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Sample records for adifor automatic differentiation

  1. ADIFOR: Automatic differentiation in a source translator environment. ADIFOR Working Note No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A.; Carle, A.

    1992-07-01

    The numerical methods employed in the solution of many scientific computing problems require the computation of derivatives of a function f: R{sup n} {yields} R{sup m}. ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORtran) is a source transformation tool that accepts Fortran 77 code for the computation of a function and writes portable Fortran 77 code for the computation of the derivatives. In contrast to previous approaches, ADIFOR views automatic differentiation as a source transformation problem and employs the data analysis capabilities of the ParaScope Fortran programming environment. Experimental results show that ADIFOR can handle real- life codes and that ADIFOR-generated codes are competitive with divided-difference approximations of derivatives. In addition, studies suggest that the source-transformation approach to automatic differentation may improve the time required to compute derivatives by orders of magnitude.

  2. ADIFOR: Automatic differentiation in a source translator environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A. ); Carle, A. . Center for Research on Parallel Computation)

    1992-01-01

    The numerical methods employed in the solution of many scientific computing problems require the computation of derivatives of a function f: R{sup n} {yields} R{sup m}. ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORtran) is a source transformation tool that accepts Fortran 77 code for the computation of a function and writes portable Fortran 77 code for the computation of the derivatives. In contrast to previous approaches, ADIFOR views automatic differentiation as a source transformation problem and employs the data analysis capabilities of the ParaScope Fortran programming environment. Experimental results show that ADIFOR can handle real- life codes and that ADIFOR-generated codes are competitive with divided-difference approximations of derivatives. In addition, studies suggest that the source-transformation approach to automatic differentation may improve the time required to compute derivatives by orders of magnitude.

  3. ADIFOR: Fortran source translation for efficient derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A.; Hovland, P. ); Carle, A. . Center for Research on Parallel Computation)

    1992-01-01

    The numerical methods employed in the solution of many scientific computing problems require the computation of derivatives of a function f: R{sup n} {yields} R{sup m}. Both the accuracy and the computational requirements of the derivative computation are usually of critical importance for the robustness and speed of the numerical method. ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation In FORtran) is a source translation tool implemented using the data abstractions and program analysis capabilities of the ParaScope Parallel Programming Environment. ADIFOR accepts arbitrary Fortran-77 code defining the computation of a function and writes portable Fortran-77 code for the computation of its derivatives. In contrast to previous approaches, ADIFOR views automatic differentiation as a process of source translation that exploits computational context to reduce the cost of derivative computations. Experimental results show that ADIFOR can handle real-life codes, providing exact derivatives with a running time that is competitive with the standard divided-difference approximations of derivatives and which may perform orders of magnitude faster than divided-differences in cases. The computational scientist using ADIFOR is freed from worrying about the accurate and efficient computation of derivatives, even for complicated functions,'' and hence, is able to concentrate on the more important issues of algorithm design or system modeling. 35 refs.

  4. Automatic differentiation: Obtaining fast and reliable derivatives -- fast

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Khademi, P.M.; Pusch, G.; Carle, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, the authors introduce automatic differentiation as a method for computing derivatives of large computer codes. After a brief discussion of methods of differentiating codes, they review automatic differentiation and introduce the ADIFOR (Automatic DIfferentiation of FORtran) tool. They highlight some applications of ADIFOR to large industrial and scientific codes (groundwater transport, CFD airfoil design, and sensitivity-enhanced MM5 mesoscale weather model), and discuss the effectiveness and performance of their approach. Finally, they discuss sparsity in automatic differentiation and introduce the SparsLinC library.

  5. Some User's Insights Into ADIFOR 2.0D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giesy, Daniel P.

    2002-01-01

    Some insights are given which were gained by one user through experience with the use of the ADIFOR 2.0D software for automatic differentiation of Fortran code. These insights are generally in the area of the user interface with the generated derivative code - particularly the actual form of the interface and the use of derivative objects, including "seed" matrices. Some remarks are given as to how to iterate application of ADIFOR in order to generate second derivative code.

  6. ADIFOR: Fortran source translation for efficient derivatives. ADIFOR Working Note No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A.; Hovland, P.; Carle, A.

    1992-07-01

    The numerical methods employed in the solution of many scientific computing problems require the computation of derivatives of a function f: R{sup n} {yields} R{sup m}. Both the accuracy and the computational requirements of the derivative computation are usually of critical importance for the robustness and speed of the numerical method. ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation In FORtran) is a source translation tool implemented using the data abstractions and program analysis capabilities of the ParaScope Parallel Programming Environment. ADIFOR accepts arbitrary Fortran-77 code defining the computation of a function and writes portable Fortran-77 code for the computation of its derivatives. In contrast to previous approaches, ADIFOR views automatic differentiation as a process of source translation that exploits computational context to reduce the cost of derivative computations. Experimental results show that ADIFOR can handle real-life codes, providing exact derivatives with a running time that is competitive with the standard divided-difference approximations of derivatives and which may perform orders of magnitude faster than divided-differences in cases. The computational scientist using ADIFOR is freed from worrying about the accurate and efficient computation of derivatives, even for complicated ``functions,`` and hence, is able to concentrate on the more important issues of algorithm design or system modeling. 35 refs.

  7. AUTOMATIC DIFFERENTIATION OF AN EULERIAN HYDROCODE

    SciTech Connect

    R. HENNINGER; A. CARLE; P. MAUDLIN

    2000-11-01

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is applied to a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamics computer code (hydrocode) to provide gradients that will be used for design optimization and uncertainty analysis. We examine AD in both the forward and adjoint (reverse) mode using Automatic Differentiation of Fortran (ADIFOR, version 3.0). Setup time, accuracy, and run times are described for three problems. The test set consists of a one-dimensional shock-propagation problem, a two-dimensional metal-jet-formation problem and a two-dimensional shell-collapse problem. Setup time for ADIFOR was approximately one month starting from a simplified, fixed-dimension version of the original code. ADIFOR produced accurate (as compared to finite difference) gradients in both modes for all of the problems. These test problems had 17 independent variables. We find that the forward mode is up to 39% slower and the adjoint mode is at least 11% faster than finding the gradient by means of finite differences. Problems of real interest will certainly have more independent variables. The adjoint mode is thus favored since the computational time increases only slightly for additional independent variables.

  8. HYDROCODE SENSITIVITIES BY MEANS OF AUTOMATIC DIFFERENTIATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. HENNINGER; A. CARLE; P. MAUDLIN

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to provide sensitivities of results from an Eulerian hydrodynamics computer code (hydrocode) for use in design-optimization and uncertainty analyses. We began by applying an equation-based sensitivity technique used successfully in the early eighties that was applied to reactor-safety thermal-hydraulics problems, which is called Differential Sensitivity Theory (DST). The methodology is as follows: the system of partial differential equations (the forward or physical PDEs) is assembled, and differentiated with respect to the model parameters of interest; the adjoint equations are then determined using the inner-product rules of Hilbert spaces; and finally, the resulting adjoint PDEs are solved using straightforward numerical operators. The forward-variable solutions when needed for the adjoint solutions are provided by the original computer code that solves the physical (or forward) problem. In the present hydrocode application, acceptable results were obtained for one-material, one-dimensional problems. The DST results were then improved by means of ''compatible'' finite difference operators. We have seen, however, that DST techniques do not produce accurate values for sensitivities to all of the parameters of interest and for problems with discontinuities such as a multi-material problem. To obtain accurate sensitivities for arbitrary numerical resolution a more code-based approach was then tried. We attempted to apply automatic differentiation (AD) in the forward mode using Automatic Differentiation of Fortran (ADIFOR, version 2.0) and the Tangent-linear and Adjoint Model Compiler (TAMC) in the forward and adjoint modes. We were successful for one-dimensional problems in both modes but failed to obtain accurate sensitivities in the adjoint mode for two-dimensional problem. Here we present the successful results for two-dimensional problems in both the forward and adjoint modes using ADIFOR, version 3.0. In what follows, we

  9. Application of automatic differentiation to groundwater transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Ross, A.A.; Whiffen, G.J.; Shoemaker, C.A.; Carle, A.

    1994-06-01

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is a technique for generating efficient and reliable derivative codes from computer programs with a minimum of human effort. Derivatives of model output with respect to input are obtained exactly. No intrinsic limits to program length or complexity exist for this procedure. Calculation of derivatives of complex numerical models is required in systems optimization, parameter identification, and systems identification. We report on our experiences with the ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation of Fortran) tool on a two-dimensional groundwater flow and contaminant transport finite-element model, ISOQUAD, and a three-dimensional contaminant transport finite-element model, TLS3D. Derivative values and computational times for the automatic differentiation procedure axe compared with values obtained from the divided differences and handwritten analytic approaches. We found that the derivative codes generated by ADIFOR provided accurate derivatives and ran significantly faster than divided-differences approximations, typically in a tenth of the CPU time required for the imprecise divided-differences method for both codes. We also comment on the impact of automatic differentiation technology with respect to accelerating the transfer of general techniques developed for using water resource computer models, such as optimal design, sensitivity analysis, and inverse modeling problems to field problems.

  10. Automatic differentiation for design sensitivity analysis of structural systems using multiple processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Storaasli, Olaf O.; Qin, Jiangning; Qamar, Ramzi

    1994-01-01

    An automatic differentiation tool (ADIFOR) is incorporated into a finite element based structural analysis program for shape and non-shape design sensitivity analysis of structural systems. The entire analysis and sensitivity procedures are parallelized and vectorized for high performance computation. Small scale examples to verify the accuracy of the proposed program and a medium scale example to demonstrate the parallel vector performance on multiple CRAY C90 processors are included.

  11. Automatic differentiation bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Corliss, G.F.

    1992-07-01

    This is a bibliography of work related to automatic differentiation. Automatic differentiation is a technique for the fast, accurate propagation of derivative values using the chain rule. It is neither symbolic nor numeric. Automatic differentiation is a fundamental tool for scientific computation, with applications in optimization, nonlinear equations, nonlinear least squares approximation, stiff ordinary differential equation, partial differential equations, continuation methods, and sensitivity analysis. This report is an updated version of the bibliography which originally appeared in Automatic Differentiation of Algorithms: Theory, Implementation, and Application.

  12. First- and Second-Order Sensitivity Analysis of a P-Version Finite Element Equation Via Automatic Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Gene

    1998-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a technique for determining derivatives of system responses with respect to design parameters. Among many methods available for sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation has been proven through many applications in fluid dynamics and structural mechanics to be an accurate and easy method for obtaining derivatives. Nevertheless, the method can be computational expensive and can require a high memory space. This project will apply an automatic differentiation tool, ADIFOR, to a p-version finite element code to obtain first- and second- order then-nal derivatives, respectively. The focus of the study is on the implementation process and the performance of the ADIFOR-enhanced codes for sensitivity analysis in terms of memory requirement, computational efficiency, and accuracy.

  13. A collection of tools in support of automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mauer, A.

    1994-02-01

    This document contains a collection of notes about tools that we have found useful in our work on automatic differentiation. Using m4 for Procedure Renaming. Most transformations necessary to link C and Fortran programs involve changing the case of the C prodecure names and some other trivial manipulations. We automate this procedure. On Linking ADOL-C and Fortran Programs. This portion of the document serves a dual purpose. It is a guide to getting started with ADOL-C, and it also describes methods of linking ADOL-C and Fortran programs together. A Quick Discussion of the fortran-manipulate{center_dot}pl Package. We provide two low-level perl functions that aid in coping with the fact that Fortran ``logical`` tines may include an initial line and many continuation lines. Fortran Text Manipulation with per1. We describe a very powerful perl template that may be easily customized to perform in many common Fortran manipulations, such as expansion of various templates in the code. A Simple Wrapper for ADIFOR. Some simple transformations of the ADIFOR script and composition files allow much more intuitive syntax.

  14. Automatic Differentiation Package

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David M.; Phipps, Eric; Bratlett, Roscoe

    2007-03-01

    Sacado is an automatic differentiation package for C++ codes using operator overloading and C++ templating. Sacado provide forward, reverse, and Taylor polynomial automatic differentiation classes and utilities for incorporating these classes into C++ codes. Users can compute derivatives of computations arising in engineering and scientific applications, including nonlinear equation solving, time integration, sensitivity analysis, stability analysis, optimization and uncertainity quantification.

  15. Using ADIFOR and ADIC to provide Jacobians for the SNES component of PETSc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Po-Ting; Bischof, C.H.; Hovland, P.D.

    1997-11-01

    The solution of large-scale nonlinear problems is important to many areas of computational science. The SNES component of PETSc provides a robust and flexible suite of numerical routines for the solving such problems. These routines generally utilize the Jacobian matrix. We present a strategy for using ADIFOR or ADIC to assist in the development of a subroutine for computing this matrix. We illustrate this strategy using one of the PETSc example programs and four different approaches to computing the Jacobian via automatic differentiation.

  16. Automatic differentiation as a tool for sensitivity analysis of a convective storm in a 3-D cloud model

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.K.; Droegemeier, K.K.; Bischof, C.H.

    1996-10-01

    The ADIFOR automatic differentiation tool is applied to a 3-D storm-scale meteorological model to generate a sensitivity-enhanced code capable of providing derivatives of all model output variables and related diagnostic (derived) parameters as a function of specified control parameters. The tangent linear approximation, applied to a deep convective storm by the first of its kind using a full-physics compressible model, is valid up to 50 min for a 1% water vapor perturbations. The result is very encouraging considering the highly nonlinear and discontinuous properties of solutions. The ADIFOR-generated code has provided valuable sensitivity information on storm dynamics. Especially, it is very efficient and useful for investigating how a perturbation inserted at earlier time propagates through the model variables at later times. However, it is computationally very expensive to be applied to the variational data assimilation, especially for 3-D meteorological models, which potentially have a large number of input variables.

  17. Automatic differentiation of advanced CFD codes for multidisciplinary design

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A.; Green, L.; Haigler, K.; Newman, P.

    1992-12-31

    Automated multidisciplinary design of aircraft and other flight vehicles requires the optimization of complex performance objectives with respect to a number of design parameters and constraints. The effect of these independent design variables on the system performance criteria can be quantified in terms of sensitivity derivatives which must be calculated and propagated by the individual discipline simulation codes. Typical advanced CFD analysis codes do not provide such derivatives as part of a flow solution; these derivatives are very expensive to obtain by divided (finite) differences from perturbed solutions. It is shown here that sensitivity derivatives can be obtained accurately and efficiently using the ADIFOR source translator for automatic differentiation. In particular, it is demonstrated that the 3-D, thin-layer Navier-Stokes, multigrid flow solver called TLNS3D is amenable to automatic differentiation in the forward mode even with its implicit iterative solution algorithm and complex turbulence modeling. It is significant that using computational differentiation, consistent discrete nongeometric sensitivity derivatives have been obtained from an aerodynamic 3-D CFD code in a relatively short time, e.g. O(man-week) not O(man-year).

  18. Automatic differentiation of advanced CFD codes for multidisciplinary design

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Corliss, G.; Griewank, A. ); Green, L.; Haigler, K.; Newman, P. . Langley Research Center)

    1992-01-01

    Automated multidisciplinary design of aircraft and other flight vehicles requires the optimization of complex performance objectives with respect to a number of design parameters and constraints. The effect of these independent design variables on the system performance criteria can be quantified in terms of sensitivity derivatives which must be calculated and propagated by the individual discipline simulation codes. Typical advanced CFD analysis codes do not provide such derivatives as part of a flow solution; these derivatives are very expensive to obtain by divided (finite) differences from perturbed solutions. It is shown here that sensitivity derivatives can be obtained accurately and efficiently using the ADIFOR source translator for automatic differentiation. In particular, it is demonstrated that the 3-D, thin-layer Navier-Stokes, multigrid flow solver called TLNS3D is amenable to automatic differentiation in the forward mode even with its implicit iterative solution algorithm and complex turbulence modeling. It is significant that using computational differentiation, consistent discrete nongeometric sensitivity derivatives have been obtained from an aerodynamic 3-D CFD code in a relatively short time, e.g. O(man-week) not O(man-year).

  19. Parallel Calculation of Sensitivity Derivatives for Aircraft Design using Automatic Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischof, c. H.; Green, L. L.; Haigler, K. J.; Knauff, T. L., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity derivative (SD) calculation via automatic differentiation (AD) typical of that required for the aerodynamic design of a transport-type aircraft is considered. Two ways of computing SD via code generated by the ADIFOR automatic differentiation tool are compared for efficiency and applicability to problems involving large numbers of design variables. A vector implementation on a Cray Y-MP computer is compared with a coarse-grained parallel implementation on an IBM SP1 computer, employing a Fortran M wrapper. The SD are computed for a swept transport wing in turbulent, transonic flow; the number of geometric design variables varies from 1 to 60 with coupling between a wing grid generation program and a state-of-the-art, 3-D computational fluid dynamics program, both augmented for derivative computation via AD. For a small number of design variables, the Cray Y-MP implementation is much faster. As the number of design variables grows, however, the IBM SP1 becomes an attractive alternative in terms of compute speed, job turnaround time, and total memory available for solutions with large numbers of design variables. The coarse-grained parallel implementation also can be moved easily to a network of workstations.

  20. ADIFOR working note. number sign. 2: Using ADIFOR to compute dense and sparse Jacobians

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Hovland, P.

    1992-01-01

    ADIFOR is a source translator that, given a collection of Fortran subroutines for the computation of a function,'' produces Fortran code for the computation of the derivatives of this function. More specifically, ADIFOR produces code to compute the matrix-matrix product JS, where J is the Jacobian of the function'' with respect to the user-defined independent variables, and S is the composition of the derivative objects corresponding to the independent variables. This interface is flexible; by setting S = x, one can compute the matrix-vector product Jx, or by setting S = I, one can compute the whole Jacobian J. Other initializations of S allow one to exploit a known sparsity structure of J. This paper illustrates the proper initialization of ADIFOR-generated derivative codes and the exploitation of a known structure of J.

  1. ADIFOR working note {number_sign}2: Using ADIFOR to compute dense and sparse Jacobians

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Hovland, P.

    1992-01-01

    ADIFOR is a source translator that, given a collection of Fortran subroutines for the computation of a ``function,`` produces Fortran code for the computation of the derivatives of this function. More specifically, ADIFOR produces code to compute the matrix-matrix product JS, where J is the Jacobian of the ``function`` with respect to the user-defined independent variables, and S is the composition of the derivative objects corresponding to the independent variables. This interface is flexible; by setting S = x, one can compute the matrix-vector product Jx, or by setting S = I, one can compute the whole Jacobian J. Other initializations of S allow one to exploit a known sparsity structure of J. This paper illustrates the proper initialization of ADIFOR-generated derivative codes and the exploitation of a known structure of J.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of a mixed-phase chemical mechanism using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R.C.

    1998-08-01

    A sensitivity analysis of a comprehensive mixed-phase chemical mechanism is conducted under a variety of atmospheric conditions. The local sensitivities of gas and aqueous phase species concentrations with respect to a variety of model parameters are calculated using the novel automatic differentiation ADIFOR tool. The main chemical reaction pathways in all phases, interfacial mass transfer processes, and ambient physical parameters that affect tropospheric O{sub 3} formation and O{sub 3}-precursor relations under all modeled conditions are identified and analyzed. The results show that the presence of clouds not only reduces many gas phase species concentrations and the total oxidizing capacity but alters O{sub 3}-precursor relations. Decreases in gas phase concentrations and photochemical formation rates of O{sub 3} can be up to 9{percent} and 100{percent}, respectively, depending on the preexisting atmospheric conditions. The decrease in O{sub 3} formation is primarily caused by the aqueous phase reactions of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} with dissolved HO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} under most cloudy conditions. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Photochemical Indicators for O3 Chemistry Using Automatic Differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Bischof, Christian H.; Easter, Richard C.; Wu, Po-Ting

    2005-05-01

    Photochemical indicators for determination of O{sub 3}-NO{sub x}-ROG sensitivity and their sensitivity to model parameters are studied for a variety of polluted conditions using a comprehensive mixed-phase chemistry box model and the novel automatic differentiation ADIFOR tool. The main chemical reaction pathways in all phases, interfacial mass transfer processes, and ambient physical parameters that affect the indicators are identified and analyzed. Condensed mixed-phase chemical mechanisms are derived from the sensitivity analysis. Our results show that cloud chemistry has a significant impact on the indicators and their sensitivities, particularly on those involving H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, HCHO, and NO{sub z}. Caution should be taken when applying the established threshold values of indicators in regions with large cloud coverage. Among the commonly used indicators, NO{sub y} and O{sub 3}/NO{sub y} are relatively insensitive to most model parameters, whereas indicators involving H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, HCHO, and NO{sub z} are highly sensitive to changes in initial species concentrations, reaction rate constants, equilibrium constants, temperature, relative humidity, cloud droplet size, and cloud water content.

  4. Automatic differentiation and Navier-Stokes.

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Hovland, P.; Mohammadi, B.

    1997-12-17

    We describe the use of automatic differentiation (AD) to enhance a compressible Navier-Stokes model. With the solver, AD is used to accelerate convergence by more than an order of magnitude. Outside the solver, AD is used to compute the derivatives needed for optimization. We emphasize the potential for performance gains if the programmer does not treat AD as a black box, but instead utilizes high-level knowledge about the nature of the application.

  5. A taxonomy of automatic differentiation tools

    SciTech Connect

    Juedes, D.W. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    Many of the current automatic differentiation (AD) tools have similar characteristics. Unfortunately, the similarities between these various AD tools often cannot be easily ascertained by reading the corresponding documentation. To clarify this situation, a taxonomy of AD tools is presented. The taxonomy places AD tools into the Elemental, Extensional, Integral, Operational, and Symbolic classes. This taxonomy is used to classify twenty-nine AD tools. Each tool is examined individually with respect to the mode of differentiation used and the degree of derivatives computed. A list detailing the availability of the surveyed AD tools is provided in the Appendix. 54 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Demonstration of Automatically-Generated Adjoint Code for Use in Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence; Carle, Alan; Fagan, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Gradient-based optimization requires accurate derivatives of the objective function and constraints. These gradients may have previously been obtained by manual differentiation of analysis codes, symbolic manipulators, finite-difference approximations, or existing automatic differentiation (AD) tools such as ADIFOR (Automatic Differentiation in FORTRAN). Each of these methods has certain deficiencies, particularly when applied to complex, coupled analyses with many design variables. Recently, a new AD tool called ADJIFOR (Automatic Adjoint Generation in FORTRAN), based upon ADIFOR, was developed and demonstrated. Whereas ADIFOR implements forward-mode (direct) differentiation throughout an analysis program to obtain exact derivatives via the chain rule of calculus, ADJIFOR implements the reverse-mode counterpart of the chain rule to obtain exact adjoint form derivatives from FORTRAN code. Automatically-generated adjoint versions of the widely-used CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an algebraic wing grid generation code were obtained with just a few hours processing time using the ADJIFOR tool. The codes were verified for accuracy and were shown to compute the exact gradient of the wing lift-to-drag ratio, with respect to any number of shape parameters, in about the time required for 7 to 20 function evaluations. The codes have now been executed on various computers with typical memory and disk space for problems with up to 129 x 65 x 33 grid points, and for hundreds to thousands of independent variables. These adjoint codes are now used in a gradient-based aerodynamic shape optimization problem for a swept, tapered wing. For each design iteration, the optimization package constructs an approximate, linear optimization problem, based upon the current objective function, constraints, and gradient values. The optimizer subroutines are called within a design loop employing the approximate linear problem until an optimum shape is found, the design loop

  7. Computing derivatives of a gravity potential by using automatic differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Alberto; Lacruz, Elvis

    2013-10-01

    A new method, based on automatic differentiation technique, has been proposed in this paper to compute the derivatives of the gravity potential. Using this method we can obtain derivatives up to any order. Instead of explicit expressions of the derivatives we use an iterative scheme to simultaneously compute the value of all the desired derivatives. The algorithm here presented can be easily parallelized by using OpenMP with the consequent improvement in CPU-time efficiency.

  8. Clad — Automatic Differentiation Using Clang and LLVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilev, V.; Vassilev, M.; Penev, A.; Moneta, L.; Ilieva, V.

    2015-05-01

    Differentiation is ubiquitous in high energy physics, for instance in minimization algorithms and statistical analysis, in detector alignment and calibration, and in theory. Automatic differentiation (AD) avoids well-known limitations in round-offs and speed, which symbolic and numerical differentiation suffer from, by transforming the source code of functions. We will present how AD can be used to compute the gradient of multi-variate functions and functor objects. We will explain approaches to implement an AD tool. We will show how LLVM, Clang and Cling (ROOT's C++11 interpreter) simplifies creation of such a tool. We describe how the tool could be integrated within any framework. We will demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept prototype, called Clad, which is able to generate n-th order derivatives of C++ functions and other language constructs. We also demonstrate how Clad can offload laborious computations from the CPU using OpenCL.

  9. Optimum Shape Design Using Automatic Differentiation in Reverse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.; Mohammadi, B.; Pironneau, O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper shows how to use automatic differentiation in reverse mode as a powerful tool in optimization procedures. It is also shown that for aerodynamic applications the gradients have to be as accurate as possible. In particular, the effect of having the exact gradient of he first or second order spatial discretization schemes is presented. We show that the loss of precision in the gradient affects not only the convergence, but also the final shape. Both two and three dimensional configurations of transonic and supersonic flows have been investigated. These cases involve up to several thousand control parameters.

  10. Optimized higher-order automatic differentiation for the Faddeeva function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Considerable research efforts have been directed at implementing the Faddeeva function w(z) and its derivatives with respect to z, but these did not consider the key computing issue of a possible dependence of z on some variable t. The general case is to differentiate the compound function w(z(t)) = w ∘ z(t) with respect to t by applying the chain rule for a first order derivative, or Faà di Bruno's formula for higher-order ones. Higher-order automatic differentiation (HOAD) is an efficient and accurate technique for derivative calculation along scientific computing codes. Although codes are available for w(z) , a special symbolic HOAD is required to compute accurate higher-order derivatives for w ∘ z(t) in an efficient manner. A thorough evaluation is carried out considering a nontrivial case study in optics to support this assertion.

  11. Automatic differentiation for Fourier series and the radii polynomial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Mireles James, J. D.; Ransford, Julian

    2016-11-01

    In this work we develop a computer-assisted technique for proving existence of periodic solutions of nonlinear differential equations with non-polynomial nonlinearities. We exploit ideas from the theory of automatic differentiation in order to formulate an augmented polynomial system. We compute a numerical Fourier expansion of the periodic orbit for the augmented system, and prove the existence of a true solution nearby using an a-posteriori validation scheme (the radii polynomial approach). The problems considered here are given in terms of locally analytic vector fields (i.e. the field is analytic in a neighborhood of the periodic orbit) hence the computer-assisted proofs are formulated in a Banach space of sequences satisfying a geometric decay condition. In order to illustrate the use and utility of these ideas we implement a number of computer-assisted existence proofs for periodic orbits of the Planar Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem (PCRTBP).

  12. Automatic differentiation as a tool in engineering design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Hall, Laura E.

    1992-01-01

    Automatic Differentiation (AD) is a tool that systematically implements the chain rule of differentiation to obtain the derivatives of functions calculated by computer programs. AD is assessed as a tool for engineering design. The forward and reverse modes of AD, their computing requirements, as well as approaches to implementing AD are discussed. The application of two different tools to two medium-size structural analysis problems to generate sensitivity information typically necessary in an optimization or design situation is also discussed. The observation is made that AD is to be preferred to finite differencing in most cases, as long as sufficient computer storage is available; in some instances, AD may be the alternative to consider in lieu of analytical sensitivity analysis.

  13. Automatic differentiation of codes in nuclear engineering applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexe, M.; Roderick, O.; Utke, J.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland, P.; Fanning, T.; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.; Unv. of Chicago

    2009-12-01

    We discuss our experience in applying automatic differentiation (AD) to calculations in nuclear reactor applications. The document is intended as a guideline on how to apply AD to Fortran codes with significant legacy components; it is also a part of a larger research effort in uncertainty quantification using sampling methods augmented with derivative information. We provide a brief theoretical description of the concept of AD, explain the necessary changes in the code structure, and remark on possible ways to deal with non-differentiability. Numerical experiments were carried out where the derivative of a functional subset of the SAS4A/SASSYS code was computed in forward mode with several AD tools. The results are in good agreement with both the real and complex finite-difference approximations of the derivative.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of O{sub 3} and photochemical indicators using a mixed-phase chemistry box model and automatic differentiation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R.C.; Bischof, C.H.; Wu, P.T.

    1997-12-31

    A comprehensive sensitivity analysis of a multi-phase atmospheric chemical mechanism is conducted under a variety of atmospheric conditions. The ADIFOR automatic differentiation technology is applied to evaluate the local sensitivities of species concentrations in gas, aqueous and aerosol phases with respect to a variety of model parameters. In this paper, sensitivities of tropospheric ozone and photochemical indicators with respect to species initial concentrations, gas-phase reaction rate constants, and aerosol surface uptake coefficients are presented and analyzed. The main gas-phase reaction pathways and aerosol surface uptake processes that affect tropospheric O{sub 3} formation, O{sub 3}-precursor relations and sensitivity of indicators are identified. The most influential gas-phase reactions include the photolytic reactions of NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HCHO, ALD{sub 2} and MGLY, the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2}, the generation and inter-conversion of OH, HO{sub 2} and RO{sub 2} radicals, and the formation and dissociation of oxidants and acids. Photochemical indicators such as O{sub 3}/NO{sub x} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/HNO{sub 3} are sensitive to changes in reaction rate constants, initial species concentrations, and uptake coefficients. These indicators are found to have higher sensitivities for hydrocarbon reactions and lower sensitivities for NO{sub x} reactions under polluted conditions as compared to less polluted conditions. Aerosol surface uptake is important when the total surface area is larger than 1,000 {micro}m{sup 2} cm{sup {minus}3}. The identified important heterogeneous processes include aerosol surface uptake of HCHO, O{sub 3}, HO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, NO, NO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, PAN, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. These uptake processes can affect not only O{sub 3} formation and its sensitivity, but also O{sub 3}-precursor relations and sensitivities of indicators.

  15. Automatic differentiation of melanoma and clark nevus skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeAnder, R. W.; Kasture, A.; Pandey, A.; Umbaugh, S. E.

    2007-03-01

    Clark nevus. Consequently, grouping melanoma and melanoma in situ together achieves the best results in classifying and automatically differentiating melanoma from Clark nevus lesions.

  16. An automatic detection software for differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Seniha Esen; Dubroca, Thierry; Hummel, Rolf E.; Gader, Paul D.

    2012-06-01

    Recent terrorist attacks have sprung a need for a large scale explosive detector. Our group has developed differential reflection spectroscopy which can detect explosive residue on surfaces such as parcel, cargo and luggage. In short, broad band ultra-violet and visible light is shone onto a material (such as a parcel) moving on a conveyor belt. Upon reflection off the surface, the light intensity is recorded with a spectrograph (spectrometer in combination with a CCD camera). This reflected light intensity is then subtracted and normalized with the next data point collected, resulting in differential reflection spectra in the 200-500 nm range. Explosives show spectral finger-prints at specific wavelengths, for example, the spectrum of 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) shows an absorption edge at 420 nm. Additionally, we have developed an automated software which detects the characteristic features of explosives. One of the biggest challenges for the algorithm is to reach a practical limit of detection. In this study, we introduce our automatic detection software which is a combination of principal component analysis and support vector machines. Finally we present the sensitivity and selectivity response of our algorithm as a function of the amount of explosive detected on a given surface.

  17. High-order space charge effects using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reusch, M.F.; Bruhwiler, D.L. |

    1997-02-01

    The Northrop Grumman Topkark code has been upgraded to Fortran 90, making use of operator overloading, so the same code can be used to either track an array of particles or construct a Taylor map representation of the accelerator lattice. We review beam optics and beam dynamics simulations conducted with TOPKARK in the past and we present a new method for modeling space charge forces to high-order with automatic differentiation. This method generates an accurate, high-order, 6-D Taylor map of the phase space variable trajectories for a bunched, high-current beam. The spatial distribution is modeled as the product of a Taylor Series times a Gaussian. The variables in the argument of the Gaussian are normalized to the respective second moments of the distribution. This form allows for accurate representation of a wide range of realistic distributions, including any asymmetries, and allows for rapid calculation of the space charge fields with free space boundary conditions. An example problem is presented to illustrate our approach. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. High-order space charge effects using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reusch, Michael F.; Bruhwiler, David L.

    1997-02-01

    The Northrop Grumman Topkark code has been upgraded to Fortran 90, making use of operator overloading, so the same code can be used to either track an array of particles or construct a Taylor map representation of the accelerator lattice. We review beam optics and beam dynamics simulations conducted with TOPKARK in the past and we present a new method for modeling space charge forces to high-order with automatic differentiation. This method generates an accurate, high-order, 6-D Taylor map of the phase space variable trajectories for a bunched, high-current beam. The spatial distribution is modeled as the product of a Taylor Series times a Gaussian. The variables in the argument of the Gaussian are normalized to the respective second moments of the distribution. This form allows for accurate representation of a wide range of realistic distributions, including any asymmetries, and allows for rapid calculation of the space charge fields with free space boundary conditions. An example problem is presented to illustrate our approach.

  19. Application of automatic differentiation to trajectory optimization via direct multiple shooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, David Marcelo

    2003-10-01

    Automatic differentiation, also called computational differentiation and algorithmic differentiation, is the process of computing the derivatives or Taylor series of functions from the computer source code implementing the functions. To date, general-purpose trajectory optimization codes have relied on finite-differencing to compute the gradients needed by the nonlinear programming (NLP) algorithms within the codes. These codes typically support the selection of an arbitrary objective and constraint set from a library of a few hundred output variables. The use of automatic differentiation in these trajectory optimization programs can provide objective and constraint gradients to the same precision as the underlying functions without requiring the generation of hundreds of analytic derivative expressions by hand or via symbolic algebra packages. This work combines automatic differentiation with a direct multiple shooting method and uses the resulting method to solve a pair of example problems. The first is the well-known lunar launch problem, while the second is a launch vehicle ascent problem similar in complexity to that which would be computed by a program such as the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) for use in vehicle design studies. Results include comparisons of convergence behavior of the NLP problem and solution accuracy. Tests comparing the use of Euler angles versus quaternion elements as control variables demonstrate the versatility of automatic differentiation. For loose convergence levels automatic differentiation provided faster convergence than finite differencing on the launcher ascent problem. For tight accuracy requirements, automatic differentiation resulted in fewer major iterations on the lunar launch problem.

  20. Efficient derivative codes through automatic differentiation and interface contraction: An application in biostatistics

    SciTech Connect

    Hovland, P.; Bischof, C.; Spiegelman, D.; Casella, M.

    1997-08-01

    Developing code for computing the first- and higher-order derivatives of a function by hand can be very time-consuming and is prone to errors. Automatic differentiation has proven capable of producing derivative codes with very little effort on the part of the user. Automatic differentiation avoids the truncation errors characteristic of divided-difference approximations. However, the derivative code produced by automatic differentiation can be significantly less efficient than one produced by hand. This shortcoming may be overcome by utilizing insight into the high-level structure of a computation. This paper focuses on how to take advantage of the fact that the number of variables passed between subroutines frequently is small compared with the number of the variables with respect to which they wish to differentiate. Such an interface contraction, coupled with the associativity of the chain rule for differentiation, allows them to apply automatic differentiation in a more judicious fashion, resulting in much more efficient code for the computation of derivatives. A case study involving a program for maximizing a logistic-normal likelihood function developed from a problem in nutritional epidemiology is examined, and performance figures are presented. This paper concludes with some directions for future study.

  1. AUTOMATISM.

    PubMed

    MCCALDON, R J

    1964-10-24

    Individuals can carry out complex activity while in a state of impaired consciousness, a condition termed "automatism". Consciousness must be considered from both an organic and a psychological aspect, because impairment of consciousness may occur in both ways. Automatism may be classified as normal (hypnosis), organic (temporal lobe epilepsy), psychogenic (dissociative fugue) or feigned. Often painstaking clinical investigation is necessary to clarify the diagnosis. There is legal precedent for assuming that all crimes must embody both consciousness and will. Jurists are loath to apply this principle without reservation, as this would necessitate acquittal and release of potentially dangerous individuals. However, with the sole exception of the defence of insanity, there is at present no legislation to prohibit release without further investigation of anyone acquitted of a crime on the grounds of "automatism".

  2. First- and second-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives via automatic differentiation with incremental iterative methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.L.; Taylor, A.C. III; Hou, G.W.; Korivi, V.M.

