Science.gov

Sample records for adiabatic sound speed

  1. Speeding up Adiabatic Quantum State Transfer by Using Dressed States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksic, Alexandre; Ribeiro, Hugo; Clerk, Aashish A.

    2016-06-01

    We develop new pulse schemes to significantly speed up adiabatic state transfer protocols. Our general strategy involves adding corrections to an initial control Hamiltonian that harness nonadiabatic transitions. These corrections define a set of dressed states that the system follows exactly during the state transfer. We apply this approach to stimulated Raman adiabatic passage protocols and show that a suitable choice of dressed states allows one to design fast protocols that do not require additional couplings, while simultaneously minimizing the occupancy of the "intermediate" level.

  2. NASA Now: The Speed of Sound

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about sonic booms and the speed of sound from aerospace engineer George Hatcher. Hatcher shares the excitement of physics in his description of the space shuttle re-entering Earth’s atmosph...

  3. NASA Now Minute: The Speed of Sound

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about sonic booms and the speed of sound from aerospace engineerGeorge Hatcher as he shares the excitement of physics in hisdescription of how the space shuttles reentered Earth’s atmosph...

  4. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing.

  5. Sound speed in downhole flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Ünalmis, Ö Haldun

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the use of sound speed in flow measurement applications in the high-pressure/high-temperature downhole environment. The propagation speed of a sound wave is a powerful tool to extract useful information from a flowing fluid medium in pipe whether the medium consists of a single-phase or multiphase flow. Considering the complex nature of the flow patterns and changing phase fractions from reservoir to surface, utilizing the propagation speed of sound of a fluid mixture is not a trivial task, especially if the interest is real-time flow measurement. The demanding applications span a wide spectrum from noisy medium originating from fast-moving gas/liquid flows to quiet medium originating from slow-moving liquid/liquid flows. In the current work, multiple flow loop tests are conducted in different facilities to evaluate the direct use of sound speed in flow rate measurement and the results are associated with real-life field examples. A tool analysis map is developed that addresses the use of sound speed for flow measurement under different scenarios. Although most examples are based on strain-based local sensing of the flow, the use of sound speed is independent of the methodology and can be implemented by other methods such as acoustic-based distributed sensing. PMID:27475167

  6. Measuring the Speed of Sound in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper begins with an early measurement of the speed of sound in water. A historical overview of the consequent development of SONAR and medical imaging is given. A method of measuring the speed suitable for demonstration to year 10 students is described in detail, and an explanation of its systematic error examined.

  7. Measurement of Sound Speed in Thread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigemi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ichiki, Akira; Miyazaki, Akiho

    2006-05-01

    By employing thin wires, human hairs and threads, the measurement of sound speed in a thread whose diameter is smaller than 0.2 mm has been attempted. Preparing two cylindrical ceramic transducers with a 300 kHz resonance frequency, a perforated glass bead to be knotted by a sample thread is bonded to the center of the end surface of each transducer. After connecting these transducers with a sample thread, a receiving transducer is attached at a ceiling so as to hang another transmitting transducer with the thread. A glass bead is bonded to another end surface of the transmitting transducer so that tension, varied with a hanged plumb, can be applied to the sample thread. The time delay of the received signal relative to the transmitting pulse is measured while gradually shortening the thread. Sound speed is determined by the proportionality of time delay with thread length. Although the measured values for metallic wires are somewhat different from the values derived from the density and Young’s modulus cited in references, they are reproducible. The sound speed for human hairs of over twenty samples, which varies between 2000 and 2500 m/s, seems to depend on hair quality. Sound speed in a cotton thread is found to approach a constant value under large tension. An advanced measurement system available for uncut threads is also presented, where semi cylindrical transducers pinch the thread.

  8. Sound speeds in suspensions in thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temkin, S.

    1992-11-01

    This work considers sound propagation in suspensions of particles of constant mass in fluids, in both relaxed and frozen thermodynamic equilibrium. Treating suspensions as relaxing media, thermodynamic arguments are used to obtain their sound speeds in equilibrium conditions. The results for relaxed equilibrium, which is applicable in the limit of low frequencies, agree with existing theories for aerosols, but disagree with Wood's equation. It is shown that the latter is thermodynamically correct only in the exceptional case when the specific heat ratios of the fluid and of the particles are equal to unity. In all other cases discrepancies occur. These may be significant when one of the two phases in the suspension is a gas, as is the case in aerosols and in bubbly liquids. The paper also includes a brief discussion of the sound speed in frozen equilibrium.

  9. Measuring the Speed of Sound through Gases Using Nitrocellulose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molek, Karen Sinclair; Reyes, Karl A.; Burnette, Brandon A.; Stepherson, Jacob R.

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the heat capacity ratios, ?, of gases either through adiabatic expansion or sound velocity is a well established physical chemistry experiment. The most accurate experiments depend on an exact determination of sound origin, which necessitates the use of lasers or a wave generator, where time zero is based on an electrical trigger. Other…

  10. The sound speed anomaly of Baltic Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rohden, C.; Weinreben, S.; Fehres, F.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the anomalous chemical composition of Baltic seawater on the speed of sound relative to seawater with quasi-standard composition was quantified at atmospheric pressure and temperatures of 1 to 46 °C. Three modern oceanographic time-of-flight sensors were applied in a laboratory setup for measuring the speed-of-sound difference δ w in a pure water diluted sample of North Atlantic seawater and a sample of Baltic seawater of the same conductivity, i.e. the same Practical Salinity (SP=7.766). The average δ w amounts to 0.069 ± 0.014 m s-1, significantly larger than the resolution and reproducibility of the sensors and independent of temperature. This magnitude for the anomaly effect was verified with offshore measurements conducted at different sites in the Baltic Sea using one of the sensors. The results from both measurements show values up to one order of magnitude smaller than existing predictions based on chemical models.

  11. The sound speed anomaly of Baltic seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rohden, C.; Weinreben, S.; Fehres, F.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the anomalous chemical composition of Baltic seawater on the speed of sound relative to seawater with quasi-standard composition was quantified at atmospheric pressure and temperatures of 1 to 46 °C. Three modern oceanographic time-of-flight sensors were applied in a laboratory setup for measuring the speed-of-sound difference δw in a pure water diluted sample of North Atlantic seawater and a sample of Baltic seawater of the same conductivity, i.e., the same practical salinity (SP = 7.766). The average δw amounts to 0.069 ± 0.014 m s-1, which is significantly larger than the resolution and reproducibility of the sensors and independent of temperature. This magnitude for the anomaly effect was verified with offshore measurements conducted at different sites in the Baltic Sea using one of the sensors. The results from both measurements show values up to 1 order of magnitude smaller than existing predictions based on chemical models.

  12. Thermodynamics and sound speeds at the Chapman-Jouguet state

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, J.N.; Forest, C.A.

    1998-12-31

    Some thermodynamic relations about an equilibrium Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state are obtained. Relations for sound speeds in the wave velocity-particle velocity plane are derived. A relation between the slope of the sound speed in this plane and the asymptotic slope of the Hugoniot is suggested.

  13. Bubbles That Change the Speed of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    The influence of bubbles on sound has long attracted the attention of physicists. In his 1920 book Sir William Bragg described sound absorption caused by foam in a glass of beer tapped by a spoon. Frank S. Crawford described and analyzed the change in the pitch of sound in a similar experiment and named the phenomenon the "hot chocolate effect."…

  14. On the estimation of sound speed in two-dimensional Yukawa fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, I. L. Thomas, H. M.; Khrapak, S. A.

    2015-11-15

    The longitudinal sound speed in two-dimensional Yukawa fluids is estimated using the conventional hydrodynamic expression supplemented by appropriate thermodynamic functions proposed recently by Khrapak et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 083706 (2015)]. In contrast to the existing approaches, such as quasi-localized charge approximation (QLCA) and molecular dynamics simulations, our model provides a relatively simple estimate for the sound speed over a wide range of parameters of interest. At strong coupling, our results are shown to be in good agreement with the results obtained using the QLCA approach and those derived from the phonon spectrum for the triangular lattice. On the other hand, our model is also expected to remain accurate at moderate values of the coupling strength. In addition, the obtained results are used to discuss the influence of the strong coupling effects on the adiabatic index of two-dimensional Yukawa fluids.

  15. On the estimation of sound speed in two-dimensional Yukawa fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, I. L.; Khrapak, S. A.; Thomas, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    The longitudinal sound speed in two-dimensional Yukawa fluids is estimated using the conventional hydrodynamic expression supplemented by appropriate thermodynamic functions proposed recently by Khrapak et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 083706 (2015)]. In contrast to the existing approaches, such as quasi-localized charge approximation (QLCA) and molecular dynamics simulations, our model provides a relatively simple estimate for the sound speed over a wide range of parameters of interest. At strong coupling, our results are shown to be in good agreement with the results obtained using the QLCA approach and those derived from the phonon spectrum for the triangular lattice. On the other hand, our model is also expected to remain accurate at moderate values of the coupling strength. In addition, the obtained results are used to discuss the influence of the strong coupling effects on the adiabatic index of two-dimensional Yukawa fluids.

  16. Double difference tomography for breast ultrasound sound speed imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Rama, Olsi; Burger, Angelika; Polin, Lisa; Nechiporchik, Nicole

    2011-03-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. Double difference (DD) tomography utilizes more accurate differential time-of-flight (ToF) data to reconstruct the sound speed structure of the breast. It can produce more precise and better resolution sound speed images than standard tomography that uses absolute ToF data. We apply DD tomography to phantom data and excised mouse mammary glands data. DD tomograms demonstrate sharper sound speed contrast than the standard tomograms.

  17. Determining the Speed of Sound Using the Doppler Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagne, Richard.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple but effective experiment that uses ultrasonic transducers and some basic electronics to study the speed of sound using the Doppler effect. Eliminates the noise problems associated with most sound experiments. Discusses the theory, and describes the apparatus and procedure. (JRH)

  18. Automatic speed of sound correction with photoacoustic image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Meng; Cao, Meng; Feng, Ting; Yuan, Jie; Cheng, Qian; Liu, XIaojun; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Sound velocity measurement is of great importance to the application of biomedical especially in the research of acoustic detection and acoustic tomography. Using correct sound velocities in each medium other than one unified sound propagation speed, we can effectively enhance sound based imaging resolution. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), is defined as cross-sectional or three-dimensional (3D) imaging of a material based on the photoacoustic effect and it is a developing, non-invasive imaging method in biomedical research. This contribution proposes a method to concurrently calculate multiple acoustic speeds in different mediums. Firstly, we get the size of infra-structure of the target by B-mode ultrasonic imaging method. Then we build the photoacoustic (PA) image of the same target with different acoustic speed in different medium. By repeatedly evaluate the quality of reconstruct PA image, we dynamically calibrate the acoustic speeds in different medium to build a finest PA image. Thus, we take these speeds of sound as the correct acoustic propagation velocities in according mediums. Experiments show that our non-invasive method can yield correct speed of sound with less than 0.3% error which might benefit future research in biomedical science.

  19. Bubbles that Change the Speed of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2012-11-01

    The influence of bubbles on sound has long attracted the attention of physicists. In his 1920 book Sir William Bragg described sound absorption caused by foam in a glass of beer tapped by a spoon. Frank S. Crawford described and analyzed the change in the pitch of sound in a similar experiment and named the phenomenon the "hot chocolate effect."2 In this paper we describe a simple and robust experiment that allows an easy audio and visual demonstration of the same effect (unfortunately without the chocolate) and offers several possibilities for student investigations. In addition to the demonstration of the above effect, the experiments described below provide an excellent opportunity for students to devise and test explanations with simple equipment.

  20. Arctic Sound Speed: A Desktop Study for Single Beam Echo Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, V. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Seafloor Sounding in Polar and Remote Areas (SSPARR) buoy is an autonomous echo sounding buoy envisioned for deployment in polar waters, in which ice cover and inclement weather frequently prevent normal shipboard survey operations. The buoy includes an echo sounder, a GPS, and Iridium phone sub- systems, allowing system to periodically fix its position, sound for the local water depth and telemeter the data to shore. The measurement of an echo sounder is the two-way travel time of a transmitted pulse. In order to obtain the approximate depth, the one-way travel time is multiplied by the vertical harmonic mean sound speed depth. However, as the local sound speed profile is not measured by the buoy, a suitable profile must be derived from another source. An analysis of 19,795 conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) vertical measurement profiles taken between 1972 and 2003 in the Arctic Ocean (above 65N Latitude) has been conducted to determine the variability of sound speed as a function of depth throughout the Arctic (World Ocean Database 2005, NODC). The temperature stability provided by the freezing point of water creates an environment such that a single canonical sound speed profile is sufficient for single beam echo sounding for the entire Arctic. Upper and lower sound speed values within each 1-meter depth interval are used to bound the likely error of depth soundings measured using the canonical profile. The method is compared to the traditional method of using historical tables (Carter's Tables) to correct echo sounders operating at a nominal (4800 ft/sec [~1463 m/s]) sound speed, and found to reduce sounding errors as much as 4%.

  1. Sound Affects the Speed of Visual Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keetels, Mirjam; Vroomen, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of a task-irrelevant sound on visual processing. Participants were presented with revolving clocks at or around central fixation and reported the hand position of a target clock at the time an exogenous cue (1 clock turning red) or an endogenous cue (a line pointing toward 1 of the clocks) was presented. A…

  2. IN VIVO BREAST SOUND-SPEED IMAGING WITH ULTRASOUND TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cuiping; Duric, Nebojsa; Littrup, Peter; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm with total-variation (TV) regularization. We have applied this algorithm to 61 in vivo breast datasets collected with our in-house clinical prototype for imaging sound-speed distributions in the breast. Our analysis showed that TV regularization could preserve sharper lesion edges than the classic Tikhonov regularization. Furthermore, the image quality of our TV bent-ray sound-speed tomograms was superior to that of the straight-ray counterparts for all types of breasts within BI-RADS density categories 1 through 4. Our analysis showed that the improvements for average sharpness (in the unit of (m · s)−1) of lesion edges in our TV bent-ray tomograms are between 2.1 to 3.4-fold compared with the straight ray tomograms. Reconstructed sound-speed tomograms illustrated that our algorithm could successfully image fatty and glandular tissues within the breast. We calculated the mean sound-speed values for fatty tissue and breast parenchyma as 1422±9 m/s (mean±SD) and 1487±21 m/s, respectively. Based on 32 lesions in a cohort of 61 patients, we also found that the mean sound-speed for malignant breast lesions 1548±17 m/s was higher, on average, than that of benign ones (1513±27 m/s) (one-sided p < 0.001). These results suggest that, clinically, sound-speed tomograms can be used to assess breast density (and therefore, breast cancer risk), as well as detect and help differentiate breast lesions. Finally, our sound-speed tomograms may also be a useful tool to monitor the clinical response of breast cancer patients to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:19647920

  3. In vivo breast sound-speed imaging with ultrasound tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm with total-variation (TV) regularization. We have applied this algorithm to 61 in vivo breast datasets collected with our in-house clinical prototype for imaging sound-speed distributions in the breast. Our analysis showed that TV regularization could preserve sharper lesion edges than the classic Tikhonov regularization. Furthermore, the image quality of our TV bent-ray sound-speed tomograms was superior to that of the straight-ray counterparts for all types of breasts within BI-RADS density categories 1-4. For all four breast types from fatty to dense, the improvements for average sharpness (in the unit of (m{center_dot} s) {sup -1}) of lesion edges in our TV bent-ray tomograms are between 2.1 to 3.4 fold compared to the straight ray tomograms. Reconstructed sound-speed tomograms illustrated that our algorithm could successfully image fatty and glandular tissues within the breast. We calculated the mean sound-speed values for fatty tissue and breast parenchyma as 1422 {+-} 9 mls (mean{+-} SD) and1487 {+-} 21 mls, respectively. Based on 32 lesions in a cohort of 61 patients, we also found that the mean sound-speed for malignant breast lesions (1548{+-}17 mls) was higher, on average, than that of benign ones (1513{+-}27 mls) (one-sided psound-speed tomograms can be used to assess breast density (, and therefore, breast cancer risk), as well as detect and help differentiate breast lesions. Finally, our sound-speed tomograms may also be a useful tool to monitor clinical response of breast cancer patients to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

  4. Sound speed measurements in liquid oxygen-liquid nitrogen mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Mazel, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    The sound speed in liquid oxygen (LOX), liquid nitrogen (LN2), and five LOX-LN2 mixtures was measured by an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique at temperatures in the vicinity of -195.8C, the boiling point of N2 at a pressure of I atm. Under these conditions, the measurements yield the following relationship between sound speed in meters per second and LN2 content M in mole percent: c = 1009.05-1.8275M+0.0026507 M squared. The second speeds of 1009.05 m/sec plus or minus 0.25 percent for pure LOX and 852.8 m/sec plus or minus 0.32 percent for pure LN2 are compared with those reported by past investigators. Measurement of sound speed should prove an effective means for monitoring the contamination of LOX by Ln2.

  5. In situ estimation of sediment sound speed and critical angle

    PubMed

    Maguer; Bovio; Fox; Schmidt

    2000-09-01

    Understanding the basic physics of sound penetration into ocean sediments is essential for the design of sonar systems that can detect, localize, classify, and identify buried objects. In this regard the sound speed of the sediment is a crucial parameter as the ratio of sound speed at the water-sediment interface determines the critical angle. Sediment sound speed is typically measured from core samples using high frequency (100's of kHz) pulsed travel time measurements. Earlier experimental work on subcritical penetration into sandy sediments has suggested that the effective sound speed in the 2-20 kHz range is significantly lower than the core measurement results. Simulations using Biot theory for propagation in porous media confirmed that sandy sediments may be highly dispersive in the range 1-100 kHz for the type of sand in which the experiments were performed. Here it is shown that a direct and robust estimate of the critical angle, and therefore the sediment sound speed, at the lower frequencies can be achieved by analyzing the grazing angle dependence of the phase delays observed on a buried array. A parametric source with secondary frequencies in the 2-16 kHz range was directed toward a sandy bottom similar to the one investigated in the earlier study. An array of 14 hydrophones was used to measure penetrated field. The critical angle was estimated by analyzing the variations of signal arrival times versus frequency, burial depth, and grazing angle. Matching the results with classical transmission theory yielded a sound speed estimate in the sand of 1626 m/s in the frequency range 2-5 kHz, again significantly lower the 1720 m/s estimated from the cores at 200 kHz. However, as described here, this dispersion is consistent with the predictions of the Biot theory for this type of sand.

  6. Using a High-Speed Camera to Measure the Speed of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, William Nathan; Baird, William H.

    2012-01-01

    The speed of sound is a physical property that can be measured easily in the lab. However, finding an inexpensive and intuitive way for students to determine this speed has been more involved. The introduction of affordable consumer-grade high-speed cameras (such as the Exilim EX-FC100) makes conceptually simple experiments feasible. Since the…

  7. Numerical Speed of Sound and its Application to Schemes for all Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Edwards, Jack R.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of "numerical speed of sound" is proposed in the construction of numerical flux. It is shown that this variable is responsible for the accurate resolution of' discontinuities, such as contacts and shocks. Moreover, this concept can he readily extended to deal with low speed and multiphase flows. As a results, the numerical dissipation for low speed flows is scaled with the local fluid speed, rather than the sound speed. Hence, the accuracy is enhanced the correct solution recovered, and the convergence rate improved. We also emphasize the role of mass flux and analyze the behavior of this flux. Study of mass flux is important because the numerical diffusivity introduced in it can be identified. In addition, it is the term common to all conservation equations. We show calculated results for a wide variety of flows to validate the effectiveness of using the numerical speed of sound concept in constructing the numerical flux. We especially aim at achieving these two goals: (1) improving accuracy and (2) gaining convergence rates for all speed ranges. We find that while the performance at high speed range is maintained, the flux now has the capability of performing well even with the low: speed flows. Thanks to the new numerical speed of sound, the convergence is even enhanced for the flows outside of the low speed range. To realize the usefulness of the proposed method in engineering problems, we have also performed calculations for complex 3D turbulent flows and the results are in excellent agreement with data.

  8. Stationary waves in tubes and the speed of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Lutz; Vogt, Patrik; Strohmeyer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The opportunity to plot oscillograms and frequency spectra with smartphones creates many options for experiments in acoustics, including several that have been described in this column.1-3 The activities presented in this paper are intended to complement these applications, and include an approach to determine sound velocity in air by using standard drain pipes4 and an outline of an investigation of the temperature dependency of the speed of sound.

  9. Local non-Gaussianity from rapidly varying sound speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Jon; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Wands, David E-mail: gianmassimo.tasinato@port.ac.uk

    2012-08-01

    We study the effect of non-trivial sound speeds on local-type non-Gaussianity during multiple-field inflation. To this end, we consider a multiple-DBI model and use the δN formalism to track the super-horizon evolution of perturbations. By adopting a sum separable Hubble parameter we derive analytic expressions for the relevant quantities in the two-field case, valid beyond slow variation. We find that non-trivial sound speeds can, in principle, curve the trajectory in such a way that significant local-type non-Gaussianity is produced. Deviations from slow variation, such as rapidly varying sound speeds, enhance this effect. To illustrate our results we consider two-field inflation in the tip regions of two warped throats and find large local-type non-Gaussianity produced towards the end of the inflationary process.

  10. Time of flight measurement of speed of sound in air with a computer sound card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz

    2014-11-01

    A computer sound card and freely available audio editing software are used to measure accurately the speed of sound in air using the time-of-flight method. In addition to speed of sound measurement, inversion behaviour upon reflection from an open and closed end of a pipe is demonstrated. Also, it is demonstrated that the reflection at an open end of a pipe occurs slightly outside the pipe. The equipment needed is readily available to any student with access to a microphone, loudspeaker and computer.

  11. THE ADIABATIC DEMAGNETIZATION REFRIGERATOR FOR THE MICRO-X SOUNDING ROCKET TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Wikus, P.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Leman, S. W.; Rutherford, J. M.; Trowbridge, S. N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Doriese, W. B.; McCammon, D.

    2010-04-09

    The Micro-X Imaging X-ray Spectrometer is a sounding rocket payload slated for launch in 2011. An array of Transition Edge Sensors, which is operated at a bath temperature of 50 mK, will be used to obtain a high resolution spectrum of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) with a 75 gram Ferric Ammonium Alum (FAA) salt pill in the bore of a 4 T superconducting magnet provides a stable heat sink for the detector array only a few seconds after burnout of the rocket motors. This requires a cold stage design with very short thermal time constants. A suspension made from Kevlar strings holds the 255 gram cold stage in place. It is capable of withstanding loads in excess of 200 g. Stable operation of the TES array in proximity to the ADR magnet is ensured by a three-stage magnetic shielding system which consists of a superconducting can, a high-permeability shield and a bucking coil. The development and testing of the Micro-X payload is well underway.

  12. The Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for the Micro-X Sounding Rocket Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikus, P.; Adams, J. S.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Bandler, S. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Eckart, M. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leman, S. W.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Rutherford, J. M.; Trowbridge, S. N.

    2010-04-01

    The Micro-X Imaging X-ray Spectrometer is a sounding rocket payload slated for launch in 2011. An array of Transition Edge Sensors, which is operated at a bath temperature of 50 mK, will be used to obtain a high resolution spectrum of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) with a 75 gram Ferric Ammonium Alum (FAA) salt pill in the bore of a 4 T superconducting magnet provides a stable heat sink for the detector array only a few seconds after burnout of the rocket motors. This requires a cold stage design with very short thermal time constants. A suspension made from Kevlar strings holds the 255 gram cold stage in place. It is capable of withstanding loads in excess of 200 g. Stable operation of the TES array in proximity to the ADR magnet is ensured by a three-stage magnetic shielding system which consists of a superconducting can, a high-permeability shield and a bucking coil. The development and testing of the Micro-X payload is well underway.

  13. The effect of sound speed profile on shallow water shipping sound maps.

    PubMed

    Sertlek, Hüseyin Özkan; Binnerts, Bas; Ainslie, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Sound mapping over large areas can be computationally expensive because of the large number of sources and large source-receiver separations involved. In order to facilitate computation, a simplifying assumption sometimes made is to neglect the sound speed gradient in shallow water. The accuracy of this assumption is investigated for ship generated sound in the Dutch North Sea, for realistic ship and wind distributions. Sound maps are generated for zero, negative and positive gradients for selected frequency bands (56 Hz to 3.6 kHz). The effect of sound speed profile for the decidecade centred at 125 Hz is less than 1.7 dB. PMID:27475218

  14. The effect of sound speed profile on shallow water shipping sound maps.

    PubMed

    Sertlek, Hüseyin Özkan; Binnerts, Bas; Ainslie, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Sound mapping over large areas can be computationally expensive because of the large number of sources and large source-receiver separations involved. In order to facilitate computation, a simplifying assumption sometimes made is to neglect the sound speed gradient in shallow water. The accuracy of this assumption is investigated for ship generated sound in the Dutch North Sea, for realistic ship and wind distributions. Sound maps are generated for zero, negative and positive gradients for selected frequency bands (56 Hz to 3.6 kHz). The effect of sound speed profile for the decidecade centred at 125 Hz is less than 1.7 dB.

  15. Estimation of vehicle speed using wayside sound pressure onset rate.

    PubMed

    Zapfe, Jeffrey A; Wood, Eric W; Newmark, Marc S

    2009-12-01

    Transportation-related environmental noise studies, particularly those associated with rail traffic, often require long term measurements near existing rights of way. In addition to the sound produced by passing vehicles, it is also useful to know their speed. Previously, speed measurements have generally required an additional piece of instrumentation, such as a second microphone, video camera, or a radar gun--resulting in added measurement cost and complexity. The present study shows how estimations of vehicle speed can be obtained using a single wayside microphone. The method is based on the rate of pressure rise as the vehicle approaches, specifically the maximum onset rate. This paper shows how the maximum onset rate depends only on the vehicle speed, the microphone distance, and the speed of sound. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach field test data are presented for train passages ranging in speed from 33.5 to 55.6 m/s, as measured by a microphone located 28.65 m from the tracks. Speed estimates derived from the onset rate were generally accurate to within 8% of the independently measured speed of the train. PMID:20000912

  16. Measurement of the Speed of Sound in a Metal Rod.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen; Ng, Yee-kong; Wu, Kam-wah

    2000-01-01

    Suggests two improved methods to measure the speed of sound in a metal rod. One employs a fast timer to measure the time required for a compression pulse to travel along the rod from end to end, and a second uses a microphone to measure the frequency of the fundamental mode of a freely suspending singing rod. (Author/ASK)

  17. Metastable sound speed in gas-liquid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursik, J. W.; Hall, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    A new method of calculating speed of sound for two-phase flow is presented. The new equation assumes no phase change during the propagation of an acoustic disturbance and assumes that only the total entropy of the mixture remains constant during the process. The new equation predicts single-phase values for the speed of sound in the limit of all gas or all liquid and agrees with available two-phase, air-water sound speed data. Other expressions used in the two-phase flow literature for calculating two-phase, metastable sound speed are reviewed and discussed. Comparisons are made between the new expression and several of the previous expressions -- most notably a triply isentropic equation as used, a triply isentropic equation as used, among others, by Karplus and by Wallis. Appropriate differences are pointed out and a thermodynamic criterion is derived which must be satisfied in order for the triply isentropic expression to be thermodynamically consistent. This criterion is not satisfied for the cases examined, which included two-phase nitrogen, air-water, two-phase parahydrogen, and steam-water. Consequently, the new equation derived is found to be superior to the other equations reviewed.

  18. Experimenting with End-Correction and the Speed of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    What follows is an alternative to the standard tuning fork and quarter-wave tube speed of sound experiment. Rather than adjusting the water level in a glass or plastic tube to vary the length of an air column, a set of resonance tubes of different lengths is used. The experiment still demonstrates the principles of standing waves in air columns…

  19. Relationship between breast sound speed and mammographic percent density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Nebojsa; Boyd, Norman; Littrup, Peter; Myc, Lukasz; Faiz, Muhammad; Li, Cuiping; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2011-03-01

    Despite some shortcomings, mammography is currently the standard of care for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. However, breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to overcome the drawbacks of mammography. It is known that women with high breast densities have a greater risk of developing breast cancer. Measuring breast density is accomplished through the use of mammographic percent density, defined as the ratio of fibroglandular to total breast area. Using an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype, we created sound speed images of the patient's breast, motivated by the fact that sound speed in a tissue is proportional to the density of the tissue. The purpose of this work is to compare the acoustic performance of the UST system with the measurement of mammographic percent density. A cohort of 251 patients was studied using both imaging modalities and the results suggest that the volume averaged breast sound speed is significantly related to mammographic percent density. The Spearman correlation coefficient was found to be 0.73 for the 175 film mammograms and 0.69 for the 76 digital mammograms obtained. Since sound speed measurements do not require ionizing radiation or physical compression, they have the potential to form the basis of a safe, more accurate surrogate marker of breast density.

  20. Effects of high sound speed confiners on ANFO detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanda, Charles; Jackson, Scott; Short, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between high explosive (HE) detonations and high sound speed confiners, where the confiner sound speed exceeds the HE's detonation speed, has not been thoroughly studied. The subsonic nature of the flow in the confiner allows stress waves to travel ahead of the main detonation front and influence the upstream HE state. The interaction between the detonation wave and the confiner is also no longer a local interaction, so that the confiner thickness now plays a significant role in the detonation dynamics. We report here on larger scale experiments in which a mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) is detonated in aluminium confiners with varying charge diameter and confiner thickness. The results of these large-scale experiments are compared with previous large-scale ANFO experiments in cardboard, as well as smaller-scale aluminium confined ANFO experiments, to characterize the effects of confiner thickness.

  1. Speed of sound in bubble-free ice.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Christian; Laihem, Karim; Wiebusch, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    The speed of sound in a large volume of bubble-free ice was measured with high accuracy using a linear array of six piezoceramic lead zirconium titanate (PZT) receivers. This array was deployed in an approximately 3 m(3) water tank, which was cooled down to -20 degrees C. The freezing process was performed inside a cooling container. Bubble-free ice was obtained using a freeze control unit, which filters and degases the water during the freezing process. A dedicated geometry was used to position PZT receivers and an emitter such that systematic errors were minimized. With this setup the longitudinal and the transverse components of the speed of sound were measured at temperatures between 17 and 0 degrees C in water and between 0 and -20 degrees C in ice with an uncertainty of approximately 0.3%.

  2. Sound Speeds of Post-Failure Wave Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cazamias, J U; Fiske, P S; Bless, S J

    2000-07-25

    Plate impact experiments were performed on B270 glass in order to measure the properties of post-failure wave material. The initial failure wave velocity is 1.27 km/s . After the material is released, the failure wave velocity drops to 0.65 km/s. At a stress of 6.72 GPa, the sound speed in the failed material is 4.97 km/s (compare to 5.79 km/s in the intact material) with a density comparable to the predicted shock value. At a stress of 0.26 GPa, the average sound speed in the failed material is 3.55 km/s, and the density drops to 65% of the intact value. The spall strength of the failed material is greater than 0.14 GPa.

  3. Speed of sound in nuclear matter and Skyrme effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.K.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1987-02-01

    Using a nuclear equation of state derived from a finite-temperature Green's function method and the Skyrme effective interactions SkI, SkIII and SkM*, the authors have calculated the speed of sound in symmetric nuclear matter. For certain densities and temperatures, this speed is found to become super-luminous. Causal boundaries in the density-temperature plane are determined, and they indicate that SkM* is a more desirable effective interaction than SkI and SkIII. Comparison with a similar calculation by Osnes and Strottman is made.

  4. Speed of Sound in Metal Pipes: An Inexpensive Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2008-01-01

    Our favorite demonstration for sound waves is to set up a compressional pulse on a horizontally stretched Slinky[TM]. One can easily watch the pulse move back and forth at a speed of the order of one meter per second. Watching this demonstration, it occurred to us that the same thing might happen in a steel pipe if you hit the end of the pipe with…

  5. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, N.A.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  6. A Comparative Study of Sound Speed in Air at Room Temperature between a Pressure Sensor and a Sound Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of sound speed measurements in air using two types of sensor that are widely employed in physics and engineering education, namely a pressure sensor and a sound sensor. A computer-based laboratory with pressure and sound sensors was used to carry out measurements of air through a 60 ml syringe. The fast Fourier…

  7. Sound transmission loss of windows on high speed trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumei; Xiao, Xinbiao; Thompson, David; Squicciarini, Giacomo; Wen, Zefeng; Li, Zhihui; Wu, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The window is one of the main components of the high speed train car body structure through which noise can be transmitted. To study the windows’ acoustic properties, the vibration of one window of a high speed train has been measured for a running speed of 250 km/h. The corresponding interior noise and the noise in the wheel-rail area have been measured simultaneously. The experimental results show that the window vibration velocity has a similar spectral shape to the interior noise. Interior noise source identification further indicates that the window makes a contribution to the interior noise. Improvement of the window's Sound Transmission Loss (STL) can reduce the interior noise from this transmission path. An STL model of the window is built based on wave propagation and modal superposition methods. From the theoretical results, the window's STL property is studied and several factors affecting it are investigated, which provide indications for future low noise design of high speed train windows.

  8. A direct method for photoacoustic tomography with inhomogeneous sound speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhachmi, Zakaria; Glatz, Thomas; Scherzer, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    The standard approach for photoacoustic imaging with variable speed of sound is time reversal, which consists of solving a well-posed final-boundary value problem for the wave equation backwards in time. This paper investigates the iterative Landweber regularization algorithm, where convergence is guaranteed by standard regularization theory, notably also in cases of trapping sound speed or for short measurement times. We formulate and solve the direct and inverse problem on the whole Euclidean space, which is common in standard photoacoustic imaging, but not for time reversal algorithms, where the problems are considered on a domain enclosed by the measurement devices. We formulate both the direct and adjoint photoacoustic operator as the solution of an interior and an exterior differential equation which are coupled by transmission conditions. The former is solved numerically using a Galerkin scheme in space and finite difference discretization in time, while the latter consists of solving a boundary integral equation. We therefore use a boundary element method/finite element method approach for numerical solution of the forward operators. We analyze this method, prove convergence, and provide numerical tests. Moreover, we compare the approach to time reversal.

  9. Sound speed profile characterization by the image source method.

    PubMed

    Pinson, S; Guillon, L

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the first results of an imaging technique that measures the geoacoustic structure of a seafloor in shallow water areas. The devices used were a broadband (100 Hz-6 kHz) acoustic source towed by a ship and a vertical array. Among all the acoustic paths existing in the water column, two are used: the direct one and the seabed-reflected one, the latter being composed of the reflections from the seafloor's surface as well as that from each buried layer. Due to the good time resolution of the signal and to the short range configuration, the reflected signal can be modeled as a sum of contributions coming from image sources relative to the seabed layers. The seabed geometry and the sound speed profile can then be recovered with the detection and localization of these image sources. The map of the image sources is obtained by a function that combines back-propagation of signals and knowledge of the emitted pulse. The thickness and sound-speed of each layer is finally obtained by a position analysis of the image sources. The results obtained by this data-driven algorithm on both at-sea and synthetic data are satisfactory. PMID:20968341

  10. Measurement of the ratio of the speed of sound to the speed of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, J. B.; Moldover, M. R.

    1986-10-01

    Measurements of the resonance frequencies of the acoustic modes and of the microwave modes of a single cavity can determine u/c, the ratio of the speed of sound of a gas to the speed of light. Such measurements with a monatomic gas would determine the thermodynamic temperature T with unprecedented accuracy. By judicious choices of cavity geometry and resonance modes, u/c can be measured to part-per-million accuracy using cavities whose geometry is known only to parts per thousand. These techniques can also be applied to measurements of the universal gas constant R.

  11. Effects of Latitudinally Dependent Solar Wind Speed on Diffusion Coefficients of Cosmic Rays in the Presence of Adiabatic Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H.-Q.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2015-02-01

    The solar wind is observed to display high speeds in high heliolatitude coronal holes and low speeds near the ecliptic plane. The heliospheric magnetic field associated with the solar wind plays a very important role in the transport and modulation of charged energetic particles, including galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs), in the three-dimensional heliosphere. In previous studies, a constant solar wind speed, which is independent of heliolatitude, was assumed and commonly used in modulation modeling of cosmic rays. In this work, we investigate the realistic latitudinally dependent solar wind speed and utilize the theoretical models in hyperbolic and piecewise polynomial forms to explore the important effects on the heliospheric magnetic field and the diffusion coefficients (parallel, perpendicular, and drift scale) of cosmic rays in the presence of adiabatic focusing. Comparisons of the diffusion coefficients derived from standard Parker field and modified magnetic fields are presented. Since the structures and properties of different solar wind sources (coronal streamer belt, polar coronal hole, and transition region between them) differ from each other in essence, we suggest that the latitudinally dependent solar wind speed and the corresponding heliospheric magnetic field and diffusion coefficients with adiabatic focusing should be employed in the global modeling studies of GCRs and SEPs in the heliosphere.

  12. 40 CFR 205.54-1 - Low speed sound emission test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Low speed sound emission test....54-1 Low speed sound emission test procedures. (a) Instrumentation. The following instrumentation... checked annually to verify that its output has not changed. (3) An engine-speed tachometer which...

  13. 40 CFR 205.54-1 - Low speed sound emission test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low speed sound emission test....54-1 Low speed sound emission test procedures. (a) Instrumentation. The following instrumentation... checked annually to verify that its output has not changed. (3) An engine-speed tachometer which...

  14. 40 CFR 205.54-1 - Low speed sound emission test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Low speed sound emission test....54-1 Low speed sound emission test procedures. (a) Instrumentation. The following instrumentation... checked annually to verify that its output has not changed. (3) An engine-speed tachometer which...

  15. 40 CFR 205.54-1 - Low speed sound emission test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Low speed sound emission test....54-1 Low speed sound emission test procedures. (a) Instrumentation. The following instrumentation... checked annually to verify that its output has not changed. (3) An engine-speed tachometer which...

  16. Sound speed and viscosity of semi-relativistic relic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Lawrence; Long, Andrew J.

    2016-07-01

    Generalized fluid equations, using sound speed ceff2 and viscosity cvis2 as effective parameters, provide a convenient phenomenological formalism for testing the relic neutrino "null hypothesis," i.e. that that neutrinos are relativistic and free-streaming prior to recombination. In this work, we relax the relativistic assumption and ask "to what extent can the generalized fluid equations accommodate finite neutrino mass?" We consider both the mass of active neutrinos, which are largely still relativistic at recombination m2 / T2 ~ 0.2, and the effect of a semi-relativistic sterile component. While there is no one-to-one mapping between mass/mixing parameters and ceff2 and cvis2, we demonstrate that the existence of a neutrino mass could induce a bias to measurements of ceff2 and cvis2 at the level of 0.01 m2 / T2 ~ 10-3.

  17. Sound speed and viscosity of semi-relativistic relic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Lawrence; Long, Andrew J.

    2016-07-01

    Generalized fluid equations, using sound speed ceff2 and viscosity cvis2 as effective parameters, provide a convenient phenomenological formalism for testing the relic neutrino "null hypothesis," i.e. that that neutrinos are relativistic and free-streaming prior to recombination. In this work, we relax the relativistic assumption and ask "to what extent can the generalized fluid equations accommodate finite neutrino mass?" We consider both the mass of active neutrinos, which are largely still relativistic at recombination m2 / T2 ~ 0.2, and the effect of a semi-relativistic sterile component. While there is no one-to-one mapping between mass/mixing parameters and ceff2 and cvis2, we demonstrate that the existence of a neutrino mass could induce a bias to measurements of ceff2 and cvis2 at the level of 0.01 m2 / T2 ~ 10‑3.

  18. Bound on the speed of sound from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cherman, Aleksey; Cohen, Thomas D.; Nellore, Abhinav

    2009-09-15

    We show that the squared speed of sound v{sub s}{sup 2} is bounded from above at high temperatures by the conformal value of 1/3 in a class of strongly coupled four-dimensional field theories, given some mild technical assumptions. This class consists of field theories that have gravity duals sourced by a single-scalar field. There are no known examples to date of field theories with gravity duals for which v{sub s}{sup 2} exceeds 1/3 in energetically favored configurations. We conjecture that v{sub s}{sup 2}=1/3 represents an upper bound for a broad class of four-dimensional theories.

  19. High-speed imaging of sound using parallel phase-shifting interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Yatabe, Kohei; Chitanont, Nachanant; Ikeda, Yusuke; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Onuma, Takashi; Niwa, Hayato; Yoshii, Minoru

    2016-06-13

    Sound-field imaging, the visualization of spatial and temporal distribution of acoustical properties such as sound pressure, is useful for understanding acoustical phenomena. This study investigated the use of parallel phase-shifting interferometry (PPSI) with a high-speed polarization camera for imaging a sound field, particularly high-speed imaging of propagating sound waves. The experimental results showed that the instantaneous sound field, which was generated by ultrasonic transducers driven by a pure tone of 40 kHz, was quantitatively imaged. Hence, PPSI can be used in acoustical applications requiring spatial information of sound pressure. PMID:27410311

  20. An Inexpensive and Versatile Version of Kundt's Tube for Measuring the Speed of Sound in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papacosta, Pangratios; Linscheid, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Experiments that measure the speed of sound in air are common in high schools and colleges. In the Kundt's tube experiment, a horizontal air column is adjusted until a resonance mode is achieved for a specific frequency of sound. When this happens, the cork dust in the tube is disturbed at the displacement antinode regions. The location of the displacement antinodes enables the measurement of the wavelength of the sound that is being used. This paper describes a design that uses a speaker instead of the traditional aluminum rod as the sound source. This allows the use of multiple sound frequencies that yield a much more accurate speed of sound in air.

  1. High-speed imaging of sound using parallel phase-shifting interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Yatabe, Kohei; Chitanont, Nachanant; Ikeda, Yusuke; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Onuma, Takashi; Niwa, Hayato; Yoshii, Minoru

    2016-06-13

    Sound-field imaging, the visualization of spatial and temporal distribution of acoustical properties such as sound pressure, is useful for understanding acoustical phenomena. This study investigated the use of parallel phase-shifting interferometry (PPSI) with a high-speed polarization camera for imaging a sound field, particularly high-speed imaging of propagating sound waves. The experimental results showed that the instantaneous sound field, which was generated by ultrasonic transducers driven by a pure tone of 40 kHz, was quantitatively imaged. Hence, PPSI can be used in acoustical applications requiring spatial information of sound pressure.

  2. Effect of ocean sound speed uncertainty on matched-field geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen-Fen; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2008-06-01

    The effect of ocean sound speed uncertainty on matched-field geoacoustic inversion is investigated using data from the SW06 experiment along a nearly range-independent bathymetric track. Significant sound speed differences were observed at the source and receiving array and several environmental parameterizations were investigated for the inversion including representing the ocean sound speed at both source and receivers with empirical orthogonal function (EOF) coefficients. A genetic algorithm-based global optimization method was applied to the candidate environmental models. Then, a Bayesian inversion technique was used to quantify uncertainty in the environmental parameters for the best environmental model, which included an EOF description of the ocean sound speed.

  3. Sound Speed of Liquid Iron Along the Outer Core Isentrope: New Pre-heated Ramp Compression Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.; Nguyen, J.; Akin, M. C.; Fatýanov, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed elasticity data on liquid Fe and candidate molten core alloys should offer new constraints on the under-constrained problem of Earth's core composition. Density, sound speed, and the gradient in sound speed with pressure are each potentially distinct experimental constraints and are each well-known for Earth. The gradient in sound speed, though, has not been used because sound speed depends on both T and P, such that data must be collected or reconstructed along the correct, nearly adiabatic, thermal profile. Reconstruction requires the Grüneisen γ, which is composition-dependent, and data over a large P-T space to allow extrapolation. Both static and dynamic compression methods could be used, but the conditions (140 - 330 GPa and 4000 - 6000 K) are very challenging for static methods and standard shock compression only samples the outer core P-T profile at a single P. Instead we are applying quasi-isentropic dynamic ramp compression, using pre-heating of the target and impedance of the leading edge of a graded-density impactor (GDI) to select a probable outer core isentrope. The target material is melted and raised to a point on the outer core isentrope by the initial shock, then quasi-isentropically ramped to a maximum P by increasing shock impedance of trailing GDI layers. Particle velocity is monitored by photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV) at two step thicknesses at the interface of Fe or Fe-alloy target and MgO windows. The difference in arrival time of each particle velocity at the two steps directly gives the Lagrangian sound speed vs. particle velocity, which is integrated to obtain Pand density. At the writing of this abstract, we have completed one shot of this type. We successfully heated a two-step Fe target in a Mo capsule with MgO windows to 1350 °C, maintaining sufficient alignment and reflectivity to collect PDV signal returns. We characterized the velocity correction factor for PDV observation through MgO windows, and have confirmed

  4. The sound speed in southern deepwater zone of the Caspian Sea, off Anzali Port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, S.; Abu Bakar, N. B.

    2011-03-01

    Sound velocity determination in seawater is a key component of modern hydrographic surveying; however, little data exists on sound velocity characteristics of the southern Caspian Sea. Hence, a study was undertaken in 2008 to examine the seasonal variability of sound speed in deep-waters of the South Caspian Sea near the Iranian coast. The seasonal cycle of seawater temperature and thermal stratification in the Caspian Sea water created a wide range of spatial and temporal changes of sound speed with relevant differences between shallow water (over the continental shelf) and deep-water area. The collected data showed that seasonal variations of the sound speed were most important in the upper 100 m water depth, while below this level that is in deepwater the changes were small. The maximum values of sound speed were observed at the surface in midsummer around 1517-1519 m s-1 over the continental shelf while the speed of sound was about 1453 m s-1 between 450-470 m depths with no major seasonal variations. Variations in vertical structure of the sound speed were in agreement with temperature changes, while effects of the salinity on the sound speed were little.

  5. Variation of ultrasound image lateral spectrum with assumed speed of sound and true scatterer density.

    PubMed

    Gyöngy, Miklós; Kollár, Sára

    2015-02-01

    One method of estimating sound speed in diagnostic ultrasound imaging consists of choosing the speed of sound that generates the sharpest image, as evaluated by the lateral frequency spectrum of the squared B-mode image. In the current work, simulated and experimental data on a typical (47 mm aperture, 3.3-10.0 MHz response) linear array transducer are used to investigate the accuracy of this method. A range of candidate speeds of sound (1240-1740 m/s) was used, with a true speed of sound of 1490 m/s in simulations and 1488 m/s in experiments. Simulations of single point scatterers and two interfering point scatterers at various locations with respect to each other gave estimate errors of 0.0-2.0%. Simulations and experiments of scatterer distributions with a mean scatterer spacing of at least 0.5 mm gave estimate errors of 0.1-4.0%. In the case of lower scatterer spacing, the speed of sound estimates become unreliable due to a decrease in contrast of the sharpness measure between different candidate speeds of sound. This suggests that in estimating speed of sound in tissue, the region of interest should be dominated by a few, sparsely spaced scatterers. Conversely, the decreasing sensitivity of the sharpness measure to speed of sound errors for higher scatterer concentrations suggests a potential method for estimating mean scatterer spacing.

