout and edge-localized mode (ELM) suppression by applied n=2 magnetic fields in low collisionality DIII-D plasmas are shown to be correlated with the magnitude of the plasma response driven on the high field side (HFS) of the magnetic axis, but not the low-field side (LFS) midplane. These distinct responses are a direct measurement of a multi-modal magnetic plasma response, with each structure preferentially excited by a different n=2 applied spectrum and preferentially detected on the LFS or HFS. Ideal and resistive MHD calculations find that the LFS measurement is primarily sensitive to excitation of stable kink modes, while the HFS measurement is primarily sensitive to resonant currents (whether fully shielding or partially penetrated). Lastly, the resonant currents are themselves strongly modified by kink excitation, with the optimal applied field pitch for pumpout and ELM suppression significantly differing from equilibrium field-alignment.

  4. Density Fitting and Cholesky Decomposition of the Two-Electron Integrals in Local Multireference Configuration Interaction Theory.

    PubMed

    Krisiloff, David B; Krauter, Caroline M; Ricci, Francis J; Carter, Emily A

    2015-11-10

    To treat large molecules with accurate ab initio quantum chemistry, reduced scaling correlated wave function methods are now commonly employed. Optimization of these wave functions in practice requires some approximation of the two-electron integrals. Both Cholesky decomposition (CD) and density fitting (DF) are widely used approaches to approximate these integrals. Here, we compare CD and DF for use in local multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction (LMRSDCI). DF-LMRSDCI provides less accurate total energies than CD-LMRSDCI, but both methods are accurate for energy differences. However, DF-LMRSDCI is significantly less computationally expensive than CD-LMRSDCI on the molecules tested, suggesting that DF-LMRSDCI is an efficient, often sufficiently accurate alternative to our previously reported CD-LMRSDCI method.

  5. Density functional theory study of the local molecular properties of acetamide derivatives as anti-HIV drugs

    PubMed Central

    Oftadeh, M.; Mahani, N. Madadi; Hamadanian, M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed on the series of 2-(4-(naphthalen-2-yl)-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylthio)-N-acetamide (TTA) derivatives. The local reactivity of the acetamide derivatives as anti-HIV drugs were studied in terms of Fukui functions in the framework of DFT. The results based on the basis set superposition error (BSSE) corrections showed that the mechanism of bond formation between the acetamide derivatives and tyrosine as a biological molecule occurs mainly through nitrogen atoms. The intramolecular interaction energies between the acetamide derivatives and tyrosine were calculated and the nature of the intermolecular interaction was revealed by natural bond orbital charge (NBO) analysis. The results suggest that acetamide derivatives with bromophenyl and nitrophenyl substitutions are the most potent as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:24082898

  6. Large-eddy simulation/probability density function modeling of local extinction and re-ignition in Sandia Flame E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng; Popov, Pavel; Hiremath, Varun; Lantz, Steven; Viswanathan, Sharadha; Pope, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    A large-eddy simulation (LES)/probability density function (PDF) code is developed and applied to the study of local extinction and re-ignition in Sandia Flame E. The modified Curl mixing model is used to account for the sub-filter scalar mixing; the ARM1 mechanism is used for the chemical reaction; and the in- situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm is used to accelerate the chemistry calculations. Calculations are performed on different grids to study the resolution requirement for this flame. Then, with sufficient grid resolution, full-scale LES/PDF calculations are performed to study the flame characteristics and the turbulence-chemistry interactions. Sensitivity to the mixing frequency model is explored in order to understand the behavior of sub-filter scalar mixing in the context of LES. The simulation results are compared to the experimental data to demonstrate the capability of the code. Comparison is also made to previous RANS/PDF simulations.

  7. Control of Transmembrane Protein Diffusion within the Postsynaptic Density Assessed by Simultaneous Single-Molecule Tracking and Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tuo P.; Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Postsynaptic transmembrane proteins are critical elements of synapses, mediating trans-cellular contact, sensitivity to neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules, and flux of Ca and other ions. Positioning and mobility of each member of this large class of proteins is critical to their individual function at the synapse. One critical example is that the position of glutamate receptors within the postsynaptic density (PSD) strongly modulates their function by aligning or misaligning them with sites of presynaptic vesicle fusion. In addition, the regulated ability of receptors to move in or out of the synapse is critical for activity-dependent plasticity. However, factors that control receptor mobility within the boundaries of the synapse are not well understood. Notably, PSD scaffold molecules accumulate in domains much smaller than the synapse. Within these nanodomains, the density of proteins is considerably higher than that of the synapse as a whole, so high that steric hindrance is expected to reduce receptor mobility substantially. However, while numerical modeling has demonstrated several features of how the varying protein density across the face of a single PSD may modulate receptor motion, there is little experimental information about the extent of this influence. To address this critical aspect of synaptic organizational dynamics, we performed single-molecule tracking of transmembrane proteins using universal point accumulation-for-imaging-in-nanoscale-topography (uPAINT) over PSDs whose internal structure was simultaneously resolved using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). The results provide important experimental confirmation that PSD scaffold protein density strongly influences the mobility of transmembrane proteins. A protein with a cytosolic domain that does not bind PSD-95 was still slowed in regions of high PSD-95 density, suggesting that crowding by scaffold molecules and perhaps other proteins is sufficient to stabilize

  8. Quantum-Classical Correspondence of Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    We formulate the theory of shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical mechanics. For a reference Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is constructed from the dispersionless Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy. Then the adiabatic theorem holds exactly for an arbitrary choice of time-dependent parameters. We use the Hamilton-Jacobi theory to define the generalized action. The action is independent of the history of the parameters and is directly related to the adiabatic invariant. The dispersionless KdV hierarchy is obtained from the classical limit of the KdV hierarchy for the quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity. This correspondence suggests some relation between the quantum and classical adiabatic theorems.

  9. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of the electronic local density of states of graphite surfaces near monoatomic step edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, Y.; Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2006-02-01

    We measured the electronic local density of states (LDOS) of graphite surfaces near monoatomic step edges, which consist of either the zigzag or armchair edge, with the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) techniques. The STM data reveal that the (3×3)R30° and honeycomb superstructures coexist over a length scale of 3-4nm from both the edges. By comparing with density-functional derived nonorthogonal tight-binding calculations, we show that the coexistence is due to a slight admixing of the two types of edges at the graphite surfaces. In the STS measurements, a clear peak in the LDOS at negative bias voltages from -100 to -20mV was observed near the zigzag edges, while such a peak was not observed near the armchair edges. We concluded that this peak corresponds to the graphite “edge state” theoretically predicted by Fujita [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 65, 1920 (1996)] with a tight-binding model for graphene ribbons. The existence of the edge state only at the zigzag type edge was also confirmed by our first-principles calculations with different edge terminations.

  10. Local density effects on individual production are dynamic: insights from natural stands of a perennial savanna grass.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Julia; Higgins, Steven I; Grimm, Volker; Hoffmann, John; Linstädter, Anja

    2015-08-01

    Perennial grasses are a dominant component of grasslands, and provide important ecosystem services. However, most knowledge of grasslands' functioning and production comes from plot-level studies, and drivers of individual-level production remain poorly explored. Extrapolation from existing experiments is hampered by the fact that these are mostly concentrated on even-aged cohorts, and/or on the early stages of a plant's life cycle. Here we explored how local density regulates individual production in mono-specific natural grassland, focusing on adult individuals of a perennial savanna grass (Stipagrostis uniplumis). We found individual production to increase with individuals' size, but to decrease with neighbour abundance. A metric of neighbour abundance that considered size was superior to a metric based solely on the number of individuals. This finding is particularly important for studying competitive effects in natural populations, where plants are normally not even-sized. The inferred competition kernel, i.e. the function describing how competitive strength varies with spatial distance from a target plant, was hump-shaped, indicating strongest intraspecific competition at intermediate distances (10-30 cm). The spatial signature of competitive effects changed with time since fire; peak effects moved successively away from the target plant. Our results suggest that inferred competition kernels of long-lived plant populations may have shapes that differ from exponential or sigmoidal decreases. More generally, results underline that competition among neighbouring plants is dynamic. Studies that address density-dependent and density-independent (fire-related) population dynamics of perennial grasses in their fire-prone environment may thus shed new light on the functioning and production of grasslands.

  11. Local Variation in Femoral Neck Cortical Bone: In Vitro Measured Bone Mineral Density, Geometry and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Louise V; Jenkins, Thomas; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dunlop, Doug G; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C; Thurner, Philipp J

    2015-12-17

    Age- and disease (osteoporotic fractured and osteoarthritic tissue)-related changes in the distribution of cortical bone were examined, using a multimodality approach, including measurement of local density, geometry and mechanical properties, where changes in these properties can give rise to instability and increasing probability of fracture. In contrast to the majority of previously reported research, this study also focuses on the characteristic non-circular femoral neck cross-sectional geometry and variation in bone mineral density (BMD) around the femoral neck. Twenty-two osteoarthritic and 7 osteoporotic femoral neck slices, collected from elective and trauma-related arthroplasty, and 16 cadaveric donor tissue controls were tested mechanically using Reference Point Indentation (BioDent™, Active Life Technologies®, Santa Barbara, CA) and then scanned with in vitro-based radiography intended to replicate the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry technique. All parameters were measured regionally around the circumference of the femoral neck, allowing examination of spatial variability within the cortical bone. Fractured tissue was less resistant to indentation in the thinner superolateral segment compared to other segments and other groups. BMD around the fractured femoral necks appeared more consistent than that of nonfractured tissue, where BMD was reduced in the superolateral segment for the other groups. Cortical bone was thin in the superolateral segment for all groups except for the osteoarthritic group, and was thicker in the inferomedial segment for both osteoarthritic and fractured groups, resulting in the largest variation in buckling ratio (ratio of cortical bone diameter to cortical bone thickness) around the femoral neck for the fractured group. With age, healthy controls appeared to have lower inferomedial cortical thickness, whereas no significant differences in Reference Point Indentation measurements and density were observed. The study has

  12. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  13. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  14. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  15. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  16. Comment on ``Adiabatic theory for the bipolaron''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smondyrev, M. A.; Devreese, J. T.

    1996-05-01

    Comments are given on the application of the Bogoliubov-Tyablikov approach to the bipolaron problem in a recent paper by Lakhno [Phys. Rev. B 51, 3512 (1995)]. This author believes that his model (1) is the translation-invariant adiabatic theory of bipolarons and (2) gives asymptotically exact solutions in the adiabatic limit while the other approaches are considered as either phenomenological or variational in nature. Numerical results by Lakhno are in contradiction with all other papers published on the subject because his model leads to much lower energies. Thus, the author concludes that bipolarons ``are more stable than was considered before.'' We prove that both the analytical and the numerical results presented by Lakhno are wrong.

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  18. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  19. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Libor Pittner, Jiří

    2014-06-07

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  20. Adiabatic invariance with first integrals of motion.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B

    2002-10-01

    The construction of a microthermodynamic formalism for isolated systems based on the concept of adiabatic invariance is an old but seldom appreciated effort in the literature, dating back at least to P. Hertz [Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 33, 225 (1910)]. An apparently independent extension of such formalism for systems bearing additional first integrals of motion was recently proposed by Hans H. Rugh [Phys. Rev. E 64, 055101 (2001)], establishing the concept of adiabatic invariance even in such singular cases. After some remarks in connection with the formalism pioneered by Hertz, it will be suggested that such an extension can incidentally explain the success of a dynamical method for computing the entropy of classical interacting fluids, at least in some potential applications where the presence of additional first integrals cannot be ignored.

  1. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  2. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  3. Multiphoton adiabatic passage for atom optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, Gabor; Djotyan, Gagik P.

    2009-04-15

    We study the force exerted on two-level atoms by short, counterpropagating laser pulses. When the counterpropagating pulses overlap each other partially, multiphoton adiabatic processes are possible in several configurations, which amplify the force exerted on the atoms. We investigate the practical usefulness of such multiphoton adiabatic transitions for the manipulation of the atoms' mechanical state. In particular, we compare the efficiency of a pair of constant frequency, oppositely detuned laser pulses and that of a pair of frequency-chirped pulses. We also consider the case of prolonged exposure to a sequence of laser pulses for a duration that is comparable to or much larger than the spontaneous lifetime of the atoms. We use numerical methods to calculate the reduction of the force and the heating of the atomic ensemble when spontaneous emission cannot be neglected during the interaction. In addition, we derive simple approximate formulas for the force and the heating, and compare them to the numerical results.

  4. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGES

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  5. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  6. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions. PMID:25308187

  7. Accurate localized resolution of identity approach for linear-scaling hybrid density functionals and for many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihrig, Arvid Conrad; Wieferink, Jürgen; Zhang, Igor Ying; Ropo, Matti; Ren, Xinguo; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2015-09-01

    A key component in calculations of exchange and correlation energies is the Coulomb operator, which requires the evaluation of two-electron integrals. For localized basis sets, these four-center integrals are most efficiently evaluated with the resolution of identity (RI) technique, which expands basis-function products in an auxiliary basis. In this work we show the practical applicability of a localized RI-variant (‘RI-LVL’), which expands products of basis functions only in the subset of those auxiliary basis functions which are located at the same atoms as the basis functions. We demonstrate the accuracy of RI-LVL for Hartree-Fock calculations, for the PBE0 hybrid density functional, as well as for RPA and MP2 perturbation theory. Molecular test sets used include the S22 set of weakly interacting molecules, the G3 test set, as well as the G2-1 and BH76 test sets, and heavy elements including titanium dioxide, copper and gold clusters. Our RI-LVL implementation paves the way for linear-scaling RI-based hybrid functional calculations for large systems and for all-electron many-body perturbation theory with significantly reduced computational and memory cost.

  8. Local density of electromagnetic states in plasmonic nanotapers: spatial resolution limits with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Berthel, Martin; Beltrán-Madrigal, Josslyn; Huant, Serge; Drezet, Aurélien; Blaize, Sylvain

    2017-03-21

    One of the most explored single quantum emitters for the development of nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging is the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond. Indeed, a NV center does not experience fluorescence bleaching and blinking at room temperature. Furthermore, its optical properties are preserved when embedded into nanodiamond hosts. This letter focuses on the modeling of the local density of states (LDOS) in a plasmonic nanofocusing structure with NV center acting as local illumination sources. Numerical calculations of the LDOS near such nanostructure were done with a classical electric dipole radiation placed inside a diamond sphere as well as near-field optical fluorescence lifetime imaging of the structure. We found that Purcell factors higher than 10 can be reached with diamond nanospheres of radius less than 5 nm and at a distance of less than 20 nm from the surface of the structure. Although the spatial resolution of the experiment is limited by the size of the nanodiamond, our work supports the analysis and interpretation of single NV color center in nanodiamond as a probe for scanning near-field optical microscopy.