    1996-12-01

    The straightforward automatic-differentiation and the hand-differentiated incremental iterative methods are interwoven to produce a hybrid scheme that captures some of the strengths of each strategy. With this compromise, discrete aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives are calculated with the efficient incremental iterative solution algorithm of the original flow code. Moreover, the principal advantage of automatic differentiation is retained. The basic equations for second-order sensitivity derivatives are presented, which results in a comparison of four different methods. Each of these four schemes for second-order derivatives requires that large systems are solved first for the first-order adjoint variables. Of these latter three schemes, two require no solutions of large systems thereafter. For the other two for which additional systems are solved, the equations and solution procedures are analogous to those for the first-order derivatives. From a practical viewpoint, implementation of the second-order methods is feasible only with software tools such as automatic differentiation, because of the extreme complexity and large number of terms. First- and second-order sensitivities are calculated accurately for two airfoil problems, including a turbulent-flow example. In each of these two sample problems, three dependent variables (coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching-moment) and six independent variables (three geometric-shape and three flow-condition design variables) are considered. Several different procedures are tested, and results are compared on the basis of accuracy, computational time, and computer memory. For first-order derivatives, the hybrid incremental iterative scheme obtained with automatic differentiation is competitive with the best hand-differentiated method. Furthermore, it is at least two to four times faster than central finite differences, without an overwhelming penalty in computer memory. 23 refs., 14 tabs.

  3. Algorithms and design for a second-order automatic differentiation module

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, J.; Bischof, C.; Roh, L.; Carle, A.

    1997-07-01

    This article describes approaches to computing second-order derivatives with automatic differentiation (AD) based on the forward mode and the propagation of univariate Taylor series. Performance results are given that show the speedup possible with these techniques relative to existing approaches. The authors also describe a new source transformation AD module for computing second-order derivatives of C and Fortran codes and the underlying infrastructure used to create a language-independent translation tool.

  4. Automatism

    PubMed Central

    McCaldon, R. J.

    1964-01-01

    Individuals can carry out complex activity while in a state of impaired consciousness, a condition termed “automatism”. Consciousness must be considered from both an organic and a psychological aspect, because impairment of consciousness may occur in both ways. Automatism may be classified as normal (hypnosis), organic (temporal lobe epilepsy), psychogenic (dissociative fugue) or feigned. Often painstaking clinical investigation is necessary to clarify the diagnosis. There is legal precedent for assuming that all crimes must embody both consciousness and will. Jurists are loath to apply this principle without reservation, as this would necessitate acquittal and release of potentially dangerous individuals. However, with the sole exception of the defence of insanity, there is at present no legislation to prohibit release without further investigation of anyone acquitted of a crime on the grounds of “automatism”. PMID:14199824

  5. Carrier-phase differential GPS for automatic control of land vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Michael Lee

    Real-time centimeter-level navigation has countless potential applications in land vehicles, including precise topographic field mapping, runway snowplowing in bad weather, and land mine detection and avoidance. Perhaps the most obvious and immediate need for accurate, robust land vehicle sensing is in the guidance and control of agricultural vehicles. Accurate guidance and automatic control of farm vehicles offers many potential advantages; however, previous attempts to automate these vehicles have been unsuccessful due to sensor limitations. With the recent development of real-time carrier-phase differential GPS (CDGPS), a single inexpensive GPS receiver can measure a vehicle's position to within a few centimeters and orientation to fractions of a degree. This ability to provide accurate real-time measurements of multiple vehicle states makes CDGPS ideal for automatic control of vehicles. This work describes the theoretical and experimental work behind the first successfully demonstrated automatic control system for land vehicles based on CDGPS. An extension of pseudolite-based CDGPS initialization methods was explored for land vehicles and demonstrated experimentally. Original land vehicle dynamic models were developed and identified using this innovative sensor. After initial automatic control testing using a Yamaha Fleetmaster golf cart, a centimeter-level, fully autonomous row guidance capability was demonstrated on a John Deere 7800 farm tractor.

  6. DNAD, a simple tool for automatic differentiation of Fortran codes using dual numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenbin; Blair, Maxwell

    2013-05-01

    DNAD (dual number automatic differentiation) is a simple, general-purpose tool to automatically differentiate Fortran codes written in modern Fortran (F90/ 95/2003) or legacy codes written in previous version of the Fortran language. It implements the forward mode of automatic differentiation using the arithmetic of dual numbers and the operator overloading feature of F90/ 95/2003. Very minimum changes of the source codes are needed to compute the first derivatives of Fortran programs. The advantages of DNAD in comparison to other existing similar computer codes are its programming simplicity, extensibility, and computational efficiency. Specifically, DNAD is more accurate and efficient than the popular complex-step approximation. Several examples are used to demonstrate its applications and advantages. Program summaryProgram title: DNAD Catalogue identifier: AEOS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3922 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 275 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90/95/2003. Computer: All computers with a modern FORTRAN compiler. Operating system: All platforms with a modern FORTRAN compiler. Classification: 4.12, 6.2. Nature of problem: Derivatives of outputs with respect to inputs of a Fortran code are often needed in physics, chemistry, and engineering. The author of the analysis code may no longer be available and the user may not have a deep knowledge of the code. Thus a simple tool is necessary to automatically differentiate the code with very minimum change to the source codes. This can be achieved using dual number arithmetic and operator overloading. Solution method: A new data type is defined with the first scalar

  7. Advanced Applications of Adifor 3.0 for Efficient Calculation of First-and Second-Order CFD Sensitivity Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III

    2004-01-01

    This final report will document the accomplishments of the work of this project. 1) The incremental-iterative (II) form of the reverse-mode (adjoint) method for computing first-order (FO) aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives (SDs) has been successfully implemented and tested in a 2D CFD code (called ANSERS) using the reverse-mode capability of ADIFOR 3.0. These preceding results compared very well with similar SDS computed via a black-box (BB) application of the reverse-mode capability of ADIFOR 3.0, and also with similar SDs calculated via the method of finite differences. 2) Second-order (SO) SDs have been implemented in the 2D ASNWERS code using the very efficient strategy that was originally proposed (but not previously tested) of Reference 3, Appendix A. Furthermore, these SO SOs have been validated for accuracy and computational efficiency. 3) Studies were conducted in Quasi-1D and 2D concerning the smoothness (or lack of smoothness) of the FO and SO SD's for flows with shock waves. The phenomenon is documented in the publications of this study (listed subsequently), however, the specific numerical mechanism which is responsible for this unsmoothness phenomenon was not discovered. 4) The FO and SO derivatives for Quasi-1D and 2D flows were applied to predict aerodynamic design uncertainties, and were also applied in robust design optimization studies.

  8. Automatic differentiation of C++ codes for large-scale scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David M.; Bartlett, Roscoe A; Phipps, Eric Todd

    2006-02-01

    We discuss computing first derivatives for models based on elements, such as large-scale finite-element PDE discretizations, implemented in the C++ programming language.We use a hybrid technique of automatic differentiation (AD) and manual assembly, with local element-level derivatives computed via AD and manually summed into the global derivative. C++ templating and operator overloading work well for both forward- and reverse-mode derivative computations. We found that AD derivative computations compared favorably in time to finite differencing for a scalable finite-element discretization of a convection-diffusion problem in two dimensions.

  9. DiffNet: automatic differential functional summarization of dE-MAP networks.

    PubMed

    Seah, Boon-Siew; Bhowmick, Sourav S; Dewey, C Forbes

    2014-10-01

    The study of genetic interaction networks that respond to changing conditions is an emerging research problem. Recently, Bandyopadhyay et al. (2010) proposed a technique to construct a differential network (dE-MAPnetwork) from two static gene interaction networks in order to map the interaction differences between them under environment or condition change (e.g., DNA-damaging agent). This differential network is then manually analyzed to conclude that DNA repair is differentially effected by the condition change. Unfortunately, manual construction of differential functional summary from a dE-MAP network that summarizes all pertinent functional responses is time-consuming, laborious and error-prone, impeding large-scale analysis on it. To this end, we propose DiffNet, a novel data-driven algorithm that leverages Gene Ontology (go) annotations to automatically summarize a dE-MAP network to obtain a high-level map of functional responses due to condition change. We tested DiffNet on the dynamic interaction networks following MMS treatment and demonstrated the superiority of our approach in generating differential functional summaries compared to state-of-the-art graph clustering methods. We studied the effects of parameters in DiffNet in controlling the quality of the summary. We also performed a case study that illustrates its utility.

  10. Automatic versus manual model differentiation to compute sensitivities and solve non-linear inverse problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo, D.; Cappelaere, B.; Faure, Ch.

    2002-04-01

    Emerging tools for automatic differentiation (AD) of computer programs should be of great benefit for the implementation of many derivative-based numerical methods such as those used for inverse modeling. The Odyssée software, one such tool for Fortran 77 codes, has been tested on a sample model that solves a 2D non-linear diffusion-type equation. Odyssée offers both the forward and the reverse differentiation modes, that produce the tangent and the cotangent models, respectively. The two modes have been implemented on the sample application. A comparison is made with a manually-produced differentiated code for this model (MD), obtained by solving the adjoint equations associated with the model's discrete state equations. Following a presentation of the methods and tools and of their relative advantages and drawbacks, the performances of the codes produced by the manual and automatic methods are compared, in terms of accuracy and of computing efficiency (CPU and memory needs). The perturbation method (finite-difference approximation of derivatives) is also used as a reference. Based on the test of Taylor, the accuracy of the two AD modes proves to be excellent and as high as machine precision permits, a good indication of Odyssée's capability to produce error-free codes. In comparison, the manually-produced derivatives (MD) sometimes appear to be slightly biased, which is likely due to the fact that a theoretical model (state equations) and a practical model (computer program) do not exactly coincide, while the accuracy of the perturbation method is very uncertain. The MD code largely outperforms all other methods in computing efficiency, a subject of current research for the improvement of AD tools. Yet these tools can already be of considerable help for the computer implementation of many numerical methods, avoiding the tedious task of hand-coding the differentiation of complex algorithms.

  11. Determination of Stability and Control Derivatives using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Automatic Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Green, Lawrence L.; Montgomery, Raymond C.; Raney, David L.

    1999-01-01

    With the recent interest in novel control effectors there is a need to determine the stability and control derivatives of new aircraft configurations early in the design process. These derivatives are central to most control law design methods and would allow the determination of closed-loop control performance of the vehicle. Early determination of the static and dynamic behavior of an aircraft may permit significant improvement in configuration weight, cost, stealth, and performance through multidisciplinary design. The classical method of determining static stability and control derivatives - constructing and testing wind tunnel models - is expensive and requires a long lead time for the resultant data. Wind tunnel tests are also limited to the preselected control effectors of the model. To overcome these shortcomings, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers are augmented via automatic differentiation, to directly calculate the stability and control derivatives. The CFD forces and moments are differentiated with respect to angle of attack, angle of sideslip, and aircraft shape parameters to form these derivatives. A subset of static stability and control derivatives of a tailless aircraft concept have been computed by two differentiated inviscid CFD codes and verified for accuracy with central finite-difference approximations and favorable comparisons to a simulation database.

  12. Automatic differentiation of color fundus images containing drusen or exudates using a contextual spatial pyramid approach.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Mark J J P; Theelen, Thomas; Witkamp, Leonard; van der Heijden, Job; van de Ven, Johannes P H; Hoyng, Carel B; van Ginneken, Bram; Sánchez, Clara I

    2016-03-01

    We developed an automatic system to identify and differentiate color fundus images containing no lesions, drusen or exudates. Drusen and exudates are lesions with a bright appearance, associated with age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, respectively. The system consists of three lesion detectors operating at pixel-level, combining their outputs using spatial pooling and classification with a random forest classifier. System performance was compared with ratings of two independent human observers using human-expert annotations as reference. Kappa agreements of 0.89, 0.97 and 0.92 and accuracies of 0.93, 0.98 and 0.95 were obtained for the system and observers, respectively.

  13. Using automatic differentiation with the quasi-procedural method for multidisciplinary design optimaization

    SciTech Connect

    Altus, S.; Kroo, I.; Bischof, C.; Hovland, P.

    1996-02-01

    As computers have become increasingly powerful, the field of design optimization has moved toward higher fidelity models (involving many more variables) in the early stages of design. One way in which this movement has manifested itself is in the increasing popularity of multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO). Because the models used in MDO are large and very complicated, a modular design is desirable. Because there are many- design parameters to optimize, derivatives must be computed accurately and efficiently. This paper describes how the quasi-procedural program architecture developed by Takai and Kroo [9] and the technique of automatic differentiation [6] can be combined to effectively address these needs. The two techniques are explained, the manner in which they were integrated into a single framework is described, and the result of using this framework for an optimization problem in airplane design is presented.

  14. Automatic Differentiation: A Powerful Device for the Estimation of Hydraulic Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, R. M.; Guerrero, J.

    2008-12-01

    Our aim is to estimate the hydraulic transmission parameter T, in the confined aquifer equation: [1] ∂ / ∂ x}( T ∂ h} / ∂ x}) + ∂ / ∂ y}( T ∂ h} / ∂ y})=S ∂ h} / ∂ t}+q, which is typical case of an ill posed inverse problem. A widely used strategy to solve (1) in practice is to estimate T as the T0 solution of a certain kind of a nonlinear optimization problem such as: [2] minT F(T), F(T)= | hk(T)-h0 |2, where h0 is a real observations vector and hk(T) is the solution of (1) related to the actual Tk solution of (2), obtained by some iterative process. We shall present computational results of estimating T for the cuban Ariguanabo aquifer, emphasizing the use of automatic differentiation to solve the optimization problem (2), by comparing this alternative with the use of the divided differences method.

  15. Challenges and Opportunities in Using Automatic Differentiation with Object-Oriented Toolkits for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hovland, P; Lee, S; McInnes, L; Norris, B; Smith, B

    2001-04-17

    The increased use of object-oriented toolkits in large-scale scientific simulation presents new opportunities and challenges for the use of automatic (or algorithmic) differentiation (AD) techniques, especially in the context of optimization. Because object-oriented toolkits use well-defined interfaces and data structures, there is potential for simplifying the AD process. Furthermore, derivative computation can be improved by exploiting high-level information about numerical and computational abstractions. However, challenges to the successful use of AD with these toolkits also exist. Among the greatest challenges is balancing the desire to limit the scope of the AD process with the desire to minimize the work required of a user. They discuss their experiences in integrating AD with the PETSc, PVODE, and TAO toolkits and the plans for future research and development in this area.

  16. Low rank approach to computing first and higher order derivatives using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J. A.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.; Utke, J.

    2012-07-01

    This manuscript outlines a new approach for increasing the efficiency of applying automatic differentiation (AD) to large scale computational models. By using the principles of the Efficient Subspace Method (ESM), low rank approximations of the derivatives for first and higher orders can be calculated using minimized computational resources. The output obtained from nuclear reactor calculations typically has a much smaller numerical rank compared to the number of inputs and outputs. This rank deficiency can be exploited to reduce the number of derivatives that need to be calculated using AD. The effective rank can be determined according to ESM by computing derivatives with AD at random inputs. Reduced or pseudo variables are then defined and new derivatives are calculated with respect to the pseudo variables. Two different AD packages are used: OpenAD and Rapsodia. OpenAD is used to determine the effective rank and the subspace that contains the derivatives. Rapsodia is then used to calculate derivatives with respect to the pseudo variables for the desired order. The overall approach is applied to two simple problems and to MATWS, a safety code for sodium cooled reactors. (authors)

  17. LOOP- SIMULATION OF THE AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SUBSYSTEM OF A DIFFERENTIAL MINIMUM SHIFT KEYING RECEIVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.

    1994-01-01

    The LOOP computer program was written to simulate the Automatic Frequency Control (AFC) subsystem of a Differential Minimum Shift Keying (DMSK) receiver with a bit rate of 2400 baud. The AFC simulated by LOOP is a first order loop configuration with a first order R-C filter. NASA has been investigating the concept of mobile communications based on low-cost, low-power terminals linked via geostationary satellites. Studies have indicated that low bit rate transmission is suitable for this application, particularly from the frequency and power conservation point of view. A bit rate of 2400 BPS is attractive due to its applicability to the linear predictive coding of speech. Input to LOOP includes the following: 1) the initial frequency error; 2) the double-sided loop noise bandwidth; 3) the filter time constants; 4) the amount of intersymbol interference; and 5) the bit energy to noise spectral density. LOOP output includes: 1) the bit number and the frequency error of that bit; 2) the computed mean of the frequency error; and 3) the standard deviation of the frequency error. LOOP is written in MS SuperSoft FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC operating under PC DOS with a memory requirement of approximately 40K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1986.

  18. Multi-Objective Differential Evolution for Automatic Clustering with Application to Micro-Array Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Kaushik; Kundu, Debarati; Ghosh, Sayan; Das, Swagatam; Abraham, Ajith; Han, Sang Yong

    2009-01-01

    This paper applies the Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm to the task of automatic fuzzy clustering in a Multi-objective Optimization (MO) framework. It compares the performances of two multi-objective variants of DE over the fuzzy clustering problem, where two conflicting fuzzy validity indices are simultaneously optimized. The resultant Pareto optimal set of solutions from each algorithm consists of a number of non-dominated solutions, from which the user can choose the most promising ones according to the problem specifications. A real-coded representation of the search variables, accommodating variable number of cluster centers, is used for DE. The performances of the multi-objective DE-variants have also been contrasted to that of two most well-known schemes of MO clustering, namely the Non Dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA II) and Multi-Objective Clustering with an unknown number of Clusters K (MOCK). Experimental results using six artificial and four real life datasets of varying range of complexities indicate that DE holds immense promise as a candidate algorithm for devising MO clustering schemes. PMID:22412346

  19. The application of automatic differentiation techniques for the prediction of rotor-dynamic coefficients of labyrinth seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Jiří

    2016-03-01

    The article describes the development of bulk-flow code for the prediction of rotor-dynamic coefficients of labyrinth seals. The code is based on the so-called single control volume approach by Childs and Scharrer [1] and the the forces are evaluated using the automatic differentiation technique. The resulting code is very simple and provides reasonable predictions of stiffness and damping coefficients at short computational time.

  20. AUTO_DERIV: Tool for automatic differentiation of a Fortran code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatiadis, S.; Farantos, S. C.

    2010-10-01

    AUTO_DERIV is a module comprised of a set of FORTRAN 95 procedures which can be used to calculate the first and second partial derivatives (mixed or not) of any continuous function with many independent variables. The mathematical function should be expressed as one or more FORTRAN 77/90/95 procedures. A new type of variables is defined and the overloading mechanism of functions and operators provided by the FORTRAN 95 language is extensively used to define the differentiation rules. Proper (standard complying) handling of floating-point exceptions is provided by using the IEEE_EXCEPTIONS intrinsic module (Technical Report 15580, incorporated in FORTRAN 2003). New version program summaryProgram title: AUTO_DERIV Catalogue identifier: ADLS_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADLS_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2963 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10 314 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 + (optionally) TR-15580 (Floating-point exception handling) Computer: all platforms with a Fortran 95 compiler Operating system: Linux, Windows, MacOS Classification: 4.12, 6.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADLS_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 127 (2000) 343 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The need to calculate accurate derivatives of a multivariate function frequently arises in computational physics and chemistry. The most versatile approach to evaluate them by a computer, automatically and to machine precision, is via user-defined types and operator overloading. AUTO_DERIV is a Fortran 95 implementation of them, designed to evaluate the first and second derivatives of a function of many variables

  1. Aerodynamic design applying automatic differentiation and using robust variable fidelity optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemiya, Tetsushi

    , and that (2) the AMF terminates optimization erroneously when the optimization problems have constraints. The first problem is due to inaccuracy in computing derivatives in the AMF, and the second problem is due to erroneous treatment of the trust region ratio, which sets the size of the domain for an optimization in the AMF. In order to solve the first problem of the AMF, automatic differentiation (AD) technique, which reads the codes of analysis models and automatically generates new derivative codes based on some mathematical rules, is applied. If derivatives are computed with the generated derivative code, they are analytical, and the required computational time is independent of the number of design variables, which is very advantageous for realistic aerospace engineering problems. However, if analysis models implement iterative computations such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which solves system partial differential equations iteratively, computing derivatives through the AD requires a massive memory size. The author solved this deficiency by modifying the AD approach and developing a more efficient implementation with CFD, and successfully applied the AD to general CFD software. In order to solve the second problem of the AMF, the governing equation of the trust region ratio, which is very strict against the violation of constraints, is modified so that it can accept the violation of constraints within some tolerance. By accepting violations of constraints during the optimization process, the AMF can continue optimization without terminating immaturely and eventually find the true optimum design point. With these modifications, the AMF is referred to as "Robust AMF," and it is applied to airfoil and wing aerodynamic design problems using Euler CFD software. The former problem has 21 design variables, and the latter 64. In both problems, derivatives computed with the proposed AD method are first compared with those computed with the finite

  2. AUTO_DERIV: Tool for automatic differentiation of a Fortran code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatiadis, S.; Farantos, S. C.

    2010-10-01

    AUTO_DERIV is a module comprised of a set of FORTRAN 95 procedures which can be used to calculate the first and second partial derivatives (mixed or not) of any continuous function with many independent variables. The mathematical function should be expressed as one or more FORTRAN 77/90/95 procedures. A new type of variables is defined and the overloading mechanism of functions and operators provided by the FORTRAN 95 language is extensively used to define the differentiation rules. Proper (standard complying) handling of floating-point exceptions is provided by using the IEEE_EXCEPTIONS intrinsic module (Technical Report 15580, incorporated in FORTRAN 2003). New version program summaryProgram title: AUTO_DERIV Catalogue identifier: ADLS_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADLS_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2963 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10 314 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 + (optionally) TR-15580 (Floating-point exception handling) Computer: all platforms with a Fortran 95 compiler Operating system: Linux, Windows, MacOS Classification: 4.12, 6.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADLS_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 127 (2000) 343 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The need to calculate accurate derivatives of a multivariate function frequently arises in computational physics and chemistry. The most versatile approach to evaluate them by a computer, automatically and to machine precision, is via user-defined types and operator overloading. AUTO_DERIV is a Fortran 95 implementation of them, designed to evaluate the first and second derivatives of a function of many variables

  3. TaylUR 3, a multivariate arbitrary-order automatic differentiation package for Fortran 95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hippel, G. M.

    2010-03-01

    comments: This version of TaylUR is released under the second version of the GNU General Public License (GPLv2). Therefore anyone is free to use or modify the code for their own calculations. As part of the licensing, it is requested that any publications including results from the use of TaylUR or any modification derived from it cite Refs. [1,2] as well as this paper. Finally, users are also requested to communicate to the author details of such publications, as well as of any bugs found or of required or useful modifications made or desired by them. Running time: The running time of TaylUR operations grows rapidly with both the number of variables and the Taylor expansion order. Judicious use of the masking facility to drop unneeded higher derivatives can lead to significant accelerations, as can activation of the Diagonal_taylors variable whenever mixed partial derivatives are not needed. Acknowledgments: The author thanks Alistair Hart for helpful comments and suggestions. This work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the SFB/TR 09. References:G.M. von Hippel, TaylUR, an arbitrary-order diagonal automatic differentiation package for Fortran 95, Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 569. G.M. von Hippel, New version announcement for TaylUR, an arbitrary-order diagonal automatic differentiation package for Fortran 95, Comput. Phys. Comm. 176 (2007) 710. G.M. Constantine, T.H. Savits, A multivariate Faa di Bruno formula with applications, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 348 (2) (1996) 503. A. Hart, G.M. von Hippel, R.R. Horgan, E.H. Müller, Automated generation of lattice QCD Feynman rules, Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2698, doi:10.1016/j.cpc.2009.04.021, arXiv:0904.0375.

  4. The automatic solution of partial differential equations using a global spectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Alex; Olver, Sheehan

    2015-10-01

    A spectral method for solving linear partial differential equations (PDEs) with variable coefficients and general boundary conditions defined on rectangular domains is described, based on separable representations of partial differential operators and the one-dimensional ultraspherical spectral method. If a partial differential operator is of splitting rank 2, such as the operator associated with Poisson or Helmholtz, the corresponding PDE is solved via a generalized Sylvester matrix equation, and a bivariate polynomial approximation of the solution of degree (nx ,ny) is computed in O ((nxny) 3 / 2) operations. Partial differential operators of splitting rank ≥3 are solved via a linear system involving a block-banded matrix in O (min ⁡ (nx3 ny ,nx ny3)) operations. Numerical examples demonstrate the applicability of our 2D spectral method to a broad class of PDEs, which includes elliptic and dispersive time-evolution equations. The resulting PDE solver is written in MATLAB and is publicly available as part of CHEBFUN. It can resolve solutions requiring over a million degrees of freedom in under 60 seconds. An experimental implementation in the JULIA language can currently perform the same solve in 10 seconds.

  5. ERPs Differentially Reflect Automatic and Deliberate Processing of the Functional Manipulability of Objects.

    PubMed

    Madan, Christopher R; Chen, Yvonne Y; Singhal, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the functional properties of an object can interact with perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes. Previously we have found that a between-subjects manipulation of judgment instructions resulted in different manipulability-related memory biases in an incidental memory test. To better understand this effect we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) while participants made judgments about images of objects that were either high or low in functional manipulability (e.g., hammer vs. ladder). Using a between-subjects design, participants judged whether they had seen the object recently (Personal Experience), or could manipulate the object using their hand (Functionality). We focused on the P300 and slow-wave event-related potentials (ERPs) as reflections of attentional allocation. In both groups, we observed higher P300 and slow wave amplitudes for high-manipulability objects at electrodes Pz and C3. As P300 is thought to reflect bottom-up attentional processes, this may suggest that the processing of high-manipulability objects recruited more attentional resources. Additionally, the P300 effect was greater in the Functionality group. A more complex pattern was observed at electrode C3 during slow wave: processing the high-manipulability objects in the Functionality instruction evoked a more positive slow wave than in the other three conditions, likely related to motor simulation processes. These data provide neural evidence that effects of manipulability on stimulus processing are further mediated by automatic vs. deliberate motor-related processing. PMID:27536224

  6. ERPs Differentially Reflect Automatic and Deliberate Processing of the Functional Manipulability of Objects

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Christopher R.; Chen, Yvonne Y.; Singhal, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the functional properties of an object can interact with perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes. Previously we have found that a between-subjects manipulation of judgment instructions resulted in different manipulability-related memory biases in an incidental memory test. To better understand this effect we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) while participants made judgments about images of objects that were either high or low in functional manipulability (e.g., hammer vs. ladder). Using a between-subjects design, participants judged whether they had seen the object recently (Personal Experience), or could manipulate the object using their hand (Functionality). We focused on the P300 and slow-wave event-related potentials (ERPs) as reflections of attentional allocation. In both groups, we observed higher P300 and slow wave amplitudes for high-manipulability objects at electrodes Pz and C3. As P300 is thought to reflect bottom-up attentional processes, this may suggest that the processing of high-manipulability objects recruited more attentional resources. Additionally, the P300 effect was greater in the Functionality group. A more complex pattern was observed at electrode C3 during slow wave: processing the high-manipulability objects in the Functionality instruction evoked a more positive slow wave than in the other three conditions, likely related to motor simulation processes. These data provide neural evidence that effects of manipulability on stimulus processing are further mediated by automatic vs. deliberate motor-related processing. PMID:27536224

  7. Automatic mesh-point clustering near a boundary in grid generation with elliptic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Sorenson, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Elliptic partial differential equations are used to generate a smooth grid that permits a one-to-one mapping in such a way that mesh lines of the same family do not cross. Problems that arise due to lack of clustering at crucial points or intersections of mesh lines at highly acute angles, are examined and various forcing or source terms are used (to correct the problems) that are either compatible with the maximum principle or are so locally controlled that mesh lines do not intersect. Attention is given to various schematics of unclustered grids and grid detail about (highly cambered) airfoils.

  8. The efficiency of geophysical adjoint codes generated by automatic differentiation tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, A. V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.

    2016-02-01

    The accuracy of numerical models that describe complex physical or chemical processes depends on the choice of model parameters. Estimating an optimal set of parameters by optimization algorithms requires knowledge of the sensitivity of the process of interest to model parameters. Typically the sensitivity computation involves differentiation of the model, which can be performed by applying algorithmic differentiation (AD) tools to the underlying numerical code. However, existing AD tools differ substantially in design, legibility and computational efficiency. In this study we show that, for geophysical data assimilation problems of varying complexity, the performance of adjoint codes generated by the existing AD tools (i) Open_AD, (ii) Tapenade, (iii) NAGWare and (iv) Transformation of Algorithms in Fortran (TAF) can be vastly different. Based on simple test problems, we evaluate the efficiency of each AD tool with respect to computational speed, accuracy of the adjoint, the efficiency of memory usage, and the capability of each AD tool to handle modern FORTRAN 90-95 elements such as structures and pointers, which are new elements that either combine groups of variables or provide aliases to memory addresses, respectively. We show that, while operator overloading tools are the only ones suitable for modern codes written in object-oriented programming languages, their computational efficiency lags behind source transformation by orders of magnitude, rendering the application of these modern tools to practical assimilation problems prohibitive. In contrast, the application of source transformation tools appears to be the most efficient choice, allowing handling even large geophysical data assimilation problems. However, they can only be applied to numerical models written in earlier generations of programming languages. Our study indicates that applying existing AD tools to realistic geophysical problems faces limitations that urgently need to be solved to allow the

  9. Automatic Tissue Differentiation Based on Confocal Endomicroscopic Images for Intraoperative Guidance in Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kamen, Ali; Sun, Shanhui; Wan, Shaohua; Kluckner, Stefan; Chen, Terrence; Gigler, Alexander M; Simon, Elfriede; Fleischer, Maximilian; Javed, Mehreen; Daali, Samira; Igressa, Alhadi; Charalampaki, Patra

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of tumor and definition of tumor borders intraoperatively using fast histopathology is often not sufficiently informative primarily due to tissue architecture alteration during sample preparation step. Confocal laser microscopy (CLE) provides microscopic information of tissue in real-time on cellular and subcellular levels, where tissue characterization is possible. One major challenge is to categorize these images reliably during the surgery as quickly as possible. To address this, we propose an automated tissue differentiation algorithm based on the machine learning concept. During a training phase, a large number of image frames with known tissue types are analyzed and the most discriminant image-based signatures for various tissue types are identified. During the procedure, the algorithm uses the learnt image features to assign a proper tissue type to the acquired image frame. We have verified this method on the example of two types of brain tumors: glioblastoma and meningioma. The algorithm was trained using 117 image sequences containing over 27 thousand images captured from more than 20 patients. We achieved an average cross validation accuracy of better than 83%. We believe this algorithm could be a useful component to an intraoperative pathology system for guiding the resection procedure based on cellular level information.

  10. Finger tapping movements of Parkinson's disease patients automatically rated using nonlinear delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainscsek, C.; Rowat, P.; Schettino, L.; Lee, D.; Song, D.; Letellier, C.; Poizner, H.

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative condition whose severity is assessed by clinical observations of motor behaviors. These are performed by a neurological specialist through subjective ratings of a variety of movements including 10-s bouts of repetitive finger-tapping movements. We present here an algorithmic rating of these movements which may be beneficial for uniformly assessing the progression of the disease. Finger-tapping movements were digitally recorded from Parkinson's patients and controls, obtaining one time series for every 10 s bout. A nonlinear delay differential equation, whose structure was selected using a genetic algorithm, was fitted to each time series and its coefficients were used as a six-dimensional numerical descriptor. The algorithm was applied to time-series from two different groups of Parkinson's patients and controls. The algorithmic scores compared favorably with the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale scores, at least when the latter adequately matched with ratings from the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Moreover, when the two sets of mean scores for all patients are compared, there is a strong (r = 0.785) and significant (p <0.0015) correlation between them.

  11. The discriminatory power of ribotyping as automatable technique for differentiation of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Peter; Pukall, Rüdiger

    2013-09-01

    Since the introduction of ribonucleic acid gene restriction patterns as taxonomic tools in 1986, ribotyping has become an established method for systematics, epidemiological, ecological and population studies of microorganisms. In the last 25 years, several modifications have improved the convenience, reproducibility and turn-around time of this technique. The technological development culminated in the automation of ribotyping which allowed for high-throughput applications e.g. in the quality control of food production, pharmaceutical industry and culture collections. The capability of the fully automated RiboPrinter(®) System for the differentiation of bacteria below the species level is compared with the discriminatory power of traditional ribotyping, of molecular fingerprint techniques like PFGE, MLST and MLVA as well as of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. While automated RiboPrinting is advantageous with respect to standardization, ease and speed, PCR ribotyping has proved being a highly discriminatory, flexible, robust and cost-efficient routine technique which makes inter-laboratory comparison and build of ribotype databases possible, too.

  12. Flight test evaluation of the E-systems Differential GPS category 3 automatic landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, David N.; Mcnally, B. David

    1995-01-01

    Test flights were conducted to evaluate the capability of Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) to provide the accuracy and integrity required for International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Category (CAT) III precision approach and landings. These test flights were part of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) program to evaluate the technical feasibility of using DGPS based technology for CAT III precision approach and landing applications. An IAI Westwind 1124 aircraft (N24RH) was equipped with DGPS receiving equipment and additional computing capability provided by E-Systems. The test flights were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center's Crows Landing Flight Facility, Crows Landing, California. The flight test evaluation was based on completing 100 approaches and landings. The navigation sensor error accuracy requirements were based on ICAO requirements for the Microwave Landing System (MLS). All of the approaches and landings were evaluated against ground truth reference data provided by a laser tracker. Analysis of these approaches and landings shows that the E-Systems DGPS system met the navigation sensor error requirements for a successful approach and landing 98 out of 100 approaches and landings, based on the requirements specified in the FAA CAT III Level 2 Flight Test Plan. In addition, the E-Systems DGPS system met the integrity requirements for a successful approach and landing or stationary trial for all 100 approaches and landings and all ten stationary trials, based on the requirements specified in the FAA CAT III Level 2 Flight Test Plan.

  13. Automatic Tissue Differentiation Based on Confocal Endomicroscopic Images for Intraoperative Guidance in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, Ali; Sun, Shanhui; Wan, Shaohua; Kluckner, Stefan; Chen, Terrence; Gigler, Alexander M.; Simon, Elfriede; Fleischer, Maximilian; Javed, Mehreen; Daali, Samira; Igressa, Alhadi; Charalampaki, Patra

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of tumor and definition of tumor borders intraoperatively using fast histopathology is often not sufficiently informative primarily due to tissue architecture alteration during sample preparation step. Confocal laser microscopy (CLE) provides microscopic information of tissue in real-time on cellular and subcellular levels, where tissue characterization is possible. One major challenge is to categorize these images reliably during the surgery as quickly as possible. To address this, we propose an automated tissue differentiation algorithm based on the machine learning concept. During a training phase, a large number of image frames with known tissue types are analyzed and the most discriminant image-based signatures for various tissue types are identified. During the procedure, the algorithm uses the learnt image features to assign a proper tissue type to the acquired image frame. We have verified this method on the example of two types of brain tumors: glioblastoma and meningioma. The algorithm was trained using 117 image sequences containing over 27 thousand images captured from more than 20 patients. We achieved an average cross validation accuracy of better than 83%. We believe this algorithm could be a useful component to an intraoperative pathology system for guiding the resection procedure based on cellular level information. PMID:27127791

  14. Automatic Tissue Differentiation Based on Confocal Endomicroscopic Images for Intraoperative Guidance in Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kamen, Ali; Sun, Shanhui; Wan, Shaohua; Kluckner, Stefan; Chen, Terrence; Gigler, Alexander M; Simon, Elfriede; Fleischer, Maximilian; Javed, Mehreen; Daali, Samira; Igressa, Alhadi; Charalampaki, Patra

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of tumor and definition of tumor borders intraoperatively using fast histopathology is often not sufficiently informative primarily due to tissue architecture alteration during sample preparation step. Confocal laser microscopy (CLE) provides microscopic information of tissue in real-time on cellular and subcellular levels, where tissue characterization is possible. One major challenge is to categorize these images reliably during the surgery as quickly as possible. To address this, we propose an automated tissue differentiation algorithm based on the machine learning concept. During a training phase, a large number of image frames with known tissue types are analyzed and the most discriminant image-based signatures for various tissue types are identified. During the procedure, the algorithm uses the learnt image features to assign a proper tissue type to the acquired image frame. We have verified this method on the example of two types of brain tumors: glioblastoma and meningioma. The algorithm was trained using 117 image sequences containing over 27 thousand images captured from more than 20 patients. We achieved an average cross validation accuracy of better than 83%. We believe this algorithm could be a useful component to an intraoperative pathology system for guiding the resection procedure based on cellular level information. PMID:27127791

  15. ADF95: Tool for automatic differentiation of a FORTRAN code designed for large numbers of independent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Christian W.