  6. Direct Measurement of the Speed of Sound Using a Microphone and a Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gómez-Tejedor, José A.; Castro-Palacio, Juan C.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple and accurate experiment to obtain the speed of sound in air using a conventional speaker and a microphone connected to a computer. A free open source digital audio editor and recording computer software application allows determination of the time-of-flight of the wave for different distances, from which the speed of sound is…

  7. Sound Speed of Primordial Fluctuations in Supergravity Inflation.

    PubMed

    Hetz, Alexander; Palma, Gonzalo A

    2016-09-01

    We study the realization of slow-roll inflation in N=1 supergravities where inflation is the result of the evolution of a single chiral field. When there is only one flat direction in field space, it is possible to derive a single-field effective field theory parametrized by the sound speed c_{s} at which curvature perturbations propagate during inflation. The value of c_{s} is determined by the rate of bend of the inflationary path resulting from the shape of the F-term potential. We show that c_{s} must respect an inequality that involves the curvature tensor of the Kähler manifold underlying supergravity, and the ratio M/H between the mass M of fluctuations ortogonal to the inflationary path, and the Hubble expansion rate H. This inequality provides a powerful link between observational constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity and information about the N=1 supergravity responsible for inflation. In particular, the inequality does not allow for suppressed values of c_{s} (values smaller than c_{s}∼0.4) unless (a) the ratio M/H is of order 1 or smaller, and (b) the fluctuations of mass M affect the propagation of curvature perturbations by inducing on them a nonlinear dispersion relation during horizon crossing. Therefore, if large non-Gaussianity is observed, supergravity models of inflation would be severely constrained.

  8. Sound Speed of Primordial Fluctuations in Supergravity Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetz, Alexander; Palma, Gonzalo A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the realization of slow-roll inflation in N =1 supergravities where inflation is the result of the evolution of a single chiral field. When there is only one flat direction in field space, it is possible to derive a single-field effective field theory parametrized by the sound speed cs at which curvature perturbations propagate during inflation. The value of cs is determined by the rate of bend of the inflationary path resulting from the shape of the F -term potential. We show that cs must respect an inequality that involves the curvature tensor of the Kähler manifold underlying supergravity, and the ratio M /H between the mass M of fluctuations ortogonal to the inflationary path, and the Hubble expansion rate H . This inequality provides a powerful link between observational constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity and information about the N =1 supergravity responsible for inflation. In particular, the inequality does not allow for suppressed values of cs (values smaller than cs˜0.4 ) unless (a) the ratio M /H is of order 1 or smaller, and (b) the fluctuations of mass M affect the propagation of curvature perturbations by inducing on them a nonlinear dispersion relation during horizon crossing. Therefore, if large non-Gaussianity is observed, supergravity models of inflation would be severely constrained.

  9. Spherical collapse in quintessence models with zero speed of sound

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; D'Amico, Guido; Noreña, Jorge; Senatore, Leonardo; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: norena@sissa.it E-mail: senatore@ias.edu

    2010-03-01

    We study the spherical collapse model in the presence of quintessence with negligible speed of sound. This case is particularly motivated for w < −1 as it is required by stability. As pressure gradients are negligible, quintessence follows dark matter during the collapse. The spherical overdensity behaves as a separate closed FLRW universe, so that its evolution can be studied exactly. We derive the critical overdensity for collapse and we use the extended Press-Schechter theory to study how the clustering of quintessence affects the dark matter mass function. The effect is dominated by the modification of the linear dark matter growth function. A larger effect occurs on the total mass function, which includes the quintessence overdensities. Indeed, here quintessence constitutes a third component of virialized objects, together with baryons and dark matter, and contributes to the total halo mass by a fraction ∼ (1+w)Ω{sub Q}/Ω{sub m}. This gives a distinctive modification of the total mass function at low redshift.

  10. Sound Speed of Primordial Fluctuations in Supergravity Inflation.

    PubMed

    Hetz, Alexander; Palma, Gonzalo A

    2016-09-01

    We study the realization of slow-roll inflation in N=1 supergravities where inflation is the result of the evolution of a single chiral field. When there is only one flat direction in field space, it is possible to derive a single-field effective field theory parametrized by the sound speed c_{s} at which curvature perturbations propagate during inflation. The value of c_{s} is determined by the rate of bend of the inflationary path resulting from the shape of the F-term potential. We show that c_{s} must respect an inequality that involves the curvature tensor of the Kähler manifold underlying supergravity, and the ratio M/H between the mass M of fluctuations ortogonal to the inflationary path, and the Hubble expansion rate H. This inequality provides a powerful link between observational constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity and information about the N=1 supergravity responsible for inflation. In particular, the inequality does not allow for suppressed values of c_{s} (values smaller than c_{s}∼0.4) unless (a) the ratio M/H is of order 1 or smaller, and (b) the fluctuations of mass M affect the propagation of curvature perturbations by inducing on them a nonlinear dispersion relation during horizon crossing. Therefore, if large non-Gaussianity is observed, supergravity models of inflation would be severely constrained. PMID:27636467

  11. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATION OF SOUND SPEED INSIDE THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D. J.; MacDonald, J.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.

    2012-08-10

    Empirical radial profiles of the changes in sound speed inside the Sun between solar minimum and solar maximum have been extracted from Michelson Doppler Imager data by Baldner and Basu and Rabello-Soares. Here, we compare these results with the theoretical radial profiles predicted by a model of magnetic inhibition of convective onset: In the model, the degree of magnetic inhibition is characterized by a parameter {delta}, which is essentially the ratio of magnetic pressure to gas pressure. We find that the theoretical profiles overlap significantly with the empirical results in the outer half of the convection zone. But differences in the deeper layers indicate that the model needs to be modified there. The main result that emerges in the present comparison is that the value of {delta} must be larger near the surface than at great depth. A secondary result is that, in the course of the solar cycle, the magnetic field magnitude at the base of the convection zone may be out of phase with the field near the surface.

  12. Causal field theory with an infinite speed of sound

    SciTech Connect

    Afshordi, Niayesh; Chung, Daniel J. H.; Geshnizjani, Ghazal

    2007-04-15

    We introduce a model of scalar field dark energy, Cuscuton, which can be realized as the incompressible (or infinite speed of sound) limit of a scalar field theory with a noncanonical kinetic term (or k-essence). Even though perturbations of Cuscuton propagate superluminally, we show that they have a locally degenerate phase space volume (or zero entropy), implying that they cannot carry any microscopic information, and thus the theory is causal. Even coupling to ordinary scalar fields cannot lead to superluminal signal propagation. Furthermore, we show that the family of constant field hypersurfaces is the family of constant mean curvature hypersurfaces, which are the analogs of soap films (or soap bubbles) in Euclidian space. This enables us to find the most general solution in 1+1 dimensions, whose properties motivate conjectures for global degeneracy of the phase space in higher dimensions. Finally, we show that the Cuscuton action can model the continuum limit of the evolution of a field with discrete degrees of freedom and argue why it is protected against quantum corrections at low energies. While this paper mainly focuses on interesting features of Cuscuton in a Minkowski space-time, a companion paper examines cosmology with Cuscuton dark energy.

  13. Statistics of low-frequency normal-mode amplitudes in an ocean with random sound-speed perturbations: shallow-water environments.

    PubMed

    Colosi, John A; Duda, Timothy F; Morozov, Andrey K

    2012-02-01

    Second- and fourth-moment mode-amplitude statistics for low-frequency ocean sound propagation through random sound-speed perturbations in a shallow-water environment are investigated using Monte Carlo simulations and a transport theory for the cross-mode coherence matrix. The acoustic observables of mean and mean square intensity are presented and the importance of adiabatic effects and cross-mode coherence decay are emphasized. Using frequencies of 200 and 400 Hz, transport theory is compared with Monte Carlo simulations in a canonical shallow-water environment representative of the summer Mid-Atlantic Bight. Except for ranges less than a horizontal coherence length of the sound structure, the intensity moments from the two calculations are in good agreement. Corrections for the short range behavior are presented. For these frequencies the computed mode coupling rates are extremely small, and the propagation is strongly adiabatic with a rapid decay of cross-mode coherence. Coupling effects are predicted to be important at kilohertz frequencies. Decay of cross-mode coherence has important implications for acoustic interactions with nonlinear internal waves: For the case in which the acoustic path is not at glancing incidence with a nonlinear internal-wave front, adiabatic phase randomizing effects lead to a significantly reduced influence of the nonlinear waves on both mean and mean square intensity.

  14. Comparison of sound speed measurements on two different ultrasound tomography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Gierach, Gretchen; Malyarenko, Antonina

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) employs sound waves to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue and precisely measures the attenuation of sound speed secondary to breast tissue composition. High breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor and sound speed is directly proportional to breast density. UST provides a quantitative measure of breast density based on three-dimensional imaging without compression, thereby overcoming the shortcomings of many other imaging modalities. The quantitative nature of the UST breast density measures are tied to an external standard, so sound speed measurement in breast tissue should be independent of specific hardware. The work presented here compares breast sound speed measurement obtained with two different UST devices. The Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system located at the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, Michigan was recently replaced with the SoftVue ultrasound tomographic device. Ongoing clinical trials have used images generated from both sets of hardware, so maintaining consistency in sound speed measurements is important. During an overlap period when both systems were in the same exam room, a total of 12 patients had one or both of their breasts imaged on both systems on the same day. There were 22 sound speed scans analyzed from each system and the average breast sound speeds were compared. Images were either reconstructed using saved raw data (for both CURE and SoftVue) or were created during the image acquisition (saved in DICOM format for SoftVue scans only). The sound speed measurements from each system were strongly and positively correlated with each other. The average difference in sound speed between the two sets of data was on the order of 1-2 m/s and this result was not statistically significant. The only sets of images that showed a statistical difference were the DICOM images created during the SoftVue scan compared to the SoftVue images reconstructed from the raw data

  15. Photoacoustic image quality enhancement by estimating mean sound speed based on optimum focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Bing; Kondo, Kengo; Namita, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    A constant sound speed (i.e., 1540 m/s) is generally used in various ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) image reconstruction algorithms based on the assumption of a homogeneous sound speed in human tissue. However, the variation of the sound speed in human tissue can be as great as 10%, which can lead to low contrast, distortion, and blurring in reconstruction images. We proposed an automatic method of selecting the mean sound speed based on optimum focusing of received PA signals to enhance the quality of reconstructed PA images. Optimum focusing is quantified by calculating the minimum sum of the deviation of beamformed PA signals from their mean value for various sound speeds. The proposed method was demonstrated by homogeneous and heterogeneous sound speed simulation models, and also evaluated by experiments with agar and porcine tissue-mimicking phantoms. The central vertical and lateral profiles of reconstructed absorbers verified the improvement of contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and spatial resolution by using the estimated mean sound speed.

  16. Sound speed as a proxy variable to temperature in Fram Strait.

    PubMed

    Dushaw, Brian D; Sagen, Hanne; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    The application of ocean acoustic tomography in Fram Strait requires a careful assessment of the accuracy to which estimates of sound speed from tomography can be converted to estimates of temperature. The Fram Strait environment is turbulent, with warm, salty, northward-flowing North Atlantic water interacting with cold, fresh, southward-flowing Arctic water. The nature of this environment suggests that salinity could play an important role with respect to sound speed. The properties of sound speed with respect to temperature and salinity in this environment were examined using climatological and in situ glider data. In cold water, a factor of about 4.5 m s(-1) °C(-1) can be used to scale between sound speed and temperature. In situ data obtained by gliders were used to determine the ambiguities between temperature, salinity, and sound speed. Tomography provides a depth-averaging measurement. While errors in the sound speed-temperature conversion at particular depths may be 0.2 °C or larger, particularly within 50 m of the surface, such errors are suppressed when the depth is averaged. Using a simple scale factor to compute temperature from sound speed introduced an error of about 20 m °C for depth-averaged temperature, a value less than formal uncertainties estimated from acoustic tomography. PMID:27475184

  17. Speed of low-frequency sound through lungs of normal men.

    PubMed

    Kraman, S S

    1983-12-01

    The speed of propagation of vesicular lung sound through the lung has not been clearly established. In a recent study (J. Appl. Physiol.: Respirat. Environ. Exercise Physiol. 54: 304-308, 1983), Rice measured the speed of sound through the parenchyma of excised horse lungs and found it to be 25-70 m/s (less than 20% the speed of sound in air). Filling the lung with helium or sulfur hexafluoride changed the speed of transmission by less than 10%, indicating nongas propagation. The present study was designed to measure the speed of sound through human lungs in vivo. Five healthy, nonsmoking males (aged 27-38 yr) were studied. A microphone was placed on the neck beneath the larynx and another at each of eight locations on the chest wall. Measurements were made at functional residual capacity. White noise was band-pass filtered between 125 and 500 Hz, amplified, and delivered to a loudspeaker connected to a mouthpiece. The speed of sound was measured by cross-correlation analysis of the signals simultaneously detected by the tracheal and chest microphones. This was done after breathing both air and a mixture of 80% He in 20% O2 (He-O2). With air, the mean sound-transit time (trachea to chest wall) ranged from 2 ms at the upper chest to 5 ms at the lower chest (speed of approximately 30 m/s). With He-O2 the mean speed increased by only 10%, whereas the predicted increase of sound speed through gas alone would be greater than 100%. These results are consistent with the in vitro findings of Rice and suggest that within the frequency range of vesicular lung sounds transmission of sound introduced at the mouth is predominantly through the lung parenchyma, not through the airways. PMID:6662777

  18. Experimental measurement of speeds of sound in dense supercritical carbon monoxide and development of a high-pressure, high-temperature equation of state.

    PubMed

    Zaug, Joseph M; Carter, Jeffrey A; Bastea, Sorin; Armstrong, Michael R; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Fried, Laurence E

    2013-05-01

    We report the adiabatic sound speeds for supercritical fluid carbon monoxide along two isotherms, from 0.17 to 2.13 GPa at 297 K and from 0.31 to 3.2 GPa at 600 K. The carbon monoxide was confined in a resistively heated diamond-anvil cell, and the sound speed measurements were conducted in situ using a recently reported variant of the photoacoustic light scattering effect. The measured sound speeds were then used to parametrize a single site dipolar exponential-6 intermolecular potential for carbon monoxide. PρT thermodynamic states, sound speeds, and shock Hugoniots were calculated using the newly parametrized intermolecular potential and compared to previously reported experimental results. Additionally, we generated an analytical equation of state for carbon monoxide by fitting to a grid of calculated PρT states over a range of 0.1-10 GPa and 150-2000 K. A 2% mean variation was found between computed high-pressure solid-phase densities and measured data-a surprising result for a spherical interaction potential. We further computed a rotationally dependent fluid to β-solid phase boundary; results signal the relative magnitude of short-range rotational disorder under conditions that span existing phase boundary measurements. PMID:23586650

  19. Processing data, for improved, accuracy, from device for measuring speed of sound in a gas

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.

    2006-09-19

    A method, used in connection with a pulse-echo type sensor for determining the speed of sound in a gas, for improving the accuracy of speed of sound measurements. The sensor operates on the principle that speed of sound can be derived from the difference between the two-way travel time of signals reflected from two different target faces of the sensor. This time difference is derived by computing the cross correlation between the two reflections. The cross correlation function may be fitted to a parabola whose vertex represents the optimum time coordinate of the coherence peak, thereby providing an accurate measure of the two-way time diffference.

  20. Speed of sound as a function of temperature for ultrasonic propagation in soybean oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, P. A.; Silva, R. M. B.; Morais, G. C.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Félix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound has been used for characterization of liquid in several productive sectors and research. This work presents the studied about the behavior of the speed of sound in soybean oil with increasing temperature. The pulse echo technique allowed observing that the speed of sound decreases linearly with increasing temperature in the range 20 to 50 °C at 1 MHz. As result, a characteristic function capable to reproduce the speed of sound behavior in soybean oil, as a function of temperature was established, with the respective measurement uncertainty.

  1. Experimental study of the speed of sound in liquid and gaseous refrigerant R-407C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, S. G.; Stankus, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The speed of sound in liquid and gaseous refrigerant R-407C was measured by the method of ultrasonic interferometer in the temperature range from 293 to 373 K and pressure from 0.05 to 0.5 to 3.7 MPa. The experimental uncertainties of the temperature, pressure, and speed of sound measurements were estimated to be within ±20 mK, ±4 kPa, and ±(0.1-0.3) %, respectively. The obtained results are compared with the calculated speed of sound from the fundamental state equation for the Helmholtz free energy.

  2. Compact sound-speed sensor for quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Dong, Lei; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-04-01

    A compact sound-speed sensor based on a phase difference method was developed. The sensor employs a U-shaped stainless steel tube with two holes located on its front and back ends, which serves as a sound wave guide. The phase difference between the two holes was measured using two mini-microphones by means of a phase-sensitive detection technique. This method offers the advantage of eliminating the influence of signal fluctuations. The frequency of a sound source offered by a loudspeaker can be scanned between 1 kHz and 50 kHz. The slope of the phase difference as a function of frequency was obtained by scanning the frequency of the sound source. The speed of sound was retrieved from the rate of change of the phase difference. The performance of the sensor was evaluated over a wide range of speeds of sound from 260 m/s to 1010 m/s in different gas mixtures. The measured speed of sound was found to be in good agreement with the theoretical value for the sound-speed sensor.

  3. Compact sound-speed sensor for quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy based applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Dong, Lei; Tittel, Frank K

    2015-04-01

    A compact sound-speed sensor based on a phase difference method was developed. The sensor employs a U-shaped stainless steel tube with two holes located on its front and back ends, which serves as a sound wave guide. The phase difference between the two holes was measured using two mini-microphones by means of a phase-sensitive detection technique. This method offers the advantage of eliminating the influence of signal fluctuations. The frequency of a sound source offered by a loudspeaker can be scanned between 1 kHz and 50 kHz. The slope of the phase difference as a function of frequency was obtained by scanning the frequency of the sound source. The speed of sound was retrieved from the rate of change of the phase difference. The performance of the sensor was evaluated over a wide range of speeds of sound from 260 m/s to 1010 m/s in different gas mixtures. The measured speed of sound was found to be in good agreement with the theoretical value for the sound-speed sensor.

  4. Analysis of a method for computing the speed of sound in a medium with inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    A method for computing the speed of sound in a medium with inclusions with the help of the theory of multiple scattering of a plane wave on a doubly periodic multilayered lattice of transparent particles is proposed.

  5. Reflectivity Reconstruction Based on Adaptive Speed of Sound Estimation from Reflection Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weiquan

    The reflectivity image reconstructed by the synthetic focus algorithm has been verified to be one of the highest in resolution of any ultrasound imaging systems. However present imaging systems with the synthetic focus algorithm suffer from signal registration problems due to diffraction and refraction effects. Recent research efforts on refraction correction for reflection imaging are based on speed of sound estimation. One approach is to determine the speed of the sound map from transmission information. In this technique, both reflection and transmission data are required. Unfortunately, it is difficult to acquire both transmission and reflection in many practical medical environments. In this dissertation, a new reflectivity reconstruction technique is investigated in which the speed of sound estimation is determined only from the reflection data. This method of speed of sound estimation is based on an optimization approach. The speed of sound of the imaging region is updated iterately based one optimization. The criterion employed is the minimization of an objective functional. In particular, the alignment error functional, correlation functional or brightness functional are defined and then investigated. These objective functionals are all dependent on the speed of sound. During the process of minimizing the objective functional with respect to the speed of sound, an approximation to the true speed of sound is determined adaptively. To minimize these specific objective functionals, the conjugate gradient method with line search and with quadratic approximation is investigated. For such a large optimization problem, an undesired local minimum is often found. The penalty function technique is suggested to overcome this local minimum problem. Due to the limitation of available computer capability, all the methods developed are first investigated by a 8 x 8 grid reconstruction of speed of sound. Finally, the simulation results for a lager 64 x 64 reflectivity

  6. An Inexpensive and Versatile Version of Kundt's Tube for Measuring the Speed of Sound in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papacosta, Pangratios; Linscheid, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Experiments that measure the speed of sound in air are common in high schools and colleges. In the Kundt's tube experiment, a horizontal air column is adjusted until a resonance mode is achieved for a specific frequency of sound. When this happens, the cork dust in the tube is disturbed at the displacement antinode regions. The location of the…

  7. Direct measurement of the speed of sound using a microphone and a speaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Tejedor, José A.; Castro-Palacio, Juan C.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2014-05-01

    We present a simple and accurate experiment to obtain the speed of sound in air using a conventional speaker and a microphone connected to a computer. A free open source digital audio editor and recording computer software application allows determination of the time-of-flight of the wave for different distances, from which the speed of sound is calculated. The result is in very good agreement with the reported value in the literature.

  8. Speed of sound in hadronic matter using non-extensive Tsallis statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuntia, Arvind; Sahoo, Pragati; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath; Cleymans, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The speed of sound ( cs) is studied to understand the hydrodynamical evolution of the matter created in heavy-ion collisions. The quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formed in heavy-ion collisions evolves from an initial QGP to the hadronic phase via a possible mixed phase. Due to the system expansion in a first-order phase transition scenario, the speed of sound reduces to zero as the specific heat diverges. We study the speed of sound for systems which deviate from a thermalized Boltzmann distribution using non-extensive Tsallis statistics. In the present work, we calculate the speed of sound as a function of temperature for different q-values for a hadron resonance gas. We observe a similar mass cut-off behaviour in the non-extensive case for c2s by including heavier particles, as is observed in the case of a hadron resonance gas following equilibrium statistics. Also, we explicitly show that the temperature where the mass cut-off starts varies with the q-parameter which hints at a relation between the degree of non-equilibrium and the limiting temperature of the system. It is shown that for values of q above approximately 1.13 all criticality disappears in the speed of sound, i.e. the decrease in the value of the speed of sound, observed at lower values of q, disappears completely.

  9. Calculation of the relative speed of sound in a gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, M J; Maitland, G

    1975-12-01

    Since the frequency spectrum of a voice signal is directly dependent on the velocity of sound, studies of speech spectra include the problem of calculating the speed of sound in the gas mixture being used. A computer program written in BASIC has been developed to calculate the speed of sound relative to air in various diving gas mixtures. In addition, a set of tables available as a separate technical report has been generated using this program. These tables are designed to provide a standard reference for reporting spectral shifts in speech due to different gas mixtures under normal diving conditions. PMID:1226588

  10. Measuring the Speed of Sound Using Only a Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bin, Mo

    2013-01-01

    corresponding time to cover that distance. But sound travels rapidly, covering about one meter in three milliseconds. This challenge can be met by using only a computer and an external microphone. A fixed frequency (1000 Hz) is fed into the computer's speaker and the…

  11. Measuring the Speed of Sound Using Only a Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Mo

    2013-05-01

    In high school, velocity is usually calculated by measuring distance and the corresponding time to cover that distance. But sound travels rapidly, covering about one meter in three milliseconds. This challenge can be met by using only a computer and an external microphone. A fixed frequency (1000 Hz) is fed into the computer's speaker and the external microphone monitors this wave train close to the speaker. Then the microphone is moved about a meter further away. This produces a waveform shift that, when compared to the original wave train recording, gives a precise measure of the number of wavelengths shifted. The flight time is this number times the period. Thus, the velocity of sound is calculated by dividing the distance the microphone was moved by this flight time.

  12. An audible demonstration of the speed of sound in bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Preston S.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2008-10-01

    The speed of sound in a bubbly liquid is strongly dependent upon the volume fraction of the gas phase, the bubble size distribution, and the frequency of the acoustic excitation. At sufficiently low frequencies, the speed of sound depends primarily on the gas volume fraction. This effect can be audibly demonstrated using a one-dimensional acoustic waveguide, in which the flow rate of air bubbles injected into a water-filled tube is varied by the user. The normal modes of the waveguide are excited by the sound of the bubbles being injected into the tube. As the flow rate is varied, the speed of sound varies as well, and hence, the resonance frequencies shift. This can be clearly heard through the use of an amplified hydrophone and the user can create aesthetically pleasing and even musical sounds. In addition, the apparatus can be used to verify a simple mathematical model known as Wood's equation that relates the speed of sound of a bubbly liquid to its void fraction.

  13. Evaluation of eye tissue elasticity by means of sound propagation speed measuring in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispim, Joao; Bogar, Adriano; Allemann, Norma; Neto, Jarbas C. C.; Chamon, Wallace

    2015-06-01

    Introduction: To date, it has never been demonstrated the propagation sound speed in human corneas and lens in vivo. With the advent of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), it became possible to determine the dimensions of the ocular tissues without the interference of sound propagation speed and to use this information to define the real propagation sound speed for each patient and individualized structure. Aim: To determine the sound propagation speed in the cornea and lens from patients that theoretically exhibits differences in tissue elasticity (normal corneas and keratoconus, corneas of young and elderly patients, in addition to clear crystalline lens from young and elderly patients with cataract). Then, relate the determined velocity in each group with the expected tissue elasticity of the cornea and lens. Methods: We studied 100 eyes from 50 patients: 50 with keratoconus and no cataract and 50 with cataract and no corneal changes. All patients measured corneal and lens thickness by ultrasound methods (Ultrasonic Biomicroscopy - UBM and Ultrasonic Pachymetry - USP) and by OCT (RTVue®, Lenstar® and Visante®), then were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (Cornea) analyzed the central corneal thickness (UBM, USP, RTVue®, Visante®, Lenstar®); Group 2 (Lens) analyzed the axial thickness of the lens (UBM and Lenstar®). Based on standard ultrasonic speed from USP (1640 m/s) and UBM (1548 m/s), we calculated the real sound propagation speed in each tissue. Results: Based on USP, the corneal sound speed on control group (1616 m/s) was faster than on keratoconus group (1547 m/s) (P < 0.0001). Based on UBM, the lens sound speed on cataract group (1664 m/s) was faster that on control group (1605 m/s) (P < 0.0001). Discussion: It is known that sound propagates faster in materials with lower elasticity. We found that the sound speed on keratoconic corneas (high elasticity) was slower and on cataract lens (lower elasticity) was faster than normal corneas and lens in vivo.

  14. Detecting Temporal Change in Dynamic Sounds: On the Role of Stimulus Duration, Speed, and Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Annett; Escoffier, Nicolas; Cheng, Xiaoqin; Feng, Yenju; Penney, Trevor B.

    2016-01-01

    For dynamic sounds, such as vocal expressions, duration often varies alongside speed. Compared to longer sounds, shorter sounds unfold more quickly. Here, we asked whether listeners implicitly use this confound when representing temporal regularities in their environment. In addition, we explored the role of emotions in this process. Using a mismatch negativity (MMN) paradigm, we asked participants to watch a silent movie while passively listening to a stream of task-irrelevant sounds. In Experiment 1, one surprised and one neutral vocalization were compressed and stretched to create stimuli of 378 and 600 ms duration. Stimuli were presented in four blocks, two of which used surprised and two of which used neutral expressions. In one surprised and one neutral block, short and long stimuli served as standards and deviants, respectively. In the other two blocks, the assignment of standards and deviants was reversed. We observed a climbing MMN-like negativity shortly after deviant onset, which suggests that listeners implicitly track sound speed and detect speed changes. Additionally, this MMN-like effect emerged earlier and was larger for long than short deviants, suggesting greater sensitivity to duration increments or slowing down than to decrements or speeding up. Last, deviance detection was facilitated in surprised relative to neutral blocks, indicating that emotion enhances temporal processing. Experiment 2 was comparable to Experiment 1 with the exception that sounds were spectrally rotated to remove vocal emotional content. This abolished the emotional processing benefit, but preserved the other effects. Together, these results provide insights into listener sensitivity to sound speed and raise the possibility that speed biases duration judgements implicitly in a feed-forward manner. Moreover, this bias may be amplified for duration increments relative to decrements and within an emotional relative to a neutral stimulus context. PMID:26793161

  15. Vibrational Spectra and Heat Capacity of Methane, and the Speed of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennis, Ronald; Bailey, Ryan; Henderson, Giles

    2000-12-01

    A two-part physical chemistry laboratory experiment is described in which students evaluate statistical mechanical theory by comparing a measured speed of sound and heat capacity with values predicted from vibrational spectra. In part 1 students measure the IR spectrum of CH4(g) and the Raman spectrum of CH4(l) to determine quantized vibrational energy spacings. Strong Raman scattering of a pulsed nitrogen laser beam is observed with a liquid methane sample in a custom cryogenic cell constructed from two side-arm test tubes and a length of Pyrex tube. These data are used with the statistical mechanics of a harmonic oscillator to calculate vibrational heat capacities and CP/CV; of CH4(g) and the speed of sound in CH4(g). In part 2, the predicted speed of sound is compared with an experimental value measured with a simple acoustic resonance cavity (Kundt's tube) exhausted to a Bunsen burner.

  16. A new process to estimate the speed of sound using three-sensor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Alexandre; Martinez-Molina, John-Jairo; Fortes-Patella, Regiane

    2016-01-01

    As a part of complex works aiming at the evaluation of the pump's dynamic transfer matrix, this paper presents an estimation method of the speed of sound in water and water/air flows using three pressure transducer measurements. The experimental study was carried out at the CREMHyG acoustic test rig, for a void ratio varying from 0 to 1 % and for amplitudes of speed of sound from 100 to 1400 m/s. To estimate the speed of sound in this large range of amplitude, a new post-treatment approach was developed, based on the least mean squares method. Experimental results obtained were compared with existing theoretical models, and a very good agreement was observed. The post-processing appeared fast, robust and accurate for all the mono- and diphasic flows analyzed. The results presented in this paper can be applied, for instance, in acoustic characterization of the hydraulic systems, mainly in the case of space rocket turbopump applications.

  17. SOUND-SPEED INVERSION OF THE SUN USING A NONLOCAL STATISTICAL CONVECTION THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chunguang; Deng Licai; Xiong Darun; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen

    2012-11-01

    Helioseismic inversions reveal a major discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and the standard solar model just below the base of the solar convection zone. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is caused by the inherent shortcomings of the local mixing-length theory adopted in the standard solar model. Using a self-consistent nonlocal convection theory, we construct an envelope model of the Sun for sound-speed inversion. Our solar model has a very smooth transition from the convective envelope to the radiative interior, and the convective energy flux changes sign crossing the boundaries of the convection zone. It shows evident improvement over the standard solar model, with a significant reduction in the discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and local convection models.

  18. Accuracy limitations on Brillouin lidar measurements of temperature and sound speed in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Fry, E S; Emery, Y; Quan, X; Katz, J W

    1997-09-20

    There are five mutually dependent variables relevant to Brillouin lidar measurements of temperature and sound speed in the ocean; they are (1) the Brillouin shift, (2) the sound speed, (3) the index of refraction, (4) the temperature, and (5) the salinity. We use three well-known relations to analyze rigorously the interdependence of these five variables. Clearly, a Brillouin shift measurement does not provide a stand-alone determination of temperature or sound speed; one more variable or one more relation must be known. The use of mean values of salinity that have been obtained by an analysis of a large set of historical in situ data is considered for this additional relation. PMID:18259560

  19. Effect of Disorder on Bulk Sound Wave Speed : A Multiscale Spectral Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Rohit; Luding, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Disorder in the form of size (polydispersity) and mass of discrete elements/particles in a disordered media (a granular matter like soil) have numerous effects on it's sound propagation characteristics [1,2]. The influence of disorder on the sound wave speed and it's frequency filtering characteristics is the subject of investigation. The study will assist in understanding the connection between particle-scale dynamics and system-scale behavior of wave propagation which can be further used for modeling during non-destructive testing, seismic exploration of buried objects (oil, mineral, etc.) or to study the internal structure of the Earth. Studying the wave propagation characteristics through Discrete Element Models with varying polydispersity and mass of discrete elements in real-time, frequency space as well as through dispersion curves (ω (frequency) v/s k (wavenumber)) can shed light on this aspect by providing better microscopic understanding. To isolate the P-wave from shear and rotational modes, a one-dimensional system of elements/particles is used to study the effect of mass disorder on bulk sound wave speed through ensemble averaging of signals. Increasing polydispersity/disorder decreases the sound wave speed because of decrease in the number of contacts between particles [2] but, in contrast, increasing mass disorder increases the sound wave speed (in 1 D chains). Thus we conclude that a competition exists between these two kinds of disorder for their influence on the bulk sound wave speed. References [1] Brian P. Lawney and Stefan Luding. Frequency filtering in disordered granular chains. Acta Mechanica, 225(8):2385-2407, 2014. [2] O. Mouraille and S. Luding. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials. Ultrasonics, 48(6-7):498 - 505, 2008. Selected Papers from ICU 2007.

  20. A Method for Direct Localized Sound Speed Estimates Using Registered Virtual Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Byram, Brett C.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate sound speed estimates are desirable in a number of fields. In an effort to increase the spatial resolution of sound speed estimates, a new method is proposed for direct measurement of sound speed between arbitrary spatial locations. The method uses the sound speed estimator developed by Anderson and Trahey. Their least squares fit of the received waveform’s curvature provides an estimate of the wave’s point of origin. The point of origin and the delay profile calculated from the fit are used to arrive at a spatially registered virtual detector. Between a pair of registered virtual detectors, a spherical wave is propagated. By beamforming the data, the time-of-flight between the two virtual sources can be calculated. From this information, the local sound speed can be estimated. Validation of the estimator is made using phantom and simulation data. The set of test phantoms consisted of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous media. Several different inhomogeneous phantom configurations were used for the physical validation. The simulation validation focused on the limits of target depth and signal-to-noise ratio on virtual detector registration. The simulations also compare the impact of two- and three-layer inhomogeneous media. The phantom results varied based on signal-to-noise ratio and geometry. The results for all cases were generally less than 1% mean error and standard deviation. The simulation results varied somewhat with depth and F/#, but primarily, they varied with signal-to-noise ratio and geometry. With two-layer geometries, the algorithm has a worst-case spatial registration bias of 0.02%. With three-layer geometries, the axial registration error gets worse with a bias magnitude up to 2.1% but is otherwise relatively stable over depth. The stability over depth of the bias in a given medium still allows for accurate sound speed estimates with a mean relative error less than 0.2%. PMID:22972913

  1. First-arrival traveltime sound speed inversion with a priori information

    PubMed Central

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A first-arrival travel-time sound speed algorithm presented byTarantola [Inverse Problem Theory and Methods for Model Parameter Estimation (SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 2005)] is adapted to the medical ultrasonics setting. Through specification of a covariance matrix for the object model, the algorithm allows for natural inclusion of physical a priori information of the object. The algorithm's ability to accurately and robustly reconstruct a complex sound speed distribution is demonstrated on simulation and experimental data using a limited aperture. Methods: The algorithm is first demonstrated generally in simulation with a numerical breast phantom imaged in different geometries. As this work is motivated by the authors' limited aperture dual sided ultrasound breast imaging system, experimental data are acquired with a Verasonics system with dual, 128 element, linear L7-4 arrays. The transducers are automatically calibrated for usage in the eikonal forward model.A priori information such as knowledge of correlated regions within the object is obtained via segmentation of B-mode images generated from synthetic aperture imaging. Results: As one illustration of the algorithm's facility for inclusion ofa priori information, physically grounded regularization is demonstrated in simulation. The algorithm's practicality is then demonstrated through experimental realization in limited aperture cases. Reconstructions of sound speed distributions of various complexity are improved through inclusion of a priori information. The sound speed maps are generally reconstructed with accuracy within a few m/s. Conclusions: This paper demonstrates the ability to form sound speed images using two opposed commercial linear arrays to mimic ultrasound image acquisition in the compressed mammographic geometry. The ability to create reasonably good speed of sound images in the compressed mammographic geometry allows images to be readily coregistered to tomosynthesis image volumes for

  2. Transcranial ultrasound imaging with speed of sound-based phase correction: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianren; Jing, Yun

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical study for ultrasound transcranial imaging. To correct for the phase aberration from the skull, two critical steps are needed prior to brain imaging. In the first step, the skull shape and speed of sound are acquired by either CT scans or ultrasound scans. In the ultrasound scan approach, phased array and double focusing technique are utilized, which are able to estimate the thickness of the skull with a maximum error of around 10% and the average speed of sound in the skull is underestimated by less than 2%. In the second step, the fast marching method is used to compute the phase delay based on the known skull shape and sound speed from the first step, and the computation can be completed in seconds for 2D problems. The computed phase delays are then used in combination with the conventional delay-and-sum algorithm for generating B-mode images. Images of wire phantoms with CT or ultrasound scan-based phase correction are shown to have much less artifact than the ones without correction. Errors of deducing speed of sound from CT scans are also discussed regarding its effect on the transcranial ultrasound images. Assuming the speed of sound grows linearly with the density, this study shows that, the CT-based phase correction approach can provide clear images of wire phantoms even if the speed of sound is overestimated by 400 m s-1, or the linear coefficient is overestimated by 40%. While in this study, ultrasound scan-based phase correction performs almost equally well with the CT-based approach, potential problems are identified and discussed.

  3. Transcranial ultrasound imaging with speed of sound-based phase correction: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianren; Jing, Yun

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical study for ultrasound transcranial imaging. To correct for the phase aberration from the skull, two critical steps are needed prior to brain imaging. In the first step, the skull shape and speed of sound are acquired by either CT scans or ultrasound scans. In the ultrasound scan approach, phased array and double focusing technique are utilized, which are able to estimate the thickness of the skull with a maximum error of around 10% and the average speed of sound in the skull is underestimated by less than 2%. In the second step, the fast marching method is used to compute the phase delay based on the known skull shape and sound speed from the first step, and the computation can be completed in seconds for 2D problems. The computed phase delays are then used in combination with the conventional delay-and-sum algorithm for generating B-mode images. Images of wire phantoms with CT or ultrasound scan-based phase correction are shown to have much less artifact than the ones without correction. Errors of deducing speed of sound from CT scans are also discussed regarding its effect on the transcranial ultrasound images. Assuming the speed of sound grows linearly with the density, this study shows that, the CT-based phase correction approach can provide clear images of wire phantoms even if the speed of sound is overestimated by 400 m s(-1), or the linear coefficient is overestimated by 40%. While in this study, ultrasound scan-based phase correction performs almost equally well with the CT-based approach, potential problems are identified and discussed.

  4. Device for precision measurement of speed of sound in a gas

    DOEpatents

    Kelner, Eric; Minachi, Ali; Owen, Thomas E.; Burzynski, Jr., Marion; Petullo, Steven P.

    2004-11-30

    A sensor for measuring the speed of sound in a gas. The sensor has a helical coil, through which the gas flows before entering an inner chamber. Flow through the coil brings the gas into thermal equilibrium with the test chamber body. After the gas enters the chamber, a transducer produces an ultrasonic pulse, which is reflected from each of two faces of a target. The time difference between the two reflected signals is used to determine the speed of sound in the gas.

  5. Sound from a Two-Blade Propeller at Supersonic Tip Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H; Lassiter, Leslie W

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of sound measurements at static conditions made for a two-blade 47-inch-diameter propeller in the tip Mach number range 0.75 to 1.30. For comparison, spectrums have been obtained at both subsonic and supersonic tip speeds. In addition, the measured data are compared with calculations by the theory of Gutin which has previously been found adequate for predicting the sound at subsonic tip speeds. Curves are presented from which the maximum over-all noise levels in free space may be estimated if the power, tip Mach number, and distance are known.

  6. Preliminary mapping of void fractions and sound speeds in gassy marine sediments from subbottom profiles.

    PubMed

    Leighton, T G; Robb, G B N

    2008-11-01

    Bubbles of gas (usually methane) in marine sediments affect the load-bearing properties of the seabed and act as a natural reservoir of "greenhouse" gas. This paper describes a simple method which can be applied to historical and future subbottom profiles to infer bubble void fractions and map the vertical and horizontal distributions of gassy sediments, and the associated sound speed perturbations, even with single-frequency insonification. It operates by identifying horizontal features in the geology and interpreting any perceived change of depth in these as a bubble-mediated change in sound speed. PMID:19045684

  7. The low-frequency sound speed of fluid-like gas-bearing sediments.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Preston S; Reed, Allen H; Wood, Warren T; Roy, Ronald A

    2008-04-01

    The low-frequency sound speed in a fluid-like kaolinite sediment containing air bubbles was measured using an acoustic resonator technique and found to be 114 ms with negligible dispersion between 100 and 400 Hz. The sediment's void fraction and bubble size distribution was determined from volumetric images obtained from x-ray computed tomography scans. A simplified version of Wood's effective medium model, which is dependent only upon the ambient pressure, the void fraction, the sediment's bulk mass density, and the assumption that all the bubbles are smaller than resonance size at the highest frequency of interest, described the measured sound speed. PMID:18396928

  8. Speed of sound in nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagermann, Axel; Zarnecki, John C.

    2005-09-01

    Speed of sound measurements in nitrogen by Younglove and McCarty [J. Chem. Thermodynam. 12, 1121-1128 (1980)] are revisited and an empirical polynomial equation for the speed of sound is derived. The polynomial coefficients differ from those given by Wong and Wu [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 650-651 (1997)] with the result that discrepancies between predicted and measured values at low temperatures are reduced. The maximal error over the complete temperature and pressure range from 80 to 350 K and 0.031 to 0.709 MPa is reduced from 5.38% to 0.78%.

  9. Sound Speed Measurement of Chicken Liver from 22°C to 60°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Valdez, R.; Contreras, M. V. H.; Vera, A.; Leija, L.

    Soft tissue acoustic characterization has been widely explored in order to understand the ultrasonic bio-effects. Speed of sound and attenuation are the most frequently measured parameters. In hyperthermia and ablation applications, tissue temperature increases due to ultrasound exposure. Sound speed temperature dependence of 10 chicken liver samples was measured in order to obtain its behavior at hyperthermia temperature interval. Pulse-echo technique was used for measuring the ultrasound speed of the tissue sample. Sound speed measurement in chicken liver at 21.8 ̊C was 1588.2 m/s, while at 60.5 ̊C was 1609.3 m/s. With these results, we proposed a 5th order polynomial to fit the curve described by the ultrasound velocity temperature dependence in chicken liver of the form cliver=2.664e-6T5-0.000536T4+0.04192T3-1.615T2+31.76T+1337, where cliver is sound speed in chicken liver and T is the temperature. It is clear that more experimentation is needed in order to have final results.

  10. High speed processing of topside ionosphere sounding data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamlutti, C.

    The problem of converting virtual height frequency records (h'(f) curves) produced by topside ionosondes to electron density height profiles (ne (h) curves) is the main task to get large amounts of data analyzed. The data collected by the Allouette and ISIS sounder satellites programs overcame the expectations and a huge amount of it is still untouched. So, in this work one looks for a way to a high speed processing alternative to help solving this trouble. The chosen method is the polynomial type developed by Titheridge (1961) and improved by Thomas et al (1963). Polynomials of order 6 or 7 may be necessary for a satisfactory analysis of data. This polynomial order allows the determination of the mean ionic mass, electron and ion temperatures and their respective gradients. These results, combined with the simultaneous measurements of electron and ion temperatures using independent probes, provide a complete and consistent set of information on the sounder satellite coverage.

  11. Can the speed of sound be used for detecting critical states of fluid mixtures?

    PubMed

    Reis, João Carlos R; Ribeiro, Nuno; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana

    2006-01-12

    The phenomenology of sound speeds in fluid mixtures is examined near and across critical lines. Using literature data for binary and ternary mixtures, it is shown that the ultrasound speed along an isotherm-isopleth passes through a minimum value in the form of an angular (or V-shaped) point at critical states. The relation between critical and pseudo-critical coordinates is discussed. For nonazeotropic fixed-composition fluid mixtures, pseudo-critical temperatures and pressures are found to be lower than the corresponding critical temperatures and pressures. The analysis shows that unstable pseudo-critical states cannot be detected using acoustic methods. The thermodynamic link between sound speeds and isochoric heat capacities is formulated and discussed in terms of p-Vm-T derivatives capable of being calculated using cubic equations of state. Based on the Griffiths-Wheeler theory of critical phenomena, a new specific link between critical sound speeds and critical isochoric heat capacities is deduced in terms of the rate of change of critical pressures and critical temperatures along the p-T projection of the critical locus of binary fluid mixtures. It is shown that the latter link can be used to obtain estimates of critical isochoric heat capacities from the experimental determination of critical speeds of sound. The applicability domain of the new link does not include binary systems at compositions along the critical line for which the rate of change in pressure with temperature changes sign. The new equation is combined with thermodynamic data to provide approximate numerical estimates for the speed of sound in two mixtures of carbon dioxide and ethane at different temperatures along their critical isochores. A clear decrease in the sound speed is found at critical points. A similar behavior is suggested by available critical heat capacity data for several binary fluid mixtures. Using an acoustic technique, the critical temperature and pressure were

  12. Multi-frequency characterization of speed of sound for longitudinal transmission on freshly excised human skulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-03-01

    The results of measurements of longitudinal speed of sound are presented for seven specimens of human calvaria. The study was done for frequencies between 0.27 and 2.525 MHz. Specimens were obtained from fresh cadavers through a protocol with the Division of Anatomy of the University of Toronto. The specimens were mounted in polycarbonate frames that were marked for stereoscopic positioning. CT scans of the skulls mounted on their frames were performed and a three-dimensional reconstruction of the skull surface was done. A positioning system ensured normal sound incidence of an acoustic signal produced by a focused device with a diameter of 5 cm and a focal length of 10 cm. Speed of sound estimation was done with measurements of time-of-flight using a needle hydrophone (diameter of 0.5 mm) and a sound propagation model through layers that takes into account change of speed of sound in function of density. For six of seven specimens, measurements were done on five locations on the calvaria and for the other specimen three measurements were done. In total, measurements were done on thirty-three locations. Results showed that the average (±s.d.) of the speed of sound was 2265(±202), 2360(±207), 2317(±283), 2309(±248) and 2080(±148) mṡs-1 for frequencies of 0.27, 0.836, 1.402, 1.965 and 2.525 MHz, respectively. Dispersion effects were observed at individual basis per specimen, which were detected for the six of specimens as in increase in the speed sound when frequency went from 0.27 to 0.836 MHz. However, this increase was only statistically significant (p-value⩽0.05) for two specimens, with a maximal increase of +152 mṡs-1. A decrease in the speed of sound was also observed for four specimens when the frequency reached the highest values but it was statistically significant only for one of them (p = 0.03), with a decrease of -229 mṡs-1.

  13. How speed-of-sound measurements could bring constraints on the composition of Titan's seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, D.