  9. Saturation deficit and deer density affect questing activity and local abundance of Ixodes ricinus (Acari, Ixodidae) in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tagliapietra, V; Rosà, R; Arnoldi, D; Cagnacci, F; Capelli, G; Montarsi, F; Hauffe, H C; Rizzoli, A

    2011-12-29

    The wood tick Ixodes ricinus, one of the most common arthropod-borne disease vectors, is of increasing relevance for human and animal health in Europe. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of several abiotic and biotic factors potentially affecting questing activity and local abundance of I. ricinus in Italy, considering the scale at which these factors interact with the host-seeking ticks. Within EDEN, a large-scale EU collaborative project on eco-epidemiology of vector-borne diseases, we collected questing ticks for three consecutive years using a standard protocol at eleven sites in the Italian Alps and Apennines. A total of 25 447 I. ricinus were collected. All sites showed the same annual pattern of tick activity (bimodal for nymphs and unimodal for larvae and adults), although the abundance of nymphs was statistically different between sites and years. A Generalized Linear Mixed Model and a Linear Mixed Model fitted to data for nymphs, showed that while the principal variables affecting the local abundance of questing ticks were saturation deficit (an index combining temperature and relative humidity) and red deer density, the most important variable affecting questing nymph activity was saturation deficit. As for the timing of seasonal emergence, we confirmed that the threshold temperature at this latitude for larvae is 10°C (mean maximum) while that for nymphs is 8°C.

  10. Generator localization by current source density (CSD): implications of volume conduction and field closure at intracranial and scalp resolutions.

    PubMed

    Tenke, Craig E; Kayser, Jürgen

    2012-12-01

    The topographic ambiguity and reference-dependency that has plagued EEG/ERP research throughout its history are largely attributable to volume conduction, which may be concisely described by a vector form of Ohm's Law. This biophysical relationship is common to popular algorithms that infer neuronal generators via inverse solutions. It may be further simplified as Poisson's source equation, which identifies underlying current generators from estimates of the second spatial derivative of the field potential (Laplacian transformation). Intracranial current source density (CSD) studies have dissected the "cortical dipole" into intracortical sources and sinks, corresponding to physiologically-meaningful patterns of neuronal activity at a sublaminar resolution, much of which is locally cancelled (i.e., closed field). By virtue of the macroscopic scale of the scalp-recorded EEG, a surface Laplacian reflects the radial projections of these underlying currents, representing a unique, unambiguous measure of neuronal activity at scalp. Although the surface Laplacian requires minimal assumptions compared to complex, model-sensitive inverses, the resulting waveform topographies faithfully summarize and simplify essential constraints that must be placed on putative generators of a scalp potential topography, even if they arise from deep or partially-closed fields. CSD methods thereby provide a global empirical and biophysical context for generator localization, spanning scales from intracortical to scalp recordings.

  11. Adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation DFT for the structural properties of solids—The renormalized ALDA and electron gas kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Christopher E. Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2015-09-14

    We present calculations of the correlation energies of crystalline solids and isolated systems within the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation formulation of density-functional theory. We perform a quantitative comparison of a set of model exchange-correlation kernels originally derived for the homogeneous electron gas (HEG), including the recently introduced renormalized adiabatic local-density approximation (rALDA) and also kernels which (a) satisfy known exact limits of the HEG, (b) carry a frequency dependence, or (c) display a 1/k{sup 2} divergence for small wavevectors. After generalizing the kernels to inhomogeneous systems through a reciprocal-space averaging procedure, we calculate the lattice constants and bulk moduli of a test set of 10 solids consisting of tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors (C, Si, SiC), ionic compounds (MgO, LiCl, LiF), and metals (Al, Na, Cu, Pd). We also consider the atomization energy of the H{sub 2} molecule. We compare the results calculated with different kernels to those obtained from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and to experimental measurements. We demonstrate that the model kernels correct the RPA’s tendency to overestimate the magnitude of the correlation energy whilst maintaining a high-accuracy description of structural properties.

  12. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  13. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-01-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  14. Aspects of adiabatic population transfer and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirplak, Mustafa

    This thesis explores two different questions. The first question we answer is how to restore a given population transfer scenario given that it works efficiently in the adiabatic limit but fails because of lack of intensity and/or short duration. We derive a very simple algorithm to do this and apply it to both toy and realistic models. Two results emerge from this study. While the mathematical existence of the programme is certain it might not always be physically desirable. The restoration of adiabaticity is phase sensitive. The second question that is answered in this thesis is not how to invent new control paradigms, but rather what would happen to them in the presence of stochastic perturbers. We first use a phenomenological model to study the effect of stochastic dephasing on population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage. The results of this Monte Carlo calculation are qualitatively explained with a perturbation theoretical result in the dressed state basis. The reliability of our phenomenological model is questioned through a more rigorous hybrid quantal-classical simulation of controlled population transfer in HCl in Ar.

  15. Adiabatic graph-state quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonio, B.; Markham, D.; Anders, J.

    2014-11-01

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) and holonomic quantum computation (HQC) are two very different computational methods. The computation in MBQC is driven by adaptive measurements executed in a particular order on a large entangled state. In contrast in HQC the system starts in the ground subspace of a Hamiltonian which is slowly changed such that a transformation occurs within the subspace. Following the approach of Bacon and Flammia, we show that any MBQC on a graph state with generalized flow (gflow) can be converted into an adiabatically driven holonomic computation, which we call adiabatic graph-state quantum computation (AGQC). We then investigate how properties of AGQC relate to the properties of MBQC, such as computational depth. We identify a trade-off that can be made between the number of adiabatic steps in AGQC and the norm of \\dot{H} as well as the degree of H, in analogy to the trade-off between the number of measurements and classical post-processing seen in MBQC. Finally the effects of performing AGQC with orderings that differ from standard MBQC are investigated.

  16. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  17. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Ken-ichi Takahashi, Ohgi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ{sub DS}) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ{sub DS}. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  18. Observational tests of non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C. E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br

    2014-10-01

    In a previous paper [1] it was shown that any dark sector model can be mapped into a non-adiabatic fluid formed by two interacting components, one with zero pressure and the other with equation-of-state parameter ω = -1. It was also shown that the latter does not cluster and, hence, the former is identified as the observed clustering matter. This guarantees that the dark matter power spectrum does not suffer from oscillations or instabilities. It applies in particular to the generalised Chaplygin gas, which was shown to be equivalent to interacting models at both background and perturbation levels. In the present paper we test the non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas against the Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae, the position of the first acoustic peak in the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and the linear power spectrum of large scale structures. We consider two different compilations of SNe Ia, namely the Constitution and SDSS samples, both calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and for the power spectrum we use the 2dFGRS catalogue. The model parameters to be adjusted are the present Hubble parameter, the present matter density and the Chaplygin gas parameter α. The joint analysis best fit gives α ≈ - 0.5, which corresponds to a constant-rate energy flux from dark energy to dark matter, with the dark energy density decaying linearly with the Hubble parameter. The ΛCDM model, equivalent to α = 0, stands outside the 3σ confidence interval.

  19. Practical approximation of the non-adiabatic coupling terms for same-symmetry interstate crossings by using adiabatic potential energies only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeck, Kyoung Koo; An, Heesun

    2017-02-01

    A very simple equation, Fij A p p=[(∂2(Via-Vja ) /∂Q2 ) /(Via-Vja ) ] 1 /2/2 , giving a reliable magnitude of non-adiabatic coupling terms (NACTs, Fij's) based on adiabatic potential energies only (Via and Vja) was discovered, and its reliability was tested for several prototypes of same-symmetry interstate crossings in LiF, C2, NH3Cl, and C6H5SH molecules. Our theoretical derivation starts from the analysis of the relationship between the Lorentzian dependence of NACTs along a diabatization coordinate and the well-established linear vibronic coupling scheme. This analysis results in a very simple equation, α =2 κ /Δc , enabling the evaluation of the Lorentz function α parameter in terms of the coupling constant κ and the energy gap Δc (Δc=|Via-Vja| Q c ) between adiabatic states at the crossing point QC. Subsequently, it was shown that QC corresponds to the point where Fij A p p exhibit maximum values if we set the coupling parameter as κ =[(Via-Vja ) ṡ(∂2(Via-Vja ) /∂Q2 ) ] Qc1 /2 /2 . Finally, we conjectured that this relation could give reasonable values of NACTs not only at the crossing point but also at other geometries near QC. In this final approximation, the pre-defined crossing point QC is not required. The results of our test demonstrate that the approximation works much better than initially expected. The present new method does not depend on the selection of an ab initio method for adiabatic electronic states but is currently limited to local non-adiabatic regions where only two electronic states are dominantly involved within a nuclear degree of freedom.

  20. The best of both Reps—Diabatized Gaussians on adiabatic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meek, Garrett A.; Levine, Benjamin G.

    2016-11-01

    When simulating nonadiabatic molecular dynamics, choosing an electronic representation requires consideration of well-known trade-offs. The uniqueness and spatially local couplings of the adiabatic representation come at the expense of an electronic wave function that changes discontinuously with nuclear motion and associated singularities in the nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The quasi-diabatic representation offers a smoothly varying wave function and finite couplings, but identification of a globally well-behaved quasi-diabatic representation is a system-specific challenge. In this work, we introduce the diabatized Gaussians on adiabatic surfaces (DGAS) approximation, a variant of the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) method that preserves the advantages of both electronic representations while avoiding their respective pitfalls. The DGAS wave function is expanded in a basis of vibronic functions that are continuous in both electronic and nuclear coordinates, but potentially discontinuous in time. Because the time-dependent Schrödinger equation contains only first-order derivatives with respect to time, singularities in the second-derivative nonadiabatic coupling terms (i.e., diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction; DBOC) at conical intersections are rigorously absent, though singular time-derivative couplings remain. Interpolation of the electronic wave function allows the accurate prediction of population transfer probabilities even in the presence of the remaining singularities. We compare DGAS calculations of the dynamics of photoexcited ethene to AIMS calculations performed in the adiabatic representation, including the DBOC. The 28 fs excited state lifetime observed in DGAS simulations is considerably shorter than the 50 fs lifetime observed in the adiabatic simulations. The slower decay in the adiabatic representation is attributable to the large, repulsive DBOC in the neighborhood of conical intersections. These repulsive DBOC terms are artifacts

  1. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  2. DFT and beyond: A discussion of exact exchange plus local- and nonlocal-density approximations to the correlation functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    Local- and semilocal-density approximations (LDA/GGA) to density-functional theory, although tremendously successful for describing the properties of many molecules and materials, suffer from, amongst others, self-interaction errors and the absence of long-range van der Waals interactions. One at present most systematic approach for handling the xc functional appears to be exact exchange combined with the random phase approximation for correlation. We show that significant insight can be obtained by this approach, e.g. for studying the interaction between two graphene sheets [1], cohesive and surface energies of transition metals [2], or the adsorption of CO on close-packed transition metal surfaces [3]. For some of these systems the LDA and GGA give an even qualitatively wrong description. --- Despite the success for the mentioned systems we also identify shortcomings of the approach, in particular for molecules. --- A second route discussed in this talk concerns the linkage of LDA+U and many-body perturbation theory: G0W0@LDA+U. We discuss results for the 4f lanthanide- oxide series [4] as well as for 3d transition metal oxides. -- - 1) A. Sanfilippo, X.G. Ren, P. Rinke, A. Tkatchenko, V. Blum, K. Reuter, and M. Scheffler, in preparation. 2) A.Soon and Matthias Scheffler, in preparation. 2) X. Ren, P. Rinke, and M. Scheffler, Phys. Rev. B 80, 045402 (2009). 4) H. Jiang, R.I. G'omez-Abal, P. Rinke, and M. Scheffler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 126403 (2009).

  3. Local structure and vibrational properties of alpha-Pu, alpha-Uand the alpha-U charge density wave

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.J.; Allen, P.G.; Blobaum, K.J.M.; Wall, W.A.; Booth, C.H.

    2004-08-10

    The local atomic environment and vibrational properties of atoms in monoclinic pure {alpha}-plutonium as well as orthorhombic pure a-uranium and its low-temperature charge-density-wave (CDW) modulation are examined by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Pu L{sub III}-edge and U L{sub III}-edge EXAFS data measured at low temperatures verify the crystal structures of {alpha}-U and {alpha}-Pu samples previously determined by x-ray diffraction and neutron scattering. Debye-Waller factors from temperature-dependent EXAFS measurements are fit with a correlated Debye model. The observed Pu-Pu bond correlated Debye temperature of {theta}{sub cD}({alpha}-Pu) = 162 {+-} 5 K for the pure {alpha}-Pu phase agrees with our previous measurement of the correlated Debye temperature of the gallium-containing {alpha}{prime}-Pu phase in a mixed phase 1.9 at% Ga-doped {alpha}{prime}-Pu/{delta}-Pu alloy. The temperature dependence of the U-U nearest neighbor Debye-Waller factor exhibits a sharp discontinuity in slope near T{sub CDW} = 43 K, the transition temperature at which the charge-density wave (CDW) in {alpha}-U condenses from a soft phonon mode along the (100) direction. Our measurement of the CDW using EXAFS is the first observation of the structure of the CDW in polycrystalline {alpha}-U. The different temperature dependence of the Debye-Waller factor for T < T{sub CDW} can be modeled by the change in bond length distributions resulting from condensation of the charge density wave. For T > T{sub CDW}, the observed correlated Debye temperature of {theta}{sub cD}({alpha}-U) = 199 {+-} 3 K is in good agreement with other measurements of the Debye temperature for polycrystalline {alpha}-U. CDW structural models fit to the {alpha}-U EXAFS data support a squared CDW at the lowest temperatures, with a displacement amplitude of {var_epsilon} = 0.05 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom}.