    2005-06-01

    ADF95 is a tool to automatically calculate numerical first derivatives for any mathematical expression as a function of user defined independent variables. Accuracy of derivatives is achieved within machine precision. ADF95 may be applied to any FORTRAN 77/90/95 conforming code and requires minimal changes by the user. It provides a new derived data type that holds the value and derivatives and applies forward differencing by overloading all FORTRAN operators and intrinsic functions. An efficient indexing technique leads to a reduced memory usage and a substantially increased performance gain over other available tools with operator overloading. This gain is especially pronounced for sparse systems with large number of independent variables. A wide class of numerical simulations, e.g., those employing implicit solvers, can profit from ADF95. Program summaryTitle of program:ADF95 Catalogue identifier: ADVI Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVI Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed: all platforms with a FORTRAN 95 compiler Programming language used:FORTRAN 95 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3103 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 9862 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of problem: In many areas in the computational sciences first order partial derivatives for large and complex sets of equations are needed with machine precision accuracy. For example, any implicit or semi-implicit solver requires the computation of the Jacobian matrix, which contains the first derivatives with respect to the independent variables. ADF95 is a software module to facilitate the automatic computation of the first partial derivatives of any arbitrarily complex mathematical FORTRAN expression. The program exploits the sparsity inherited by many set of equations thereby enabling faster computations compared to alternate

  16. New version announcement for TaylUR, an arbitrary-order diagonal automatic differentiation package for Fortran 95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hippel, G. M.

    2007-06-01

    We present a new version of TaylUR, a Fortran 95 module to automatically compute the numerical values of a complex-valued function's derivatives with respect to several variables up to an arbitrary order in each variable, but excluding mixed derivatives. The new version fixes a potentially serious bug in the code for exponential-related functions that could corrupt the imaginary parts of derivatives, as well as being compatible with a wider range of compilers. Program summaryTitle of program: TaylUR Catalogue identifier: ADXR_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXR_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Programming language used: Fortran 95 Computer: Any computer with a conforming Fortran 95 compiler Operating system: Any system with a conforming Fortran 95 compiler No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6548 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 468 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADXR_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 569-576 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: yes Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of problem: Problems that require potentially high orders of derivatives with respect to some variables or derivatives of complex-valued functions, such as, e.g., expansions of Feynman diagrams in particle masses in perturbative Quantum Field Theory. Solution method: Arithmetic operators and Fortran intrinsics are overloaded to act correctly on objects of a defined type taylor, which encodes a function along with its first few derivatives with respect to the user-defined independent variables. Derivatives of products and composite functions are computed using Leibniz's rule and Fàa di Bruno's formula. Reasons for the new version: The previous version [G.M. von Hippel, TaylUR, an arbitrary-order diagonal automatic differentiation package for

  17. An evolutionary computation based algorithm for calculating solar differential rotation by automatic tracking of coronal bright points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahamatnia, Ehsan; Dorotovič, Ivan; Fonseca, Jose M.; Ribeiro, Rita A.

    2016-03-01

    Developing specialized software tools is essential to support studies of solar activity evolution. With new space missions such as Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), solar images are being produced in unprecedented volumes. To capitalize on that huge data availability, the scientific community needs a new generation of software tools for automatic and efficient data processing. In this paper a prototype of a modular framework for solar feature detection, characterization, and tracking is presented. To develop an efficient system capable of automatic solar feature tracking and measuring, a hybrid approach combining specialized image processing, evolutionary optimization, and soft computing algorithms is being followed. The specialized hybrid algorithm for tracking solar features allows automatic feature tracking while gathering characterization details about the tracked features. The hybrid algorithm takes advantages of the snake model, a specialized image processing algorithm widely used in applications such as boundary delineation, image segmentation, and object tracking. Further, it exploits the flexibility and efficiency of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), a stochastic population based optimization algorithm. PSO has been used successfully in a wide range of applications including combinatorial optimization, control, clustering, robotics, scheduling, and image processing and video analysis applications. The proposed tool, denoted PSO-Snake model, was already successfully tested in other works for tracking sunspots and coronal bright points. In this work, we discuss the application of the PSO-Snake algorithm for calculating the sidereal rotational angular velocity of the solar corona. To validate the results we compare them with published manual results performed by an expert.

  18. Modulating rest-break length induces differential recruitment of automatic and controlled attentional processes upon task reengagement.

    PubMed

    Lim, Julian; Teng, James; Wong, Kian Foong; Chee, Michael W L

    2016-07-01

    Rest breaks are commonly administered as a countermeasure to reduce on-the-job fatigue, both physical and mental. However, this practice makes the assumption that recovery from fatigue, as measured by the reversal of performance declines, is the sole effect of taking a break on behavior. Here, through administering rest breaks of differing lengths in between blocks of a mentally demanding symbol decoding task, we show that this assumption may not be strictly true. First, we replicate previous work by showing that taking a longer break leads to two correlated effects: greater immediate rebound in performance, and greater subsequent time-on-task decline. Using fMRI, we reveal that time-on-task in this paradigm is associated with increasing recruitment of fronto-parietal areas associated with top-down control, and decreasing deactivation in the default-mode network. Finally, by analyzing individual differences, we reveal a potential neural basis for our behavioral observation: greater recovery following long breaks is associated with greater activity in the putamen, an area associated with the automatic generation of motor responses, followed by greater activity in left middle frontal gyrus by the end of those task periods. Taken together, this suggests a shift in the implicit engagement of automatic and controlled attentional processing following longer breaks. This shift may be undesirable or detrimental in real-world situations where maintaining a stable level of attention over time is necessary. PMID:27039697

  19. Differential Arc expression in the hippocampus and striatum during the transition from attentive to automatic navigation on a plus maze

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Robert S.; Suarez, Daniel F.; Robinson-Burton, Nadira K.; Rudnicky, Christopher J.; Gulati, Asish; Ascoli, Giorgio A.; Dumas, Theodore C.

    2016-01-01

    The strategies utilized to effectively perform a given task change with practice and experience. During a spatial navigation task, with relatively little training, performance is typically attentive enabling an individual to locate the position of a goal by relying on spatial landmarks. These (place) strategies require an intact hippocampus. With task repetition, performance becomes automatic; the same goal is reached using a fixed response or sequence of actions. These (response) strategies require an intact striatum. The current work aims to understand the activation patterns across these neural structures during this experience-dependent strategy transition. This was accomplished by region-specific measurement of activity-dependent immediate early gene expression among rats trained to different degrees on a dual-solution task (i.e., a task that can be solved using either place or response navigation). As expected, rats increased their reliance on response navigation with extended task experience. In addition, dorsal hippocampal expression of the immediate early gene Arc was considerably reduced in rats that used a response strategy late in training (as compared with hippocampal expression in rats that used a place strategy early in training). In line with these data, vicarious trial and error, a behavior linked to hippocampal function, also decreased with task repetition. Although Arc mRNA expression in dorsal medial or lateral striatum alone did not correlate with training stage, the ratio of expression in the medial striatum to that in the lateral striatum was relatively high among rats that used a place strategy early in training as compared with the ratio among over-trained response rats. Altogether, these results identify specific changes in the activation of dissociated neural systems that may underlie the experience-dependent emergence of response-based automatic navigation. PMID:26976088

  20. Automatic differentiation method for numerical construction of the rotational-vibrational Hamiltonian as a power series in the curvilinear internal coordinates using the Eckart frame.

    PubMed

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Yurchenko, Sergei N

    2015-07-01

    We present a new numerical method to construct a rotational-vibrational Hamiltonian of a general polyatomic molecule in the Eckart frame as a power series expansion in terms of curvilinear internal coordinates. The expansion of the kinetic energy operator of an arbitrary order is obtained numerically using an automatic differentiation (AD) technique. The method is applicable to molecules of arbitrary size and structure and is flexible for choosing various types of internal coordinates. A new way of solving the Eckart-frame equations for curvilinear coordinates also based on the AD technique is presented. The resulting accuracy of the high-order expansion coefficients for the kinetic energy operator using our numerical technique is comparable to that obtained by symbolic differentiation, with the advantage of being faster and less demanding in memory. Examples for H2CO, NH3, PH3, and CH3Cl molecules demonstrate the advantages of the curvilinear internal coordinates and the Eckart molecular frame for accurate ro-vibrational calculations. Our results show that very high accuracy and quick convergence can be achieved even with moderate expansions if curvilinear coordinates are employed, which is important for applications involving large polyatomic molecules.

  1. Differential rumination, intake, and enteric methane production of dairy cows in a pasture-based automatic milking system.

    PubMed

    Watt, L J; Clark, C E F; Krebs, G L; Petzel, C E; Nielsen, S; Utsumi, S A

    2015-10-01

    Proper performance monitoring of cows on pasture-based diets is crucial to inform nutritional recommendations that minimize undesirable effects of high ruminant CH4 emissions into the environment. The prediction of linkages between rumination patterns, methane emissions, and correlated production traits of cows in a pasture-based automatic milking system was tested. A previous 10-d baseline measurement of rumination activity by acoustic methodology of 156 Holstein-Friesian cows was used for frequency analysis of rumination time and identification of 2 treatment groups (n = 37 cows/group) represented by cows with consistently high (HR; 75th rumination percentile = 617.55 ± 81.37 min/d) or low (LR; 25th rumination percentile = 356.65 ± 72.67 min/d) rumination. The HR and LR cows were paired by nearest parity, days in milk, body weight (BW), and previous 10-d milk production, and within pairs randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experimental groups managed on a voluntary milking system with diets consisting of at least 75% pasture, plus concentrates. Animal traits, including rumination time, mass flux of CH4 (QCH4) and carbon dioxide (QCO2), milk production, and estimated dry matter intake according to individual QCO2 fluxes over a 22-d period were analyzed with repeated measure mixed models for a completely randomized design, structural equation modeling, and nonlinear regression. High rumination and methane was seen in older and heavier cows that had greater estimated dry matter intake and milk production. A consistent difference in rumination time and QCH4 across days was detected between HR and LR, even after adjustment for metabolic BW. Estimated dry matter intake had direct positive effects on rumination and QCH4, but no independent direct effect of rumination on QCH4 was detected. The LR cows produced more QCH4/milk, associated with lower milk, BW, concentrate intake, and greater activity at pasture. A typical dilution of maintenance effect on QCH4/milk was detected

  2. Selection of shape parameters that differentiate sand grains, based on the automatic analysis of two-dimensional images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochan, Agata; Zieliński, Paweł; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A grain shape analysis of sandy deposits has implications for determining the processes that affect grain shape. So far, most methods of carrying out a grain shape analysis are based on the subjective estimation of the researcher. The purpose of this study is to indicate the shape parameter/parameters that best differentiate sand grains, and to compare the results with those that have been obtained by the Krumbein method. We determined the shape parameters of sand grains (size range from 0.71 mm to 1 mm) using photos of two-dimensional images of particle projections onto a plane. The photos were taken under an optical microscope and were then subjected to an image analysis. We selected six shape parameters that best differentiate the studied sand grains, based on the criteria of: i) the monotonicity of parameter value, which changed depending on the categorization of the grains to the successive Krumbein roundness classes, and ii) the statistical significance of differences between the optical parameter values in the individual Krumbein classes. We selected three circularity parameters (θ1, θ4 and θ5) and three surface structure parameters (κ3, κ4 and κ6). None of these shape parameters allowed the direct categorization of a particle into a particular Krumbein roundness class. Nevertheless, despite the fact that an unambiguous characterization of deposits is not possible, this method can be helpful in identifying the origin of deposits. Moreover, it is possible to develop more advanced methods (e.g., based on artificial intelligence tools), which would allow an unambiguous categorization based on the determined shape parameters.

  3. Flight test evaluation of the Stanford University/United Airlines differential GPS Category 3 automatic landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, David N.; Ncnally, B. David

    1995-01-01

    Test flights were conducted to evaluate the capability of Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) to provide the accuracy and integrity required for International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Category (CAT) 3 precision approach and landings. These test flights were part of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) program to evaluate the technical feasibility of using DGPS based technology for CAT 3 precision approach and landing applications. A United Airlines Boeing 737-300 (N304UA) was equipped with DGPS receiving equipment and additional computing capability provided by Stanford University. The test flights were conducted at NASA Ames Research Center's Crows Landing Flight Facility, Crows Landing, California. The flight test evaluation was based on completing 100 approaches and autolandings; 90 touch and go, and 10 terminating with a full stop. Two types of accuracy requirements were evaluated: 1) Total system error, based on the Required Navigation Performance (RNP), and 2) Navigation sensor error, based on ICAO requirements for the Microwave Landing System (MLS). All of the approaches and autolandings were evaluated against ground truth reference data provided by a laser tracker. Analysis of these approaches and autolandings shows that the Stanford University/United Airlines system met the requirements for a successful approach and autolanding 98 out of 100 approaches and autolandings, based on the total system error requirements as specified in the FAA CAT 3 Level 2 Flight Test Plan.

  4. Automatic Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    "Automatic imitation" is a type of stimulus-response compatibility effect in which the topographical features of task-irrelevant action stimuli facilitate similar, and interfere with dissimilar, responses. This article reviews behavioral, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging research on automatic imitation, asking in what sense it is "automatic"…

  5. An automatic differentiation-based gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in magnetic resonance elastography: specific application in fibrous soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelin, Simon; Charpentier, Isabelle; Corbin, Nadège; Meylheuc, Laurence; Vappou, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative and accurate measurement of in vivo mechanical properties using dynamic elastography has been the scope of many research efforts over the past two decades. Most of the shear-wave-based inverse approaches for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) make the assumption of isotropic viscoelasticity. In this paper, we propose a quantitative gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in anisotropic media derived from a full waveform description using analytical viscoelastic Green formalism and automatic differentiation. The abilities and performances of the proposed identification method are first evaluated on numerical phantoms calculated in a transversely isotropic medium, and subsequently on experimental MRE data measured on an isotropic hydrogel phantom, on an anisotropic cryogel phantom and on an ex vivo fibrous muscle. The experiments are carried out by coupling circular shear wave profiles generated by acoustic radiation force and MRE acquisition of the wave front. Shear modulus values obtained by our MRE method are compared to those obtained by rheometry in the isotropic hydrogel phantom, and are found to be in good agreement despite non-overlapping frequency ranges. Both the cryogel and the ex vivo muscle are found to be anisotropic. Stiffness values in the longitudinal direction are found to be 1.8 times and 1.9 times higher than those in the transverse direction for the cryogel and the muscle, respectively. The proposed method shows great perspectives and substantial benefits for the in vivo quantitative investigation of complex mechanical properties in fibrous soft tissues.

  6. An automatic differentiation-based gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in magnetic resonance elastography: specific application in fibrous soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Chatelin, Simon; Charpentier, Isabelle; Corbin, Nadège; Meylheuc, Laurence; Vappou, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative and accurate measurement of in vivo mechanical properties using dynamic elastography has been the scope of many research efforts over the past two decades. Most of the shear-wave-based inverse approaches for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) make the assumption of isotropic viscoelasticity. In this paper, we propose a quantitative gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in anisotropic media derived from a full waveform description using analytical viscoelastic Green formalism and automatic differentiation. The abilities and performances of the proposed identification method are first evaluated on numerical phantoms calculated in a transversely isotropic medium, and subsequently on experimental MRE data measured on an isotropic hydrogel phantom, on an anisotropic cryogel phantom and on an ex vivo fibrous muscle. The experiments are carried out by coupling circular shear wave profiles generated by acoustic radiation force and MRE acquisition of the wave front. Shear modulus values obtained by our MRE method are compared to those obtained by rheometry in the isotropic hydrogel phantom, and are found to be in good agreement despite non-overlapping frequency ranges. Both the cryogel and the ex vivo muscle are found to be anisotropic. Stiffness values in the longitudinal direction are found to be 1.8 times and 1.9 times higher than those in the transverse direction for the cryogel and the muscle, respectively. The proposed method shows great perspectives and substantial benefits for the in vivo quantitative investigation of complex mechanical properties in fibrous soft tissues.

  7. Monitoring Obstructive Sleep Apnea by means of a real-time mobile system based on the automatic extraction of sets of rules through Differential Evolution.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Giovanna; De Falco, Ivanoe; De Pietro, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    Real-time Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) episode detection and monitoring are important for society in terms of an improvement in the health of the general population and of a reduction in mortality and healthcare costs. Currently, to diagnose OSA patients undergo PolySomnoGraphy (PSG), a complicated and invasive test to be performed in a specialized center involving many sensors and wires. Accordingly, each patient is required to stay in the same position throughout the duration of one night, thus restricting their movements. This paper proposes an easy, cheap, and portable approach for the monitoring of patients with OSA, which collects single-channel ElectroCardioGram (ECG) data only. It is easy to perform from the patient's point of view because only one wearable sensor is required, so the patient is not restricted to keeping the same position all night long, and the detection and monitoring can be carried out in any place through the use of a mobile device. Our approach is based on the automatic extraction, from a database containing information about the monitored patient, of explicit knowledge in the form of a set of IF…THEN rules containing typical parameters derived from Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis. The extraction is carried out off-line by means of a Differential Evolution algorithm. This set of rules can then be exploited in the real-time mobile monitoring system developed at our Laboratory: the ECG data is gathered by a wearable sensor and sent to a mobile device, where it is processed in real time. Subsequently, HRV-related parameters are computed from this data, and, if their values activate some of the rules describing the occurrence of OSA, an alarm is automatically produced. This approach has been tested on a well-known literature database of OSA patients. The numerical results show its effectiveness in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, and the achieved sets of rules evidence the user-friendliness of the approach

  8. Automatic Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, FR

    1936-01-01

    This report lays more stress on the principles underlying automatic piloting than on the means of applications. Mechanical details of servomotors and the mechanical release device necessary to assure instantaneous return of the controls to the pilot in case of malfunction are not included. Descriptions are provided of various commercial systems.

  9. AUTOMATIC COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, H.P.

    1960-06-01

    An automatic counter of alpha particle tracks recorded by a sensitive emulsion of a photographic plate is described. The counter includes a source of mcdulated dark-field illumination for developing light flashes from the recorded particle tracks as the photographic plate is automatically scanned in narrow strips. Photoelectric means convert the light flashes to proportional current pulses for application to an electronic counting circuit. Photoelectric means are further provided for developing a phase reference signal from the photographic plate in such a manner that signals arising from particle tracks not parallel to the edge of the plate are out of phase with the reference signal. The counting circuit includes provision for rejecting the out-of-phase signals resulting from unoriented tracks as well as signals resulting from spurious marks on the plate such as scratches, dust or grain clumpings, etc. The output of the circuit is hence indicative only of the tracks that would be counted by a human operator.

  10. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.

    1988-02-16

    An automatic transmission is described combining a stator reversing type torque converter and speed changer having first and second sun gears comprising: (a) a planetary gear train composed of first and second planetary gears sharing one planetary carrier in common; (b) a clutch and requisite brakes to control the planetary gear train; and (c) a speed-increasing or speed-decreasing mechanism is installed both in between a turbine shaft coupled to a turbine of the stator reversing type torque converter and the first sun gear of the speed changer, and in between a stator shaft coupled to a reversing stator and the second sun gear of the speed changer.

  11. Automatic stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, FR

    1936-01-01

    This report concerns the study of automatic stabilizers and extends it to include the control of the three-control system of the airplane instead of just altitude control. Some of the topics discussed include lateral disturbed motion, static stability, the mathematical theory of lateral motion, and large angles of incidence. Various mechanisms and stabilizers are also discussed. The feeding of Diesel engines by injection pumps actuated by engine compression, achieves the required high speeds of injection readily and permits rigorous control of the combustible charge introduced into each cylinder and of the peak pressure in the resultant cycle.

  12. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, N.

    1988-10-11

    This patent describes an automatic transmission including a fluid torque converter, a first gear unit having three forward-speed gears and a single reverse gear, a second gear unit having a low-speed gear and a high-speed gear, and a hydraulic control system, the hydraulic control system comprising: a source of pressurized fluid; a first shift valve for controlling the shifting between the first-speed gear and the second-speed gear of the first gear unit; a second shift valve for controlling the shifting between the second-speed gear and the third-speed gear of the first gear unit; a third shift valve equipped with a spool having two positions for controlling the shifting between the low-speed gear and the high-speed gear of the second gear unit; a manual selector valve having a plurality of shift positions for distributing the pressurized fluid supply from the source of pressurized fluid to the first, second and third shift valves respectively; first, second and third solenoid valves corresponding to the first, second and third shift valves, respectively for independently controlling the operation of the respective shift valves, thereby establishing a six forward-speed automatic transmission by combining the low-speed gear and the high-speed gear of the second gear unit with each of the first-speed gear, the second speed gear and the third-speed gear of the first gear unit; and means to fixedly position the spool of the third shift valve at one of the two positions by supplying the pressurized fluid to the third shift valve when the manual selector valve is shifted to a particular shift position, thereby locking the second gear unit in one of low-speed gear and the high-speed gear, whereby the six forward-speed automatic transmission is converted to a three forward-speed automatic transmission when the manual selector valve is shifted to the particular shift position.

  13. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, H.

    1989-03-21

    An automatic transmission is described, comprising: a torque converter including an impeller having a connected member, a turbine having an input member and a reactor; and an automatic transmission mechanism having first to third clutches and plural gear units including a single planetary gear unit with a ring gear and a dual planetary gear unit with a ring gear. The single and dual planetary gear units have respective carriers integrally coupled with each other and respective sun gears integrally coupled with each other, the input member of the turbine being coupled with the ring gear of the single planetary gear unit through the first clutch, and being coupled with the sun gear through the second clutch. The connected member of the impeller is coupled with the ring gear of the dual planetary gear of the dual planetary gear unit is made to be and ring gear of the dual planetary gear unit is made to be restrained as required, and the carrier is coupled with an output member.

  14. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, M.; Inuzuka, T.

    1986-08-26

    1. An automatic transmission with four forward speeds and one reverse position, is described which consists of: an input shaft; an output member; first and second planetary gear sets each having a sun gear, a ring gear and a carrier supporting a pinion in mesh with the sun gear and ring gear; the carrier of the first gear set, the ring gear of the second gear set and the output member all being connected; the ring gear of the first gear set connected to the carrier of the second gear set; a first clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the sun gear of the first gear set, including friction elements, a piston selectively engaging the friction elements and a fluid servo in which hydraulic fluid is selectively supplied to the piston; a second clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the sun gear of the second gear set a third clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the carrier of the second gear set including friction elements, a piston selectively engaging the friction elements and a fluid servo in which hydraulic fluid is selectively supplied to the piston; a first drive-establishing means for selectively preventing rotation of the ring gear of the first gear set and the carrier of the second gear set in only one direction and, alternatively, in any direction; a second drive-establishing means for selectively preventing rotation of the sun gear of the second gear set; and a drum being open to the first planetary gear set, with a cylindrical intermediate wall, an inner peripheral wall and outer peripheral wall and forming the hydraulic servos of the first and third clutch means between the intermediate wall and the inner peripheral wall and between the intermediate wall and the outer peripheral wall respectively.

  15. Effect of various binning methods and ROI sizes on the accuracy of the automatic classification system for differentiation between diffuse infiltrative lung diseases on the basis of texture features at HRCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkug; Seo, Joon Beom; Sung, Yu Sub; Park, Bum-Woo; Lee, Youngjoo; Park, Seong Hoon; Lee, Young Kyung; Kang, Suk-Ho

    2008-03-01

    To find optimal binning, variable binning size linear binning (LB) and non-linear binning (NLB) methods were tested. In case of small binning size (Q <= 10), NLB shows significant better accuracy than the LB. K-means NLB (Q = 26) is statistically significant better than every LB. To find optimal binning method and ROI size of the automatic classification system for differentiation between diffuse infiltrative lung diseases on the basis of textural analysis at HRCT Six-hundred circular regions of interest (ROI) with 10, 20, and 30 pixel diameter, comprising of each 100 ROIs representing six regional disease patterns (normal, NL; ground-glass opacity, GGO; reticular opacity, RO; honeycombing, HC; emphysema, EMPH; and consolidation, CONS) were marked by an experienced radiologist from HRCT images. Histogram (mean) and co-occurrence matrix (mean and SD of angular second moment, contrast, correlation, entropy, and inverse difference momentum) features were employed to test binning and ROI effects. To find optimal binning, variable binning size LB (bin size Q: 4~30, 32, 64, 128, 144, 196, 256, 384) and NLB (Q: 4~30) methods (K-means, and Fuzzy C-means clustering) were tested. For automated classification, a SVM classifier was implemented. To assess cross-validation of the system, a five-folding method was used. Each test was repeatedly performed twenty times. Overall accuracies with every combination of variable ROIs, and binning sizes were statistically compared. In case of small binning size (Q <= 10), NLB shows significant better accuracy than the LB. K-means NLB (Q = 26) is statistically significant better than every LB. In case of 30x30 ROI size and most of binning size, the K-means method showed better than other NLB and LB methods. When optimal binning and other parameters were set, overall sensitivity of the classifier was 92.85%. The sensitivity and specificity of the system for each class were as follows: NL, 95%, 97.9%; GGO, 80%, 98.9%; RO 85%, 96.9%; HC, 94

  16. [Wearable Automatic External Defibrillators].

    PubMed

    Luo, Huajie; Luo, Zhangyuan; Jin, Xun; Zhang, Leilei; Wang, Changjin; Zhang, Wenzan; Tu, Quan

    2015-11-01

    Defibrillation is the most effective method of treating ventricular fibrillation(VF), this paper introduces wearable automatic external defibrillators based on embedded system which includes EGG measurements, bioelectrical impedance measurement, discharge defibrillation module, which can automatic identify VF signal, biphasic exponential waveform defibrillation discharge. After verified by animal tests, the device can realize EGG acquisition and automatic identification. After identifying the ventricular fibrillation signal, it can automatic defibrillate to abort ventricular fibrillation and to realize the cardiac electrical cardioversion.

  17. 33 CFR 401.20 - Automatic Identification System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...' maritime Differential Global Positioning System radiobeacon services; or (7) The use of a temporary unit... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System. (a) Each of the following vessels must use an Automatic Identification System...

  18. 33 CFR 401.20 - Automatic Identification System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...' maritime Differential Global Positioning System radiobeacon services; or (7) The use of a temporary unit... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System. (a) Each of the following vessels must use an Automatic Identification System...

  19. 33 CFR 401.20 - Automatic Identification System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...' maritime Differential Global Positioning System radiobeacon services; or (7) The use of a temporary unit... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System. (a) Each of the following vessels must use an Automatic Identification System...

  20. 33 CFR 401.20 - Automatic Identification System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...' maritime Differential Global Positioning System radiobeacon services; or (7) The use of a temporary unit... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Identification System. (a) Each of the following vessels must use an Automatic Identification System...

  1. Automatism and hypoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Guy

    2007-02-01

    A case of a detained person (DP) suffering from insulin-dependent diabetes, who subsequently used the disorder in his defence as a reason to claim automatism, is discussed. The legal and medical history of automatism is outlined along with the present day situation. Forensic physicians should be aware when examining any diabetic that automatism may subsequently be claimed. With this in mind, the importance of relevant history taking specifically relating to diabetic control and symptoms is discussed.

  2. An anatomy of automatism.

    PubMed

    Mackay, R D

    2015-07-01

    The automatism defence has been described as a quagmire of law and as presenting an intractable problem. Why is this so? This paper will analyse and explore the current legal position on automatism. In so doing, it will identify the problems which the case law has created, including the distinction between sane and insane automatism and the status of the 'external factor doctrine', and comment briefly on recent reform proposals.

  3. An anatomy of automatism.

    PubMed

    Mackay, R D

    2015-07-01

    The automatism defence has been described as a quagmire of law and as presenting an intractable problem. Why is this so? This paper will analyse and explore the current legal position on automatism. In so doing, it will identify the problems which the case law has created, including the distinction between sane and insane automatism and the status of the 'external factor doctrine', and comment briefly on recent reform proposals. PMID:26378105

  4. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  5. Automatic Versus Manual Indexing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Meulen, W. A.; Janssen, P. J. F. C.

    1977-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of results in terms of recall and precision from queries submitted to systems with automatic and manual subject indexing. Differences were attributed to query formulation. The effectiveness of automatic indexing was found equivalent to manual indexing. (Author/KP)

  6. Method for automatically scramming a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Schultz, Richard R.; Terry, William K.

    2005-12-27

    An automatically scramming nuclear reactor system. One embodiment comprises a core having a coolant inlet end and a coolant outlet end. A cooling system operatively associated with the core provides coolant to the coolant inlet end and removes heated coolant from the coolant outlet end, thus maintaining a pressure differential therebetween during a normal operating condition of the nuclear reactor system. A guide tube is positioned within the core with a first end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant inlet end of the core, and a second end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant outlet end of the core. A control element is positioned within the guide tube and is movable therein between upper and lower positions, and automatically falls under the action of gravity to the lower position when the pressure differential drops below a safe pressure differential.

  7. Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

    2003-01-01

    An efficient incremental iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a two-dimensional inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0 and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straightforward, black-box reverse-mode applicaiton of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-rder aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoinct) procedures; then, a very efficient noniterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hesian matrices) of lift, wave drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric shape, angle of attack, and freestream Mach number.

  8. Some Advanced Concepts in Discrete Aerodynamic Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Putko, Michele M.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient incremental-iterative approach for differentiating advanced flow codes is successfully demonstrated on a 2D inviscid model problem. The method employs the reverse-mode capability of the automatic- differentiation software tool ADIFOR 3.0, and is proven to yield accurate first-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives. A substantial reduction in CPU time and computer memory is demonstrated in comparison with results from a straight-forward, black-box reverse- mode application of ADIFOR 3.0 to the same flow code. An ADIFOR-assisted procedure for accurate second-order aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives is successfully verified on an inviscid transonic lifting airfoil example problem. The method requires that first-order derivatives are calculated first using both the forward (direct) and reverse (adjoint) procedures; then, a very efficient non-iterative calculation of all second-order derivatives can be accomplished. Accurate second derivatives (i.e., the complete Hessian matrices) of lift, wave-drag, and pitching-moment coefficients are calculated with respect to geometric- shape, angle-of-attack, and freestream Mach number

  9. Automatic and Flexible

    PubMed Central

    Hassin, Ran R.; Bargh, John A.; Zimerman, Shira

    2008-01-01

    Arguing from the nature of goal pursuit and from the economy of mental resources this paper suggests that automatic goal pursuit, much like its controlled counterpart, may be flexible. Two studies that employ goal priming procedures examine this hypothesis using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (Study 1) and a variation of the Iowa Gambling Task (Study 2). Implications of the results for our understanding of the dichotomy between automatic and controlled processes in general, and for our conception of automatic goal pursuit in particular, are discussed. PMID:19325712

  10. Automatic amino acid analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, B. J.; Carle, G. C.; Oyama, V. I.

    1971-01-01

    Analyzer operates unattended or up to 15 hours. It has an automatic sample injection system and can be programmed. All fluid-flow valve switching is accomplished pneumatically from miniature three-way solenoid pilot valves.

  11. AUTOMATIC MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, M.L.; Tabor, C.D. Jr.

    1961-12-01

    A mass spectrometer for analyzing the components of a gas is designed which is capable of continuous automatic operation such as analysis of samples of process gas from a continuous production system where the gas content may be changing. (AEC)

  12. Automatic Payroll Deposit System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    The Automatic Payroll Deposit System in Yakima, Washington's Public School District No. 7, directly transmits each employee's salary amount for each pay period to a bank or other financial institution. (Author/MLF)

  13. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  14. A new automatic synchronizer

    SciTech Connect

    Malm, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    A phase lock loop automatic synchronizer, PLLS, matches generator speed starting from dead stop to bus frequency, and then locks the phase difference at zero, thereby maintaining zero slip frequency while the generator breaker is being closed to the bus. The significant difference between the PLLS and a conventional automatic synchronizer is that there is no slip frequency difference between generator and bus. The PLL synchronizer is most advantageous when the penstock pressure fluctuates the grid frequency fluctuates, or both. The PLL synchronizer is relatively inexpensive. Hydroplants with multiple units can economically be equipped with a synchronizer for each unit.

  15. WOLF; automatic typing program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evenden, G.I.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV program for the Hewlett-Packard 1000 series computer provides for automatic typing operations and can, when employed with manufacturer's text editor, provide a system to greatly facilitate preparation of reports, letters and other text. The input text and imbedded control data can perform nearly all of the functions of a typist. A few of the features available are centering, titles, footnotes, indentation, page numbering (including Roman numerals), automatic paragraphing, and two forms of tab operations. This documentation contains both user and technical description of the program.

  16. AUTOMATIC COUNTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Howell, W.D.

    1957-08-20

    An apparatus for automatically recording the results of counting operations on trains of electrical pulses is described. The disadvantages of prior devices utilizing the two common methods of obtaining the count rate are overcome by this apparatus; in the case of time controlled operation, the disclosed system automatically records amy information stored by the scaler but not transferred to the printer at the end of the predetermined time controlled operations and, in the case of count controlled operation, provision is made to prevent a weak sample from occupying the apparatus for an excessively long period of time.

  17. Automaticity of Conceptual Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Gliksman, Yarden; Itamar, Shai; Leibovich, Tali; Melman, Yonatan; Henik, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    What is bigger, an elephant or a mouse? This question can be answered without seeing the two animals, since these objects elicit conceptual magnitude. How is an object’s conceptual magnitude processed? It was suggested that conceptual magnitude is automatically processed; namely, irrelevant conceptual magnitude can affect performance when comparing physical magnitudes. The current study further examined this question and aimed to expand the understanding of automaticity of conceptual magnitude. Two different objects were presented and participants were asked to decide which object was larger on the screen (physical magnitude) or in the real world (conceptual magnitude), in separate blocks. By creating congruent (the conceptually larger object was physically larger) and incongruent (the conceptually larger object was physically smaller) pairs of stimuli it was possible to examine the automatic processing of each magnitude. A significant congruity effect was found for both magnitudes. Furthermore, quartile analysis revealed that the congruity was affected similarly by processing time for both magnitudes. These results suggest that the processing of conceptual and physical magnitudes is automatic to the same extent. The results support recent theories suggested that different types of magnitude processing and representation share the same core system. PMID:26879153

  18. Automatic sweep circuit

    DOEpatents

    Keefe, Donald J.

    1980-01-01

    An automatically sweeping circuit for searching for an evoked response in an output signal in time with respect to a trigger input. Digital counters are used to activate a detector at precise intervals, and monitoring is repeated for statistical accuracy. If the response is not found then a different time window is examined until the signal is found.

  19. Automatic Program Synthesis Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biermann, A. W.; And Others

    Some of the major results of future goals of an automatic program synthesis project are described in the two papers that comprise this document. The first paper gives a detailed algorithm for synthesizing a computer program from a trace of its behavior. Since the algorithm involves a search, the length of time required to do the synthesis of…

  20. Brut: Automatic bubble classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Christopher; Goodman, Alyssa; Williams, Jonathan; Kendrew, Sarah; Simpson, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Brut, written in Python, identifies bubbles in infrared images of the Galactic midplane; it uses a database of known bubbles from the Milky Way Project and Spitzer images to build an automatic bubble classifier. The classifier is based on the Random Forest algorithm, and uses the WiseRF implementation of this algorithm.

  1. Automatic multiple applicator electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    Easy-to-use, economical device permits electrophoresis on all known supporting media. System includes automatic multiple-sample applicator, sample holder, and electrophoresis apparatus. System has potential applicability to fields of taxonomy, immunology, and genetics. Apparatus is also used for electrofocusing.

  2. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  3. Reactor component automatic grapple

    SciTech Connect

    Greenaway, P.R.

    1982-12-07

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  4. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOEpatents

    Greenaway, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  5. Automatic Data Processing Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Budget, Washington, DC.

    The technology of the automatic information processing field has progressed dramatically in the past few years and has created a problem in common term usage. As a solution, "Datamation" Magazine offers this glossary which was compiled by the U.S. Bureau of the Budget as an official reference. The terms appear in a single alphabetic sequence,…

  6. AUTOmatic Message PACKing Facility

    2004-07-01

    AUTOPACK is a library that provides several useful features for programs using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). Features included are: 1. automatic message packing facility 2. management of send and receive requests. 3. management of message buffer memory. 4. determination of the number of anticipated messages from a set of arbitrary sends, and 5. deterministic message delivery for testing purposes.

  7. Fully automatic telemetry data processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, F. B.; Keipert, F. A.; Lee, R. C.

    1968-01-01

    Satellite Telemetry Automatic Reduction System /STARS 2/, a fully automatic computer-controlled telemetry data processor, maximizes data recovery, reduces turnaround time, increases flexibility, and improves operational efficiency. The system incorporates a CDC 3200 computer as its central element.