    2016-06-01

    The hydrocarbon seas of Titan, discovered by the Cassini/Huygens mission are among the most mysterious and interesting features of this moon. In the future, a possible dedicated planetary probe will certainly measure the speed of sound in this cryogenic liquid, as was planned in the case of Huygens landing in a sea. Previous theoretical studies of such acoustic measurements were based on simple models, leading in some cases to unphysical situations. Employed in a vast body of chemical engineering works, the state-of-the-art perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) model has been recently introduced in studies aimed at Titan. Here, I revisit the issue of the speed of sound in Titan's liquids, in light of this theory. I describe, in detail, the derivation of the speed of sound from the chosen equation of state and the potential limitations of the approach. To make estimations of the composition of a ternary liquid mixture N2:CH4:C2H6 from speed-of-sound measurements an original inversion algorithm is proposed. It is shown that 50 measures between 90 and 100 K are enough to ensure an accuracy of the derived compositions of better than 10 per cent. The influence of the possible presence of propane is also investigated.

  14. Time-of-Flight Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    A simple setup is designed to investigate a "time-of-flight" measurement of the speed of sound in water. This experiment only requires low cost components and is also very simple to understand by students. It could be easily used as a demonstration experiment.

  15. Range dependent sediment sound speed profile measurements using the image source method.

    PubMed

    Pinson, S; Guillon, L; Holland, C W

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a range dependent sediment sound speed profile measurement obtained using the image source method. This technique is based on the analysis of the seafloor reflected acoustic wave as a collection of image sources which positions are linked with the thick-nesses and the sound speed of the sediment stack. The data used were acquired by the NURC in 2009 during the Clutter09 experiment. The equipment used was an autonomous undersea vehicle towing a 1600-3500 Hz frequency band source and a 32 m horizontal line array of 32 hydrophones at 12 m above the seabed. Under the assumption of locally range independent seabed properties, the moving horizontal array provides successive range independent sediment sound speed profiles along a track to obtain the range and depth dependent structure of the seafloor. Two key steps include recovery of the time-varying unknown array shape from the data and spatial filtering of the successive sound speed profiles. A comparison of the image source method result and seismic data along nearly the same 14 km track indicates that the seabed stratigraphy is correctly mapped by this method. PMID:23862794

  16. Determination of correlation functions of turbulent velocity and sound speed fluctuations by means of ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Tatiana A.; Durgin, William W.

    2011-12-01

    An experimental study of the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through grid-generated turbulence by means of an ultrasound technique is discussed. Experimental data were obtained for ultrasonic wave propagation downstream of heated and non-heated grids in a wind tunnel. A semi-analytical acoustic propagation model that allows the determination of the spatial correlation functions of the flow field is developed based on the classical flowmeter equation and the statistics of the travel time of acoustic waves traveling through the kinematic and thermal turbulence. The basic flowmeter equation is reconsidered in order to take into account sound speed fluctuations and turbulent velocity fluctuations. It allows deriving an integral equation that relates the correlation functions of travel time, sound speed fluctuations and turbulent velocity fluctuations. Experimentally measured travel time statistics of data with and without grid heating are approximated by an exponential function and used to analytically solve the integral equation. The reconstructed correlation functions of the turbulent velocity and sound speed fluctuations are presented. The power spectral density of the turbulent velocity and sound speed fluctuations are calculated.

  17. Time-of-Flight Measurement of the Speed of Sound in a Metal Bar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    A simple setup was designed for a "time-of-flight" measurement of the sound speed in a metal bar. The experiment requires low cost components and is very simple to understand by students. A good use of it is as a demonstration experiment.

  18. Time-of-flight measurement of the speed of sound in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2016-05-01

    A simple setup is designed to investigate a time-of-flight measurement of the speed of sound in water. This experiment only requires low cost components and is also very simple to understand by students. It could be easily used as a demonstration experiment.

  19. Comments on "Speed of Sound in Metal Pipes: An Inexpensive Lab"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blodgett, Earl D.

    2009-01-01

    In a recent article Huggins outlines a very simple method of measuring the speed of sound in metal pipes by striking one end with a hammer and recording the transit time as the resultant pulse echoes back and forth. We immediately adapted this for use in an introductory laboratory where we are familiarizing students with the measurement of…

  20. Smartphone-Aided Measurements of the Speed of Sound in Different Gaseous Mixtures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parolin, Sara Orsola; Pezzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe classroom-based procedures aiming at the estimation of the speed of sound in different gas mixtures with the help of a plastic drain pipe and two iPhones or iPod touches. The procedures were conceived to be performed with simple and readily available tools.

  1. Time-angle sensitivity kernels for sound-speed perturbations in a shallow ocean.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Florian; Nicolas, Barbara; Roux, Philippe; Mars, Jérôme I

    2013-07-01

    Acoustic waves traveling in a shallow-water waveguide produce a set of multiple paths that can be characterized as a geometric approximation by their travel time (TT), direction of arrival (DOA), and direction of departure (DOD). This study introduces the use of the DOA and DOD as additional observables that can be combined to the classical TT to track sound-speed perturbations in an oceanic waveguide. To model the TT, DOA, and DOD variations induced by sound-speed perturbations, the three following steps are used: (1) In the first-order Born approximation, the Fréchet kernel provides a linear link between the signal fluctuations and the sound-speed perturbations; (2) a double-beamforming algorithm is used to transform the signal fluctuations received on two source-receiver arrays in the time, receiver-depth, and source-depth domain into the eigenray equivalent measured in the time, reception-angle and launch angle domain; and finally (3) the TT, DOA, and DOD variations are extracted from the double-beamformed signal variations through a first-order Taylor development. As a result, time-angle sensitivity kernels are defined and used to build a linear relationship between the observable variations and the sound-speed perturbations. This approach is validated with parabolic-equation simulations in a shallow-water ocean context.

  2. An Undergraduate Experiment for the Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Air: Phenomena and Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hujiang; Zhao, Xiaohong; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Jinghua

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss some phenomena in an undergraduate experiment for the measurement of the speed of sound in air. A square wave distorts when connected to a piezoelectric transducer. Moreover, the amplitude of the receiving signal varies with the driving frequency. Comparing with the Gibbs phenomenon, these phenomena can be…

  3. Observations of sound-speed fluctuations in the western Philippine Sea in the spring of 2009.

    PubMed

    Colosi, John A; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Cornuelle, Bruce D; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Worcester, Peter F; Dushaw, Brian D; Ramp, Steven R

    2013-10-01

    As an aid to understanding long-range acoustic propagation in the Philippine Sea, statistical and phenomenological descriptions of sound-speed variations were developed. Two moorings of oceanographic sensors located in the western Philippine Sea in the spring of 2009 were used to track constant potential-density surfaces (isopycnals) and constant potential-temperature surfaces (isotherms) in the depth range 120-2000 m. The vertical displacements of these surfaces are used to estimate sound-speed fluctuations from internal waves, while temperature/salinity variability along isopycnals are used to estimate sound-speed fluctuations from intrusive structure often termed spice. Frequency spectra and vertical covariance functions are used to describe the space-time scales of the displacements and spiciness. Internal-wave contributions from diurnal and semi-diurnal internal tides and the diffuse internal-wave field [related to the Garrett-Munk (GM) spectrum] are found to dominate the sound-speed variability. Spice fluctuations are weak in comparison. The internal wave and spice frequency spectra have similar form in the upper ocean but are markedly different below 170-m depth. Diffuse internal-wave mode spectra show a form similar to the GM model, while internal-tide mode spectra scale as mode number to the minus two power. Spice decorrelates rapidly with depth, with a typical correlation scale of tens of meters.

  4. SOLAR-CYCLE VARIATION OF SOUND SPEED NEAR THE SOLAR SURFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Rabello-Soares, M. C.

    2012-02-01

    We present evidence that the sound-speed variation with solar activity has a two-layer configuration, similar to the one observed below an active region, which consists of a negative layer near the solar surface and a positive one in the layer immediately below the first one. Frequency differences between the activity minimum and maximum of solar cycle 23, obtained applying global helioseismology to the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, is used to determine the sound-speed variation from below the base of the convection zone to a few Mm below the solar surface. We find that the sound speed at solar maximum is smaller than at solar minimum at the limit of our determination (5.5 Mm). The min-to-max difference decreases in absolute values until {approx}7 Mm. At larger depths, the sound speed at solar maximum is larger than at solar minimum and the difference increases with depth until {approx}10 Mm. At this depth, the relative difference ({delta}c{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) is less than half of the value observed at the lowest depth determination. At deeper layers, it slowly decreases with depth until there is no difference between maximum and minimum activity.

  5. Observations of sound-speed fluctuations in the western Philippine Sea in the spring of 2009.

    PubMed

    Colosi, John A; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Cornuelle, Bruce D; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Worcester, Peter F; Dushaw, Brian D; Ramp, Steven R

    2013-10-01

    As an aid to understanding long-range acoustic propagation in the Philippine Sea, statistical and phenomenological descriptions of sound-speed variations were developed. Two moorings of oceanographic sensors located in the western Philippine Sea in the spring of 2009 were used to track constant potential-density surfaces (isopycnals) and constant potential-temperature surfaces (isotherms) in the depth range 120-2000 m. The vertical displacements of these surfaces are used to estimate sound-speed fluctuations from internal waves, while temperature/salinity variability along isopycnals are used to estimate sound-speed fluctuations from intrusive structure often termed spice. Frequency spectra and vertical covariance functions are used to describe the space-time scales of the displacements and spiciness. Internal-wave contributions from diurnal and semi-diurnal internal tides and the diffuse internal-wave field [related to the Garrett-Munk (GM) spectrum] are found to dominate the sound-speed variability. Spice fluctuations are weak in comparison. The internal wave and spice frequency spectra have similar form in the upper ocean but are markedly different below 170-m depth. Diffuse internal-wave mode spectra show a form similar to the GM model, while internal-tide mode spectra scale as mode number to the minus two power. Spice decorrelates rapidly with depth, with a typical correlation scale of tens of meters. PMID:24116515

  6. Detecting interferences with iOS applications to measure speed of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Ahmet; Kağan Temiz, Burak

    2016-01-01

    Traditional experiments measuring the speed of sound consist of studying harmonics by changing the length of a glass tube closed at one end. In these experiments, the sound source and observer are outside of the tube. In this paper, we propose the modification of this old experiment by studying destructive interference in a pipe using a headset, iPhone and iPad. The iPhone is used as an emitter with signal generator application and the iPad is used as the receiver with a spectrogram application. Two experiments are carried out for measures: the emitter inside of the tube with the receiver outside, and vice versa. We conclude that it is even possible to adequately and easily measure the speed of sound using a cup or a can of coke with the method described in this paper.

  7. Effects of small variations of speed of sound in optoacoustic tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Speed of sound difference in the imaged object and surrounding coupling medium may reduce the resolution and overall quality of optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained by assuming a uniform acoustic medium. In this work, the authors investigate the effects of acoustic heterogeneities and discuss potential benefits of accounting for those during the reconstruction procedure. Methods: The time shift of optoacoustic signals in an acoustically heterogeneous medium is studied theoretically by comparing different continuous and discrete wave propagation models. A modification of filtered back-projection reconstruction is subsequently implemented by considering a straight acoustic rays model for ultrasound propagation. The results obtained with this reconstruction procedure are compared numerically and experimentally to those obtained assuming a heuristically fitted uniform speed of sound in both full-view and limited-view optoacoustic tomography scenarios. Results: The theoretical analysis showcases that the errors in the time-of-flight of the signals predicted by considering the straight acoustic rays model tend to be generally small. When using this model for reconstructing simulated data, the resulting images accurately represent the theoretical ones. On the other hand, significant deviations in the location of the absorbing structures are found when using a uniform speed of sound assumption. The experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms and a mouse postmortem are found to be consistent with the numerical simulations. Conclusions: Accurate analysis of effects of small speed of sound variations demonstrates that accounting for differences in the speed of sound allows improving optoacoustic reconstruction results in realistic imaging scenarios involving acoustic heterogeneities in tissues and surrounding media.

  8. Determinants of the reliability of ultrasound tomography sound speed estimates as a surrogate for volumetric breast density

    SciTech Connect

    Khodr, Zeina G.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Sak, Mark A.; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Duric, Nebojsa; Littrup, Peter; Ali, Haythem; Vallieres, Patricia; Sherman, Mark E.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: High breast density, as measured by mammography, is associated with increased breast cancer risk, but standard methods of assessment have limitations including 2D representation of breast tissue, distortion due to breast compression, and use of ionizing radiation. Ultrasound tomography (UST) is a novel imaging method that averts these limitations and uses sound speed measures rather than x-ray imaging to estimate breast density. The authors evaluated the reproducibility of measures of speed of sound and changes in this parameter using UST. Methods: One experienced and five newly trained raters measured sound speed in serial UST scans for 22 women (two scans per person) to assess inter-rater reliability. Intrarater reliability was assessed for four raters. A random effects model was used to calculate the percent variation in sound speed and change in sound speed attributable to subject, scan, rater, and repeat reads. The authors estimated the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for these measures based on data from the authors’ experienced rater. Results: Median (range) time between baseline and follow-up UST scans was five (1–13) months. Contributions of factors to sound speed variance were differences between subjects (86.0%), baseline versus follow-up scans (7.5%), inter-rater evaluations (1.1%), and intrarater reproducibility (∼0%). When evaluating change in sound speed between scans, 2.7% and ∼0% of variation were attributed to inter- and intrarater variation, respectively. For the experienced rater’s repeat reads, agreement for sound speed was excellent (ICC = 93.4%) and for change in sound speed substantial (ICC = 70.4%), indicating very good reproducibility of these measures. Conclusions: UST provided highly reproducible sound speed measurements, which reflect breast density, suggesting that UST has utility in sensitively assessing change in density.

  9. Echogenicity in transrectal ultrasound is determined by sound speed of prostate tissue components.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Hideki; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2012-01-01

    Typically, conventional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging of the cancer tissue is hypoechoic in echo texture. However, TRUS does not reliably distinguish between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue in the prostate. In the present study, sound speed of prostate needle biopsy specimens were measured by ultrasound speed microscope (USM) to construct a database for interpreting clinical TRUS images. Biopsy specimens were formalin-fixed and sectioned approximately 5 µm in thickness. They were mounted on glass slides without cover slips. The ultrasonic transducer with the central frequency of 120 MHz was mechanically scanned over the specimen to measure sound speed distribution. Echo intensity of TRUS images were qualitatively classified into three categories; hyperechoic, iso-echoic and hypoechoic areas. Sound speed was 1596.9 ± 28.2 m/s in hyperechoic, 1571.2 ± 35.8 m/s in iso-echoic and 1562.6 ± 35.1 m/s in hypoechoic area, respectively. However, echo intensity showed no significant relationship to malignancy of prostatic tissue. Echo intensity of TRUS is significantly affected with tissue components and USM findings would provide important information for interpretation of TRUS images. PMID:23365928

  10. Joint seismic tomography for bulk sound and shear wave speed in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Widiyantoro, S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    1998-06-01

    High-quality P and S travel times are now available from careful reprocessing of data reported to international agencies. A restricted data set has been extracted for which comparable ray coverage is achieved for P and S, and used for a joint inversion to produce a three-dimensional model for shear and bulk sound velocities represented in terms of 2° × 2° cells and 18 layers in depth through the mantle. About 106 times for each of P and S are combined to produce 312,549 summary rays for each wave type. Linearizing about the ak135 reference model, 583,200 coupled tomographic equations are solved using an iterative partitioned scheme. Clear high-resolution images are obtained for both bulk-sound speed and shear wavespeed. The bulk and shear moduli have differing sensitivity to temperature and mineral composition, and so the images of the two velocity distributions help to constrain the nature of the processes which produce the variations. Different heterogeneity regimes can be recognised in the upper mantle, the transition zone, most of the lower mantle, and the lowermost mantle. In the upper mantle, many features can be explained by thermal effects; but in some orogenic zones (e.g. western North America), the opposite sense of the bulk-sound and shear wave speed variation requires compositional effects or volatiles to outweigh any thermal effects. In the lower mantle, pronounced narrow structures which may represent remnant subduction are most marked in shear. The level of large-scale variations in bulk sound speed compared to shear diminishes with depth in the lower mantle reaching a minimum near 2000 km. Below this depth, the variability of both wave speeds increases. Near the core-mantle boundary the variations of the two wave speeds show little concordance, suggesting the presence of widespread chemical heterogeneity.

  11. Vibrational behavior of a soundbox in an atmosphere with a variable speed of sound.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Kotlicki, Andrzej; Waltham, Chris; Wolfe, Nathan; Yu, Jing Fei; Zhu, Chenchong

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a semi-quantitative method, suitable for a student laboratory exercise that shows that the acoustic properties of the soundbox of a musical instrument depend on the sound speed of the atmosphere surrounding and filling the instrument. A gas tent was constructed and used to enclose instruments in helium, carbon dioxide and mixtures thereof, allowing the sound speed to be varied from 250 to 1000 m/s. Soundboard admittance data were taken using a guitar and a violin as examples. The data, expressed as contour plots, show clearly the qualitative relationship between air and wood modes, and the guitar data are compared with a simple mechanical model. Experimental details of the construction and operation of gas tent are given, with attention paid to safety issues. PMID:22423799

  12. Acoustic method for measuring the sound speed of gases over small path lengths.

    PubMed

    Olfert, J S; Checkel, M D; Koch, C R

    2007-05-01

    Acoustic "phase shift" methods have been used in the past to accurately measure the sound speed of gases. In this work, a phase shift method for measuring the sound speed of gases over small path lengths is presented. We have called this method the discrete acoustic wave and phase detection (DAWPD) method. Experimental results show that the DAWPD method gives accurate (+/-3.2 ms) and predictable measurements that closely match theory. The sources of uncertainty in the DAWPD method are examined and it is found that ultrasonic reflections and changes in the frequency ratio of the transducers (the ratio of driving frequency to resonant frequency) can be major sources of error. Experimentally, it is shown how these sources of uncertainty can be minimized. PMID:17552851

  13. Generalization of low pressure, gas-liquid, metastable sound speed to high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bursik, J. W.; Hall, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    A theory is developed for isentropic metastable sound propagation in high pressure gas-liquid mixtures. Without simplification, it also correctly predicts the minimum speed for low pressure air-water measurements where other authors are forced to postulate isothermal propagation. This is accomplished by a mixture heat capacity ratio which automatically adjusts from its single phase values to approximately the isothermal value of unity needed for the minimum speed. Computations are made for the pure components parahydrogen and nitrogen, with emphasis on the latter. With simplifying assumptions, the theory reduces to a well known approximate formula limited to low pressure.

  14. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  15. Speed of Sound versus Temperature Using PVC Pipes Open at Both Ends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the speed of sound in air as a function of temperature using a simple and inexpensive apparatus. For this experiment it is essential that the appropriate end corrections be taken into account. In a recent paper the end corrections for 2-in i.d. (5.04-cm) PVC pipes open at both ends were investigated. The air column…

  16. Gas Nonideality at One Atmosphere Revealed through Speed of Sound Measurements and Heat Capacity Determinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Liu, Allen

    2008-01-01

    Using an easy-to-make cylindrical resonator, students can measure the speed of sound in a gas, u, with sufficiently high precision (by locating standing-wave Lissajous patterns on an oscilloscope) to observe real gas properties at one atmosphere and 300 K. For CO[subscript 2] and SF[subscript 6], u is found to be 268.83 and 135.25 m s[superscript…

  17. Interpretation of Helioseismic Travel Times. Sensitivity to Sound Speed, Pressure, Density, and Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent; Birch, Aaron C.

    2015-12-01

    Time-distance helioseismology uses cross-covariances of wave motions on the solar surface to determine the travel times of wave packets moving from one surface location to another. We review the methodology to interpret travel-time measurements in terms of small, localised perturbations to a horizontally homogeneous reference solar model. Using the first Born approximation, we derive and compute 3D travel-time sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels for perturbations in sound-speed, density, pressure, and vector flows. While kernels for sound speed and flows had been computed previously, here we extend the calculation to kernels for density and pressure, hence providing a complete description of the effects of solar dynamics and structure on travel times. We treat three thermodynamic quantities as independent and do not assume hydrostatic equilibrium. We present a convenient approach to computing damped Green's functions using a normal-mode summation. The Green's function must be computed on a wavenumber grid that has sufficient resolution to resolve the longest lived modes. The typical kernel calculations used in this paper are computer intensive and require on the order of 600 CPU hours per kernel. Kernels are validated by computing the travel-time perturbation that results from horizontally-invariant perturbations using two independent approaches. At fixed sound-speed, the density and pressure kernels are approximately related through a negative multiplicative factor, therefore implying that perturbations in density and pressure are difficult to disentangle. Mean travel-times are not only sensitive to sound-speed, density and pressure perturbations, but also to flows, especially vertical flows. Accurate sensitivity kernels are needed to interpret complex flow patterns such as convection.

  18. Thermodynamic properties of nitrogen gas derived from measurements of sound speed. [for cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younglove, B.; Mccarty, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    A virial equation of state for nitrogen was determined by use of newly measured speed-of-sound data and existing pressure-density-temperature data in a multiproperty-fitting technique. The experimental data taken were chosen to optimize the equation of state for a pressure range of 0 to 10 atm and for a temperature range of 60 to 350 K. Comparisons are made for thermodynamic properties calculated both from the new equation and from existing equations of state.

  19. Sound speed estimation and source localization with linearization and particle filtering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni

    2014-03-01

    A method is developed for the estimation of source location and sound speed in the water column relying on linearization. The Jacobian matrix, necessary for the proposed linearization approach, includes derivatives with respect to empirical orthogonal function coefficients instead of sound speed directly. First, the inversion technique is tested on synthetic arrival times, using Gaussian distributions for the errors in the considered arrival times. The approach is efficient, requiring a few iterations, and produces accurate results. Probability densities of the estimates are calculated for different levels of noise in the arrival times. Subsequently, particle filtering is employed for the estimation of arrival times from signals recorded during the Shallow Water 06 experiment. It has been shown in the past that particle filtering can be employed for the successful estimation of multipath arrival times from short-range data and, consequently, in geometry, bathymetry, and sound speed inversion. Here probability density functions of arrival times computed via particle filtering are propagated backward through the proposed inversion process. Inversion estimates are consistent with values reported in the literature for the same quantities. Last it is shown that results are consistent with estimates resulting from fast simulated annealing applied to the same data.

  20. Measuring the Speed of Sound in a 1D Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jacob; Revelle, Melissa; Hulet, Randall

    2016-05-01

    We report measurements of the speed of sound in a two-spin component, 1D gas of fermionic lithium. The 1D system is an array of one-dimensional tubes created by a 2D optical lattice. By increasing the lattice depth, the tunneling between tubes is sufficiently small to make each an independent 1D system. To measure the speed of sound, we create a density notch at the center of the atom cloud using a sheet of light tuned far from resonance. The dipole force felt by both spin states will be equivalent, so this notch can be thought of as a charge excitation. Once this beam is turned off, the notch propagates to the edge of the atomic cloud with a velocity that depends on the strength of interatomic interactions. We control interactions using a magnetically tuned Feshbach resonance, allowing us to measure the speed of sound over a wide range of interaction. This method may be used to extract the Luttinger parameter vs. interaction strength. Supported by an ARO MURI Grant, NSF, and The Welch Foundation.

  1. Evaluation Experiment of Ultrasound Computed Tomography for the Abdominal Sound Speed Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Keisuke; Yamada, Akira

    2007-07-01

    Abdominal sound speed tomographic imaging using through-transmission travel time data on the body surface was investigated. To this end, a hundred kHz range low-frequency wave was used to reduce the wave attenuation within an inner body medium. A method was investigated for the reconstruction of the image with the smallest possible number of path data around the abdominal surface. Specifically, the data from a strong scattering spinal cord should be avoided. To fulfill the requirement, the smoothed path algebraic reconstruction technique was introduced. The validity of this method was examined both on the numerically synthesized data and the experimentally measured data for the phantom specimen and actual human subject. It was shown that an abdominal tomographic sound speed image could be successfully obtained by preparing only 32 transducer locations at the circumference around the abdominal surface and their combination of less than 100 number of observation path data as well as by avoiding the data intersecting the spinal cord. In addition, fat regions were extracted having a sound speed lower than the threshold value to demonstrate the possibility of this method for metabolic syndrome diagnosis.

  2. SOUND-SPEED TOMOGRAPHY USING FIRST-ARRIVAL TRANSMISSION ULTRASOUND FOR A RING ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; QUAN, YOULI

    2007-01-31

    Sound-speed tomography images can be used for cancer detection and diagnosis. Tumors have generally higher sound speeds than the surrounding tissue. Quality and resolution of tomography images are primarily determined by the insonification/illumination aperture of ultrasound and the capability of the tomography method for accurately handling heterogeneous nature of the breast. We investigate the capability of an efficient time-of-flight tomography method using transmission ultrasound from a ring array for reconstructing sound-speed images of the breast. The method uses first arrival times of transmitted ultrasonic signals emerging from non-beamforming ultrasound transducers located around a ring. It properly accounts for ray bending within the breast by solving the eikonal equation using a finite-difference scheme. We test and validate the time-of-flight transmission tomography method using synthetic data for numerical breast phantoms containing various objects. In our simulation, the objects are immersed in water within a ring array. Two-dimensional synthetic data are generated using a finite-difference scheme to solve acoustic-wave equation in heterogeneous media. We study the reconstruction accuracy of the tomography method for objects with different sizes and shapes as well as different perturbations from the surrounding medium. In addition, we also address some specific data processing issues related to the tomography. Our tomography results demonstrate that the first-arrival transmission tomography method can accurately reconstruct objects larger than approximately five wavelengths of the incident ultrasound using a ring array.

  3. An absolute instrument for determination of the speed of sound in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhu, Junchao; Li, Tao; Zhang, Baofeng

    2016-05-01

    An apparatus for the absolute determination of the sound speed in water based on the time-of-flight technique is described. The time measurement is realized by hardware circuits and the distance measurement by a double-beam plane-mirror interferometer. A highly accurate time chip, with a resolution of approximately 90 ps, is employed for time measurements. The acoustic path length is adjustable and can be measured directly. Two transducers are used for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals without reflection. The transducers are immersed in a thermostatic vessel that maintains bath temperature with high stability. The speed of sound in pure water was measured at ambient pressure and at the temperatures 308 K, 303 K, 298 K, and 293 K. The achieved measurement uncertainties are 2 mK for temperature and 0.045 m/s for speed of sound. The results are compared to data from the literature, equation of state models, and measurements by two commercial sensors in the same experiment, showing excellent agreement among them. PMID:27250470

  4. Verification of the helioseismology travel-time measurement technique and the inversion procedure for sound speed using artificial data

    SciTech Connect

    Parchevsky, K. V.; Zhao, J.; Hartlep, T.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-04-10

    We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations of the solar surface acoustic wave field for the quiet Sun and for three models with different localized sound-speed perturbations in the interior with deep, shallow, and two-layer structures. We used the simulated data generated by two solar acoustics codes that employ the same standard solar model as a background model, but utilize different integration techniques and different models of stochastic wave excitation. Acoustic travel times were measured using a time-distance helioseismology technique, and compared with predictions from ray theory frequently used for helioseismic travel-time inversions. It is found that the measured travel-time shifts agree well with the helioseismic theory for sound-speed perturbations, and for the measurement procedure with and without phase-speed filtering of the oscillation signals. This testing verifies the whole measuring-filtering-inversion procedure for static sound-speed anomalies with small amplitude inside the Sun outside regions of strong magnetic field. It is shown that the phase-speed filtering, frequently used to extract specific wave packets and improve the signal-to-noise ratio, does not introduce significant systematic errors. Results of the sound-speed inversion procedure show good agreement with the perturbation models in all cases. Due to its smoothing nature, the inversion procedure may overestimate sound-speed variations in regions with sharp gradients of the sound-speed profile.

  5. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  6. Measured sound speeds and acoustic nonlinearity parameter in liquid water up to 523 K and 14 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtevant, Blake T.; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2016-07-01

    Sound speed in liquid water at temperatures between 275 and 523 K and pressures up to 14 MPa were experimentally determined using a high temperature/high pressure capable acoustic resonance cell. The measurements enabled the determination of the temperature and pressure dependence of sound speed and thus the parameter of acoustic nonlinearly, B/A, over this entire P-T space. Most of the sound speeds measured in this work were found to be within 0.4% of the IAPWS-IF97 formulation, an international standard for calculating sound speed in water as a function of temperature and pressure. The values for B/A determined at laboratory ambient pressure and at temperatures up to 356 K, were found to be in general agreement with values calculated from the IAPWS-IF97 formulation. Additionally, B/A at 293 K was found to be 4.6, in agreement with established literature values.

  7. Intensive sound speed monitoring in ocean and its impact on the GPS/acoustic seafloor geodetic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    GPS/acoustic (GPS/A) technique, based on GPS positioning and acoustic ranging, is now getting a popular tool to measure seafloor crustal movement. Several groups in the world have been intensively conducted campaign surveys in the region of scientifically interest. As the technology of measurement has been matured and plenty of data are accumulated, researchers are now aware of the limit of its precision mainly due to unexpected undulation of sound speed in ocean, which significantly degrades acoustic ranging. If sound speed structure keeps its figure during survey period, e.g., more than a couple of hours, it can be estimated by a moving survey to get sufficient paths from various directions to illustrate the structure. However the sound speed structure often varies quickly with in a hour due to internal gravitational wave excited by interaction of tidal current and seafloor topography. In this case one cannot separate temporal and spatial variations. We revisited our numerous sound speed profile data derived from numbers of XBT measurements, which were concurrently carried out with GPS/A survey along the Nankai Trough and Japan Trench. Among the measurements, we found notably short-period variation in sound speed profile through intensive XBT survey repeatedly cast every 6 minutes for one hour, which also appeared in residuals in traveltime of acoustic ranging. The same feature is also found in more moderate rate for semidiurnal undulation, in which vertical oscillation of the middle of the profile can be clearly seen rather than variation of absolute sound speed. This also reflects traveltime residuals in the GPS/A measurement. These typical frequencies represent dominant wavelengths of spatial sound speed variation. In the latter, local horizontal variation can be negligible in the vicinity of a point survey area and the traditional analysis can be applicable that assumes time-varying stratified sound speed structure. In the former case, on the contrary, local

  8. Optical Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Air Over the Temperature Range 300-650 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), the speed of sound in room air (1 atm) is measured over the temperature range 300-650 K. Since the LITA apparatus maintains a fixed sound wavelength as temperature is varied, this temperature range simultaneously corresponds to a sound frequency range of 10-15 MHz. The data are compared to a published model and typically agree within 0.1%-0.4% at each of 21 temperatures.

  9. Measurement and analysis of radiated sound from a low speed fan with a large tip gap.

    PubMed

    Bilka, M J; Anthoine, J; Schram, C

    2014-05-01

    The wake flow field and radiated sound from a low speed axial fan is studied experimentally. The fan geometry uses controlled diffusion blades and is designed with a low aspect ratio (0.9). The fan is installed with a large tip gap, approximately 10% of the blade span. The radiated sound field is analyzed using a known trailing edge noise formulation. First, the model is compared to an experiment of a single airfoil in a wind tunnel to assess the predictive capabilities. Second, measurements of the fan are made at two different blade loading conditions. Hot wire measurements are made in the near wake of the fan to assess the extent of the tip leakage flow for each condition. The radiated sound fields are compared with the trailing edge noise theory. Use is made of the wake measurements as an input to a surface pressure model. When the fan is operated with the optimal blade loading, the influence of the tip leakage flow is found to be of secondary acoustic impact. When the fan is operated at a high loading condition for the blades, a more significant leakage flow develops and is found to be responsible for the dominant radiated sound.

  10. Effect of rotatory instrument speed on its capacity to remove demineralized and sound dentin

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Mariana; Pecorari, Vanessa Galego Arias; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of two rotatory instruments (controlled speed electric motor [CSEM] – 300 rpm; conventional slow handpiece [CSHP] – 18,000 rpm) to remove sound and demineralized dentin, by examining prepared cavity walls using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and assessing loss of mass. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 blocks of human occlusal dentin, measuring 5 mm × 5 mm × 4 mm (L × W × H), were divided into two groups according to the substrate type in which the cavity preparation was performed: D - demineralized dentin; and S - sound dentin (control group). The groups were subdivided according to the rotatory instrument used for cavity preparation (n = 10): CSEM (300 rpm); and CSHP (18,000 rpm). In half of the dentin blocks, caries lesion induction was performed for 6 weeks. The preparation of the cavities was performed on a standardizing machine, using a cylindrical tungsten carbide burr. Before and after the preparation, specimens were dehydrated in an incubator at 60°C for 30 min. The initial and final mass (in mg) of each dentin block was measured 3 times using the digital precision balance to obtain the mean weight Following cavity preparation, all specimens were hemisected and SEM was used to blindly assess each half so that the lateral walls of the prepared cavity were measured in μm, accepting the average of two measurements as the total depth of the preparation. Non-parametric Mann-Whitney analysis was performed with a 5% of significance level. Results: Regarding the weight difference (mg), no significance was detected between the groups. Regarding depth (μm), a significant difference was found between the groups, so that the CSRM showed lower cavity depth when compared with CSHP, both in sound and demineralized dentin. Conclusions: Controlled speed rotatory instruments were found to be more conservative in removing both sound and demineralized dentin, in terms of preparation and depth

  11. SOUND-SPEED AND ATTENUATION IMAGING OF BREAST TISSUE USING WAVEFORM TOMOGRAPHY OF TRANSMISSION ULTRASOUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; PRATT, R. GERHARD; DURIC, NEB; LITTRUP, PETER

    2007-01-25

    Waveform tomography results are presented from 800 kHz ultrasound transmission scans of a breast phantom, and from an in vivo ultrasound breast scan: significant improvements are demonstrated in resolution over time-of-flight reconstructions. Quantitative reconstructions of both sound-speed and inelastic attenuation are recovered. The data were acquired in the Computed Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system, comprising a 20 cm diameter solid-state ultrasound ring array with 256 active, non-beamforming transducers. Waveform tomography is capable of resolving variations in acoustic properties at sub-wavelength scales. This was verified through comparison of the breast phantom reconstructions with x-ray CT results: the final images resolve variations in sound speed with a spatial resolution close to 2 mm. Waveform tomography overcomes the resolution limit of time-of-flight methods caused by finite frequency (diffraction) effects. The method is a combination of time-of-flight tomography, and 2-D acoustic waveform inversion of the transmission arrivals in ultrasonic data. For selected frequency components of the waveforms, a finite-difference simulation of the visco-acoustic wave equation is used to compute synthetic data in the current model, and the data residuals are formed by subtraction. The residuals are used in an iterative, gradient-based scheme to update the sound-speed and attenuation model to produce a reduced misfit to the data. Computational efficiency is achieved through the use of time-reversal of the data residuals to construct the model updates. Lower frequencies are used first, to establish the long wavelength components of the image, and higher frequencies are introduced later to provide increased resolution.

  12. Acoustic metafluid with anisotropic mass density and tunable sound speed: An approach based on suspensions of orientable anisotropic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitel, Mark; Tse, Stephen; Shan, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    We investigate liquid suspensions of micron-scale, anisotropic particles as potential acoustic metafluids having anisotropic and actively controllable acoustic properties. The effective mass density (and hence the sound propagation speed) of these metafluids can vary because the added mass of an anisotropic particle suspended in the fluid changes with the particle's orientation relative to the direction of the wave propagation. A suspension with disc-like particles oriented broadside to the direction of wave propagation is thus expected to have higher effective inertia and lower sound speed than a suspension with particles with end-on alignment. To test these predictions, sound speed is measured with a time-of-flight method in suspensions of micron-size nickel flakes suspended in oil, with and without magnetic-field-induced alignment of the particles. The sound speed, relative to the unaligned case, is found to decrease for particles oriented broadside to the sound wave, and increase for edgewise alignment. We also investigate the frequency dependence of the effective sound speed, since the added mass effect is expected to diminish as the flow becomes steady at low frequencies. The experimental results are compared to the predictions of a model proposed by Ahuja & Hardee (J. Acoust. Soc. Am 1978) for the acoustic properties of aligned oblate-spheroid suspensions.

  13. Oral and Hand Movement Speeds Are Associated with Expressive Language Ability in Children with Speech Sound Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that children with speech sound disorder have generalized slowed motor speeds. It evaluated associations among oral and hand motor speeds and measures of speech (articulation and phonology) and language (receptive vocabulary, sentence comprehension, sentence imitation), in 11 children with moderate to severe SSD…

  14. Vortex/Body Interaction and Sound Generation in Low-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Hsiao C.

    1998-01-01

    The problem of sound generation by vortices interacting with an arbitrary body in a low-speed flow has been investigated by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. For the purpose of this report, it is convenient to divide the problem into three parts. In the first part the mechanism of the vortex/body interaction, which is essentially the inner solution in the inner region, is examined. The trajectories for a system of vortices rotating about their centroid are found to undergo enormous changes after interaction; from this, some interesting properties emerged. In the second part, the problem is formulated, the outer solution is found, matching is implemented, and solutions for acoustic pressure are obtained. In the third part, Fourier integrals are evaluated and predicated results presented. An examination of these results reveals the following: (a) the background noise can be either augmented or attenuated by a body after interaction, (b) sound generated by vortex/body interaction obeys a scaling factor, (C) sound intensity can be reduced substantially by positioning the vortex system in the "favorable" side of the body instead of the "unfavorable" side, and (d) acoustic radiation from vortex/bluff-body interaction is less than that from vortex/airfoil interaction under most circumstances.

  15. Ranging in an underwater medium with multiple isogradient sound speed profile layers.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Hamid; Leus, Geert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the problem of acoustic ranging between sensor nodes in an underwater environment. The underwater medium is assumed to be composed of multiple isogradient sound speed profile (SSP) layers where in each layer the sound speed is linearly related to the depth. Furthermore, each sensor node is able to measure its depth and can exchange this information with other nodes. Under these assumptions, we first show how the problem of underwater localization can be converted to the traditional range-based terrestrial localization problem when the depth information of the nodes is known a priori. Second, we relate the pair-wise time of flight (ToF) measurements between the nodes to their positions. Next, based on this relation, we propose a novel ranging algorithm for an underwater medium. The proposed ranging algorithm considers reflections from the seabed and sea surface. We will show that even without any reflections, the transmitted signal may travel through more than one path between two given nodes. The proposed algorithm analyzes them and selects the fastest one (first arrival path) based on the measured ToF and the nodes' depth measurements. Finally, in order to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm we run several simulations and compare the results with other existing algorithms.

  16. Ranging in an Underwater Medium with Multiple Isogradient Sound Speed Profile Layers

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Hamid; Leus, Geert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the problem of acoustic ranging between sensor nodes in an underwater environment. The underwater medium is assumed to be composed of multiple isogradient sound speed profile (SSP) layers where in each layer the sound speed is linearly related to the depth. Furthermore, each sensor node is able to measure its depth and can exchange this information with other nodes. Under these assumptions, we first show how the problem of underwater localization can be converted to the traditional range-based terrestrial localization problem when the depth information of the nodes is known a priori. Second, we relate the pair-wise time of flight (ToF) measurements between the nodes to their positions. Next, based on this relation, we propose a novel ranging algorithm for an underwater medium. The proposed ranging algorithm considers reflections from the seabed and sea surface. We will show that even without any reflections, the transmitted signal may travel through more than one path between two given nodes. The proposed algorithm analyzes them and selects the fastest one (first arrival path) based on the measured ToF and the nodes’ depth measurements. Finally, in order to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm we run several simulations and compare the results with other existing algorithms. PMID:22736989

  17. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Sinha, Dipen N.; Osterhoudt, Curtis F.

    2012-08-15

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  18. Experimental findings on the underwater measurements uncertainty of speed of sound and the alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, T. Q.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Oliveira, D. P.; Mayworm, R. C.; Souza, R. M.; Costa-Félix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Speed of sound is an important quantity to characterize reference materials for ultrasonic applications, for instance. The alignment between the transducer and the test body is an key activity in order to perform reliable and consistent measurement. The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of the alignment system to the expanded uncertainty of such measurement. A stainless steel cylinder was previously calibrated on an out of water system typically used for calibration of non-destructive blocks. Afterwards, the cylinder was calibrated underwater with two distinct alignment system: fixed and mobile. The values were statistically compared to the out-of-water measurement, considered the golden standard for such application. For both alignment systems, the normalized error was less than 0.8, leading to conclude that the both measurement system (under and out-of-water) do not diverge significantly. The gold standard uncertainty was 2.7 m-s-1, whilst the fixed underwater system resulted in 13 m-s-1, and the mobile alignment system achieved 6.6 m-s-1. After the validation of the underwater system for speed of sound measurement, it will be applied to certify Encapsulated Tissue Mimicking Material as a reference material for biotechnology application.

  19. Enhancement of photoacoustic tomography in the tissue with speed-of-sound variance using ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ren-Xiang; Chao, Tao; Xiao-Jun, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The speed-of-sound variance will decrease the imaging quality of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue. In this study, ultrasound computed tomography is combined with photoacoustic tomography to enhance the photoacoustic tomography in this situation. The speed-of-sound information is recovered by ultrasound computed tomography. Then, an improved delay-and-sum method is used to reconstruct the image from the photoacoustic signals. The simulation results validate that the proposed method can obtain a better photoacoustic tomography than the conventional method when the speed-of-sound variance is increased. In addition, the influences of the speed-of-sound variance and the fan-angle on the image quality are quantitatively explored to optimize the image scheme. The proposed method has a good performance even when the speed-of-sound variance reaches 14.2%. Furthermore, an optimized fan angle is revealed, which can keep the good image quality with a low cost of hardware. This study has a potential value in extending the biomedical application of photoacoustic tomography. Projection supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11422439, 11274167, and 11274171), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20120091110001).

  20. Carotid atherosclerotic plaque characterisation by measurement of ultrasound sound speed in vitro at high frequency, 20 MHz.

    PubMed

    Brewin, M P; Srodon, P D; Greenwald, S E; Birch, M J

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to utilise a tissue mimicking material (TMM) in order to embed in vitro carotid plaque tissue so that its acoustic properties could be assessed. Here, an International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) agar-based TMM was adapted to a clear gel by removal of the particulates. This clear TMM was measured with sound speed at 1540 ms(-1) and an attenuation coefficient of 0.15 dB cm(-1)MHz(-1). Composite sound speed was then measured through the embedded material using a scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). Both broadband reflection and transmission techniques were performed on each plaque specimen in order to ensure the consistency of the measurement of sound speed, both at 21 °C and 37 °C. The plaque was measured at two temperatures to investigate any effect on the lipid content of the plaque. The contour maps from its associated attenuation plots were used to match the speed data to the photographic mask of the plaque outline. This physical matching was then used to derive the sound speed from the percentage composition seen in the histological data by solution of simultaneous equations. Individual speed values for five plaque components were derived; TMM, elastin, fibrous/collagen, calcification and lipid. The results for derived sound speed in the TMM were consistently close to the expected value of soft tissue, 1540 ms(-1). The fibrous tissue showed a mean value of 1584 ms(-1) at 37 °C. The derived sound speeds for elastic and lipid exhibited large inter-quartile ranges. The calcification had higher sound speed than the other plaque components at 1760-2000 ms(-1). The limitations here lay in the difficulties in the matching process caused by the inhomogeneity of the plaque material and shrinkage during the histological process. Future work may concentrate on more homogeneous material in order to derive sound speed data for separate components. Nevertheless, this study increases the known data ranges of the individual components within a plaque

  1. A Time-of-Flight Method to Measure the Speed of Sound Using a Stereo Sound Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Carlos C.; dos Santos, J. M. B. Lopes; Marques, M. B.

    2008-01-01

    Most homes in developed countries have a sophisticated data acquisition board, namely the PC sound board. Designed to be able to reproduce CD-quality stereo sound, it must have a sampling rate of at least 44 kHz and have very accurate timing between the two stereo channels. With a very simple adaptation of a pair of regular PC microphones, a…

  2. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic doppler velocimetry using speed of sound and reflection mode pulsed wideband doppler

    DOEpatents

    Shekarriz, Alireza; Sheen, David M.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a method and apparatus rely upon tomographic measurement of the speed of sound and fluid velocity in a pipe. The invention provides a more accurate profile of velocity within flow fields where the speed of sound varies within the cross-section of the pipe. This profile is obtained by reconstruction of the velocity profile from the local speed of sound measurement simultaneously with the flow velocity. The method of the present invention is real-time tomographic ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry utilizing a to plurality of ultrasonic transmission and reflection measurements along two orthogonal sets of parallel acoustic lines-of-sight. The fluid velocity profile and the acoustic velocity profile are determined by iteration between determining a fluid velocity profile and measuring local acoustic velocity until convergence is reached.

  3. High-speed helicopter rotor noise - Shock waves as a potent source of sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang; Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of high speed rotor noise prediction. In particular, we propose that from the point of view of the acoustic analogy, shocks around rotating blades are sources of sound. We show that, although for a wing at uniform steady rectilinear motion with shocks the volume quadrupole and shock sources cancel in the far field to the order of 1/r, this cannot happen for rotating blades. In this case, some cancellation between volume quadrupoles and shock sources occurs, yet the remaining shock noise contribution is still potent. A formula for shock noise prediction is presented based on mapping the deformable shock surface to a time independent region. The resulting equation is similar to Formulation 1A of Langley. Shock noise prediction for a hovering model rotor for which experimental noise data exist is presented. The comparison of measured and predicted acoustic data shows good agreement.

  4. Photoacoustically Measured Speeds of Sound of Liquid HBO2: On Unlocking the Fuel Potential of Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S; Crowhurst, J; Armstrong, M; ., N T

    2010-03-24

    Elucidation of geodynamic, geochemical, and shock induced processes is often limited by challenges to accurately determine molecular fluid equations of state (EOS). High pressure liquid state reactions of carbon species underlie physiochemical mechanisms such as differentiation of planetary interiors, deep carbon sequestration, propellant deflagration, and shock chemistry. Here we introduce a versatile photoacoustic technique developed to measure accurate and precise speeds of sound (SoS) of high pressure molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. SoS of an intermediate boron oxide, HBO{sub 2} are measured up to 0.5 GPa along the 277 C isotherm. A polarized Exponential-6 interatomic potential form, parameterized using our SoS data, enables EOS determinations and corresponding semi-empirical evaluations of > 2000 C thermodynamic states including energy release from bororganic formulations. Our thermochemical model propitiously predicts boronated hydrocarbon shock Hugoniot results.

  5. Using the speed of sound for in situ calibration of mass flow controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajid, Abdul

    2000-09-01

    Mass flow controllers (MFCs) are widely used for precise delivery of process gases, particularly in semiconductor industry. Often a specific MFC is factory calibrated with an inert gas. In order to estimate the actual delivery of process gases, which may be corrosive and hazardous, a multiplier called the gas calibration factor is used. Moreover, a single MFC may be used to deliver multiple gases and its thermal characteristics do change over time. We describe here a very simple method of calibrating thermal mass flow controllers, in situ, with actual process gases, utilizing the speed of sound. We have used a commercially available instrument that uses acoustic resonance technique for determining the composition of a binary gas mixture.