  4. Local Structure and Vibrational Properties of alpha-Pu, alpha-U, and the alpha-U Charge Density Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E J; Allen, P G; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Booth, C H

    2004-08-10

    The local atomic environment and vibrational properties of atoms in monoclinic pure {alpha}-plutonium as well as orthorhombic pure {alpha}-uranium and its low-temperature charge-density-wave (CDW) modulation are examined by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Pu L{sub III}-edge and U L{sub III}-edge EXAFS data measured at low temperatures verify the crystal structures of {alpha}-U and {alpha}-Pu samples previously determined by x-ray diffraction and neutron scattering. Debye-Waller factors from temperature-dependent EXAFS measurements are fit with a correlated Debye model. The observed Pu-Pu bond correlated Debye temperature of {theta}{sub cD}({alpha}-Pu) = 162 {+-} 5 K for the pure {alpha}-Pu phase agrees with our previous measurement of the correlated Debye temperature of the gallium-containing {alpha}'-Pu phase in a mixed phase 1.9 at% Ga-doped {alpha}'-Pu/{delta}-Pu alloy. The temperature dependence of the U-U nearest neighbor Debye-Waller factor exhibits a sharp discontinuity in slope near T{sub CDW} = 43 K, the transition temperature at which the charge-density wave (CDW) in {alpha}-U condenses from a soft phonon mode along the (100) direction. Our measurement of the CDW using EXAFS is the first observation of the structure of the CDW in polycrystalline {alpha}-U. The different temperature dependence of the Debye-Waller factor for T < T{sub CDW} can be modeled by the change in bond length distributions resulting from condensation of the charge density wave. For T > T{sub CDW}, the observed correlated Debye temperature of {theta}{sub cD}({alpha}-U) = 199 {+-} 3 K is in good agreement with other measurements of the Debye temperature for polycrystalline {alpha}-U. CDW structural models fit to the {alpha}-U EXAFS data support a squared CDW at the lowest temperatures, with a displacement amplitude of {var_epsilon} = 0.05 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom}.

  5. Resource efficient gadgets for compiling adiabatic quantum optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; O'Gorman, Bryan; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-11-01

    We develop a resource efficient method by which the ground-state of an arbitrary k-local, optimization Hamiltonian can be encoded as the ground-state of a (k-1)-local optimization Hamiltonian. This result is important because adiabatic quantum algorithms are often most easily formulated using many-body interactions but experimentally available interactions are generally 2-body. In this context, the efficiency of a reduction gadget is measured by the number of ancilla qubits required as well as the amount of control precision needed to implement the resulting Hamiltonian. First, we optimize methods of applying these gadgets to obtain 2-local Hamiltonians using the least possible number of ancilla qubits. Next, we show a novel reduction gadget which minimizes control precision and a heuristic which uses this gadget to compile 3-local problems with a significant reduction in control precision. Finally, we present numerics which indicate a substantial decrease in the resources required to implement randomly generated, 3-body optimization Hamiltonians when compared to other methods in the literature.

  6. High magnetic field theory for the local density of states in graphene with smooth arbitrary potential landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champel, Thierry; Florens, Serge

    2010-07-01

    We study theoretically the energy and spatially resolved local density of states (LDoS) in graphene at high perpendicular magnetic field. For this purpose, we extend from the Schrödinger to the Dirac case a semicoherent-state Green’s-function formalism, devised to obtain in a quantitative way the lifting of the Landau-level degeneracy in the presence of smooth confinement and smooth disordered potentials. Our general technique, which rigorously describes quantum-mechanical motion in a magnetic field beyond the semiclassical guiding center picture of vanishing magnetic length (both for the ordinary two-dimensional electron gas and graphene), is connected to the deformation (Weyl) quantization theory in phase space developed in mathematical physics. For generic quadratic potentials of either scalar (i.e., electrostatic) or mass (i.e., associated with coupling to the substrate) types, we exactly solve the regime of large magnetic field (yet at finite magnetic length, formally, this amounts to considering an infinite Fermi velocity) where Landau-level mixing becomes negligible. Hence, we obtain a closed-form expression for the graphene Green’s function in this regime, providing analytically the discrete energy spectra for both cases of scalar and mass parabolic confinement. Furthermore, the coherent-state representation is shown to display a hierarchy of local energy scales ordered by powers of the magnetic length and successive spatial derivatives of the local potential, which allows one to devise controlled approximation schemes at finite temperature for arbitrary and possibly disordered potential landscapes. As an application, we derive general analytical nonperturbative expressions for the LDoS, which may serve as a good starting point for interpreting experimental studies. For instance, we are able to account for many puzzling features of the LDoS recently observed by high magnetic field scanning tunneling spectroscopy experiments on graphene, such as a

  7. First-order derivative couplings between excited states from adiabatic TDDFT response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Qi; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Bellchambers, Gregory D.; Furche, Filipp

    2015-02-14

    We present a complete derivation of derivative couplings between excited states in the framework of adiabatic time-dependent density functional response theory. Explicit working equations are given and the resulting derivative couplings are compared with derivative couplings from a pseudo-wavefunction ansatz. For degenerate excited states, i.e., close to a conical intersection (CI), the two approaches are identical apart from an antisymmetric overlap term. However, if the difference between two excitation energies equals another excitation energy, the couplings from response theory exhibit an unphysical divergence. This spurious behavior is a result of the adiabatic or static kernel approximation of time-dependent density functional theory leading to an incorrect analytical structure of the quadratic response function. Numerical examples for couplings close to a CI and for well-separated electronic states are given.

  8. First-order derivative couplings between excited states from adiabatic TDDFT response theory.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qi; Bellchambers, Gregory D; Furche, Filipp; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-02-14

    We present a complete derivation of derivative couplings between excited states in the framework of adiabatic time-dependent density functional response theory. Explicit working equations are given and the resulting derivative couplings are compared with derivative couplings from a pseudo-wavefunction ansatz. For degenerate excited states, i.e., close to a conical intersection (CI), the two approaches are identical apart from an antisymmetric overlap term. However, if the difference between two excitation energies equals another excitation energy, the couplings from response theory exhibit an unphysical divergence. This spurious behavior is a result of the adiabatic or static kernel approximation of time-dependent density functional theory leading to an incorrect analytical structure of the quadratic response function. Numerical examples for couplings close to a CI and for well-separated electronic states are given.

  9. Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James E; Robinson, Robert L; Gasem, Khaled A M

    2006-11-07

    The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO2 sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

  10. Exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the parametric two-electron reduced-density-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePrince, A. Eugene; Mazziotti, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The parametric variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) method is applied to computing electronic correlation energies of medium-to-large molecular systems by exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the framework of the cluster-in-molecule (CIM) approximation [S. Li et al., J. Comput. Chem. 23, 238 (2002); J. Chem. Phys. 125, 074109 (2006)]. The 2-RDMs of individual molecular fragments within a molecule are determined, and selected portions of these 2-RDMs are recombined to yield an accurate approximation to the correlation energy of the entire molecule. In addition to extending CIM to the parametric 2-RDM method, we (i) suggest a more systematic selection of atomic-orbital domains than that presented in previous CIM studies and (ii) generalize the CIM method for open-shell quantum systems. The resulting method is tested with a series of polyacetylene molecules, water clusters, and diazobenzene derivatives in minimal and nonminimal basis sets. Calculations show that the computational cost of the method scales linearly with system size. We also compute hydrogen-abstraction energies for a series of hydroxyurea derivatives. Abstraction of hydrogen from hydroxyurea is thought to be a key step in its treatment of sickle cell anemia; the design of hydroxyurea derivatives that oxidize more rapidly is one approach to devising more effective treatments.

  11. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy with sub-nanosecond beam blanking for direct evaluation of the local density of states.

    PubMed

    Moerland, Robert J; Weppelman, I Gerward C; Garming, Mathijs W H; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2016-10-17

    We show cathodoluminescence-based time-resolved electron beam spectroscopy in order to directly probe the spontaneous emission decay rate that is modified by the local density of states in a nanoscale environment. In contrast to dedicated laser-triggered electron-microscopy setups, we use commercial hardware in a standard SEM, which allows us to easily switch from pulsed to continuous operation of the SEM. Electron pulses of 80-90 ps duration are generated by conjugate blanking of a high-brightness electron beam, which allows probing emitters within a large range of decay rates. Moreover, we simultaneously attain a resolution better than λ/10, which ensures details at deep-subwavelength scales can be retrieved. As a proof-of-principle, we employ the pulsed electron beam to spatially measure excited-state lifetime modifications in a phosphor material across the edge of an aluminum half-plane, coated on top of the phosphor. The measured emission dynamics can be directly related to the structure of the sample by recording photon arrival histograms together with the secondary-electron signal. Our results show that time-resolved electron cathodoluminescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool of choice for nanophotonics, within reach of a large audience.

  12. Localization of a Radio-Frequency Identification Tag from Measurements of the Fourier Coefficients of Its Magnetic Flux Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Takaaki; Takanashi, Yuushi; Watanabe, Hirotoshi

    This paper presents a method for estimating the position of a radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag in two-dimensional (2D) space. A low-frequency (135 kHz), passive RFID tag with a loop antenna transmits its ID number to the tag reader by electromagnetic induction. This study reveals that the radial distance and the azimuth of the RFID tag in a 2D plane can be determined from the absolute value and phase of the first-order Fourier coefficient of the magnetic flux density generated by the tag. The authors develop a sensor unit that consists of four coils: two special coils that generate electromotive forces that are proportional to the first-order Fourier cosine and sine coefficients and two conventional loop coils. Using the developed sensor, a 29-mm-diameter disk-shaped RFID tag can be localized with a maximum (average) error of 18 mm (5 mm) within a circular domain of radius 140 mm.

  13. Adiabatic contraction revisited: Implications for primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capela, Fabio; Pshirkov, Maxim; Tinyakov, Peter

    2014-10-01

    We simulate the adiabatic contraction of a dark matter (DM) distribution during the process of the star formation, paying particular attention to the phase space distribution of the DM particles after the contraction. Assuming the initial uniform density and Maxwellian distribution of DM velocities, we find that the number n(r) of DM particles within the radius r scales like n(r)∝r1.5, leading to the DM density profile ρ∝r-1.5, in agreement with the Liouville theorem and previous numerical studies. At the same time, the number of DM particles ν(r) with periastra smaller than r is parametrically larger, ν(r)∝r, implying that many particles contributing at any given moment into the density ρ(r) at small r have very elongated orbits and spend most of their time at distances larger than r. This has implications for the capture of DM by stars in the process of their formation. As a concrete example we consider the case of primordial black holes (PBHs). We show that accounting for very eccentric orbits boosts the amount of captured PBH by a factor of up to 2×103 depending on the PBH mass, improving correspondingly the previously derived constraints on the PBH abundance.

  14. Measurements of the Effect of Adiabat on Shell Decompression in Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Davis, A. K.; Craxton, R. S.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the effect of adiabat (α) on the shell thickness were performed in direct-drive implosions. The maximum in-flight shell thickness was obtained using a novel technique where the outer and inner surfaces of the shell were simultaneously measured using self-emission images of the imploding target. When reducing the shell's adiabat from α = 6 to α = 4.5 , the shell thickness was measured to decrease from 75 μm to 60 μm, but when decreasing the adiabat further (α = 1.8), the shell thickness was measured to increase to 75 μm. The measured shell thickness, shell trajectories, neutron bang time, and neutron yield were reproduced by two-dimensional simulations that include laser imprint, nonlocal thermal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and first-principles equation-of-state models. These results show that the decompression of the shell measured for low-adiabat implosions was a result of laser imprint. Additional information on the evolution of the density profile was obtained using x-ray radiography. The backlighter was created with six of the 60 OMEGA laser beams, with the pointings and energies of other beams adjusted to maintain a uniform implosion. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  16. Quantized adiabatic transport in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Ho, Derek Y H; Gong, Jiangbin

    2012-07-06

    Though topological aspects of energy bands are known to play a key role in quantum transport in solid-state systems, the implications of Floquet band topology for transport in momentum space (i.e., acceleration) have not been explored so far. Using a ratchet accelerator model inspired by existing cold-atom experiments, here we characterize a class of extended Floquet bands of one-dimensional driven quantum systems by Chern numbers, reveal topological phase transitions therein, and theoretically predict the quantization of adiabatic transport in momentum space. Numerical results confirm our theory and indicate the feasibility of experimental studies.

  17. Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for space use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Warner, B. A.; Castles, S.; Breon, S. R.; San Sebastian, M.; Hait, T.

    1990-01-01

    An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) for space use is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The breadboard ADR operated at 100 mK for 400 minutes. Some significant changes to that ADR, designed to eliminate shortcomings revealed during tests, are reported. To increase thermal contact, the ferric ammonium sulfate crystals were grown directly on gold-plated copper wires which serve as the thermal bus. The thermal link to the X-ray sensors was also markedly improved. To speed up the testing required to determine the best design parameters for the gas gap heat switch, the new heat switch has a modular design and is easy to disassemble.

  18. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-01-01

    We study the Ising Hamiltonian with a transverse field term to simulate the quantum annealing. Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we design the time dependence of the Hamiltonian. The dynamical invariant is obtained by the mean-field ansatz, and the Hamiltonian is designed by the inverse engineering. We show that the time dependence of physical quantities such as the magnetization is independent of the speed of the Hamiltonian variation in the infinite-range model. We also show that rotating transverse magnetic fields are useful to achieve the ideal time evolution.

  19. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  20. Decoherence in a scalable adiabatic quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-15

    We consider the effects of decoherence on Landau-Zener crossings encountered in a large-scale adiabatic-quantum-computing setup. We analyze the dependence of the success probability--i.e., the probability for the system to end up in its new ground state--on the noise amplitude and correlation time. We determine the optimal sweep rate that is required to maximize the success probability. We then discuss the scaling of decoherence effects with increasing system size. We find that those effects can be important for large systems, even if they are small for each of the small building blocks.

  1. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  2. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  3. Generating shortcuts to adiabaticity in quantum and classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Transitionless quantum driving achieves adiabatic evolution in a hurry, using a counterdiabatic Hamiltonian to stifle nonadiabatic transitions. Here this shortcut to adiabaticity is cast in terms of a generator of adiabatic transport. This yields a classical analog of transitionless driving, and provides a strategy for constructing quantal counterdiabatic Hamiltonians. As an application of this framework, exact classical and quantal counterdiabatic terms are obtained for a particle in a box and for even-power-law potentials in one degree of freedom.