  8. Automatism and driving offences.

    PubMed

    Rumbold, John

    2013-10-01

    Automatism is a rarely used defence, but it is particularly used for driving offences because many are strict liability offences. Medical evidence is almost always crucial to argue the defence, and it is important to understand the bars that limit the use of automatism so that the important medical issues can be identified. The issue of prior fault is an important public safeguard to ensure that reasonable precautions are taken to prevent accidents. The total loss of control definition is more problematic, especially with disorders of more gradual onset like hypoglycaemic episodes. In these cases the alternative of 'effective loss of control' would be fairer. This article explores several cases, how the criteria were applied to each, and the types of medical assessment required. PMID:24112330

  9. Automatic transmission control method

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.; Ishiguro, T.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a method of controlling an automatic transmission of an automotive vehicle. The transmission has a gear train which includes a brake for establishing a first lowest speed of the transmission, the brake acting directly on a ring gear which meshes with a pinion, the pinion meshing with a sun gear in a planetary gear train, the ring gear connected with an output member, the sun gear being engageable and disengageable with an input member of the transmission by means of a clutch. The method comprises the steps of: detecting that a shift position of the automatic transmission has been shifted to a neutral range; thereafter introducing hydraulic pressure to the brake if present vehicle velocity is below a predetermined value, whereby the brake is engaged to establish the first lowest speed; and exhausting hydraulic pressure from the brake if present vehicle velocity is higher than a predetermined value, whereby the brake is disengaged.

  10. Automatism and driving offences.

    PubMed

    Rumbold, John

    2013-10-01

    Automatism is a rarely used defence, but it is particularly used for driving offences because many are strict liability offences. Medical evidence is almost always crucial to argue the defence, and it is important to understand the bars that limit the use of automatism so that the important medical issues can be identified. The issue of prior fault is an important public safeguard to ensure that reasonable precautions are taken to prevent accidents. The total loss of control definition is more problematic, especially with disorders of more gradual onset like hypoglycaemic episodes. In these cases the alternative of 'effective loss of control' would be fairer. This article explores several cases, how the criteria were applied to each, and the types of medical assessment required.

  11. Automatic Abstraction in Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, abstraction in planning has been accomplished by either state abstraction or operator abstraction, neither of which has been fully automatic. We present a new method, predicate relaxation, for automatically performing state abstraction. PABLO, a nonlinear hierarchical planner, implements predicate relaxation. Theoretical, as well as empirical results are presented which demonstrate the potential advantages of using predicate relaxation in planning. We also present a new definition of hierarchical operators that allows us to guarantee a limited form of completeness. This new definition is shown to be, in some ways, more flexible than previous definitions of hierarchical operators. Finally, a Classical Truth Criterion is presented that is proven to be sound and complete for a planning formalism that is general enough to include most classical planning formalisms that are based on the STRIPS assumption.

  12. Automatic vehicle monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravman, J. S.; Durrani, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    Automatic vehicle monitoring systems are discussed. In a baseline system for highway applications, each vehicle obtains position information through a Loran-C receiver in rural areas and through a 'signpost' or 'proximity' type sensor in urban areas; the vehicle transmits this information to a central station via a communication link. In an advance system, the vehicle carries a receiver for signals emitted by satellites in the Global Positioning System and uses a satellite-aided communication link to the central station. An advanced railroad car monitoring system uses car-mounted labels and sensors for car identification and cargo status; the information is collected by electronic interrogators mounted along the track and transmitted to a central station. It is concluded that automatic vehicle monitoring systems are technically feasible but not economically feasible unless a large market develops.

  13. Automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy-Wilson, Carol

    2005-04-01

    Great strides have been made in the development of automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology over the past thirty years. Most of this effort has been centered around the extension and improvement of Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approaches to ASR. Current commercially-available and industry systems based on HMMs can perform well for certain situational tasks that restrict variability such as phone dialing or limited voice commands. However, the holy grail of ASR systems is performance comparable to humans-in other words, the ability to automatically transcribe unrestricted conversational speech spoken by an infinite number of speakers under varying acoustic environments. This goal is far from being reached. Key to the success of ASR is effective modeling of variability in the speech signal. This tutorial will review the basics of ASR and the various ways in which our current knowledge of speech production, speech perception and prosody can be exploited to improve robustness at every level of the system.

  14. Automatic volume calibration system

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, A.J.; Aaron, C.C.

    1985-05-06

    The Automatic Volume Calibration System presently consists of three independent volume-measurement subsystems and can possibly be expanded to five subsystems. When completed, the system will manually or automatically perform the sequence of valve-control and data-acquisition operations required to measure given volumes. An LSI-11 minicomputer controls the vacuum and pressure sources and controls solenoid control valves to open and close various volumes. The input data are obtained from numerous displacement, temperature, and pressure sensors read by the LSI-11. The LSI-11 calculates the unknown volume from the data acquired during the sequence of valve operations. The results, based on the Ideal Gas Law, also provide information for feedback and control. This paper describes the volume calibration system, its subsystems, and the integration of the various instrumentation used in the system's design and development. 11 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Automatic Skin Color Beautification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Huang, Da-Yuan; Fuh, Chiou-Shann

    In this paper, we propose an automatic skin beautification framework based on color-temperature-insensitive skin-color detection. To polish selected skin region, we apply bilateral filter to smooth the facial flaw. Last, we use Poisson image cloning to integrate the beautified parts into the original input. Experimental results show that the proposed method can be applied in varied light source environment. In addition, this method can naturally beautify the portrait skin.

  16. Automatic payload deployment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshkian, Narek; Nguyen, Hoa G.; Burmeister, Aaron; Holz, Kevin; Hart, Abraham

    2010-04-01

    The ability to precisely emplace stand-alone payloads in hostile territory has long been on the wish list of US warfighters. This type of activity is one of the main functions of special operation forces, often conducted at great danger. Such risk can be mitigated by transitioning the manual placement of payloads over to an automated placement mechanism by the use of the Automatic Payload Deployment System (APDS). Based on the Automatically Deployed Communication Relays (ADCR) system, which provides non-line-of-sight operation for unmanned ground vehicles by automatically dropping radio relays when needed, the APDS takes this concept a step further and allows for the delivery of a mixed variety of payloads. For example, payloads equipped with a camera and gas sensor in addition to a radio repeater, can be deployed in support of rescue operations of trapped miners. Battlefield applications may include delivering food, ammunition, and medical supplies to the warfighter. Covert operations may require the unmanned emplacement of a network of sensors for human-presence detection, before undertaking the mission. The APDS is well suited for these tasks. Demonstrations have been conducted using an iRobot PackBot EOD in delivering a variety of payloads, for which the performance and results will be discussed in this paper.

  17. Valuing the Advanced Learner: Differentiating up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Sandra; Stanford, Barbara; Reeves, Stacy

    2010-01-01

    In today's educational climate, differentiated instruction is a common practice for students who need remediation; what is less common is to Differentiate Instruction for the advanced learner. Contrary to popular perceptions, advanced learners do not automatically differentiate instruction on their own. Students who have the potential to excel…

  18. Threat-related automatic associations in socially anxious adolescents.

    PubMed

    de Hullu, Eva; de Jong, Peter J; Sportel, B Esther; Nauta, Maaike H

    2011-08-01

    Threat-related automatic associations are assumed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of social anxiety. We tested whether threat-related automatic associations are already evident in high socially anxious adolescents, by comparing a group of adolescents (age 12-15) with subclinical levels of social anxiety (n=170) to a group of low socially anxious adolescents (n=193). We used a single-target implicit association test to measure threat-related automatic associations to social cues. Results showed that indeed in high socially anxious adolescents social cues automatically elicited relatively strong threat-related associations. Supporting the relevance of differentiating between automatic and more explicit measures, both automatic and explicit associations were independently associated with adolescents' level of self-reported social anxiety. The present pattern of findings is not only consistent with the view that automatic and more deliberate threat-related associations are both involved in the etiology of social-anxiety symptoms, but also suggest that both types of associations are proper targets for early intervention programs. PMID:21652030

  19. Automatic range selector

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, Clyde E.

    1977-01-04

    A device is provided for automatically selecting from a plurality of ranges of a scale of values to which a meter may be made responsive, that range which encompasses the value of an unknown parameter. A meter relay indicates whether the unknown is of greater or lesser value than the range to which the meter is then responsive. The rotatable part of a stepping relay is rotated in one direction or the other in response to the indication from the meter relay. Various positions of the rotatable part are associated with particular scales. Switching means are sensitive to the position of the rotatable part to couple the associated range to the meter.

  20. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  1. Automatic level control circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toole, P. C.; Mccarthy, D. M. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An automatic level control circuit for an operational amplifier for minimizing spikes or instantaneous gain of the amplifier at a low period wherein no signal is received on the input is provided. The apparatus includes a multibranch circuit which is connected between an output terminal and a feedback terminal. A pair of zener diodes are connected back to back in series with a capacitor provided in one of the branches. A pair of voltage dividing resistors are connected in another of the branches and a second capacitor is provided in the remaining branch of controlling the high frequency oscillations of the operational amplifier.

  2. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (AISSE) system consisting of a: (1) Twelve-channel all-in-view Differential Global Positioning System (d... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004,...

  3. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (AISSE) system consisting of a: (1) Twelve-channel all-in-view Differential Global Positioning System (d... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004,...

  4. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (AISSE) system consisting of a: (1) Twelve-channel all-in-view Differential Global Positioning System (d... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004,...

  5. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (AISSE) system consisting of a: (1) Twelve-channel all-in-view Differential Global Positioning System (d... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic Identification System... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004,...

  6. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, T.

    A measuring system is described for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principle use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse of fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  7. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, Ted

    1982-01-01

    A measuring system is disclosed for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principal use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse or fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  8. Automatic temperature control

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, J.P.

    1986-07-22

    An automatic temperature control system is described for maintaining a preset temperature in an enclosed space in a building, comprising: heating and cooling means for conditioning the air in the enclosed space to maintain the preset temperature; exterior thermostat means outside the building for sensing ambient exterior temperature levels; interior thermostat means in the enclosed space, preset to the preset temperature to be maintained and connected with the heating and cooling means to energize the means for heating or cooling, as appropriate, when the preset temperature is reached; means defining a heat sink containing a volume of air heated by solar radiation, the volume of the heat sink being such that the temperature level therein is not affected by minor or temporary ambient temperature fluctuations; and heat sink thermostat means in the heat sink sensing the temperature in the heat sink, the heat sink thermostat means being connected in tandem with the exterior thermostat means and operative with the exterior thermostat means to switch the interior thermostat means to either a first readiness state for heating or a second readiness state for cooling, depending upon which mode is indicated by both the exterior and heat sink thermostat means, whereby the system automatically switches between heating and cooling, as required, in response to a comparison of exterior and heat sink temperatures.

  9. Comparison of automatic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppelt, W

    1941-01-01

    This report deals with a reciprocal comparison of an automatic pressure control, an automatic rpm control, an automatic temperature control, and an automatic directional control. It shows the difference between the "faultproof" regulator and the actual regulator which is subject to faults, and develops this difference as far as possible in a parallel manner with regard to the control systems under consideration. Such as analysis affords, particularly in its extension to the faults of the actual regulator, a deep insight into the mechanism of the regulator process.

  10. Automatism, medicine and the law.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, P

    1990-01-01

    The law on automatism is undergoing change. For some time there has been a conflict between the medical and the legal views. The medical profession believes that the present division between sane and insane automatism makes little medical sense. Insane automatism is due to an internal factor, that is, a disease of the brain, while sane automatism is due to an external factor, such as a blow on the head or an injection of a drug. This leads to the situation where, for example, the hypoglycaemia resulting from injected insulin would be sane automatism, while hypoglycaemia while results from an islet tumour would be insane automatism. This would not matter if the consequences were the same. However, sane automatism leads to an acquittal, whereas insane automatism leads to committal to a secure mental hospital. This article traces the development of the concept of automatism in the 1950s to the present time, and looks at the anomalies in the law as it now stands. It considers the medical conditions of, and the law relating to, epilepsy, alcohol and drug automatism, hypoglycaemic automatisms, transient global amnesia, and hysterical automatisms. Sleep automatisms, and offences committed during a somnambulistic automatism, are also discussed in detail. The article also examines the need of the Courts to be provided with expert evidence and the role that the qualified medical practitioner should take. It clarifies the various points which medical practitioners should consider when assessing whether a defence of automatism is justified on medical grounds, and in seeking to establish such a defence. The present law is unsatisfactory, as it does not allow any discretion in sentencing on the part of the judge once a verdict of not guilty by virtue of insane automatism has been passed. The judge must sentence the defendant to detention in a secure mental hospital. This would certainly be satisfactory where violent crimes have been committed. However, it is inappropriate in

  11. Automatic routing module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Janice A.

    1987-01-01

    Automatic Routing Module (ARM) is a tool to partially automate Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) routing. For any accessible launch point or target pair, ARM creates flyable routes that, within the fidelity of the models, are optimal in terms of threat avoidance, clobber avoidance, and adherence to vehicle and planning constraints. Although highly algorithmic, ARM is an expert system. Because of the heuristics applied, ARM generated routes closely resemble manually generated routes in routine cases. In more complex cases, ARM's ability to accumulate and assess threat danger in three dimensions and trade that danger off with the probability of ground clobber results in the safest path around or through difficult areas. The tools available prior to ARM did not provide the planner with enough information or present it in such a way that ensured he would select the safest path.

  12. AUTOMATIC HAND COUNTER

    DOEpatents

    Mann J.R.; Wainwright, A.E.

    1963-06-11

    An automatic, personnel-operated, alpha-particle hand monitor is described which functions as a qualitative instrument to indicate to the person using it whether his hands are cold'' or hot.'' The monitor is activated by a push button and includes several capacitor-triggered thyratron tubes. Upon release of the push button, the monitor starts the counting of the radiation present on the hands of the person. If the count of the radiation exceeds a predetermined level within a predetermined time, then a capacitor will trigger a first thyratron tube to light a hot'' lamp. If, however, the count is below such level during this time period, another capacitor will fire a second thyratron to light a safe'' lamp. (AEC)

  13. Automatic thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.; Cunningham, J. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes a first thermally conductive plate, a second thermally conductive plate and a thermal transfer plate pivotally mounted between the first and second plates. A phase change power unit, including a plunger connected to the transfer plate, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element, connected to the transfer plate, biases the transfer plate in a predetermined position with respect to the first and second plates. When the phase change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first plate, the plunger extends and pivots the transfer plate to vary the thermal conduction between the first and second plates through the transfer plate. The biasing element, transfer plate and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally open thermally conductive path between the first and second plates.

  14. Automatic Bayesian polarity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The polarity of the first motion of a seismic signal from an earthquake is an important constraint in earthquake source inversion. Microseismic events often have low signal-to-noise ratios, which may lead to difficulties estimating the correct first-motion polarities of the arrivals. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to polarity picking that can be both automated and combined with manual picking. This approach includes a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty of the polarity, improving calculation of the polarity probability density function for source inversion. It is sufficiently fast to be incorporated into an automatic processing workflow. When used in source inversion, the results are consistent with those from manual observations. In some cases, they produce a clearer constraint on the range of high-probability source mechanisms, and are better constrained than source mechanisms determined using a uniform probability of an incorrect polarity pick.

  15. Automatic alkaloid removal system.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, Muhammad Rizuwan; Hj Razali, Mohd Hudzari; Abu Bakar, Che Abdullah; Ismail, Wan Ishak Wan; Muda, Wan Musa Wan; Mat, Nashriyah; Zakaria, Abd

    2014-01-01

    This alkaloid automated removal machine was developed at Instrumentation Laboratory, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin Malaysia that purposely for removing the alkaloid toxicity from Dioscorea hispida (DH) tuber. It is a poisonous plant where scientific study has shown that its tubers contain toxic alkaloid constituents, dioscorine. The tubers can only be consumed after it poisonous is removed. In this experiment, the tubers are needed to blend as powder form before inserting into machine basket. The user is need to push the START button on machine controller for switching the water pump ON by then creating turbulence wave of water in machine tank. The water will stop automatically by triggering the outlet solenoid valve. The powders of tubers are washed for 10 minutes while 1 liter of contaminated water due toxin mixture is flowing out. At this time, the controller will automatically triggered inlet solenoid valve and the new water will flow in machine tank until achieve the desire level that which determined by ultra sonic sensor. This process will repeated for 7 h and the positive result is achieved and shows it significant according to the several parameters of biological character ofpH, temperature, dissolve oxygen, turbidity, conductivity and fish survival rate or time. From that parameter, it also shows the positive result which is near or same with control water and assuming was made that the toxin is fully removed when the pH of DH powder is near with control water. For control water, the pH is about 5.3 while water from this experiment process is 6.0 and before run the machine the pH of contaminated water is about 3.8 which are too acid. This automated machine can save time for removing toxicity from DH compared with a traditional method while less observation of the user. PMID:24783795

  16. Automatic Coal-Mining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Coal cutting and removal done with minimal hazard to people. Automatic coal mine cutting, transport and roof-support movement all done by automatic machinery. Exposure of people to hazardous conditions reduced to inspection tours, maintenance, repair, and possibly entry mining.

  17. Automatic Indexing of Full Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonak, Zdenek

    1984-01-01

    Demonstrates efficiency of preparation of query description using semantic analyser method based on analysis of semantic structure of documents in field of automatic indexing. Results obtained are compared with automatic indexing results performed by traditional methods and results of indexing done by human indexers. Sample terms and codes are…

  18. Automatic Command Sequence Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladded, Roy; Khanampompan, Teerapat

    2007-01-01

    Automatic Sequence Generator (Autogen) Version 3.0 software automatically generates command sequences for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and several other JPL spacecraft operated by the multi-mission support team. Autogen uses standard JPL sequencing tools like APGEN, ASP, SEQGEN, and the DOM database to automate the generation of uplink command products, Spacecraft Command Message Format (SCMF) files, and the corresponding ground command products, DSN Keywords Files (DKF). Autogen supports all the major multi-mission mission phases including the cruise, aerobraking, mapping/science, and relay mission phases. Autogen is a Perl script, which functions within the mission operations UNIX environment. It consists of two parts: a set of model files and the autogen Perl script. Autogen encodes the behaviors of the system into a model and encodes algorithms for context sensitive customizations of the modeled behaviors. The model includes knowledge of different mission phases and how the resultant command products must differ for these phases. The executable software portion of Autogen, automates the setup and use of APGEN for constructing a spacecraft activity sequence file (SASF). The setup includes file retrieval through the DOM (Distributed Object Manager), an object database used to store project files. This step retrieves all the needed input files for generating the command products. Depending on the mission phase, Autogen also uses the ASP (Automated Sequence Processor) and SEQGEN to generate the command product sent to the spacecraft. Autogen also provides the means for customizing sequences through the use of configuration files. By automating the majority of the sequencing generation process, Autogen eliminates many sequence generation errors commonly introduced by manually constructing spacecraft command sequences. Through the layering of commands into the sequence by a series of scheduling algorithms, users are able to rapidly and reliably construct the

  19. Electronically controlled automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.; Shiba, H.; Nakamura, K.

    1989-03-28

    This patent describes an electronically controlled automatic transmission having a manual valve working in connection with a manual shift lever, shift valves operated by solenoid valves which are driven by an electronic control circuit previously memorizing shift patterns, and a hydraulic circuit controlled by these manual valve and shift valves for driving brakes and a clutch in order to change speed. Shift patterns of 2-range and L-range, in addition to a shift pattern of D-range, are memorized previously in the electronic control circuit, an operation switch is provided which changes the shift pattern of the electronic control circuit to any shift pattern among those of D-range, 2-range and L-range at time of the manual shift lever being in a D-range position, a releasable lock mechanism is provided which prevents the manual shift lever from entering 2-range and L-range positions, and the hydraulic circuit is set to a third speed mode when the manual shift lever is in the D-range position. The circuit is set to a second speed mode when it is in the 2-range position, and the circuit is set to a first speed mode when it is in the L-range position, respectively, in case where the shift valves are not working.

  20. Automatic Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Robotic welding has been of interest to industrial firms because it offers higher productivity at lower cost than manual welding. There are some systems with automated arc guidance available, but they have disadvantages, such as limitations on types of materials or types of seams that can be welded; susceptibility to stray electrical signals; restricted field of view; or tendency to contaminate the weld seam. Wanting to overcome these disadvantages, Marshall Space Flight Center, aided by Hayes International Corporation, developed system that uses closed-circuit TV signals for automatic guidance of the welding torch. NASA granted license to Combined Technologies, Inc. for commercial application of the technology. They developed a refined and improved arc guidance system. CTI in turn, licensed the Merrick Corporation, also of Nashville, for marketing and manufacturing of the new system, called the CT2 Optical Trucker. CT2 is a non-contracting system that offers adaptability to broader range of welding jobs and provides greater reliability in high speed operation. It is extremely accurate and can travel at high speed of up to 150 inches per minute.

  1. Automatic transmission system

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, J.S.

    1989-04-25

    An automatic transmission system is described for use in vehicles, which comprises: a clutch wheel containing a plurality of concentric rings of decreasing diameter, the clutch wheel being attached to an engine of the vehicle; a plurality of clutch gears corresponding in size to the concentric rings, the clutch gears being adapted to selectively and frictionally engage with the concentric rings of the clutch wheel; an accelerator pedal and a gear selector, the accelerator pedals being connected to one end of a substantially U-shaped frame member, the other end of the substantially U-shaped frame member selectively engaging with one end of one of wires received in a pair of apertures of the gear selector; a plurality of drive gear controllers and a reverse gear controller; means operatively connected with the gear selector and the plurality of drive gear controllers and reverse gear controller for selectively engaging one of the drive and reverse gear controllers depending upon the position of the gear selector; and means for individually connecting the drive and reverse gear controllers with the corresponding clutch gears whereby upon the selection of the gear selector, friction engagement is achieved between the clutch gear and the clutch wheels for rotating the wheel in the forward or reverse direction.

  2. Attaining Automaticity in the Visual Numerosity Task is Not Automatic

    PubMed Central

    Speelman, Craig P.; Muller Townsend, Katrina L.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment is a replication of experiments reported by Lassaline and Logan (1993) using the visual numerosity task. The aim was to replicate the transition from controlled to automatic processing reported by Lassaline and Logan (1993), and to examine the extent to which this result, reported with average group results, can be observed in the results of individuals within a group. The group results in this experiment did replicate those reported by Lassaline and Logan (1993); however, one half of the sample did not attain automaticity with the task, and one-third did not exhibit a transition from controlled to automatic processing. These results raise questions about the pervasiveness of automaticity, and the interpretation of group means when examining cognitive processes. PMID:26635658

  3. Automatic transmission apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hiketa, M.

    1987-10-06

    An automatic transmission apparatus is described comprising: an input shaft, an output shaft disposed behind and coaxially with the input shaft, a counter shaft disposed substantially parallel to both of the input and output shafts, a first gear train including a first gear provided on the input shaft and a second gear provided on the counter shaft to be meshed with the first gear so as to form a first power transmitting path, first friction clutch means operative selectively to make and break the first power transmitting path, a second gear train including a third gear provided through one-way clutch means on a rear end portion of the input shaft and a fourth gear provided on the counter shaft to be meshed with the third gear so as to form a second power transmitting path, second friction clutch means provided at a front end portion of the output shaft, a third gear train including a fifth gear provided on a rear end portion of the counter shaft and a sixth gear provided on the output shaft to be meshed with the fifth gear so as to form a fourth power transmitting path, third friction clutch means operative selectively to make and break the fourth power transmitting path, fourth friction clutch means operative selectively to make and break the second power transmitting path, a fourth gear train including a seventh gear provided on the counter shaft and an eighth gear provided on the output shaft and fifth friction clutch means operative selectively to make and break the fifth power transmitting path.

  4. Conditioned craving cues elicit an automatic approach tendency.

    PubMed

    Van Gucht, Dinska; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Van den Bergh, Omer; Beckers, Tom

    2008-10-01

    In two experiments, we used a Pavlovian differential conditioning procedure to induce craving for chocolate. As a result of repeated pairing with chocolate intake, initially neutral cues came to elicit an automatic approach tendency in a speeded stimulus-response compatibility reaction time task. This automatic approach tendency, moreover, seemed to be sensitive to manipulations of extinction and renewal in the Pavlovian conditioning procedure. These findings corroborate and extend previous reports of automatic approach tendencies elicited by substance-relevant cues in addiction, while controlling for alternative accounts for such observations. Moreover, our data lend support to and extend learning models of cue-induced craving and addiction. Finally, we argue that the procedure we present here provides an ecologically valid behavioural tool that allows studying processes involved in cue-induced craving, addiction and relapse without relying on verbal report. PMID:18684435

  5. Clothes Dryer Automatic Termination Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2014-10-01

    Volume 2: Improved Sensor and Control Designs Many residential clothes dryers on the market today provide automatic cycles that are intended to stop when the clothes are dry, as determined by the final remaining moisture content (RMC). However, testing of automatic termination cycles has shown that many dryers are susceptible to over-drying of loads, leading to excess energy consumption. In particular, tests performed using the DOE Test Procedure in Appendix D2 of 10 CFR 430 subpart B have shown that as much as 62% of the energy used in a cycle may be from over-drying. Volume 1 of this report shows an average of 20% excess energy from over-drying when running automatic cycles with various load compositions and dryer settings. Consequently, improving automatic termination sensors and algorithms has the potential for substantial energy savings in the U.S.

  6. Automatic programming of simulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Tseng, Fan T.; Zhang, Shou X.; Dwan, Wen S.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of automatic programming is to improve the overall environment for describing the program. This improved environment is realized by a reduction in the amount of detail that the programmer needs to know and is exposed to. Furthermore, this improved environment is achieved by a specification language that is more natural to the user's problem domain and to the user's way of thinking and looking at the problem. The goal of this research is to apply the concepts of automatic programming (AP) to modeling discrete event simulation system. Specific emphasis is on the design and development of simulation tools to assist the modeler define or construct a model of the system and to then automatically write the corresponding simulation code in the target simulation language, GPSS/PC. A related goal is to evaluate the feasibility of various languages for constructing automatic programming simulation tools.

  7. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1988-01-01

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  8. Prospects for de-automatization.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F

    2011-06-01

    Research by Raz and his associates has repeatedly found that suggestions for hypnotic agnosia, administered to highly hypnotizable subjects, reduce or even eliminate Stroop interference. The present paper sought unsuccessfully to extend these findings to negative priming in the Stroop task. Nevertheless, the reduction of Stroop interference has broad theoretical implications, both for our understanding of automaticity and for the prospect of de-automatizing cognition in meditation and other altered states of consciousness.

  9. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  10. Automatic multirate methods for ordinary differential equations. [Adaptive time steps

    SciTech Connect

    Gear, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study is made of the application of integration methods in which different step sizes are used for different members of a system of equations. Such methods can result in savings if the cost of derivative evaluation is high or if a system is sparse; however, the estimation and control of errors is very difficult and can lead to high overheads. Three approaches are discussed, and it is shown that the least intuitive is the most promising. 2 figures.

  11. Automatic rapid attachable warhead section

    DOEpatents

    Trennel, Anthony J.

    1994-05-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for (1) automatically selecting warheads or reentry vehicles from a storage area containing a plurality of types of warheads or reentry vehicles, (2) automatically selecting weapon carriers from a storage area containing at least one type of weapon carrier, (3) manipulating and aligning the selected warheads or reentry vehicles and weapon carriers, and (4) automatically coupling the warheads or reentry vehicles with the weapon carriers such that coupling of improperly selected warheads or reentry vehicles with weapon carriers is inhibited. Such inhibition enhances safety of operations and is achieved by a number of means including computer control of the process of selection and coupling and use of connectorless interfaces capable of assuring that improperly selected items will be rejected or rendered inoperable prior to coupling. Also disclosed are a method and apparatus wherein the stated principles pertaining to selection, coupling and inhibition are extended to apply to any item-to-be-carried and any carrying assembly.

  12. Automatic rapid attachable warhead section

    DOEpatents

    Trennel, A.J.

    1994-05-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for automatically selecting warheads or reentry vehicles from a storage area containing a plurality of types of warheads or reentry vehicles, automatically selecting weapon carriers from a storage area containing at least one type of weapon carrier, manipulating and aligning the selected warheads or reentry vehicles and weapon carriers, and automatically coupling the warheads or reentry vehicles with the weapon carriers such that coupling of improperly selected warheads or reentry vehicles with weapon carriers is inhibited. Such inhibition enhances safety of operations and is achieved by a number of means including computer control of the process of selection and coupling and use of connectorless interfaces capable of assuring that improperly selected items will be rejected or rendered inoperable prior to coupling. Also disclosed are a method and apparatus wherein the stated principles pertaining to selection, coupling and inhibition are extended to apply to any item-to-be-carried and any carrying assembly. 10 figures.

  13. Automatic analysis of macroarrays images.

    PubMed

    Caridade, C R; Marcal, A S; Mendonca, T; Albuquerque, P; Mendes, M V; Tavares, F

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of dot blot (macroarray) images is currently based on the human identification of positive/negative dots, which is a subjective and time consuming process. This paper presents a system for the automatic analysis of dot blot images, using a pre-defined grid of markers, including a number of ON and OFF controls. The geometric deformations of the input image are corrected, and the individual markers detected, both tasks fully automatically. Based on a previous training stage, the probability for each marker to be ON is established. This information is provided together with quality parameters for training, noise and classification, allowing for a fully automatic evaluation of a dot blot image. PMID:21097139

  14. Automatic programming of simulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Tseng, Fan T.; Zhang, Shou X.; Dwan, Wen S.

    1990-01-01

    The concepts of software engineering were used to improve the simulation modeling environment. Emphasis was placed on the application of an element of rapid prototyping, or automatic programming, to assist the modeler define the problem specification. Then, once the problem specification has been defined, an automatic code generator is used to write the simulation code. The following two domains were selected for evaluating the concepts of software engineering for discrete event simulation: manufacturing domain and a spacecraft countdown network sequence. The specific tasks were to: (1) define the software requirements for a graphical user interface to the Automatic Manufacturing Programming System (AMPS) system; (2) develop a graphical user interface for AMPS; and (3) compare the AMPS graphical interface with the AMPS interactive user interface.

  15. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  16. Automatic interpretation of Schlumberger soundings

    SciTech Connect

    Ushijima, K.

    1980-09-01

    The automatic interpretation of apparent resistivity curves from horizontally layered earth models is carried out by the curve-fitting method in three steps: (1) the observed VES data are interpolated at equidistant points of electrode separations on the logarithmic scale by using the cubic spline function, (2) the layer parameters which are resistivities and depths are predicted from the sampled apparent resistivity values by SALS system program and (3) the theoretical VES curves from the models are calculated by Ghosh's linear filter method using the Zhody's computer program. Two soundings taken over Takenoyu geothermal area were chosen to test the procedures of the automatic interpretation.

  17. Algorithms for skiascopy measurement automatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomins, Sergejs; Trukša, Renārs; KrūmiĆa, Gunta

    2014-10-01

    Automatic dynamic infrared retinoscope was developed, which allows to run procedure at a much higher rate. Our system uses a USB image sensor with up to 180 Hz refresh rate equipped with a long focus objective and 850 nm infrared light emitting diode as light source. Two servo motors driven by microprocessor control the rotation of semitransparent mirror and motion of retinoscope chassis. Image of eye pupil reflex is captured via software and analyzed along the horizontal plane. Algorithm for automatic accommodative state analysis is developed based on the intensity changes of the fundus reflex.

  18. Traduction automatique et terminologie automatique (Automatic Translation and Automatic Terminology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansereau, Jules

    1978-01-01

    An exposition of reasons why a system of automatic translation could not use a terminology bank except as a source of information. The fundamental difference between the two tools is explained and examples of translation and mistranslation are given as evidence of the limits and possibilities of each process. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  19. Automatic Error Analysis Using Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, E. J.; Cloud, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for automatic error analysis using interval mathematics is introduced. A comparison to standard error propagation methods shows that in cases involving complicated formulas, the interval approach gives comparable error estimates with much less effort. Several examples are considered, and numerical errors are computed using the INTLAB…

  20. Automatic 35 mm slide duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, H. F.; Texler, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Automatic duplicator is readily assembled from conventional, inexpensive equipment and parts. Series of slides can be exposed without operator attention, eliminating considerable manual handling and processing ordinarily required. At end of programmed exposure sequence, unit shuts off and audible alarm signals completion of process.

  1. Bubble vector in automatic merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, P. R.; Butler, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is within the capability of the DMAP language to build a set of vectors that can grow incrementally to be applied automatically and economically within a DMAP loop that serves to append sub-matrices that are generated within a loop to a core matrix. The method of constructing such vectors is explained.

  2. Automatically Preparing Safe SQL Queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, Prithvi; Sistla, A. Prasad; Venkatakrishnan, V. N.

    We present the first sound program source transformation approach for automatically transforming the code of a legacy web application to employ PREPARE statements in place of unsafe SQL queries. Our approach therefore opens the way for eradicating the SQL injection threat vector from legacy web applications.

  3. Graphonomics, Automaticity and Handwriting Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucha, Oliver; Tucha, Lara; Lange, Klaus W.

    2008-01-01

    A recent review of handwriting research in "Literacy" concluded that current curricula of handwriting education focus too much on writing style and neatness and neglect the aspect of handwriting automaticity. This conclusion is supported by evidence in the field of graphonomic research, where a range of experiments have been used to investigate…

  4. Automatic Identification of Metaphoric Utterances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Jonathan Edwin

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the problem of metaphor identification in linguistic and computational semantics, considering both manual and automatic approaches. It describes a manual approach to metaphor identification, the Metaphoricity Measurement Procedure (MMP), and compares this approach with other manual approaches. The dissertation then…

  5. Automatic marker for photographic film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabbard, N. M.; Surrency, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    Commercially-produced wire-marking machine is modified to title or mark film rolls automatically. Machine is used with film drive mechanism which is powered with variable-speed, 28-volt dc motor. Up to 40 frames per minute can be marked, reducing time and cost of process.

  6. How automatic are crossmodal correspondences?

    PubMed

    Spence, Charles; Deroy, Ophelia

    2013-03-01

    The last couple of years have seen a rapid growth of interest (especially amongst cognitive psychologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and developmental researchers) in the study of crossmodal correspondences - the tendency for our brains (not to mention the brains of other species) to preferentially associate certain features or dimensions of stimuli across the senses. By now, robust empirical evidence supports the existence of numerous crossmodal correspondences, affecting people's performance across a wide range of psychological tasks - in everything from the redundant target effect paradigm through to studies of the Implicit Association Test, and from speeded discrimination/classification tasks through to unspeeded spatial localisation and temporal order judgment tasks. However, one question that has yet to receive a satisfactory answer is whether crossmodal correspondences automatically affect people's performance (in all, or at least in a subset of tasks), as opposed to reflecting more of a strategic, or top-down, phenomenon. Here, we review the latest research on the topic of crossmodal correspondences to have addressed this issue. We argue that answering the question will require researchers to be more precise in terms of defining what exactly automaticity entails. Furthermore, one's answer to the automaticity question may also hinge on the answer to a second question: Namely, whether crossmodal correspondences are all 'of a kind', or whether instead there may be several different kinds of crossmodal mapping (e.g., statistical, structural, and semantic). Different answers to the automaticity question may then be revealed depending on the type of correspondence under consideration. We make a number of suggestions for future research that might help to determine just how automatic crossmodal correspondences really are. PMID:23370382

  7. Auxiliary circuit enables automatic monitoring of EKG'S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Auxiliary circuits allow direct, automatic monitoring of electrocardiograms by digital computers. One noiseless square-wave output signal for each trigger pulse from an electrocardiogram preamplifier is produced. The circuit also permits automatic processing of cardiovascular data from analog tapes.

  8. Automatisms: bridging clinical neurology with criminal law.

    PubMed

    Rolnick, Joshua; Parvizi, Josef

    2011-03-01

    The law, like neurology, grapples with the relationship between disease states and behavior. Sometimes, the two disciplines share the same terminology, such as automatism. In law, the "automatism defense" is a claim that action was involuntary or performed while unconscious. Someone charged with a serious crime can acknowledge committing the act and yet may go free if, relying on the expert testimony of clinicians, the court determines that the act of crime was committed in a state of automatism. In this review, we explore the relationship between the use of automatism in the legal and clinical literature. We close by addressing several issues raised by the automatism defense: semantic ambiguity surrounding the term automatism, the presence or absence of consciousness during automatisms, and the methodological obstacles that have hindered the study of cognition during automatisms.