  6. Modelling acoustic scattering, sound speed, and attenuation in gassy soft marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Mantouka, A; Dogan, H; White, P R; Leighton, T G

    2016-07-01

    A model for nonlinear gas bubble pulsation in marine sediments is presented. This model is then linearized to determine the resonance frequency and the damping terms for linear radial oscillations. The linear model is then used to predict the effects that such bubble pulsations will have on the sound speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating in gassy marine sediment. The results are compared for monodisperse populations against the predictions of a model of Anderson and Hampton and, furthermore, the additional abilities of the model introduced in this paper are discussed. These features include the removal of the sign ambiguities in the expressions, the straightforward implementation for acoustic propagation through polydisperse bubble populations, the capability to estimate bubble size distributions through a full acoustic inversion, and the capability to predict nonlinear effects. PMID:27475152

  7. Hadronic equation of state and speed of sound in thermal and dense medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasser Tawfik, Abdel; Magdy, Hend

    2014-10-01

    The equation of state p(ɛ) and speed of sound squared cs2 are studied in grand canonical ensemble of all hadron resonances having masses ≤2 GeV. This large ensemble is divided into strange and non-strange hadron resonances and furthermore to pionic, bosonic and fermionic sectors. It is found that the pions represent the main contributors to cs2 and other thermodynamic quantities including the equation of state p(ɛ) at low temperatures. At high temperatures, the main contributions are added in by the massive hadron resonances. The speed of sound squared can be calculated from the derivative of pressure with respect to the energy density, ∂p/∂ɛ, or from the entropy-specific heat ratio, s/cv. It is concluded that the physics of these two expressions is not necessarily identical. They are distinguishable below and above the critical temperature Tc. This behavior is observed at vanishing and finite chemical potential. At high temperatures, both expressions get very close to each other and both of them approach the asymptotic value, 1/3. In the hadron resonance gas (HRG) results, which are only valid below Tc, the difference decreases with increasing the temperature and almost vanishes near Tc. It is concluded that the HRG model can very well reproduce the results of the lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) of ∂p/∂ɛ and s/cv, especially at finite chemical potential. In light of this, energy fluctuations and other collective phenomena associated with the specific heat might be present in the HRG model. At fixed temperatures, it is found that cs2 is not sensitive to the chemical potential.

  8. Oral and hand movement speeds are associated with expressive language ability in children with speech sound disorder.

    PubMed

    Peter, Beate

    2012-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that children with speech sound disorder have generalized slowed motor speeds. It evaluated associations among oral and hand motor speeds and measures of speech (articulation and phonology) and language (receptive vocabulary, sentence comprehension, sentence imitation), in 11 children with moderate to severe SSD and 11 controls. Syllable durations from a syllable repetition task served as an estimate of maximal oral movement speed. In two imitation tasks, nonwords and clapped rhythms, unstressed vowel durations and quarter-note clap intervals served as estimates of oral and hand movement speed, respectively. Syllable durations were significantly correlated with vowel durations and hand clap intervals. Sentence imitation was correlated with all three timed movement measures. Clustering on syllable repetition durations produced three clusters that also differed in sentence imitation scores. Results are consistent with limited movement speeds across motor systems and SSD subtypes defined by motor speeds as a corollary of expressive language abilities.

  9. Oral and Hand Movement Speeds are Associated with Expressive Language Ability in Children with Speech Sound Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Beate

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that children with speech sound disorder have generalized slowed motor speeds. It evaluated associations among oral and hand motor speeds and measures of speech (articulation and phonology) and language (receptive vocabulary, sentence comprehension, sentence imitation), in 11 children with moderate to severe SSD and 11 controls. Syllable durations from a syllable repetition task served as an estimate of maximal oral movement speed. In two imitation tasks, nonwords and clapped rhythms, unstressed vowel durations and quarter-note clap intervals served as estimates of oral and hand movement speed, respectively. Syllable durations were significantly correlated with vowel durations and hand clap intervals. Sentence imitation was correlated with all three timed movement measures. Clustering on syllable repetition durations produced three clusters that also differed in sentence imitation scores. Results are consistent with limited movement speeds across motor systems and SSD subtypes defined by motor speeds as a corollary of expressive language abilities. PMID:22411590

  10. The partial molar sound speed of TiO2 in sodium silicate melts: Evidence for an exceptionally compressible component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Ai, Y.; Lange, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    Longitudinal acoustic velocities were measured at one bar by an ultrasonic frequency sweep acoustic interferometer for ten Na2O-TiO2-SiO2 (NTS) liquids for which previous density and thermal expansion measurements were made (Liu and Lange, 2001). This previous study showed that the partial molar volume of the TiO2 component varied systematically with composition and reflected changes in the average coordination of Ti4+ from values of ~4.6 to ~5.4. Sound speed data were collected at frequencies of 4.5, 5, and 6 MHz between 1233 and 1896 K; in all cases, the sound speeds decrease with increasing temperature. Six of the liquids share a similar (~25 mol%) TiO2 concentration, so that the effect of varying Na:Si ratio on the partial molar sound speed of the TiO2 component can be evaluated. The results for these ten NTS liquids were combined with sound speed data on Na2O-SiO2 liquids from the literature to derive the partial molar sound speed of the TiO2 component in these liquids. The results show that, at 1573 K, it is inversely correlated with SiO2 concentration, from values as low as 571±56 m/s to those as high as 1235±54 m/s, a variation of more than 100%. Fitted values for the partial molar sound speeds of the SiO2 and Na2O components at 1573 K are constants at 2538±52 and 2713±52 m/s, respectively. When the sound speed data are combined with density data to calculate melt compressibility, the results show that the TiO2 component is 3-15 more compressible than either the Na2O or SiO2 component. The partial molar compressibility of the TiO2 component is also strongly correlated to its partial molar thermal expansivity. It is shown that the TiO2 component is most compressible and most expansive when the average Ti4+ coordination in these sodium silicate liquids is near five, which strongly suggests that the abundance of five-coordinated Ti4+ enhances topological mechanisms of both compression and thermal expansion.

  11. High-speed system for FBG-based measurements of vibration and sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Devrez M.; Ibrahim, Selwan K.; Koumans, Yorick; Meulblok, Bastiaan; Knoppers, Rik

    2016-05-01

    Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) allow for optical detection of localized physical effects without the need to couple the light out and back into a fiber, enabling robust and multiplexed sensor systems. The need of combining wide bandwidth and high resolution for dynamic sensing applications, like acoustics and vibrations, has presented significant challenges for FBG-based solutions. Here, we present a novel FBG-based measurement system enabled by using high-speed and highprecision tunable laser-based optical interrogation scheme. Multiple levels of integrated wavelength referencing coupled with low-noise high-speed electronics allow for spectral feature tracking at a resolution of <20 fm at kHz-frequencies. In combination with fiber accelerometers that employ unique force transmission mechanisms, amplifying strain on the Bragg grating and increasing the resonance frequency of the transducer, resolutions <10 μg (150 Hz bandwidth) to submg resolution in kHz-frequencies is achieved. Similarly, compact wavelength-multiplexed hydrophones with wide range linearity and dynamic range, sub-Pa resolution and flat-sensitivity down to static pressures are demonstrated. The sensors are demonstrated to be customizable to application-specific requirements, and designed to be scalable to large quantity reproducible manufacturing. In contrast to interferometry-based solutions, the tunable swept-laser detection scheme in combination with strain-based FBG sensors provides a cost-effective system that allows for easy scaling of sensor counts per fiber with multiple fibers being simultaneously recorded. Finally, the integrated high accuracy triggering and hybrid measurement capabilities present the potential to monitor sounds and vibrations in a wide range of applications from seismic surveys to machine and structural monitoring applications in harsh environments.

  12. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-14

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  13. 101-SY waste sample speed of sound/rheology testing for sonic probe program

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.

    1994-07-25

    One problem faced in the clean-up operation at Hanford is that a number of radioactive waste storage tanks are experiencing a periodic buildup and release of potentially explosive gases. The best known example is Tank 241-SY-101 (commonly referred to as 101-SY) in which hydrogen gas periodically built up within the waste to the point that increased buoyancy caused a roll-over event, in which the gas was suddenly released in potentially explosive concentrations (if an ignition source were present). The sonic probe concept is to generate acoustic vibrations in the 101-SY tank waste at nominally 100 Hz, with sufficient amplitude to cause the controlled release of hydrogen bubbles trapped in the waste. The sonic probe may provide a potentially cost-effective alternative to large mixer pumps now used for hydrogen mitigation purposes. Two important parameters needed to determine sonic probe effectiveness and design are the speed of sound and yield stress of the tank waste. Tests to determine these parameters in a 240 ml sample of 101-SY waste (obtained near the tank bottom) were performed, and the results are reported.

  14. Optical coherence tomography enables accurate measurement of equine cartilage thickness for determination of speed of sound.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, Pia H; Te Moller, Nikae C R; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Tiitu, Virpi; Korhonen, Rami K; Brommer, Harold; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Arthroscopic estimation of articular cartilage thickness is important for scoring of lesion severity, and measurement of cartilage speed of sound (SOS)-a sensitive index of changes in cartilage composition. We investigated the accuracy of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in measurements of cartilage thickness and determined SOS by combining OCT thickness and ultrasound (US) time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Material and methods - Cartilage thickness measurements from OCT and microscopy images of 94 equine osteochondral samples were compared. Then, SOS in cartilage was determined using simultaneous OCT thickness and US TOF measurements. SOS was then compared with the compositional, structural, and mechanical properties of cartilage. Results - Measurements of non-calcified cartilage thickness using OCT and microscopy were significantly correlated (ρ = 0.92; p < 0.001). With calcified cartilage included, the correlation was ρ = 0.85 (p < 0.001). The mean cartilage SOS (1,636 m/s) was in agreement with the literature. However, SOS and the other properties of cartilage lacked any statistically significant correlation. Interpretation - OCT can give an accurate measurement of articular cartilage thickness. Although SOS measurements lacked accuracy in thin equine cartilage, the concept of SOS measurement using OCT appears promising.

  15. Waveform Inversion with Source Encoding for Breast Sound Speed Reconstruction in Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the sound speed distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Both computer-simulation and experimental phantom studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden. PMID:25768816

  16. Experimental evaluation of bone quality using speed of sound measurement in cadaver mandibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Haffar, Iyad; Padilla, Frederic; Laugier, Pascal; Nefussi, Raphael; Kolta, Sami; Foucart, Jean-Michel

    2004-10-01

    This study is the first attempt to use speed of sound (SOS) as a new ultrasonic diagnostic tool for bone quality assessment before oral implant treatment. The objective is to demonstrate the in vitro feasibility of local SOS measurement at the mandible, and to investigate the relationships between mandibular SOS and local bone mineral density (BMD) and the ratio between the trabecular and cortical thickness (Tb.Th/Cort.Th). Fourteen excised human mandible were measured in transmission with a pair of flat 1.6-MHz central frequency transducers. Three regions of interest (ROIs) were selected in the specimens: incisor, premolar and molar regions. Ten measurements with repositioning were performed on each ROI to determine the short-term precision. Dual x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed on the samples for local BMD measurements. Computed tomography (CT) was used to determine mandibular cross-sectional morphological measurements. SOS measurements at different sites were significantly different, reflecting the heterogeneity between the different sites. A strong linear relationship was found between SOS and BMD (r2=0.68, p<0,0001) while a nonlinear relationship was found between SOS and Tb.Th/Cort.Th (r2=0.48, p<0,0001). This study demonstrates in vitro the feasibility of SOS measurement at the mandible. In vitro mandibular SOS reflects local BMD and Tb.Th/Cort.Th before implant.

  17. Searching for Minimum in Dependence of Squared Speed-of-Sound on Collision Energy

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Fu-Hu; Gao, Li-Na; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimore » mental results of the rapidity distributions of negatively charged pions produced in proton-proton ( p - p ) and beryllium-beryllium (Be-Be) collisions at different beam momentums, measured by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration at the super proton synchrotron (SPS), are described by a revised (three-source) Landau hydrodynamic model. The squared speed-of-sound parameter c s 2 is then extracted from the width of rapidity distribution. There is a local minimum (knee point) which indicates a softest point in the equation of state (EoS) appearing at about 40 A  GeV/ c (or 8.8 GeV) in c s 2 excitation function (the dependence of c s 2 on incident beam momentum (or center-of-mass energy)). This knee point should be related to the searching for the onset of quark deconfinement and the critical point of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase transition.« less

  18. Validation of speed of sound for the assessment of cortical bone maturity.

    PubMed

    Rose, E C; Hagenmüller, M; Jonas, I E; Rahn, B A

    2005-04-01

    Bone changes its structural and physical properties during maturation. In order to validate ultrasound measurements with regard to their usefulness in assessing cortical bone maturation, speed of sound (SOS) data were compared with mechanical properties (elastic modulus, bending strength, and cortical surface hardness), density and water content. Thirty pig mandibles were selected from three different age groups. Rectangular specimens of the buccal cortical bone of the body of the mandible were prepared. SOS was measured with pulsed ultrasound at a frequency of 2 MHz in all three dimensions, bone mineral density (BMD) by quantitative computed tomography, breaking strength and apparent elastic modulus in a three-point bending test to failure, water content using the lyophilization technique, and micro-indentation hardness using a modified Vickers' technique. While SOS in all three directions, BMD, surface hardness, and bending strength increased significantly (P < 0.001), bone tissue water content decreased significantly (P < 0.001) with age. Changes in the elastic modulus were not significant. Changes in SOS in the antero-posterior and apico-occlusal directions can be partly explained by BMD. In a bucco-lingual direction the increase is inadequately explained by the physical parameters investigated, and has possibly to be attributed to structural differences. Maturation of the mandible implies changes in its architectural organization, in material composition, and in the mechanical properties of cortical bone. In vitro SOS measurements reflect different structural and physical properties that are all age dependent. It thus seems feasible that age-related changes in bone maturation could be monitored by SOS measurements.

  19. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for a solar model evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Fontes, Christopher; Walczak, Przemyslaw; Wood, Suzannah R.; Mussack, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Los Alamos has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of a standard solar model including these new opacities, and compare with a model evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities released about 1996. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval, and Scott (2009), including 2015 updates. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a,b) are somewhat higher than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities near the base of the solar convection zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. We discuss the potential for increased opacities to partially mitigate the ‘solar abundance problem’.References:J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr., G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, Eighth International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications: ICAMDATA, Gaithersburg, MD 2012, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1545, (AIP, New York, 2013a), pp. 17-26.J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr, G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, High Energy Density Physics 9, 369 (2013b).

  20. Axial speed of sound for the monitoring of injured equine tendons: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Vergari, Claudio; Pourcelot, Philippe; Ravary-Plumioën, Bérangère; Dupays, Anne-Gaëlle; Jacquet, Sandrine; Audigié, Fabrice; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Laugier, Pascal; Mitton, David; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT) are often injured, and they represent an excellent model for human sport tendinopathies. While lesions can be precisely diagnosed by clinical evaluation and ultrasonography, a prognosis is often difficult to establish; the knowledge of the injured tendon's mechanical properties would help in anticipating the outcome. The objectives of the present study were to compare the axial speed of sound (SOS) measured in vivo in normal and injured tendons and to investigate their relationship with the tendons' mechanical parameters, in order to assess the potential of quantitative axial ultrasound to monitor the healing of the injured tendons. SOS was measured in vivo in the right fore SDFTs of 12 horses during walk, before and 3.5 months after the surgical induction of a bilateral core lesion. The 12 horses were then euthanized, their SDFTs isolated and tested in tension to measure their elastic modulus and maximal load (and corresponding stress). SOS significantly decreased from 2179.4 ± 31.4 m/s in normal tendons to 2065.8 ± 67.1 m/s 3.5 months after the surgical induction, and the tendons' elastic modulus (0.90 ± 0.17 GPa) was found lower than what has been reported in normal tendons. While SOS was not correlated to tendon maximal load and corresponding stress, the SOS normalized on its value in normal tendons was correlated to the tendons' elastic modulus. These preliminary results confirm the potential of axial SOS in helping the functional assessment of injured tendon.

  1. Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capstick, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    1. The nature of sound; 2. Elasticity and vibrations; 3. Transverse waves; 4. Longitudinal waves; 5. Velocity of longitudinal waves; 6. Reflection and refraction. Doppler's principle; 7. Interference. Beats. Combination tones; 8. Resonance and forced vibrations; 9. Quality of musical notes; 10. Organ pipes; 11. Rods. Plates. Bells; 12. Acoustical measurements; 13. The phonograph, microphone and telephone; 14. Consonance; 15. Definition of intervals. Scales. Temperament; 16. Musical instruments; 17. Application of acoustical principles to military purposes; Questions; Answers to questions; Index.

  2. In situ acoustic and laboratory ultrasonic sound speed and attenuation measured in heterogeneous soft seabed sediments: Eel River shelf, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorgas, T.J.; Wilkens, R.H.; Fu, S.S.; Neil, Frazer L.; Richardson, M.D.; Briggs, K.B.; Lee, H.

    2002-01-01

    We compared in situ and laboratory velocity and attenuation values measured in seafloor sediments from the shallow water delta of the Eel River, California. This region receives a substantial volume of fluvial sediment that is discharged annually onto the shelf. Additionally, a high input of fluvial sediments during storms generates flood deposits that are characterized by thin beds of variable grain-sizes between the 40- and 90-m isobaths. The main objectives of this study were (1) to investigate signatures of seafloor processes on geoacoustic and physical properties, and (2) to evaluate differences between geoacoustic parameters measured in situ at acoustic (7.5 kHz) and in the laboratory at ultrasonic (400 kHz) frequencies. The in situ acoustic measurements were conducted between 60 and 100 m of water depth. Wet-bulk density and porosity profiles were obtained to 1.15 m below seafloor (m bsf) using gravity cores of the mostly cohesive fine-grained sediments across- and along-shelf. Physical and geoacoustic properties from six selected sites obtained on the Eel margin revealed the following. (1) Sound speed and wet-bulk density strongly correlated in most cases. (2) Sediment compaction with depth generally led to increased sound speed and density, while porosity and in situ attenuation values decreased. (3) Sound speed was higher in coarser- than in finer-grained sediments, on a maximum average by 80 m s-1. (4) In coarse-grained sediments sound speed was higher in the laboratory (1560 m s-1) than in situ (1520 m s-1). In contrast, average ultrasonic and in situ sound speed in fine-grained sediments showed only little differences (both approximately 1480 m s-1). (5) Greater attenuation was commonly measured in the laboratory (0.4 and 0.8 dB m-1 kHz-1) than in situ (0.02 and 0.65 dB m-1 kHz-1), and remained almost constant below 0.4 m bsf. We attributed discrepancies between laboratory ultrasonic and in situ acoustic measurements to a frequency dependence of

  3. Smooth 2-D ocean sound speed from Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion of seismic oceanography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, Tanya M.; Jun, Hyunggu; Rosado, Hayley; Shin, Changsoo

    2016-02-01

    In seismic oceanography, processed images highlight small temperature changes, but inversion is needed to obtain absolute temperatures. Local search-based full waveform inversion has a lower computational cost than global search but requires accurate starting models. Unfortunately, most marine seismic data have little associated hydrographic data and the band-limited nature of seismic data makes extracting the long wavelength sound speed trend directly from seismic data inherently challenging. Laplace and Laplace-Fourier domain inversion (LDI) can use rudimentary starting models without prior information about the medium. Data are transformed to the Laplace domain, and a smooth sound speed model is extracted by examining the zero and low frequency components of the damped wavefield. We applied LDI to five synthetic data sets based on oceanographic features and recovered smoothed versions of our synthetic models, showing the viability of LDI for creating starting models suitable for more detailed inversions.

  4. Measurement of the speed of sound by observation of the Mach cones in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I. Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N.; Thomas, H. M.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Schwabe, M.

    2015-02-15

    We report the first observation of the Mach cones excited by a larger microparticle (projectile) moving through a cloud of smaller microparticles (dust) in a complex plasma with neon as a buffer gas under microgravity conditions. A collective motion of the dust particles occurs as propagation of the contact discontinuity. The corresponding speed of sound was measured by a special method of the Mach cone visualization. The measurement results are incompatible with the theory of ion acoustic waves. The estimate for the pressure in a strongly coupled Coulomb system and a scaling law for the complex plasma make it possible to derive an evaluation for the speed of sound, which is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments in complex plasmas.

  5. Low-frequency sound speed and attenuation in sandy seabottom from long-range broadband acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lin; Zhou, Ji-Xun; Rogers, Peter H

    2010-08-01

    A joint China-U.S. underwater acoustics experiment was conducted in the Yellow Sea with a very flat bottom and a strong and sharp thermocline. Broadband explosive sources were deployed both above and below the thermocline along two radial lines up to 57.2 km and a quarter circle with a radius of 34 km. Two inversion schemes are used to obtain the seabottom sound speed. One is based on extracting normal mode depth functions from the cross-spectral density matrix. The other is based on the best match between the calculated and measured modal arrival times for different frequencies. The inverted seabottom sound speed is used as a constraint condition to extract the seabottom sound attenuation by three methods. The first method involves measuring the attenuation coefficients of normal modes. In the second method, the seabottom sound attenuation is estimated by minimizing the difference between the theoretical and measured modal amplitude ratios. The third method is based on finding the best match between the measured and modeled transmission losses (TLs). The resultant seabottom attenuation, averaged over three independent methods, can be expressed as alpha=(0.33+/-0.02)f(1.86+/-0.04)(dB/m kHz) over a frequency range of 80-1000 Hz.

  6. Laser Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Gases: A Novel Approach to Determining Heat Capacity Ratios and Gas Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, J. Clayton; Compton, R. N.; Feigerle, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    The speed of sound is measured in several gases using a pulsed laser to create a micro-spark on a carbon rod and a microphone connected to a digital oscilloscope to measure the time-of-flight of the resulting shockwave over a known distance. These data are used to calculate the heat capacity ratios (C[subscript p]/C[subscript V]) of the gases and…

  7. Density and sound speed of two gelatinous zooplankton: ctenophore (Mnemiopsis leidyi) and lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata).

    PubMed

    Warren, Joseph D; Smith, Joy N

    2007-07-01

    The density and sound speed of two coastal, gelatinous zooplankton, Mnemiopsis leidyi (a ctenophore) and Cyanea capillata (lion's mane jellyfish), were measured. These parameters are important inputs to acoustic scattering models. Two different methods were used to measure the density of individual animals: one used a balance and graduated cylinder to determine the mass and displacement volume of the animal, the other varied the density of the solution the animal was immersed in. When the same animal was measured using both methods, density values were within 1% of each other. A travel-time difference method was used to measure the sound speed within the animals. The densities of both zooplankton slightly decreased as the animals increased in length, mass, and volume. The ratio of animal density and sound speed to the surrounding seawater (g and h, respectively) are reported for both animals. For Mnemiopsis leidyi ranging in length from 1 to 5 cm, the mean value (+/-standard deviation) of g and h were 1.009 (+/-0.004) and 1.007 (+/-0.001). For Cyanea capillata ranging in bell diameter from 2 to 11 cm, the mean value (+/-standard deviation) of g and single value of h were 1.009 (+/-0.004) and 1.0004. PMID:17614513

  8. Multi-frequency characterization of the speed of sound and attenuation coefficient for longitudinal transmission of freshly excised human skulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Sin, Vivian W.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    For medical applications of ultrasound inside the brain, it is necessary to understand the relationship between the apparent density of skull bone and its corresponding speed of sound and attenuation coefficient. Although there have been previous studies exploring this phenomenon, there is still a need to extend the measurements to cover more of the clinically relevant frequency range. The results of measurements of the longitudinal speed of sound and attenuation coefficient are presented for specimens of human calvaria. The study was performed for the frequencies of 0.27, 0.836, 1.402, 1.965 and 2.525 MHz. Specimens were obtained from fresh cadavers through a protocol with the Division of Anatomy of the University of Toronto. The protocol was approved by the Research Ethics Board of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The specimens were mounted in polycarbonate supports that were marked for stereoscopic positioning. Computer tomography (CT) scans of the skulls mounted on their supports were performed, and a three-dimensional skull surface was reconstructed. This surface was used to guide a positioning system to ensure the normal sound incidence of an acoustic signal. This signal was produced by a focused device with a diameter of 5 cm and a focal length of 10 cm. Measurements of delay in time of flight were carried out using a needle hydrophone. Measurements of effective transmitted energy were carried out using a radiation force method with a 10 µg resolution scale. Preliminary functions of speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, both of which are related to apparent density, were established using a multi-layer propagation model that takes into account speed of sound, density and thickness of the layer. An optimization process was executed from a large set of random functions and the best functions were chosen for those ones that closest reproduced the experimental observations. The final functions were obtained after a second pass of the optimization

  9. Radiated Sound of a High-Speed Water-Jet-Propelled Transportation Vessel.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Alexis B; Richlen, Michael F; Stimpert, Alison K; Au, Whitlow W L

    2016-01-01

    The radiated noise from a high-speed water-jet-propelled catamaran was measured for catamaran speeds of 12, 24, and 37 kn. The radiated noise increased with catamaran speed, although the shape of the noise spectrum was similar for all speeds and measuring hydrophone depth. The spectra peaked at ~200 Hz and dropped off continuously at higher frequencies. The radiated noise was 10-20 dB lower than noise from propeller-driven ships at comparable speeds. The combination of low radiated noise and high speed could be a factor in the detection and avoidance of water-jet-propelled ships by baleen whales. PMID:26611054

  10. Radiated Sound of a High-Speed Water-Jet-Propelled Transportation Vessel.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Alexis B; Richlen, Michael F; Stimpert, Alison K; Au, Whitlow W L

    2016-01-01

    The radiated noise from a high-speed water-jet-propelled catamaran was measured for catamaran speeds of 12, 24, and 37 kn. The radiated noise increased with catamaran speed, although the shape of the noise spectrum was similar for all speeds and measuring hydrophone depth. The spectra peaked at ~200 Hz and dropped off continuously at higher frequencies. The radiated noise was 10-20 dB lower than noise from propeller-driven ships at comparable speeds. The combination of low radiated noise and high speed could be a factor in the detection and avoidance of water-jet-propelled ships by baleen whales.

  11. T1 ρ MRI contrast in the human brain: Modulation of the longitudinal rotating frame relaxation shutter-speed during an adiabatic RF pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaeli, Shalom; Sorce, Dennis J.; Springer, Charles S.; Ugurbil, Kamil; Garwood, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Longitudinal relaxation in the rotating frame (T1ρ) is the dominant mechanism during a train of adiabatic full passage (AFP) RF pulses with no interpulse intervals, placed prior to an excitation pulse. Asymptotic apparent time constants (T1ρ ‧) were measured for human occipital lobe 1H2O at 4 T using brief imaging readouts following such pulse trains. Two members of the hyperbolic secant (HSn) AFP pulse family (n = 1 or 4; i.e., arising from different amplitude- and frequency-modulation functions) were used. These produced two different non-monoexponential signal decays during the pulse trains. Thus, there are differing contrasts in asymptotic T1ρ ‧ maps derived from these data. This behavior is quite different than that of 1H2O signals from an aqueous protein solution of roughly the same macromolecular volume fraction as tissue. The ROI-averaged decays from the two acquisitions can be simultaneously accommodated by a two-site-exchange model for an equilibrium isochronous process whose exchange condition is modulated during the pulse. The model employs a two-spin description of dipolar interaction fluctuations in each site. The intrinsic site R1ρ (≡T1ρ-1) value is sensitive to fluctuations at the effective Larmor frequency (ωeff) in the rotating frame, and this is modulated differently during the two types of AFP pulses. Agreement with the data is quite good for site orientation correlation time constants characteristic of macromolecule-interacting water (site A) and bulk-like water (site B). Since R1ρA is significantly modulated while R1ρB is not, the intrinsic relaxographic shutter-speed for the process (≡|R1ρA - R1ρB|), and thus the exchange condition, is modulated. However, the mean residence time (67 ms) and intrinsic population fraction (0.2) values found for site A are each rather larger than might be expected, suggesting a disproportionate role for the water molecules known to be "buried" within the large and concentrated macromolecules of

  12. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    PubMed

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  13. Acoustic measurements of the sound-speed profile in the bubbly wake formed by a small motor boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagle, Svein; Burch, Holly

    2005-01-01

    In situ measurements of the bubble field within wakes generated by a small motorboat show that the bubble field, shortly after the initial turbulent generation period, consists mainly of bubbles with radii between 20 and 200 μm. The subsequent dispersion of the wake field can be described using a model that includes bubble buoyancy and dissolution only, and the air volume fraction within the wakes decay exponentially with an e-folding time of between 40 and 60 s. Simultaneous measurements of sound propagating through the bubbly wake exhibit spectral banding due to waveguide propagation. Inversions using the inverse-square theory developed by Buckingham [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 335, 513-555 (1991)] show that this acoustic inversion technique provide a viable means of estimating the low-frequency sound-speed profile in an upward refractive bubble layer when dispersion can be neglected. .

  14. Computed Ultrasound Tomography in Echo mode (CUTE) of speed of sound for diagnosis and for aberration correction in pulse-echo sonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Michael; Held, Gerrit; Preisser, Stefan; Peeters, Sara; Grünig, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Sound speed as a diagnostic marker for various diseases of human tissue has been of interest for a while. Up to now, mostly transmission ultrasound computed tomography (UCT) was able to detect spatially resolved sound speed, and its promise as a diagnostic tool has been demonstrated. However, UCT is limited to acoustically transparent samples such as the breast. We present a novel technique where spatially resolved detection of sound speed can be achieved using conventional pulse-echo equipment in reflection mode. For this purpose, pulse-echo images are acquired under various transmit beam directions and a two-dimensional map of the sound speed is reconstructed from the changing phase of local echoes using a direct reconstruction method. Phantom results demonstrate that a high spatial resolution (1 mm) and contrast (0.5 % of average sound speed) can be achieved suitable for diagnostic purposes. In comparison to previous reflection-mode based methods, CUTE works also in a situation with only diffuse echoes, and its direct reconstruction algorithm enables real-time application. This makes it suitable as an addition to conventional clinical ultrasound where it has the potential to benefit diagnosis in a multimodal approach. In addition, knowledge of the spatial distribution of sound speed allows full aberration correction and thus improved spatial resolution and contrast of conventional B-mode ultrasound.

  15. On the significance of density-induced speed of sound variations on US-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To show the effect of speed of sound (SOS) aberration on ultrasound guided radiotherapy (US-gRT) as a function of implemented workflow. US systems assume that SOS is constant in human soft tissues (at a value of 1540 m/s), while its actual nonuniform distribution produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. When a coregistered computerized tomography (CT) scan is available, the US image can be corrected for SOS aberration. Typically, image guided radiotherapy workflows implementing US systems only provide a CT scan at the simulation (SIM) stage. If changes occur in geometry or density distribution between SIM and treatment (TX) stage, SOS aberration can change accordingly, with a final impact on the measured position of structures which is dependent on the workflow adopted. Methods: Four basic scenarios were considered of possible changes between SIM and TX: (1) No changes, (2) only patient position changes (rigid rotation-translation), (3) only US transducer position changes (constrained on patient's surface), and (4) patient tissues thickness changes. Different SOS aberrations may arise from the different scenarios, according to the specific US-gRT workflow used: intermodality (INTER) where TX US scans are compared to SIM CT scans; intramodality (INTRA) where TX US scans are compared to SIM US scans; and INTERc and INTRAc where all US images are corrected for SOS aberration (using density information provided by SIM CT). For an experimental proof of principle, the effect of tissues thickness change was simulated in the different workflows: a dual layered phantom was filled with layers of sunflower oil (SOS 1478 m/s), water (SOS 1482 m/s), and 20% saline solution (SOS 1700 m/s). The phantom was US scanned, the layer thicknesses were increased and the US scans were repeated. The errors resulting from the different workflows were compared. Results: Theoretical considerations show that workflows

  16. Bone speed of sound and physical activity levels of overweight and normal-weight girls and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yao, Mathew; Ludwa, Izabella; Corbett, Lauren; Klentrou, Panagiota; Bonsu, Peter; Gammage, Kimberley; Falk, Bareket

    2011-02-01

    Bone properties, reflected by speed of sound (SOS), and physical activity levels were examined in overweight (OW) girls (n = 19) and adolescents (n = 22), in comparison with normal-weight (NW) girls (n = 21) and adolescents (n = 13). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was higher in NW than in OW in both age groups. Tibial SOS was lower in OW compared with NW in both age groups. MVPA correlated with tibial SOS, once age was partialed out. The results suggest that overweight girls and adolescents are characterized by low tibial SOS, which may be partially attributed to lower physical activity levels.

  17. Fast calibration of speed-of-sound using temperature prior in whole-body small animal optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Subhamoy; Nasonova, Elena; Deán-Ben, X. L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The speed of sound (SoS) in the imaged sample and in the coupling medium is an important parameter in optoacoustic tomography that must be specified in order to accurately restore maps of local optical absorbance. In this work, several hybrid focusing functions are described that successfully determine the most suitable SoS based on post-reconstruction images. The SoS in the coupling medium (water) can be determined from temperature readings. Thereby, this value is suggested to be used as an initial guess for faster SoS calibration in the reconstruction of tissues having a different SoS than water.

  18. Monitoring the Lateral Gradient of Sound Speed in Ocean Toward Fast GPS/Acoustic Seafloor Positioning for the Cabled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Fujimoto, H.; Kaneda, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic technique is now in practical use for seafloor positioning to monitor crustal deformation beneath the ocean, where land-based GPS networks are not available. To achieve semi-realtime monitoring of the strain accumulation and possible precursor for the expected Nankai earthquake in Japan, JAMSTEC and others have started so called DONET project (Development of Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis), funded by MEXT Japan, where numerous seismometers, pressure gauges, and acoustic ranging instruments are going to be equipped through the planing seafloor cables at Kumano-nada. A GPS/acoustic system will be combined in part of the cable system. The present GPS/acoustic survey, which acoustically measures slant ranges between a surface transducer and three seafloor transponders, has a fault to get position in semi-realtime. The problem setting supposes a laterally stratified sound speed structure. Violation of this condition with lateral gradient in sound speed results in the deviation of apparent position of the transponders. At present, ~5~cm of accuracy is achieved after taking time-average more than 1~day to cancel-out the time-varying direction of the gradient. In addition, if a long-lived gradient appeared, we have no way to distinguish seafloor displacement from the gradient. To overcome the present status, we propose a new survey style which actively estimates the sound speed gradient and makes its correction on apparent positioning by using five transponders. This rather complicated survey style requires severe layout of the transponders and observing position to stably resolve five unknowns: the horizontal displacement vector, stratified sound speed, and its gradient vector. We numerically investigated the best arrangement by evaluating the condition number of the observation equations. For further application, we also diagnosed the case of the reduced number of the unknowns and transponders for lower-cost construction of

  19. Image reconstruction and system optimization for three-dimensional speed of sound tomography using laser-induced ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Fatima; Su, Richard; Nadvoretsky, Vyacheslav V.; Conjusteau, André; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2013-03-01

    We developed the first prototype of dual-modality imager combining optoacoustic tomography (OAT) and laser ultrasound tomography (UST) using computer models followed by experimental validation. The system designed for preclinical biomedical research can concurrently yield images depicting both the absorbed optical energy density and acoustic properties (speed of sound) of an object. In our design of the UST imager, we seek to replace conventional electrical generation of ultrasound waves by laser-induced ultrasound (LU). While earlier studies yielded encouraging results [Manohar, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett, 131911, 2007], they were limited to two-dimensional (2D) geometries. In this work, we conduct computer-simulation studies to investigate different designs for the 3D LU UST imager. The number and location of the laser ultrasound emitters, which are constrained to reside on the cylindrical surface opposite to the arc of detectors, are optimized. In addition to the system parameters, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm was optimized. We demonstrate that high quality volumetric maps of the speed of sound can be reconstructed when only 32 emitters and 128 receiving transducers are employed to record time-of-flight data at 360 tomographic view angles. The implications of the proposed system for small animal and breast-cancer imaging are discussed.

  20. About the equilibrium speed of sound in a liquid with gas-vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Gubaidullina, D. D.; Fedorov, Yu V.

    2016-01-01

    The general expression of an equilibrium velocity of a sound in vapor-gas-liquid mixtures is presented and influence of concentration of vapor and a volume content of bubbles on the received expression is analyzed. In special cases, for gas-liquid and vapor-liquid mixtures expressions of an equilibrium velocity are presented and the satisfactory consent of the received expressions with known experimental data is discovered.

  1. What Makes Speech Sound Fluent? The Contributions of Pauses, Speed and Repairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosker, Hans Rutger; Pinget, Anne-France; Quene, Hugo; Sanders, Ted; de Jong, Nivja H.

    2013-01-01

    The oral fluency level of an L2 speaker is often used as a measure in assessing language proficiency. The present study reports on four experiments investigating the contributions of three fluency aspects (pauses, speed and repairs) to perceived fluency. In Experiment 1 untrained raters evaluated the oral fluency of L2 Dutch speakers. Using…

  2. 40 CFR 205.54-1 - Low speed sound emission test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wind speed accurate within ±10 percent. (5) A thermometer for measurement of ambient temperature... material such as gravel. EC01FE92.052 (13) Vehicles with diesel engines shall be tested using Number 1D or... only for those vehicles equipped with an engine brake. (i) Select the highest rear axle...

  3. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F.

    2016-05-01

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate – in analogy to sound – at velocities controlled by the interface’s compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations.

  4. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics

    PubMed Central

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F.

    2016-01-01

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate – in analogy to sound – at velocities controlled by the interface’s compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations. PMID:27216038

  5. Protons at the speed of sound: Predicting specific biological signaling from physics.

    PubMed

    Fichtl, Bernhard; Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F

    2016-01-01

    Local changes in pH are known to significantly alter the state and activity of proteins and enzymes. pH variations induced by pulses propagating along soft interfaces (e.g. membranes) would therefore constitute an important pillar towards a physical mechanism of biological signaling. Here we investigate the pH-induced physical perturbation of a lipid interface and the physicochemical nature of the subsequent acoustic propagation. Pulses are stimulated by local acidification and propagate - in analogy to sound - at velocities controlled by the interface's compressibility. With transient local pH changes of 0.6 directly observed at the interface and velocities up to 1.4 m/s this represents hitherto the fastest protonic communication observed. Furthermore simultaneously propagating mechanical and electrical changes in the lipid interface are detected, exposing the thermodynamic nature of these pulses. Finally, these pulses are excitable only beyond a threshold for protonation, determined by the pKa of the lipid head groups. This protonation-transition plus the existence of an enzymatic pH-optimum offer a physical basis for intra- and intercellular signaling via sound waves at interfaces, where not molecular structure and mechano-enyzmatic couplings, but interface thermodynamics and thermodynamic transitions are the origin of the observations. PMID:27216038

  6. Using speed of sound measurements to constrain the Huygens probe descent profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedhem, Håkan; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Zarnecki, John; Hathi, Brijen

    2004-02-01

    The Acoustic Properties Investigation (API) is a set of sensors for acoustic measurements in gases or liquids, making a part of the Surface Science Package (SSP) on the Huygens probe. It consists of two units, API-V (Velocity of sound) and API-S (Sounding). The API-V has two ultrasonic transducers sending and receiving acoustic pulses over an unobstructed path of 15 cm. An accurate timing circuit is measuring the time it takes to propagate over the distance. Measurements are made in both directions to eliminate the effect of a constant drift of the medium. The transducers have been optimised to operate at low pressure (high altitude) and will operate from about 60 km down to the surface. They will also perform well in case of landing in a liquid. The API-S unit is an acoustic sounder, sending short pulses at 15 kHz every second and listening for echoes in between. It will detect droplets in the atmosphere and for the last 100 m it will characterise the acoustic scattering properties of the surface below. It will also give an accurate value for the descend velocity during the last 100 m. In case of landing in a (liquid) lake/ocean it will measure the depth of the late-ocean down to a maximum of about 1000 m. Accurate measurements of the velocity of sound will, together with knowledge on the temperature, enable the mean molecular weight to be calculated along the descent trajectory. The temperature will be measured by complementary sensors inside the SSP Top Hat, near the API-V, and to a high accuracy by the HASI instrument at the periphery of the Huygens probe. The API units and associated electronics has been designed and build at the Research and Scientific Support Department at ESTEC, where also the testing and initial calibration has been done. Detailed calibration has been performed with different gas mixtures and at different temperatures in the Titan simulation chamber at the University of Kent, Canterbury, UK. Further supporting studies are planned in the

  7. Modeling unsteady sound refraction by coherent structures in a high-speed jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Pinqing; Lewalle, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    We construct a visual model for the unsteady refraction of sound waves from point sources in a Ma = 0.6 jet. The mass and inviscid momentum equations give an equation governing acoustic fluctuations, including anisotropic propagation, attenuation and sources; differences with Lighthill's equation will be discussed. On this basis, the theory of characteristics gives canonical equations for the acoustic paths from any source into the far field. We model a steady mean flow in the near-jet region including the potential core and the mixing region downstream of its collapse, and model the convection of coherent structures as traveling wave perturbations of this mean flow. For a regular distribution of point sources in this region, we present a visual rendition of fluctuating distortion, lensing and deaf spots from the viewpoint of a far-field observer. Supported in part by AFOSR Grant FA-9550-10-1-0536 and by a Syracuse University Graduate Fellowship.

  8. Joint inversion for transponder localization and sound-speed profile temporal variation in high-precision acoustic surveys.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Dosso, Stan E; Sun, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    This letter develops a Bayesian inversion for localizing underwater acoustic transponders using a surface ship which compensates for sound-speed profile (SSP) temporal variation during the survey. The method is based on dividing observed acoustic travel-time data into time segments and including depth-independent SSP variations for each segment as additional unknown parameters to approximate the SSP temporal variation. SSP variations are estimated jointly with transponder locations, rather than calculated separately as in existing two-step inversions. Simulation and sea-trial results show this localization/SSP joint inversion performs better than two-step inversion in terms of localization accuracy, agreement with measured SSP variations, and computational efficiency. PMID:27475210

  9. Joint inversion for transponder localization and sound-speed profile temporal variation in high-precision acoustic surveys.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Dosso, Stan E; Sun, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    This letter develops a Bayesian inversion for localizing underwater acoustic transponders using a surface ship which compensates for sound-speed profile (SSP) temporal variation during the survey. The method is based on dividing observed acoustic travel-time data into time segments and including depth-independent SSP variations for each segment as additional unknown parameters to approximate the SSP temporal variation. SSP variations are estimated jointly with transponder locations, rather than calculated separately as in existing two-step inversions. Simulation and sea-trial results show this localization/SSP joint inversion performs better than two-step inversion in terms of localization accuracy, agreement with measured SSP variations, and computational efficiency.

  10. Photoacoustically Measured Speeds of Sound and the Equation of State of HBO2: On Understanding Detonation with Boron Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Crowhurst, J; Armstrong, M; Fried, L; Teslich, N

    2010-03-09

    Elucidation of geodynamic, geochemical, and shock induced processes is limited by challenges to accurately determine molecular fluid equations of state (EOS). High pressure liquid state reactions of carbon species underlie physiochemical mechanisms such as differentiation of planetary interiors, deep carbon sequestration, propellant deflagration, and shock chemistry. In this proceedings paper we introduce a versatile photoacoustic technique developed to measure accurate and precise speeds of sound (SoS) of high pressure molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. SoS of an intermediate boron oxide, HBO{sub 2} are measured up to 0.5 GPa along the 277 C isotherm. A polarized exponential-6 interatomic potential form, parameterized using our SoS data, enables EOS determinations and corresponding semi-empirical evaluations of >2000 C thermodynamic states including energy release from bororganic formulations. Our thermochemical model propitiously predicts boronated hydrocarbon shock Hugoniot results.

  11. Measurement of the speed of sound in trabecular bone by using a time reversal acoustics focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il; Choi, Bok Kyoung

    2014-10-01

    A new method for measuring the speed of sound (SOS) in trabecular bone by using a time reversal acoustics (TRA) focusing system was proposed and validated with measurements obtained by using the conventional pulse-transmission technique. The SOS measured in 14 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples by using the two methods was highly correlated each other, although the SOS measured by using the TRA focusing system was slightly lower by an average of 2.2 m/s. The SOS measured by using the two methods showed high correlation coefficients of r = 0.92 with the apparent bone density, consistent with the behavior in human trabecular bone in vitro. These results prove the efficacy of the new method based on the principle of TRA to measure the SOS in trabecular bone.

  12. Determination of the Boltzmann constant k from the speed of sound in helium gas at the triple point of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitre, L.; Risegari, L.; Sparasci, F.; Plimmer, M. D.; Himbert, M. E.; Giuliano Albo, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    The Boltzmann constant k has been determined from a measurement of the speed of sound in helium gas in a quasi-spherical resonator (volume 0.5 l) maintained at a temperature close to the triple point of water (273.16 K). The acoustic velocity c is deduced from measured acoustic resonance frequencies and the dimensions of the quasi-sphere, the latter being obtained via simultaneous microwave resonance. Values of c are extrapolated to the zero pressure limit of ideal gas behaviour. We find k=1.380 6487(14)× {{10}-23} JṡK-1, a result consistent with previous measurements in our group and elsewhere. The value for k, which has a relative standard uncertainty of 1.02 ppm, lies 0.02 ppm below that of the CODATA 2010 adjustment.

  13. Indirect Measurement Of Nitrogen In A Multi-Component Gas By Measuring The Speed Of Sound At Two States Of The Gas.

    DOEpatents

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring, II, Kendricks A.

    2004-10-12

    A methods of indirectly measuring the nitrogen concentration in a gas mixture. The molecular weight of the gas is modeled as a function of the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. Regression analysis is used to calculate the constant values, which can then be substituted into the model equation. If the speed of sound in the gas is measured at two states and diluent concentrations other than nitrogen (typically carbon dioxide) are known, two equations for molecular weight can be equated and solved for the nitrogen concentration in the gas mixture.

  14. Speed of Sound of a Spin-Balanced Fermi Gas with s- and d-Wave Pairings Across the BCS-BEC Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koinov, Zlatko; Mendoza, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    The authors of a recent paper (Phys Rev A 87:013613, 2013) argued that in fermionic systems with d-wave pairing the speed of sound is nonanalytic across the BCS-BEC crossover at the point where the chemical potential vanishes, regardless of the specific details of the interaction potential. On the contrary, the numerical results reported here suggest that the speed of sound across the BCS-BEC evolution of atomic Fermi gases with s- and d-wave pairings in two-dimensional square lattices is a smooth analytic function at the vanishing chemical potential.