  4. Investigation of the local density of states in self-assembled GeSi/Si(001) nanoislands by combined scanning tunneling and atomic-force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, P. A.; Bukharaev, A. A.; Filatov, D. O. Isakov, M. A.; Shengurov, V. G.; Chalkov, V. Yu.; Denisov, Yu. A.

    2011-03-15

    The local density of states in self-assembled GeSi/Si(001) nanoislands is investigated for the first time by combined tunneling and atomic-force scanning microscopy. Current images and tunneling spectra of individual GeSi/Si(001) islands are obtained. These measurements yield the spatial and energy distributions of the local density of states in GeSi islands, respectively. The tunneling spectroscopy data demonstrate that uncapped Ge{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7}/Si(001) islands behave as type-I heterostructures.

  5. Phase relations and adiabats in boiling seafloor geothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of large salinity variations and vent temperatures in the range of 380-400??C suggest that boiling or two-phase separation may be occurring in some seafloor geothermal systems. Consideration of flow rates and the relatively small differences in density between vapors and liquids at the supercritical pressures at depth in these systems suggests that boiling is occurring under closed-system conditions. Salinity and temperature of boiling vents can be used to estimate the pressure-temperature point in the subsurface at which liquid seawater first reached the two-phase boundary. Data are reviewed to construct phase diagrams of coexisting brines and vapors in the two-phase region at pressures corresponding to those of the seafloor geothermal systems. A method is developed for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of the coexisting mixtures, and results are used to construct adiabats from the seafloor to the P-T two-phase boundary. Results for seafloor vents discharging at 2300 m below sea level indicate that a 385??C vent is composed of a brine (7% NaCl equivalent) in equilibrium with a vapor (0.1% NaCl). Brine constitutes 45% by weight of the mixture, and the fluid first boiled at approximately 1 km below the seafloor at 415??C, 330 bar. A 400??C vent is primarily vapor (88 wt.%, 0.044% NaCl) with a small amount of brine (26% NaCl) and first boiled at 2.9 km below the seafloor at 500??C, 520 bar. These results show that adiabatic decompression in the two-phase region results in dramatic cooling of the fluid mixture when there is a large fraction of vapor. ?? 1985.

  6. Numerical simulations of solar spicules: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuźma, B.; Murawski, K.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Konkol, P.; Mignone, A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the formation and evolution of solar spicules using numerical simulations of a vertical velocity pulse that is launched from the upper chromosphere. Methods: With the use of the PLUTO code, we numerically solved adiabatic and non-adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D cylindrical geometry. We followed the evolution of spicules triggered by pulses that are launched in a vertical velocity component from the upper chromosphere. Then we compared the results obtained with and without non-adiabatic terms in the MHD equations. Results: Our numerical results reveal that the velocity pulse is steepened into a shock that propagates upward into the corona. The chromospheric cold and dense plasma follows the shock and rises into the corona with the mean speed of 20-25 km s-1. The nonlinear wake behind the pulse in the stratified atmosphere leads to quasi-periodic rebound shocks, which lead to quasi-periodic rising of chromospheric plasma into the corona with a period close to the acoustic cut-off period of the chromosphere. We found that the effect of non-adiabatic terms on spicule evolution is minor; the general properties of spicules such as their heights and rising-time remain slightly affected by these terms. Conclusions: In the framework of the axisymmetric model we devised, we show that the solar spicules can be triggered by the vertical velocity pulses, and thermal conduction and radiative cooling terms do not exert any significant influence on the dynamics of these spicules.

  7. On the relation between orbital-localization and self-interaction errors in the density functional theory treatment of organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Körzdörfer, T

    2011-03-07

    It is commonly argued that the self-interaction error (SIE) inherent in semilocal density functionals is related to the degree of the electronic localization. Yet at the same time there exists a latent ambiguity in the definitions of the terms "localization" and "self-interaction," which ultimately prevents a clear and readily accessible quantification of this relationship. This problem is particularly pressing for organic semiconductor molecules, in which delocalized molecular orbitals typically alternate with localized ones, thus leading to major distortions in the eigenvalue spectra. This paper discusses the relation between localization and SIEs in organic semiconductors in detail. Its findings provide further insights into the SIE in the orbital energies and yield a new perspective on the failure of self-interaction corrections that identify delocalized orbital densities with electrons.

  8. Adiabatic following for a three-state quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Shore, Bruce W.; Rangelov, Andon; Kyoseva, Elica

    2017-01-01

    Adiabatic time-evolution - found in various forms of adiabatic following and adiabatic passage - is often advantageous for controlled manipulation of quantum systems due to its insensitivity to deviations in the pulse shapes and timings. In this paper we discuss controlled adiabatic evolution of a three-state quantum system, a natural advance to the widespread use of two-state systems in numerous contemporary applications. We discuss, and illustrate, not only possibilities for population transfer but also for creating, with prescribed relative phase, 50:50 superpositions of two Zeeman sublevels in a letter-vee coupling linkage.

  9. Adiabatic approximation via hodograph translation and zero-curvature equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasev, M. V.

    2014-04-01

    For quantum as well classical slow-fast systems, we develop a general method which allows one to compute the adiabatic invariant (approximate integral of motion), its symmetries, the adiabatic guiding center coordinates and the effective scalar Hamiltonian in all orders of a small parameter. The scheme does not exploit eigenvectors or diagonalization, but is based on the ideas of isospectral deformation and zero-curvature equations, where the role of "time" is played by the adiabatic (quantization) parameter. The algorithm includes the construction of the zero-curvature adiabatic connection and its splitting generated by averaging up to an arbitrary order in the small parameter.

  10. Adaptive localization of focus point regions via random patch probabilistic density from whole-slide, Ki-67-stained brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Yazan M; Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Norul Huda; MdZin, Reena Rahayu; Omar, Khairuddin

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved.

  11. Adaptive Localization of Focus Point Regions via Random Patch Probabilistic Density from Whole-Slide, Ki-67-Stained Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Yazan M.; MdZin, Reena Rahayu

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of whole-slide tissue for digital pathology images has been clinically approved to provide a second opinion to pathologists. Localization of focus points from Ki-67-stained histopathology whole-slide tissue microscopic images is considered the first step in the process of proliferation rate estimation. Pathologists use eye pooling or eagle-view techniques to localize the highly stained cell-concentrated regions from the whole slide under microscope, which is called focus-point regions. This procedure leads to a high variety of interpersonal observations and time consuming, tedious work and causes inaccurate findings. The localization of focus-point regions can be addressed as a clustering problem. This paper aims to automate the localization of focus-point regions from whole-slide images using the random patch probabilistic density method. Unlike other clustering methods, random patch probabilistic density method can adaptively localize focus-point regions without predetermining the number of clusters. The proposed method was compared with the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Our proposed method achieves a good performance, when the results were evaluated by three expert pathologists. The proposed method achieves an average false-positive rate of 0.84% for the focus-point region localization error. Moreover, regarding RPPD used to localize tissue from whole-slide images, 228 whole-slide images have been tested; 97.3% localization accuracy was achieved. PMID:25793010

  12. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  13. The genesis of adiabatic shear bands

    PubMed Central

    Landau, P.; Osovski, S.; Venkert, A.; Gärtnerová, V.; Rittel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Adiabatic shear banding (ASB) is a unique dynamic failure mechanism that results in an unpredicted catastrophic failure due to a concentrated shear deformation mode. It is universally considered as a material or structural instability and as such, ASB is hardly controllable or predictable to some extent. ASB is modeled on the premise of stability analyses. The leading paradigm is that a competition between strain (rate) hardening and thermal softening determines the onset of the failure. It was recently shown that microstructural softening transformations, such as dynamic recrystallization, are responsible for adiabatic shear failure. These are dictated by the stored energy of cold work, so that energy considerations can be used to macroscopically model the failure mechanism. The initial mechanisms that lead to final failure are still unknown, as well as the ASB formation mechanism(s). Most of all - is ASB an abrupt instability or rather a gradual transition as would be dictated by microstructural evolutions? This paper reports thorough microstructural characterizations that clearly show the gradual character of the phenomenon, best described as a nucleation and growth failure mechanism, and not as an abrupt instability as previously thought. These observations are coupled to a simple numerical model that illustrates them. PMID:27849023

  14. Accurate Variational Description of Adiabatic Quantum Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, Giuseppe; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    Adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) is a quantum computing protocol where a system is driven by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The initial Hamiltonian has an easily prepared ground-state and the final Hamiltonian encodes some desired optimization problem. An adiabatic time evolution then yields a solution to the optimization problem. Several challenges emerge in the theoretical description of this protocol: on one hand, the exact simulation of quantum dynamics is exponentially complex in the size of the optimization problem. On the other hand, approximate approaches such as tensor network states (TNS) are limited to small instances by the amount of entanglement that can be encoded. I will present here an extension of the time-dependent Variational Monte Carlo approach to problems in AQO. This approach is based on a general class of (Jastrow-Feenberg) entangled states, whose parameters are evolved in time according to a stochastic variational principle. We demonstrate this approach for optimization problems of the Ising spin-glass type. A very good accuracy is achieved when compared to exact time-dependent TNS on small instances. We then apply this approach to larger problems, and discuss the efficiency of the quantum annealing scheme in comparison with its classical counterpart.

  15. Nonadiabatic Transitions in Adiabatic Rapid Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2006-05-01

    Optical forces much larger than the ordinary radiative force can be achieved on a two-level atom by multiple repetitions of adiabatic rapid passage sweeps with counterpropagating light beams. Chirped light pulses drive the atom-laser system up a ladder of dressed state energy sheets on sequential trajectories, thereby decreasing the atomic kinetic energy. Nonadiabatic transitions between the energy sheets must be avoided for this process to be effective. We have calculated the nonadiabatic transition probability for various chirped light pulses numerically. These results were compared to the first Demkov-Kunike model and the well-known Landau-Zener model. In addition, an analytical form of the nonadiabatic transition probability has been found for linearly chirped pulses and an approximate form for generic symmetric finite-time pulses has been found for the entire parameter space using the technique of unitary integration. From this, the asymptotic transition probability in the adiabatic limit was derived. T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys., Rev. A 71 061405(R) (2005). Yu. Demkov and M. Kunike, Vestn. Leningr. Univ. Fis. Khim., 16, 39 (1969); K.-A. Suominen and B. Garraway, Phys. Rev. A45, 374 (1992)

  16. Non-adiabatic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Jesse; Denissen, Nicholas; Reisner, Jon

    2016-11-01

    Onset of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a non-adiabatic environment is investigated with the multi-physics numerical model, FLAG. This work was inspired by laboratory experiments of non-adiabatic RTI, where a glass vessel with a layer of tetrahyrdofuran (THF) below a layer of toluene was placed inside a microwave. THF, a polar solvent, readily absorbs electromagnetic energy from microwaves. Toluene, a non-polar solvent, is nearly transparent to microwave heating. The presence of a heat source in the THF layer produced convection and a time-dependent Atwood number (At). The system, initially in stable hydrostatic equilibrium At < 0 , was set into motion by microwave induced, volumetric heating of the THF. The point when At > 0 , indicates that the system is RTI unstable. The observed dominant mode at the onset of RTI was the horizontal length scale of the vessel. This scale is contrary to classical RTI, where the modes start small and increases in scale with time. It is shown that the dominant RTI mode observed in the experiments was determined by the THF length scale prior to RTI. The dominant length scale transitions from the THF to the toluene via the updrafts and downdrafts in the convective cells. This happens when At passes from negative to positive. This work was funded by the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program.

  17. Field-effect modulation of the local density of optical states in a reflectarray metasurface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafaie Shirmanesh, Ghazaleh; Sokhoyan, Ruzan; Han, Seunghoon; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-09-01

    During recent years, advances in the design of arrays of subwavelength optical elements with special electromagnetic properties have enabled quasi two-dimensional structures that control and manipulate electromagnetic phase, amplitude and polarization. Active control of the response of metasurfaces is possible using transparent conducting oxides such as Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) as a tunable active material [1]. Changing the complex permittivity of ITO by applying a voltage yields modulation of reflected wave phase and amplitude. To achieve this, we designed subwavelength antenna arrays consisting of a gold back reflector and gold fishbone antennas. Planar dielectric layers containing a gate tunable layer of ITO are sandwiched between the back reflector and the antenna. The obtained structure shows resonance around 1.5 µm. As a result, based on the 1.54 µm photoluminescence emission of Er doped Al2O3 films, we embedded trivalent erbium ions as quantum emitters inside an alumina host within the metasurface in order to enhance the local density of optical states (LDOS). Simulations indicate the designed structure shows a significant LDOS enhancement (of order of hundreds). By applying a bias between the antenna and the ITO layer, across an HfO2 gate dielectric, we can control the permittivity of ITO and hence dynamically modulate the decay rate of quantum emitters embedded within the structure. In this way, we can achieve LDOS enhancement modulation of about 325%. 1. Y. W Huang, H. W. H. Lee, R. Sokhoyan, R. Pala, K. Thyagarajan, S. Han, D. P. Tsai, H. A. Atwater, "Gate-tunable conducting oxide metasurfaces". (arXiv:1511.09380).

  18. Correlating the Local Defect-Level Density with the Macroscopic Composition and Energetics of Chalcopyrite Thin-Film Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bröker, Sebastian; Kück, Dennis; Timmer, Alexander; Lauermann, Iver; Ümsür, Bünyamin; Greiner, Dieter; Kaufmann, Christian A; Mönig, Harry

    2015-06-17

    The unusual defect chemistry of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin films is a main issue for a profound understanding of recombination losses in chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells. Especially, impurity-driven passivation of electronic levels due to point defects segregating at the surface and at grain boundaries is extensively debated. By combining current imaging tunneling spectroscopy with photoelectron spectroscopy, the local defect-level density and unusual optoelectronic grain-boundary properties of this material are correlated with the macroscopic energy levels and surface composition. Vacuum annealing of different CIGSe materials provides evidence that Na diffusion from the glass substrate does not affect the surface defect passivation or grain-boundary properties of standard Cu-poor materials. Furthermore, we find no major impact on the observed thermally activated dipole compensation or the accompanying change in surface band bending (up to 0.6 eV) due to Na. In contrast, Cu-rich CIGSe shows an opposing surface defect chemistry with only minor heat-induced band bending. Our results lead to a comprehensive picture, where the highly desirable type inversion at the p/n interface in standard chalcopyrite thin-film solar cells is dominated by band bending within the CIGSe absorber rather than the result of Na impurities or an n-type defect phase segregating at the interface. This is in accordance with recent studies suggesting a surface reconstruction as the origin for Cu depletion and band-gap widening at the surface of chalcopyrite thin films.