  9. Automatic quantification of in vitro NET formation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Volker; Goosmann, Christian; Kühn, Lars I; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) consist of decondensed chromatin studded with granular and some cytoplasmic proteins. They are formed by activated neutrophil granulocytes, also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) as the result of an active cell death program, named NETosis. NETosis can be induced by a wide range of stimuli including coculture of neutrophils with pathogens (bacteria, fungi, parasites, virus particles), activated platelets, or pathogen components. The first step of the NETotic cascade is stimulation of one or several receptors followed by activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway that culminates in the assembly of the multimeric NADPH oxidase complex and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Later, intracellular membranes disintegrate, the granular protein Neutrophil Elastase enters the nucleus and processes core histones that also get hypercitrullinated. This leads to decondensation and mobilization of chromatin. The amount of NET formation varies with the degree of stimulation, and this is dependent on the type and concentration of the stimulus. NETs can be quantified using various methods including fluorescence microscopy or measuring DNA release. Each of these methods have specific drawbacks: analysis of fluorescence microscopy is prone to subjective variations, and DNA release does not differentiate between DNA that has been released by NETosis or by other forms of cell death. Here we present a protocol to semi-automatically quantify NET formation. It relies on the observation that anti-chromatin antibodies bind more readily to decondensed chromatin present in the nuclei of cells undergoing NETosis and in the NETs. Relating the fluorescence signals of the anti-chromatin antibody to the signals of a DNA-binding dye allows the automatic calculation of the percentage of netting neutrophils. This method does not require sophisticated microscopic equipment, and the images are quantified with a public-domain software package. PMID

  10. Self-Compassion and Automatic Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akin, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the relationships between self-compassion and automatic thoughts. Participants were 299 university students. In this study, the Self-compassion Scale and the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire were used. The relationships between self-compassion and automatic thoughts were examined using correlation analysis…

  11. Automatic Target Recognizer Database Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, David R.

    1987-09-01

    Data representative of imaging sensors and scenarios which form the inputs for automatic target recognizers (ATRs) is critical to their development, testing and performance evaluation. The Data Base Committee of the Automatic Target Recognizer Working Group provides a forum and produces products to assist collection, distribution and use of data for development of military ATR systems. Examples discussed in the paper include digital image data exchange format specifications. Requirements for ground and image truth data have been the subject of surveys. Such inputs are intended as recommendations for consideration by imagery data collection activities whose products are potentially useful for ATR development. Other topics concerning collection, reduction, use and exchange of imaging sensor data are outlined but not discussed in detail.

  12. A MODULAR APPROACH TO SIMULATION WITH AUTOMATIC SENSITIVITY CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    K. HANSON; G. CUNNINGHAM

    2001-02-01

    When using simulation codes, one often has the task of minimizing a scalar objective function with respect to numerous parameters. This situation occurs when trying to fit (assimilate) data or trying to optimize an engineering design. For simulations in which the objective function to be minimized is reasonably well behaved, that is, is differentiable and does not contain too many multiple minima, gradient-based optimization methods can reduce the number of function evaluations required to determine the minimizing parameters. However, gradient-based methods are only advantageous if one can efficiently evaluate the gradients of the objective function. Adjoint differentiation efficiently provides these sensitivities. One way to obtain code for calculating adjoint sensitivities is to use special compilers to process the simulation code. However, this approach is not always so ''automatic''. We will describe a modular approach to constructing simulation codes, which permits adjoint differentiation to be incorporated with relative ease.

  13. Automatically-Programed Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, L.; Clerman, N.

    1985-01-01

    Software produces cutter location files for numerically-controlled machine tools. APT, acronym for Automatically Programed Tools, is among most widely used software systems for computerized machine tools. APT developed for explicit purpose of providing effective software system for programing NC machine tools. APT system includes specification of APT programing language and language processor, which executes APT statements and generates NC machine-tool motions specified by APT statements.

  14. Automatic computation of transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Atcitty, Stanley; Watson, Luke Dale

    2015-04-14

    Technologies pertaining to the automatic computation of transfer functions for a physical system are described herein. The physical system is one of an electrical system, a mechanical system, an electromechanical system, an electrochemical system, or an electromagnetic system. A netlist in the form of a matrix comprises data that is indicative of elements in the physical system, values for the elements in the physical system, and structure of the physical system. Transfer functions for the physical system are computed based upon the netlist.

  15. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  16. Automatic translation among spoken languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Sharon M.; Costigan, Kelly

    1994-02-01

    The Machine Aided Voice Translation (MAVT) system was developed in response to the shortage of experienced military field interrogators with both foreign language proficiency and interrogation skills. Combining speech recognition, machine translation, and speech generation technologies, the MAVT accepts an interrogator's spoken English question and translates it into spoken Spanish. The spoken Spanish response of the potential informant can then be translated into spoken English. Potential military and civilian applications for automatic spoken language translation technology are discussed in this paper.

  17. Automatic translation among spoken languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Sharon M.; Costigan, Kelly

    1994-01-01

    The Machine Aided Voice Translation (MAVT) system was developed in response to the shortage of experienced military field interrogators with both foreign language proficiency and interrogation skills. Combining speech recognition, machine translation, and speech generation technologies, the MAVT accepts an interrogator's spoken English question and translates it into spoken Spanish. The spoken Spanish response of the potential informant can then be translated into spoken English. Potential military and civilian applications for automatic spoken language translation technology are discussed in this paper.

  18. Group Dynamics in Automatic Imitation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Neil; Reddy, Geetha; Catmur, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Imitation–matching the configural body movements of another individual–plays a crucial part in social interaction. We investigated whether automatic imitation is not only influenced by who we imitate (ingroup vs. outgroup member) but also by the nature of an expected interaction situation (competitive vs. cooperative). In line with assumptions from Social Identity Theory), we predicted that both social group membership and the expected situation impact on the level of automatic imitation. We adopted a 2 (group membership target: ingroup, outgroup) x 2 (situation: cooperative, competitive) design. The dependent variable was the degree to which participants imitated the target in a reaction time automatic imitation task. 99 female students from two British Universities participated. We found a significant two-way interaction on the imitation effect. When interacting in expectation of cooperation, imitation was stronger for an ingroup target compared to an outgroup target. However, this was not the case in the competitive condition where imitation did not differ between ingroup and outgroup target. This demonstrates that the goal structure of an expected interaction will determine the extent to which intergroup relations influence imitation, supporting a social identity approach. PMID:27657926

  19. Automatic Contrail Detection and Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, John M.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1998-01-01

    Automatic contrail detection is of major importance in the study of the atmospheric effects of aviation. Due to the large volume of satellite imagery, selecting contrail images for study by hand is impractical and highly subject to human error. It is far better to have a system in place that will automatically evaluate an image to determine 1) whether it contains contrails and 2) where the contrails are located. Preliminary studies indicate that it is possible to automatically detect and locate contrails in Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery with a high degree of confidence. Once contrails have been identified and localized in a satellite image, it is useful to segment the image into contrail versus noncontrail pixels. The ability to partition image pixels makes it possible to determine the optical properties of contrails, including optical thickness and particle size. In this paper, we describe a new technique for segmenting satellite images containing contrails. This method has good potential for creating a contrail climatology in an automated fashion. The majority of contrails are detected, rejecting clutter in the image, even cirrus streaks. Long, thin contrails are most easily detected. However, some contrails may be missed because they are curved, diffused over a large area, or present in short segments. Contrails average 2-3 km in width for the cases studied.

  20. Automatic programming for critical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loganantharaj, Raj L.

    1988-01-01

    The important phases of a software life cycle include verification and maintenance. Usually, the execution performance is an expected requirement in a software development process. Unfortunately, the verification and the maintenance of programs are the time consuming and the frustrating aspects of software engineering. The verification cannot be waived for the programs used for critical applications such as, military, space, and nuclear plants. As a consequence, synthesis of programs from specifications, an alternative way of developing correct programs, is becoming popular. The definition, or what is understood by automatic programming, has been changed with our expectations. At present, the goal of automatic programming is the automation of programming process. Specifically, it means the application of artificial intelligence to software engineering in order to define techniques and create environments that help in the creation of high level programs. The automatic programming process may be divided into two phases: the problem acquisition phase and the program synthesis phase. In the problem acquisition phase, an informal specification of the problem is transformed into an unambiguous specification while in the program synthesis phase such a specification is further transformed into a concrete, executable program.

  1. Automatic Extraction of Building Outline from High Resolution Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yandong

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new approach for automated extraction of building boundary from high resolution imagery is proposed. The proposed approach uses both geometric and spectral properties of a building to detect and locate buildings accurately. It consists of automatic generation of high quality point cloud from the imagery, building detection from point cloud, classification of building roof and generation of building outline. Point cloud is generated from the imagery automatically using semi-global image matching technology. Buildings are detected from the differential surface generated from the point cloud. Further classification of building roof is performed in order to generate accurate building outline. Finally classified building roof is converted into vector format. Numerous tests have been done on images in different locations and results are presented in the paper.

  2. ARCO: a program for Automatic Reduction of CCD Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, E.; Messina, S.; Cutispoto, G.; Parihar, P. S.; Comparato, M.; Busá, I.; Lanza, A. F.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pagano, I.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    The huge amount of CCD photometric data collected by robotic telescopes (as for instance the ICE-T telescope to be installed at Dome-C) requires a fully automated approach to the reduction and analysis procedures. To this end, we are developing a pipeline, making use of IRAF, DAOPHOTII and tasks build up by us, which will enable to automatically extract differential magnitude time series. Both aperture and PSF photometry methods are used to build a proper sample of comparison stars, with the best method between the two being automatically selected. Finally, the search of rotational periods is performed. To test our package, we present results obtained using a 4-year dataset of a field in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) containing about 350 stars (150 of which turned out to be periodic variables).

  3. Computation of Sensitivity Derivatives of Navier-Stokes Equations using Complex Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate computation of sensitivity derivatives is becoming an important item in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) because of recent emphasis on using nonlinear CFD methods in aerodynamic design, optimization, stability and control related problems. Several techniques are available to compute gradients or sensitivity derivatives of desired flow quantities or cost functions with respect to selected independent (design) variables. Perhaps the most common and oldest method is to use straightforward finite-differences for the evaluation of sensitivity derivatives. Although very simple, this method is prone to errors associated with choice of step sizes and can be cumbersome for geometric variables. The cost per design variable for computing sensitivity derivatives with central differencing is at least equal to the cost of three full analyses, but is usually much larger in practice due to difficulty in choosing step sizes. Another approach gaining popularity is the use of Automatic Differentiation software (such as ADIFOR) to process the source code, which in turn can be used to evaluate the sensitivity derivatives of preselected functions with respect to chosen design variables. In principle, this approach is also very straightforward and quite promising. The main drawback is the large memory requirement because memory use increases linearly with the number of design variables. ADIFOR software can also be cumber-some for large CFD codes and has not yet reached a full maturity level for production codes, especially in parallel computing environments.

  4. Automatic twin vessel recrystallizer. Effective purification of acetaminophen by successive automatic recrystallization and absolute determination of purity by DSC.

    PubMed

    Nara, Osamu

    2011-01-24

    I describe an interchangeable twin vessel (J, N) automatic glass recrystallizer that eliminates the time-consuming recovery and recycling of crystals for repeated recrystallization. The sample goes in the dissolution vessel J containing a magnetic stir-bar K; J is clamped to the upper joint H of recrystallizer body D. Empty crystallization vessel N is clamped to the lower joint M. Pure solvent is delivered to the dissolution vessel and the crystallization vessel via the head of the condenser A. Crystallization vessel is heated (P). The dissolution reservoir is stirred and heated by the solvent vapor (F). Continuous outflow of filtrate E out of J keeps N at a stable boiling temperature. This results in efficient dissolution, evaporation and separation of pure crystals Q. Pure solvent in the dissolution reservoir is recovered by suction. Empty dissolution and crystallization vessels are detached. Stirrer magnet is transferred to the crystallization vessel and the role of the vessels are then reversed. Evacuating mother liquor out of the upper twin vessel, the apparatus unit is ready for the next automatic recrystallization by refilling twin vessels with pure solvent. We show successive automatic recrystallization of acetaminophen from diethyl ether obtaining acetaminophen of higher melting temperatures than USP and JP reference standards by 8× automatic recrystallization, 96% yield at each stage. Also, I demonstrate a novel approach to the determination of absolute purity by combining the successive automatic recrystallization with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement requiring no reference standards. This involves the measurement of the criterial melting temperature T(0) corresponding to the 100% pure material and quantitative ΔT in DSC based on the van't Hoff law of melting point depression. The purity of six commercial acetaminophen samples and reference standards and an eight times recrystallized product evaluated were 98.8 mol%, 97.9 mol%, 99

  5. The concept of automatic reinforcement: implications for behavioral research in developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T R

    1994-01-01

    Automatic reinforcement refers to situations in which behavior is maintained by operant mechanisms independent of the social environment. A number of difficulties exist in conducting an adequate functional analysis of automatically reinforced aberrant behavior. For example, sources of reinforcement are often difficult or impossible to identify, manipulate, or control. Further, the development of treatments is often difficult because many behavioral interventions, such as timeout, involve manipulation of the social environment--an approach that may be functionally irrelevant in the case of automatic reinforcement. This article discusses the problems inherent in the analysis of automatically reinforced behavior and reviews four classes of treatment that are compatible with that behavioral function. The four types of intervention reviewed include manipulations of establishing operations, sensory extinction, differential reinforcement, and punishment. Suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:7938787

  6. The concept of automatic reinforcement: implications for behavioral research in developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T R

    1994-01-01

    Automatic reinforcement refers to situations in which behavior is maintained by operant mechanisms independent of the social environment. A number of difficulties exist in conducting an adequate functional analysis of automatically reinforced aberrant behavior. For example, sources of reinforcement are often difficult or impossible to identify, manipulate, or control. Further, the development of treatments is often difficult because many behavioral interventions, such as timeout, involve manipulation of the social environment--an approach that may be functionally irrelevant in the case of automatic reinforcement. This article discusses the problems inherent in the analysis of automatically reinforced behavior and reviews four classes of treatment that are compatible with that behavioral function. The four types of intervention reviewed include manipulations of establishing operations, sensory extinction, differential reinforcement, and punishment. Suggestions for future research are discussed.

  7. Automatic Synthesis of Anthropomorphic Pulmonary CT Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Carretero, Daniel; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Diaz Cacio, Mario; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The great density and structural complexity of pulmonary vessels and airways impose limitations on the generation of accurate reference standards, which are critical in training and in the validation of image processing methods for features such as pulmonary vessel segmentation or artery–vein (AV) separations. The design of synthetic computed tomography (CT) images of the lung could overcome these difficulties by providing a database of pseudorealistic cases in a constrained and controlled scenario where each part of the image is differentiated unequivocally. This work demonstrates a complete framework to generate computational anthropomorphic CT phantoms of the human lung automatically. Starting from biological and image-based knowledge about the topology and relationships between structures, the system is able to generate synthetic pulmonary arteries, veins, and airways using iterative growth methods that can be merged into a final simulated lung with realistic features. A dataset of 24 labeled anthropomorphic pulmonary CT phantoms were synthesized with the proposed system. Visual examination and quantitative measurements of intensity distributions, dispersion of structures and relationships between pulmonary air and blood flow systems show good correspondence between real and synthetic lungs (p > 0.05 with low Cohen’s d effect size and AUC values), supporting the potentiality of the tool and the usefulness of the generated phantoms in the biomedical image processing field. PMID:26731653

  8. SPHOTOM - Package for an Automatic Multicolour Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimucha, Š.; Vaňko, M.; Mikloš, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present basic information about package SPHOTOM for an automatic multicolour photometry. This package is in development for the creation of a photometric pipe-line, which we plan to use in the near future with our new instruments. It could operate in two independent modes, (i) GUI mode, in which the user can select images and control functions of package through interface and (ii) command line mode, in which all processes are controlled using a main parameter file. SPHOTOM is developed as a universal package for Linux based systems with easy implementation for different observatories. The photometric part of the package is based on the Sextractor code, which allows us to detect all objects on the images and perform their photometry with different apertures. We can also perform astrometric solutions for all images for a correct cross-identification of the stars on the images. The result is a catalogue of all objects with their instrumental photometric measurements which are consequently used for a differential magnitudes calculations with one or more comparison stars, transformations to an international system, and determinations of colour indices.

  9. The Automaticity of Social Life.

    PubMed

    Bargh, John A; Williams, Erin L

    2006-02-01

    Much of social life is experienced through mental processes that are not intended and about which one is fairly oblivious. These processes are automatically triggered by features of the immediate social environment, such as the group memberships of other people, the qualities of their behavior, and features of social situations (e.g., norms, one's relative power). Recent research has shown these nonconscious influences to extend beyond the perception and interpretation of the social world to the actual guidance, over extended time periods, of one's important goal pursuits and social interactions.

  10. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for a prototype Loran C receiver. The receiver uses a microcomputer to control a memory aided phase-locked loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The circuit designed for the AGC is described, and bench and flight test results are presented. The AGC circuit described actually samples starting at a point 40 microseconds after a zero crossing determined by the software lock pulse ultimately generated by a 30 microsecond delay and add network in the receiver front end envelope detector.

  11. The Automaticity of Social Life.

    PubMed

    Bargh, John A; Williams, Erin L

    2006-02-01

    Much of social life is experienced through mental processes that are not intended and about which one is fairly oblivious. These processes are automatically triggered by features of the immediate social environment, such as the group memberships of other people, the qualities of their behavior, and features of social situations (e.g., norms, one's relative power). Recent research has shown these nonconscious influences to extend beyond the perception and interpretation of the social world to the actual guidance, over extended time periods, of one's important goal pursuits and social interactions. PMID:18568084

  12. Students' Feedback Preferences: How Do Students React to Timely and Automatically Generated Assessment Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether or not undergraduate and postgraduate accounting students at an Australian university differentiate between timely feedback and extremely timely feedback, and whether or not the replacement of manually written formal assessment feedback with automatically generated feedback influences students' perception of…

  13. Mediating Effects of Working Memory in the Relation between Rapid Automatized Naming and Chinese Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Xiaoqian; Li, Guangze; Li, Rongbao

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the mediating role of working memory (WM) in the relation between rapid automatized naming (RAN) and Chinese reading comprehension. Three tasks assessing differentially visual and verbal components of WM were programmed by E-prime 2.0. Data collected from 55 Chinese college students were analyzed using correlations and…

  14. The Masculinity of Money: Automatic Stereotypes Predict Gender Differences in Estimated Salaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melissa J.; Paluck, Elizabeth Levy; Spencer-Rodgers, Julie

    2010-01-01

    We present the first empirical investigation of why men are assumed to earn higher salaries than women (the "salary estimation effect"). Although this phenomenon is typically attributed to conscious consideration of the national wage gap (i.e., real inequities in salary), we hypothesize instead that it reflects differential, automatic economic…

  15. Automatic Computer Mapping of Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedes, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    Computer processing of 17 wavelength bands of visible, reflective infrared, and thermal infrared scanner spectrometer data, and of three wavelength bands derived from color aerial film has resulted in successful automatic computer mapping of eight or more terrain classes in a Yellowstone National Park test site. The tests involved: (1) supervised and non-supervised computer programs; (2) special preprocessing of the scanner data to reduce computer processing time and cost, and improve the accuracy; and (3) studies of the effectiveness of the proposed Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) data channels in the automatic mapping of the same terrain, based on simulations, using the same set of scanner data. The following terrain classes have been mapped with greater than 80 percent accuracy in a 12-square-mile area with 1,800 feet of relief; (1) bedrock exposures, (2) vegetated rock rubble, (3) talus, (4) glacial kame meadow, (5) glacial till meadow, (6) forest, (7) bog, and (8) water. In addition, shadows of clouds and cliffs are depicted, but were greatly reduced by using preprocessing techniques.

  16. Capillary-driven automatic packaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Hong, Lingfei; Nie, Baoqing; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-04-21

    Packaging continues to be one of the most challenging steps in micro-nanofabrication, as many emerging techniques (e.g., soft lithography) are incompatible with the standard high-precision alignment and bonding equipment. In this paper, we present a simple-to-operate, easy-to-adapt packaging strategy, referred to as Capillary-driven Automatic Packaging (CAP), to achieve automatic packaging process, including the desired features of spontaneous alignment and bonding, wide applicability to various materials, potential scalability, and direct incorporation in the layout. Specifically, self-alignment and self-engagement of the CAP process induced by the interfacial capillary interactions between a liquid capillary bridge and the top and bottom substrates have been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed with scalable implications. High-precision alignment (of less than 10 µm) and outstanding bonding performance (up to 300 kPa) has been reliably obtained. In addition, a 3D microfluidic network, aligned and bonded by the CAP technique, has been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this facile yet robust packaging technique for emerging microfluidic and bioengineering applications.

  17. Automatic temperature controlled retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlott, Kerstin; Koinzer, Stefan; Ptaszynski, Lars; Bever, Marco; Baade, Alex; Roider, Johann; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    Laser coagulation is a treatment method for many retinal diseases. Due to variations in fundus pigmentation and light scattering inside the eye globe, different lesion strengths are often achieved. The aim of this work is to realize an automatic feedback algorithm to generate desired lesion strengths by controlling the retinal temperature increase with the irradiation time. Optoacoustics afford non-invasive retinal temperature monitoring during laser treatment. A 75 ns/523 nm Q-switched Nd:YLF laser was used to excite the temperature-dependent pressure amplitudes, which were detected at the cornea by an ultrasonic transducer embedded in a contact lens. A 532 nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser served for photocoagulation. The ED50 temperatures, for which the probability of ophthalmoscopically visible lesions after one hour in vivo in rabbits was 50%, varied from 63°C for 20 ms to 49°C for 400 ms. Arrhenius parameters were extracted as ΔE=273 J mol-1 and A=3.1044 s-1. Control algorithms for mild and strong lesions were developed, which led to average lesion diameters of 162+/-34 μm and 189+/-34 μm, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the sizes of the automatically controlled lesions were widely independent of the treatment laser power and the retinal pigmentation.

  18. Automatic Inspection In Industry Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Richard A.

    1989-02-01

    With increasing competition in the manufacturing industries product quality is becoming even more important. The shortcomings of human inspectors in many applications are well know, however, the eye/brain combination is very powerful and difficult to replace. At best, any system only simulates a small subset of the human's operations. The economic justification for installing automatic inspection is often difficult without previous applications experience. It therefore calls for confidence and long-term vision by those making the decisions. Over the last ten years the use of such systems has increased as the technology involved has matured and the risks have diminished. There is now a complete spectrum of industrial applications from simple, low-cost systems using standard sensors and computer hardware to the higher cost, custom-designed systems using novel sensors and processing hardware. The underlying growth in enabling technology has been in many areas; sensors and sensing techniques, signal processing and data processing have all moved forward rapidly. This paper will examine the currrent state of automatic inspection and look to the future. The use of expert systems is an obvious candidate. Parallel processing, giving massive increases in the speed of data reduction, is also likely to play a major role in future systems.

  19. Automatic Inspection In Industry Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Richard A.

    1989-03-01

    With increasing competition in the manufacturing industries product quality is becoming even more important. The shortcomings of human inspectors in many applications are well know, however, the eye/brain combination is very powerful and difficult to replace. At best, any system only simulates a small subset of the human's operations. The economic justification for installing automatic inspection is often difficult without previous applications experience. It therefore calls for confidence and long-term vision by those making the decisions. Over the last ten years the use of such systems has increased as the technology involved has matured and the risks have diminished. There is now a complete spectrum of industrial applications from simple, low-cost systems using standard sensors and computer hardware to the higher cost, custom-designed systems using novel sensors and processing hardware. The underlying growth in enabling technology has been in many areas; sensors and sensing techniques, signal processing and data processing have all moved forward rapidly. This paper will examine the currrent state of automatic inspection and look to the future. The use of expert systems is an obvious candidate. Parallel processing, giving massive increases in the speed of data reduction, is also likely to play a major role in future systems.

  20. Differential operator in seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Differential operators can detect significant changes in signals. This has been utilized to enhance the contrast of the seizure signatures in depth EEG or ECoG. We have actually taken normalized exponential of absolute value of single or double derivative of epileptic ECoG. This in short we call differential filtering. Windowed variance operation has been performed to automatically detect seizure onset on differentially filtered signal. A novel method for determining the duration of seizure has also been proposed. Since all operations take only linear time, the whole method is extremely fast. Seven empirical parameters have been introduced whose patient specific thresholding brings down the rate of false detection to a bare minimum. Results of implementation of the methods on the ECoG data of four epileptic patients have been reported with an ROC curve analysis. High value of the area under the ROC curve indicates excellent detection performance.

  1. Differentiated Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Robert W.; And Others

    This report describes school operation changes in scheduling, curriculum, decisionmaking powers, and individualization of instruction that are concurrent with the adoption of differentiated staffing. The author defines differentiated staffing, explains where and at what levels it has been utilized, provides descriptions of results achieved, gives…

  2. Differential games.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaiya, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    General discussion of the theory of differential games with two players and zero sum. Games starting at a fixed initial state and ending at a fixed final time are analyzed. Strategies for the games are defined. The existence of saddle values and saddle points is considered. A stochastic version of a differential game is used to examine the synthesis problem.

  3. Towards automatic classification of all WISE sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurcz, A.; Bilicki, M.; Solarz, A.; Krupa, M.; Pollo, A.; Małek, K.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has detected hundreds of millions of sources over the entire sky. Classifying them reliably is, however, a challenging task owing to degeneracies in WISE multicolour space and low levels of detection in its two longest-wavelength bandpasses. Simple colour cuts are often not sufficient; for satisfactory levels of completeness and purity, more sophisticated classification methods are needed. Aims: Here we aim to obtain comprehensive and reliable star, galaxy, and quasar catalogues based on automatic source classification in full-sky WISE data. This means that the final classification will employ only parameters available from WISE itself, in particular those which are reliably measured for the majority of sources. Methods: For the automatic classification we applied a supervised machine learning algorithm, support vector machines (SVM). It requires a training sample with relevant classes already identified, and we chose to use the SDSS spectroscopic dataset (DR10) for that purpose. We tested the performance of two kernels used by the classifier, and determined the minimum number of sources in the training set required to achieve stable classification, as well as the minimum dimension of the parameter space. We also tested SVM classification accuracy as a function of extinction and apparent magnitude. Thus, the calibrated classifier was finally applied to all-sky WISE data, flux-limited to 16 mag (Vega) in the 3.4 μm channel. Results: By calibrating on the test data drawn from SDSS, we first established that a polynomial kernel is preferred over a radial one for this particular dataset. Next, using three classification parameters (W1 magnitude, W1-W2 colour, and a differential aperture magnitude) we obtained very good classification efficiency in all the tests. At the bright end, the completeness for stars and galaxies reaches ~95%, deteriorating to ~80% at W1 = 16 mag, while for quasars it stays at a level of

  4. MRI-Guided Target Motion Assessment using Dynamic Automatic Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Daniel L.

    Motion significantly impacts the radiotherapy process and represents one of the persisting problems in treatment delivery. In order to improve motion management techniques and implement future image guided radiotherapy tools such as MRI-guidance, automatic segmentation algorithms hold great promise. Such algorithms are attractive due to their direct measurement accuracy, speed, and ability to assess motion trajectories for daily treatment plan modifications. We developed and optimized an automatic segmentation technique to enable target tracking using MR cines, 4D-MRI, and 4D-CT. This algorithm overcomes weaknesses in automatic contouring such as lack of image contrast, subjectivity, slow speed, and lack of differentiating feature vectors by the use of morphological processing. The software is enhanced with predictive parameter capabilities and dynamic processing. The 4D-MRI images are acquired by applying a retrospective phase binning approach to radially-acquired MR image projections. The quantification of motion is validated with a motor phantom undergoing a known trajectory in 4D-CT, 4D-MRI, and in MR cines from the ViewRay MR-Guided RT system. In addition, a clinical case study demonstrates wide-reaching implications of the software to segment lesions in the brain and lung as well as critical structures such as the liver. Auto-segmentation results from MR cines of canines correlate well with manually drawn contours, both in terms of Dice similarity coefficient and agreement of extracted motion trajectories.

  5. Cerebral Correlates of Automatic Associations Towards Performance Enhancing Substances

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Sebastian; Wolff, Wanja

    2015-01-01

    The direct assessment of explicit attitudes toward performance enhancing substances, for example Neuroenhancement or doping in sports, can be affected by social desirability biases and cheating attempts. According to Dual Process Theories of cognition, indirect measures like the Implicit Association Test (IAT) measure automatic associations toward a topic (as opposed to explicit attitudes measured by self-report measures). Such automatic associations are thought to occur rapidly and to evade voluntary control. However, whether or not such indirect tests actually reflect automatic associations is difficult to validate. Electroencephalography (EEG) has a superior time resolution which can differentiate between highly automatic compared to more elaborate processing stages. We therefore used EEG to examine on which processing stages cortical differences between negative or positive attitudes to doping occur, and whether or not these differences can be related to BIAT scores. We tested 42 university students (31 females, 24.43 ± 3.17 years old), who were requested to complete a brief doping IAT (BIAT) on attitudes toward doping. Cerebral activity during doping BIAT completion was assessed using high-density EEG. Behaviorally, participants D-scores exhibited negative attitudes toward doping, represented by faster reaction times in the doping + dislike pairing task. Event-related potentials (ERPs) revealed earliest effects between 200 and 300 ms. Here, a relatively larger occipital positivity was found for the doping + dislike pairing task. Further, in the LPP time range between 400 and 600 ms a larger late positive potential was found for the doping + dislike pairing task over central regions. These LPP amplitude differences were successfully predicting participants' BIAT D-scores. Results indicate that event-related potentials differentiate between positive and negative doping attitudes at stages of mid-latency. However, it seems that IAT scores can be predicted only

  6. ANPS - AUTOMATIC NETWORK PROGRAMMING SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Development of some of the space program's large simulation projects -- like the project which involves simulating the countdown sequence prior to spacecraft liftoff -- requires the support of automated tools and techniques. The number of preconditions which must be met for a successful spacecraft launch and the complexity of their interrelationship account for the difficulty of creating an accurate model of the countdown sequence. Researchers developed ANPS for the Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center to assist programmers attempting to model the pre-launch countdown sequence. Incorporating the elements of automatic programming as its foundation, ANPS aids the user in defining the problem and then automatically writes the appropriate simulation program in GPSS/PC code. The program's interactive user dialogue interface creates an internal problem specification file from user responses which includes the time line for the countdown sequence, the attributes for the individual activities which are part of a launch, and the dependent relationships between the activities. The program's automatic simulation code generator receives the file as input and selects appropriate macros from the library of software modules to generate the simulation code in the target language GPSS/PC. The user can recall the problem specification file for modification to effect any desired changes in the source code. ANPS is designed to write simulations for problems concerning the pre-launch activities of space vehicles and the operation of ground support equipment and has potential for use in developing network reliability models for hardware systems and subsystems. ANPS was developed in 1988 for use on IBM PC or compatible machines. The program requires at least 640 KB memory and one 360 KB disk drive, PC DOS Version 2.0 or above, and GPSS/PC System Version 2.0 from Minuteman Software. The program is written in Turbo Prolog Version 2.0. GPSS/PC is a trademark of Minuteman Software. Turbo Prolog

  7. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control system (AGC) was designed and constructed for the prototype Loran C receiver. The AGC is designed to improve the signal-to-signal ratio of the received Loran signals. The AGC design does not require any analog to digital conversion and it utilizes commonly available components. The AGC consists of: (1) a circuit which samples the peak of the envelope of the Loran signal to obtain an AGC voltage for each of three Loran stations, (2) a dc gain circuit to control the overall gain of the AGC system, and (3) an AGC amplification of the input RF signal. The performance of the AGC system was observed in bench and flight tests; it has improved the overall accuracy of the receiver. Improvements in the accuracy of the time difference calculations to within approx. + or - 1.5 microseconds of the observed time differnces for a given position are reported.

  8. Automatic inspection of leather surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelzleitner, Wolfgang; Niel, Albert

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the key elements of a system for detecting quality defects on leather surfaces. The inspection task must treat defects like scars, mite nests, warts, open fissures, healed scars, holes, pin holes, and fat folds. The industrial detection of these defects is difficult because of the large dimensions of the leather hides (2 m X 3 m), and the small dimensions of the defects (150 micrometers X 150 micrometers ). Pattern recognition approaches suffer from the fact that defects are hidden on an irregularly textured background, and can be hardly seen visually by human graders. We describe the methods tested for automatic classification using image processing, which include preprocessing, local feature description of texture elements, and final segmentation and grading of defects. We conclude with a statistical evaluation of the recognition error rate, and an outlook on the expected industrial performance.

  9. Automatic blocking of nested loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert; Dongarra, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Blocked algorithms have much better properties of data locality and therefore can be much more efficient than ordinary algorithms when a memory hierarchy is involved. On the other hand, they are very difficult to write and to tune for particular machines. The reorganization is considered of nested loops through the use of known program transformations in order to create blocked algorithms automatically. The program transformations used are strip mining, loop interchange, and a variant of loop skewing in which invertible linear transformations (with integer coordinates) of the loop indices are allowed. Some problems are solved concerning the optimal application of these transformations. It is shown, in a very general setting, how to choose a nearly optimal set of transformed indices. It is then shown, in one particular but rather frequently occurring situation, how to choose an optimal set of block sizes.

  10. Automatic tools for system testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peccia, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    As spacecraft control and other space-related ground systems become increasingly complex, the effort required in testing and validation also increases. Implementation of a spacecraft control system normally involves a number of incremental deliveries. In addition kernel or general purpose software may also be involved, which must itself be considered in the integration and testing program. Tools can be used to assist this testing. These can reduce the effort required or alternatively they can ensure that for a given level of effort, a better job is done. Great benefit could be derived by automating certain types of testing (interactive software) which up to now has been performed manually at a terminal. This paper reports on an on-going study. The study examines means of automating spacecraft control system testing, evaluates relevant commercial tools and aims to prototype basic automatic testing functions.

  11. Automatic home medical product recommendation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Thomas, Selena B; Tang, Chunqiang

    2012-04-01

    Web-based personal health records (PHRs) are being widely deployed. To improve PHR's capability and usability, we proposed the concept of intelligent PHR (iPHR). In this paper, we use automatic home medical product recommendation as a concrete application to demonstrate the benefits of introducing intelligence into PHRs. In this new application domain, we develop several techniques to address the emerging challenges. Our approach uses treatment knowledge and nursing knowledge, and extends the language modeling method to (1) construct a topic-selection input interface for recommending home medical products, (2) produce a global ranking of Web pages retrieved by multiple queries, and (3) provide diverse search results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our techniques using USMLE medical exam cases. PMID:20703712

  12. Automatic Mechetronic Wheel Light Device

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Mohammed John Fitzgerald

    2004-09-14

    A wheel lighting device for illuminating a wheel of a vehicle to increase safety and enhance aesthetics. The device produces the appearance of a "ring of light" on a vehicle's wheels as the vehicle moves. The "ring of light" can automatically change in color and/or brightness according to a vehicle's speed, acceleration, jerk, selection of transmission gears, and/or engine speed. The device provides auxiliary indicator lights by producing light in conjunction with a vehicle's turn signals, hazard lights, alarm systems, and etc. The device comprises a combination of mechanical and electronic components and can be placed on the outer or inner surface of a wheel or made integral to a wheel or wheel cover. The device can be configured for all vehicle types, and is electrically powered by a vehicle's electrical system and/or battery.

  13. Automatic insulation resistance testing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wyant, Francis J.; Nowlen, Steven P.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for automatic measurement of insulation resistances of a multi-conductor cable. In one embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, a plurality of input relay controlled contacts, a plurality of output relay controlled contacts, a relay controller and a computer. In another embodiment of the invention the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, an input switching unit, an output switching unit and a control unit/data logger. Embodiments of the apparatus of the invention may also incorporate cable fire testing means. The apparatus and methods of the present invention use either voltage or current for input and output measured variables.

  14. Autoclass: An automatic classification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutz, John; Cheeseman, Peter; Hanson, Robin

    1991-01-01

    The task of inferring a set of classes and class descriptions most likely to explain a given data set can be placed on a firm theoretical foundation using Bayesian statistics. Within this framework, and using various mathematical and algorithmic approximations, the AutoClass System searches for the most probable classifications, automatically choosing the number of classes and complexity of class descriptions. A simpler version of AutoClass has been applied to many large real data sets, has discovered new independently-verified phenomena, and has been released as a robust software package. Recent extensions allow attributes to be selectively correlated within particular classes, and allow classes to inherit, or share, model parameters through a class hierarchy. The mathematical foundations of AutoClass are summarized.

  15. Automatic electronic fish tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, P. W.; Hoffman, E.; Merriner, J. V.; Richards, C. E.; Lovelady, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A newly developed electronic fish tracking system to automatically monitor the movements and migratory habits of fish is reported. The system is aimed particularly at studies of effects on fish life of industrial facilities which use rivers or lakes to dump their effluents. Location of fish is acquired by means of acoustic links from the fish to underwater Listening Stations, and by radio links which relay tracking information to a shore-based Data Base. Fish over 4 inches long may be tracked over a 5 x 5 mile area. The electronic fish tracking system provides the marine scientist with electronics which permit studies that were not practical in the past and which are cost-effective compared to manual methods.