  15. Speed of sound in solid molecular hydrogen-deuterium: Quantum Molecular Dynamics Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Carlo Luis; Perlado, Jose Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Uniformity of the solid layer is one of the critical points for an efficient ignition of the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) target. During the compression process this layer, perturbations grow as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Knowing the mechanical properties of this layer and its thermo-mechanical limits is necessary if we want to control or to minimize these instabilities. In this work we have used a simplified approach, replacing the DT ice system with a mixture of hydrogen-deuterium (HD) because beta decay of tritium complicates the analysis in the former case. Through simulation with ab initio methods we have calculated the elastic constants, the bulk modulus and sound velocity for hydrogen isotopes in solid molecular state. In this work we present the results for hydrogen-deuterium mixtures 50%-50%, at 15 K and with a compression which covers the range of 1 to 15 GPa. This system is interesting for study the early stages of the dynamic compression and provides conditions that are close to the manufacture of DT target in inertial confinement fusion. Discontinuities in the curve that have been observed on pure hydrogen, which are associated with phase transitions and the phase hysteresis.

  16. Sound Sources Identified in High-Speed Jets by Correlating Flow Density Fluctuations With Far-Field Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    2003-01-01

    Noise sources in high-speed jets were identified by directly correlating flow density fluctuation (cause) to far-field sound pressure fluctuation (effect). The experimental study was performed in a nozzle facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in support of NASA s initiative to reduce the noise emitted by commercial airplanes. Previous efforts to use this correlation method have failed because the tools for measuring jet turbulence were intrusive. In the present experiment, a molecular Rayleigh-scattering technique was used that depended on laser light scattering by gas molecules in air. The technique allowed accurate measurement of air density fluctuations from different points in the plume. The study was conducted in shock-free, unheated jets of Mach numbers 0.95, 1.4, and 1.8. The turbulent motion, as evident from density fluctuation spectra was remarkably similar in all three jets, whereas the noise sources were significantly different. The correlation study was conducted by keeping a microphone at a fixed location (at the peak noise emission angle of 30 to the jet axis and 50 nozzle diameters away) while moving the laser probe volume from point to point in the flow. The following figure shows maps of the nondimensional coherence value measured at different Strouhal frequencies ([frequency diameter]/jet speed) in the supersonic Mach 1.8 and subsonic Mach 0.95 jets. The higher the coherence, the stronger the source was.

  17. Use of a new high-speed digital data acquisition system in airborne ice-sounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, David L.; Bradley, Jerry A.; Hodge, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed digital data acquisition and signal averaging system for borehole, surface, and airborne radio-frequency geophysical measurements was designed and built by the US Geological Survey. The system permits signal averaging at rates high enough to achieve significant signal-to-noise enhancement in profiling, even in airborne applications. The first field use of the system took place in Greenland in 1987 for recording data on a 150 by 150-km grid centered on the summit of the Greenland ice sheet. About 6000-line km were flown and recorded using the new system. The data can be used to aid in siting a proposed scientific corehole through the ice sheet.

  18. Substituting an Inexpensive Function Generator for the Pulsed Laser in the Experiment "Laser Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Gases"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Mark G.; Laszlo, Matthew W.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    We present an adaptation to an experiment previously published in this "Journal". The experiment was designed to determine the heat capacity ratios of gases by measuring the speed of sound using a modified Kundt's tube. The experiment yielded excellent results for all of the gases and gas mixtures measured. Although elegant in its simplicity, it…

  19. Phase aberration correction by multi-stencils fast marching method using sound speed image in ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Lin, Hongxiang; Imoto, Haruka; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-04-01

    Reflection image from ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) system can be obtained by synthetic aperture technique, however its quality is decreased by phase aberration caused by inhomogeneous media. Therefore, phase aberration correction is important to improve image quality. In this study, multi-stencils fast marching method (MSFMM) is employed for phase correction. The MSFMM is an accurate and fast solution of Eikonal equation which considers the refraction. The proposed method includes two steps. First, the MSFMM is used to compute sound propagation time from each element to each image gird point using sound speed image of USCT. Second, synthetic aperture technique is employed to obtain reflection image using the computed propagation time. To evaluate the proposed method, both numerical simulation and phantom experiment were conducted. With regard to numerical simulation, both quantitative and qualitative comparisons between reflection images with and without phase aberration correction were given. In the quantitative comparison, the diameters of point spread function (PSF) in reflection images of a two layer structure were presented. In the qualitative comparison, reflection images of simple circle and complex breast modes with phase aberration correction show higher quality than that without the correction. In respect to phantom experiment, a piece of breast phantom with artificial glandular structure inside was scanned by a USCT prototype, and the artificial glandular structure is able to be visible more clearly in the reflection image with phase aberration correction than in that without the correction. In this study, a phase aberration correction method by the MSFMM are proposed for reflection image of the USCT.

  20. Effects of gamma irradiation on mechanical properties of defatted trabecular bone allografts assessed by speed-of-sound measurement.

    PubMed

    Vastel, L; Masse, C; Crozier, E; Padilla, F; Laugier, P; Mitton, D; Bardonnet, R; Courpied, J-P

    2007-01-01

    New sterilization methods for human bone allografts may lead to alterations in bone mechanical properties, which strongly influence short- and medium-term outcomes. In many sterilization procedures, bone allografts are subjected to gamma irradiation, usually with 25 KGy, after treatment and packaging. We used speed-of-sound (SOS) measurements to evaluate the effects of gamma irradiation on bone. All bone specimens were subjected to the same microbial inactivation procedure. They were then separated into three groups, of which one was treated and not irradiated and two were exposed to 10 and 25 KGy of gamma radiation, respectively. SOS was measured using high- and low-frequency ultrasound beams in each orthogonal direction. SOS and Young modulus were altered significantly in the three groups, compared to native untreated bone. Exposure to 10 or 25 KGy had no noticeable effect on the study variables. The impact of irradiation was small compared to the effects of physical or chemical defatting. Reducing the radiation dose used in everyday practice failed to improve graft mechanical properties in this study.

  1. Magnitude of speed of sound aberration corrections for ultrasound image guided radiotherapy for prostate and other anatomical sites

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Stroian, Gabriela; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of speed of sound (SOS) aberrations in three-dimensional ultrasound (US) imaging systems in image guided radiotherapy. The discrepancy between the fixed SOS value of 1540 m/s assumed by US systems in human soft tissues and its actual nonhomogeneous distribution in patients produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. Methods: A correction, provided by a previously published density-based algorithm, was applied to a set of five prostate, five liver, and five breast cancer patients. The shifts of the centroids of target structures and the change in shape were evaluated. Results: After the correction the prostate cases showed shifts up to 3.6 mm toward the US probe, which may explain largely the reported positioning discrepancies in the literature on US systems versus other imaging modalities. Liver cases showed the largest changes in volume of the organ, up to almost 9%, and shifts of the centroids up to more than 6 mm either away or toward the US probe. Breast images showed systematic small shifts of the centroids toward the US probe with a maximum magnitude of 1.3 mm. Conclusions: The applied correction in prostate and liver cancer patients shows positioning errors of several mm due to SOS aberration; the errors are smaller in breast cancer cases, but possibly becoming more important when breast tissue thickness increases.

  2. Sound speed and thermal property measurements of inert materials: laser spectroscopy and the diamond-anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    An indispensable companion to dynamical physics experimentation, static high-pressure diamond-anvil cell research continues to evolve, with laser diagnostic, as an accurate and versatile experimental deep planetary properties have bootstrapped each other in a process that has produced even higher pressures; consistently improved calibrations of temperature and pressure under static and dynamic conditions; and unprecedented data and understanding of materials, their elasticity, equations of state (EOS), and transport properties under extreme conditions. A collection of recent pressure and/or temperature dependent acoustic and thermal measurements and deduced mechanical properties and EOS data are summarized for a wide range of materials including H2, H2O, H2S, D2S, CO2, CH4, N2O, CH3OH,, SiO2, synthetic lubricants, PMMA, single crystal silicates, and ceramic superconductors. Room P&T sound speed measurements are presented for the first time on single crystals of beta-HMX. New high-pressure and temperature diamond cell designed and pressure calibrant materials are reviewed.

  3. Characterization of condenser microphones under different environmental conditions for accurate speed of sound measurements with acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Guianvarc'h, Cécile; Gavioso, Roberto M; Benedetto, Giuliana; Pitre, Laurent; Bruneau, Michel

    2009-07-01

    Condenser microphones are more commonly used and have been extensively modeled and characterized in air at ambient temperature and static pressure. However, several applications of interest for metrology and physical acoustics require to use these transducers in significantly different environmental conditions. Particularly, the extremely accurate determination of the speed of sound in monoatomic gases, which is pursued for a determination of the Boltzmann constant k by an acoustic method, entails the use of condenser microphones mounted within a spherical cavity, over a wide range of static pressures, at the temperature of the triple point of water (273.16 K). To further increase the accuracy achievable in this application, the microphone frequency response and its acoustic input impedance need to be precisely determined over the same static pressure and temperature range. Few previous works examined the influence of static pressure, temperature, and gas composition on the microphone's sensitivity. In this work, the results of relative calibrations of 1/4 in. condenser microphones obtained using an electrostatic actuator technique are presented. The calibrations are performed in pure helium and argon gas at temperatures near 273 K and in the pressure range between 10 and 600 kPa. These experimental results are compared with the predictions of a realistic model available in the literature, finding a remarkable good agreement. The model provides an estimate of the acoustic impedance of 1/4 in. condenser microphones as a function of frequency and static pressure and is used to calculate the corresponding frequency perturbations induced on the normal modes of a spherical cavity when this is filled with helium or argon gas. PMID:19655971

  4. A speed of sound aberration correction algorithm for curvilinear ultrasound transducers in ultrasound-based image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Pesente, Silvia; Pascoli, Francesco; Ermacora, Denis; Abu Rumeileh, Imad; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-03-01

    Conventional ultrasound (US) devices use the time of flight (TOF) of reflected US pulses to calculate distances inside the scanned tissues and thus create images. The speed of sound (SOS) is assumed to be constant in all human soft tissues at a generally accepted average value of 1540 m s-1. This assumption is a source of systematic errors up to several millimeters and of image distortion in quantitative US imaging. In this work, an extension of a method recently published by Fontanarosa et al (2011 Med. Phys. 38 2665-73) is presented: the aim is to correct SOS aberrations in three-dimensional (3D) US images in those cases where a spatially co-registered computerized tomography (CT) scan is also available; the algorithm is then applicable to a more general case where the lines of view (LOV) of the US device are not necessarily parallel and coplanar, thus allowing correction also for US transducers other than linear. The algorithm was applied on a multi-modality pelvic US phantom, scanned through three different liquid layers on top of the phantom with different SOS values; the results show that the correction restores a better match between the CT and the US images, reducing the differences to sub-millimeter agreement. Fifteen clinical cases of prostate cancer patients were also investigated: the SOS corrections of prostate centroids were on average +3.1 mm (max + 4.9 mm-min + 1.3 mm). This is in excellent agreement with reports in the literature on differences between measured prostate positions by US and other techniques, where often the discrepancy was attributed to other causes.

  5. Seafloor sound-speed profile characterization with non-parallel layering by the image source method: Application to CLUTTER'09 campaign data.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Holland, Charles W

    2016-08-01

    The image source method was originally developed to estimate sediment sound speed as a function of depth assuming plane-layered sediments. Recently, the technique was extended to treat dipping, i.e., non-parallel layers and was tested using synthetic data. Here, the technique is applied to measured reflection data with dipping layers and mud volcanoes. The data were collected with an autonomous underwater vehicle towing a source (1600-3500 Hz) and a horizontal array of hydrophones. Data were collected every 3 m criss-crossing an area about 1 km(2). The results provide a combination of two-dimensional sections of the sediment sound-speeds plotted in a three-dimensional picture.

  6. Seafloor sound-speed profile characterization with non-parallel layering by the image source method: Application to CLUTTER'09 campaign data.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Holland, Charles W

    2016-08-01

    The image source method was originally developed to estimate sediment sound speed as a function of depth assuming plane-layered sediments. Recently, the technique was extended to treat dipping, i.e., non-parallel layers and was tested using synthetic data. Here, the technique is applied to measured reflection data with dipping layers and mud volcanoes. The data were collected with an autonomous underwater vehicle towing a source (1600-3500 Hz) and a horizontal array of hydrophones. Data were collected every 3 m criss-crossing an area about 1 km(2). The results provide a combination of two-dimensional sections of the sediment sound-speeds plotted in a three-dimensional picture. PMID:27586773

  7. Isothermal and Adiabatic Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNairy, William W.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the working of the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus, a useful tool for measuring the pressure, temperature, and volume of a variety of gases undergoing compressions and expansions. Describes the adaptation of this apparatus to perform isothermal measurements and discusses the theory behind the adiabatic and isothermal processes. (JRH)

  8. AB INITIO SIMULATIONS FOR MATERIAL PROPERTIES ALONG THE JUPITER ADIABAT

    SciTech Connect

    French, Martin; Becker, Andreas; Lorenzen, Winfried; Nettelmann, Nadine; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Redmer, Ronald; Wicht, Johannes

    2012-09-15

    We determine basic thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrogen-helium-water mixtures for the extreme conditions along Jupiter's adiabat via ab initio simulations, which are compiled in an accurate and consistent data set. In particular, we calculate the electrical and thermal conductivity, the shear and longitudinal viscosity, and diffusion coefficients of the nuclei. We present results for associated quantities like the magnetic and thermal diffusivity and the kinematic shear viscosity along an adiabat that is taken from a state-of-the-art interior structure model. Furthermore, the heat capacities, the thermal expansion coefficient, the isothermal compressibility, the Grueneisen parameter, and the speed of sound are calculated. We find that the onset of dissociation and ionization of hydrogen at about 0.9 Jupiter radii marks a region where the material properties change drastically. In the deep interior, where the electrons are degenerate, many of the material properties remain relatively constant. Our ab initio data will serve as a robust foundation for applications that require accurate knowledge of the material properties in Jupiter's interior, e.g., models for the dynamo generation.

  9. Measurements of Speed of Sound in Lean and Rich Natural Gas Mixtures at Pressures up to 37 MPa Using a Specialized Rupture Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botros, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of the speed of sound in 42 different compositions of lean, medium, and rich natural-gas mixtures using a specialized high-pressure rupture tube have been conducted. The rupture tube is made of stainless steel (internal diameter = 38.1 mm and length = 42 m), and is instrumented with 13 high-frequency-response dynamic pressure transducers (Endevco) mounted very close to the rupture end and along the length of the tube to capture the pressure-time traces of the decompression wave. Tests were conducted for initial pressures ranging from 10 MPa to 37 MPa and a temperature range from -25°C to+68°C. Gas mixture compositions were controlled by mixing conventional natural-gas mixtures from an adjacent gas pipeline with richer components of alkanes. Temperature control is achieved by a heat tracer along the tube with a set point at the desired gas temperature of the particular test. Uncertainty analysis indicated that the uncertainty in the experimentally determined speed of sound in the undisturbed gas mixture at the initial pressure and temperature is on the order of 0.306 %. The measured speeds of sound were compared to predictions by five equations of state, namely; the Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling (BWRS), AGA-8, Peng-Robinson (PR), Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RK-Soave), and Groupe Européen de Recherches Gaziéres (GERG-2004) equations.

  10. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  11. Assessment of total efficiency in adiabatic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitianiec, W.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents influence of ceramic coating in all surfaces of the combustion chamber of SI four-stroke engine on working parameters mainly on heat balance and total efficiency. Three cases of engine were considered: standard without ceramic coating, fully adiabatic combustion chamber and engine with different thickness of ceramic coating. Consideration of adiabatic or semi-adiabatic engine was connected with mathematical modelling of heat transfer from the cylinder gas to the cooling medium. This model takes into account changeable convection coefficient based on the experimental formulas of Woschni, heat conductivity of multi-layer walls and also small effect of radiation in SI engines. The simulation model was elaborated with full heat transfer to the cooling medium and unsteady gas flow in the engine intake and exhaust systems. The computer program taking into account 0D model of engine processes in the cylinder and 1D model of gas flow was elaborated for determination of many basic engine thermodynamic parameters for Suzuki DR-Z400S 400 cc SI engine. The paper presents calculation results of influence of the ceramic coating thickness on indicated pressure, specific fuel consumption, cooling and exhaust heat losses. Next it were presented comparisons of effective power, heat losses in the cooling and exhaust systems, total efficiency in function of engine rotational speed and also comparison of temperature inside the cylinder for standard, semi-adiabatic and full adiabatic engine. On the basis of the achieved results it was found higher total efficiency of adiabatic engines at 2500 rpm from 27% for standard engine to 37% for full adiabatic engine.

  12. Parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakago, Kosuke; Hajdušek, Michal; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how a temporally ordered gate sequence can be parallelized in adiabatic implementations of quantum computation, we modify adiabatic gate teleportation, a model of quantum computation proposed by Bacon and Flammia [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 120504 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.120504], to a form deterministically simulating parallelized gate teleportation, which is achievable only by postselection. We introduce a twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian, a Heisenberg-type spin interaction where the coordinates of the second qubit are twisted according to a unitary gate. We develop parallelizable adiabatic gate teleportation (PAGT) where a sequence of unitary gates is performed in a single step of the adiabatic process. In PAGT, numeric calculations suggest the necessary time for the adiabatic evolution implementing a sequence of L unitary gates increases at most as O (L5) . However, we show that it has the interesting property that it can map the temporal order of gates to the spatial order of interactions specified by the final Hamiltonian. Using this property, we present a controlled-PAGT scheme to manipulate the order of gates by a control qubit. In the controlled-PAGT scheme, two differently ordered sequential unitary gates F G and G F are coherently performed depending on the state of a control qubit by simultaneously applying the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonians implementing unitary gates F and G . We investigate why the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian allows PAGT. We show that the twisted Heisenberg-type interaction Hamiltonian has an ability to perform a transposed unitary gate by just modifying the space ordering of the final Hamiltonian implementing a unitary gate in adiabatic gate teleportation. The dynamics generated by the time-reversed Hamiltonian represented by the transposed unitary gate enables deterministic simulation of a postselected event of parallelized gate teleportation in adiabatic

  13. Density, Viscosity, Sound Speed, and Thermoacoustical Parameters of Benzaldehyde with Chlorobenzene or Nitrobenzene at 303.15 K, 308.15 K, and 313.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavanya, T. G.; Saravanakumar, K.; Baskaran, R.; Kubendran, T. R.

    2013-07-01

    The values of the density, viscosity, and speed of sound for binary liquid mixtures of benzaldehyde with chlorobenzene or nitrobenzene have been measured over the entire range of composition at (303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K. These values have been used to calculate the excess molar volume (), and excess free volume (). McAllister's three-body interaction model is used for correlating the kinematic viscosity of binary mixtures. The thermophysical properties (density, viscosity, and ultrasonic velocity) under study were fit to the Jouyban-Acree model.

  14. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of {approx} {+-}22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than {approx} 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance {approx} 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance {approx} 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  15. Adiabatic gate teleportation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T

    2009-09-18

    The difficulty in producing precisely timed and controlled quantum gates is a significant source of error in many physical implementations of quantum computers. Here we introduce a simple universal primitive, adiabatic gate teleportation, which is robust to timing errors and many control errors and maintains a constant energy gap throughout the computation above a degenerate ground state space. This construction allows for geometric robustness based upon the control of two independent qubit interactions. Further, our piecewise adiabatic evolution easily relates to the quantum circuit model, enabling the use of standard methods from fault-tolerance theory for establishing thresholds.

  16. Full correction for spatially distributed speed-of-sound in echo ultrasound based on measuring aberration delays via transmit beam steering.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Michael; Robinson, Elise; Akarçay, H Günhan; Frenz, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Aberrations of the acoustic wave front, caused by spatial variations of the speed-of-sound, are a main limiting factor to the diagnostic power of medical ultrasound imaging. If not accounted for, aberrations result in low resolution and increased side lobe level, over all reducing contrast in deep tissue imaging. Various techniques have been proposed for quantifying aberrations by analysing the arrival time of coherent echoes from so-called guide stars or beacons. In situations where a guide star is missing, aperture-based techniques may give ambiguous results. Moreover, they are conceptually focused on aberrators that can be approximated as a phase screen in front of the probe. We propose a novel technique, where the effect of aberration is detected in the reconstructed image as opposed to the aperture data. The varying local echo phase when changing the transmit beam steering angle directly reflects the varying arrival time of the transmit wave front. This allows sensing the angle-dependent aberration delay in a spatially resolved way, and thus aberration correction for a spatially distributed volume aberrator. In phantoms containing a cylindrical aberrator, we achieved location-independent diffraction-limited resolution as well as accurate display of echo location based on reconstructing the speed-of-sound spatially resolved. First successful volunteer results confirm the clinical potential of the proposed technique. PMID:25989072

  17. Full correction for spatially distributed speed-of-sound in echo ultrasound based on measuring aberration delays via transmit beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Michael; Robinson, Elise; Günhan Akarçay, H.; Frenz, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Aberrations of the acoustic wave front, caused by spatial variations of the speed-of-sound, are a main limiting factor to the diagnostic power of medical ultrasound imaging. If not accounted for, aberrations result in low resolution and increased side lobe level, over all reducing contrast in deep tissue imaging. Various techniques have been proposed for quantifying aberrations by analysing the arrival time of coherent echoes from so-called guide stars or beacons. In situations where a guide star is missing, aperture-based techniques may give ambiguous results. Moreover, they are conceptually focused on aberrators that can be approximated as a phase screen in front of the probe. We propose a novel technique, where the effect of aberration is detected in the reconstructed image as opposed to the aperture data. The varying local echo phase when changing the transmit beam steering angle directly reflects the varying arrival time of the transmit wave front. This allows sensing the angle-dependent aberration delay in a spatially resolved way, and thus aberration correction for a spatially distributed volume aberrator. In phantoms containing a cylindrical aberrator, we achieved location-independent diffraction-limited resolution as well as accurate display of echo location based on reconstructing the speed-of-sound spatially resolved. First successful volunteer results confirm the clinical potential of the proposed technique.

  18. The clock is ticking: the sound of a ticking clock speeds up women's attitudes on reproductive timing.

    PubMed

    Moss, Justin H; Maner, Jon K

    2014-09-01

    The "biological clock" serves as a powerful metaphor that reflects the constraints posed by female reproductive biology. The biological clock refers to the progression of time from puberty to menopause, marking the period during which women can conceive children. Findings from two experiments suggest that priming the passage of time through the sound of a ticking clock influenced various aspects of women's (but not men's) reproductive timing. Moreover, consistent with recent research from the domain of life history theory, those effects depended on women's childhood socioeconomic status (SES). The subtle sound of a ticking clock led low (but not high) SES women to reduce the age at which they sought to get married and have their first child (Study 1), as well as the priority they placed on the social status and long-term earning potential of potential romantic partners (Study 2). Findings suggest that early developmental sensitization processes can interact with subtle environmental stimuli to affect reproductive timing during adulthood.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann method for adiabatic acoustics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanbing; Shan, Xiaowen

    2011-06-13

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been proved to be a useful tool in many areas of computational fluid dynamics, including computational aero-acoustics (CAA). However, for historical reasons, its applications in CAA have been largely restricted to simulations of isothermal (Newtonian) sound waves. As the recent kinetic theory-based reformulation establishes a theoretical framework in which LBM can be extended to recover the full Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NS) equations and beyond, in this paper, we show that, at least at the low-frequency limit (sound frequency much less than molecular collision frequency), adiabatic sound waves can be accurately simulated by the LBM provided that the lattice and the distribution function ensure adequate recovery of the full NS equations.

  20. Adiabatically implementing quantum gates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng Liu, Fang

    2014-06-14

    We show that, through the approach of quantum adiabatic evolution, all of the usual quantum gates can be implemented efficiently, yielding running time of order O(1). This may be considered as a useful alternative to the standard quantum computing approach, which involves quantum gates transforming quantum states during the computing process.

  1. Entanglement and adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrensmeier, D.

    2006-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum computation provides an alternative approach to quantum computation using a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The time evolution of entanglement during the adiabatic quantum search algorithm is studied, and its relevance as a resource is discussed.

  2. Optical and thermodynamic properties of MgO from radiative shock temperature and sound speed measurements on samples preheated to 2300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatýanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thermodynamic properties of MgO, one of the major end-members of deep planetary interiors, play a significant role in the processes inside the Earth's lower mantle. Of particular importance in geophysics and geochemistry is the MgO melting behavior at high pressure. Despite considerable theoretical and experimental efforts over decades, it remains essentially unknown. The melting temperature predictions for MgO at 135 GPa, the Earth's core-mantle boundary pressure, range from 5 to 9 kK. In a continuous effort to resolve this inconsistency and to probe the P-T region previously unexplored, we developed a technique for radiative shock temperature measurements in single-crystal MgO preheated to 2300 K. Large ventilated Mo capsules were employed to hold ~20 mm long MgO crystals with controlled longitudinal thermal gradients. These hot targets were impacted by 0.8 mm thick Ta flyers launched at 6.5 to 7.5 km/s on the Caltech two-stage light-gas gun. Six spectral radiance histories from MgO shock front were recorded in every shot with 3 ns time resolution over 440-750 nm or 500-830 nm spectral range. The majority of our experiments showed smooth pressure dependence of MgO shock temperature and sound speed consistent with the solid phase at 197-243 GPa. Although most observed temperatures are ~700 K lower and sound speeds ~1 km/s higher than the model predictions, the pressure slopes for both parameters are in close agreement with those calculated for the solid phase. Unconfirmed data from a single experiment at 239 GPa and 8.3 kK showed correlated temperature and sound speed anomalies (both values lower than expected) that may be explained by partial melting. Our past and recent data on shock-compressed preheated MgO suggest its melting curve above 200 GPa is higher than the extrapolation of the experiments of Zerr & Boehler or the theoretical calculation by Strachan et. al. These results, features of shock experiments with 2300 K pre-heat temperatures, data analysis

  3. Speed of Sound in Aqueous Solutions at sub-GPa Pressures: a New Experiment to Unveil the Properties of Extra-Terrestrial Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollengier, O.; Brown, J. M.; Vance, S.; Shaw, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical data from the Galileo and Cassini-Huygens missions are consistent with the presence of aqueous subsurface oceans in Ganymede, Callisto and Titan, the largest icy satellites of the solar system. To understand the history and present state of these moons, the next generation of evolution models will require an accurate description of the properties of these liquid layers to predict the phase boundaries, heat transports and chemical exchanges within them. Sound speed measurements in pressure and temperature allow for the reconstruction of the Gibbs free energy surface of a phase, which in turn gives access to the desired properties (chemical potential, density, heat capacity...). However, such data are still scarce for aqueous solutions bearing Na+, Mg2+, Cl- and SO42- ions (major ions expected in extra-terrestrial oceans) at the high pressures and low temperatures expected for water inside these moons (up to 1.5 GPa for Ganymede, down to freezing temperatures). For pure water, IAPWS accuracy for sound speeds is given to 0.3% above 0.4 GPa. MgSO4aqueous solutions have been explored to 0.7 GPa with a precision limited to about 0.5%. Most other aqueous solutions bearing any combination of these four ions have not been explored at all above a few hundreds MPa. To acquire new high-precision sound speeds in aqueous solutions of various compositions, we set up a new experimental system working in the 0 - 0.7 GPa pressure range and 240 - 350 K temperature range. The device consists in an oil-pressurized steel vessel enclosing a titanium alloy rod supporting the sample and a sealing bellows. A transducer at the top end of the titanium rod generates ultrasonic waves and collects the series of subsequent reflections. Preliminary tests with pure water illustrate a precision of 0.02% and an accuracy within 0.1% of IAPWS on our whole pressure range. Revision of the properties of pure water and H2O-MgSO4 solutions up to 0.7 GPa along with the first data in the H2O-MgCl2

  4. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.; Neels, Alice

    2015-07-01

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev's surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computation size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.

  5. Densities, viscosities, refractive indices, and speeds of sound of the binary mixtures of bis(2-methoxyethyl) ether with nonane, decane, dodecane, tetradecane, and hexadecane at 298. 15, 308. 15, and 318. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Aminabhavi, T.M.; Gopalkrishna, B. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-07-01

    Densities, viscosities, refractive indices, and speeds of sound for the boundary mixtures of bis(2-methoxyethyl) ether with nonane, decane, dodecane, tetradecane, and hexadecane have been measured at 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15 K over the entire range of mole fractions. From these results, the excess molar volumes and deviations in viscosity, refractivity, speed of sound, and isentropic compressibility have been calculated. These results are fitted to the Redlich-Kister polynomial relation to estimate the binary interaction parameters. The excess molar volumes and deviations in isentropic compressibility are positive, while the deviations in viscosity, speed of sound, and molar refractivity are negative. The results show a trend with the chain length of the alkanes.

  6. Sound modes in holographic superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Yarom, Amos

    2009-11-15

    Superfluids support many different types of sound waves. We investigate the relation between the sound waves in a relativistic and a nonrelativistic superfluid by using hydrodynamics to calculate the various sound speeds. Then, using a particular holographic scalar gravity realization of a strongly interacting superfluid, we compute first, second, and fourth sound speeds as a function of the temperature. The relativistic low temperature results for second sound differ from Landau's well known prediction for the nonrelativistic, incompressible case.

  7. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  8. Shortcut to Adiabatic Passage in Two- and Three-Level Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.

    2010-09-17

    We propose a method to speed up adiabatic passage techniques in two-level and three-level atoms extending to the short-time domain their robustness with respect to parameter variations. It supplements or substitutes the standard laser beam setups with auxiliary pulses that steer the system along the adiabatic path. Compared to other strategies, such as composite pulses or the original adiabatic techniques, it provides a fast and robust approach to population control.

  9. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchon-Enrich, R.; Benseny, A.; Ahufinger, V.; Greentree, A. D.; Busch, Th; Mompart, J.

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound.

  10. Adiabatic effects in the dynamics of Langmuir solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Astrelin, V.T.; Breizman, B.N.; Sedlacek, Z.; Jungwirth, K.

    1988-06-01

    The adiabatic slowness with which the plasma density profile is reconstructed from localized in large-amplitude Langmuir solitons is characteristic of such solitons. Several examples making use of this feature in the description of the soliton dynamics are given. Specifically, long-lived states in the form of composite solitons ar found. Additional limitations are found on the interaction of solitons with each other and with sound waves. The effect of the adiabatic nature on the formation of solitons from free plasmons is discussed.

  11. Adiabatic regularisation of power spectra in k-inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Alinea, Allan L.; Kubota, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Yukari; Naylor, Wade E-mail: kubota@celas.osaka-u.ac.jp E-mail: naylor@phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    We look at the question posed by Parker et al. about the effect of UV regularisation on the power spectrum for inflation. Focusing on the slow-roll k-inflation, we show that up to second order in the Hubble and sound flow parameters, the adiabatic regularisation of such model leads to no difference in the power spectrum apart from certain cases that violate near scale-invariant power spectra. Furthermore, extending to non-minimal k-inflation, we establish the equivalence of the subtraction terms in the adiabatic regularisation of the power spectrum in Jordan and Einstein frames.

  12. Spatial adiabatic passage: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Menchon-Enrich, R; Benseny, A; Ahufinger, V; Greentree, A D; Busch, Th; Mompart, J

    2016-07-01

    Adiabatic techniques are known to allow for engineering quantum states with high fidelity. This requirement is currently of large interest, as applications in quantum information require the preparation and manipulation of quantum states with minimal errors. Here we review recent progress on developing techniques for the preparation of spatial states through adiabatic passage, particularly focusing on three state systems. These techniques can be applied to matter waves in external potentials, such as cold atoms or electrons, and to classical waves in waveguides, such as light or sound. PMID:27245462

  13. Geometry of the Adiabatic Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Augusto Cesar; Ribeiro, Rafael Antunes; Ribeiro, Clyffe de Assis; Dieguez, Pedro Ruas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and pedagogical derivation of the quantum adiabatic theorem for two-level systems (a single qubit) based on geometrical structures of quantum mechanics developed by Anandan and Aharonov, among others. We have chosen to use only the minimum geometric structure needed for the understanding of the adiabatic theorem for this case.…

  14. Inter-individual changes in cortical bone three-dimensional microstructure and elastic coefficient have opposite effects on radial sound speed.

    PubMed

    Eneh, Chibuzor T M; Liukkonen, Jukka; Malo, Markus K H; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge about simultaneous contributions of tissue microstructure and elastic properties on ultrasound speed in cortical bone is limited. In a previous study, porosities and elastic coefficients of cortical bone in human femurs were shown to change with age. In the present study, influences of inter-individual and site-dependent variation in cortical bone microstructure and elastic properties on radial speed of sound (SOS; at 4, 6, and 8 MHz) were investigated using three-dimensional (3D) finite difference time domain modeling. Models with fixed (nominal model) and sample-specific (sample-specific model) values of radial elastic coefficients were compared. Elastic coefficients and microstructure for samples (n = 24) of human femoral shafts (n = 6) were derived using scanning acoustic microscopy and micro-computed tomography images, respectively. Porosity-related SOS varied more extensively in nominal models than in sample-specific models. Linear correlation between pore separation and SOS was similar (R = 0.8, p < 0.01, for 4 MHz) for both models. The determination coefficient (R(2)= 0.75, p < 0.05) between porosity and radial SOS, especially at 4 MHz, was highest in the posterior quadrant. The determination coefficient was lower for models with sample-specific values of radial elastic coefficient implemented (R(2) < 0.33, p < 0.05), than for nominal models (0.48 < R(2)< 0.63, p < 0.05). This information could be useful in in vivo pulse-echo cortical thickness measurements applying constant SOS. PMID:26723306

  15. Properties of an equilibrium hadron gas subjected to the adiabatic longitudinal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Dariusz; Turko, Ludwik

    1995-06-01

    We consider an ideal gas of massive hadrons in thermal and chemical equilibrium. The gas expands longitudinally in an adiabatic way. This evolution for a baryonless gas reduces to a hydrodynamic expansion. Cooling process is parametrized by the sound velocity. The sound velocity is temperature dependent and is strongly influenced by hadron mass spectrum.

  16. The speed of sound and attenuation of an IEC agar-based tissue-mimicking material for high frequency ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Pye, Stephen D; Browne, Jacinta E; Janeczko, Anna; Ellis, Bill; Butler, Mairead B; Sboros, Vassilis; Thomson, Adrian J W; Brewin, Mark P; Earnshaw, Charles H; Moran, Carmel M

    2012-07-01

    This study characterized the acoustic properties of an International Electromechanical Commission (IEC) agar-based tissue mimicking material (TMM) at ultrasound frequencies in the range 10-47 MHz. A broadband reflection substitution technique was employed using two independent systems at 21°C ± 1°C. Using a commercially available preclinical ultrasound scanner and a scanning acoustic macroscope, the measured speeds of sound were 1547.4 ± 1.4 m∙s(-1) and 1548.0 ± 6.1 m∙s(-1), respectively, and were approximately constant over the frequency range. The measured attenuation (dB∙cm(-1)) was found to vary with frequency f (MHz) as 0.40f + 0.0076f(2). Using this polynomial equation and extrapolating to lower frequencies give values comparable to those published at lower frequencies and can estimate the attenuation of this TMM in the frequency range up to 47 MHz. This characterisation enhances understanding in the use of this TMM as a tissue equivalent material for high frequency ultrasound applications.

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving for trapped-ion displacement in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Shuoming; Lv, Dingshun; Del Campo, Adolfo; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-09-01

    The application of adiabatic protocols in quantum technologies is severely limited by environmental sources of noise and decoherence. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving constitute a powerful alternative that speed up time-evolution while mimicking adiabatic dynamics. Here we report the experimental implementation of counterdiabatic driving in a continuous variable system, a shortcut to the adiabatic transport of a trapped ion in phase space. The resulting dynamics is equivalent to a `fast-motion video' of the adiabatic trajectory. The robustness of this protocol is shown to surpass that of competing schemes based on classical local controls and Fourier optimization methods. Our results demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity provide a robust speedup of quantum protocols of wide applicability in quantum technologies.

  18. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving for trapped-ion displacement in phase space

    PubMed Central

    An, Shuoming; Lv, Dingshun; del Campo, Adolfo; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-01-01

    The application of adiabatic protocols in quantum technologies is severely limited by environmental sources of noise and decoherence. Shortcuts to adiabaticity by counterdiabatic driving constitute a powerful alternative that speed up time-evolution while mimicking adiabatic dynamics. Here we report the experimental implementation of counterdiabatic driving in a continuous variable system, a shortcut to the adiabatic transport of a trapped ion in phase space. The resulting dynamics is equivalent to a ‘fast-motion video' of the adiabatic trajectory. The robustness of this protocol is shown to surpass that of competing schemes based on classical local controls and Fourier optimization methods. Our results demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity provide a robust speedup of quantum protocols of wide applicability in quantum technologies. PMID:27669897

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION CALCULATION OF THE SOLAR GLOBAL CONVECTION WITH THE REDUCED SPEED OF SOUND TECHNIQUE. II. NEAR SURFACE SHEAR LAYER WITH THE ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R {sub ☉} and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R {sub ☉}. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation 〈v{sub r}{sup ′}v{sub θ}{sup ′}〉 results from rotationally aligned convection cells ({sup b}anana cells{sup )}. The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  20. High-resolution Calculation of the Solar Global Convection with the Reduced Speed of Sound Technique. II. Near Surface Shear Layer with the Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R ☉ and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R ☉. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the < v\\prime r v\\prime _θ > correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation < v\\prime _rv\\prime _θ > is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation < v\\prime _rv\\prime _θ > results from rotationally aligned convection cells ("banana cells"). The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  1. High-resolution Calculation of the Solar Global Convection with the Reduced Speed of Sound Technique. II. Near Surface Shear Layer with the Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, highly stratified numerical simulation of rotating thermal convection in a spherical shell. Our aim is to study in detail the processes that can maintain a near surface shear layer (NSSL) as inferred from helioseismology. Using the reduced speed of sound technique, we can extend our global convection simulation to 0.99 R ⊙ and include, near the top of our domain, small-scale convection with short timescales that is only weakly influenced by rotation. We find the formation of an NSSL preferentially in high latitudes in the depth range of r = 0.95-0.975 R ⊙. The maintenance mechanisms are summarized as follows. Convection under the weak influence of rotation leads to Reynolds stresses that transport angular momentum radially inward in all latitudes. This leads to the formation of a strong poleward-directed meridional flow and an NSSL, which is balanced in the meridional plane by forces resulting from the < v\\prime r v\\prime _θ > correlation of turbulent velocities. The origin of the required correlations depends to some degree on latitude. In high latitudes, a positive correlation < v\\prime _rv\\prime _θ > is induced in the NSSL by the poleward meridional flow whose amplitude increases with the radius, while a negative correlation is generated by the Coriolis force in bulk of the convection zone. In low latitudes, a positive correlation < v\\prime _rv\\prime _θ > results from rotationally aligned convection cells ("banana cells"). The force caused by these Reynolds stresses is in balance with the Coriolis force in the NSSL.

  2. Experimental observations of detonation in ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) surrounded by a high-sound speed, shockless, aluminum confiner

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Klyanda, Charles B; Short, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Detonations in explosive mixtures of ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum allow for transport of detonation energy ahead of the detonation front due to the aluminum sound speed exceeding the detonation velocity. The net effect of this energy transport on the detonation is unclear. It could enhance the detonation by precompressing the explosive near the wall. Alternatively, it could desensitize the explosive by crushing porosity required for shock initiation or destroying confinement ahead of the detonation. As these phenomena are not well understood, most numerical explosive models are unable to account for them. But with slowly detonating, non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) systems becoming increasing prevalent, proper understanding and prediction of the performance of these metal-confined NIHE systems is desirable. Experiments are discussed that measured the effect of this ANFO detonation energy transported upstream of the front by an aluminum confining tube. Detonation velocity, detonation front curvature, and aluminum response are recorded as a function of confiner wall thickness and length. Front curvature profiles display detonation acceleration near the confining surface, which is attributed to energy transported upstream modifying the flow. Average detonation velocities were seen to increase with increasing confiner thickness due to the additional inertial confinement of the reaction zone flow. Significant radial sidewall tube motion was observed immediately ahead of the detonation. Axial motion was also detected which interfered with the front curvature measurements in some cases. It was concluded that the confiner was able to transport energy ahead of the detonation and that this transport has a definite effect on the detonation.

  3. Isentropic phase changes in dissociating gases and the method of sound dispersion for the investigation of homogeneous gas reactions with very high speed : Conclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damkohler, Gerhard

    1950-01-01

    The analytical results of Part I are also applied to sound dispersion by friction and heat conduction, An irreversible change of momentum, energy, and type of particle corresponding to friction, heat conduction, and diffusion effects can appear both in the direction of the sound field and traverse to it. Longitudinal damping, the coupling of longitudinal damping and that due to chemical and physical changes, and coupling of diffusion and compositional changes are treated for a plane sound wave of infinite extent. The same principles are also applied to sound effects in cylindrical tubes. The limitations of the method are discussed in some detail.

  4. Excess Volumes, Densities, Speeds of Sound, and Viscosities for the Binary Systems of 1-Octanol with Hexadecane and Squalane at (298.15, 303.15 and 308.15) K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Gyan P.; Sharma, Monika

    2008-08-01

    Excess molar volumes, {V_m^E } , excess molar isentropic compressibilities, {K_{S,m}^E } , and deviations of the speeds of sound, u D, from their ideal values u id in an ideal mixture for binary mixtures of 1-octanol, C8H17OH, with hexadecane, C16H34, and squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane), C30H62, at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K and at atmospheric pressure were derived from experimental density, ρ, and speed-of-sound data, u. Viscosity measurements were also carried out for the same mixtures. The Prigogine-Flory-Patterson (PFP) theory has been applied to analyze {V_m^E} of these systems. Furthermore, the apparent molar volumes, {overline{{V}}_{\\varphi ,i}^0 } and apparent molar compressibility, {overline{{K}}_{\\varphi ,i}^{ 0} } of the components at infinite dilution have been calculated.

  5. Arbitrary Amplitude DIA and DA Solitary Waves in Adiabatic Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Jahan, N.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    The dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) as well as the dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves (SWs) in an adiabatic dusty plasma are investigated by the pseudo-potential approach which is valid for arbitrary amplitude SWs. The role of the adiabaticity of electrons and ions in modifying the basic features (polarity, speed, amplitude and width) of arbitrary amplitude DIA and DA SWs are explicitly examined. It is found that the effects of the adiabaticity of electrons and ions significantly modify the basic features (polarity, speed, amplitude and width) of the DIA and DA SWs. The implications of our results in space and laboratory dusty plasmas are briefly discussed.

  6. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  7. Adiabatic computation: A toy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Mosseri, Rémy

    2006-10-01

    We discuss a toy model for adiabatic quantum computation which displays some phenomenological properties expected in more realistic implementations. This model has two free parameters: the adiabatic evolution parameter s and the α parameter, which emulates many-variable constraints in the classical computational problem. The proposed model presents, in the s-α plane, a line of first-order quantum phase transition that ends at a second-order point. The relation between computation complexity and the occurrence of quantum phase transitions is discussed. We analyze the behavior of the ground and first excited states near the quantum phase transition, the gap, and the entanglement content of the ground state.

  8. Adiabatic computation: A toy model

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Mosseri, Remy

    2006-10-15

    We discuss a toy model for adiabatic quantum computation which displays some phenomenological properties expected in more realistic implementations. This model has two free parameters: the adiabatic evolution parameter s and the {alpha} parameter, which emulates many-variable constraints in the classical computational problem. The proposed model presents, in the s-{alpha} plane, a line of first-order quantum phase transition that ends at a second-order point. The relation between computation complexity and the occurrence of quantum phase transitions is discussed. We analyze the behavior of the ground and first excited states near the quantum phase transition, the gap, and the entanglement content of the ground state.

  9. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  10. Adiabatic molecular-dynamics-simulation-method studies of kinetic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Sokoloff, J. B.

    2005-06-01

    An adiabatic molecular-dynamics method is developed and used to study the Muser-Robbins model for dry friction (i.e., nonzero kinetic friction in the slow sliding speed limit). In this model, dry friction between two crystalline surfaces rotated with respect to each other is due to mobile molecules (i.e., dirt particles) adsorbed at the interface. Our adiabatic method allows us to quickly locate interface potential-well minima, which become unstable during sliding of the surfaces. Since dissipation due to friction in the slow sliding speed limit results from mobile molecules dropping out of such unstable wells, our method provides a way to calculate dry friction, which agrees extremely well with results found by conventional molecular dynamics for the same system, but our method is more than a factor of 10 faster.

  11. Elementary examples of adiabatic invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1990-04-01

    Simple classical one-dimensional systems subject to adiabatic (gradual) perturbations are examined. The first examples are well known: the adiabatic invariance of the product Eτ of energy E and period τ for the simple pendulum and for the simple harmonic oscillator. Next, the adiabatic invariants of the vertical bouncer are found—a ball bouncing elastically from the floor of a rising elevator having slowly varying velocity and acceleration. These examples lead to consideration of adiabatic invariance for one-dimensional systems with potentials of the form V=axn, with a=a(t) slowly varying in time. Then, the horizontal bouncer is considered—a mass sliding on a smooth floor, bouncing back and forth between two impenetrable walls, one of which is slowly moving. This example is generalized to a particle in a bound state of a general potential with one slowly moving ``turning point.'' Finally, circular motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field slowly varying in time under three different configurations is considered: (a) a free particle in a uniform field; (b) a free particle in a nonuniform ``betatron'' field; and (c) a particle constrained to a circular orbit in a uniform field.

  12. Pressure Oscillations in Adiabatic Compression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Roland

    2011-01-01

    After finding Moloney and McGarvey's modified adiabatic compression apparatus, I decided to insert this experiment into my physical chemistry laboratory at the last minute, replacing a problematic experiment. With insufficient time to build the apparatus, we placed a bottle between two thick textbooks and compressed it with a third textbook forced…

  13. Studies in Chaotic adiabatic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzynski, C.

    1994-01-01

    Chaotic adiabatic dynamics refers to the study of systems exhibiting chaotic evolution under slowly time-dependent equations of motion. In this dissertation the author restricts his attention to Hamiltonian chaotic adiabatic systems. The results presented are organized around a central theme, namely, that the energies of such systems evolve diffusively. He begins with a general analysis, in which he motivates and derives a Fokker-Planck equation governing this process of energy diffusion. He applies this equation to study the {open_quotes}goodness{close_quotes} of an adiabatic invariant associated with chaotic motion. This formalism is then applied to two specific examples. The first is that of a gas of noninteracting point particles inside a hard container that deforms slowly with time. Both the two- and three-dimensional cases are considered. The results are discussed in the context of the Wall Formula for one-body dissipation in nuclear physics, and it is shown that such a gas approaches, asymptotically with time, an exponential velocity distribution. The second example involves the Fermi mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays. Explicit evolution equations are obtained for the distribution of cosmic ray energies within this model, and the steady-state energy distribution that arises when this equation is modified to account for the injection and removal of cosmic rays is discussed. Finally, the author re-examines the multiple-time-scale approach as applied to the study of phase space evolution under a chaotic adiabatic Hamiltonian. This leads to a more rigorous derivation of the above-mentioned Fokker-Planck equation, and also to a new term which has relevance to the problem of chaotic adiabatic reaction forces (the forces acting on slow, heavy degrees of freedom due to their coupling to light, fast chaotic degrees).