  19. Adiabatic effects of electrons and ions on electro-acoustic solitary waves in an adiabatic dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanjia, Fatema; Mamun, A. A.

    2009-02-01

    A dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged cold dust, adiabatic hot ions, and inertia-less adiabatic hot electrons has been considered. The adiabatic effects of electrons and ions on the basic properties of electro-acoustic solitary waves associated with different types of electro-acoustic (viz. ion-acoustic (IA), dust ion-acoustic (DIA), and dust acoustic (DA)) waves are thoroughly investigated by the reductive perturbation method. It is found that the basic properties of the IA, DIA, and DA waves are significantly modified by the adiabatic effects of ions and inertia-less electrons. The implications of our results in space and laboratory dusty plasmas are briefly discussed.

  20. Adiabatic quantum state transfer in tight-binding chains using periodic driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.

    2014-09-01

    A method for high-fidelity coherent adiabatic transport in a zig-zag tight-binding chain, based on application of two external periodic driving fields, is theoretically proposed. The method turns out to be robust against imperfections and disorder of the static lattice Hamiltonian, is tolerant to next-nearest neighborhood interactions, and enables coherent transport in long chains without the need for a local control and timing of the trapping potential.

  1. Landscape and local effects on occupancy and densities of an endangered wood-warbler in an urbanizing landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reidy, Jennifer; Thompson III, Frank R.; Amundson, Courtney; O'Donnell, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Landscape composition and habitat structure were important determinants of warbler occupancy and density, and the large intact patches of juniper and mixed forest on BCP (>2100 ha) supported a high density of warblers. Increasing urbanization and fragmentation in the surrounding landscape will likely result in lower breeding density due to loss of juniper and mixed forest and increasing urban land cover and edge.

  2. Local density and group size interacts with age and sex to determine direction and rate of social dispersal in a polygynous mammal

    PubMed Central

    Marjamäki, Paula H; Contasti, Adrienne L; Coulson, Tim N; McLoughlin, Philip D

    2013-01-01

    Movement away from an area or social group in response to increasing density (density-dependent dispersal) is known for most species; why it evolves is fundamental to our understanding of ecology and evolution. However, we have yet to fully appreciate how individuals of varying conditions (e.g., age and sex) might differently consider effects of density (quorum) when deciding to disperse or not, and scale dependence in their sense of quorum. We tracked movements of all individuals of a naturalized population of feral horses (Equus ferus caballus; Sable Island National Park Reserve, Nova Scotia, Canada) during a period of rapid population growth (N increased from 375 to 484 horses from 2008 to 2010). Permanent dispersal from breeding groups (bands) was positively density dependent for all age and sex categories with respect to local density (horses/km2, bounded by the 99th percentile of individual movements [8000 m]), but was negatively and positively density dependent for males and females, respectively, in relation to group (band) size. Dispersal was generally female biased, with the exception of foals which moved with their mothers (no sex effect), and for yearlings and subadults when band sizes were smaller than average, in which case males dispersed at higher rates than females. Dispersal distance was positively related to local density. We conclude that dispersal rate can be both positively and negatively density dependent for feral horses, contingent on the state of individuals and the scale at which quorum with respect to choosing to disperse or not is assessed. Scale effects and interactions of density-dependent and sex- and age-biased dispersal may have both ecological and evolutionary consequences through effects on resource and mate competition. PMID:24101995

  3. Ab initio quasi-particle approximation bandgaps of silicon nanowires calculated at density functional theory/local density approximation computational effort

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, M.

    2015-06-21

    Ab initio calculations of hydrogen-passivated Si nanowires were performed using density functional theory within LDA-1/2, to account for the excited states properties. A range of diameters was calculated to draw conclusions about the ability of the method to correctly describe the main trends of bandgap, quantum confinement, and self-energy corrections versus the diameter of the nanowire. Bandgaps are predicted with excellent accuracy if compared with other theoretical results like GW, and with the experiment as well, but with a low computational cost.

  4. A Modified Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Evaluation of Boolean Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a modified construction of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for Boolean functions studied by M. Andrecut et al. [13, 14]. Our algorithm has the time complexity O(1) for the evaluation of Boolean functions, without additional computational cost of implementing the driving Hamiltonian, which is required by the adiabatic evolution described in [13, 14].

  5. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  6. The Adiabatic Invariance of the Action Variable in Classical Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Clive G.; Siklos, Stephen T. C.

    2007-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional classical time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with quasi-periodic orbits. It is well known that such systems possess an adiabatic invariant which coincides with the action variable of the Hamiltonian formalism. We present a new proof of the adiabatic invariance of this quantity and illustrate our arguments by means of…

  7. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  8. Diurnal evolution of the F region electron density local time gradient at low and middle latitudes resolved by the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Zhou, Yun-Liang; Lühr, Hermann; Ma, Shu-Ying

    2016-09-01

    In this study we have provided new insights into the local time gradient of F region electron density (ΔNe) derived from the lower pair of Swarm satellites flying side by side. Our result shows that the electron density (Ne) increase starts just at sunrise, around 06:00 LT, simultaneously at low and middle latitudes due to the increased photoionization. At equatorial latitudes the increase in electron density gets even steeper after 07:00 LT, and the steepest increase of electron density (about 3 · 1010 m-3 within 6 min) occurs around 09:00 LT. We suggest that the upward vertical plasma drift in connection with the buildup of the equatorial fountain effect plays a major role. We also found that the local time variations of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crest electron density during daytime are similar to the respective evolutions at the equator, but about 1-2 h delayed. We relate this delay to the response time between the equatorial electric field and the buildup of the plasma fountain. At equinox months a fast decrease of the F region electron density is seen at the EIA trough region during the prereversal enhancement, while an increase is found meanwhile at crest regions. Afterward, a fast decrease of the EIA crest electron density occurs between 19:00 and 23:00 LT, with seasonal dependence. The local time gradient between Swarm A and C shows also prominent longitudinal wave-4 pattern around August months, and the phase of DE3 in ΔNe is found to be delayed by 6 h compared to that in Ne.

  9. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  10. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  11. The HAWC and SAFIRE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; Behr, Jason; Kunes, Evan; Hait, Tom; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High-Resolution Airborne Wide-band Camera (HAWC) and Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) are far-infrared experiments which will fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. HAWC's detectors will operate at 0.2 Kelvin, while those of SAFIRE will be at 0.1 Kelvin. Each instrument will include an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to cool its detector stage from the liquid helium bath temperature (HAWC's at 4.2 Kelvin and SAFIRE's pumped to about 1.3 Kelvin) to its operating temperature. Except for the magnets used to achieve the cooling and a slight difference in the heat switch design, the two ADRs are nearly identical. We describe the ADR design and present the results of performance testing.

  12. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  13. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-02-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  14. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  15. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  16. Design of a spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, A. T.; Kunes, E.; Sansebastian, M.

    1992-01-01

    A spaceworthy adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) under development at NASA-Goddard is presented. A baseline model heat switch was tested extensively with an on/off ratio of about 10,000 and a parasitic heat leak of 10 micro-W. Data obtained from the breadboard models were used to design an ADR with improved structural integrity. The core of the ADR is the salt pill which consists of the paramagnetic salt crystal and the thermal bus. When a magnetic field is applied to the salt it forces the alignment of the magnetic moments, thereby decreasing the entropy of the salt. Preliminary tests results showed a net crystal mass of 680 g instead of the expected 740 g, which indicate that there are gaps in the salt pill. A partial fix was accomplished by sealing helium gas in the salt pill at a pressure of 2 bar, which improved the thermal contact during salt magnetization, at about 2 K.

  17. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  18. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; McCaskey, Alex; Bennink, Ryan S; Billings, Jay Jay; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Sullivan, Blair D; Klymko, Christine F; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  19. An integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, T. S.; McCaskey, A. J.; Bennink, R. S.; Billings, J. J.; DʼAzevedo, E. F.; Sullivan, B. D.; Klymko, C. F.; Seddiqi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for AQO called Jade Adiabatic Development Environment (JADE) that provides control over all the steps taken during program synthesis. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously specify the AQO algorithm while allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its potential use for benchmarking AQO programs by the quantum computer science community.

  20. Adiabatic theory, Liapunov exponents, and rotation number for quadratic Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, François; Foulon, Patrick

    1987-11-01

    We consider the adiabatic problem for general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonians and develop a method quite different from WKB. In particular, we apply our results to the Schrödinger equation in a strip. We show that there exists a first regular step (avoiding resonance problems) providing one adiabatic invariant, bounds on the Liapunov exponents, and estimates on the rotation number at any order of the perturbation theory. The further step is shown to be equivalent to a quantum adiabatic problem, which, by the usual adiabatic techniques, provides the other possible adiabatic invariants. In the special case of the Schrödinger equation our method is simpler and more powerful than the WKB techniques.

  1. Adiabatic vs. non-adiabatic determination of specific absorption rate of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natividad, Eva; Castro, Miguel; Mediano, Arturo

    2009-05-01

    The measurement of temperature variations in adiabatic conditions allows the determination of the specific absorption rate of magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids from the correct incremental expression, SAR=(1/ m MNP) C(Δ T/Δ t). However, when measurements take place in non-adiabatic conditions, one must approximate this expression by SAR≈ Cβ/ m MNP, where β is the initial slope of the temperature vs. time curve during alternating field application. The errors arising from the use of this approximation were estimated through several experiments with different isolating conditions, temperature sensors and sample-sensor contacts. It is concluded that small to appreciable errors can appear, which are difficult to infer or control.

  2. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  3. Temperature gradients due to adiabatic plasma expansion in a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Longmier, B. W.; Bering, E. A.; Olsen, C. S.; Squire, J. P.; Ballenger, M. G.; Carter, M. D.; Cassady, L. D.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Glover, T. W.; Ilin, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    A mechanism for ambipolar ion acceleration in a magnetic nozzle is proposed. The plasma is adiabatic (i.e., does not exchange energy with its surroundings) in the diverging section of a magnetic nozzle so any energy lost by the electrons must be transferred to the ions via the electric field. Fluid theory indicates that the change in plasma potential is proportional to the change in average electron energy. These predictions were compared to measurements in the VX-200 experiment which has conditions conducive to ambipolar ion acceleration. A planar Langmuir probe was used to measure the plasma potential, electron density, and electron temperature for a range of mass flow rates and power levels. Axial profiles of those parameters were also measured, showing consistency with the adiabatic ambipolar fluid theory.

  4. Slow-roll suppression of adiabatic instabilities in coupled scalar field-dark matter models

    SciTech Connect

    Corasaniti, Pier Stefano

    2008-10-15

    We study the evolution of linear density perturbations in the context of interacting scalar field-dark matter cosmologies, where the presence of the coupling acts as a stabilization mechanism for the runaway behavior of the scalar self-interaction potential as in the case of the chameleon model. We show that, in the 'adiabatic' background regime of the system, the rise of unstable growing modes of the perturbations is suppressed by the slow-roll dynamics of the field. Furthermore, the coupled system behaves as an inhomogeneous adiabatic fluid. In contrast, instabilities may develop for large values of the coupling constant, or along nonadiabatic solutions, characterized by a period of high-frequency dumped oscillations of the scalar field. In the latter case, the dynamical instabilities of the field fluctuations, which are typical of oscillatory scalar field regimes, are amplified and transmitted by the coupling to dark matter perturbations.

  5. Differences between MEG and high-density EEG source localizations using a distributed source model in comparison to fMRI.

    PubMed

    Klamer, Silke; Elshahabi, Adham; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Erb, Michael; Scheffler, Klaus; Focke, Niels K

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) are widely used to localize brain activity and their spatial resolutions have been compared in several publications. While most clinical studies demonstrated higher accuracy of MEG source localization, simulation studies suggested a more accurate EEG than MEG localization for the same number of channels. However, studies comparing real MEG and EEG data with equivalent number of channels are scarce. We investigated 14 right-handed healthy subjects performing a motor task in MEG, high-density-(hd-) EEG and fMRI as well as a somatosensory task in MEG and hd-EEG and compared source analysis results of the evoked brain activity between modalities with different head models. Using individual head models, hd-EEG localized significantly closer to the anatomical reference point obtained by fMRI than MEG. Source analysis results were least accurate for hd-EEG based on a standard head model. Further, hd-EEG and MEG localized more medially than fMRI. Localization accuracy of electric source imaging is dependent on the head model used with more accurate results obtained with individual head models. If this is taken into account, EEG localization can be more accurate than MEG localization for the same number of channels.

  6. Relative contributions of local and regional factors to species richness and total density of butterflies and moths in semi-natural grasslands.

    PubMed

    Pöyry, Juha; Paukkunen, Juho; Heliölä, Janne; Kuussaari, Mikko

    2009-06-01

    Metapopulation theory predicts that species richness and total population density of habitat specialists increase with increasing area and regional connectivity of the habitat. To test these predictions, we examined the relative contributions of habitat patch area, connectivity of the regional habitat network and local habitat quality to species richness and total density of butterflies and day-active moths inhabiting semi-natural grasslands. We studied butterflies and moths in 48 replicate landscapes situated in southwest Finland, including a focal patch and the surrounding network of other semi-natural grasslands within a radius of 1.5 km from the focal patch. By applying the method of hierarchical partitioning, which can distinguish between independent and joint contributions of individual explanatory variables, we observed that variables of the local habitat quality (e.g. mean vegetation height and nectar plant abundance) generally showed the highest independent effect on species richness and total density of butterflies and moths. Habitat area did not show a significant independent contribution to species richness and total density of butterflies and moths. The effect of habitat connectivity was observed only for total density of the declining butterflies and moths. These observations indicate that the local habitat quality is of foremost importance in explaining variation in species richness and total density of butterflies and moths. In addition, declining butterflies and moths have larger populations in well-connected networks of semi-natural grasslands. Our results suggest that, while it is crucial to maintain high-quality habitats by management, with limited resources it would be appropriate to concentrate grassland management and restoration to areas with well-connected grassland networks in which the declining species currently have their strongest populations.

  7. Calculation of Local Water Densities in Biological Systems — A Comparison of Molecular Dynamics Simulations and the 3D-RISM-KH Molecular Theory of Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Stumpe, Martin C.; Blinov, Nikolay; Wishart, David; Kovalenko, Andriy; Pande, Vijay S.