  16. Automatic Synthesis Of Greedy Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhansali, Sanjay; Miriyala, Kanth; Harandi, Mehdi T.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes a knowledge based approach to automatically generate Lisp programs using the Greedy method of algorithm design. The system's knowledge base is composed of heuristics for recognizing problems amenable to the Greedy method and knowledge about the Greedy strategy itself (i.e., rules for local optimization, constraint satisfaction, candidate ordering and candidate selection). The system has been able to generate programs for a wide variety of problems including the job-scheduling problem, the 0-1 knapsack problem, the minimal spanning tree problem, and the problem of arranging files on tape to minimize access time. For the special class of problems called matroids, the synthesized program provides optimal solutions, whereas for most other problems the solutions are near-optimal.

  17. Automatic toilet seat lowering apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Guerty, Harold G.

    1994-09-06

    A toilet seat lowering apparatus includes a housing defining an internal cavity for receiving water from the water supply line to the toilet holding tank. A descent delay assembly of the apparatus can include a stationary dam member and a rotating dam member for dividing the internal cavity into an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber and controlling the intake and evacuation of water in a delayed fashion. A descent initiator is activated when the internal cavity is filled with pressurized water and automatically begins the lowering of the toilet seat from its upright position, which lowering is also controlled by the descent delay assembly. In an alternative embodiment, the descent initiator and the descent delay assembly can be combined in a piston linked to the rotating dam member and provided with a water channel for creating a resisting pressure to the advancing piston and thereby slowing the associated descent of the toilet seat. A toilet seat lowering apparatus includes a housing defining an internal cavity for receiving water from the water supply line to the toilet holding tank. A descent delay assembly of the apparatus can include a stationary dam member and a rotating dam member for dividing the internal cavity into an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber and controlling the intake and evacuation of water in a delayed fashion. A descent initiator is activated when the internal cavity is filled with pressurized water and automatically begins the lowering of the toilet seat from its upright position, which lowering is also controlled by the descent delay assembly. In an alternative embodiment, the descent initiator and the descent delay assembly can be combined in a piston linked to the rotating dam member and provided with a water channel for creating a resisting pressure to the advancing piston and thereby slowing the associated descent of the toilet seat.

  18. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  19. Sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sinisi, A A; Pasquali, D; Notaro, A; Bellastella, A

    2003-01-01

    In humans, like as in other mammals, the gonads, the internal genital ducts, and the external genital structures all develop from bipotential embryologic tissues. Male or female phenotype develops through a cascade of processes which initiate with sex determination and follow with sex differentiation. The karyotype (46, XY or 46, XX) of the embryo (genetic sex) determines whether primordial gonad differentiates into a testis or an ovary, respectively (gonadal differentiation). A Y-related gene, SRY, acts as a switch signal for testis differentiation. Testis development process involves several steps controlled by other non-OY-linked genes, such as Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1), EMX2, LIM1, steroidogenic factor 1(SF-1), SRY box-related gene 9 (SOX9). Since other genes, such as Wnt-4 and DAX-1, are necessary for the initiation of female pathway in sex determination, female development cannot be considered a default process. Hormonal production of differentiated gonads is relevant for differentiation of the internal and external genitalia during fetal life, and for the development of secondary sex characteristics at puberty. Antimullerian hormone (AMH) secreted by Sertoli cells inhibits the development of female internal genitalia (tube, uterus, upper part of vagina); testosterone secreted by Leydig cells induces stabilization of wolffian ducts and development of internal male genitalia. Differentiation of external male genitalia requires the transformation of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone by 5alpha reductase type 2 expressed in genital skin and urogenital sinus. The effects of androgens occur in presence of functional androgen receptor (AR) protein. Mutations of genes coding for steroidogenic enzymes, AMH, AMH receptor, AR and 5alpha reductase are all associated with impairment of sex differentiation and result in genital ambiguity. PMID:12834017

  20. Automatic star-horizon angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, K.; Koso, D. A.; Nardella, P. C.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic star horizontal angle measuring aid for general navigational use incorporates an Apollo type sextant. The eyepiece of the sextant is replaced with two light detectors and appropriate circuitry. The device automatically determines the angle between a navigational star and a unique point on the earths horizon as seen on a spacecraft.

  1. Automatic Item Generation of Probability Word Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holling, Heinz; Bertling, Jonas P.; Zeuch, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical word problems represent a common item format for assessing student competencies. Automatic item generation (AIG) is an effective way of constructing many items with predictable difficulties, based on a set of predefined task parameters. The current study presents a framework for the automatic generation of probability word problems…

  2. Annual Report: Automatic Informative Abstracting and Extracting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, L. L.; And Others

    The development of automatic indexing, abstracting, and extracting systems is investigated. Part I describes the development of tools for making syntactic and semantic distinctions of potential use in automatic indexing and extracting. One of these tools is a program for syntactic analysis (i.e., parsing) of English, the other is a dictionary of…

  3. Automatic Contour Tracking in Ultrasound Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Min; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new automatic contour tracking system, EdgeTrak, for the ultrasound image sequences of human tongue is presented. The images are produced by a head and transducer support system (HATS). The noise and unrelated high-contrast edges in ultrasound images make it very difficult to automatically detect the correct tongue surfaces. In…

  4. Automatic Grading of Spreadsheet and Database Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacic, Zlatko J.; Green, John Steven

    2012-01-01

    Growing enrollment in distance education has increased student-to-lecturer ratios and, therefore, increased the workload of the lecturer. This growing enrollment has resulted in mounting efforts to develop automatic grading systems in an effort to reduce this workload. While research in the design and development of automatic grading systems has a…

  5. Automatic data editing: a brief introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Liepins, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the automatic data editing process: (1) check the data records for consistency, (2) analyze the inconsistent records to determine the inconsistent variables. It is stated that the application of automatic data editing is broad, and two specific examples are cited. One example, that of a vehicle maintenance data base is used to illustrate the process.

  6. 6 CFR 7.28 - Automatic declassification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic declassification. 7.28 Section 7.28 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Classified Information § 7.28 Automatic declassification. (a) Subject to paragraph (b) of...

  7. Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A.R.; Abshire, James B.; Spinhirne, James D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An autonomous, low-power atmospheric lidar instrument is being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This compact, portable lidar will operate continuously in a temperature controlled enclosure, charge its own batteries through a combination of a small rugged wind generator and solar panels, and transmit its data from remote locations to ground stations via satellite. A network of these instruments will be established by co-locating them at remote Automatic Weather Station (AWS) sites in Antarctica under the auspices of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF Office of Polar Programs provides support to place the weather stations in remote areas of Antarctica in support of meteorological research and operations. The AWS meteorological data will directly benefit the analysis of the lidar data while a network of ground based atmospheric lidar will provide knowledge regarding the temporal evolution and spatial extent of Type la polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). These clouds play a crucial role in the annual austral springtime destruction of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica, i.e. the ozone hole. In addition, the lidar will monitor and record the general atmospheric conditions (transmission and backscatter) of the overlying atmosphere which will benefit the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Prototype lidar instruments have been deployed to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station (1995-96, 2000) and to an Automated Geophysical Observatory site (AGO 1) in January 1999. We report on data acquired with these instruments, instrument performance, and anticipated performance of the AWS Lidar.

  8. Ekofisk automatic GPS subsidence measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mes, M.J.; Landau, H.; Luttenberger, C.

    1996-10-01

    A fully automatic GPS satellite-based procedure for the reliable measurement of subsidence of several platforms in almost real time is described. Measurements are made continuously on platforms in the North Sea Ekofisk Field area. The procedure also yields rate measurements, which are also essential for confirming platform safety, planning of remedial work, and verification of subsidence models. GPS measurements are more attractive than seabed pressure-gauge-based platform subsidence measurements-they are much cheaper to install and maintain and not subject to gauge drift. GPS measurements were coupled to oceanographic quantities such as the platform deck clearance, which leads to less complex offshore survey procedures. Ekofisk is an oil and gas field in the southern portion of the Norwegian North Sea. Late in 1984, it was noticed that the Ekofisk platform decks were closer to the sea surface than when the platforms were installed-subsidence was the only logical explanation. After the subsidence phenomenon was recognized, an accurate measurement method was needed to measure progression of subsidence and the associated subsidence rate. One available system for which no further development was needed, was the NAVSTAR GPS-measurements started in March 1985.

  9. Automatic segmentation of psoriasis lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Yang; Shi, Chenbo; Wang, Li; Shu, Chang

    2014-10-01

    The automatic segmentation of psoriatic lesions is widely researched these years. It is an important step in Computer-aid methods of calculating PASI for estimation of lesions. Currently those algorithms can only handle single erythema or only deal with scaling segmentation. In practice, scaling and erythema are often mixed together. In order to get the segmentation of lesions area - this paper proposes an algorithm based on Random forests with color and texture features. The algorithm has three steps. The first step, the polarized light is applied based on the skin's Tyndall-effect in the imaging to eliminate the reflection and Lab color space are used for fitting the human perception. The second step, sliding window and its sub windows are used to get textural feature and color feature. In this step, a feature of image roughness has been defined, so that scaling can be easily separated from normal skin. In the end, Random forests will be used to ensure the generalization ability of the algorithm. This algorithm can give reliable segmentation results even the image has different lighting conditions, skin types. In the data set offered by Union Hospital, more than 90% images can be segmented accurately.

  10. Actuator for automatic cruising system

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.

    1989-03-07

    An actuator for an automatic cruising system is described, comprising: a casing; a control shaft provided in the casing for rotational movement; a control motor for driving the control shaft; an input shaft; an electromagnetic clutch and a reduction gear which are provided between the control motor and the control shaft; and an external linkage mechanism operatively connected to the control shaft; wherein the reduction gear is a type of Ferguson's mechanical paradox gear having a pinion mounted on the input shaft always connected to the control motor; a planetary gear meshing with the pinion so as to revolve around the pinion; a static internal gear meshing with the planetary gear and connected with the electromagnetic clutch for movement to a position restricting rotation of the static internal gear; and a rotary internal gear fixed on the control shaft and meshed with the planetary gear, the rotary internal gear having a number of teeth slightly different from a number of teeth of the static internal gear; and the electromagnetic clutch has a tubular electromagnetic coil coaxially provided around the input shaft and an engaging means for engaging and disengaging with the static internal gear in accordance with on-off operation of the electromagnetic coil.

  11. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  12. Automatic restart of complex irrigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, H.D.; Alcock, R.; DeBoer, D.W.; Olson, D.I. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    Automatic restart of irrigation systems under load management has the potential to maximize pumping time during off-peak hours. Existing automation technology ranges from time delay relays to more sophisticated control using computers together with weather data to optimize irrigation practices. Centrifugal pumps and water hammer concerns prevent automatic restart of common but often complex irrigation systems in South Dakota. The irrigator must manually prime the pump and control water hammer during pipeline pressurization. Methods to prime centrifugal pumps and control water hammer facilitate automatic restart after load management is released. Seven priming methods and three water hammer control methods were investigated. A sump pump and small vacuum pump were used to test two automatic prime and restart systems in the laboratory. A variable frequency phase converter was also used to automatically control water hammer during pipeline pressurization. Economical methods to safely prime and restart centrifugal pumps were discussed. The water hammer control methods safely pressurize the pipeline but require a higher initial investment. The automatic restart systems can be used to safely restart centrifugal pumps and control water hammer after load management is released. Based upon laboratory research and a technical review of available restart components, a computer software program was developed. The program assists customers in evaluating various restart options for automatic restarting of electric irrigation pumps. For further information on the software program, contact the South Dakota State University, Department of Agricultural Engineering.

  13. Automatisms in non common law countries.

    PubMed

    Falk-Pedersen, J K

    1997-01-01

    The distinction made in the common law tradition between sane and insane automatisms, and in particular the labelling of epileptic automatisms as insane, are legal concepts which surprise and even astonish lawyers of other traditions, whether they work within a civil law system or one with elements both from civil law and common law. It could be useful to those lawyers, doctors and patients struggling for a change in the common law countries to receive comparative material from other countries. Thus, the way automatisms are dealt with in non-common law countries will be discussed with an emphasis on the Norwegian criminal law system. In Norway no distinction is made between sane and insane automatisms and the plea Not Guilty by virtue of epileptic automatism is both available and valid assuming certain conditions are met. No. 44 of the Penal Code states that acts committed while the perpetrator is unconscious are not punishable. Automatisms are regarded as "relative unconsciousness", and thus included under No. 44. Exceptions may be made if the automatism is a result of self-inflicted intoxication following the consumption of alcohol or (illegal) drugs. Also, the role and relevance of experts as well as the law of some other European countries will be briefly discussed.

  14. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    The foregoing studies are intended to define a differentiation process and to permit genetic access to the mechanisms that control this process. In order to elucidate the basic mechanisms whereby a cell dictates its own defined morphogenic changes, we have found it helpful to study an organism that can be manipulated both biochemically and genetically. We have attempted to develop the studies initiated by Poindexter,Stove and Stanier, and Schmidt and Stanier (16, 17, 20) with the Caulobacter genus so that these bacteria can serve as a model system for prokaryotic differentiation. The Caulobacter life cycle, defined in synchronously growing cultures, includes a sequential series of morphological changes that occur at specific times in the cycle and at specific locations in the cell. Six distinct cellular characteristics, which are peculiar to these bacteria, have been defined and include (i) the synthesis of a polar organelle which may be membranous (21-23), (ii) a satellite DNA in the stalked cell (26), (iii) pili to which RNA bacteriophage specifically adsorb (16, 33), (iv) a single polar flagellum(17), (v) a lipopolysaccharide phage receptor site (27), and (vi) new cell wall material at the flagellated pole of the cell giving rise to a stalk (19, 20). Cell division, essential for the viability of the organism, is dependent on the irreversible differentiation of a flagellated swarmer cell to a mature stalked cell. The specific features of the Caulobacter system which make it a system of choice for studies of the control of sequential events resulting in cellular differentiation can be summarized as follows. 1) Cell populations can be synchronized, and homogeneous populations at each stage in the differentiation cycle can thus be obtained. 2) A specific technique has been developed whereby the progress of the differentiation cycle can be accurately measured by adsorption of labeled RNA phage or penetration of labeled phage DNA into specific cell forms. This

  15. Automatic Operation For A Robot Lawn Mower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. Y.; Cao, Z. L.; Oh, S. J.; Kattan, E. U.; Hall, E. L.

    1987-02-01

    A domestic mobile robot, lawn mower, which performs the automatic operation mode, has been built up in the Center of Robotics Research, University of Cincinnati. The robot lawn mower automatically completes its work with the region filling operation, a new kind of path planning for mobile robots. Some strategies for region filling of path planning have been developed for a partly-known or a unknown environment. Also, an advanced omnidirectional navigation system and a multisensor-based control system are used in the automatic operation. Research on the robot lawn mower, especially on the region filling of path planning, is significant in industrial and agricultural applications.

  16. Automatic Behavior Pattern Classification for Social Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Abraham; Bellas, Francisco; Caamaño, Pilar; Duro, Richard J.

    In this paper, we focus our attention on providing robots with a system that allows them to automatically detect behavior patterns in other robots, as a first step to introducing social responsive robots. The system is called ANPAC (Automatic Neural-based Pattern Classification). Its main feature is that ANPAC automatically adjusts the optimal processing window size and obtains the appropriate features through a dimensional transformation process that allow for the classification of behavioral patterns of large groups of entities from perception datasets. Here we present the basic elements and operation of ANPAC, and illustrate its applicability through the detection of behavior patterns in the motion of flocks.

  17. Automatic defensive control of asynchronous sequential machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Control theoretic techniques are utilised to develop automatic controllers that counteract robotic adversarial interventions in the operation of asynchronous sequential machines. The scenario centres on automatic protection against pre-programmed adversarial agents that attempt to subvert the operation of an asynchronous computing system. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of defensive controllers that automatically defeat such adversarial agents are derived. These conditions are stated in terms of skeleton matrices - matrices of zeros and ones obtained directly from the given description of the asynchronous sequential machine being protected. When defensive controllers exist, a procedure for their design is outlined.

  18. Output gear of automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ideta, Y.; Miida, S.

    1986-12-16

    An automatic transmission is described for a front engine, front wheel drive vehicle, comprising: a torque converter; a main power train comprising a rotatory terminal member, the main power train being connected with the torque converter for transmitting a driving torque from the torque converter to the terminal member; housing means enclosing the main power train, the housing means having a cylindrical bore and at least one oil feed passage opening in a cylindrical surface of the bore, and an output gear rotatably supported by the housing means and connected detachably with the terminal member of the main power train for transmitting the driving torque from the main power train to front wheels of the vehicle. The main power train is placed between the torque converter and the output gear, the output gear having a hub which is splined detachably to the terminal member, and which is fitting in the bore of the housing means in such a manner that the hub can rotate in the bore. The hub has an annular groove formed on an outer cylindrical surface of the hub, the output gear being formed with lubricating means extending from the annular groove for conveying oil from the annular groove, the oil feed passage of the housing means opening into the annular groove for supplying oil into the lubricating means through the annular groove. The annular groove has sufficient depth and width within a range permitted by a strength of the hub to prevent a shortage of the oil supply through the annular groove to the lubricating means due to a centrifugal force of the oil rotating in the annular groove together with walls of the annular groove.

  19. Traceability Through Automatic Program Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Julian; Green, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Program synthesis is a technique for automatically deriving programs from specifications of their behavior. One of the arguments made in favour of program synthesis is that it allows one to trace from the specification to the program. One way in which traceability information can be derived is to augment the program synthesis system so that manipulations and calculations it carries out during the synthesis process are annotated with information on what the manipulations and calculations were and why they were made. This information is then accumulated throughout the synthesis process, at the end of which, every artifact produced by the synthesis is annotated with a complete history relating it to every other artifact (including the source specification) which influenced its construction. This approach requires modification of the entire synthesis system - which is labor-intensive and hard to do without influencing its behavior. In this paper, we introduce a novel, lightweight technique for deriving traceability from a program specification to the corresponding synthesized code. Once a program has been successfully synthesized from a specification, small changes are systematically made to the specification and the effects on the synthesized program observed. We have partially automated the technique and applied it in an experiment to one of our program synthesis systems, AUTOFILTER, and to the GNU C compiler, GCC. The results are promising: 1. Manual inspection of the results indicates that most of the connections derived from the source (a specification in the case of AUTOFILTER, C source code in the case of GCC) to its generated target (C source code in the case of AUTOFILTER, assembly language code in the case of GCC) are correct. 2. Around half of the lines in the target can be traced to at least one line of the source. 3. Small changes in the source often induce only small changes in the target.

  20. Automatic mathematical modeling for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Caroline K.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for automatic mathematical modeling is described. The major objective is to create a very friendly environment for engineers to design, maintain and verify their model and also automatically convert the mathematical model into FORTRAN code for conventional computation. A demonstration program was designed for modeling the Space Shuttle Main Engine simulation mathematical model called Propulsion System Automatic Modeling (PSAM). PSAM provides a very friendly and well organized environment for engineers to build a knowledge base for base equations and general information. PSAM contains an initial set of component process elements for the Space Shuttle Main Engine simulation and a questionnaire that allows the engineer to answer a set of questions to specify a particular model. PSAM is then able to automatically generate the model and the FORTRAN code. A future goal is to download the FORTRAN code to the VAX/VMS system for conventional computation.

  1. Automatic program debugging for intelligent tutoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis explores the process by which student programs can be automatically debugged in order to increase the instructional capabilities of these systems. This research presents a methodology and implementation for the diagnosis and correction of nontrivial recursive programs. In this approach, recursive programs are debugged by repairing induction proofs in the Boyer-Moore Logic. The potential of a program debugger to automatically debug widely varying novice programs in a nontrivial domain is proportional to its capabilities to reason about computational semantics. By increasing these reasoning capabilities a more powerful and robust system can result. This thesis supports these claims by examining related work in automated program debugging and by discussing the design, implementation, and evaluation of Talus, an automatic degugger for LISP programs. Talus relies on its abilities to reason about computational semantics to perform algorithm recognition, infer code teleology, and to automatically detect and correct nonsyntactic errors in student programs written in a restricted, but nontrivial, subset of LISP.

  2. Low distortion automatic phase control circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauge, G.; Pederson, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Circuit for generation and demodulation of quadrature double side band signals in frequency division multiplexing system is described. Circuit is designed to produce low distortion automatic phase control. Illustration of circuit and components is included.

  3. Variable load automatically tests dc power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, H. C., Jr.; Sullivan, R. M.

    1965-01-01

    Continuously variable load automatically tests dc power supplies over an extended current range. External meters monitor current and voltage, and multipliers at the outputs facilitate plotting the power curve of the unit.

  4. Computer systems for automatic earthquake detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, S.W.

    1974-01-01

    U.S Geological Survey seismologists in Menlo park, California, are utilizing the speed, reliability, and efficiency of minicomputers to monitor seismograph stations and to automatically detect earthquakes. An earthquake detection computer system, believed to be the only one of its kind in operation, automatically reports about 90 percent of all local earthquakes recorded by a network of over 100 central California seismograph stations. The system also monitors the stations for signs of malfunction or abnormal operation. Before the automatic system was put in operation, all of the earthquakes recorded had to be detected by manually searching the records, a time-consuming process. With the automatic detection system, the stations are efficiently monitored continuously. 

  5. Automaticity in social-cognitive processes.

    PubMed

    Bargh, John A; Schwader, Kay L; Hailey, Sarah E; Dyer, Rebecca L; Boothby, Erica J

    2012-12-01

    Over the past several years, the concept of automaticity of higher cognitive processes has permeated nearly all domains of psychological research. In this review, we highlight insights arising from studies in decision-making, moral judgments, close relationships, emotional processes, face perception and social judgment, motivation and goal pursuit, conformity and behavioral contagion, embodied cognition, and the emergence of higher-level automatic processes in early childhood. Taken together, recent work in these domains demonstrates that automaticity does not result exclusively from a process of skill acquisition (in which a process always begins as a conscious and deliberate one, becoming capable of automatic operation only with frequent use) - there are evolved substrates and early childhood learning mechanisms involved as well.

  6. Automatic Evolution of Molecular Nanotechnology Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes strategies for automatically generating designs for analog circuits at the molecular level. Software maps out the edges and vertices of potential nanotechnology systems on graphs, then selects appropriate ones through evolutionary or genetic paradigms.

  7. Automatic water inventory, collecting, and dispensing unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Williams, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Two cylindrical tanks with piston bladders and associated components for automatic filling and emptying use liquid inventory readout devices in control of water flow. Unit provides for adaptive water collection, storage, and dispensation in weightlessness environment.

  8. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  9. Gear drive automatically indexes rotary table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, M. F.

    1966-01-01

    Combination indexer and drive unit drills equally spaced circular hole patterns on rotary tables. It automatically rotates the table a distance exactly equal to one hole spacing for each revolution of a special idler gear.

  10. Three layered framework for automatic service composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinqiong; Xia, Ping; Wan, Junli

    2009-10-01

    For automatic service composition, a planning based framework MOCIS is proposed. Planning is based on two major techniques, service reasoning and constraint satisfaction. Constraint satisfaction can be divided into quality constraint satisfaction and quantity constraint satisfaction. Contrary to traditional methods realizing upon techniques by interleaving activity, message and provider, the novelty of the framework is dividing these concerns into three layers, with activity layer majoring service reasoning, message layer for quality constraint and provider layer for quantity constraint. The layered architecture makes automatic web service composition possible for activity tree that abstract BPEL list and concrete BPEL list are achieved automatically with each layer, and users can selection proper abstract BPEL or BPEL to satisfy their request. And E-traveling composition cases have been tested, demonstrating that complex service can be achieved through three layers compositing automatically.

  11. Automatic calibration system for pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Fifty-channel automatic pressure transducer calibration system increases quantity and accuracy for test evaluation calibration. The pressure transducers are installed in an environmental tests chamber and manifolded to connect them to a pressure balance which is uniform.

  12. An automatic LCD panel quality detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bianfang; Hou, Wenguang; Ding, Mingyue

    2009-10-01

    Automatic detection using computer vision expands rapidly along with the development of image processing technology. In this paper, we developed a rapid LCD quality detection system for automobile instrument panel production, which has wide range of usage and good stability.Our automatic detection system consists of four parts: panel fixture, signal generator module, image acquisition module and image processing software. Experiments demonstrated that our system is feasible, efficient and fast compared to manual detection.

  13. Automatic Refilling System For Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, Aristides; Sansebastian, Mark; Geagen, Jay; Warner, Brent

    1990-01-01

    Cryogenic experiments left unattended for days. System automatically replenishes liquid helium in cryogenic experimental apparatus as liquid evaporates. Automatic filling system transfers liquid helium from storage vessel to experimental apparatus under computer control. Gaseous helium from cylinder supplies pumping pressure. Circuit senses level of liquid helium by sensing voltage across measuring resistors in series with silicon resistance thermometers (SRT's). Low voltage indicates SRT covered, while high voltage indicates uncovered.

  14. Automatic safety rod for reactors. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-03-23

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  15. UMLS-based automatic image indexing.

    PubMed

    Sneiderman, C; Sneiderman, Charles Alan; Demner-Fushman, D; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Fung, K W; Fung, Kin Wah; Bray, B; Bray, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    To date, most accurate image retrieval techniques rely on textual descriptions of images. Our goal is to automatically generate indexing terms for an image extracted from a biomedical article by identifying Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts in image caption and its discussion in the text. In a pilot evaluation of the suggested image indexing method by five physicians, a third of the automatically identified index terms were found suitable for indexing.

  16. Automatic Visual Tracking and Social Behaviour Analysis with Multiple Mice

    PubMed Central

    Giancardo, Luca; Sona, Diego; Huang, Huiping; Sannino, Sara; Managò, Francesca; Scheggia, Diego; Papaleo, Francesco; Murino, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions are made of complex behavioural actions that might be found in all mammalians, including humans and rodents. Recently, mouse models are increasingly being used in preclinical research to understand the biological basis of social-related pathologies or abnormalities. However, reliable and flexible automatic systems able to precisely quantify social behavioural interactions of multiple mice are still missing. Here, we present a system built on two components. A module able to accurately track the position of multiple interacting mice from videos, regardless of their fur colour or light settings, and a module that automatically characterise social and non-social behaviours. The behavioural analysis is obtained by deriving a new set of specialised spatio-temporal features from the tracker output. These features are further employed by a learning-by-example classifier, which predicts for each frame and for each mouse in the cage one of the behaviours learnt from the examples given by the experimenters. The system is validated on an extensive set of experimental trials involving multiple mice in an open arena. In a first evaluation we compare the classifier output with the independent evaluation of two human graders, obtaining comparable results. Then, we show the applicability of our technique to multiple mice settings, using up to four interacting mice. The system is also compared with a solution recently proposed in the literature that, similarly to us, addresses the problem with a learning-by-examples approach. Finally, we further validated our automatic system to differentiate between C57B/6J (a commonly used reference inbred strain) and BTBR T+tf/J (a mouse model for autism spectrum disorders). Overall, these data demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of this new machine learning system in the detection of social and non-social behaviours in multiple (>2) interacting mice, and its versatility to deal with different experimental settings and

  17. Automatic lymphoma classification with sentence subgraph mining from pathology reports

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Sohani, Aliyah R; Hochberg, Ephraim P; Szolovits, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pathology reports are rich in narrative statements that encode a complex web of relations among medical concepts. These relations are routinely used by doctors to reason on diagnoses, but often require hand-crafted rules or supervised learning to extract into prespecified forms for computational disease modeling. We aim to automatically capture relations from narrative text without supervision. Methods We design a novel framework that translates sentences into graph representations, automatically mines sentence subgraphs, reduces redundancy in mined subgraphs, and automatically generates subgraph features for subsequent classification tasks. To ensure meaningful interpretations over the sentence graphs, we use the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus to map token subsequences to concepts, and in turn sentence graph nodes. We test our system with multiple lymphoma classification tasks that together mimic the differential diagnosis by a pathologist. To this end, we prevent our classifiers from looking at explicit mentions or synonyms of lymphomas in the text. Results and Conclusions We compare our system with three baseline classifiers using standard n-grams, full MetaMap concepts, and filtered MetaMap concepts. Our system achieves high F-measures on multiple binary classifications of lymphoma (Burkitt lymphoma, 0.8; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 0.909; follicular lymphoma, 0.84; Hodgkin lymphoma, 0.912). Significance tests show that our system outperforms all three baselines. Moreover, feature analysis identifies subgraph features that contribute to improved performance; these features agree with the state-of-the-art knowledge about lymphoma classification. We also highlight how these unsupervised relation features may provide meaningful insights into lymphoma classification. PMID:24431333

  18. First Theory Institute on Computational Differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Griewank, A.; Khademi, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    Computational differentiation (CD) is concerned with tools, techniques, and mathematics for generating, with little human effort, efficient and accurate derivative codes from programs written in such computer languages as C and Fortran. The primary purposes of the meeting were to explore the deep complexity issues that lie at the heart of the computation of derivatives from computer programs and to provide a forum for brainstorming on future research directions, including the applications of automatic differentiation (AD) in scientific computing and the development of AD tools.

  19. Fully automatic adjoints: a robust and efficient mechanism for generating adjoint ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Funke, S. W.; Rognes, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    The problem of generating and maintaining adjoint models is sufficiently difficult that typically only the most advanced and well-resourced community ocean models achieve it. There are two current technologies which each suffer from their own limitations. Algorithmic differentiation, also called automatic differentiation, is employed by models such as the MITGCM [2] and the Alfred Wegener Institute model FESOM [3]. This technique is very difficult to apply to existing code, and requires a major initial investment to prepare the code for automatic adjoint generation. AD tools may also have difficulty with code employing modern software constructs such as derived data types. An alternative is to formulate the adjoint differential equation and to discretise this separately. This approach, known as the continuous adjoint and employed in ROMS [4], has the disadvantage that two different model code bases must be maintained and manually kept synchronised as the model develops. The discretisation of the continuous adjoint is not automatically consistent with that of the forward model, producing an additional source of error. The alternative presented here is to formulate the flow model in the high level language UFL (Unified Form Language) and to automatically generate the model using the software of the FEniCS project. In this approach it is the high level code specification which is differentiated, a task very similar to the formulation of the continuous adjoint [5]. However since the forward and adjoint models are generated automatically, the difficulty of maintaining them vanishes and the software engineering process is therefore robust. The scheduling and execution of the adjoint model, including the application of an appropriate checkpointing strategy is managed by libadjoint [1]. In contrast to the conventional algorithmic differentiation description of a model as a series of primitive mathematical operations, libadjoint employs a new abstraction of the simulation

  20. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  1. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  2. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  3. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  4. 46 CFR 63.25-1 - Small automatic auxiliary boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Small automatic auxiliary boilers. 63.25-1 Section 63.25... AUXILIARY BOILERS Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-1 Small automatic auxiliary boilers. Small automatic auxiliary boilers defined as having heat-input ratings of 400,000...

  5. 46 CFR 52.01-10 - Automatic controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Automatic controls. 52.01-10 Section 52.01-10 Shipping... Requirements § 52.01-10 Automatic controls. (a) Each main boiler must meet the special requirements for automatic safety controls in § 62.35-20(a)(1) of this chapter. (b) Each automatically controlled...

  6. 46 CFR 52.01-10 - Automatic controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Automatic controls. 52.01-10 Section 52.01-10 Shipping... Requirements § 52.01-10 Automatic controls. (a) Each main boiler must meet the special requirements for automatic safety controls in § 62.35-20(a)(1) of this chapter. (b) Each automatically controlled...

  7. 46 CFR 52.01-10 - Automatic controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Automatic controls. 52.01-10 Section 52.01-10 Shipping... Requirements § 52.01-10 Automatic controls. (a) Each main boiler must meet the special requirements for automatic safety controls in § 62.35-20(a)(1) of this chapter. (b) Each automatically controlled...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 23.1329 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1329 Automatic pilot system. If an automatic pilot system is installed, it must meet the following: (a) Each system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be quickly and...

  9. The Importance of Automaticity for Developing Expertise in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, S. Jay; Flor, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses how students become automatic at reading sub-skills, the indicators that can be used to determine whether a student is automatic, and the psychological mechanisms that allow students to perform complex skills automatically. Discusses implications of automaticity research for teaching reading. (RS)

  10. 7 CFR 58.418 - Automatic cheese making equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Automatic cheese making equipment. 58.418 Section 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.418 Automatic cheese making equipment. (a) Automatic Curd Maker. The automatic curd making system shall be constructed of stainless steel or of material approved in the...

  11. 7 CFR 58.418 - Automatic cheese making equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic cheese making equipment. 58.418 Section 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.418 Automatic cheese making equipment. (a) Automatic Curd Maker. The automatic curd making system shall be constructed of stainless steel or of material approved in the...

  12. 7 CFR 58.418 - Automatic cheese making equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic cheese making equipment. 58.418 Section 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.418 Automatic cheese making equipment. (a) Automatic Curd Maker. The automatic curd making system shall be constructed of stainless steel or of material approved in the...

  13. 7 CFR 58.418 - Automatic cheese making equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Automatic cheese making equipment. 58.418 Section 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.418 Automatic cheese making equipment. (a) Automatic Curd Maker. The automatic curd making system shall be constructed of stainless steel or of material approved in the...

  14. 7 CFR 58.418 - Automatic cheese making equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automatic cheese making equipment. 58.418 Section 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.418 Automatic cheese making equipment. (a) Automatic Curd Maker. The automatic curd making system shall be constructed of stainless steel or of material approved in the...

  15. 10 CFR 429.45 - Automatic commercial ice makers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Automatic commercial ice makers. 429.45 Section 429.45... PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.45 Automatic commercial ice makers. (a... automatic commercial ice makers; and (2) For each basic model of automatic commercial ice maker selected...

  16. 10 CFR 429.45 - Automatic commercial ice makers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automatic commercial ice makers. 429.45 Section 429.45... PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.45 Automatic commercial ice makers. (a... automatic commercial ice makers; and (2) For each basic model of automatic commercial ice maker selected...

  17. 10 CFR 429.45 - Automatic commercial ice makers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Automatic commercial ice makers. 429.45 Section 429.45... PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.45 Automatic commercial ice makers. (a... automatic commercial ice makers; and (2) For each basic model of automatic commercial ice maker selected...

  18. 46 CFR 52.01-10 - Automatic controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic controls. 52.01-10 Section 52.01-10 Shipping... Requirements § 52.01-10 Automatic controls. (a) Each main boiler must meet the special requirements for automatic safety controls in § 62.35-20(a)(1) of this chapter. (b) Each automatically controlled...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 23.1329 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1329 Automatic pilot system. If an automatic pilot system is installed, it must meet the following: (a) Each system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be quickly and...

  20. Automatic detection of spermatozoa for laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Van Hoofstat, David; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter

    2009-03-01

    In sexual assault crimes, differential extraction of spermatozoa from vaginal swab smears is often ineffective, especially when only a few spermatozoa are present in an overwhelming amount of epithelial cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables the precise separation of spermatozoa and epithelial cells. However, standard sperm-staining techniques are non-specific and rely on sperm morphology for identification. Moreover, manual screening of the microscope slides is time-consuming and labor-intensive. Here, we describe an automated screening method to detect spermatozoa stained with Sperm HY-LITER. Different ratios of spermatozoa and epithelial cells were used to assess the automatic detection method. In addition, real postcoital samples were also screened. Detected spermatozoa were isolated using LCM and DNA analysis was performed. Robust DNA profiles without allelic dropout could be obtained from as little as 30 spermatozoa recovered from postcoital samples, showing that the staining had no significant influence on DNA recovery.

  1. Practical automatic Arabic license plate recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Khader; Agaian, Sos; Saleh, Hani

    2011-02-01

    Since 1970's, the need of an automatic license plate recognition system, sometimes referred as Automatic License Plate Recognition system, has been increasing. A license plate recognition system is an automatic system that is able to recognize a license plate number, extracted from image sensors. In specific, Automatic License Plate Recognition systems are being used in conjunction with various transportation systems in application areas such as law enforcement (e.g. speed limit enforcement) and commercial usages such as parking enforcement and automatic toll payment private and public entrances, border control, theft and vandalism control. Vehicle license plate recognition has been intensively studied in many countries. Due to the different types of license plates being used, the requirement of an automatic license plate recognition system is different for each country. [License plate detection using cluster run length smoothing algorithm ].Generally, an automatic license plate localization and recognition system is made up of three modules; license plate localization, character segmentation and optical character recognition modules. This paper presents an Arabic license plate recognition system that is insensitive to character size, font, shape and orientation with extremely high accuracy rate. The proposed system is based on a combination of enhancement, license plate localization, morphological processing, and feature vector extraction using the Haar transform. The performance of the system is fast due to classification of alphabet and numerals based on the license plate organization. Experimental results for license plates of two different Arab countries show an average of 99 % successful license plate localization and recognition in a total of more than 20 different images captured from a complex outdoor environment. The results run times takes less time compared to conventional and many states of art methods.