  14. Transition from hydrodynamic to viscoelastic propagation of sound in molten RbBr.

    PubMed

    Demmel, F; Szubrin, D; Pilgrim, W C; De Francesco, A; Formisano, F

    2015-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was applied to measure the acoustic-type excitations in the molten alkali halide rubidium bromide. For molten RbBr neutron scattering is mainly sensitive to the number density fluctuation spectrum and is not influenced by charge fluctuations. Utilizing a dedicated Brillouin scattering spectrometer, we focused on the small-wave-vector range. From inelastic excitations in the spectra a dispersion relation was obtained, which shows a large positive dispersion effect. This frequency enhancement is related to a viscoelastic response of the liquid at high frequencies. Towards small wave vectors we identify the transition to hydrodynamic behavior. This observation is supported by a transition of the sound velocity from a viscoelastic enhanced value to the adiabatic speed of sound for the acoustic-type excitations. Furthermore, the spectrum transforms into a line shape compatible with a prediction from hydrodynamics. PMID:26274162

  15. On adiabatic stabilization and geometry of Bunsen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.J.; Sung, C.J.; Law, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    Two aspects of stretched flame dynamics are investigated via the model problem of the stabilization and geometry of Bunsen flames. Specifically, the possibility of stabilizing a Bunsen flame without heat loss to the burner rim is experimentally investigated by examining the temperature of the rim, the temperature gradient between the rim and the flame base, and the standoff distance of the flame base in relation to the flame thickness. Results show that, while heat loss is still the dominant stabilization mechanism for flames in uniform flows and for strong flames in parabolic flow, adiabatic stabilization and, subsequently, blowoff are indeed possible for weak flames in parabolic flows. The adiabatically stabilized flame is then modeled by using the scalar field formulation and by allowing for the effects of curvature and aerodynamic straining on the local flame speed. The calculated flame configuration agrees well with the experiment for the adiabatically stabilized flame but not for the nonadiabatic flame. Results further show that active modification of the flame curvature is the dominant cause for the flame to maintain adiabatic stabilization. Implications of the present results on turbulent flame modeling are discussed.

  16. Invalidity of the quantitative adiabatic condition and general conditions for adiabatic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dafa

    2016-05-01

    The adiabatic theorem was proposed about 90 years ago and has played an important role in quantum physics. The quantitative adiabatic condition constructed from eigenstates and eigenvalues of a Hamiltonian is a traditional tool to estimate adiabaticity and has proven to be the necessary and sufficient condition for adiabaticity. However, recently the condition has become a controversial subject. In this paper, we list some expressions to estimate the validity of the adiabatic approximation. We show that the quantitative adiabatic condition is invalid for the adiabatic approximation via the Euclidean distance between the adiabatic state and the evolution state. Furthermore, we deduce general necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic approximation by different definitions.

  17. Calibration of sound velocimeter in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baofeng; Li, Tao; Zhu, Junchao; Xie, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of sound speed is important to calibrate a sound velocity profiler which provides real-time sound velocity to the sonar equipment in oceanographic survey. The sound velocity profiler calculates the sound speed by measuring the time-of-flight of a 1 MHz single acoustic pulse to travel over about 300 mm path. A standard sound velocimeter instrument was invited to calibrate the sound velocity profiler in pure water at temperatures of 278,283, 288, 293, 298, 303 and 308K in a thermostatic vessel at one atmosphere. The sound velocity profiler was deployed in the thermostatic vessel alongside the standard sound velocimeter instrument and two platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) which were calibrated to 0.002k by comparison with a standard PRT. Time of flight circuit board was used to measure the time-of-flight to 22 picosecond precision. The sound speed which was measured by the sound velocity profiler was compared to the standard sound speed calculated by UNESCO to give the laboratory calibration coefficients and was demonstrated agreement with CTD-derived sound speed using Del Grosso's seawater equation after removing a bias.

  18. Adiabatic Wankel type rotary engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamo, R.; Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1988-01-01

    This SBIR Phase program accomplished the objective of advancing the technology of the Wankel type rotary engine for aircraft applications through the use of adiabatic engine technology. Based on the results of this program, technology is in place to provide a rotor and side and intermediate housings with thermal barrier coatings. A detailed cycle analysis of the NASA 1007R Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engine was performed which concluded that applying thermal barrier coatings to the rotor should be successful and that it was unlikely that the rotor housing could be successfully run with thermal barrier coatings as the thermal stresses were extensive.

  19. Adiabatic processes in monatomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera-Patiño, Martin E.

    1988-08-01

    A kinetic model is used to predict the temperature evolution of a monatomic ideal gas undergoing an adiabatic expansion or compression at a constant finite rate, and it is then generalized to treat real gases. The effects of interatomic forces are considered, using as examples the gas with the square-well potential and the van der Waals gas. The model is integrated into a Carnot cycle operating at a finite rate to compare the efficiency's rate-dependent behavior with the reversible result. Limitations of the model, rate penalties, and their importance are discussed.

  20. Adiabatic preparation of Floquet condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinisch, Christoph; Holthaus, Martin

    2016-10-01

    We argue that a Bose-Einstein condensate can be transformed into a Floquet condensate, that is, into a periodically time-dependent many-particle state possessing the coherence properties of a mesoscopically occupied single-particle Floquet state. Our reasoning is based on the observation that the denseness of the many-body system's quasienergy spectrum does not necessarily obstruct effectively adiabatic transport. Employing the idealized model of a driven bosonic Josephson junction, we demonstrate that only a small amount of Floquet entropy is generated when a driving force with judiciously chosen frequency and maximum amplitude is turned on smoothly.

  1. On the question of adiabatic invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropol'Skii, Iu. A.

    Some aspects of the construction of adiabadic invariants for dynamic systems with a single degree of freedom are discussed. Adiabatic invariants are derived using classical principles and the method proposed by Djukic (1981). The discussion covers an adiabatic invariant for a dynamic system with slowly varying parameters; derivation of an expression for an adiabatic invariant by the Djukic method for a second-order equation with a variable mass; and derivation of an expression for the adiabatic invariant for a nearly integrable differential equation.

  2. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. II. LAGRANGIAN CONSTRAINED ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Lecoanet, Daniel; Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Wood, Toby S.

    2013-08-20

    The speed of sound greatly exceeds typical flow velocities in many stellar and planetary interiors. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof models attempt to remove fast acoustic waves while retaining stratified convection and buoyancy dynamics. In astrophysics, anelastic models typically receive the most attention in the class of sound-filtered stratified models. Generally, anelastic models remain valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may break down in strongly sub-adiabatic, stably stratified layers common in stellar radiative zones. However, studying stellar rotation, circulation, and dynamos requires understanding the complex coupling between convection and radiative zones, and this requires robust equations valid in both regimes. Here we extend the analysis of equation sets begun in Brown et al., which studied anelastic models, to two types of pseudo-incompressible models. This class of models has received attention in atmospheric applications, and more recently in studies of white-dwarf supernova progenitors. We demonstrate that one model conserves energy but the other does not. We use Lagrangian variational methods to extend the energy conserving model to a general equation of state, and dub the resulting equation set the generalized pseudo-incompressible (GPI) model. We show that the GPI equations suitably capture low-frequency phenomena in both convection and radiative zones in stars and other stratified systems, and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number codes to this equation set.

  3. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. PART I. ANELASTIC APPROXIMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.

    2012-09-10

    Typical flows in stellar interiors are much slower than the speed of sound. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof equations are in wide use, particularly in stellar astrophysical fluid dynamics. These low-Mach number equations include the anelastic equations. Generally, these equations are valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may not be valid in the sub-adiabatic, stably stratified stellar radiative interiors. Understanding the coupling between the convection zone and the radiative interior is a problem of crucial interest and may have strong implications for solar and stellar dynamo theories as the interface between the two, called the tachocline in the Sun, plays a crucial role in many solar dynamo theories. Here, we study the properties of gravity waves in stably stratified atmospheres. In particular, we explore how gravity waves are handled in various sound-proof equations. We find that some anelastic treatments fail to conserve energy in stably stratified atmospheres, instead conserving pseudo-energies that depend on the stratification, and we demonstrate this numerically. One anelastic equation set does conserve energy in all atmospheres and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number anelastic codes to this set of equations.

  4. Adiabatic quantum algorithm for search engine ranking.

    PubMed

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in "q-sampling" protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank. PMID:23003933

  5. Degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory: Foundations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigolin, Gustavo; Ortiz, Gerardo

    2014-08-01

    We present details and expand on the framework leading to the recently introduced degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 170406 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.170406], and on the formulation of the degenerate adiabatic theorem, along with its necessary and sufficient conditions [given in Phys. Rev. A 85, 062111 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.062111]. We start with the adiabatic approximation for degenerate Hamiltonians that paves the way to a clear and rigorous statement of the associated degenerate adiabatic theorem, where the non-Abelian geometric phase (Wilczek-Zee phase) plays a central role to its quantitative formulation. We then describe the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory, whose zeroth-order term is the degenerate adiabatic approximation, in its full generality. The parameter in the perturbative power-series expansion of the time-dependent wave function is directly associated to the inverse of the time it takes to drive the system from its initial to its final state. With the aid of the degenerate adiabatic perturbation theory we obtain rigorous necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. Finally, to illustrate the power and wide scope of the methodology, we apply the framework to a degenerate Hamiltonian, whose closed-form time-dependent wave function is derived exactly, and also to other nonexactly solvable Hamiltonians whose solutions are numerically computed.

  6. Adiabatic shear mechanisms for the hard cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Caixu; Wang, Bo; Liu, Xianli; Feng, Huize; Cai, Chunbin

    2015-05-01

    The most important consequence of adiabatic shear phenomenon is formation of sawtooth chip. Lots of scholars focused on the formation mechanism of sawtooth, and the research often depended on experimental approach. For the present, the mechanism of sawtooth chip formation still remains some ambiguous aspects. This study develops a combined numerical and experimental approach to get deeper understanding of sawtooth chip formation mechanism for Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) tools orthogonal cutting hard steel GCr15. By adopting the Johnson-Cook material constitutive equations, the FEM simulation model established in this research effectively overcomes serious element distortions and cell singularity in high strain domain caused by large material deformation, and the adiabatic shear phenomenon is simulated successfully. Both the formation mechanism and process of sawtooth are simulated. Also, the change features regarding the cutting force as well as its effects on temperature are studied. More specifically, the contact of sawtooth formation frequency with cutting force fluctuation frequency is established. The cutting force and effect of cutting temperature on mechanism of adiabatic shear are investigated. Furthermore, the effects of the cutting condition on sawtooth chip formation are researched. The researching results show that cutting feed has the most important effect on sawtooth chip formation compared with cutting depth and speed. This research contributes a better understanding of mechanism, feature of chip formation in hard turning process, and supplies theoretical basis for the optimization of hard cutting process parameters.

  7. Meteorological effects on long-range outdoor sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, Helmut

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of sound propagation over distances up to 1000 m were carried out with an impulse sound source offering reproducible, short time signals. Temperature and wind speed at several heights were monitored simultaneously; the meteorological data are used to determine the sound speed gradients according to the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The sound speed profile is compared to a corresponding prediction, gained through the measured travel time difference between direct and ground reflected pulse (which depends on the sound speed gradient). Positive sound speed gradients cause bending of the sound rays towards the ground yielding enhanced sound pressure levels. The measured meteorological effects on sound propagation are discussed and illustrated by ray tracing methods.

  8. Development of a practical ultrasonic approach for simultaneous measurement of the thickness and the sound speed in human skull bones: a laboratory phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wydra, A.; Malyarenko, E.; Shapoori, K.; Maev, R. Gr

    2013-02-01

    The availability of a non-invasive express method for the in vivo measurement of both sound velocity and thickness of the human skull bone would be of great benefit to various transcranial ultrasonic imaging and treatment applications. This paper investigates two ultrasonic methods that measure both parameters and are based on the variable focus technique. All the experiments described in this paper were conducted on specially prepared custom skull bone phantoms, including flat and deformed samples, designed and developed in our laboratory. The first method uses a single immersion 2.25 MHz ultrasonic transducer consecutively focused on the front and back surfaces of the sample. The accuracy and precision of this method are demonstrated via single point measurements on flat samples with and without porosity. The measurement results from a specimen with the randomly curved back surface show the possibility of obtaining the inner profile of the skull bone. The second presented method is a practical modification of the variable focus technique for the linear phased array case. The method was tested on flat and curved skull bone phantoms with and without inner porosity showing higher measurement accuracy and simpler practical realization than its scanning counterpart.

  9. On a Nonlinear Model in Adiabatic Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Lu, Song-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study a kind of nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution in quantum search problem. As will be seen here, for this problem, there always exists a possibility that this nonlinear model can successfully solve the problem, while the linear model can not. Also in the same setting, when the overlap between the initial state and the final stare is sufficiently large, a simple linear adiabatic evolution can achieve O(1) time efficiency, but infinite time complexity for the nonlinear model of adiabatic evolution is needed. This tells us, it is not always a wise choice to use nonlinear interpolations in adiabatic algorithms. Sometimes, simple linear adiabatic evolutions may be sufficient for using. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61402188 and 61173050. The first author also gratefully acknowledges the support from the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2014M552041

  10. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  11. Adiabaticity and gravity theory independent conservation laws for cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Mooij, Sander; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-04-01

    We carefully study the implications of adiabaticity for the behavior of cosmological perturbations. There are essentially three similar but different definitions of non-adiabaticity: one is appropriate for a thermodynamic fluid δPnad, another is for a general matter field δPc,nad, and the last one is valid only on superhorizon scales. The first two definitions coincide if cs2 = cw2 where cs is the propagation speed of the perturbation, while cw2 = P ˙ / ρ ˙ . Assuming the adiabaticity in the general sense, δPc,nad = 0, we derive a relation between the lapse function in the comoving slicing Ac and δPnad valid for arbitrary matter field in any theory of gravity, by using only momentum conservation. The relation implies that as long as cs ≠cw, the uniform density, comoving and the proper-time slicings coincide approximately for any gravity theory and for any matter field if δPnad = 0 approximately. In the case of general relativity this gives the equivalence between the comoving curvature perturbation Rc and the uniform density curvature perturbation ζ on superhorizon scales, and their conservation. This is realized on superhorizon scales in standard slow-roll inflation. We then consider an example in which cw =cs, where δPnad = δPc,nad = 0 exactly, but the equivalence between Rc and ζ no longer holds. Namely we consider the so-called ultra slow-roll inflation. In this case both Rc and ζ are not conserved. In particular, as for ζ, we find that it is crucial to take into account the next-to-leading order term in ζ's spatial gradient expansion to show its non-conservation, even on superhorizon scales. This is an example of the fact that adiabaticity (in the thermodynamic sense) is not always enough to ensure the conservation of Rc or ζ.

  12. The Sound of Cymbals Crashing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Sal

    1991-01-01

    Presents an outdoor experiment to measure the speed of sound as a classroom experience to begin the teaching year. Measures the delay time from seeing and hearing crashing cymbals across a field to calculate the speed. Exposes students to experimental uncertainties and limits of uncertainty in measurement. (MDH)

  13. A geometric criterion for adiabatic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, T.J. ); Kovacic, G. )

    1994-03-01

    Chaos in adiabatic Hamiltonian systems is a recent discovery and a pervasive phenomenon in physics. In this work, a geometric criterion is discussed based on the theory of action from classical mechanics to detect the existence of Smale horseshoe chaos in adiabatic systems. It is used to show that generic adiabatic planar Hamiltonian systems exhibit stochastic dynamics in large regions of phase space. To illustrate the method, results are obtained for three problems concerning relativistic particle dynamics, fluid mechanics, and passage through resonance, results which either could not be obtained with existing methods, or which were difficult and analytically impractical to obtain with them.

  14. Heating and cooling in adiabatic mixing process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jing; Zou Xubo; Guo Guangcan; Cai Zi

    2010-12-15

    We study the effect of interaction on the temperature change in the process of adiabatic mixing of two components of Fermi gases using the real-space Bogoliubov-de Gennes method. We find that in the process of adiabatic mixing, the competition between the adiabatic expansion and the attractive interaction makes it possible to cool or heat the system depending on the strength of the interaction and the initial temperature of the system. The changes of the temperature in a bulk system and in a trapped system are investigated.

  15. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  16. Breakdown of adiabatic electron behavior in expanding magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichko, Emily; Egedal, Jan; Daughton, William

    2015-11-01

    During magnetic reconnection the incoming magnetic flux tubes expand in the inflow region. If this expansion is sufficiently slow the results are well described by a previously developed adiabatic model. Using kinetic simulations in a simple geometry and applying rapid magnetic perturbations, this study investigates the point at which the adiabatic assumption fails. To this end a 2D VPIC simulation was constructed, where the magnetic field in a uniform plasma is perturbed by externally driven currents. By varying the onset speed of the magnetic perturbation and the electron thermal speed, we found a sharp threshold at which this model breaks down. We believe that this point is determined by the time of the magnetic pumping compared to the electron transit time through the region, i.e. ω ~ Ḃ / B ~vthe / L . This threshold was also characterized by the launching of Whistler waves and with time domain structures, such as electron holes and double layers, which agree with those seen during magnetic reconnection and may relate to similar structures in the Van Allen Belts. NSF GEM award 1405166 and NASA grant NNX14AC68G.

  17. Simulation of periodically focused, adiabatic thermal beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Akylas, T. R.; Barton, T. J.; Field, D. M.; Lang, K. M.; Mok, R. V.

    2012-12-21

    Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are performed to verify earlier theoretical predictions of adiabatic thermal beams in a periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field [K.R. Samokhvalova, J. Zhou and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 14, 103102 (2007); J. Zhou, K.R. Samokhvalova and C. Chen, Phys. Plasma 15, 023102 (2008)]. In particular, results are obtained for adiabatic thermal beams that do not rotate in the Larmor frame. For such beams, the theoretical predictions of the rms beam envelope, the conservations of the rms thermal emittances, the adiabatic equation of state, and the Debye length are verified in the simulations. Furthermore, the adiabatic thermal beam is found be stable in the parameter regime where the simulations are performed.

  18. Adiabatic Motion of Fault Tolerant Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, David Edward

    This work proposes and analyzes the adiabatic motion of fault tolerant qubits in two systems as candidates for the building blocks of a quantum computer. The first proposal examines a pair of electron spins in double quantum dots, finding that the leading source of decoherence, hyperfine dephasing, can be suppressed by adiabatic rotation of the dots in real space. The additional spin-orbit effects introduced by this motion are analyzed, simulated, and found to result in an infidelity below the error-correction threshold. The second proposal examines topological qubits formed by Majorana zero modes theorized to exist at the ends of semiconductor nanowires coupled to conventional superconductors. A model is developed to design adiabatic movements of the Majorana bound states to produce entangled qubits. Analysis and simulations indicate that these adiabatic operations can also be used to demonstrate entanglement experimentally by testing Bell's theorem.

  19. General conditions for quantum adiabatic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Comparat, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Adiabaticity occurs when, during its evolution, a physical system remains in the instantaneous eigenstate of the Hamiltonian. Unfortunately, existing results, such as the quantum adiabatic theorem based on a slow down evolution [H({epsilon}t),{epsilon}{yields}0], are insufficient to describe an evolution driven by the Hamiltonian H(t) itself. Here we derive general criteria and exact bounds, for the state and its phase, ensuring an adiabatic evolution for any Hamiltonian H(t). As a corollary, we demonstrate that the commonly used condition of a slow Hamiltonian variation rate, compared to the spectral gap, is indeed sufficient to ensure adiabaticity but only when the Hamiltonian is real and nonoscillating (for instance, containing exponential or polynomial but no sinusoidal functions)

  20. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  1. Experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraft, Daniel; Halfmann, Thomas; Genov, Genko T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of composite adiabatic passage (CAP) for robust and efficient manipulation of two-level systems. The technique represents a altered version of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP), driven by composite sequences of radiation pulses with appropriately chosen phases. We implement CAP with radio-frequency pulses to invert (i.e., to rephase) optically prepared spin coherences in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. We perform systematic investigations of the efficiency of CAP and compare the results with conventional π pulses and RAP. The data clearly demonstrate the superior features of CAP with regard to robustness and efficiency, even under conditions of weakly fulfilled adiabaticity. The experimental demonstration of composite sequences to support adiabatic passage is of significant relevance whenever a high efficiency or robustness of coherent excitation processes need to be maintained, e.g., as required in quantum information technology.

  2. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  3. Adiabatic invariance of oscillons/I -balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takeda, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    Real scalar fields are known to fragment into spatially localized and long-lived solitons called oscillons or I -balls. We prove the adiabatic invariance of the oscillons/I -balls for a potential that allows periodic motion even in the presence of non-negligible spatial gradient energy. We show that such a potential is uniquely determined to be the quadratic one with a logarithmic correction, for which the oscillons/I -balls are absolutely stable. For slightly different forms of the scalar potential dominated by the quadratic one, the oscillons/I -balls are only quasistable, because the adiabatic charge is only approximately conserved. We check the conservation of the adiabatic charge of the I -balls in numerical simulation by slowly varying the coefficient of logarithmic corrections. This unambiguously shows that the longevity of oscillons/I -balls is due to the adiabatic invariance.

  4. Confrontation naming of environmental sounds.

    PubMed

    Marcell, M M; Borella, D; Greene, M; Kerr, E; Rogers, S

    2000-12-01

    The development of a set of everyday, nonverbal, digitized sounds for use in auditory confrontation naming applications is described. Normative data are reported for 120 sounds of varying lengths representing a wide variety of acoustic events such as sounds produced by animals, people, musical instruments, tools, signals, and liquids. In Study 1, criteria for scoring naming accuracy were developed and rating data were gathered on degree of confidence in sound identification and the perceived familiarity, complexity, and pleasantness of the sounds. In Study 2, the previously developed criteria for scoring naming accuracy were applied to the naming responses of a new sample of subjects, and oral naming times were measured. In Study 3 data were gathered on how subjects categorized the sounds: In the first categorization task - free classification - subjects generated category descriptions for the sounds; in the second task - constrained classification - a different sample of subjects selected the most appropriate category label for each sound from a list of 27 labels generated in the first task. Tables are provided in which the 120 stimuli are sorted by familiarity, complexity, pleasantness, duration, naming accuracy, speed of identification, and category placement. The. WAV sound files are freely available to researchers and clinicians via a sound archive on the World Wide Web; the URL is http://www.cofc.edu/~marcellm/confront.htm.

  5. Adiabatic Demagnetization Cooler For Far Infrared Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akio; Yazawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Junya

    1988-11-01

    An small adiabatic demagnetization cooler for an astronomical far infrared detector has been built. Single crystals of manganese ammonium sulphate and chromium potassium alum, were prepared as magnetic substances. The superconducting magnet was indirectly cooled and operated by small current up to 13.3 A, the maximum field being 3.5 T. As a preliminary step, adiabatic demagnetization to zero field was implemented. The lowest temperature obtained was 0.5 K, for 5.0 K initial temperature.

  6. Symmetry of the Adiabatic Condition in the Piston Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses a controversial issue in the adiabatic piston problem, namely that of the piston being adiabatic when it is fixed but no longer so when it can move freely. It is shown that this apparent contradiction arises from the usual definition of adiabatic condition. The issue is addressed here by requiring the adiabatic condition to be…

  7. Hierarchical theory of quantum adiabatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gong, Jiangbin; Wu, Biao

    2014-12-01

    Quantum adiabatic evolution is a dynamical evolution of a quantum system under slow external driving. According to the quantum adiabatic theorem, no transitions occur between nondegenerate instantaneous energy eigenstates in such a dynamical evolution. However, this is true only when the driving rate is infinitesimally small. For a small nonzero driving rate, there are generally small transition probabilities between the energy eigenstates. We develop a classical mechanics framework to address the small deviations from the quantum adiabatic theorem order by order. A hierarchy of Hamiltonians is constructed iteratively with the zeroth-order Hamiltonian being determined by the original system Hamiltonian. The kth-order deviations are governed by a kth-order Hamiltonian, which depends on the time derivatives of the adiabatic parameters up to the kth-order. Two simple examples, the Landau-Zener model and a spin-1/2 particle in a rotating magnetic field, are used to illustrate our hierarchical theory. Our analysis also exposes a deep, previously unknown connection between classical adiabatic theory and quantum adiabatic theory.

  8. Laboratory Measurements of Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairy, W. W.

    1997-04-01

    Adiabatic and isothermal measurements on various of gases are made possible by using the Adiabatic Gas Law apparatus made by PASCO Scientific(Much of this work was published by the author in "The Physics Teacher", vol. 34, March 1996, p. 178-80.). By using a computer interface, undergraduates are able to data for monatomic, diatomic and polyatomic gases for both compression and expansion processes. Designed principally to obtain adiabatic data, the apparatus may be easily modified for use in isothermal processes. The various sets of data are imported into a spreadsheet program where fits may be made to the ideal gas law and the adiabatic gas law. Excellent results are obtained for the natural logarithm of pressure versus the natural logarithm of volume for both the isothermal data (expected slope equal to -1 in all cases) and the adiabatic data (slope equal to -1 times the ratio of specific heats for the particular gas). An overview of the lab procedure used at VMI will be presented along with data obtained for several adiabatic and isothermal processes.

  9. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-02-01

    In the graph isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and transforms G →G'. If yes, then G and G' are said to be isomorphic; otherwise they are nonisomorphic. The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. In this paper we present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI and which also provides an approach to determining all automorphisms of a given graph. We show how the GI problem can be converted to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate the algorithm's quantum dynamics and show that it correctly (i) distinguishes nonisomorphic graphs; (ii) recognizes isomorphic graphs and determines the permutation(s) that connect them; and (iii) finds the automorphism group of a given graph G. We then discuss the GI quantum algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing how it can be leveraged to give a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of the NP-complete subgraph isomorphism problem. The computational complexity of an adiabatic quantum algorithm is largely determined by the minimum energy gap Δ (N) separating the ground and first-excited states in the limit of large problem size N ≫1. Calculating Δ (N) in this limit is a fundamental open problem in adiabatic quantum computing, and so it is not possible to determine the computational complexity of adiabatic quantum algorithms in general, nor consequently, of the specific adiabatic quantum algorithms presented here. Adiabatic quantum computing has been shown to be equivalent to the circuit model of quantum computing, and so development of adiabatic quantum algorithms continues to be of great interest.

  10. Is it possible to observationally distinguish adiabatic quartessence from {lambda}CDM?

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, L.; Reis, R. R. R.; Waga, I.

    2006-09-15

    The equation of state (EOS) in quartessence models interpolates between two stages: p{approx_equal}0 at high energy densities and p{approx_equal}-{rho} at small ones. In the quartessence models analyzed up to now, the EOS is convex, implying increasing adiabatic sound speed (c{sub s}{sup 2}) as the energy density decreases in an expanding universe. A nonnegligible c{sub s}{sup 2} at recent times is the source of the matter power spectrum problem that plagued all convex (nonsilent) quartessence models. Viability for these cosmologies is only possible in the limit of almost perfect mimicry to {lambda}CDM. In this work we investigate if similarity to {lambda}CDM is also required in the class of quartessence models whose EOS changes concavity as the Universe evolves. We focus our analysis in the simple case in which the EOS has a steplike shape, such that at very early times p{approx_equal}0, and at late times p{approx_equal}const<0. For this class of models a nonnegligible c{sub s}{sup 2} is a transient phenomenon and could be relevant only at a more early epoch. We show that agreement with a large set of cosmological data requires that the transition between these two asymptotic states would have occurred at high redshift (z{sub t} > or approx. 38). This leads us to conjecture that the cosmic expansion history of any successful nonsilent quartessence is (practically) identical to the {lambda}CDM one.

  11. Efficient shortcuts to adiabatic passage for three-dimensional entanglement generation via transitionless quantum driving

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuang; Su, Shi-Lei; Wang, Dong-Yang; Sun, Wen-Mei; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-01-01

    We propose an effective scheme of shortcuts to adiabaticity for generating a three-dimensional entanglement of two atoms trapped in a cavity using the transitionless quantum driving (TQD) approach. The key point of this approach is to construct an effective Hamiltonian that drives the dynamics of a system along instantaneous eigenstates of a reference Hamiltonian to reproduce the same final state as that of an adiabatic process within a much shorter time. In this paper, the shortcuts to adiabatic passage are constructed by introducing two auxiliary excited levels in each atom and applying extra cavity modes and classical fields to drive the relevant transitions. Thereby, the three-dimensional entanglement is obtained with a faster rate than that in the adiabatic passage. Moreover, the influences of atomic spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity are discussed by numerical simulation. The results show that the speed of entanglement implementation is greatly improved by the use of adiabatic shortcuts and that this entanglement implementation is robust against decoherence. This will be beneficial to the preparation of high-dimensional entanglement in experiment and provides the necessary conditions for the application of high-dimensional entangled states in quantum information processing. PMID:27499169

  12. Efficient shortcuts to adiabatic passage for three-dimensional entanglement generation via transitionless quantum driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuang; Su, Shi-Lei; Wang, Dong-Yang; Sun, Wen-Mei; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-08-01

    We propose an effective scheme of shortcuts to adiabaticity for generating a three-dimensional entanglement of two atoms trapped in a cavity using the transitionless quantum driving (TQD) approach. The key point of this approach is to construct an effective Hamiltonian that drives the dynamics of a system along instantaneous eigenstates of a reference Hamiltonian to reproduce the same final state as that of an adiabatic process within a much shorter time. In this paper, the shortcuts to adiabatic passage are constructed by introducing two auxiliary excited levels in each atom and applying extra cavity modes and classical fields to drive the relevant transitions. Thereby, the three-dimensional entanglement is obtained with a faster rate than that in the adiabatic passage. Moreover, the influences of atomic spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity are discussed by numerical simulation. The results show that the speed of entanglement implementation is greatly improved by the use of adiabatic shortcuts and that this entanglement implementation is robust against decoherence. This will be beneficial to the preparation of high-dimensional entanglement in experiment and provides the necessary conditions for the application of high-dimensional entangled states in quantum information processing.

  13. Efficient shortcuts to adiabatic passage for three-dimensional entanglement generation via transitionless quantum driving.

    PubMed

    He, Shuang; Su, Shi-Lei; Wang, Dong-Yang; Sun, Wen-Mei; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-08-08

    We propose an effective scheme of shortcuts to adiabaticity for generating a three-dimensional entanglement of two atoms trapped in a cavity using the transitionless quantum driving (TQD) approach. The key point of this approach is to construct an effective Hamiltonian that drives the dynamics of a system along instantaneous eigenstates of a reference Hamiltonian to reproduce the same final state as that of an adiabatic process within a much shorter time. In this paper, the shortcuts to adiabatic passage are constructed by introducing two auxiliary excited levels in each atom and applying extra cavity modes and classical fields to drive the relevant transitions. Thereby, the three-dimensional entanglement is obtained with a faster rate than that in the adiabatic passage. Moreover, the influences of atomic spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity are discussed by numerical simulation. The results show that the speed of entanglement implementation is greatly improved by the use of adiabatic shortcuts and that this entanglement implementation is robust against decoherence. This will be beneficial to the preparation of high-dimensional entanglement in experiment and provides the necessary conditions for the application of high-dimensional entangled states in quantum information processing.

  14. Efficient shortcuts to adiabatic passage for three-dimensional entanglement generation via transitionless quantum driving.

    PubMed

    He, Shuang; Su, Shi-Lei; Wang, Dong-Yang; Sun, Wen-Mei; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-01-01

    We propose an effective scheme of shortcuts to adiabaticity for generating a three-dimensional entanglement of two atoms trapped in a cavity using the transitionless quantum driving (TQD) approach. The key point of this approach is to construct an effective Hamiltonian that drives the dynamics of a system along instantaneous eigenstates of a reference Hamiltonian to reproduce the same final state as that of an adiabatic process within a much shorter time. In this paper, the shortcuts to adiabatic passage are constructed by introducing two auxiliary excited levels in each atom and applying extra cavity modes and classical fields to drive the relevant transitions. Thereby, the three-dimensional entanglement is obtained with a faster rate than that in the adiabatic passage. Moreover, the influences of atomic spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity are discussed by numerical simulation. The results show that the speed of entanglement implementation is greatly improved by the use of adiabatic shortcuts and that this entanglement implementation is robust against decoherence. This will be beneficial to the preparation of high-dimensional entanglement in experiment and provides the necessary conditions for the application of high-dimensional entangled states in quantum information processing. PMID:27499169

  15. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10-12 at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10-7 cm-1, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  16. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10{sup −12} at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H{sub 2}, HD, HT, D{sub 2}, DT, and T{sub 2} has been determined. For the ground state of H{sub 2} the estimated precision is 3 × 10{sup −7} cm{sup −1}, which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels.

  17. Accurate adiabatic correction in the hydrogen molecule.

    PubMed

    Pachucki, Krzysztof; Komasa, Jacek

    2014-12-14

    A new formalism for the accurate treatment of adiabatic effects in the hydrogen molecule is presented, in which the electronic wave function is expanded in the James-Coolidge basis functions. Systematic increase in the size of the basis set permits estimation of the accuracy. Numerical results for the adiabatic correction to the Born-Oppenheimer interaction energy reveal a relative precision of 10(-12) at an arbitrary internuclear distance. Such calculations have been performed for 88 internuclear distances in the range of 0 < R ⩽ 12 bohrs to construct the adiabatic correction potential and to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Finally, the adiabatic correction to the dissociation energies of all rovibrational levels in H2, HD, HT, D2, DT, and T2 has been determined. For the ground state of H2 the estimated precision is 3 × 10(-7) cm(-1), which is almost three orders of magnitude higher than that of the best previous result. The achieved accuracy removes the adiabatic contribution from the overall error budget of the present day theoretical predictions for the rovibrational levels. PMID:25494728

  18. Sound Guard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

  19. Energy efficiency of adiabatic superconductor logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic superconductor logic (ASL), including adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) logic, exhibits high energy efficiency because its bit energy can be decreased below the thermal energy through adiabatic switching operations. In the present paper, we present the general scaling laws of ASL and compare the energy efficiency of ASL with those of other energy-efficient logics. Also, we discuss the minimum energy-delay product (EDP) of ASL at finite temperature. Our study shows that there is a maximum temperature at which the EDP can reach the quantum limit given by ħ/2, which is dependent on the superconductor material and the Josephson junction quality, and that it is reasonable to operate ASL at cryogenic temperatures in order to achieve an EDP that approaches ħ/2.

  20. Adiabatic approximation for the density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.

    1992-05-01

    An adiabatic approximation for the Liouville density-matrix equation which includes decay terms is developed. The adiabatic approximation employs the eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator. The approximation is valid when there exists a complete set of eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator (i.e., the eigenvectors span the density-matrix space), the time rate of change of the Liouville operator is small, and an auxiliary matrix is nonsingular. Numerical examples are presented involving efficient population transfer in a molecule by stimulated Raman scattering, with the intermediate level of the molecule decaying on a time scale that is fast compared with the pulse durations of the pump and Stokes fields. The adiabatic density-matrix approximation can be simply used to determine the density matrix for atomic or molecular systems interacting with cw electromagnetic fields when spontaneous emission or other decay mechanisms prevail.

  1. Adiabaticity and viscosity in deep mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quareni, F.; Yuen, D. A.; Saari, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been conducted of steady convection with adiabatic and viscous heating for variable viscosity in the Boussinesq limit using the mean-field theory. A strong nonlinear coupling is found between the thermodynamic constants governing adiabatic heating and the rheological parameters. The range of rheological values for which adiabaticity would occur throughout the mantle has been established. Too large an activation volume, greater than 6 cu cm/mol for the cases examined, would produce unreasonably high temperature at the bottom of the mantle (greater than 6000 K) and superadiabatic gradients, especially in the lower mantle. Radiogenic heating plays a profound role in controlling dynamically mantle temperatures. Present values for the averaged mantle heat production would yield objectionably high temperatures in the lower mantle.

  2. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation of compounds affected during optoacoustic monitoring of thermal therapies measured in the temperature range from 5°C to 60°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruganti, Tanmayi; Petrova, Elena; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging is being adopted for monitoring tissue temperature during hypothermic and hyperthermic cancer treatments. The technique's accuracy benefits from the knowledge of speed of sound (SoS) and acoustic coefficient of attenuation (AcA) as they change with temperature in biological tissues, blood, and acoustic lens of an ultrasound probe. In these studies we measured SoS and AcA of different ex vivo tissues and blood components (plasma and erythrocyte concentrates) in the temperature range from 5°C to 60°C. We used the technique based on measurements of time-delay and spectral amplitude of pressure pulses generated by wideband planar acoustic waves propagating through the interrogated medium. Water was used as a reference medium with known acoustic properties. In order to validate our experimental technique, we measured the temperature dependence of SoS and AcA for aqueous NaCl solution of known concentration and obtained the results in agreement with published data. Similar to NaCl solution and pure water, SoS in blood and plasma was monotonously increasing with temperature. However, SoS of erythrocyte concentrates displayed abnormalities at temperatures above 45°C, suggesting potential effects from hemoglobin denaturation and/or hemolysis of erythrocytes. On the contrary to aqueous solutions, the SoS in polyvinyl-chloride (plastisol) - a material frequently used for mimicking optical and acoustic properties of tissues - decreased with temperature. We also measured SoS and AcA in silicon material of an acoustic lens and did not observe temperature-related changes of SoS.

  4. Comparison of Speed of Sound Measures Assessed by Multisite Quantitative Ultrasound to Bone Mineral Density Measures Assessed by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in a Large Canadian Cohort: the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos).

    PubMed

    Olszynski, Wojciech P; Adachi, Jonathon D; Hanley, David A; Davison, Kenneth S; Brown, Jacques P

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is an important tool for the estimate of fracture risk through the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). Similarly, multisite quantitate ultrasound can prospectively predict future fracture through the measurement of speed of sound (SOS). This investigation compared BMD (at the femoral neck, total hip, and lumbar spine) and SOS measures (at the distal radius, tibia, and phalanx sites) in a large sample of randomly-selected and community-based individuals from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study. Furthermore, mass, height, and age were also compared with both measures. There were 4123 patients included with an age range of 30-96.8 yr. Pearson product moment correlations between BMD and SOS measures were low (0.21-0.29; all p<0.001), irrespective of site. Mass was moderately correlated with BMD measures (0.40-0.58; p<0.001), but lowly correlated with SOS measures (0.03-0.13; p<0.05). BMD and SOS were negatively correlated to age (-0.17 to -0.44; p<0.001). When regression analyses were performed to predict SOS measures at the 3 sites, the models predicted 20%-23% of the variance, leaving 77%-80% unaccounted for. The SOS measures in this study were found to be largely independent from BMD measures. In areas with no or limited access to DXA, the multisite quantitative ultrasound may act as a valuable tool to assess fracture risk. In locales with liberal access to DXA, the addition of SOS to BMD and other clinical risk factors may improve the identification of those patients at high risk for future fracture.

  5. High-resolution calculations of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique. I. The structure of the convection and the magnetic field without the rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Rempel, M.

    2014-05-01

    We carry out non-rotating high-resolution calculations of the solar global convection, which resolve convective scales of less than 10 Mm. To cope with the low Mach number conditions in the lower convection zone, we use the reduced speed of sound technique (RSST), which is simple to implement and requires only local communication in the parallel computation. In addition, the RSST allows us to expand the computational domain upward to about 0.99 R {sub ☉}, as it can also handle compressible flows. Using this approach, we study the solar convection zone on the global scale, including small-scale near-surface convection. In particular, we investigate the influence of the top boundary condition on the convective structure throughout the convection zone as well as on small-scale dynamo action. Our main conclusions are as follows. (1) The small-scale downflows generated in the near-surface layer penetrate into deeper layers to some extent and excite small-scale turbulence in the region >0.9 R {sub ☉}, where R {sub ☉} is the solar radius. (2) In the deeper convection zone (<0.9 R {sub ☉}), the convection is not influenced by the location of the upper boundary. (3) Using a large eddy simulation approach, we can achieve small-scale dynamo action and maintain a field of about 0.15B {sub eq}-0.25B {sub eq} throughout the convection zone, where B {sub eq} is the equipartition magnetic field to the kinetic energy. (4) The overall dynamo efficiency varies significantly in the convection zone as a consequence of the downward directed Poynting flux and the depth variation of the intrinsic convective scales.

  6. On adiabatic invariant in generalized Galileon theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Kazunori; Mukaida, Kyohei E-mail: jinno@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We consider background dynamics of generalized Galileon theories in the context of inflation, where gravity and inflaton are non-minimally coupled to each other. In the inflaton oscillation regime, the Hubble parameter and energy density oscillate violently in many cases, in contrast to the Einstein gravity with minimally coupled inflaton. However, we find that there is an adiabatic invariant in the inflaton oscillation regime in any generalized Galileon theory. This adiabatic invariant is useful in estimating the expansion law of the universe and also the particle production rate due to the oscillation of the Hubble parameter.

  7. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  8. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  9. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  10. Partial Molar Volumes, Viscosity B-Coefficients, and Adiabatic Compressibilities of Sodium Molybdate in Aqueous 1,3-Dioxolane Mixtures from 303.15 to 323.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Dakua, Vikas Kumar; Sinha, Biswajit

    2007-08-01

    Partial molar volumes (V_φ^0) and viscosity B-coefficients of sodium molybdate in 1,3-dioxolane + water mixtures have been determined from solution density and viscosity measurements at 303.15, 313.15, and 323.15 K and at various electrolyte concentrations. Also, the adiabatic compressibility of different solutions has been determined from the measurement of sound speeds at 303.15 K. The experimental density data were evaluated by the Masson equation, and the derived parameters were interpreted in terms of ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions. The viscosity data have been analyzed using the Jones-Dole equation, and the derived parameters, B and A, have also been interpreted in terms of ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions, respectively. The structure- making or breaking capacity of the electrolyte under investigation has been discussed in terms of the sign of (δ 2V_φ^0/δ T2)P . The compressibility data obtained from sound speeds of different solutions indicate the electrostriction of the solvent molecules around the ions.

  11. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  12. Towards fault tolerant adiabatic quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Lidar, Daniel A

    2008-04-25

    I show how to protect adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) against decoherence and certain control errors, using a hybrid methodology involving dynamical decoupling, subsystem and stabilizer codes, and energy gaps. Corresponding error bounds are derived. As an example, I show how to perform decoherence-protected AQC against local noise using at most two-body interactions.

  13. Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston.

    PubMed

    Munakata, T; Ogawa, H

    2001-09-01

    Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston are investigated, based on the mass ratio expansion of the master equation for the piston velocity distribution function. Simple theory for piston motion and relaxation of an ideal gas in a cylinder turns out to reproduce our numerical experiments quantitatively.

  14. Adiabatic reversible compression: a molecular view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, E. N.

    2002-07-01

    The adiabatic compression (or expansion) of an ideal gas has been analysed. Using the kinetic theory of gases the usual relation between temperature and volume is obtained, while textbooks follow a thermodynamic approach. In this way we show, once again, the agreement between a macroscopic view (thermodynamics) and a microscopic one (kinetic theory).

  15. Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, Toyonori; Ogawa, Hideki

    2001-09-01

    Dynamical aspects of an adiabatic piston are investigated, based on the mass ratio expansion of the master equation for the piston velocity distribution function. Simple theory for piston motion and relaxation of an ideal gas in a cylinder turns out to reproduce our numerical experiments quantitatively.

  16. Adiabatic Compression in a Fire Syringe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.; Baird, Scott C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using better materials in fire syringes to obtain more effective results during demonstrations which show the elevation in temperature upon a very rapid (adiabatic) compression of air. Also describes an experiment (using ignition temperatures) which introduces students to the use of thermocouples for high temperature measurements. (DH)

  17. Time dependence of adiabatic particle number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Robert; Dunne, Gerald V.

    2016-09-01

    We consider quantum field theoretic systems subject to a time-dependent perturbation, and discuss the question of defining a time-dependent particle number not just at asymptotic early and late times, but also during the perturbation. Naïvely, this is not a well-defined notion for such a nonequilibrium process, as the particle number at intermediate times depends on a basis choice of reference states with respect to which particles and antiparticles are defined, even though the final late-time particle number is independent of this basis choice. The basis choice is associated with a particular truncation of the adiabatic expansion. The adiabatic expansion is divergent, and we show that if this divergent expansion is truncated at its optimal order, a universal time dependence is obtained, confirming a general result of Dingle and Berry. This optimally truncated particle number provides a clear picture of quantum interference effects for perturbations with nontrivial temporal substructure. We illustrate these results using several equivalent definitions of adiabatic particle number: the Bogoliubov, Riccati, spectral function and Schrödinger picture approaches. In each approach, the particle number may be expressed in terms of the tiny deviations between the exact and adiabatic solutions of the Ermakov-Milne equation for the associated time-dependent oscillators.

  18. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  19. Adiabatic Mass Parameters for Spontaneous Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Sheikh, J. A.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2009-01-01

    The collective mass tensor derived from the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory, perturbative cranking approximation, and the Gaussian overlap approximation to the generator-coordinate method is discussed. Illustrative calculations are carried out for ^{252}Fm using the nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme interaction SkM* and seniority pairing.

  20. Superplane! High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  1. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  2. Transient energy excitation in shortcuts to adiabaticity for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Muga, J. G.

    2010-11-15

    We study for the time-dependent harmonic oscillator the transient energy excitation in speed-up processes ('shortcuts to adiabaticity') designed to reproduce the initial populations at some predetermined final frequency and time. We provide lower bounds and examples. Implications for the limits imposed to the process times and for the principle of unattainability of the absolute zero, in a single expansion or in quantum refrigerator cycles, are drawn.

  3. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  4. Communication: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic electron-nuclear motion: Quantum and classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Albert, Julian; Kaiser, Dustin; Engel, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Using a model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion we investigate the range from negligible to strong non-adiabatic coupling. In the adiabatic case, the quantum dynamics proceeds in a single electronic state, whereas for strong coupling a complete transition between two adiabatic electronic states takes place. It is shown that in all coupling regimes the short-time wave-packet dynamics can be described using ensembles of classical trajectories in the phase space spanned by electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. We thus provide an example which documents that the quantum concept of non-adiabatic transitions is not necessarily needed if electronic and nuclear motion is treated on the same footing.