    2010-01-01

    Water plays a unique role in all living organisms. Not only is it nature’s ubiquitous solvent, but it also actively takes part in many cellular processes. In particular, the structure and properties of interfacial water near biomolecules like proteins are often related to the function of the respective molecule. It can therefore be highly instructive to study the local water density around solutes in cellular systems, particularly when solvent-mediated forces like the hydrophobic effect are relevant. Computational methods like molecular dynamics (MD) simulations seem well suited to study these systems at the atomic level. However, due to sampling requirements, it is not clear that MD simulations are indeed the method of choice to obtain converged densities at a given level of precision. We here compare the calculation of local water densities with two different methods, MD simulations and the three-dimensional reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure (3D-RISM-KH). In particular, we investigate the convergence of the local water density to assess the required simulation times for different levels of resolution. Moreover, we provide a quantitative comparison of the densities calculated with MD and with 3D-RISM-KH, and investigate the effect of the choice of the water model for both methods. Our results show that 3D-RISM-KH yields density distributions that are very similar to those from MD up to a 0.5 Å resolution, but for significantly reduced computational cost. The combined use of MD and 3D-RISM-KH emerges as an auspicious perspective for efficient solvent sampling in dynamical systems. PMID:21174421

  8. On what controls the spacing of spontaneous adiabatic shear bands in collapsing thick-walled cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovinger, Zev; Rosenberg, Zvi; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Shear bands formation in collapsing thick walled cylinders occurs in a spontaneous manner. The advantage of examining spontaneous, as opposed to forced shear localization, is that it highlights the inherent susceptibility of the material to adiabatic shear banding without prescribed geometrical constraints. The Thick-Walled Cylinder technique (TWC) provides a controllable and repeatable technique to create and study multiple adiabatic shear bands. The technique, reported in the literature uses an explosive cylinder to create the driving force, collapsing the cylindrical sample. Recently, we developed an electro-magnetic set-up using a pulsed current generator to provide the collapsing force, replacing the use of explosives. Using this platform we examined the shear band evolution at different stages of formation in 7 metallic alloys, spanning a wide range of strength and failure properties. We examined the number of shear bands and spacing between them for the different materials to try and figure out what controls these parameters. The examination of the different materials enabled us to better comprehend the mechanisms which control the spatial distribution of multiple shear bands in this geometry. The results of these tests are discussed and compared to explosively driven collapsing TWC results in the literature and to existing analytical models for spontaneous adiabatic shear localization.

  9. High temperature and dynamic testing of AHSS for an analytical description of the adiabatic cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, S.; Schmitz, F.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    In the automotive industry, advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are widely used as sheet part components to reduce weight, even though this leads to several challenges. The demand for high-quality shear cutting surfaces that do not require reworking can be fulfilled by adiabatic shear cutting: High strain rates and local temperatures lead to the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASB). While this process is well suited to produce AHSS parts with excellent cutting surface quality, a fundamental understanding of the process is still missing today. In this study, compression tests in a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar with an initial strain rate of 1000 s-1 were performed in a temperature range between 200 °C and 1000 °C. The experimental results show that high strength steels with nearly the same mechanical properties at RT may possess a considerably different behavior at higher temperatures. The resulting microstructures after testing at different temperatures were analyzed by optical microscopy. The thermo-mechanical material behavior was then considered in an analytical model. To predict the local temperature increase that occurs during the adiabatic blanking process, experimentally determined flow curves were used. Furthermore, the influence of temperature evolution with respect to phase transformation is discussed. This study contributes to a more complete understanding of the relevant microstructural and thermo-mechanical mechanisms leading to the evolution of ASB during cutting of AHSS.

  10. On the use of Abelian point group symmetry in density-fitted local MP2 using various types of virtual orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Köppl, Christoph; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-28

    Electron correlation methods based on symmetry-adapted canonical Hartree-Fock orbitals can be speeded up significantly in the well known group theoretical manner, using the fact that integrals vanish unless the integrand is totally symmetric. In contrast to this, local electron correlation methods cannot benefit from such simplifications, since the localized molecular orbitals (LMOs) generally do not transform according to irreducible representations of the underlying point group symmetry. Instead, groups of LMOs become symmetry-equivalent and this can be exploited to accelerate local calculations. We describe an implementation of such a symmetry treatment for density-fitted local Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, using various types of virtual orbitals: Projected atomic orbitals, orbital specific virtuals, and pair natural orbitals. The savings by the symmetry treatment are demonstrated by calculations for several large molecules having different point group symmetries. Benchmarks for the parallel execution efficiency of our method are also presented.

  11. A quantum-walk-inspired adiabatic algorithm for solving graph isomorphism problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamascelli, Dario; Zanetti, Luca

    2014-08-01

    We present a quantum algorithm for solving graph isomorphism problems that is based on an adiabatic protocol. We use a collection of continuous time quantum walks, each one generated by an XY Hamiltonian, to visit the configuration space. In this way we avoid a diffusion over all the possible configurations and significantly reduce the dimensionality of the accessible Hilbert space. Within this restricted space, the graph isomorphism problem can be translated into searching for a satisfying assignment to a 2-SAT (satisfiable) formula and mapped onto a 2-local Hamiltonian without resorting to perturbation gadgets or projective techniques. We present an analysis of the time for execution of the algorithm on small graph isomorphism problem instances and discuss the issue of an implementation of the proposed adiabatic scheme on current quantum computing hardware.

  12. Universal adiabatic quantum computation via the space-time circuit-to-Hamiltonian construction.

    PubMed

    Gosset, David; Terhal, Barbara M; Vershynina, Anna

    2015-04-10

    We show how to perform universal adiabatic quantum computation using a Hamiltonian which describes a set of particles with local interactions on a two-dimensional grid. A single parameter in the Hamiltonian is adiabatically changed as a function of time to simulate the quantum circuit. We bound the eigenvalue gap above the unique ground state by mapping our model onto the ferromagnetic XXZ chain with kink boundary conditions; the gap of this spin chain was computed exactly by Koma and Nachtergaele using its q-deformed version of SU(2) symmetry. We also discuss a related time-independent Hamiltonian which was shown by Janzing to be capable of universal computation. We observe that in the limit of large system size, the time evolution is equivalent to the exactly solvable quantum walk on Young's lattice.

  13. On the General Class of Models of Adiabatic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Liu, Fang

    2016-10-01

    The general class of models of adiabatic evolution was proposed to speed up the usual adiabatic computation in the case of quantum search problem. It was shown [8] that, by temporarily increasing the ground state energy of a time-dependent Hamiltonian to a suitable quantity, the quantum computation can perform the calculation in time complexity O(1). But it is also known that if the overlap between the initial and final states of the system is zero, then the computation based on the generalized models of adiabatic evolution can break down completely. In this paper, we find another severe limitation for this class of adiabatic evolution-based algorithms, which should be taken into account in applications. That is, it is still possible that this kind of evolution designed to deal with the quantum search problem fails completely if the interpolating paths in the system Hamiltonian are chosen inappropriately, while the usual adiabatic evolutions can do the same job relatively effectively. This implies that it is not always recommendable to use nonlinear paths in adiabatic computation. On the contrary, the usual simple adiabatic evolution may be sufficient for effective use.

  14. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  15. Pure spin current induced by adiabatic quantum pumping in zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Souma, Satofumi Ogawa, Matsuto

    2014-05-05

    We show theoretically that pure spin current can be generated in zigzag edged graphene nanoribbons through the adiabatic pumping by edge selective pumping potentials. The origin of such pure spin current is the spin splitting of the edge localized states, which are oppositely spin polarized at opposite edges. In the proposed device, each edge of the ribbon is covered by two independent time-periodic local gate potentials with a definite phase difference, inducing the edge spin polarized current. When the pumping phase difference is opposite in sign between two edges, the total charge currents is zero and the pure edge spin current is generated.

  16. Thermodynamic and spectral properties of adiabatic Peierls chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manuel; Assaad, Fakher F.; Hohenadler, Martin

    2016-10-01

    We present exact numerical results for the effects of thermal fluctuations on the experimentally relevant thermodynamic and spectral properties of Peierls chains. To this end, a combination of classical Monte Carlo sampling and exact diagonalization is used to study adiabatic half-filled Holstein and Su-Schrieffer-Heeger models. The classical nature of the lattice displacements in combination with parallel tempering permit simulations on large system sizes and a direct calculation of spectral functions in the frequency domain. Most notably, the long-range order and the associated Peierls gap give rise to a distinct low-temperature peak in the specific heat. The closing of the gap and suppression of order by thermal fluctuations involves in-gap excitations in the form of soliton-antisoliton pairs and is also reflected in the dynamic density and bond structure factors as well as in the optical conductivity. We compare our data to the widely used mean-field approximation and highlight relations to symmetry-protected topological phases and disorder problems.

  17. Salt licks do not increase local densities of the deer ked, Lipoptena cervi, an abundant ectoparasite of cervids.

    PubMed

    Paakkonen, T; Nieminen, P; Roininen, H; Mustonen, A-M

    2014-09-01

    The deer ked, Lipoptena cervi (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), is a common ectoparasite of the moose, Alces alces (Artiodactyla: Cervidae). Salt licks are widely used to manipulate moose movements to prevent damage to saplings and traffic accidents. They may cause moose to gather in small areas, which could create aggregates of deer ked pupae as the parasite is a short-distance flyer and its dispersion depends on its hosts. We investigated whether the population density of flying deer keds could be influenced by manipulating salt licks and how environmental variables affect parasite density. Densities were estimated in 40 experimental sites with four treatments (no salt licks, introduced salt licks, removed salt licks, permanent salt licks) in September during 2007-2010. Forest edges, mixed forests on mineral soil and coniferous forests on peat soil were the habitats with high numbers of parasites. The manipulation of salt licks seemed to be ineffective in reducing the density of deer keds as the only factor to show statistical significance with parasite numbers in the mixed-model analysis was year of determination. Annual deer ked densities correlated with the abundance of moose in the region. Moreover, high spring and summer temperatures seemed to increase the numbers of flying imagos.

  18. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  19. A harmonic adiabatic approximation to calculate highly excited vibrational levels of ``floppy molecules''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvergnat, David; Nauts, André; Justum, Yves; Chapuisat, Xavier

    2001-04-01

    The harmonic adiabatic approximation (HADA), an efficient and accurate quantum method to calculate highly excited vibrational levels of molecular systems, is presented. It is well-suited to applications to "floppy molecules" with a rather large number of atoms (N>3). A clever choice of internal coordinates naturally suggests their separation into active, slow, or large amplitude coordinates q', and inactive, fast, or small amplitude coordinates q″, which leads to an adiabatic (or Born-Oppenheimer-type) approximation (ADA), i.e., the total wave function is expressed as a product of active and inactive total wave functions. However, within the framework of the ADA, potential energy data concerning the inactive coordinates q″ are required. To reduce this need, a minimum energy domain (MED) is defined by minimizing the potential energy surface (PES) for each value of the active variables q', and a quadratic or harmonic expansion of the PES, based on the MED, is used (MED harmonic potential). In other words, the overall picture is that of a harmonic valley about the MED. In the case of only one active variable, we have a minimum energy path (MEP) and a MEP harmonic potential. The combination of the MED harmonic potential and the adiabatic approximation (harmonic adiabatic approximation: HADA) greatly reduces the size of the numerical computations, so that rather large molecules can be studied. In the present article however, the HADA is applied to our benchmark molecule HCN/CNH, to test the validity of the method. Thus, the HADA vibrational energy levels are compared and are in excellent agreement with the ADA calculations (adiabatic approximation with the full PES) of Light and Bačić [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 4008 (1987)]. Furthermore, the exact harmonic results (exact calculations without the adiabatic approximation but with the MEP harmonic potential) are compared to the exact calculations (without any sort of approximation). In addition, we compare the densities of

  20. Charge transport calculations by a wave-packet dynamical approach using maximally localized Wannier functions based on density functional theory: Application to high-mobility organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    We present a wave-packet dynamical approach to charge transport using maximally localized Wannier functions based on density functional theory including van der Waals interactions. We apply it to the transport properties of pentacene and rubrene single crystals and show the temperature-dependent natures from bandlike to thermally activated behaviors as a function of the magnitude of external static disorder. We compare the results with those obtained by the conventional band and hopping models and experiments.

  1. Using van Hove singularities of the two-phonon density of states to investigate the intrinsically localized vibrations of NaI crystal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agyare, Benjamin; Riseborough, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically Localized Modes (ILMs) have purportedly been observed in NaI but only for wave-vectors, q at the corner of the 3-D Brillouin Zone. It has been suggested that, for high-symmetry q vectors, several van Hove singularities may converge at one frequency producing a large peak in the two-phonon density of state and giving rise to ILMs with these q values. We fit the experimentally determined acoustic and the optic phonon modes using a nearest neighbor and a next-nearest neighbor force constant. We find that the two-phonon density of states, for fixed q exhibits non-divergent van Hove singularities. The frequencies of these features are found to vary as q is varied. We intend to search for q values at which the two-phonon density of states is enhanced and then examine whether the anharmonic interactions can bind the two-phonon excitations to produce a quantized ILM.

  2. Characterization of the local density-of-states fluctuations near the integer quantum Hall transition in a quantum-dot array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jug, Giancarlo; Ziegler, Klaus

    1997-10-01

    We present a calculation for the second moment of the local density of states in a model of a two-dimensional quantum dot array near the quantum Hall transition. The quantum dot array model is a realistic adaptation of the lattice model for the quantum Hall transition in the two-dimensional electron gas in an external magnetic field proposed by Ludwig, Fisher, Shankar, and Grinstein. We make use of a Dirac fermion representation for the Green's functions in the presence of fluctuations for the quantum dot energy levels. A saddle-point approximation yields nonperturbative results for the first and second moments of the local density of states, showing interesting fluctuation behavior near the quantum Hall transition. To our knowledge we discuss here one of the first analytic characterizations of chaotic behavior for a two-dimensional mesoscopic structure. The connection with possible experimental investigations of the local density of states in the quantum dot array structures (by means of NMR Knight-shift or single-electron-tunneling techniques) and our work is also established.

  3. Quantum adiabatic optimization and combinatorial landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution algorithm on a variant of the satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, γ=M/N . We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (instead of only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold γ=γd starting with some value of K —the number of variables in each clause. Beyond the dynamic threshold, the algorithm should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz. We have been able to map the ensemble of random graphs onto another ensemble with fluctuations significantly reduced. This enabled us to obtain tight upper bounds on the satisfiability transition and to recompute the dynamical transition using the extended set of landscapes.