  2. Accuracy of differential sensitivity for one-dimensional shock problems

    SciTech Connect

    Henninger, R.J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Rightley, M.L.

    1998-07-01

    The technique called Differential Sensitivity has been applied to the system of Eulerian continuum mechanics equations solved by a hydrocode. Differential Sensitivity uses forward and adjoint techniques to obtain output response sensitivity to input parameters. Previous papers have described application of the technique to two-dimensional, multi-component problems. Inaccuracies in the adjoint solutions have prompted us to examine our numerical techniques in more detail. Here we examine one-dimensional, one material shock problems. Solution accuracy is assessed by comparison to sensitivities obtained by automatic differentiation and a code-based adjoint differentiation technique. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Attention to Automatic Movements in Parkinson's Disease: Modified Automatic Mode in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Hejia; Hallett, Mark; Zheng, Zheng; Chan, Piu

    2015-01-01

    We investigated neural correlates when attending to a movement that could be made automatically in healthy subjects and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Subjects practiced a visuomotor association task until they could perform it automatically, and then directed their attention back to the automated task. Functional MRI was obtained during the early-learning, automatic stage, and when re-attending. In controls, attention to automatic movement induced more activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), anterior cingulate cortex, and rostral supplementary motor area. The motor cortex received more influence from the cortical motor association regions. In contrast, the pattern of the activity and connectivity of the striatum remained at the level of the automatic stage. In PD patients, attention enhanced activity in the DLPFC, premotor cortex, and cerebellum, but the connectivity from the putamen to the motor cortex decreased. Our findings demonstrate that, in controls, when a movement achieves the automatic stage, attention can influence the attentional networks and cortical motor association areas, but has no apparent effect on the striatum. In PD patients, attention induces a shift from the automatic mode back to the controlled pattern within the striatum. The shifting between controlled and automatic behaviors relies in part on striatal function. PMID:24925772

  4. Automatic Choice of Control Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, Gayle; Hardoon, David R.; Kaski, Samuel

    In experimental design, a standard approach for distinguishing experimentally induced effects from unwanted effects is to design control measurements that differ only in terms of the former. However, in some cases, it may be problematic to design and measure controls specifically for an experiment. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of learning to choose suitable controls from a database of potential controls, which differ in their degree of relevance to the experiment. This approach is especially relevant in the field of bioinformatics where experimental studies are predominantly small-scale, while vast amounts of biological measurements are becoming increasingly available. We focus on finding controls for differential gene expression studies (case vs control) of various cancers. In this situation, the ideal control would be a healthy sample from the same tissue (the same mixture of cells as the tumor tissue), under the same conditions except for cancer-specific effects, which is almost impossible to obtain in practice. We formulate the problem of learning to choose the control in a Gaussian process classification framework, as a novel paired multitask learning problem. The similarities between the underlying set of classifiers are learned from the set of control tissue gene expression profiles.

  5. Automatic imitation is reduced in narcissists.

    PubMed

    Obhi, Sukhvinder S; Hogeveen, Jeremy; Giacomin, Miranda; Jordan, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Narcissism is a personality trait that has been extensively studied in normal populations. Individuals high on subclinical narcissism tend to display an excessive self-focus and reduced concern for others. Does their disregard of others have roots in low-level processes of social perception? We investigated whether narcissism is related to the automatic imitation of observed actions. In the automatic imitation task, participants make cued actions in the presence of action videos displaying congruent or incongruent actions. The difference in response times and accuracy between congruent and incongruent trials (i.e., the interference effect) is a behavioral index of motor resonance in the brain-a process whereby observed actions activate matching motor representations in the observer. We found narcissism to be negatively related to interference in the automatic imitation task, such that high narcissism is associated with reduced imitation. Thus, levels of narcissism predict differences in the tendency to automatically resonate with others, and the pattern of data we observe suggests that a key difference is that high narcissists possess an improved ability to suppress automatic imitation when such imitation would be detrimental to task performance. To the extent that motor resonance is a product of a human mirror system, our data constitute evidence for a link between narcissistic tendencies and mirror system functioning. PMID:23957308

  6. Automatic Fastening Large Structures: a New Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumley, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The external tank (ET) intertank structure for the space shuttle, a 27.5 ft diameter 22.5 ft long externally stiffened mechanically fastened skin-stringer-frame structure, was a labor intensitive manual structure built on a modified Saturn tooling position. A new approach was developed based on half-section subassemblies. The heart of this manufacturing approach will be 33 ft high vertical automatic riveting system with a 28 ft rotary positioner coming on-line in mid 1985. The Automatic Riveting System incorporates many of the latest automatic riveting technologies. Key features include: vertical columns with two sets of independently operating CNC drill-riveting heads; capability of drill, insert and upset any one piece fastener up to 3/8 inch diameter including slugs without displacing the workpiece offset bucking ram with programmable rotation and deep retraction; vision system for automatic parts program re-synchronization and part edge margin control; and an automatic rivet selection/handling system.

  7. Automatic prejudice in childhood and early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Degner, Juliane; Wentura, Dirk

    2010-03-01

    Four cross-sectional studies are presented that investigated the automatic activation of prejudice in children and adolescents (aged 9 years to 15 years). Therefore, 4 different versions of the affective priming task were used, with pictures of ingroup and outgroup members being presented as prejudice-related prime stimuli. In all 4 studies, a pattern occurred that suggests a linear developmental increase of automatic prejudice with significant effects of outgroup negativity appearing only around the ages of 12 to 13 years. Results of younger children, on the contrary, did not indicate any effect of automatic prejudice activation. In contrast, prejudice effects in an Implicit Association Test (IAT) showed high levels of prejudice independent of age (Study 3). Results of Study 4 suggest that these age differences are due to age-related differences in spontaneous categorization processes. Introducing a forced-categorization into the affective priming procedure produced a pattern of results equivalent to that obtained with the IAT. These results suggest that although children are assumed to acquire prejudice at much younger ages, automatization of such attitudes might be related to developmental processes in early adolescence. We discuss possible theoretical implications of these results for a developmental theory of prejudice representation and automatization during childhood and adolescence. PMID:20175618

  8. Automatic contrast: evidence that automatic comparison with the social self affects evaluative responses.

    PubMed

    Ruys, Kirsten I; Spears, Russell; Gordijn, Ernestine H; de Vries, Nanne K

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present research was to investigate whether unconsciously presented affective information may cause opposite evaluative responses depending on what social category the information originates from. We argue that automatic comparison processes between the self and the unconscious affective information produce this evaluative contrast effect. Consistent with research on automatic behaviour, we propose that when an intergroup context is activated, an automatic comparison to the social self may determine the automatic evaluative responses, at least for highly visible categories (e.g. sex, ethnicity). Contrary to previous research on evaluative priming, we predict automatic contrastive responses to affective information originating from an outgroup category such that the evaluative response to neutral targets is opposite to the valence of the suboptimal primes. Two studies using different intergroup contexts provide support for our hypotheses. PMID:17705936

  9. Differential gearing

    SciTech Connect

    Tamiya, S.

    1986-07-29

    A differential for motor vehicles is described and the like comprising, an input drive shaft, a pair of coaxially spaced drive gears simultaneously driven by the input shaft in a same direction at a same speed of rotation about a common axis of rotation, a driven gear driven peripherally by the pair of drive gears for transmission of power from the input drive shaft, two coaxial opposed bevel sun gears having an axis of rotation concentric with an axis of rotation of the driven gear, two planetary gears disposed between the sun gears for differential driving thereof during turns of the vehicle to the right and to the left of each meshing with the sun gears for driving the suns gears. Each planetary gear has a separate axis of rotation carried by the driven gear disposed therein radially and symmetrically relative to the axis of rotation of the sun gears, and each sun gear having a respective power output shaft connected thereto for rotation therewith.

  10. Automatic CT Measurement In Lumbar Vertebrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisseling, Johannes T.; van Erning, Leon J. T. O.; Schouten, Theo E.; Lemmen, J. Albert M.

    1989-04-01

    Reliable software for automatic determination of the border between the cancellous bone and the cortical bone of lumbar vertebrae has been developed. An automatic procedure is needed because calculations in a larger series of patient data take too much time due to the inevitable human interaction required by available software packages. Processing in batch mode is essential. An important advantage of automatic outlining is its reproducibility, because only a single technique with objective criteria is used. In a so-called Region Of Interest (ROI) texture analysis can be performed to quantify the condition of the vertebral body in order to diagnose osteoporosis. This technique may be an alternative to a classification based solely on the average X-ray absorption value.

  11. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  12. Support vector machine for automatic pain recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monwar, Md Maruf; Rezaei, Siamak

    2009-02-01

    Facial expressions are a key index of emotion and the interpretation of such expressions of emotion is critical to everyday social functioning. In this paper, we present an efficient video analysis technique for recognition of a specific expression, pain, from human faces. We employ an automatic face detector which detects face from the stored video frame using skin color modeling technique. For pain recognition, location and shape features of the detected faces are computed. These features are then used as inputs to a support vector machine (SVM) for classification. We compare the results with neural network based and eigenimage based automatic pain recognition systems. The experiment results indicate that using support vector machine as classifier can certainly improve the performance of automatic pain recognition system.

  13. Automatic weld torch guidance control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smaith, H. E.; Wall, W. A.; Burns, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A highly reliable, fully digital, closed circuit television optical, type automatic weld seam tracking control system was developed. This automatic tracking equipment is used to reduce weld tooling costs and increase overall automatic welding reliability. The system utilizes a charge injection device digital camera which as 60,512 inidividual pixels as the light sensing elements. Through conventional scanning means, each pixel in the focal plane is sequentially scanned, the light level signal digitized, and an 8-bit word transmitted to scratch pad memory. From memory, the microprocessor performs an analysis of the digital signal and computes the tracking error. Lastly, the corrective signal is transmitted to a cross seam actuator digital drive motor controller to complete the closed loop, feedback, tracking system. This weld seam tracking control system is capable of a tracking accuracy of + or - 0.2 mm, or better. As configured, the system is applicable to square butt, V-groove, and lap joint weldments.

  14. Automatic metro map layout using multicriteria optimization.

    PubMed

    Stott, Jonathan; Rodgers, Peter; Martínez-Ovando, Juan Carlos; Walker, Stephen G

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an automatic mechanism for drawing metro maps. We apply multicriteria optimization to find effective placement of stations with a good line layout and to label the map unambiguously. A number of metrics are defined, which are used in a weighted sum to find a fitness value for a layout of the map. A hill climbing optimizer is used to reduce the fitness value, and find improved map layouts. To avoid local minima, we apply clustering techniques to the map-the hill climber moves both stations and clusters when finding improved layouts. We show the method applied to a number of metro maps, and describe an empirical study that provides some quantitative evidence that automatically-drawn metro maps can help users to find routes more efficiently than either published maps or undistorted maps. Moreover, we have found that, in these cases, study subjects indicate a preference for automatically-drawn maps over the alternatives.

  15. Automatic alignment method for calibration of hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. J.; Chang, K. H.; Chon, J. C.; Oh, C. Y.

    2004-04-01

    This paper presents a new method to automatically align specific scale-marks for the calibration of hydrometers. A hydrometer calibration system adopting the new method consists of a vision system, a stepping motor, and software to control the system. The vision system is composed of a CCD camera and a frame grabber, and is used to acquire images. The stepping motor moves the camera, which is attached to the vessel containing a reference liquid, along the hydrometer. The operating program has two main functions: to process images from the camera to find the position of the horizontal plane and to control the stepping motor for the alignment of the horizontal plane with a particular scale-mark. Any system adopting this automatic alignment method is a convenient and precise means of calibrating a hydrometer. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by comparing the calibration results using the automatic alignment method with those obtained using the manual method.

  16. Automatic discrimination of emotion from spoken Finnish.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, Juhani; Väyrynen, Eero; Seppänen, Tapio

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, experiments on the automatic discrimination of basic emotions from spoken Finnish are described. For the purpose of the study, a large emotional speech corpus of Finnish was collected; 14 professional actors acted as speakers, and simulated four primary emotions when reading out a semantically neutral text. More than 40 prosodic features were derived and automatically computed from the speech samples. Two application scenarios were tested: the first scenario was speaker-independent for a small domain of speakers while the second scenario was completely speaker-independent. Human listening experiments were conducted to assess the perceptual adequacy of the emotional speech samples. Statistical classification experiments indicated that, with the optimal combination of prosodic feature vectors, automatic emotion discrimination performance close to human emotion recognition ability was achievable. PMID:16038449

  17. An Automatic Speed Control for Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1928-01-01

    Described here is an automatic control that has been used in several forms in wind tunnels at the Washington Navy Yard. The form now in use with the 8-foot tunnel at the Navy Yard is considered here. Details of the design and operation of the automatic control system are given. Leads from a Pitot tube are joined to an inverted cup manometer located above a rheostat. When the sliding weight of this instrument is set to a given notch, say for 40 m.p.h, the beam tip vibrates between two electric contacts that feed the little motor. Thus, when the wind is too strong or too weak, the motor automatically throws the rheostat slide forward and backward. If it failed to function well, the operator would notice the effect on his meniscus, and would operate the hand control by merely pressing the switch.

  18. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOEpatents

    Langner, Jr., G. Harold

    1993-01-01

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  19. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOEpatents

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-12

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  20. Automatic gisting systems for voice communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, A. T.

    It is pointed out that the detection of a limited number of key words in voice communications, combined with nonlinguistic cues and situation knowledge, holds out the promise for automatic extraction of the general content or gist of the transmitted messages. A systems-level description of an end-to-end automatic gisting system for screening voice communications is presented. The emphasis is on identifying information which can usefully supplement the detected key words in the gisting process. Principal subsystems are identified, and their functions are discussed in the context of an overall system architecture. The example of automatic determination of aircraft takeoffs and landings at an airport, based on monitoring conversations between pilots and air traffic controllers, is used for illustrative purposes.

  1. Automatic exposure control for space sequential camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcatee, G. E., Jr.; Stoap, L. J.; Solheim, C. D.; Sharpsteen, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    The final report for the automatic exposure control study for space sequential cameras, for the NASA Johnson Space Center is presented. The material is shown in the same sequence that the work was performed. The purpose of the automatic exposure control is to automatically control the lens iris as well as the camera shutter so that the subject is properly exposed on the film. A study of design approaches is presented. Analysis of the light range of the spectrum covered indicates that the practical range would be from approximately 20 to 6,000 foot-lamberts, or about nine f-stops. Observation of film available from space flights shows that optimum scene illumination is apparently not present in vehicle interior photography as well as in vehicle-to-vehicle situations. The evaluation test procedure for a breadboard, and the results, which provided information for the design of a brassboard are given.

  2. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  3. Automatic identification of species with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Serna, Andrés; Jiménez-Segura, Luz Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    A new automatic identification system using photographic images has been designed to recognize fish, plant, and butterfly species from Europe and South America. The automatic classification system integrates multiple image processing tools to extract the geometry, morphology, and texture of the images. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used as the pattern recognition method. We tested a data set that included 740 species and 11,198 individuals. Our results show that the system performed with high accuracy, reaching 91.65% of true positive fish identifications, 92.87% of plants and 93.25% of butterflies. Our results highlight how the neural networks are complementary to species identification.

  4. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  5. Automatic reading of hybridization filter images.

    PubMed

    Audic, S; Zanetti, G

    1995-10-01

    We describe a new technique for the automatic detection and characterization, in terms of location, size and intensity, of positive hybridization spots on hybridization filter images. We will also discuss how this information can be used to reconstruct the spot deposition pattern on the filter and thus identify the spots. The part of the algorithm dedicated to the detection of spots is derived from a technique used in astronomy for the automatic recognition of galaxies on photographic plates. This technique has been modified so that it becomes able to cope with the strongly varying background typical of hybridization filter images. The technique does not require any human intervention.

  6. Automatic cell counting with ImageJ.

    PubMed

    Grishagin, Ivan V

    2015-03-15

    Cell counting is an important routine procedure. However, to date there is no comprehensive, easy to use, and inexpensive solution for routine cell counting, and this procedure usually needs to be performed manually. Here, we report a complete solution for automatic cell counting in which a conventional light microscope is equipped with a web camera to obtain images of a suspension of mammalian cells in a hemocytometer assembly. Based on the ImageJ toolbox, we devised two algorithms to automatically count these cells. This approach is approximately 10 times faster and yields more reliable and consistent results compared with manual counting.

  7. Automatic emotional expression analysis from eye area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkoç, Betül; Arslan, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    Eyes play an important role in expressing emotions in nonverbal communication. In the present study, emotional expression classification was performed based on the features that were automatically extracted from the eye area. Fırst, the face area and the eye area were automatically extracted from the captured image. Afterwards, the parameters to be used for the analysis through discrete wavelet transformation were obtained from the eye area. Using these parameters, emotional expression analysis was performed through artificial intelligence techniques. As the result of the experimental studies, 6 universal emotions consisting of expressions of happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, anger and fear were classified at a success rate of 84% using artificial neural networks.

  8. Automatic identification of species with neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Segura, Luz Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    A new automatic identification system using photographic images has been designed to recognize fish, plant, and butterfly species from Europe and South America. The automatic classification system integrates multiple image processing tools to extract the geometry, morphology, and texture of the images. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used as the pattern recognition method. We tested a data set that included 740 species and 11,198 individuals. Our results show that the system performed with high accuracy, reaching 91.65% of true positive fish identifications, 92.87% of plants and 93.25% of butterflies. Our results highlight how the neural networks are complementary to species identification. PMID:25392749

  9. Automatisms--the current legal position related to clinical practice and medicolegal interpretation.

    PubMed

    Beran, R G

    1992-01-01

    The interface between medicine and the law is an area which demands further investigation. There can be no criminal capability for an act unless the perpetrator had both the will to so act and the capacity to differentiate and choose whether or not to conform the particular behaviour to that dictated by the law. The capacity for choice must remain the fundamental issue. The range of conditions which can raise volition as a defence include: Somnambulism; post-traumatic syndromes; epilepsy; arteriosclerosis; or acts secondary to cerebral neoplasia. There is need to differentiate between reflex actions and automatisms and it is imperative that terms such as automatism or automatic behaviour are not perverted to allow an excuse for that which is inexcusable. Cases such as that of Cogdon, who was acquitted of murdering her daughter; Ramsbottom who was found guilty of causing a traffic accident despite having a stroke; Dennison in which a driver was found guilty despite epilepsy or Jenkins where the driver was initially found innocent of dangerous driving because of the unpredictable nature of diabetes are discussed. Special attention will be focused upon the case of Sullivan, a landmark in consideration of automatism in epilepsy. The paper examines insane verses non-insane automatism and the Australian legal system as it affects modern neurological practice. Suggestions are proffered as to how the law should be modified to better reflect justice as required within the context of modern medical knowledge. 'The social and psychological pressures that shape our criminals also shape-those who make and remake the laws which aim to control, punish or rehabilitate them, and those who try to change their behaviour.'

  10. Feedback Improvement in Automatic Program Evaluation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupas, Bronius

    2010-01-01

    Automatic program evaluation is a way to assess source program files. These techniques are used in learning management environments, programming exams and contest systems. However, use of automated program evaluation encounters problems: some evaluations are not clear for the students and the system messages do not show reasons for lost points.…

  11. Automatic Positioning System of Small Agricultural Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momot, M. V.; Proskokov, A. V.; Natalchenko, A. S.; Biktimirov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The present article discusses automatic positioning systems of agricultural robots used in field works. The existing solutions in this area have been analyzed. The article proposes an original solution, which is easy to implement and is characterized by high- accuracy positioning.

  12. Automatic Guidance System for Welding Torches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H.; Wall, W.; Burns, M. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Digital system automatically guides welding torch to produce squarebutt, V-groove and lap-joint weldments within tracking accuracy of +0.2 millimeter. Television camera observes and traverses weld joint, carrying welding torch behind. Image of joint digitized, and resulting data used to derive control signals that enable torch to track joint.

  13. Support for Debugging Automatically Parallelized Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robert; Jost, Gabriele

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on support sources available for the automatic parallelization of computer program. CAPTools, a support tool developed at the University of Greenwich, transforms, with user guidance, existing sequential Fortran code into parallel message passing code. Comparison routines are then run for debugging purposes, in essence, ensuring that the code transformation was accurate.

  14. Flight Investigation of an Automatic Pitchup Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurt, George J., Jr.; Whitten, James B.

    1960-01-01

    A flight investigation of an automatic pitchup control has been conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Langley Research Center. The pitching-moment characteristics of a transonic fighter airplane which was subject to pitchup were altered by driving the stabilizer in accordance with a signal that was a function of a combination of the measured angle of attack and the pitching velocity. An angle-of-attack threshold control was used to preset the angle of attack at which the automatic pitchup-control system would begin to drive the stabilizer. No threshold control as such existed for the pitching-velocity signal. A summing linkage in series with the pilot's longitudinal control allowed the automatic pitchup-control system to drive the stabilizer 13.5 percent of the total stabilizer travel independently of the pilot's control. Tests were made at an altitude of 35,000 feet over a Mach number range of 0.80 to 0.90. Various gearings between the control and the sensing devices were investigated. The automatic system was capable of extending the region of positive stability for the test airplane to angles of attack above the basic-airplane pitchup threshold angle of attack. In most cases a limit-cycle oscillation about the airplane pitch axis occurred.

  15. Automatic Layout Design for Power Module

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Puqi; Wang, Fei; Ngo, Khai

    2013-01-01

    The layout of power modules is one of the key points in power module design, especially for high power densities, where couplings are increased. In this paper, along with the design example, an automatic design processes by using a genetic algorithm are presented. Some practical considerations and implementations are introduced in the optimization of module layout design.

  16. Automatic optometer operates with infrared test pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornsweet, T. N.; Crane, H. D.

    1970-01-01

    Refractive strength of human eye is monitored by optometer that automatically and continuously images infrared test pattern onto the retina. Condition of focus of the eye at any instant is determined from optometer settings needed to maintain focus of the pattern on the retina.

  17. Automatic thematic mapping in the EROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edson, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    A specified approach to the automatic extraction and catographic presentation of thematic data contained in multispectral photographic images is presented. Experimental efforts were directed toward the mapping of open waters, snow and ice, infrared reflective vegetation, and massed works of man. The system must also be able to process data from a wide variety of sources.

  18. Low Speed Control for Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Amplifier module allows rotating positioner of automatic welding machine to operate at speeds below normal range. Low speeds are precisely regulated by a servomechanism as are normal-range speeds. Addition of module to standard welding machine makes it unnecessary to purchase new equipment for low-speed welding.

  19. Automatic speech recognition in air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Joakim

    1990-01-01

    Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology and its application to the Air Traffic Control system are described. The advantages of applying ASR to Air Traffic Control, as well as criteria for choosing a suitable ASR system are presented. Results from previous research and directions for future work at the Flight Transportation Laboratory are outlined.

  20. 42 CFR 407.17 - Automatic enrollment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) ENROLLMENT AND ENTITLEMENT Individual Enrollment and Entitlement for SMI... enrolled for SMI if he or she: (1) Resides in the United States, except in Puerto Rico; (2) Becomes... chapter; and (3) Does not decline SMI enrollment. (b) Opportunity to decline automatic enrollment. (1)...

  1. Multiple Regression Analysis and Automatic Interaction Detection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koplyay, Janos B.

    The Automatic Interaction Detector (AID) is discussed as to its usefulness in multiple regression analysis. The algorithm of AID-4 is a reversal of the model building process; it starts with the ultimate restricted model, namely, the whole group as a unit. By a unique splitting process maximizing the between sum of squares for the categories of…

  2. A Statistical Approach to Automatic Speech Summarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Chiori; Furui, Sadaoki; Malkin, Rob; Yu, Hua; Waibel, Alex

    2003-12-01

    This paper proposes a statistical approach to automatic speech summarization. In our method, a set of words maximizing a summarization score indicating the appropriateness of summarization is extracted from automatically transcribed speech and then concatenated to create a summary. The extraction process is performed using a dynamic programming (DP) technique based on a target compression ratio. In this paper, we demonstrate how an English news broadcast transcribed by a speech recognizer is automatically summarized. We adapted our method, which was originally proposed for Japanese, to English by modifying the model for estimating word concatenation probabilities based on a dependency structure in the original speech given by a stochastic dependency context free grammar (SDCFG). We also propose a method of summarizing multiple utterances using a two-level DP technique. The automatically summarized sentences are evaluated by summarization accuracy based on a comparison with a manual summary of speech that has been correctly transcribed by human subjects. Our experimental results indicate that the method we propose can effectively extract relatively important information and remove redundant and irrelevant information from English news broadcasts.

  3. Automatic Assessment of 3D Modeling Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanna, A.; Lamberti, F.; Paravati, G.; Demartini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based assessment of exams provides teachers and students with two main benefits: fairness and effectiveness in the evaluation process. This paper proposes a fully automatic evaluation tool for the Graphic and Virtual Design (GVD) curriculum at the First School of Architecture of the Politecnico di Torino, Italy. In particular, the tool is…

  4. Automatic Pilot For Flight-Test Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, Eugene L.; Jones, Frank P.; Roncoli, Ralph B.

    1992-01-01

    Autopilot replaces pilot during automatic maneuvers. Pilot, based on ground, flies aircraft to required altitude, then turns control over to autopilot. Increases quality of maneuvers significantly beyond that attainable through remote manual control by pilot on ground. Also increases quality of maneuvers because it performs maneuvers faster than pilot could and because it does not have to repeat poorly executed maneuvers.

  5. 28 CFR 17.28 - Automatic declassification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 17.28 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND... through the Department Security Officer of any specific information they propose to exempt from automatic... information exempted does not identify a confidential human source or human intelligence source. (c)...

  6. 28 CFR 17.28 - Automatic declassification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 17.28 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CLASSIFIED NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND... through the Department Security Officer of any specific information they propose to exempt from automatic... information exempted does not identify a confidential human source or human intelligence source. (c)...

  7. Laser tracking system with automatic reacquisition capability.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R E; Weiss, P F

    1968-06-01

    A laser based tracking system is described that has the capability of automatically performing an acquisition search to locate the target. This work is intended for precision launch phase tracking of the Saturn V launch vehicle. System tracking accuracies limited only by the atmosphere have been demonstrated, as has acquisition over a 1 degrees x 1 degrees field of view.

  8. Automatic thermographic image defect detection of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bin; Liebenberg, Bjorn; Raymont, Jeff; Santospirito, SP

    2011-05-01

    Detecting defects, and especially reliably measuring defect sizes, are critical objectives in automatic NDT defect detection applications. In this work, the Sentence software is proposed for the analysis of pulsed thermography and near IR images of composite materials. Furthermore, the Sentence software delivers an end-to-end, user friendly platform for engineers to perform complete manual inspections, as well as tools that allow senior engineers to develop inspection templates and profiles, reducing the requisite thermographic skill level of the operating engineer. Finally, the Sentence software can also offer complete independence of operator decisions by the fully automated "Beep on Defect" detection functionality. The end-to-end automatic inspection system includes sub-systems for defining a panel profile, generating an inspection plan, controlling a robot-arm and capturing thermographic images to detect defects. A statistical model has been built to analyze the entire image, evaluate grey-scale ranges, import sentencing criteria and automatically detect impact damage defects. A full width half maximum algorithm has been used to quantify the flaw sizes. The identified defects are imported into the sentencing engine which then sentences (automatically compares analysis results against acceptance criteria) the inspection by comparing the most significant defect or group of defects against the inspection standards.

  9. Second-Generation Automatic Problem Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Ronald L.

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen widespread adoption of automatic grading of physics homework problems. Although first-generation homework management systems provide feedback and assign scores based only on the answers, problem-solving performance on exams seems to be no worse for students using these systems than for those who receive detailed comments…

  10. 12 CFR 925.4 - Automatic membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK MEMBERS AND HOUSING ASSOCIATES... for certain charter conversions. An insured depository institution member that converts from one charter type to another automatically shall become a member of the Bank of which the...

  11. An automatic bridge for inductive voltage dividers

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.; Liang, C.P.; Hsiao, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    We describe an automatic, injection-type bridge for inductive voltage divider (IVD) applications at low audio frequencies. We used it to self-calibrate programmable IVDs fabricated in house, by an automated {open_quotes}boot-strap{close_quotes} procedure. It is the heart of our reference standard for ac voltage ratios as well as a calibration system for IVDs.

  12. 32 CFR 2001.30 - Automatic declassification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provisions of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, shall be referred to the Department of Energy... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic declassification. 2001.30 Section 2001.30 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY...

  13. 32 CFR 2001.30 - Automatic declassification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, shall be referred to the Department of Energy... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic declassification. 2001.30 Section 2001.30 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY...

  14. 32 CFR 2001.30 - Automatic declassification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, shall be referred to the Department of Energy... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic declassification. 2001.30 Section 2001.30 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY...

  15. 32 CFR 2001.30 - Automatic declassification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, shall be referred to the Department of Energy... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic declassification. 2001.30 Section 2001.30 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY...

  16. 32 CFR 2001.30 - Automatic declassification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions of the National Security Act of 1947, as amended, shall be referred to the Department of Energy... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automatic declassification. 2001.30 Section 2001.30 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY...

  17. Automatic Activation of Exercise and Sedentary Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Tanya; Spence, John C.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the automatic activation of "sedentary" and "exerciser" stereotypes using a social prime Stroop task. Results showed significantly slower response times between the exercise words and the exercise control words and between the sedentary words and the exercise control words when preceded by an attractive exerciser prime. Words preceded…

  18. Handwriting Automaticity: The Search for Performance Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medwell, Jane; Wray, David

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that handwriting has an important role in written composition. In particular, handwriting automaticity appears to relate to success in composition. This relationship has been little explored in British contexts and we currently have little idea of what threshold performance levels might be. In this paper, we report on two…

  19. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  20. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  1. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  2. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  3. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  4. Automatic TLI recognition system beta prototype testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the beta prototype automatic target recognition system ATR3, and some performance tests done with this system. This is a fully operational system, with a high computational speed. It is useful for findings any kind of target in digitized image data, and as a general purpose image analysis tool.

  5. RFID: A Revolution in Automatic Data Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2004-01-01

    Radio frequency identification, or RFID, is a generic term for technologies that use radio waves to automatically identify people or objects. There are several methods of identification, but the most common is to store a serial number that identifies a person or object, and perhaps other information, on a microchip that is attached to an antenna…

  6. A Method for Automatically Abstracting Visual Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorvig, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a method for automatically selecting key frames that can be used to represent the total image sequence of visual documents. An abstracting algorithm developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is explained, and extensive examples of abstracted motion sequences are presented. (eight references) (LRW)

  7. MARZ: Manual and automatic redshifting software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, S. R.; Davis, Tamara M.; Lidman, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Lewis, G. F.

    2016-04-01

    The Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES) is a 100-night spectroscopic survey underway on the Anglo-Australian Telescope using the fibre-fed 2-degree-field (2dF) spectrograph. We have developed a new redshifting application MARZ with greater usability, flexibility, and the capacity to analyse a wider range of object types than the RUNZ software package previously used for redshifting spectra from 2dF. MARZ is an open-source, client-based, Javascript web-application which provides an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra generated from the AAOmega spectrograph to produce high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. The software can be run interactively or via the command line, and is easily adaptable to other instruments and pipelines if conforming to the current FITS file standard is not possible. Behind the scenes, a modified version of the AUTOZ cross-correlation algorithm is used to match input spectra against a variety of stellar and galaxy templates, and automatic matching performance for OzDES spectra has increased from 54% (RUNZ) to 91% (MARZ). Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be easily redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features.

  8. Automatization of Student Assessment Using Multimedia Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taniar, David; Rahayu, Wenny

    Most use of multimedia technology in teaching and learning to date has emphasized the teaching aspect only. An application of multimedia in examinations has been neglected. This paper addresses how multimedia technology can be applied to the automatization of assessment, by proposing a prototype of a multimedia question bank, which is able to…

  9. Grammatically-Based Automatic Word Class Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschman, Lynette; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an automatic procedure which uses the syntactic relations as the basis for grouping words into classes. It forms classes by grouping together nouns that occur as subject (or object) of the same verbs, and similarly by grouping together verbs occurring with the same subject or object. (Author)

  10. A Semi-Automatic Variability Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, G.; Niedzielski, A.

    Technical features of the Semi-Automatic Variability Search (SAVS) operating at the Astronomical Observatory of the Nicolaus Copernicus University and the results of the first year of observations are presented. The user-friendly software developed for reduction of acquired CCD images and detection of new variable stars is also described.

  11. Young Children's Automatic Encoding of Social Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisman, Kara; Johnson, Marissa V.; Shutts, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The present research investigated young children's automatic encoding of two social categories that are highly relevant to adults: gender and race. Three- to 6-year-old participants learned facts about unfamiliar target children who varied in either gender or race and were asked to remember which facts went with which targets. When participants…

  12. Automatic TLI recognition system, general description

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report is a general description of an automatic target recognition system developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Department of Energy. A user`s manual is a separate volume, Automatic TLI Recognition System, User`s Guide, and a programmer`s manual is Automatic TLI Recognition System, Programmer`s Guide. This system was designed as an automatic target recognition system for fast screening of large amounts of multi-sensor image data, based on low-cost parallel processors. This system naturally incorporates image data fusion, and it gives uncertainty estimates. It is relatively low cost, compact, and transportable. The software is easily enhanced to expand the system`s capabilities, and the hardware is easily expandable to increase the system`s speed. In addition to its primary function as a trainable target recognition system, this is also a versatile, general-purpose tool for image manipulation and analysis, which can be either keyboard-driven or script-driven. This report includes descriptions of three variants of the computer hardware, a description of the mathematical basis if the training process, and a description with examples of the system capabilities.

  13. Automatic visual inspection of hybrid microcircuits

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, R.E.

    1980-05-01

    An automatic visual inspection system using a minicomputer and a video digitizer was developed for inspecting hybrid microcircuits (HMC) and thin-film networks (TFN). The system performed well in detecting missing components on HMCs and reduced the testing time for each HMC by 75%.

  14. Semi-automatic approach for music classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong

    2003-11-01

    Audio categorization is essential when managing a music database, either a professional library or a personal collection. However, a complete automation in categorizing music into proper classes for browsing and searching is not yet supported by today"s technology. Also, the issue of music classification is subjective to some extent as each user may have his own criteria for categorizing music. In this paper, we propose the idea of semi-automatic music classification. With this approach, a music browsing system is set up which contains a set of tools for separating music into a number of broad types (e.g. male solo, female solo, string instruments performance, etc.) using existing music analysis methods. With results of the automatic process, the user may further cluster music pieces in the database into finer classes and/or adjust misclassifications manually according to his own preferences and definitions. Such a system may greatly improve the efficiency of music browsing and retrieval, while at the same time guarantee accuracy and user"s satisfaction of the results. Since this semi-automatic system has two parts, i.e. the automatic part and the manual part, they are described separately in the paper, with detailed descriptions and examples of each step of the two parts included.

  15. Automatic Collection of Rock and Soil Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrias, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed machine would sample rock or soil automatically. Mounted on a wheeled or tracked vehicle, machine positions drill for cut at any angle from horizontal to vertical, moves power head to drive drill into cut, and stores drilled core in a container. New concept may also be useful in terrestrial agricultural and geologic surveys.

  16. Automatic spatiotemporal matching of detected pleural thickenings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaisaowong, Kraisorn; Keller, Simon Kai; Kraus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pleural thickenings can be found in asbestos exposed patient's lung. Non-invasive diagnosis including CT imaging can detect aggressive malignant pleural mesothelioma in its early stage. In order to create a quantitative documentation of automatic detected pleural thickenings over time, the differences in volume and thickness of the detected thickenings have to be calculated. Physicians usually estimate the change of each thickening via visual comparison which provides neither quantitative nor qualitative measures. In this work, automatic spatiotemporal matching techniques of the detected pleural thickenings at two points of time based on the semi-automatic registration have been developed, implemented, and tested so that the same thickening can be compared fully automatically. As result, the application of the mapping technique using the principal components analysis turns out to be advantageous than the feature-based mapping using centroid and mean Hounsfield Units of each thickening, since the resulting sensitivity was improved to 98.46% from 42.19%, while the accuracy of feature-based mapping is only slightly higher (84.38% to 76.19%).