  5. The dynamic instability of adiabatic blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1991-01-01

    Adiabatic blastwaves, which have a total energy injected from the center E varies as t(sup q) and propagate through a preshock medium with a density rho(sub E) varies as r(sup -omega) are described by a family of similarity solutions. Previous work has shown that adiabatic blastwaves with increasing or constant postshock entropy behind the shock front are susceptible to an oscillatory instability, caused by the difference between the nature of the forces on the two sides of the dense shell behind the shock front. This instability sets in if the dense postshock layer is sufficiently thin. The stability of adiabatic blastwaves with a decreasing postshock entropy is considered. Such blastwaves, if they are decelerating, always have a region behind the shock front which is subject to convection. Some accelerating blastwaves also have such region, depending on the values of q, omega, and gamma where gamma is the adiabatic index. However, since the shock interface stabilizes dynamically induced perturbations, blastwaves become convectively unstable only if the convective zone is localized around the origin or a contact discontinuity far from the shock front. On the other hand, the contact discontinuity of accelerating blastwaves is subject to a strong Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The frequency spectra of the nonradial, normal modes of adiabatic blastwaves have been calculated. The results have been applied to the shocks propagating through supernovae envelopes. It is shown that the metal/He and He/H interfaces are strongly unstable against the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This instability will induce mixing in supernovae envelopes. In addition the implications of this work for the evolution of planetary nebulae is discussed.

  6. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  7. Adiabatic pulse propagation in coherent atomic media with the tripod level configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Mazets, I.E.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate the problem of propagation of three-component resonant light pulses with adiabatically varying amplitudes through a medium consisting of atoms with the tripod level configuration. By means of both analytic and numerical methods we find the two modes of shape-preserving pulse propagation. The pulse propagation velocity of the fast mode is equal to the speed of light in vacuum, whereas the group velocity of the other (slow) mode is significantly slowed down. These two modes represent a general asymptotic solution of the problem of adiabatic pulse propagation, i.e., a pulse of any shape, which is consistent with the adiabaticity conditions, and a finite duration evolves at large propagation distances (and, correspondingly, at large times of interaction with the medium) to a well-separated pair of fast and slow pulses. The experimental requirements for adiabatic pulse propagation in a tripod medium are similar to that needed for observation of slow light propagation in a medium with the {lambda} configuration of levels. However, the tripod scheme offers a different possibility, which is absent in the {lambda}-medium case: collisions of fast and slow pulses. It is found numerically that after such a collision the shapes of the pulses change, so these pulses do not match the classical definition of a soliton.

  8. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  9. Quantum adiabatic evolution with energy degeneracy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    A classical-kind phase-space formalism is developed to address the tiny intrinsic dynamical deviation from what is predicted by Wilczek-Zee theorem during quantum adiabatic evolution on degeneracy levels. In this formalism, the Hilbert space and the aggregate of degenerate eigenstates become the classical-kind phase space and a high-dimensional subspace in the phase space, respectively. Compared with the previous analogous study by a different method, the current result is qualitatively different in that the first-order deviation derived here is always perpendicular to the degeneracy subspace. A tripod-scheme Hamiltonian with two degenerate dark states is employed to illustrate the adiabatic deviation with degeneracy levels.

  10. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    SciTech Connect

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are stored in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.

  11. Adiabatic quantum optimization for associative memory recall

    DOE PAGES

    Seddiqi, Hadayat; Humble, Travis S.

    2014-12-22

    Hopfield networks are a variant of associative memory that recall patterns stored in the couplings of an Ising model. Stored memories are conventionally accessed as fixed points in the network dynamics that correspond to energetic minima of the spin state. We show that memories stored in a Hopfield network may also be recalled by energy minimization using adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO). Numerical simulations of the underlying quantum dynamics allow us to quantify AQO recall accuracy with respect to the number of stored memories and noise in the input key. We investigate AQO performance with respect to how memories are storedmore » in the Ising model according to different learning rules. Our results demonstrate that AQO recall accuracy varies strongly with learning rule, a behavior that is attributed to differences in energy landscapes. Consequently, learning rules offer a family of methods for programming adiabatic quantum optimization that we expect to be useful for characterizing AQO performance.« less

  12. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  13. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-01

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  14. Adiabatic Heating of Contracting Turbulent Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Goldreich, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Turbulence influences the behavior of many astrophysical systems, frequently by providing non-thermal pressure support through random bulk motions. Although turbulence is commonly studied in systems with constant volume and mean density, turbulent astrophysical gases often expand or contract under the influence of pressure or gravity. Here, we examine the behavior of turbulence in contracting volumes using idealized models of compressed gases. Employing numerical simulations and an analytical model, we identify a simple mechanism by which the turbulent motions of contracting gases "adiabatically heat," experiencing an increase in their random bulk velocities until the largest eddies in the gas circulate over a Hubble time of the contraction. Adiabatic heating provides a mechanism for sustaining turbulence in gases where no large-scale driving exists. We describe this mechanism in detail and discuss some potential applications to turbulence in astrophysical settings.

  15. ADIABATIC HEATING OF CONTRACTING TURBULENT FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brant; Goldreich, Peter

    2012-05-10

    Turbulence influences the behavior of many astrophysical systems, frequently by providing non-thermal pressure support through random bulk motions. Although turbulence is commonly studied in systems with constant volume and mean density, turbulent astrophysical gases often expand or contract under the influence of pressure or gravity. Here, we examine the behavior of turbulence in contracting volumes using idealized models of compressed gases. Employing numerical simulations and an analytical model, we identify a simple mechanism by which the turbulent motions of contracting gases 'adiabatically heat', experiencing an increase in their random bulk velocities until the largest eddies in the gas circulate over a Hubble time of the contraction. Adiabatic heating provides a mechanism for sustaining turbulence in gases where no large-scale driving exists. We describe this mechanism in detail and discuss some potential applications to turbulence in astrophysical settings.

  16. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  17. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts to adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.

  18. Shortcuts to adiabaticity from linear response theory

    DOE PAGES

    Acconcia, Thiago V.; Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-23

    A shortcut to adiabaticity is a finite-time process that produces the same final state as would result from infinitely slow driving. We show that such shortcuts can be found for weak perturbations from linear response theory. Moreover, with the help of phenomenological response functions, a simple expression for the excess work is found—quantifying the nonequilibrium excitations. For two specific examples, i.e., the quantum parametric oscillator and the spin 1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field, we show that finite-time zeros of the excess work indicate the existence of shortcuts. We finally propose a degenerate family of protocols, which facilitates shortcuts tomore » adiabaticity for specific and very short driving times.« less

  19. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II - Adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point.

  20. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II. Adiabatic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Montesinos, B.; Thomas, J.H.

    1989-02-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point. 15 references.

  1. Computer Code For Turbocompounded Adiabatic Diesel Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assanis, D. N.; Heywood, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation developed to study advantages of increased exhaust enthalpy in adiabatic turbocompounded diesel engine. Subsytems of conceptual engine include compressor, reciprocator, turbocharger turbine, compounded turbine, ducting, and heat exchangers. Focus of simulation of total system is to define transfers of mass and energy, including release and transfer of heat and transfer of work in each subsystem, and relationship among subsystems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  2. Adiabatic charging of nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Chuck; Foroozan, S.; Brewer, Jeff; Jackson, Lorna

    1995-02-01

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. The transition from nickel-cadium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their high self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, has made this aspect of spacecraft battery management even more challenging. The AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure efficient charging, was considered and proved to be difficult and expensive. Alternative approaches were evaluated. Optimized charging, in the absence of cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. Initial testing was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the 'Adiabatic Charging' approach. Feasibility was demonstrated and additional testing performed to provide a quantitative, parametric data base. The assumption that the battery is in an adiabatic environment during prelaunch charging is a conservative approximation because the battery will transfer some heat to its surroundings by convective air cooling. The amount is small compared to the heat dissipated during battery overcharge. Because the battery has a large thermal mass, substantial overcharge can occur before the cells get too hot to charge efficiently. The testing presented here simulates a true adiabatic environment. Accordingly the data base may be slightly conservative. The adiabatic charge methodology used in this investigation begins with stabilizing the cell at a given starting temperature. The cell is then fully insulated on all sides. Battery temperature is carefully monitored and the charge terminated when the cell temperature reaches 85 F. Charging has been evaluated with starting temperatures from 55 to 75 F.

  3. Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Paul C. W.

    2004-01-01

    The research at Houston was focused on optimizing the design of superconducting magnets for advanced adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs), assessing the feasibility of using high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets in ADRs in the future, and developing techniques to deposit HTS thin and thick films on high strength, low thermal conductivity substrates for HTS magnet leads. Several approaches have been tested for the suggested superconducting magnets.

  4. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  5. Non-adiabatic dark fluid cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S.; Velten, H.E.S.; Zimdahl, W. E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2009-06-01

    We model the dark sector of the cosmic substratum by a viscous fluid with an equation of state p = −ζΘ, where Θ is the fluid-expansion scalar and ζ is the coefficient of bulk viscosity for which we assume a dependence ζ∝ρ{sup ν} on the energy density ρ. The homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics coincides with that of a generalized Chaplygin gas with equation of state p = −A/ρ{sup α}. The perturbation dynamics of the viscous model, however, is intrinsically non-adiabatic and qualitatively different from the Chaplygin-gas case. In particular, it avoids short-scale instabilities and/or oscillations which apparently have ruled out unified models of the Chaplygin-gas type. We calculate the matter power spectrum and demonstrate that the non-adiabatic model is compatible with the data from the 2dFGRS and the SDSS surveys. A χ{sup 2}-analysis shows, that for certain parameter combinations the viscous-dark-fluid (VDF) model is well competitive with the ΛCDM model. These results indicate that non-adiabatic unified models can be seen as potential contenders for a General-Relativity-based description of the cosmic substratum.

  6. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  7. Chasing Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Neiworth, Julie J

    2012-01-01

    Prior work with Wright and others demonstrated that rhesus monkeys recognized the relative relationships of notes in common melodies. As an extension of tests of pattern similarities, tamarins were habituated to 3-sound unit patterns in an AAB or ABB form that were human phonemes, piano notes, or monkey calls. The subjects were tested with novel sounds in each category constructed either to match the prior pattern or to violate the prior habituated pattern. The monkeys attended significantly more to a violation of their habituated pattern to a new pattern when human phonemes were used, and there was a trend difference in attention toward pattern violations with melodies. Monkey call patterns generated a variety of behavioral responses, were less likely to show habituation, and did not generate a strong attention reaction to changes in the patterns. Monkeys can extract abstract rules and patterns from auditory stimuli but the stimuli, by their nature, may generate competing responses which block processing of abstract regularities. PMID:23219981

  8. Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2011-02-15

    The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  9. Consideration of microstructural changes in the study of adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Romesh C.

    1994-09-01

    We have analyzed the effect of microstructural changes on the initiation and growth of shear bands. These have been studied by developing an adaptive mesh refinement technique to decipher adiabatic shear bands in two-dimensional problems, formulating a three-dimensional finite-deformation theory for dipolar thermoviscoplastic materials and using it to examine the initiation and growth of shear bands in plane strain thermomechanical deformations of dipolar materials, employing an internal variable theory of Brown, Kim and Anand to study the shear band problem, investigating the possibility of phase transformations during the development of adiabatic shear bands in a steel specimen, ascertaining the speed of propagation of a shear band in a steel tube, assessing the effect of frictional forces between the loading device and the cylinder ends, and, analyzing the development of a shear band in a FCC single crystal. Principal results obtained during these investigations are summarized in the report.

  10. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  11. Shortcut to adiabaticity in spinor condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Arnau; Núñez, David López; Martorell, Joan; De Sarlo, Luigi; Zibold, Tilman; Gerbier, Fabrice; Polls, Artur; Juliá-Díaz, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    We devise a method to shortcut the adiabatic evolution of a spin-1 Bose gas with an external magnetic field as the control parameter. An initial many-body state with almost all bosons populating the Zeeman sublevel m =0 is evolved to a final state very close to a macroscopic spin-singlet condensate, a fragmented state with three macroscopically occupied Zeeman states. The shortcut protocol, obtained by an approximate mapping to a harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian, is compared to linear and exponential variations of the control parameter. We find a dramatic speedup of the dynamics when using the shortcut protocol.

  12. On adiabatic perturbations in the ekpyrotic scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, A.; Mukhanov, V.; Vikman, A. E-mail: Viatcheslav.Mukhanov@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2010-02-01

    In a recent paper, Khoury and Steinhardt proposed a way to generate adiabatic cosmological perturbations with a nearly flat spectrum in a contracting Universe. To produce these perturbations they used a regime in which the equation of state exponentially rapidly changed during a short time interval. Leaving aside the singularity problem and the difficult question about the possibility to transmit these perturbations from a contracting Universe to the expanding phase, we will show that the methods used in Khoury are inapplicable for the description of the cosmological evolution and of the process of generation of perturbations in this scenario.

  13. Generalized Ramsey numbers through adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, Mani; Macready, William G.; Clark, Lane; Gaitan, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Ramsey theory is an active research area in combinatorics whose central theme is the emergence of order in large disordered structures, with Ramsey numbers marking the threshold at which this order first appears. For generalized Ramsey numbers r( G, H), the emergent order is characterized by graphs G and H. In this paper we: (i) present a quantum algorithm for computing generalized Ramsey numbers by reformulating the computation as a combinatorial optimization problem which is solved using adiabatic quantum optimization; and (ii) determine the Ramsey numbers r({{T}}m,{{T}}n) for trees of order m,n = 6,7,8, most of which were previously unknown.

  14. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  15. Phase avalanches in near-adiabatic evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Englman, R.

    2006-02-15

    In the course of slow, nearly adiabatic motion of a system, relative changes in the slowness can cause abrupt and high magnitude phase changes, ''phase avalanches,'' superimposed on the ordinary geometric phases. The generality of this effect is examined for arbitrary Hamiltonians and multicomponent (>2) wave packets and is found to be connected (through the Blaschke term in the theory of analytic signals) to amplitude zeros in the lower half of the complex time plane. Motion on a nonmaximal circle on the Poincare-sphere suppresses the effect. A spectroscopic transition experiment can independently verify the phase-avalanche magnitudes.

  16. Local entanglement generation in the adiabatic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cliche, M.; Veitia, Andrzej

    2010-09-15

    We study entanglement generation in a pair of qubits interacting with an initially correlated system. Using time-independent perturbation theory and the adiabatic theorem, we show conditions under which the qubits become entangled as the joint system evolves into the ground state of the interacting theory. We then apply these results to the case of qubits interacting with a scalar quantum field. We study three different variations of this setup; a quantum field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions, a quantum field interacting with a classical potential, and a quantum field that starts in a thermal state.

  17. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, R. D.; Richards, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators have been built and installed in small portable liquid helium cryostats to test the feasibility of this method of cooling infrared bolometric detectors to temperatures below 0.3 K. Performance has been achieved which suggests that bolometer temperatures of 0.2 K can be maintained for periods of approximately 60 hours. Applications to sensitive infrared detection from ground-based telescopes and space satellites are discussed. Design data are given which permit the evaluation of refrigerator performance for a variety of design parameters.

  18. Method of sound synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Miner, Nadine E.; Caudell, Thomas P.

    2004-06-08

    A sound synthesis method for modeling and synthesizing dynamic, parameterized sounds. The sound synthesis method yields perceptually convincing sounds and provides flexibility through model parameterization. By manipulating model parameters, a variety of related, but perceptually different sounds can be generated. The result is subtle changes in sounds, in addition to synthesis of a variety of sounds, all from a small set of models. The sound models can change dynamically according to changes in the simulation environment. The method is applicable to both stochastic (impulse-based) and non-stochastic (pitched) sounds.

  19. Slow-sound photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Yong; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    We propose to enhance the axial resolution of photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) by reducing the speed of sound within the imaging region of interest. With silicone oil immersion, we have achieved a finest axial resolution of 5.8 μm for PAM, as validated by phantom experiments. The axial resolution was also enhanced in vivo when mouse ears injected with silicone oil were imaged. When tissue-compatible low-speed liquid becomes available, this approach may find broad applications in PAM as well as in other imaging modalities, such as photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound imaging. PMID:23696693

  20. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  1. Effect of the Heat Pipe Adiabatic Region.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Taoufik; Jemni, Abdelmajid

    2014-04-01

    The main motivation of conducting this work is to present a rigorous analysis and investigation of the potential effect of the heat pipe adiabatic region on the flow and heat transfer performance of a heat pipe under varying evaporator and condenser conditions. A two-dimensional steady-state model for a cylindrical heat pipe coupling, for both regions, is presented, where the flow of the fluid in the porous structure is described by Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model which accounts for the boundary and inertial effects. The model is solved numerically by using the finite volumes method, and a fortran code was developed to solve the system of equations obtained. The results show that a phase change can occur in the adiabatic region due to temperature gradient created in the porous structure as the heat input increases and the heat pipe boundary conditions change. A recirculation zone may be created at the condenser end section. The effect of the heat transfer rate on the vapor radial velocities and the performance of the heat pipe are discussed. PMID:24895467

  2. The sounds of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    As scientists carefully study some aspects of the ocean environment, are they unintentionally distressing others? That is a question to be answered by Robert Benson and his colleagues in the Center for Bioacoustics at Texas A&M University.With help from a 3-year, $316,000 grant from the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Benson will study how underwater noise produced by naval operations and other sources may affect marine mammals. In Benson's study, researchers will generate random sequences of low-frequency, high-intensity (180-decibel) sounds in the Gulf of Mexico, working at an approximate distance of 1 km from sperm whale herds. Using an array of hydrophones, the scientists will listen to the characteristic clicks and whistles of the sperm whales to detect changes in the animals' direction, speed, and depth, as derived from fluctuations in their calls.

  3. Adiabat Shaping of ICF Capsules Using Ramped Pressure Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marinak, M. M.; Haan, S. W.

    2002-11-01

    Target design of direct-drive ICF capsules has historically involved a compromise between high 1-D (clean) yield and capsule stability. Low-adiabat fuel is desirable to achieve high compression and, hence, high yield. A higher adiabat at the ablation front reduces the growth rate of the Raleigh--Taylor instability due to higher ablation velocity. An optimal target design will take advantage of both by shaping the adiabat of the capsule to allow for high adiabat in the material that is to be ablated and low adiabat in the remaining fuel. We present here a method of adiabat shaping using a low-intensity prepulse followed by laser shutoff before beginning the main drive pulse. This creates a decaying shock with a ramped pressure profile behind it. Since the prepulse is low intensity, the adiabat is not strongly affected by the prepulse. The main shock is then launched up this ramped pressure profile to set the adiabat. Because the main shock sees an increasing pressure profile, the effective strength of the shock decreases as it propagates through the shell, thus creating a smooth adiabat profile from high outer-shell adiabat to low inner-shell adiabat. Results of simulations using 1-D LILAC and 2-D DRACO (LLE), as well as 1-D and 2-D HYDRA (LLNL), are presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460 and by the University of California LLNL under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. Ion thermal effects on slow mode solitary waves in plasmas with two adiabatic ion species

    SciTech Connect

    Nsengiyumva, F. Hellberg, M. A. Mace, R. L.

    2015-09-15

    Using both the Sagdeev and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) methods, ion thermal effects on slow mode ion acoustic solitons and double layers are investigated in a plasma with two adiabatic positive ion species. It is found that reducing the gap between the two ion thermal speeds by increasing the relative temperature of the cool ions increases the typical soliton/double layer speeds for all values of the ion-ion density ratio and reduces the range in the density ratio that supports double layers. The effect of increasing the relative cool ion temperature on the soliton/double layer amplitudes depends on the relative densities. For lower values of the ion density ratio, an increase in cool ion temperature leads to a significant decrease in soliton/double layer amplitude, so one may find that solitons of all permissible speeds lie within the range of KdV theory.

  5. Korotkoff Sounds.

    PubMed

    Shennan; Halligan

    1996-12-01

    We were interested in the historical perspective that Arabidze et al. [1] brought to the subject of Korotkoff's auscultatory method of measuring blood pressure. The original description by the Reverend Stephen Hales performing the very first blood pressure measurement (which was actually published in 1733) does not make reference to a column of water as the authors suggest [2]. Hales wrote: 'Then untying the Ligature on the Artery, the Blood rose in the Tube eight Feet three Inches.'. He goes on to state that, 'When it was at its full Height, it would rise and fall at and after each Pulse two, three, or four Inches, and sometimes it would fall twelve or fourteen Inches, and have there for a time the same vibrations up and down at and after each Pulse, as it had, when it was at its full Height; to which it would rise again, after forty or fifty Pulses'. We believe this fall of '12 or 14 in' to have been the first description of blood pressure variability, which has wrongly been attributed to respirations by subsequent authors [3]. The mare's pulse rate was described to be about 50 beats per minute; therefore an unanaesthetized horse would not be likely to have a respiration rate of once per minute. One further important point of error concerning the Korotkoff sounds is their reproducibility. We have demonstrated recently that phase IV is reproduced or identified poorly, both in adults and even during pregnancy, when it has been recommended to be used in favour of phase V. We have also demonstrated that phase I (systolic blood pressure) is perceived to be significantly clearer than phase V [4]. PMID:10226281

  6. Sound modes at the BCS-BEC crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Heiselberg, H.

    2006-01-15

    First and second sound speeds are calculated for a uniform superfluid gas of Fermi atoms as a function of temperature, density, and interaction strength. The second sound speed is of particular interest as it is a clear signal of a superfluid component and it determines the critical temperature. The sound modes and their dependence on density, scattering length, and temperature are calculated in the BCS, molecular Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), and unitarity limits and a smooth crossover is extrapolated. It is found that first and second sounds undergo avoided crossing on the BEC side due to mixing. Consequently, they are detectable at crossover both as density and thermal waves in traps.

  7. Suppression of repeated adiabatic shear banding by dynamic large strain extrusion machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S. L.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    High speed machining (HSM) is an advanced production technology with great future potential. Chip serration or segmentation is a commonly observed phenomenon during high speed machining of metals, which is found to be ascribed to a repeated shear band formation fueled by thermo-plastic instability occurring within the primary shear zone. The occurrence of serrated chips leads to the cutting force fluctuation, decreased tool life, degradation of the surface finish and less accuracy in machine parts during high speed machining. Hence, understanding and controlling serrated chip formation in HSM are extremely important. In this work, a novel dynamic large strain extrusion machining (DLSEM) technique is developed for suppressing formation of serrated chips. The systematic DLSEM experiments of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 alloy with varying degrees of imposed extrusion constraint were carried out. It is found that there is a prominent chip morphology transition from serrated to continuous state and shear band spacing decreases with the constraint degree increasing. In order to uncover underlying mechanism of the imposed extrusion constraint suppressing repeated adiabatic shear banding in DLSEM, new theoretical models are developed where the effects of extrusion constraint, material convection due to chip flow and momentum diffusion during shear band propagation are included. The analytical expressions for the onset criterion of adiabatic shear band and shear band spacing in DLSEM are obtained. The theoretical predictions are in agreement with the experimental results.

  8. The Adiabatic Invariance of the Action Variable in Classical Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Clive G.; Siklos, Stephen T. C.

    2007-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional classical time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with quasi-periodic orbits. It is well known that such systems possess an adiabatic invariant which coincides with the action variable of the Hamiltonian formalism. We present a new proof of the adiabatic invariance of this quantity and illustrate our arguments by means of…

  9. Generation of atomic NOON states via shortcuts to adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chong; Su, Shi-Lei; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2016-10-01

    Based on Lewis-Riesenfeld invariants and quantum Zeno dynamics, we propose an effective scheme for generating atomic NOON states via shortcuts to adiabatic passage. The photon losses are efficiently suppressed by engineering shortcuts to adiabatic passage in the scheme. The numerical simulation shows that the atomic NOON states can be generated with high fidelity.

  10. Kinetic Theory Derivation of the Adiabatic Law for Ideal Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Michael I.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how the adiabatic law for ideal gases can be derived from the assumption of a Maxwell-Boltzmann (or any other) distribution of velocities--in contrast to the usual derivations from thermodynamics alone, and the higher-order effect that leads to one-body viscosity. An elementary derivation of the adiabatic law is given. (Author/DS)

  11. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  12. Adiabatic Effectiveness and Heat Transfer Coefficient on a Film-Cooled Rotating Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1997-01-01

    three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code has been used to compute the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a rotating film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the United Technologies Research Center(UTRC) rotor with five film-cooling rows containing 83 holes, including three rows on the shower head with 49 holes, covering about 86% of the blade span. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature 1900 K and stagnation pressure 3 MPa. The blade speed is taken to be 5200 rpm. The adiabatic effectiveness is higher for a rotating blade as compared to that for a stationary blade. Also, the direction of coolant injection from the shower-head holes considerably affects the effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient values on both the pressure and suction surfaces. In all cases the heat transfer coefficient and adiabatic effectiveness are highly three-dimensional in the vicinity of holes but tend to become two-dimensional far downstream.

  13. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timbie, P. T.; Bernstein, G. M.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the multiband imaging photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). One such refrigerator has been built which uses a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3-T solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is less than 0.5 microW. The system has a hold time at 0.1K of more than 12 h. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built at a SIRTF prototype to fly on a ballon-borne telescope. It will use a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using a high-Tc solenoid-actuated heat switch is also discussed.

  14. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for SIRTF

    SciTech Connect

    Timbie, P.T.; Bernstein, G.M.; Richards, P.L.

    1989-02-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) has been proposed to cool bolometric infrared detectors on the Multiband Imaging Photometer of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). The authors have built one such refrigerator which employs a ferric ammonium alum salt pill suspended by nylon threads in a 3 Tesla solenoid. The resonant modes of this suspension are above 100 Hz. The heat leak to the salt pill is <0.5 ..mu..W. The system has a hold time at 0.1 /sup 0/K of >12 hours. The cold stage temperature is regulated with a feedback loop that controls the magnetic field. A second, similar refrigerator is being built as a SIRTF prototype to fly on a balloon-borne telescope. It will employ a ferromagnetic shield. The possibility of using high T/sub c/ leads to the superconducting magnet and a solenoid-actuated heat switch are also discussed.

  15. The HAWC and SAFIRE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; DiPirro, Michael; Jackson, Michael; Behr, Jason; Kunes, Evan; Hait, Tom; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High-Resolution Airborne Wide-band Camera (HAWC) and Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) are far-infrared experiments which will fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aircraft. HAWC's detectors will operate at 0.2 Kelvin, while those of SAFIRE will be at 0.1 Kelvin. Each instrument will include an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to cool its detector stage from the liquid helium bath temperature (HAWC's at 4.2 Kelvin and SAFIRE's pumped to about 1.3 Kelvin) to its operating temperature. Except for the magnets used to achieve the cooling and a slight difference in the heat switch design, the two ADRs are nearly identical. We describe the ADR design and present the results of performance testing.

  16. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  17. Differential topology of adiabatically controlled quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, Edmond A.; Rezakhani, Ali T.; Ahmad, Farooq

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that in a controlled adiabatic homotopy between two Hamiltonians, H 0 and H 1, the gap or "anti-crossing" phenomenon can be viewed as the development of cusps and swallow tails in the region of the complex plane where two critical value curves of the quadratic map associated with the numerical range of H 0 + i H 1 come close. The "near crossing" in the energy level plots happens to be a generic situation, in the sense that a crossing is a manifestation of the quadratic numerical range map being unstable in the sense of differential topology. The stable singularities that can develop are identified and it is shown that they could occur near the gap, making those singularities of paramount importance. Various applications, including the quantum random walk, are provided to illustrate this theory.

  18. Quantum Adiabatic Optimization and Combinatorial Landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Knysh, S.; Morris, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the performance of the Quantum Adiabatic Evolution (QAE) algorithm on a variant of Satisfiability problem for an ensemble of random graphs parametrized by the ratio of clauses to variables, gamma = M / N. We introduce a set of macroscopic parameters (landscapes) and put forward an ansatz of universality for random bit flips. We then formulate the problem of finding the smallest eigenvalue and the excitation gap as a statistical mechanics problem. We use the so-called annealing approximation with a refinement that a finite set of macroscopic variables (verses only energy) is used, and are able to show the existence of a dynamic threshold gamma = gammad, beyond which QAE should take an exponentially long time to find a solution. We compare the results for extended and simplified sets of landscapes and provide numerical evidence in support of our universality ansatz.

  19. Geometric Adiabatic Transport in Quantum Hall States.

    PubMed

    Klevtsov, S; Wiegmann, P

    2015-08-21

    We argue that in addition to the Hall conductance and the nondissipative component of the viscous tensor, there exists a third independent transport coefficient, which is precisely quantized. It takes constant values along quantum Hall plateaus. We show that the new coefficient is the Chern number of a vector bundle over moduli space of surfaces of genus 2 or higher and therefore cannot change continuously along the plateau. As such, it does not transpire on a sphere or a torus. In the linear response theory, this coefficient determines intensive forces exerted on electronic fluid by adiabatic deformations of geometry and represents the effect of the gravitational anomaly. We also present the method of computing the transport coefficients for quantum Hall states. PMID:26340197

  20. Geometric Adiabatic Transport in Quantum Hall States.

    PubMed

    Klevtsov, S; Wiegmann, P

    2015-08-21

    We argue that in addition to the Hall conductance and the nondissipative component of the viscous tensor, there exists a third independent transport coefficient, which is precisely quantized. It takes constant values along quantum Hall plateaus. We show that the new coefficient is the Chern number of a vector bundle over moduli space of surfaces of genus 2 or higher and therefore cannot change continuously along the plateau. As such, it does not transpire on a sphere or a torus. In the linear response theory, this coefficient determines intensive forces exerted on electronic fluid by adiabatic deformations of geometry and represents the effect of the gravitational anomaly. We also present the method of computing the transport coefficients for quantum Hall states.

  1. Adiabatic frequency conversion of ultrafast pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowski, H.; Bruner, B. D.; Ganany-Padowicz, A.; Juwiler, I.; Arie, A.; Silberberg, Y.

    2011-12-01

    A new method for efficient, broadband sum and difference frequency generation of ultrafast pulses is demonstrated. The principles of the method follow from an analogy between frequency conversion and coherent optical excitation of a two-level system. For conversion of ultrafast pulses, the concepts of adiabatic conversion are developed further in order to account for dispersion and group velocity mismatch. The scheme was implemented using aperiodically poled nonlinear crystals and a single step nonlinear mixing process, leading to conversion of near-IR (˜790 nm) ultrafast pulses into the blue (˜450 nm) and mid-IR (˜3.15 μm) spectral regions. Conversion bandwidths up to 15 THz FWHM and efficiencies up to 50% are reported.

  2. Stirling engine with one adiabatic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, C. D.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that integration around the P-V loop of a Stirling-like cycle with an adiabatic expansion or compression space is possible through careful application of the ideal gas laws. The result is a set of closed-form solutions or the work output, work input, and efficiency for ideal gases. Previous analyses yielded closed-form solutions only for machines in which all spaces behave isothermally, or that have other limitations that simplify the arithmetic but omit important aspects of real machines. The results of this analysis, although still far removed from the exact behavior of real, practical engines, yield important insights into the effects observed in computer models and experimental machines. These results are especially illuminating for machines intended to operate with fairly small temperature differences. Heat pumps and low-technology solar-powered engines might be included in this category.

  3. Adiabatic connection at negative coupling strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Michael; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2010-01-15

    The adiabatic connection of density functional theory (DFT) for electronic systems is generalized here to negative values of the coupling strength alpha (with attractive electrons). In the extreme limit alpha->-infinity a simple physical solution is presented and its implications for DFT (as well as its limitations) are discussed. For two-electron systems (a case in which the present solution can be calculated exactly), we find that an interpolation between the limit alpha->-infinity and the opposite limit of infinitely strong repulsion (alpha->+infinity) yields a rather accurate estimate of the second-order correlation energy E{sub c}{sup GL2}[rho] for several different densities rho, without using virtual orbitals. The same procedure is also applied to the Be isoelectronic series, analyzing the effects of near degeneracy.

  4. Sliding seal materials for adiabatic engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, J.

    1985-01-01

    The sliding friction coefficients and wear rates of promising carbide, oxide, and nitride materials were measured under temperature, environmental, velocity, loading conditions that are representative of the adiabatic engine environment. In order to provide guidance needed to improve materials for this application, the program stressed fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in friction and wear. Microhardness tests were performed on the candidate materials at elevated temperatures, and in atmospheres relevant to the piston seal application, and optical and electron microscopy were used to elucidate the micromechanisms of wear following wear testing. X-ray spectroscopy was used to evaluate interface/environment interactions which seemed to be important in the friction and wear process. Electrical effects in the friction and wear processes were explored in order to evaluate the potential usefulness of such effects in modifying the friction and wear rates in service. However, this factor was found to be of negligible significance in controlling friction and wear.

  5. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  6. An integrated programming and development environment for adiabatic quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, T. S.; McCaskey, A. J.; Bennink, R. S.; Billings, J. J.; DʼAzevedo, E. F.; Sullivan, B. D.; Klymko, C. F.; Seddiqi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware has raised challenging questions about how to evaluate adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) programs. Processor behavior depends on multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program, which are each highly tunable. We present an integrated programming and development environment for AQO called Jade Adiabatic Development Environment (JADE) that provides control over all the steps taken during program synthesis. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously specify the AQO algorithm while allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its potential use for benchmarking AQO programs by the quantum computer science community.

  7. An Integrated Development Environment for Adiabatic Quantum Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; McCaskey, Alex; Bennink, Ryan S; Billings, Jay Jay; D'Azevedo, Eduardo; Sullivan, Blair D; Klymko, Christine F; Seddiqi, Hadayat

    2014-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing is a promising route to the computational power afforded by quantum information processing. The recent availability of adiabatic hardware raises the question of how well quantum programs perform. Benchmarking behavior is challenging since the multiple steps to synthesize an adiabatic quantum program are highly tunable. We present an adiabatic quantum programming environment called JADE that provides control over all the steps taken during program development. JADE captures the workflow needed to rigorously benchmark performance while also allowing a variety of problem types, programming techniques, and processor configurations. We have also integrated JADE with a quantum simulation engine that enables program profiling using numerical calculation. The computational engine supports plug-ins for simulation methodologies tailored to various metrics and computing resources. We present the design, integration, and deployment of JADE and discuss its use for benchmarking adiabatic quantum programs.

  8. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. II. The adiabatic representation

    SciTech Connect

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J.

    2012-12-14

    We present a complex quantum trajectory method for treating non-adiabatic dynamics. Each trajectory evolves classically on a single electronic surface but with complex position and momentum. The equations of motion are derived directly from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, and the population exchange arises naturally from amplitude-transfer terms. In this paper the equations of motion are derived in the adiabatic representation to complement our work in the diabatic representation [N. Zamstein and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A517 (2012)]. We apply our method to two benchmark models introduced by John Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)], and get very good agreement with converged quantum-mechanical calculations. Specifically, we show that decoherence (spatial separation of wavepackets on different surfaces) is already contained in the equations of motion and does not require ad hoc augmentation.

  9. Making Sound Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  10. The Sound of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  11. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  12. Central to peripheral sound propagation in excised lung.

    PubMed

    Rice, D A; Rice, J C

    1987-10-01

    The time it takes audible sound to travel from the trachea to the pleura in five intact, excised horse lungs and one dog lung inflated with several gases was measured. Regression estimates of sound speed at total lung capacity (TLC) using straight line distance from the carina to the pleura are: helium, 775 +/- 60.5 m/s (means +/- 95% confidence limits); air, 282 +/- 23.5; carbon dioxide, 219 +/- 25.5; sulfur hexafluoride, 142 +/- 43.5. With the exception of sulfur hexafluoride, these speeds are 15%-20% less than the free-field speed of sound in each gas. Total airway length did not predict time delay any better or worse than straight line distance, but the high correlation between these two predictors (r = 0.94) prevents showing either to be the more predictive. In one lung, airway length was partitioned according to airway diameter. A regression using partitioned airway lengths significantly improved time delay prediction (p less than 0.001) over an unpartitioned model. Sound speed in the trachea equals free-field sound speed. Sound speed in air-filled airways 1 to 25 mm in diameter equals 268 +/- 44 m/s. We conclude that the first sound to reach the surface travels in the airways for at least 90% of the distance, spending at least 87% of the total travel time there. PMID:3680773

  13. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  14. Superplane!High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  15. Optimality of partial adiabatic search and its circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Ying; Sun, Jie; Lu, Songfeng; Gao, Chao

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we first uncover a fact that a partial adiabatic quantum search with time complexity is in fact optimal, in which is the total number of elements in an unstructured database, and () of them are the marked ones(one) . We then discuss how to implement a partial adiabatic search algorithm on the quantum circuit model. From the implementing procedure on the circuit model, we can find out that the approximating steps needed are always in the same order of the time complexity of the adiabatic algorithm.

  16. Adiabatic control of atomic dressed states for transport and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, N. R.; Rey, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    We describe forms of adiabatic transport that arise for dressed-state atoms in optical lattices. Focusing on the limit of weak tunnel-coupling between nearest-neighbor lattice sites, we explain how adiabatic variation of optical dressing allows control of atomic motion between lattice sites: allowing adiabatic particle transport in a direction that depends on the internal state, and force measurements via spectroscopic preparation and readout. For uniformly filled bands these systems display topologically quantized particle transport. An implementation of the dressing scheme using optical transitions in alkaline-earth atoms is discussed as well as its favorable features for precise force sensing.

  17. Topological States and Adiabatic Pumping in Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Yaakov; Lahini, Yoav; Ringel, Zohar; Verbin, Mor; Zilberberg, Oded

    2012-02-01

    We find a connection between quasicrystals and topological matter, namely that quasicrystals exhibit non-trivial topological phases attributed to dimensions higher than their own [1]. Quasicrystals are materials which are neither ordered nor disordered, i.e. they exhibit only long-range order [2]. This long-range order is usually expressed as a projection from a higher dimensional ordered system. Recently, the unrelated discovery of Topological Insulators [3] defined a new type of materials classified by their topology. We show theoretically and experimentally using photonic lattices, that one-dimensional quasicrystals exhibit topologically-protected boundary states equivalent to the edge states of the two-dimensional Integer Quantum Hall Effect. We harness this property to adiabatically pump light across the quasicrystal, and generalize our results to higher dimensional systems. Hence, quasicrystals offer a new platform for the study of topological phases while their topology may better explain their surface properties.[4pt] [1] Y. E. Kraus, Y. Lahini, Z. Ringel, M. Verbin, and O. Zilberberg, arXiv:1109.5983 (2011).[0pt] [2] C. Janot, Quasicrystals (Clarendon, Oxford, 1994), 2nd ed.[0pt] [3] M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane, Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 3045 (2010).

  18. On the persistence of adiabatic shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakye-Yiadom, S.; Bassim, M. N.; Al-Ameeri, S.

    2012-08-01

    It is generally agreed that the initiation and development of adiabatic shear bands (ASBs) are manifestations of damage in metallic materials subjected to high strain rates and large strains as those due to impact in a Hopkinson Bar system. Models for evolution of these bands have been described in the literature. One question that has not received attention is how persistent these bands are and whether their presence and effect can be reversed or eliminated by using a process of thermal (heat treatment) or thermo-mechanical treatment that would relieve the material from the high strain associated with ASBs and their role as precursors to crack initiation and subsequent failure. Since ASBs are more prevalent and more defined in BCC metals including steels, a study was conducted to investigate the best conditions of generating ASBs in a heat treatable steel, followed by determining the best conditions for heat treatment of specimens already damaged by the presence of ASBs in order to relieve the strains due to ASBs and restore the material to an apparent microstructure without the "scars" due to the previous presence of ASBs. It was found that heat treatment achieves the curing from ASBs. This presentation documents the process undertaken to achieve this objective.

  19. Graph isomorphism and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2014-03-01

    In the Graph Isomorphism (GI) problem two N-vertex graphs G and G' are given and the task is to determine whether there exists a permutation of the vertices of G that preserves adjacency and maps G --> G'. If yes (no), then G and G' are said to be isomorphic (non-isomorphic). The GI problem is an important problem in computer science and is thought to be of comparable difficulty to integer factorization. We present a quantum algorithm that solves arbitrary instances of GI, and which provides a novel approach to determining all automorphisms of a graph. The algorithm converts a GI instance to a combinatorial optimization problem that can be solved using adiabatic quantum evolution. Numerical simulation of the algorithm's quantum dynamics shows that it correctly distinguishes non-isomorphic graphs; recognizes isomorphic graphs; and finds the automorphism group of a graph. We also discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation and show how it can be leveraged to solve arbitrary instances of the NP-Complete Sub-Graph Isomorphism problem.

  20. Design of the PIXIE Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; Kimball, Mark Oliver; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Li, Xiaoyi; DiPirro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a proposed mission to densely map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. It will operate in a scanning mode from a sun-synchronous orbit, using low temperature detectors (at 0.1 K) and located inside a teslescope that is cooled to approximately 2.73 K - to match the background temperature. A mechanical cryocooler operating at 4.5 K establishes a low base temperature from which two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) assemblies will cool the telescope and detectors. To achieve continuous scanning capability, the ADRs must operate continuously. Complicating the design are two factors: 1) the need to systematically vary the temperature of various telescope components in order to separate the small polarization signal variations from those that may arise from temperature drifts and changing gradients within the telescope, and 2) the orbital and monthly variations in lunar irradiance into the telescope barrels. These factors require the telescope ADR to reject quasi-continuous heat loads of 2-3 millwatts, while maintaining a peak heat reject rate of less than 12 milliwatts. The detector heat load at 0.1 K is comparatively small at 1-2 microwatts. This paper will describe the 3-stage and 2-stage continuous ADRs that will be used to meet the cooling power and temperature stability requirements of the PIXIE detectors and telescope.

  1. The mechanical forces in katydid sound production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huaping; Chiu, Cheng-Wei; Zhou, Yan; He, Xingliang; Epstein, Ben; Liang, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Katydids and crickets generate their characteristic calling sound by rubbing their wings together. The mechanisms of the rubbing force, however, have not been extensively studied. The change of mechanical force with external parameters (speed and applied load) in the stridulation process has not been reported. Our current study aims to investigate the mechanical forces of katydid stridulation. Four pairs of files and plectrums from a katydid, which are responsible for the katydid's sound production, were examined with a specially designed experimental configuration. Due to the asymmetric nature of the wing motion in their opening and closing, the contact between the plectrum and file resembles that of a ratchet. Multiple frequencies were generated during experimental wing rubbing so that a calling-like sound was produced. Results showed that the morphology of the plectrum/file contact has significant effects on mechanical forces induced on the wings and resulting sound production. The roles of the mechanical forces include sound generation, tone modification, and energy consumption. The findings in this work reveal the variation trend of mechanical force with sliding speed and applied load. The frequency and amplitude of the sound wave produced in tribo-test are close to those in natural condition. By mimicking the microstructure of the plectrum and file teeth, acoustic instruments with high mechanical energy conversion rate can be developed. Our results provide new approaches in the design and improvement of micro-machines for acoustic applications, as well as in hybrid robotic systems.

  2. Subtyping Children with Speech Sound Disorders by Endophenotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Barbara A.; Avrich, Allison A.; Freebairn, Lisa A.; Taylor, H. Gerry; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Stein, Catherine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examined associations of 5 endophenotypes (i.e., measurable skills that are closely associated with speech sound disorders and are useful in detecting genetic influences on speech sound production), oral motor skills, phonological memory, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and speeded naming, with 3 clinical criteria…

  3. Aerodynamics of Sounding-Rocket Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical aerodynamics program TAD predicts aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding-rocket configurations. These slender, Axisymmetric finned vehicles have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high-speed armament. TAD calculates characteristics of separate portions of vehicle, calculates interference between portions, and combines results to form total vehicle solution.

  4. Sound velocities in liquid lead at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, R.S.; Winkler, M.A.; Shaner, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    A dynamic technique, the isobaric expansion experiment (IEX) is used to reach high temperature and pressure states in liquid lead. A unique technique is described for making sound speed measurements once a final equilibrium end state is obtained. Data over an extended density range are presented. The sound speed in liquid lead over this range appears to vary linearly with density, and has no dependence on temperature within our experimental precision.

  5. Adiabaticity and spectral splits in collective neutrino transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2007-12-15

    Neutrinos streaming off a supernova core transform collectively by neutrino-neutrino interactions, leading to 'spectral splits' where an energy E{sub split} divides the transformed spectrum sharply into parts of almost pure but different flavors. We present a detailed description of the spectral-split phenomenon which is conceptually and quantitatively understood in an adiabatic treatment of neutrino-neutrino effects. Central to this theory is a self-consistency condition in the form of two sum rules (integrals over the neutrino spectra that must equal certain conserved quantities). We provide explicit analytic and numerical solutions for various neutrino spectra. We introduce the concept of the adiabatic reference frame and elaborate on the relative adiabatic evolution. Violating adiabaticity leads to the spectral split being 'washed out'. The sharpness of the split appears to be represented by a surprisingly universal function.

  6. Adiabatic rotation, quantum search, and preparation of superposition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, M. Stewart

    2007-06-01

    We introduce the idea of using adiabatic rotation to generate superpositions of a large class of quantum states. For quantum computing this is an interesting alternative to the well-studied “straight line” adiabatic evolution. In ways that complement recent results, we show how to efficiently prepare three types of states: Kitaev’s toric code state, the cluster state of the measurement-based computation model, and the history state used in the adiabatic simulation of a quantum circuit. We also show that the method, when adapted for quantum search, provides quadratic speedup as other optimal methods do with the advantages that the problem Hamiltonian is time independent and that the energy gap above the ground state is strictly nondecreasing with time. Likewise the method can be used for optimization as an alternative to the standard adiabatic algorithm.

  7. Coherent transfer by adiabatic passage in two-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-09-15

    Coherent tunneling by adiabatic passage (CTAP) is a well-established technique for robust spatial transport of quantum particles in linear chains. Here we introduce two exactly-solvable models where the CTAP protocol can be extended to two-dimensional lattice geometries. Such bi-dimensional lattice models are synthesized from time-dependent second-quantization Hamiltonians, in which the bosonic field operators evolve adiabatically like in an ordinary three-level CTAP scheme thus ensuring adiabatic passage in Fock space. - Highlights: • New ways of coherent transport by adiabatic passage (CTAP) in 2D lattices. • Synthesis of exactly-solvable 2D lattices from a simple three-well model. • CTAP in 2D lattices can be exploited for quantum state transfer.

  8. Adiabatic and isocurvature perturbation projections in multi-field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Chris; Saffin, Paul M. E-mail: Paul.Saffin@nottingham.ac.uk

    2013-08-01

    Current data are in good agreement with the predictions of single field inflation. However, the hemispherical asymmetry, seen in the cosmic microwave background data, may hint at a potential problem. Generalizing to multi-field models may provide one possible explanation. A useful way of modeling perturbations in multi-field inflation is to investigate the projection of the perturbation along and perpendicular to the background fields' trajectory. These correspond to the adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations. However, it is important to note that in general there are no corresponding adiabatic and isocurvature fields. The purpose of this article is to highlight the distinction between a field redefinition and a perturbation projection. We provide a detailed derivation of the evolution of the isocurvature perturbation to show that no assumption of an adiabatic or isocurvature field is needed. We also show how this evolution equation is consistent with the field covariant evolution equations for the adiabatic perturbation in the flat field space limit.