  4. Design of the PIXIE adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark O.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael J.

    2012-04-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a telescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: (1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and (2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 mW, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 mW. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 μW. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  5. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    PubMed

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-08

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  6. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  7. On the persistence of adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakye-Yiadom, S.; Bassim, M. N.; Al-Ameeri, S.

    2012-08-01

    It is generally agreed that the initiation and development of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) are manifestations of damage in metallic materials subjected to high strain rates and large strains as those due to impact in a Hopkinson Bar system. Models for evolution of these bands have been described in the literature. One question that has not received attention is how persistent these bands are and whether their presence and effect can be reversed or eliminated by using a process of thermal (heat treatment) or thermo-mechanical treatment that would relieve the material from the high strain associated with ASBs and their role as precursors to crack initiation and subsequent failure. Since ASBs are more prevalent and more defined in BCC metals including steels, a study was conducted to investigate the best conditions of generating ASBs in a heat treatable steel, followed by determining the best conditions for heat treatment of specimens already damaged by the presence of ASBs in order to relieve the strains due to ASBs and restore the material to an apparent microstructure without the "scars" due to the previous presence of ASBs. It was found that heat treatment achieves the curing from ASBs. This presentation documents the process undertaken to achieve this objective.

  8. Adiabatic Spin Pumping with Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciolo, Eduardo R.

    Electronic transport in mesoscopic systems has been intensively studied for more the last three decades. While there is a substantial understanding of the stationary regime, much less is know about phase-coherent nonequilibrium transport when pulses or ac perturbations are used to drive electrons at low temperatures and at small length scales. However, about 20 years ago Thouless proposed to drive nondissipative currents in quantum systems by applying simultaneously two phase-locked external perturbations. The so-called adiabatic pumping mechanism has been revived in the last few years, both theoretically and experimentally, in part because of the development of lateral semiconductor quantum dots. Here we will explain how open dots can be used to create spin-polarized currents with little or no net charge transfer. The pure spin pump we propose is the analog of a charge battery in conventional electronics and may provide a needed circuit element for spin-based electronics. We will also discuss other relevant issues such as rectification and decoherence and point out possible extensions of the mechanism to closed dots.

  9. Serial Scanning and Registration of High Resolution Quantitative Computed Tomography Volume Scans for the Determination of Local Bone Density Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert T.; Napel, Sandy; Yan, Chye H.

    1996-01-01

    Progress in development of the methods required to study bone remodeling as a function of time is reported. The following topics are presented: 'A New Methodology for Registration Accuracy Evaluation', 'Registration of Serial Skeletal Images for Accurately Measuring Changes in Bone Density', and 'Precise and Accurate Gold Standard for Multimodality and Serial Registration Method Evaluations.'

  10. ELUCID - Exploring the Local Universe with ReConstructed Initial Density Field III: Constrained Simulation in the SDSS Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Yang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Youcai; Shi, JingJing; Jing, Y. P.; Liu, Chengze; Li, Shijie; Kang, Xi; Gao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    A method we developed recently for the reconstruction of the initial density field in the nearby universe is applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. A high-resolution N-body constrained simulation (CS) of the reconstructed initial conditions, with 30723 particles evolved in a 500 {h}-1 {Mpc} box, is carried out and analyzed in terms of the statistical properties of the final density field and its relation with the distribution of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. We find that the statistical properties of the cosmic web and the halo populations are accurately reproduced in the CS. The galaxy density field is strongly correlated with the CS density field, with a bias that depends on both galaxy luminosity and color. Our further investigations show that the CS provides robust quantities describing the environments within which the observed galaxies and galaxy systems reside. Cosmic variance is greatly reduced in the CS so that the statistical uncertainties can be controlled effectively, even for samples of small volumes.

  11. MARSIS remote sounding of localized density structures in the dayside Martian ionosphere: A study of controlling parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diéval, C.; Andrews, D. J.; Morgan, D. D.; Brain, D. A.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    Enhanced topside electron densities in the dayside Martian ionosphere have been repetitively observed in areas of near-radial crustal magnetic fields, for periods of tens of days, indicating their long-term spatial and temporal stability despite changing solar wind conditions. We perform a statistical study of these density structures using the ionospheric mode of the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) onboard Mars Express. We estimate the apparent extents of these structures relative to the altitude of the surrounding ionosphere. The apex of the density structures often lies higher than the surrounding ionosphere (median vertical extent of 18 km), which indicates upwellings. These structures are much wider than they are high, with latitudinal scales of several degrees. The radar reflector regions are observed above both moderate and strong magnetic anomalies, and their precise locations and latitudinal extents match quite well with the locations and latitudinal extents of magnetic structures of given magnetic polarity (oblique to vertical fields), which happen to be regions where the field lines are open part of the time. The majority of the density structures occur in regions where ionospheric plasma is dominant, indicating closed field regions shielded from shocked solar wind plasma.

  12. Ion thermal effects on slow mode solitary waves in plasmas with two adiabatic ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Nsengiyumva, F. Hellberg, M. A. Mace, R. L.

    2015-09-15

    Using both the Sagdeev and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) methods, ion thermal effects on slow mode ion acoustic solitons and double layers are investigated in a plasma with two adiabatic positive ion species. It is found that reducing the gap between the two ion thermal speeds by increasing the relative temperature of the cool ions increases the typical soliton/double layer speeds for all values of the ion-ion density ratio and reduces the range in the density ratio that supports double layers. The effect of increasing the relative cool ion temperature on the soliton/double layer amplitudes depends on the relative densities. For lower values of the ion density ratio, an increase in cool ion temperature leads to a significant decrease in soliton/double layer amplitude, so one may find that solitons of all permissible speeds lie within the range of KdV theory.

  13. Latitudinal variation of the specific local time of postmidnight enhancement peaks in F layer electron density at low latitudes: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Deng, Chi; Yang, Guobin; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Peng; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Zhou, Chen; Wu, Xiongbin; Zhang, Yuannong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Komolmis, Tharadol; Supnithi, Pornchai; Yatini, Clara Y.

    2016-04-01

    Ionospheric nighttime enhancements are manifested in an increase of the electron density at nighttime. This paper studies the latitudinal variation of the specific local time of postmidnight enhancement peaks using ionosondes distributed at low latitudes. To obtain the parameters of the ionosphere, we manually extracted ionograms recorded by ionosondes. Cases show that there are significant latitudinal variations in the observed local time of the postmidnight enhancement peaks. Results show that the lower the geomagnetic latitude, the earlier the enhancement peak occurred in the geomagnetic northern hemisphere. Additionally, the enhancement peaks occurred earlier in the geomagnetic southern hemisphere than that in the geomagnetic northern hemisphere for these present cases. We suggest that the combined effect of the geomagnetic inclination and transequatorial meridional wind might be the main driving force for latitudinal variation of the local time of the occurrence.

  14. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Shumpei; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-10-15

    We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.

  15. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  16. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Chris; Saffin, Paul M. E-mail: Paul.Saffin@nottingham.ac.uk

    2013-08-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit.

  17. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  18. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for non-Hermitian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, S.; Martinez-Garaot, S.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Chen Xi

    2011-08-15

    Adiabatic processes driven by non-Hermitian, time-dependent Hamiltonians may be sped up by generalizing inverse engineering techniques based on counter-diabatic (transitionless driving) algorithms or on dynamical invariants. We work out the basic theory and examples described by two-level Hamiltonians: the acceleration of rapid adiabatic passage with a decaying excited level and of the dynamics of a classical particle on an expanding harmonic oscillator.

  19. Nonadiabatic transitions in finite-time adiabatic rapid passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T.; Miao, X.; Metcalf, H.

    2007-06-01

    To apply the adiabatic rapid passage process repetitively [T. Lu, X. Miao, and H. Metcalf, Phys. Rev. A 71, 061405(R) (2005)], the nonadiabatic transition probability of a two-level atom subject to chirped light pulses over a finite period of time needs to be calculated. Using a unitary first-order perturbation method in the rotating adiabatic frame, an approximate formula has been derived for such transition probabilities in the entire parameter space of the pulses.

  20. ENTROPY-VORTEX WAVES IN NON-ADIABATIC FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Ibáñez S, Miguel H.

    2016-02-20

    The Ertel theorem on the vorticity along the flow of adiabatic fluids is generalized for non-adiabatic flows. Several limiting cases are analyzed and the results are applied to flows behind different hydrodynamics fronts, particularly to thermal fronts (heat and cooling fronts). An important conclusion of the present analysis is that vorticity is inherent in the condensation’s (or hot spots) formation by thermal instabilities in plasma flows. Implications for several astrophysical plasmas are outlined.

  1. Vacuum vessel eddy current modeling for TFTR adiabatic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    DeLucia, J.; Bell, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1985-07-01

    A relatively simple current filament model of the TFTR vacuum vessel is described. It is used to estimate the three-dimensional structure of magnetic field perturbations in the vicinity of the plasma that arise from vacuum vessel eddy currents induced during adiabatic compression. Eddy currents are calculated self-consistently with the plasma motion. The Shafranov formula and adiabatic scaling laws are used to model the plasma. Although the specific application is to TFTR, the present model is of generation applicability.

  2. Atomic-scale observation of a graded polar discontinuity and a localized two-dimensional electron density at an insulating oxide interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-P.; Lin, J. G.; Jeng, H. T.; Cheng, S.-L.; Pong, W. F.; Shao, Y. C.; Chin, Y. Y.; Lin, H.-J.; Chen, C. W.; Yang, J.-R.; Chen, C. H.; Chu, M.-W.

    2013-02-01

    Using atomically resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy, the atomic-plane-by-atomic-plane, unit-cell-by-unit-cell stoichiometry, and charge characteristics of the oxide interface (Nd0.35Sr0.65)MnO3/SrTiO3, with a primitive polar discontinuity of (Nd0.35Sr0.65O)0.35+-(TiO2)0, were thoroughly investigated. (Nd0.35Sr0.65)MnO3 is a strongly correlated insulator and the interface was characterized to be insulating. The cell-specific stoichiometric evaluation unveiled an extensive interdiffusion across the interface. The plane-specific charge characterization revealed that the interdiffusion grades the primitive polar discontinuity. Despite the graded polar discontinuity, a charge transfer inversely into (Nd0.35Sr0.65)MnO3 was firmly resolved with a length scale of ˜2 nm and a charge density on the order of ˜1013/cm2 and is effectively mediated by an asymmetric Ti interdiffusion. The intricate electronic correlations of the interfacial (Nd0.35Sr0.65)MnO3 unit cells and the interdiffusion-induced chemical disorder tend to render the charges localized, resulting in a localized two-dimensional electron density and thus the insulating interface, in distinct contrast to the conventional understanding of a vanishing charge density for an insulating interface and the metallic two-dimensional electron gas found at other classical polar-discontinuous interface systems. A potential strain manipulation on the electronic localization of the electron density was also proposed.

  3. Derivation of the Fano profile from time-dependent density-functional theory for local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokawa, Shuji

    2007-04-01

    We give the derivation of the Fano profile (the resonance energy position, the resonance width Γ , and q value) from the time-dependent nonrelativistic density-functional theory (DFT) and propose a scheme for calculating the photoabsorption cross section of hot dense plasmas. As a consequence of this derivation, we show the line profile is obtained as a superposition of Fano and Lorentz profiles when the competition of two optically allowed bound-bound and bound-free transitions occurs. We also show the results of the photoabsorption cross section by applying our scheme to an Fe plasma (density is 7.85g/cm3 , temperature is 100eV ), where the calculation is carried out without numerical divergence for any photon energy. The calculated results are in good agreement with those of Grimaldi.

  4. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  5. Local variations in bone mineral density: a comparison of OCT versus x-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Stevens-Smith, Jenna; Scutt, Andrew; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2008-02-01

    We describe variations in the degree of mineralisation within the subchondral bone plate of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. A comparison of Optical Coherence Tomography, Micro CT, and SEM techniques was performed. These data are compared between sites on a healthy sample and at points on an osteoarthritically degenerated sample. No significant correlation was found between the optical scattering coefficient and the micro-CT derived BMD for comparisons between different sites on the bone surface. Also OCT demonstrated a larger regional variation in scattering coefficient than did micro CT for bone mineral density. This suggests that the optical scattering coefficient of bone is not related solely to the volume-density of calcium-phosphate. Patches of lower optical scattering coefficient were found in the bone structure that was related to the osteoarthritic lesion area on the overlying cartilage. Areas of microcracking, as revealed by both SEM and micro CT produced distinctive granularity in the OCT images. In further experiments, OCT was compared with micro CT and mechanical strength testing (3-point bending) in a small animal model of cardiovascular disease (cholesterol overload in mice). In the cardiovascular diseased mice, micro-CT of the trabecular bone did not demonstrate a significant change in trabecular bone mineral density before and after administration of the high cholesterol diet. However mechanical testing demonstrated a decrease in mechanical strength and OCT demonstrated a corresponding statistically significant decrease in optical scattering of the bone.

  6. Michel accretion of a polytropic fluid with adiabatic index \\gamma \\gt 5/3: global flows versus homoclinic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverra, Eliana; Mach, Patryk; Sarbach, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of a polytropic fluid that is radially accreted into a Schwarzschild black hole. The case where the adiabatic index γ lies in the range of 1\\lt γ ≤slant 5/3 has been treated in previous work. In this article, we analyze the complementary range of 5/3\\lt γ ≤slant 2. To this purpose, the problem is cast into an appropriate Hamiltonian dynamical system, whose phase flow is analyzed. While, for 1\\lt γ ≤slant 5/3, the solutions are always characterized by the presence of a unique critical saddle point, we show that, when 5/3\\lt γ ≤slant 2, an additional critical point might appear, which is a center point. For the parametrization used in this paper, we prove that, whenever this additional critical point appears, there is a homoclinic orbit. Solutions corresponding to homoclinic orbits differ from standard transonic solutions with vanishing asymptotic velocities in two aspects: they are local (i.e., they cannot be continued to arbitrarily large radii); the dependence of the density or the value of the velocity on the radius is not monotonic.

  7. Calculation of the local density of states for a discrete pyramidal model of a diamond tip surmounted by a single atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskovsky, N. M.; Cutler, P. H.