  9. Ultrafast stimulated Raman parallel adiabatic passage by shaped pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dridi, G.; Guerin, S.; Hakobyan, V.; Jauslin, H. R.; Eleuch, H.

    2009-10-15

    We present a general and versatile technique of population transfer based on parallel adiabatic passage by femtosecond shaped pulses. Their amplitude and phase are specifically designed to optimize the adiabatic passage corresponding to parallel eigenvalues at all times. We show that this technique allows the robust adiabatic population transfer in a Raman system with the total pulse area as low as 3{pi}, corresponding to a fluence of one order of magnitude below the conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage process. This process of short duration, typically picosecond and subpicosecond, is easily implementable with the modern pulse shaper technology and opens the possibility of ultrafast robust population transfer with interesting applications in quantum information processing.

  10. Prediction of underwater sound levels from rain and wind.

    PubMed

    Ma, Barry B; Nystuen, Jeffrey A; Lien, Ren-Chieh

    2005-06-01

    Wind and rain generated ambient sound from the ocean surface represents the background baseline of ocean noise. Understanding these ambient sounds under different conditions will facilitate other scientific studies. For example, measurement of the processes producing the sound, assessment of sonar performance, and helping to understand the influence of anthropogenic generated noise on marine mammals. About 90 buoy-months of ocean ambient sound data have been collected using Acoustic Rain Gauges in different open-ocean locations in the Tropical Pacific Ocean. Distinct ambient sound spectra for various rainfall rates and wind speeds are identified through a series of discrimination processes. Five divisions of the sound spectra associated with different sound generating mechanisms can be predicted using wind speed and rainfall rate as input variables. The ambient sound data collected from the Intertropical Convergence Zone are used to construct the prediction algorithms, and are tested on the data from the Western Pacific Warm Pool. This physically based semi-empirical model predicts the ambient sound spectra (0.5-50 kHz) at rainfall rates from 2-200 mm/h and wind speeds from 2 to 14 m/s.

  11. Adiabatic invariant value variation under shortwave band subcritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svistunov, K. V.; Tinin, M. V.

    1985-04-01

    The possibility of significant variations of the adiabatic invariant is examined for the propagation of radio waves in an irregular Earth-ionosphere waveguide with a parabolic dependence of permittivity on height. Numerical and analytical results indicate that nonexponential deviations of the adiabatic invariant can occur not only when the characteristic size of horizontal irregularity decreases (e.g., during resonant beam excitation) but also in quasi-critical conditions and for smoothly irregular waveguides.

  12. Shortcuts to adiabaticity for non-Hermitian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, S.; Martinez-Garaot, S.; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Chen Xi

    2011-08-15

    Adiabatic processes driven by non-Hermitian, time-dependent Hamiltonians may be sped up by generalizing inverse engineering techniques based on counter-diabatic (transitionless driving) algorithms or on dynamical invariants. We work out the basic theory and examples described by two-level Hamiltonians: the acceleration of rapid adiabatic passage with a decaying excited level and of the dynamics of a classical particle on an expanding harmonic oscillator.

  13. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  14. Heat capacity and sound velocities of low dimensional Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, P.; Solis, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report the heat capacity ratio and sound velocities for an interactionless Fermi gas immersed in periodic structures such as penetrable multilayers or multitubes created by one (planes) or two perpendicular (tubes) external Dirac comb potentials. The isobaric specific heat of the fermion gas presents the dimensional crossover previously observed in the isochoric specific heat - from 3D to 2D or to 1D -. The quotient between the two quantities has a prominent bump related to the confinement, and as the temperature increases, it goes towards the monoatomic classical gas value 5/3. We present the isothermal and the adiabatic sound velocities of the fermion gas which show anomalous behavior at temperatures below TF due to the dimensionality of the system, while at higher temperatures again we recover the behavior of a classical Fermi gas. Furthermore, as the temperature goes to zero the sound velocity has a finite value, as expected.

  15. Quantifying Waddington landscapes and paths of non-adiabatic cell fate decisions for differentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhe; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Cellular differentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation are determined by underlying gene regulatory networks. Non-adiabatic regulation via slow binding/unbinding to the gene can be important in these cell fate decision-making processes. Based on a stem cell core gene network, we uncovered the stem cell developmental landscape. As the binding/unbinding speed decreases, the landscape topography changes from bistable attractors of stem and differentiated states to more attractors of stem and other different cell states as well as substates. Non-adiabaticity leads to more differentiated cell types and provides a natural explanation for the heterogeneity observed in the experiments. We quantified Waddington landscapes with two possible cell fate decision mechanisms by changing the regulation strength or regulation timescale (non-adiabaticity). Transition rates correlate with landscape topography through barrier heights between different states and quantitatively determine global stability. We found the optimal speeds of these cell fate decision-making processes. We quantified biological paths and predict that differentiation and reprogramming go through an intermediate state (IM1), whereas transdifferentiation goes through another intermediate state (IM2). Some predictions are confirmed by recent experimental studies. PMID:24132204

  16. Decadal trends in Indian Ocean ambient sound.

    PubMed

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Bradley, David L; Niu, Xiaoyue Maggie

    2013-11-01

    The increase of ocean noise documented in the North Pacific has sparked concern on whether the observed increases are a global or regional phenomenon. This work provides evidence of low frequency sound increases in the Indian Ocean. A decade (2002-2012) of recordings made off the island of Diego Garcia, UK in the Indian Ocean was parsed into time series according to frequency band and sound level. Quarterly sound level comparisons between the first and last years were also performed. The combination of time series and temporal comparison analyses over multiple measurement parameters produced results beyond those obtainable from a single parameter analysis. The ocean sound floor has increased over the past decade in the Indian Ocean. Increases were most prominent in recordings made south of Diego Garcia in the 85-105 Hz band. The highest sound level trends differed between the two sides of the island; the highest sound levels decreased in the north and increased in the south. Rate, direction, and magnitude of changes among the multiple parameters supported interpretation of source functions driving the trends. The observed sound floor increases are consistent with concurrent increases in shipping, wind speed, wave height, and blue whale abundance in the Indian Ocean. PMID:24180757

  17. Decadal trends in Indian Ocean ambient sound.

    PubMed

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Bradley, David L; Niu, Xiaoyue Maggie

    2013-11-01

    The increase of ocean noise documented in the North Pacific has sparked concern on whether the observed increases are a global or regional phenomenon. This work provides evidence of low frequency sound increases in the Indian Ocean. A decade (2002-2012) of recordings made off the island of Diego Garcia, UK in the Indian Ocean was parsed into time series according to frequency band and sound level. Quarterly sound level comparisons between the first and last years were also performed. The combination of time series and temporal comparison analyses over multiple measurement parameters produced results beyond those obtainable from a single parameter analysis. The ocean sound floor has increased over the past decade in the Indian Ocean. Increases were most prominent in recordings made south of Diego Garcia in the 85-105 Hz band. The highest sound level trends differed between the two sides of the island; the highest sound levels decreased in the north and increased in the south. Rate, direction, and magnitude of changes among the multiple parameters supported interpretation of source functions driving the trends. The observed sound floor increases are consistent with concurrent increases in shipping, wind speed, wave height, and blue whale abundance in the Indian Ocean.

  18. Use of natural sounds and metaphors for data perceptualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodha, Suresh K.; Venable, Ellen; Marsh, David; Meads, Doanna; Manh, Nguyet; Robinson, Casey; Roskin, Krishna

    2001-05-01

    We describe three systems that use natural or event-based sounds as means of data delivery. In these systems we have mapped data to natural sounds using metaphors. In the first system we evaluate the use of sounds of air, horn, and train to convey ordered numeric values between 1 to 6. An example of the metaphor used here is the association of speed values to the sound of a moving train at different speeds. In the second system, we use sounds of ocean waves to convey whether the exposure in a protein structural alignment is buried, partially exposed or fully exposed. The metaphor used here is the association of sound with how exposed the user is with respect to the ocean. In the third system, we map animal sounds such as the sound of a roaring lion or a chirping bird to certain stocks based on user preferences. The behavior of the stocks are then sounded by the use of whistles and car crash to signify the movement in process of the stocks. An up whistling sound can be clearly associated with an uptrend. We present and discuss the results of user evaluation studies for all the three systems.

  19. Priming Gestures with Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M.; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge. PMID:26544884

  20. More sound of church bells: Authors' correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kasper, Lutz; Burde, Jan-Philipp

    2016-01-01

    In the recently published article "The Sound of Church Bells: Tracking Down the Secret of a Traditional Arts and Crafts Trade," the bell frequencies have been erroneously oversimplified. The problem affects Eqs. (2) and (3), which were derived from the elementary "coffee mug model" and in which we used the speed of sound in air. However, this does not make sense from a physical point of view, since air only acts as a sound carrier, not as a sound source in the case of bells. Due to the excellent fit of the theoretical model with the empirical data, we unfortunately failed to notice this error before publication. However, all other equations, e.g., the introduction of the correction factor in Eq. (4) and the estimation of the mass in Eqs. (5) and (6) are not affected by this error, since they represent empirical models. However, it is unfortunate to introduce the speed of sound in air as a constant in Eqs. (4) and (6). Instead, we suggest the following simple rule of thumb for relating the radius of a church bell R to its humming frequency fhum:

  1. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Hull, G F; Dryden, H L

    1925-01-01

    This report deals with an experimental investigation of the aerodynamical characteristics of airfoils at high speeds. Lift, drag, and center of pressure measurements were made on six airfoils of the type used by the air service in propeller design, at speeds ranging from 550 to 1,000 feet per second. The results show a definite limit to the speed at which airfoils may efficiently be used to produce lift, the lift coefficient decreasing and the drag coefficient increasing as the speed approaches the speed of sound. The change in lift coefficient is large for thick airfoil sections (camber ratio 0.14 to 0.20) and for high angles of attack. The change is not marked for thin sections (camber ratio 0.10) at low angles of attack, for the speed range employed. At high speeds the center of pressure moves back toward the trailing edge of the airfoil as the speed increases. The results indicate that the use of tip speeds approaching the speed of sound for propellers of customary design involves a serious loss in efficiency.

  2. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Adiabatic process reversibility: microscopic and macroscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mário G.

    2009-05-01

    The reversibility of adiabatic processes was recently addressed by two publications. In the first (Miranda 2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 937-43), an equation was derived relating the initial and final volumes and temperatures for adiabatic expansions of an ideal gas, using a microscopic approach. In that relation the parameter r accounts for the process reversibility, ranging between 0 and 1, which corresponds to the free and reversible expansion, respectively. In the second (Anacleto and Pereira 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30 177-83), the authors have shown that thermodynamics can effectively and efficiently be used to obtain the general law for adiabatic processes carried out by an ideal gas, including compressions, for which r \\ge 1. The present work integrates and extends the aforementioned studies, providing thus further insights into the analysis of the adiabatic process. It is shown that Miranda's work is wholly valid for compressions. In addition, it is demonstrated that the adiabatic reversibility coefficient given in terms of the piston velocity and the root mean square velocity of the gas particles is equivalent to the macroscopic description, given just by the quotient between surroundings and system pressure values.

  3. Adiabatic continuity, wave-function overlap, and topological phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jiahua; Sun, Kai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the relation between wave-function overlap and adiabatic continuity in gapped quantum systems. We show that for two band insulators, a scalar function can be defined in the momentum space, which characterizes the wave-function overlap between Bloch states in the two insulators. If this overlap is nonzero for all momentum points in the Brillouin zone, these two insulators are adiabatically connected, i.e., we can deform one insulator into the other smoothly without closing the band gap. In addition, we further prove that this adiabatic path preserves all the symmetries of the insulators. The existence of such an adiabatic path implies that two insulators with nonzero wave-function overlap belong to the same topological phase. This relation, between adiabatic continuity and wave-function overlap, can be further generalized to correlated systems. The generalized relation cannot be applied to study generic many-body systems in the thermodynamic limit, because of the orthogonality catastrophe. However, for certain interacting systems (e.g., quantum Hall systems), the quantum wave-function overlap can be utilized to distinguish different quantum states. Experimental implications are also discussed.

  4. Adiabatic condition and the quantum hitting time of Markov chains

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Ozols, Maris; Roland, Jeremie

    2010-08-15

    We present an adiabatic quantum algorithm for the abstract problem of searching marked vertices in a graph, or spatial search. Given a random walk (or Markov chain) P on a graph with a set of unknown marked vertices, one can define a related absorbing walk P{sup '} where outgoing transitions from marked vertices are replaced by self-loops. We build a Hamiltonian H(s) from the interpolated Markov chain P(s)=(1-s)P+sP{sup '} and use it in an adiabatic quantum algorithm to drive an initial superposition over all vertices to a superposition over marked vertices. The adiabatic condition implies that, for any reversible Markov chain and any set of marked vertices, the running time of the adiabatic algorithm is given by the square root of the classical hitting time. This algorithm therefore demonstrates a novel connection between the adiabatic condition and the classical notion of hitting time of a random walk. It also significantly extends the scope of previous quantum algorithms for this problem, which could only obtain a full quadratic speedup for state-transitive reversible Markov chains with a unique marked vertex.

  5. Flapping current sheet motions in magnetotail excited by non-adiabatic ions: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The current sheet is a crucial region of the magnetotail, where energy reserve and release take place. The origin of the up-down motions of the current sheet, referred to as flapping motions, is among the most fundamental issues of magnetotail dynamics. Observational evidences suggest that the flapping motion is a kind of internal excited kink-like waves, but its particular propagating features such as the low phase speeds and the propagating direction from the tail center toward flanks do not match any local generation mechanisms previously established so far. Here we report observations of the current sheet flapping motions induced by non-adiabatic ions in the magnetic field configurations with a finite guiding component, whose population present periodic hemispherical asymmetries. Three type of current sheet flapping event in this paper will be discussed. This current sheet flapping phenomenon implies that the excitation mechanism of the current sheet flapping motions is a self-circulation process between the non-adiabatic ion population and the current sheet equilibrium itself.

  6. The current sheet tiled and non-adiabatic ions effect on the flapping motion in magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, XinHua

    2016-04-01

    The current sheet is a crucial region of the magnetotail, where energy reserve and release take place. The origin of the up-down motions of the current sheet, referred to as flapping motions, is among the most fundamental issues of magnetotail dynamics. Observational evidences suggest that the flapping motion is a kind of internal excited kink-like waves, but its particular propagating features such as the low phase speeds and the propagating direction from the tail center toward flanks do not match any local generation mechanisms previously established so far. Here we report observations of the current sheet flapping motions induced by non-adiabatic ions in the magnetic field configurations with a finite guiding component, whose population present periodic hemispherical asymmetries. These flapping motion current sheet cases often observed tiled. The current sheet flapping phenomenon implies that the excitation mechanism of the current sheet flapping motions is a self-circulation process between the non-adiabatic ion population and the current sheet equilibrium itself.

  7. Crushing runtimes in adiabatic quantum computation with Energy Landscape Manipulation (ELM): Application to Quantum Factoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nike; Tanburn, Richard; Lunt, Oliver

    We introduce two methods for speeding up adiabatic quantum computations by increasing the energy between the ground and first excited states. Our methods are even more general. They can be used to shift a Hamiltonian's density of states away from the ground state, so that fewer states occupy the low-lying energies near the minimum, hence allowing for faster adiabatic passages to find the ground state with less risk of getting caught in an undesired low-lying excited state during the passage. Even more generally, our methods can be used to transform a discrete optimization problem into a new one whose unique minimum still encodes the desired answer, but with the objective function's values forming a different landscape. Aspects of the landscape such as the objective function's range, or the values of certain coefficients, or how many different inputs lead to a given output value, can be decreased *or* increased. One of the many examples for which these methods are useful is in finding the ground state of a Hamiltonian using NMR. We apply our methods to an AQC algorithm for integer factorization, and the first method reduces the maximum runtime in our example by up to 754%, and the second method reduces the maximum runtime of another example by up to 250%.

  8. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    PubMed Central

    Campo, A. del; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential. PMID:22970340

  9. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box.

    PubMed

    del Campo, A; Boshier, M G

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential.

  10. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in a time-dependent box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Campo, A.; Boshier, M. G.

    2012-09-01

    A method is proposed to drive an ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of an ultracold gas trapped in a time-dependent box potential. The resulting state is free from spurious excitations associated with the breakdown of adiabaticity, and preserves the quantum correlations of the initial state up to a scaling factor. The process relies on the existence of an adiabatic invariant and the inversion of the dynamical self-similar scaling law dictated by it. Its physical implementation generally requires the use of an auxiliary expulsive potential. The method is extended to a broad family of interacting many-body systems. As illustrative examples we consider the ultrafast expansion of a Tonks-Girardeau gas and of Bose-Einstein condensates in different dimensions, where the method exhibits an excellent robustness against different regimes of interactions and the features of an experimentally realizable box potential.

  11. Effect of dephasing on stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P.A.; Vitanov, N.V.; Bergmann, K.

    2004-12-01

    This work explores the effect of phase relaxation on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The study is based on the Liouville equation, which is solved analytically in the adiabatic limit. The transfer efficiency of STIRAP is found to decrease exponentially with the dephasing rate; this effect is stronger for shorter pulse delays and weaker for larger delays, since the transition time is found to be inversely proportional to the pulse delay. Moreover, it is found that the transfer efficiency of STIRAP in the presence of dephasing does not depend on the peak Rabi frequencies at all, as long as they are sufficiently large to enforce adiabatic evolution; hence increasing the field intensity cannot reduce the dephasing losses. It is shown also that for any dephasing rate, the final populations of the initial state and the intermediate state are equal. For strong dephasing all three populations tend to (1/3)

  12. Design of a photonic lattice using shortcuts to adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanatos, Dionisis

    2014-08-01

    In this article we use the method of shortcuts to adiabaticity to design a photonic lattice (array of waveguides) which can drive the input light to a controlled location at the output. The output position in the array is determined by functions of the propagation distance along the waveguides, which modulate the lattice characteristics (index of refraction, and first- and second-neighbor couplings). The proposed coupler is expected to possess the robustness properties of the design method, coming from its adiabatic nature, and also to have a smaller footprint than purely adiabatic couplers. The present work provides a very interesting example where methods from quantum control can be exploited to design lattices with desired input-output properties.

  13. Adiabatic Quantum Programming: Minor Embedding With Hard Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Klymko, Christine F; Sullivan, Blair D; Humble, Travis S

    2013-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum programming defines the time-dependent mapping of a quantum algorithm into the hardware or logical fabric. An essential programming step is the embedding of problem-specific information into the logical fabric to define the quantum computational transformation. We present algorithms for embedding arbitrary instances of the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm into a square lattice of specialized unit cells. Our methods are shown to be extensible in fabric growth, linear in time, and quadratic in logical footprint. In addition, we provide methods for accommodating hard faults in the logical fabric without invoking approximations to the original problem. These hard fault-tolerant embedding algorithms are expected to prove useful for benchmarking the adiabatic quantum optimization algorithm on existing quantum logical hardware. We illustrate this versatility through numerical studies of embeddabilty versus hard fault rates in square lattices of complete bipartite unit cells.

  14. Adiabatic Quantum Computation and the Theory of Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, William; Lloyd, Seth

    2007-03-01

    We present a general approach to determining the asymptotic scaling of adiabatic quantum computational resources (space, time, energy, and precision) on random instances of NP-complete graph theory problems. By utilizing the isomorphisms between certain NP-complete graph theory problems and certain frustrated spin models, we demonstrate that the asymptotic scaling of the minimum spectral gap that determines the asymptotic running time of adiabatic algorithms is itself determined by the presence and character of quantum phase transitions in these frustrated models. Most notably, we draw the conclusion that adiabatic quantum computers based on quantum Ising models are much less likely to be efficient than those based on quantum rotor or Heisenberg models. We then exhibit practical rotor and Heisenberg model based architectures using Josephson junction and quantum dot circuits.

  15. Global adiabaticity and non-Gaussianity consistency condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Mooij, Sander; Sasaki, Misao

    2016-10-01

    In the context of single-field inflation, the conservation of the curvature perturbation on comoving slices, Rc, on super-horizon scales is one of the assumptions necessary to derive the consistency condition between the squeezed limit of the bispectrum and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation. However, the conservation of Rc holds only after the perturbation has reached the adiabatic limit where the constant mode of Rc dominates over the other (usually decaying) mode. In this case, the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation defined in the thermodynamic sense, δPnad ≡ δP - cw2 δρ where cw2 = P ˙ / ρ ˙ , usually becomes also negligible on superhorizon scales. Therefore one might think that the adiabatic limit is the same as thermodynamic adiabaticity. This is in fact not true. In other words, thermodynamic adiabaticity is not a sufficient condition for the conservation of Rc on super-horizon scales. In this paper, we consider models that satisfy δPnad = 0 on all scales, which we call global adiabaticity (GA), which is guaranteed if cw2 = cs2, where cs is the phase velocity of the propagation of the perturbation. A known example is the case of ultra-slow-roll (USR) inflation in which cw2 = cs2 = 1. In order to generalize USR we develop a method to find the Lagrangian of GA K-inflation models from the behavior of background quantities as functions of the scale factor. Applying this method we show that there indeed exists a wide class of GA models with cw2 = cs2, which allows Rc to grow on superhorizon scales, and hence violates the non-Gaussianity consistency condition.

  16. Gravitational Chern-Simons and the adiabatic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLellan, Brendan

    2010-12-01

    We compute the gravitational Chern-Simons term explicitly for an adiabatic family of metrics using standard methods in general relativity. We use the fact that our base three-manifold is a quasiregular K-contact manifold heavily in this computation. Our key observation is that this geometric assumption corresponds exactly to a Kaluza-Klein Ansatz for the metric tensor on our three-manifold, which allows us to translate our problem into the language of general relativity. Similar computations have been performed by Guralnik et al. [Ann. Phys. 308, 222 (2008)], although not in the adiabatic context.

  17. Quantum Adiabatic Pumping by Modulating Tunnel Phase in Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kubo, Toshihiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    In a mesoscopic system, under zero bias voltage, a finite charge is transferred by quantum adiabatic pumping by adiabatically and periodically changing two or more control parameters. We obtained expressions for the pumped charge for a ring of three quantum dots (QDs) by choosing the magnetic flux penetrating the ring as one of the control parameters. We found that the pumped charge shows a steplike behavior with respect to the variance of the flux. The value of the step heights is not universal but depends on the trajectory of the control parameters. We discuss the physical origin of this behavior on the basis of the Fano resonant condition of the ring.

  18. Classical nuclear motion coupled to electronic non-adiabatic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Gross, E. K. U.

    2014-12-07

    Based on the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, we have recently proposed a mixed quantum-classical scheme [A. Abedi, F. Agostini, and E. K. U. Gross, Europhys. Lett. 106, 33001 (2014)] to deal with non-adiabatic processes. Here we present a comprehensive description of the formalism, including the full derivation of the equations of motion. Numerical results are presented for a model system for non-adiabatic charge transfer in order to test the performance of the method and to validate the underlying approximations.

  19. Gravitational Chern-Simons and the adiabatic limit

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Brendan

    2010-12-15

    We compute the gravitational Chern-Simons term explicitly for an adiabatic family of metrics using standard methods in general relativity. We use the fact that our base three-manifold is a quasiregular K-contact manifold heavily in this computation. Our key observation is that this geometric assumption corresponds exactly to a Kaluza-Klein Ansatz for the metric tensor on our three-manifold, which allows us to translate our problem into the language of general relativity. Similar computations have been performed by Guralnik et al.[Ann. Phys. 308, 222 (2008)], although not in the adiabatic context.

  20. Adiabatic fluctuations from cosmic strings in a contracting universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Robert H.; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2009-07-01

    We show that adiabatic, super-Hubble, and almost scale invariant density fluctuations are produced by cosmic strings in a contracting universe. An essential point is that isocurvature perturbations produced by topological defects such as cosmic strings on super-Hubble scales lead to a source term which seeds the growth of curvature fluctuations on these scales. Once the symmetry has been restored at high temperatures, the isocurvature seeds disappear, and the fluctuations evolve as adiabatic ones in the expanding phase. Thus, cosmic strings may be resurrected as a mechanism for generating the primordial density fluctuations observed today.

  1. Power-driven and adiabatic expansions into vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, A. V., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for the planar, cylindrical, and spherical expansions into vacuum of matter initially concentrated at a plane, a line, or a point. Both power-driven and adiabatic expansions are considered, where in the power-driven case, the specific power is deposited uniformly in space, but may vary in time according to a power law. These problems are found to be self-similar. The non-self-similar motion of matter during the adiabatic expansion that follows a power pulse of finite duration has also been addressed and a solution has been obtained.

  2. Local control of non-adiabatic dissociation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomble, L.; Chenel, A.; Meier, C.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present a theoretical approach which consists of applying the strategy of local control to projectors based on asymptotic scattering states. This allows to optimize final state distributions upon laser excitation in cases where strong non-adiabatic effects are present. The approach, despite being based on a time-local formulation, can take non-adiabatic transitions that appear at later times fully into account and adopt a corresponding control strategy. As an example, we show various dissociation channels of HeH+, a system where the ultrafast dissociation dynamics is determined by strong non-Born-Oppenheimer effects.

  3. Do multipartite correlations speed up adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Farouk, Ahmed; Abutalib, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum correlations are thought to be the reason why certain quantum algorithms overcome their classical counterparts. Since the nature of this resource is still not fully understood, we shall investigate how multipartite entanglement and non-locality among qubits vary as the quantum computation runs. We shall encounter that quantum measures on the whole system cannot account for their corresponding speedup.

  4. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage for improved performance of a cold-atom electron and ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparkes, B. M.; Murphy, D.; Taylor, R. J.; Speirs, R. W.; McCulloch, A. J.; Scholten, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    We implement high-efficiency coherent excitation to a Rydberg state using stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a cold-atom electron and ion source. We achieve an efficiency of 60% averaged over the laser excitation volume with a peak efficiency of 82%, a 1.6 times improvement relative to incoherent pulsed-laser excitation. Using pulsed electric field ionization of the Rydberg atoms we create electron bunches with durations of 250 ps. High-efficiency excitation will increase source brightness, crucial for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and coherent excitation to high-lying Rydberg states could allow for the reduction of internal bunch heating and the creation of a high-speed single-ion source.

  5. Trace element mass balance in hydrous adiabatic mantle melting: The Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    numerical mass balance calculation model for the adiabatic melting of a dry to hydrous peridotite has been programmed in order to simulate the trace element compositions of basalts from mid-ocean ridges, back-arc basins, ocean islands, and large igneous provinces. The Excel spreadsheet-based calculator, Hydrous Adiabatic Mantle Melting Simulator version 1 (HAMMS1) uses (1) a thermodynamic model of fractional adiabatic melting of mantle peridotite, with (2) the parameterized experimental melting relationships of primitive to depleted mantle sources in terms of pressure, temperature, water content, and degree of partial melting. The trace element composition of the model basalt is calculated from the accumulated incremental melts within the adiabatic melting regime, with consideration for source depletion. The mineralogic mode in the primitive to depleted source mantle in adiabat is calculated using parameterized experimental results. Partition coefficients of the trace elements of mantle minerals are parameterized to melt temperature mostly from a lattice strain model and are tested using the latest compilations of experimental results. The parameters that control the composition of trace elements in the model are as follows: (1) mantle potential temperature, (2) water content in the source mantle, (3) depth of termination of adiabatic melting, and (4) source mantle depletion. HAMMS1 enables us to obtain the above controlling parameters using Monte Carlo fitting calculations and by comparing the calculated basalt compositions to primary basalt compositions. Additionally, HAMMS1 compares melting parameters with a major element model, which uses petrogenetic grids formulated from experimental results, thus providing better constraints on the source conditions.

  6. Using the Sound Card as a Timer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, C. E.; Pereira, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments in mechanics often involve measuring time intervals much smaller than one second, a task that is hard to perform with handheld stopwatches. This is one of the reasons why photogate timers are so popular in school labs. There is an interesting alternative to stopwatches and photogates, easily available if one has access to a personal computer with sound-recording capability. The idea is simple: a computer sound card can record audio frequencies up to several kilohertz, which means it has a time resolution of a fraction of a millisecond, comparable to that of photogate timers. Many experiments in mechanics can be timed by the sound they produce, and in these situations a direct audio recording may provide accurate measurements of the time intervals of interest. This idea has already been explored in a few cases,1-5 and here we apply it to an experiment that our students found very enjoyable: measuring the speed of soccer balls they kicked.

  7. Concerns of the Institute of Transport Study and Research for reducing the sound level inside completely repaired buses. [noise and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groza, A.; Calciu, J.; Nicola, I.; Ionasek, A.

    1974-01-01

    Sound level measurements on noise sources on buses are used to observe the effects of attenuating acoustic pressure levels inside the bus by sound-proofing during complete repair. A spectral analysis of the sound level as a function of motor speed, bus speed along the road, and the category of the road is reported.

  8. Poetry Pages. Sound Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fina, Allan de

    1992-01-01

    Explains how elementary teachers can help students understand onomatopoeia, suggesting that they define onomatopoeia, share examples of it, read poems and have students discuss onomatopoeic words, act out common household sounds, write about sound effects, and create choral readings of onomatopoeic poems. Two appropriate poems are included. (SM)

  9. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Part one of a three-part series about noise pollution and its effects on humans. This section presents the background information for teachers who are preparing a unit on sound. The next issues will offer learning activities for measuring the effects of sound and some references. (SA)

  10. Sounding rocket lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Maybee, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Programmatic, applicatory, developmental, and operational aspects of sounding rocket utilization for materials processing studies are discussed. Lessons learned through the experience of 10 sounding rocket missions are described. Particular attention is given to missions from the SPAR, Consort, and Joust programs. Successful experiments on Consort include the study of polymer membranes and resins, biological processes, demixing of immiscible liquids, and electrodeposition.

  11. Breaking the Sound Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Boehringer, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Students in a fourth-grade class participated in a series of dynamic sound learning centers followed by a dramatic capstone event--an exploration of the amazing Trashcan Whoosh Waves. It's a notoriously difficult subject to teach, but this hands-on, exploratory approach ignited student interest in sound, promoted language acquisition, and built…

  12. The Bosstown Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    Based on the argument that (contrary to critical opinion) the musicians in the various bands associated with Bosstown Sound were indeed talented, cohesive individuals and that the bands' lack of renown was partially a result of ill-treatment by record companies and the press, this paper traces the development of the Bosstown Sound from its…

  13. Does temperature increase or decrease in adiabatic decompression of magma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilinc, A. I.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Khan, T.

    2011-12-01

    We have modeled adiabatic decompression of an andesitic and a basaltic magma as an isentropic process using the Melts algorithm. Our modeling shows that during adiabatic decompression temperature of andesitic magma increases but temperature of basaltic magma decreases. In an isentropic process entropy is constant so change of temperature with pressure can be written as dT/dP=T (dV/dT)/Cp where T (dV/dT)/Cp is generally positive. If delta P is negative so is delta T. In general, in the absence of phase change, we expect the temperature to decrease with adiabatic decompression. The effect of crystallization is to turn a more entropic phase (liquid) into a less entropic phase (solid), which must be compensated by raising the temperature. If during adiabatic decompression there is small amount or no crystallization, T (dV/dT)/Cp effect which lowers the temperature overwhelms the small amount of crystallization, which raises the temperature, and overall system temperature decreases.

  14. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  15. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable. PMID:27279216

  16. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-08

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  17. Failure of geometric electromagnetism in the adiabatic vector Kepler problem

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, J.R.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2004-02-01

    The magnetic moment of a particle orbiting a straight current-carrying wire may precess rapidly enough in the wire's magnetic field to justify an adiabatic approximation, eliminating the rapid time dependence of the magnetic moment and leaving only the particle position as a slow degree of freedom. To zeroth order in the adiabatic expansion, the orbits of the particle in the plane perpendicular to the wire are Keplerian ellipses. Higher-order postadiabatic corrections make the orbits precess, but recent analysis of this 'vector Kepler problem' has shown that the effective Hamiltonian incorporating a postadiabatic scalar potential ('geometric electromagnetism') fails to predict the precession correctly, while a heuristic alternative succeeds. In this paper we resolve the apparent failure of the postadiabatic approximation, by pointing out that the correct second-order analysis produces a third Hamiltonian, in which geometric electromagnetism is supplemented by a tensor potential. The heuristic Hamiltonian of Schmiedmayer and Scrinzi is then shown to be a canonical transformation of the correct adiabatic Hamiltonian, to second order. The transformation has the important advantage of removing a 1/r{sup 3} singularity which is an artifact of the adiabatic approximation.

  18. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  19. Quantum back-reaction from non-adiabatic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, Curtis; Berenstein, David

    2011-04-01

    Motivated by the problem of thermalization in QFTs and the dual non-equilibrium BH dynamics, we examine a generic and non-trivial aspect of these phenomena, non-adiabatic changes, in a highly simplified setting. We consider a harmonic oscillator whose frequency depends on a second quantum variable x. Beginning with a classical analysis, we show how the system can be described by an improved adiabatic expansion with a velocity dependent force for x. We find an instability at a critical velocity beyond which the adiabatic (Born-Oppenheimer) approximation breaks down. We extend this calculation to the fully quantum system and to field theory and describe how to study fermions with similar techniques. Finally, we set up a model with an abrupt change in the oscillator whose quantum mechanics can be solved exactly so that one can study the effects of back-reaction of a fully non-adiabatic change in a controlled setting. We comment on applications of these general results to the physics of D-branes, inflation, and BHs in AdS/CFT.

  20. Adiabatic quantum computing with phase modulated laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of quantum logical gates for multilevel systems is demonstrated through decoherence control under the quantum adiabatic method using simple phase modulated laser pulses. We make use of selective population inversion and Hamiltonian evolution with time to achieve such goals robustly instead of the standard unitary transformation language. PMID:17195865

  1. Adiabatic frequency conversion with a sign flip in the coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. S.; Rangelov, A. A.; Montemezzani, G.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    Adiabatic frequency conversion is a method recently developed in nonlinear optics [H. Suchowski, D. Oron, A. Arie, and Y. Silberberg, Phys. Rev. A 78, 063821 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.78.063821], using ideas from the technique of rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) via a level crossing in quantum physics. In this method, the coupling coefficients are constant and the phase mismatch is chirped adiabatically. In this work, we propose another method for adiabatic frequency conversion, in which the phase mismatch is constant and the coupling is a pulse-shaped function with a sign flip (i.e., a phase step of π ) at its maximum. Compared to the RAP method, our technique has comparable efficiency but it is simpler to implement for it only needs two bulk crystals with opposite χ(2 ) nonlinearity. Moreover, because our technique requires constant nonzero frequency mismatch and has zero conversion efficiency on exact frequency matching, it can be used as a frequency filter.

  2. The flat Grothendieck-Riemann-Roch theorem without adiabatic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Man-Ho

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we give a simplified proof of the flat Grothendieck-Riemann-Roch theorem. The proof makes use of the local family index theorem and basic computations of the Chern-Simons form. In particular, it does not involve any adiabatic limit computation of the reduced eta-invariant.

  3. When an Adiabatic Irreversible Expansion or Compression Becomes Reversible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Ferreira, J. M.; Soares, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concepts of a "reversible process" and "entropy". For this purpose, an adiabatic irreversible expansion or compression is analysed, by considering that an ideal gas is expanded (compressed), from an initial pressure P[subscript i] to a final pressure P[subscript f], by being placed in…

  4. A Kinetic Study of the Adiabatic Polymerization of Acrylamide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, R. A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory, procedures, and results for an experiment which demonstrates the application of basic physics to chemical problems. The experiment involves the adiabatic process, in which polymerization carried out in a vacuum flask is compared to the theoretical prediction of the model with the temperature-time curve obtained in practice. (JN)

  5. Visualization of sound generation: special imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius F.; Skaloud, Daniel C.; Gutzmann, Holger L.; Kutz, Sascha; Rothe, Hendrik

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is dedicated to the Optics and Music session of the Novel Systems Design and Optimization XVI Conference. It is intended as an informative paper for the music enthusiasts. Included are some examples of visualization of sound generation and vibration modes of musically relevant objects and processes - record playback, an electric guitar and a wine glass - using high speed video, borescopic view and cross polarization techniques.

  6. The sound manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Michael J.; Bisnovatyi, Ilia

    2000-11-01

    Computing practice today depends on visual output to drive almost all user interaction. Other senses, such as audition, may be totally neglected, or used tangentially, or used in highly restricted specialized ways. We have excellent audio rendering through D-A conversion, but we lack rich general facilities for modeling and manipulating sound comparable in quality and flexibility to graphics. We need coordinated research in several disciplines to improve the use of sound as an interactive information channel. Incremental and separate improvements in synthesis, analysis, speech processing, audiology, acoustics, music, etc. will not alone produce the radical progress that we seek in sonic practice. We also need to create a new central topic of study in digital audio research. The new topic will assimilate the contributions of different disciplines on a common foundation. The key central concept that we lack is sound as a general-purpose information channel. We must investigate the structure of this information channel, which is driven by the cooperative development of auditory perception and physical sound production. Particular audible encodings, such as speech and music, illuminate sonic information by example, but they are no more sufficient for a characterization than typography is sufficient for characterization of visual information. To develop this new conceptual topic of sonic information structure, we need to integrate insights from a number of different disciplines that deal with sound. In particular, we need to coordinate central and foundational studies of the representational models of sound with specific applications that illuminate the good and bad qualities of these models. Each natural or artificial process that generates informative sound, and each perceptual mechanism that derives information from sound, will teach us something about the right structure to attribute to the sound itself. The new Sound topic will combine the work of computer

  7. Wind Speed Measurement by Paper Anemometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Juhua; Cheng, Zhongqi; Guan, Wenchuan

    2011-01-01

    A simple wind speed measurement device, a paper anemometer, is fabricated based on the theory of standing waves. In providing the working profile of the paper anemometer, an experimental device is established, which consists of an anemometer sensor, a sound sensor, a microphone, paper strips, a paper cup, and sonic acquisition software. It shows…

  8. Sound as artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  9. Properties of sound attenuation around a two-dimensional underwater vehicle with a large cavitation number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng-Cheng; Pan, Guang

    2015-06-01

    Due to the high speed of underwater vehicles, cavitation is generated inevitably along with the sound attenuation when the sound signal traverses through the cavity region around the underwater vehicle. The linear wave propagation is studied to obtain the influence of bubbly liquid on the acoustic wave propagation in the cavity region. The sound attenuation coefficient and the sound speed formula of the bubbly liquid are presented. Based on the sound attenuation coefficients with various vapor volume fractions, the attenuation of sound intensity is calculated under large cavitation number conditions. The result shows that the sound intensity attenuation is fairly small in a certain condition. Consequently, the intensity attenuation can be neglected in engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51279165 and 51479170) and the National Defense Basic Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. B2720133014).

  10. Second Sound in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Po-Hsien

    Second sound in nonmetallic crystals is often described by the relation, tau(theta)q _{t} + q = {-kappa}(theta) theta_{x}, in which q _{t} is the time-derivative of the heat flux q, and theta_{x } is the spatial derivative of the temperature theta. In earlier work, Coleman, Fabrizio, and Owen showed that this relation implies a quadratic dependence of the internal energy density e on the magnitude of q, i.e., e = ~{e }(theta,q) = e_0(theta) + a(theta)q ^2, where 2a(theta) = { -theta}^2 d[ tau( theta)kappa(theta)^{-1} theta^{-2}] /dtheta. The resulting field equations for theta and q are nonlinear in q, and this nonlinearity influences the growth and decay of singularities. Exact expressions are derived here for the time-dependence of jumps in theta_{x} and theta_{t} as they propagate into regions in which there is a steady, but not necessarily zero, flux of heat. Such jumps become infinite in a finite time when they have appropriate signs and their magnitudes exceed critical values. The derived expressions for jumps in theta_{t } and theta_{x} are evaluated using available experimental data for crystals of sodium fluoride (NaF) and bismuth (Bi). Coleman, Fabrizio, and Owen pointed out that the quadratic nonlinearity of e in q implies that the time it takes a singularity to traverse an interval with a underlying steady flux of heat is greater if it is traveling from a hot to a cold region than if it is traveling in the opposite direction. Coleman and Newman's numerical study of the phenomenon is here extended and refined and detailed results are given for NaF and Bi. An analysis is made here of the implications of the dependence of e on q for temporally sinusoidal waves perturbing a steady flux q^0 of heat. It is shown that when q^0 perturbed at the boundary of a crystal by sinusoidal thermal oscillations, the resulting temperature field can show a nonstationary, long wavelength interference pattern that propagates through the crystal in the direction of the

  11. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  12. Pectoral sound generation in the blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus.

    PubMed

    Mohajer, Yasha; Ghahramani, Zachary; Fine, Michael L

    2015-03-01

    Catfishes produce pectoral stridulatory sounds by "jerk" movements that rub ridges on the dorsal process against the cleithrum. We recorded sound synchronized with high-speed video to investigate the hypothesis that blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus produce sounds by a slip-stick mechanism, previously described only in invertebrates. Blue catfish produce a variably paced series of sound pulses during abduction sweeps (pulsers) although some individuals (sliders) form longer duration sound units (slides) interspersed with pulses. Typical pulser sounds are evoked by short 1-2 ms movements with a rotation of 2°-3°. Jerks excite sounds that increase in amplitude after motion stops, suggesting constructive interference, which decays before the next jerk. Longer contact of the ridges produces a more steady-state sound in slides. Pulse pattern during stridulation is determined by pauses without movement: the spine moves during about 14 % of the abduction sweep in pulsers (~45 % in sliders) although movement appears continuous to the human eye. Spine rotation parameters do not predict pulse amplitude, but amplitude correlates with pause duration suggesting that force between the dorsal process and cleithrum increases with longer pauses. Sound production, stimulated by a series of rapid movements that set the pectoral girdle into resonance, is caused by a slip-stick mechanism.

  13. Mapping the Sound Speed Structure of the Sun's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciani, A.; Jefferies, S. M.; Finsterle, W.; Giebink, C.; Knox, A.; Rapex, P.; Subrizi, B.; Cesario, L.

    We describe an instrument for seismically probing the acoustic properties of the Sun's lower atmosphere. The instrument, which is based on magneto-optical filter technology, acquires full-disk Dopplergrams simultaneously in the K D1 (770 nm) and Na D2 (589 nm) Fraunhofer lines. The Dopplergrams have a spatial resolution of ~5 arc secs and are recorded at a cadence of one frame every 10 seconds, average from 16 frames per second. These data allow us to use acoustic waves with frequencies beyond the cut-off frequency for the solar atmosphere (~5mHz) to map the spatial and temporal changes in the vertical wave travel time between the mid-chromosphere and the low-photosphere. These types of maps will provide a strong constraint for models of the solar atmosphere and possibly study early warnings for explosive phenomena. We present some preliminary results from observations made at the geographical South Pole during the 2002/2003 Austral summer. We also discuss our program for the next campaign with instrumental improvements as far as a third level Dopplergram and magnetographic capability. We also consider cloning the instrument for Dome C in order to further minimize atmospheric noise and gaps in the data string due to bad weather.

  14. Time-of-Flight Measurement of Sound Speed in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a set of simple experiments with a very low cost using a notebook as a measuring instrument without external hardware. The major purpose is to provide demonstration experiments for schools with very low budgets. (Contains 6 figures.)

  15. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  16. Sound Visualization and Holography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Winston E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes liquid surface holograms including their application to medicine. Discusses interference and diffraction phenomena using sound wave scanning techniques. Compares focussing by zone plate to holographic image development. (GH)

  17. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    The second part of a three-part series, this article describes sound measurement, effects, and indoor learning activities. Thirty elementary school activities are described with appropriate grade levels specified. (Author/CS)

  18. Sound velocity in shock compressed molybdenum obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukinov, T.; Simak, S. I.; Belonoshko, A. B.

    2015-08-01

    The sound velocity of Mo along the Hugoniot adiabat is calculated from first principles using density-functional theory based molecular dynamics. These data are compared to the sound velocity as measured in recent experiments. The theoretical and experimental Hugoniot and sound velocities are in very good agreement up to pressures of 210 GPa and temperatures of 3700 K on the Hugoniot. However, above that point the experiment and theory diverge. This implies that Mo undergoes a phase transition at about the same point. Considering that the melting point of Mo is likely much higher at that pressure, the related change in the sound velocity in experiment can be ascribed to a solid-solid transition.

  19. Sound velocity in shock compressed molybdenum obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukinov, Tymofiy; Belonoshko, Anatoly; Simak, Sergey

    The sound velocity of Mo along the Hugoniot adiabat is calculated from first principles using density-functional theory based molecular dynamics. These data are compared to the sound velocity as measured in recent experiments. The theoretical and experimental Hugoniot and sound velocities are in very good agreement up to pressures of 210 GPa and temperatures of 3700 K on the Hugoniot. However, above that point the experiment and theory diverge. This implies that Mo undergoes a phase transition at about the same point. Considering that the melting point of Mo is likely much higher at that pressure, the related change in the sound velocity in experiment can be ascribed to a solid-solid transition.

  20. The Sounds of Sentences: Differentiating the Influence of Physical Sound, Sound Imagery, and Linguistically Implied Sounds on Physical Sound Processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Mackenzie, Ian Grant; Strozyk, Jessica; Kaup, Barbara; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Both the imagery literature and grounded models of language comprehension emphasize the tight coupling of high-level cognitive processes, such as forming a mental image of something or language understanding, and low-level sensorimotor processes in the brain. In an electrophysiological study, imagery and language processes were directly compared and the sensory associations of processing linguistically implied sounds or imagined sounds were investigated. Participants read sentences describing auditory events (e.g., "The dog barks"), heard a physical (environmental) sound, or had to imagine such a sound. We examined the influence of the 3 sound conditions (linguistic, physical, imagery) on subsequent physical sound processing. Event-related potential (ERP) difference waveforms indicated that in all 3 conditions, prime compatibility influenced physical sound processing. The earliest compatibility effect was observed in the physical condition, starting in the 80-110 ms time interval with a negative maximum over occipital electrode sites. In contrast, the linguistic and the imagery condition elicited compatibility effects starting in the 180-220 ms time window with a maximum over central electrode sites. In line with the ERPs, the analysis of the oscillatory activity showed that compatibility influenced early theta and alpha band power changes in the physical, but not in the linguistic and imagery, condition. These dissociations were further confirmed by dipole localization results showing a clear separation between the source of the compatibility effect in the physical sound condition (superior temporal area) and the source of the compatibility effect triggered by the linguistically implied sounds or the imagined sounds (inferior temporal area). Implications for grounded models of language understanding are discussed. PMID:27473463