    1999-09-01

    In a series of recent experiments, diamond cold cathodes have yielded high current at low power (μA to mA at about 10 V). These results, coupled with the extraordinary physical and electronic properties of this wide bandgap material ( Eg≈5.5 eV) make diamond cold cathodes promising candidates for use in flat panel displays, high frequency devices, sensors and other vacuum microelectronics applications. The experimental work on these cathodes has concentrated on thin film composites and needle geometries. It has been proposed that the emission originates from localized asperities (or crystallites) on the film (which can be of nanometer, or even atomic, size) or from very sharp tips approaching atomic size in the case of needle geometry. A quantity important in determining the origin of the tunneling electron states is the local density of states function. In the present work we have calculated the local density of states (LDOS) at an atomically sharp diamond asperity (or tip) using a tight binding model. A pyramidal shaped cluster of 159 atoms is constructed to model the tip. The forces are calculated and used to optimize the atomic geometry of the top six layers of atoms. The bottom layers are fixed to simulate the bulk diamond. The broken symmetry of the pyramidal tip gives rise to unique features in the LDOS compared to the slab or flat-surface geometry. In the tip geometry, there are unoccupied states just above the topmost occupied energy states which gives rise to a more 'metallic' like behavior in the presence of an applied electric field. Since the tunneling characteristics depend strongly on the local density of states at the 'surface', it is expected (without even considering field enhancement effects) that the field electron energy distribution from these tips will be significantly different from so called flat or 'blunt' field emitters.

  8. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, B. D.; Thijssen, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green’s function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  9. Adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge pumping in a single-level molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Napitu, B D; Thijssen, J M

    2015-07-15

    We propose a design for realizing quantum charge pump based on a recent proposal for a molecular motor (Seldenthuis J S et al 2010 ACS Nano 4 6681). Our design is based on the presence of a moiety with a permanent dipole moment which can rotate, thereby modulating the couplings to metallic contacts at both ends of the molecule. Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function formalism (NEGF), we show that our design indeed generates a pump current. In the non-interacting pump, the variation of frequency from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime, can be used to control the direction as well as the amplitude of the average current. The effect of Coulomb interaction is considered within the first- and the second- order perturbation. The numerical implementation of the scheme is quite demanding, and we develop an analytical approximation to obtain a speed-up giving results within a reasonable time. We find that the amplitude of the average pumped current can be controlled by both the driving frequency and the Coulomb interaction. The direction of of pumped current is shown to be determined by the phase difference between left and right anchoring groups.

  10. Adiabatic fission barriers in superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachimowicz, P.; Kowal, M.; Skalski, J.

    2017-01-01

    Using the microscopic-macroscopic model based on the deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential and the Yukawa-plus-exponential macroscopic energy, we calculated static fission barriers Bf for 1305 heavy and superheavy nuclei 98 ≤Z ≤126 , including even-even, odd-even, even-odd and odd-odd systems. For odd and odd-odd nuclei, adiabatic potential-energy surfaces were calculated by a minimization over configurations with one blocked neutron or/and proton on a level from the 10th below to the 10th above the Fermi level. The parameters of the model that have been fixed previously by a fit to masses of even-even heavy nuclei were kept unchanged. A search for saddle points has been performed by the "imaginary water flow" method on a basic five-dimensional deformation grid, including triaxiality. Two auxiliary grids were used for checking the effects of the mass asymmetry and hexadecapole nonaxiality. The ground states (g.s.) were found by energy minimization over configurations and deformations. We find that the nonaxiality significantly changes first and second fission saddle in many nuclei. The effect of the mass asymmetry, known to lower the second, very deformed saddles in actinides, in the heaviest nuclei appears at the less deformed saddles in more than 100 nuclei. It happens for those saddles in which the triaxiality does not play any role, which suggests a decoupling between effects of the mass asymmetry and triaxiality. We studied also the influence of the pairing interaction strength on the staggering of Bf for odd- and even-particle numbers. Finally, we provide a comparison of our results with other theoretical fission barrier evaluations and with available experimental estimates.

  11. Adiabatic formation of a matched-beam distribution for an alternating-gradient quadrupole lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.; Qin Hong

    2009-12-15

    The formation of a quasiequilibrium beam distribution matched to an alternating-gradient quadrupole focusing lattice by means of the adiabatic turn-on of the oscillating focusing field is studied numerically using particle-in-cell simulations. Quiescent beam propagation over several hundred lattice periods is demonstrated for a broad range of beam intensities and vacuum phase advances describing the strength of the oscillating focusing field. Properties of the matched-beam distribution are investigated. In particular, self-similar evolution of the beam density profile is observed over a wide range of system parameters. The numerical simulations are performed using the WARP particle-in-cell code.

  12. Adiabatic Formation of a Matched-beam Distribution for an Alternating-gradient Quadrupole Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.; Qin, Hong

    2010-02-02

    The formation of a quasiequilibrium beam distribution matched to an alternating-gradient quadrupole focusing lattice by means of the adiabatic turn-on of the oscillating focusing field is studied numerically using particle-in-cell simulations. Quiescent beam propagation over several hundred lattice periods is demonstrated for a broad range of beam intensities and vacuum phase advances describing the strength of the oscillating focusing field. Properties of the matched-beam distribution are investigated. In particular, self-similar evolution of the beam density profile is observed over a wide range of system parameters. The numerical simulations are performed using the WARP particle-in-cell code.

  13. Local states in one-dimensional CDW (charge density wave) materials: Spectral signatures for polarons and bipolarons in MX chains

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B. I.; Donohoe, R. J.; Worl, L. A.; Bulou, A. D.F.; Arrington, C. A.; Gammel, J. T.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    We have undertaken a combined theoretical and experimental effort directed toward the examination of both the ground and defect states in halide-bridged mixed-valence metal linear chains materials as they are tuned within and between broken symmetry phases. Novel low-dimensional highly correlated electronic materials offer a difficult theoretical challenge as we must span from a description of electronic structure on a molecular scale to the meso scale structure that is intrinsic to these solids. Our theoretical effort at Los Alamos combines quantum chemistry, band structure calculations, and many body modeling using Peierls-Hubbard Hamiltonians in order to model ground and local states. The experimental effort combines synthesis and a variety of microscopic structural and spectroscopic probes and macroscopic measurements in an effort to fully characterize both ground and local states as these materials are tuned in the phase boundary regions between broken symmetry states. The present article summarizes some of our recent research using optical spectroscopy to obtain signatures of photoexcited and intrinsic local states and compares these experimental results with Peierls-Hubbard calculations of the optical properties of these materials. Details concerning the theoretical and experimental approaches can be found elsewhere.

  14. NMR shielding tensors for density fitted local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory using gauge including atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Loibl, Stefan; Schütz, Martin

    2012-08-28

    An efficient method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors is presented, which treats electron correlation at the level of second-order Mo̸ller-Plesset perturbation theory. It uses spatially localized functions to span occupied and virtual molecular orbital spaces, respectively, which are expanded in a basis of gauge including atomic orbitals (GIAOs or London atomic orbitals). Doubly excited determinants are restricted to local subsets of the virtual space and pair energies with an interorbital distance beyond a certain threshold are omitted. Furthermore, density fitting is employed to factorize the electron repulsion integrals. Ordinary Gaussians are employed as fitting functions. It is shown that the errors in the resulting NMR shielding constant, introduced (i) by the local approximation and (ii) by density fitting, are very small or even negligible. The capabilities of the new program are demonstrated by calculations on some extended molecular systems, such as the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolesion with adjacent nucleobases in the native intrahelical DNA double strand (ATTA sequence). Systems of that size were not accessible to correlated ab initio calculations of NMR spectra before. The presented method thus opens the door to new and interesting applications in this area.

  15. Positive Feedback Loops for Factor V and Factor VII Activation Supply Sensitivity to Local Surface Tissue Factor Density During Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Balandina, A.N.; Shibeko, A.M.; Kireev, D.A.; Novikova, A.A.; Shmirev, I.I.; Panteleev, M.A.; Ataullakhanov, F.I.

    2011-01-01

    Blood coagulation is triggered not only by surface tissue factor (TF) density but also by surface TF distribution. We investigated recognition of surface TF distribution patterns during blood coagulation and identified the underlying molecular mechanisms. For these investigations, we employed 1), an in vitro reaction-diffusion experimental model of coagulation; and 2), numerical simulations using a mathematical model of coagulation in a three-dimensional space. When TF was uniformly immobilized over the activating surface, the clotting initiation time in normal plasma increased from 4 min to >120 min, with a decrease in TF density from 100 to 0.7 pmol/m2. In contrast, surface-immobilized fibroblasts initiated clotting within 3–7 min, independently of fibroblast quantity and despite a change in average surface TF density from 0.5 to 130 pmol/m2. Experiments using factor V-, VII-, and VIII-deficient plasma and computer simulations demonstrated that different responses to these two TF distributions are caused by two positive feedback loops in the blood coagulation network: activation of the TF–VII complex by factor Xa, and activation of factor V by thrombin. This finding suggests a new role for these reactions: to supply sensitivity to local TF density during blood coagulation. PMID:22004734

  16. Departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium in cutting arc plasmas derived from electron and gas density measurements using a two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2011-03-15

    A two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique that allows inferring the electron and gas densities of axisymmetric arc plasmas without imposing any assumption regarding statistical equilibrium models is reported. This technique was applied to the study of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) departures within the core of a 30 A high-energy density cutting arc. In order to derive the electron and heavy particle temperatures from the inferred density profiles, a generalized two-temperature Saha equation together with the plasma equation of state and the quasineutrality condition were employed. Factors such as arc fluctuations that influence the accuracy of the measurements and the validity of the assumptions used to derive the plasma species temperature were considered. Significant deviations from chemical equilibrium as well as kinetic equilibrium were found at elevated electron temperatures and gas densities toward the arc core edge. An electron temperature profile nearly constant through the arc core with a value of about 14000-15000 K, well decoupled from the heavy particle temperature of about 1500 K at the arc core edge, was inferred.

  17. Higher sika deer density is associated with higher local abundance of Haemaphysalis longicornis nymphs and adults but not larvae in central Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Hideharu; Nakamura, Yoshio; Kamio, Tsugihiko; Inokuma, Hisashi; Hanafusa, Yasuko; Matsuda, Naoko; Maruyama, Tetsuya; Ohba, Takahiro; Nagata, Koji

    2014-02-01

    Haemaphysalis longicornis (Acari: Ixodidae) is one of the most common and important arthropod disease vectors in Japan, carrying Japanese spotted fever and bovine theileriosis. The recent expansion of sika deer (Cervus nippon, Artiodactyla: Cervidae) populations, the most common wild host of H. longicornis, has also caused concern about increasing the risk of vector-borne diseases in Japan. We used generalized linear mixed model analysis to determine the relative contribution of deer density and other biological and abiotic factors on the abundance of H. longicornis ticks questing at each developmental stage. A total of 6223 H. longicornis adults, nymphs, and larvae were collected from 70 sites in three regions of central Japan. The abundance of questing adult and nymphal ticks was associated with deer density and other biotic and abiotic factors. However, the abundance of questing larvae showed no association with deer density but did show an association with other biotic and abiotic factors. These findings show that a high density of deer along with other biotic and abiotic factors is associated with increased risk of vector-borne diseases through amplified local abundance of questing nymphal and adult H. longicornis. Further, questing larvae abundance is likely regulated by environmental conditions and is likely correlated with survival potential or the distribution of other host species.

  18. Solar Flux Effect on the Reproducibility of Global/Local-Time Variations of Ion Density Structure at Low-Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shin-Yi

    Longitudinal/seasonal (l/s) variations of ion density structures at the 600-km low-latitude ionosphere observed by ROCSAT-1 between two similar solar activity years of 2000 and 2002 are examined at four different local-time (LT) regions. The gross feature of l/s density structure is almost identical to each other at the four LT regions examined. A complete reproducibility of density structure can be assumed, including the shape of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), for identical solar flux input that also implicitly affect other atmospheric components such as the neutral O/N2 ratio and neutral wind variation. The fact that the solar variability effect is thought as the ultimate driver to shape the global ionospheric structure can be confirmed with the reproduction of ROCSAT observations with the simulation results of the TIEGCM model runs using the observed solar flux inputs for various seasons. However, the EIA crestto-valley ratio or no-valley signature in this background density structure can not be used to infer the post-sunset irregularity occurrence rates because the l/s variation of the magnetic declination effect that determines the post-sunset ionospheric conductivity for the ionospheric electrodynamics can not be readily obtained from this ionospheric background structure.

  19. Non-adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics of supersonic beam epitaxy of silicon carbide at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Taioli, Simone; Garberoglio, Giovanni; Simonucci, Stefano; Beccara, Silvio a; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco; Verucchi, Roberto; Iannotta, Salvatore; Dapor, Maurizio; and others

    2013-01-28

    In this work, we investigate the processes leading to the room-temperature growth of silicon carbide thin films by supersonic molecular beam epitaxy technique. We present experimental data showing that the collision of fullerene on a silicon surface induces strong chemical-physical perturbations and, for sufficient velocity, disruption of molecular bonds, and cage breaking with formation of nanostructures with different stoichiometric character. We show that in these out-of-equilibrium conditions, it is necessary to go beyond the standard implementations of density functional theory, as ab initio methods based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation fail to capture the excited-state dynamics. In particular, we analyse the Si-C{sub 60} collision within the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics framework, where stochastic hops occur between adiabatic surfaces calculated with time-dependent density functional theory. This theoretical description of the C{sub 60} impact on the Si surface is in good agreement with our experimental findings.

  20. Self-organization in foliated phase space: Construction of a scale hierarchy by adiabatic invariants of magnetized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Z.; Mahajan, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    Adiabatic invariants foliate phase space, and impart a macro-scale hierarchy by separating microscopic variables. On a macroscopic leaf, long-scale ordered structures are created while maximizing entropy. A plasma confined in a magnetosphere is invoked to unveil the organizing principle-in the vicinity of a magnetic dipole, the plasma self-organizes to a state with a steep density gradient. The resulting nontrivial structure has maximum entropy in an appropriate, constrained phase space. One could view such a phase space as a leaf foliated in terms of Casimir invariants-adiabatic invariants measuring the number of quasi-particles (macroscopic representation of periodic motions) are identified as the relevant Casimir invariants. The density clump is created in response to the inhomogeneity of the energy levels (frequencies) of the quasi-particles.