  17. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  18. Automatic River Network Extraction from LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maderal, E. N.; Valcarcel, N.; Delgado, J.; Sevilla, C.; Ojeda, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    National Geographic Institute of Spain (IGN-ES) has launched a new production system for automatic river network extraction for the Geospatial Reference Information (GRI) within hydrography theme. The goal is to get an accurate and updated river network, automatically extracted as possible. For this, IGN-ES has full LiDAR coverage for the whole Spanish territory with a density of 0.5 points per square meter. To implement this work, it has been validated the technical feasibility, developed a methodology to automate each production phase: hydrological terrain models generation with 2 meter grid size and river network extraction combining hydrographic criteria (topographic network) and hydrological criteria (flow accumulation river network), and finally the production was launched. The key points of this work has been managing a big data environment, more than 160,000 Lidar data files, the infrastructure to store (up to 40 Tb between results and intermediate files), and process; using local virtualization and the Amazon Web Service (AWS), which allowed to obtain this automatic production within 6 months, it also has been important the software stability (TerraScan-TerraSolid, GlobalMapper-Blue Marble , FME-Safe, ArcGIS-Esri) and finally, the human resources managing. The results of this production has been an accurate automatic river network extraction for the whole country with a significant improvement for the altimetric component of the 3D linear vector. This article presents the technical feasibility, the production methodology, the automatic river network extraction production and its advantages over traditional vector extraction systems.

  19. Leg automaticity is stronger than arm automaticity during simultaneous arm and leg cycling.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masanori; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Endoh, Takashi; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that human locomotion is quadrupedal in nature. An automatic rhythm-generating system is thought to play a crucial role in controlling arm and leg movements. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate differences between intrinsic arm and leg automaticity by investigating cadence variability during simultaneous arm and leg (AL) cycling. Participants performed AL cycling with visual feedback of arm or leg cadence. Participants were asked to focus their attention to match the predetermined cadence; this affects the automaticity of the rhythm-generating system. Leg cadence variability was only mildly affected when the participants intended to precisely adjust either their arm or leg cycling cadence to a predetermined value. In contrast, arm cadence variability significantly increased when the participants adjusted their leg cycling cadence to a predetermined value. These findings suggest that different neural mechanisms underlie the automaticities of arm and leg cycling and that the latter is stronger than the former during AL cycling.

  20. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness. PMID:26790484

  1. PN acquisition demodulator achieves automatic synchronization of a telemetry channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couvillon, L.

    1966-01-01

    Data demodulator for automatic sync acquisition provides an automatic means for obtaining initial word and bit synchronization in a pulse-code-modulated/phase-shift-keyed digital communications system.

  2. Using automatic programming for simulating reliability network models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Fan T.; Schroer, Bernard J.; Zhang, S. X.; Wolfsberger, John W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an automatic programming system for assisting modelers of reliability networks to define problems and then automatically generate the corresponding code in the target simulation language GPSS/PC.

  3. 2. FRONT VIEW, TWO DOUBLE AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNALS, EASTBOUND ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FRONT VIEW, TWO DOUBLE AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNALS, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE 486 - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  4. 4. OBLIQUE VIEW, AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNAL, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OBLIQUE VIEW, AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNAL, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE 486 - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  5. 1. FRONT VIEW, AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNAL, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FRONT VIEW, AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNAL, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE 486 - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  6. 3. REAR VIEW, AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNAL, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. REAR VIEW, AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNAL, EASTBOUND ON CATENARY BRIDGE 486 - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  7. Automatic Locking of Laser Frequency to an Absorption Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic system adjusts the frequency of a tunable laser, eventually locking the frequency to a peak in the optical absorption spectrum of a gas (or of a Fabry-Perot cavity that has an absorption peak like that of a gas). This system was developed to enable precise locking of the frequency of a laser used in differential absorption LIDAR measurements of trace atmospheric gases. This system also has great commercial potential as a prototype of means for precise control of frequencies of lasers in future dense wavelength-division-multiplexing optical communications systems. The operation of this system is completely automatic: Unlike in the operation of some prior laser-frequency-locking systems, there is ordinarily no need for a human operator to adjust the frequency manually to an initial value close enough to the peak to enable automatic locking to take over. Instead, this system also automatically performs the initial adjustment. The system (see Figure 1) is based on a concept of (1) initially modulating the laser frequency to sweep it through a spectral range that includes the desired absorption peak, (2) determining the derivative of the absorption peak with respect to the laser frequency for use as an error signal, (3) identifying the desired frequency [at the very top (which is also the middle) of the peak] as the frequency where the derivative goes to zero, and (4) thereafter keeping the frequency within a locking range and adjusting the frequency as needed to keep the derivative (the error signal) as close as possible to zero. More specifically, the system utilizes the fact that in addition to a zero crossing at the top of the absorption peak, the error signal also closely approximates a straight line in the vicinity of the zero crossing (see Figure 2). This vicinity is the locking range because the linearity of the error signal in this range makes it useful as a source of feedback for a proportional + integral + derivative control scheme that

  8. 5 CFR 831.502 - Automatic separation; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Automatic separation; exemption. 831.502... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Eligibility for Retirement § 831.502 Automatic separation; exemption. (a... automatic separation at the end of that month. The department or agency shall notify the employee of...

  9. 5 CFR 831.502 - Automatic separation; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Automatic separation; exemption. 831.502... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Eligibility for Retirement § 831.502 Automatic separation; exemption. (a... automatic separation at the end of that month. The department or agency shall notify the employee of...

  10. 5 CFR 831.502 - Automatic separation; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic separation; exemption. 831.502... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Eligibility for Retirement § 831.502 Automatic separation; exemption. (a... automatic separation at the end of that month. The department or agency shall notify the employee of...

  11. 5 CFR 831.502 - Automatic separation; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automatic separation; exemption. 831.502... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Eligibility for Retirement § 831.502 Automatic separation; exemption. (a... automatic separation at the end of that month. The department or agency shall notify the employee of...

  12. 46 CFR 171.118 - Automatic ventilators and side ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic ventilators and side ports. 171.118 Section... Bulkhead or Weather Deck § 171.118 Automatic ventilators and side ports. (a) An automatic ventilator must... Officer, Marine Safety Center. (b) The design and construction of each gangway, cargo and coaling...

  13. 46 CFR 171.118 - Automatic ventilators and side ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Automatic ventilators and side ports. 171.118 Section... Bulkhead or Weather Deck § 171.118 Automatic ventilators and side ports. (a) An automatic ventilator must... Officer, Marine Safety Center. (b) The design and construction of each gangway, cargo and coaling...

  14. 46 CFR 153.980 - Isolation of automatic closing valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Isolation of automatic closing valves. 153.980 Section... Transfer Procedures § 153.980 Isolation of automatic closing valves. The person in charge of cargo transfer may isolate automatic closing valves described in § 153.408(b) from a cargo containment system if...

  15. 46 CFR 153.980 - Isolation of automatic closing valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Isolation of automatic closing valves. 153.980 Section... Transfer Procedures § 153.980 Isolation of automatic closing valves. The person in charge of cargo transfer may isolate automatic closing valves described in § 153.408(b) from a cargo containment system if...

  16. 49 CFR 236.826 - System, automatic train stop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false System, automatic train stop. 236.826 Section 236... § 236.826 System, automatic train stop. A system so arranged that its operation will automatically result in the application of the brakes until the train has been brought to a stop....

  17. 49 CFR 236.826 - System, automatic train stop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false System, automatic train stop. 236.826 Section 236... § 236.826 System, automatic train stop. A system so arranged that its operation will automatically result in the application of the brakes until the train has been brought to a stop....

  18. 49 CFR 236.826 - System, automatic train stop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false System, automatic train stop. 236.826 Section 236... § 236.826 System, automatic train stop. A system so arranged that its operation will automatically result in the application of the brakes until the train has been brought to a stop....

  19. 49 CFR 236.826 - System, automatic train stop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false System, automatic train stop. 236.826 Section 236... § 236.826 System, automatic train stop. A system so arranged that its operation will automatically result in the application of the brakes until the train has been brought to a stop....

  20. 49 CFR 236.826 - System, automatic train stop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false System, automatic train stop. 236.826 Section 236... § 236.826 System, automatic train stop. A system so arranged that its operation will automatically result in the application of the brakes until the train has been brought to a stop....

  1. Automaticity of walking: functional significance, mechanisms, measurement and rehabilitation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Automaticity is a hallmark feature of walking in adults who are healthy and well-functioning. In the context of walking, “automaticity” refers to the ability of the nervous system to successfully control typical steady state walking with minimal use of attention-demanding executive control resources. Converging lines of evidence indicate that walking deficits and disorders are characterized in part by a shift in the locomotor control strategy from healthy automaticity to compensatory executive control. This is potentially detrimental to walking performance, as an executive control strategy is not optimized for locomotor control. Furthermore, it places excessive demands on a limited pool of executive reserves. The result is compromised ability to perform basic and complex walking tasks and heightened risk for adverse mobility outcomes including falls. Strategies for rehabilitation of automaticity are not well defined, which is due to both a lack of systematic research into the causes of impaired automaticity and to a lack of robust neurophysiological assessments by which to gauge automaticity. These gaps in knowledge are concerning given the serious functional implications of compromised automaticity. Therefore, the objective of this article is to advance the science of automaticity of walking by consolidating evidence and identifying gaps in knowledge regarding: (a) functional significance of automaticity; (b) neurophysiology of automaticity; (c) measurement of automaticity; (d) mechanistic factors that compromise automaticity; and (e) strategies for rehabilitation of automaticity. PMID:25999838

  2. 14 CFR 29.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 29.1329 Section 29... pilot system. (a) Each automatic pilot system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be sufficiently overpowered by one pilot to allow control of the rotorcraft; and (2) Be readily and...

  3. 14 CFR 27.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 27.1329 Section 27... pilot system. (a) Each automatic pilot system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be sufficiently overpowered by one pilot to allow control of the rotorcraft; and (2) Be readily and...

  4. 14 CFR 171.263 - Localizer automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Localizer automatic monitor system. 171.263... System (ISMLS) § 171.263 Localizer automatic monitor system. (a) The ISMLS localizer equipment must provide an automatic monitor system that transmits a warning to designated local and remote control...

  5. 21 CFR 211.68 - Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. 211.68 Section 211.68 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Equipment § 211.68 Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. (a) Automatic, mechanical, or...

  6. 21 CFR 211.68 - Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. 211.68 Section 211.68 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Equipment § 211.68 Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. (a) Automatic, mechanical, or...

  7. 21 CFR 211.68 - Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. 211.68 Section 211.68 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Equipment § 211.68 Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. (a) Automatic, mechanical, or...

  8. 21 CFR 211.68 - Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. 211.68 Section 211.68 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Equipment § 211.68 Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. (a) Automatic, mechanical, or...

  9. 21 CFR 211.68 - Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. 211.68 Section 211.68 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Equipment § 211.68 Automatic, mechanical, and electronic equipment. (a) Automatic, mechanical, or...

  10. 40 CFR 1037.660 - Automatic engine shutdown systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic engine shutdown systems... § 1037.660 Automatic engine shutdown systems. This section specifies requirements that apply for certified automatic engine shutdown systems (AES) that are modeled under § 1037.520. It does not apply...

  11. 40 CFR 1037.660 - Automatic engine shutdown systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic engine shutdown systems... § 1037.660 Automatic engine shutdown systems. This section specifies requirements that apply for certified automatic engine shutdown (AES) systems modeled under § 1037.520. It does not apply for...

  12. 14 CFR 27.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 27.1329 Section 27... pilot system. (a) Each automatic pilot system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be sufficiently overpowered by one pilot to allow control of the rotorcraft; and (2) Be readily and...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 29.1329 Section 29... pilot system. (a) Each automatic pilot system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be sufficiently overpowered by one pilot to allow control of the rotorcraft; and (2) Be readily and...

  14. 30 CFR 77.314 - Automatic temperature control instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic temperature control instruments. 77... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.314 Automatic temperature control instruments. (a) Automatic temperature control instruments for thermal dryer system shall be of the recording type. (b)...

  15. 30 CFR 77.314 - Automatic temperature control instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic temperature control instruments. 77... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.314 Automatic temperature control instruments. (a) Automatic temperature control instruments for thermal dryer system shall be of the recording type. (b)...

  16. 30 CFR 77.314 - Automatic temperature control instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automatic temperature control instruments. 77... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.314 Automatic temperature control instruments. (a) Automatic temperature control instruments for thermal dryer system shall be of the recording type. (b)...

  17. 30 CFR 77.314 - Automatic temperature control instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic temperature control instruments. 77... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.314 Automatic temperature control instruments. (a) Automatic temperature control instruments for thermal dryer system shall be of the recording type. (b)...

  18. 30 CFR 77.314 - Automatic temperature control instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic temperature control instruments. 77... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.314 Automatic temperature control instruments. (a) Automatic temperature control instruments for thermal dryer system shall be of the recording type. (b)...

  19. 12 CFR 7.1018 - Automatic payment plan account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Automatic payment plan account. 7.1018 Section... OPERATIONS Bank Powers § 7.1018 Automatic payment plan account. A national bank may, for the benefit and convenience of its savings depositors, adopt an automatic payment plan under which a savings account will...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1403-4 - Criteria-Automatic elevators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria-Automatic elevators. 75.1403-4 Section... Criteria—Automatic elevators. (a) The doors of automatic elevators should be equipped with interlocking switches so arranged that the elevator car will be immovable while any door is opened or unlocked,...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1403-4 - Criteria-Automatic elevators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criteria-Automatic elevators. 75.1403-4 Section... Criteria—Automatic elevators. (a) The doors of automatic elevators should be equipped with interlocking switches so arranged that the elevator car will be immovable while any door is opened or unlocked,...

  2. 30 CFR 77.1401 - Automatic controls and brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic controls and brakes. 77.1401 Section... MINES Personnel Hoisting § 77.1401 Automatic controls and brakes. Hoists and elevators shall be equipped with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop controls and with brakes capable of stopping the...

  3. 30 CFR 77.1401 - Automatic controls and brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automatic controls and brakes. 77.1401 Section... MINES Personnel Hoisting § 77.1401 Automatic controls and brakes. Hoists and elevators shall be equipped with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop controls and with brakes capable of stopping the...

  4. 30 CFR 77.1401 - Automatic controls and brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic controls and brakes. 77.1401 Section... MINES Personnel Hoisting § 77.1401 Automatic controls and brakes. Hoists and elevators shall be equipped with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop controls and with brakes capable of stopping the...

  5. 30 CFR 77.1401 - Automatic controls and brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic controls and brakes. 77.1401 Section... MINES Personnel Hoisting § 77.1401 Automatic controls and brakes. Hoists and elevators shall be equipped with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop controls and with brakes capable of stopping the...

  6. 30 CFR 77.1401 - Automatic controls and brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic controls and brakes. 77.1401 Section... MINES Personnel Hoisting § 77.1401 Automatic controls and brakes. Hoists and elevators shall be equipped with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop controls and with brakes capable of stopping the...

  7. 46 CFR 15.816 - Automatic radar plotting aids (ARPAs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Automatic radar plotting aids (ARPAs). 15.816 Section 15... REQUIREMENTS Computations § 15.816 Automatic radar plotting aids (ARPAs). Every person in the required complement of deck officers, including the master, on seagoing vessels equipped with automatic radar...

  8. Flight Investigation of an Automatic Throttle Control in Landing Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lina, Lindsay J.; Champine, Robert A.; Morris, Garland J.

    1959-01-01

    A flight investigation of an automatic throttle control in landing approaches has been made. It was found that airspeed could be maintained satisfactorily by the automatic throttle control. Turbulent air caused undesirably large variations of engine power which were uncomfortable and disconcerting; nevertheless, the pilot felt that he could make approaches 5 knots slower with equal assurance when the automatic control was in operation.

  9. Automatic TLI recognition system, user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes how to use an automatic target recognition system (version 14). In separate volumes are a general description of the ATR system, Automatic TLI Recognition System, General Description, and a programmer`s manual, Automatic TLI Recognition System, Programmer`s Guide.

  10. 21 CFR 892.1900 - Automatic radiographic film processor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automatic radiographic film processor. 892.1900... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1900 Automatic radiographic film processor. (a) Identification. An automatic radiographic film processor is a device intended to be used...

  11. 30 CFR 56.19006 - Automatic hoist braking devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic hoist braking devices. 56.19006 Section 56.19006 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Hoisting Hoists § 56.19006 Automatic hoist braking devices. Automatic hoists shall be provided with...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1900 - Automatic radiographic film processor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automatic radiographic film processor. 892.1900... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1900 Automatic radiographic film processor. (a) Identification. An automatic radiographic film processor is a device intended to be used...

  13. Automatic Evaluations in Clinically Anxious and Nonanxious Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervoort, Leentje; Wolters, Lidewij H.; Hogendoorn, Sanne M.; Prins, Pier J. M.; de Haan, Else; Nauta, Maaike H.; Boer, Frits

    2010-01-01

    Automatic evaluations of clinically anxious and nonanxious children (n = 40, aged 8-16, 18 girls) were compared using a pictorial performance-based measure of automatic affective associations. Results showed a threat-related evaluation bias in clinically anxious but not in nonanxious children. In anxious participants, automatic evaluations of…

  14. Automatic recognition of malicious intent indicators.

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, D. J.; Yee, Mark L.; Giron, Casey; Fogler, Robert Joseph; Nguyen, Hung D.; Koch, Mark William

    2010-09-01

    A major goal of next-generation physical protection systems is to extend defenses far beyond the usual outer-perimeter-fence boundaries surrounding protected facilities. Mitigation of nuisance alarms is among the highest priorities. A solution to this problem is to create a robust capability to Automatically Recognize Malicious Indicators of intruders. In extended defense applications, it is not enough to distinguish humans from all other potential alarm sources as human activity can be a common occurrence outside perimeter boundaries. Our approach is unique in that it employs a stimulus to determine a malicious intent indicator for the intruder. The intruder's response to the stimulus can be used in an automatic reasoning system to decide the intruder's intent.

  15. Autotract: automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets.

  16. Automatic digital-analog impedance plethysmograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goy, C. B.; Mauro, K. A.; Yanicelli, L. M.; Parodi, N. F.; Gómez López, M. A.; Herrera, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Venous occlusion plethysmography (VOP) is a traditional method widely used to assess limb blood circulation. One common mode to record VOP is by means of evaluating limb volume changes using impedance plethysmography (IP). In this paper the design and implementation of an automatic digital-analog impedance plethysmograph (ADAIP) for VOP is presented. The system is tested using precision resistances in order to calculate its repeatability. Then its global performance is assessed by means of VOP recordings on the upper and me lower limb of a healthy volunteer. The obtained repeatability was very high (95%), and the VOP recordings where the expected ones. It can be concluded that the whole system performs well and that it is suitable for automatic VOP recording.

  17. Automatic design and manufacture of robotic lifeforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, Hod; Pollack, Jordan B.

    2000-08-01

    Biological life is in control of its own means of reproduction, which generally involves complex, autocatalysing chemical reactions. But this autonomy of design and manufacture has not yet been realized artificially. Robots are still laboriously designed and constructed by teams of human engineers, usually at considerable expense. Few robots are available because these costs must be absorbed through mass production, which is justified only for toys, weapons and industrial systems such as automatic teller machines. Here we report the results of a combined computational and experimental approach in which simple electromechanical systems are evolved through simulations from basic building blocks (bars, actuators and artificial neurons); the `fittest' machines (defined by their locomotive ability) are then fabricated robotically using rapid manufacturing technology. We thus achieve autonomy of design and construction using evolution in a `limited universe' physical simulation coupled to automatic fabrication.

  18. Automatic line generalization using zero-crossings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thapa, K.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of automating the process of line generalization has been very difficult. It has not been solved yet despite the concerted effort of many private firms as well as government agencies. There does not exist an algorithm which can automatically perform this process when there is a drastic change in scale between the original and generalized maps. In this paper, an algorithm which is successful in automatically generalizing lines from any large scale to any small scale is presented. The algorthm achieves different levels of smoothing the line while preserving the overall shape of the line. The results are compared with those obtained by manual methods. It was found that the results obtained by the algorithm are very close to those obtained by cartographers using manual methods.

  19. Automatic Prosodic Analysis to Identify Mild Dementia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Moreira, Eduardo; Torres-Boza, Diana; Kairuz, Héctor Arturo; Ferrer, Carlos; Garcia-Zamora, Marlene; Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Hernandez-Gómez, Luis Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory technique to identify mild dementia by assessing the degree of speech deficits. A total of twenty participants were used for this experiment, ten patients with a diagnosis of mild dementia and ten participants like healthy control. The audio session for each subject was recorded following a methodology developed for the present study. Prosodic features in patients with mild dementia and healthy elderly controls were measured using automatic prosodic analysis on a reading task. A novel method was carried out to gather twelve prosodic features over speech samples. The best classification rate achieved was of 85% accuracy using four prosodic features. The results attained show that the proposed computational speech analysis offers a viable alternative for automatic identification of dementia features in elderly adults. PMID:26558287

  20. Automatic document navigation for digital content remastering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaofan; Simske, Steven J.

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method of automatically adding navigation capabilities to re-mastered electronic books. We first analyze the need for a generic and robust system to automatically construct navigation links into re-mastered books. We then introduce the core algorithm based on text matching for building the links. The proposed method utilizes the tree-structured dictionary and directional graph of the table of contents to efficiently conduct the text matching. Information fusion further increases the robustness of the algorithm. The experimental results on the MIT Press digital library project are discussed and the key functional features of the system are illustrated. We have also investigated how the quality of the OCR engine affects the linking algorithm. In addition, the analogy between this work and Web link mining has been pointed out.

  1. Automatic stereoscopic system for person recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murynin, Alexander B.; Matveev, Ivan A.; Kuznetsov, Victor D.

    1999-06-01

    A biometric access control system based on identification of human face is presented. The system developed performs remote measurements of the necessary face features. Two different scenarios of the system behavior are implemented. The first one assumes the verification of personal data entered by visitor from console using keyboard or card reader. The system functions as an automatic checkpoint, that strictly controls access of different visitors. The other scenario makes it possible to identify visitors without any person identifier or pass. Only person biometrics are used to identify the visitor. The recognition system automatically finds necessary identification information preliminary stored in the database. Two laboratory models of recognition system were developed. The models are designed to use different information types and sources. In addition to stereoscopic images inputted to computer from cameras the models can use voice data and some person physical characteristics such as person's height, measured by imaging system.

  2. Automatic Palette Identification of Colored Graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Vinciane

    The median-shift, a new clustering algorithm, is proposed to automatically identify the palette of colored graphics, a pre-requisite for graphics vectorization. The median-shift is an iterative process which shifts each data point to the "median" point of its neighborhood defined thanks to a distance measure and a maximum radius, the only parameter of the method. The process is viewed as a graph transformation which converges to a set of clusters made of one or several connected vertices. As the palette identification depends on color perception, the clustering is performed in the L*a*b* feature space. As pixels located on edges are made of mixed colors not expected to be part of the palette, they are removed from the initial data set by an automatic pre-processing. Results are shown on scanned maps and on the Macbeth color chart and compared to well established methods.

  3. Automatic Prosodic Analysis to Identify Mild Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Moreira, Eduardo; Torres-Boza, Diana; Kairuz, Héctor Arturo; Ferrer, Carlos; Garcia-Zamora, Marlene; Espinoza-Cuadros, Fernando; Hernandez-Gómez, Luis Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory technique to identify mild dementia by assessing the degree of speech deficits. A total of twenty participants were used for this experiment, ten patients with a diagnosis of mild dementia and ten participants like healthy control. The audio session for each subject was recorded following a methodology developed for the present study. Prosodic features in patients with mild dementia and healthy elderly controls were measured using automatic prosodic analysis on a reading task. A novel method was carried out to gather twelve prosodic features over speech samples. The best classification rate achieved was of 85% accuracy using four prosodic features. The results attained show that the proposed computational speech analysis offers a viable alternative for automatic identification of dementia features in elderly adults. PMID:26558287

  4. Automatic breast density classification using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefan, D.; Talebpour, A.; Ahmadinejhad, N.; Kamali Asl, A.

    2015-12-01

    According to studies, the risk of breast cancer directly associated with breast density. Many researches are done on automatic diagnosis of breast density using mammography. In the current study, artifacts of mammograms are removed by using image processing techniques and by using the method presented in this study, including the diagnosis of points of the pectoral muscle edges and estimating them using regression techniques, pectoral muscle is detected with high accuracy in mammography and breast tissue is fully automatically extracted. In order to classify mammography images into three categories: Fatty, Glandular, Dense, a feature based on difference of gray-levels of hard tissue and soft tissue in mammograms has been used addition to the statistical features and a neural network classifier with a hidden layer. Image database used in this research is the mini-MIAS database and the maximum accuracy of system in classifying images has been reported 97.66% with 8 hidden layers in neural network.

  5. Automatic design and manufacture of robotic lifeforms.

    PubMed

    Lipson, H; Pollack, J B

    2000-08-31

    Biological life is in control of its own means of reproduction, which generally involves complex, autocatalysing chemical reactions. But this autonomy of design and manufacture has not yet been realized artificially. Robots are still laboriously designed and constructed by teams of human engineers, usually at considerable expense. Few robots are available because these costs must be absorbed through mass production, which is justified only for toys, weapons and industrial systems such as automatic teller machines. Here we report the results of a combined computational and experimental approach in which simple electromechanical systems are evolved through simulations from basic building blocks (bars, actuators and artificial neurons); the 'fittest' machines (defined by their locomotive ability) are then fabricated robotically using rapid manufacturing technology. We thus achieve autonomy of design and construction using evolution in a 'limited universe' physical simulation coupled to automatic fabrication.

  6. Autotract: Automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets. PMID:27065227

  7. Device for automatically charging a woodburning stove

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.A.

    1981-12-29

    A device for automatically dropping logs at a predetermined time for charging a fire laid on the bottom of a woodburning stove. The device includes a pair of elongated arcuate shaped log supporting members each of which is journaled within the stove adjacent a respective top side corner thereof. A latching system is connected to the log supporting member for releasably maintaining the log supporting members in a substantially horizontal supporting position. An electrically operated movable member is connected to the latching system for releasing the latching system upon being energized under control of a timing device at a predetermined time. As a result, the stove can be automatically charged during the middle of the night ensuring a fire in the morning.

  8. Automatic photointerpretation via texture and morphology analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tou, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Computer-based techniques for automatic photointerpretation based upon information derived from texture and morphology analysis of images are discussed. By automatic photointerpretation, is meant the determination of semantic descriptions of the content of the images by computer. To perform semantic analysis of morphology, a heirarchical structure of knowledge representation was developed. The simplest elements in a morphology are strokes, which are used to form alphabets. The alphabets are the elements for generating words, which are used to describe the function or property of an object or a region. The words are the elements for constructing sentences, which are used for semantic description of the content of the image. Photointerpretation based upon morphology is then augmented by textural information. Textural analysis is performed using a pixel-vector approach.

  9. Double Precision Differential/Algebraic Sensitivity Analysis Code

    1995-06-02

    DDASAC solves nonlinear initial-value problems involving stiff implicit systems of ordinary differential and algebraic equations. Purely algebraic nonlinear systems can also be solved, given an initial guess within the region of attraction of a solution. Options include automatic reconciliation of inconsistent initial states and derivatives, automatic initial step selection, direct concurrent parametric sensitivity analysis, and stopping at a prescribed value of any user-defined functional of the current solution vector. Local error control (in the max-normmore » or the 2-norm) is provided for the state vector and can include the sensitivities on request.« less

  10. Automatic Extraction of JPF Options and Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luks, Wojciech; Tkachuk, Oksana; Buschnell, David

    2011-01-01

    Documenting existing Java PathFinder (JPF) projects or developing new extensions is a challenging task. JPF provides a platform for creating new extensions and relies on key-value properties for their configuration. Keeping track of all possible options and extension mechanisms in JPF can be difficult. This paper presents jpf-autodoc-options, a tool that automatically extracts JPF projects options and other documentation-related information, which can greatly help both JPF users and developers of JPF extensions.

  11. Automatic landslides detection on Stromboli volcanic Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silengo, Maria Cristina; Delle Donne, Dario; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Cigolini, Corrado; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Landslides occurring in active volcanic islands play a key role in triggering tsunami and other related risks. Therefore, it becomes vital for a correct and prompt risk assessment to monitor landslides activity and to have an automatic system for a robust early-warning. We then developed a system based on a multi-frequency analysis of seismic signals for automatic landslides detection occurring at Stromboli volcano. We used a network of 4 seismic 3 components stations located along the unstable flank of the Sciara del Fuoco. Our method is able to recognize and separate the different sources of seismic signals related to volcanic and tectonic activity (e.g. tremor, explosions, earthquake) from landslides. This is done using a multi-frequency analysis combined with a waveform patter recognition. We applied the method to one year of seismic activity of Stromboli volcano centered during the last 2007 effusive eruption. This eruption was characterized by a pre-eruptive landslide activity reflecting the slow deformation of the volcano edifice. The algorithm is at the moment running off-line but has proved to be robust and efficient in picking automatically landslide. The method provides also real-time statistics on the landslide occurrence, which could be used as a proxy for the volcano deformation during the pre-eruptive phases. This method is very promising since the number of false detections is quite small (<5%) and is reducing when the size of the landslide increases. The final aim will be to apply this method on-line and for a real-time automatic detection as an improving tool for early warnings of tsunami-genic landslide activity. We suggest that a similar approach could be also applied to other unstable non-volcanic also slopes.

  12. Automatic learning by an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    de Saussure, G.; Spelt, P.F.; Killough, S.M.; Pin, F.G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes recent research in automatic learning by the autonomous mobile robot HERMIES-IIB at the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR). By acting on the environment and observing the consequences during a set of training examples, the robot learns a sequence of successful manipulations on a simulated control panel. The robot learns to classify panel configurations in order to deal with new configurations that are not part of the original training set. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Automatic generation of tree level helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, T.; Long, W. F.

    1994-11-01

    The program MadGraph is presented which automatically generates postscript Feynman diagrams and Fortran code to calculate arbitrary tree level helicity amplitudes by calling HELAS[1] subroutines. The program is written in Fortran and is available in Unix and VMS versions. MadGraph currently includes standard model interactions of QCD and QFD, but is easily modified to include additional models such as supersymmetry.

  14. Automatic generation of tree level helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, T.; Long, W. F.

    1994-07-01

    The program MadGraph is presented which automatically generates postscript Feynman diagrams and Fortran code to calculate arbitrary tree level helicity amplitudes by calling HELAS[1] subroutines. The program is written in Fortran and is available in Unix and VMS versions. MadGraph currently includes standard model interactions of QCD and QFD, but is easily modified to include additional models such as supersymmetry.

  15. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction (EF) of the left ventricle (LV). Despite research on cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, has been shown to have high inter-observer variability, with a variation of the EF by up to 8%. Therefore, an automatic way of identifying the basal slice is still required. Prior published methods operate by automatically tracking the mitral valve points from the long-axis view of the LV. These approaches assumed that the basal slice is the first short-axis slice below the mitral valve. However, guidelines published in 2013 by the society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance indicate that the basal slice is the uppermost short-axis slice with more than 50% myocardium surrounding the blood cavity. Consequently, these existing methods are at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under these guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that focuses on the two-chamber slice to find the basal slice. To this end, an active shape model is trained to automatically segment the two-chamber view for 51 samples using the leave-one-out strategy. The basal slice was detected using temporal binary profiles created for each short-axis slice from the segmented two-chamber slice. From the 51 successfully tested samples, 92% and 84% of detection results were accurate at the end-systolic and the end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle, respectively.

  16. Automatic detection of sweep-meshable volumes

    DOEpatents

    Tautges; Timothy J. , White; David R.

    2006-05-23

    A method of and software for automatically determining whether a mesh can be generated by sweeping for a representation of a geometric solid comprising: classifying surface mesh schemes for surfaces of the representation locally using surface vertex types; grouping mappable and submappable surfaces of the representation into chains; computing volume edge types for the representation; recursively traversing surfaces of the representation and grouping the surfaces into source, target, and linking surface lists; and checking traversal direction when traversing onto linking surfaces.

  17. Classification and automatic transcription of primate calls.

    PubMed

    Versteegh, Maarten; Kuhn, Jeremy; Synnaeve, Gabriel; Ravaux, Lucie; Chemla, Emmanuel; Cäsar, Cristiane; Fuller, James; Murphy, Derek; Schel, Anne; Dunbar, Ewan

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on an automated and openly available tool for automatic acoustic analysis and transcription of primate calls, which takes raw field recordings and outputs call labels time-aligned with the audio. The system's output predicts a majority of the start times of calls accurately within 200 milliseconds. The tools do not require any manual acoustic analysis or selection of spectral features by the researcher.

  18. Theory of automatic control of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Herbert K

    1939-01-01

    Methods of automatically controlling the airplane are reviewed. Equations for the controlled motion including inertia effects of the control are developed and methods of investigating the stability of the resulting fifth and higher order equations are presented. The equations for longitudinal and lateral motion with both ideal and non-ideal controls are developed in dimensionless form in terms of control parameters based on simple dynamic tests of the isolated control unit.

  19. Sleep-related automatism and the law.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Irshaad Osman; Fenwick, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Crimes carried out during or arising from sleep highlight many difficulties with our current law and forensic sleep medicine clinical practice. There is a need for clarity in the law and agreement between experts on a standardised form of assessment and diagnosis in these challenging cases. We suggest that the time has come for a standardised, internationally recognised diagnostic protocol to be set as a minimum standard in all cases of suspected sleep-related forensic cases. The protocol of a full medical history, sleep history, psychiatric history, neuropsychiatric and psychometric examination and electroencephalography (EEG), should be routine. It should now be mandatory to carry out routine polysomnography (PSG) to establish the presence of precipitating and modulating factors. Sleepwalking is classified as insane automatism in England and Wales and sudden arousal from sleep in a non-sleepwalker as sane automatism. The recent case in England of R v. Lowe (2005) highlights these anomalies. Moreover, the word insanity stigmatises sleepwalkers and should be dropped. The simplest solution to these problems would be for the law to be changed so that there is only one category of defence for all sleep-related offences--not guilty by reason of sleep disorder. This was rejected by the House of Lords for cases of automatism due to epilepsy, and is likely to be rejected for sleepwalkers. Removing the categories of automatism (sane or insane) would be the best solution. Risk assessment is already standard practice in the UK and follow up, subsequent to disposal, by approved specialists should become part of the sentencing process. This will provide support for the defendant and protection of the public.

  20. Automatic Beam Position Control at LASREF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oothoudt, M. A.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M. V.

    1997-05-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual control to position the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp was used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances. Results and details of the system will be presented.

  1. Sleep-related automatism and the law.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Irshaad Osman; Fenwick, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Crimes carried out during or arising from sleep highlight many difficulties with our current law and forensic sleep medicine clinical practice. There is a need for clarity in the law and agreement between experts on a standardised form of assessment and diagnosis in these challenging cases. We suggest that the time has come for a standardised, internationally recognised diagnostic protocol to be set as a minimum standard in all cases of suspected sleep-related forensic cases. The protocol of a full medical history, sleep history, psychiatric history, neuropsychiatric and psychometric examination and electroencephalography (EEG), should be routine. It should now be mandatory to carry out routine polysomnography (PSG) to establish the presence of precipitating and modulating factors. Sleepwalking is classified as insane automatism in England and Wales and sudden arousal from sleep in a non-sleepwalker as sane automatism. The recent case in England of R v. Lowe (2005) highlights these anomalies. Moreover, the word insanity stigmatises sleepwalkers and should be dropped. The simplest solution to these problems would be for the law to be changed so that there is only one category of defence for all sleep-related offences--not guilty by reason of sleep disorder. This was rejected by the House of Lords for cases of automatism due to epilepsy, and is likely to be rejected for sleepwalkers. Removing the categories of automatism (sane or insane) would be the best solution. Risk assessment is already standard practice in the UK and follow up, subsequent to disposal, by approved specialists should become part of the sentencing process. This will provide support for the defendant and protection of the public. PMID:18533572

  2. Automatic targeting of plasma spray gun

    DOEpatents

    Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Neal, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    A means for monitoring the material portion in the flame of a plasma spray gun during spraying operations is provided. A collimated detector, sensitive to certain wavelengths of light emission, is used to locate the centroid of the material with each pass of the gun. The response from the detector is then relayed to the gun controller to be used to automatically realign the gun.

  3. Automatic frequency control for FM transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honnell, M. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic frequency control circuit for an FM television transmitter is described. The frequency of the transmitter is sampled during what is termed the back porch portion of the horizontal synchronizing pulse which occurs during the retrace interval, the frequency sample compared with the frequency of a reference oscillator, and a correction applied to the frequency of the transmitter during this portion of the retrace interval.

  4. Automatic-repeat-request error control schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.; Miller, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Error detection incorporated with automatic-repeat-request (ARQ) is widely used for error control in data communication systems. This method of error control is simple and provides high system reliability. If a properly chosen code is used for error detection, virtually error-free data transmission can be attained. Various types of ARQ and hybrid ARQ schemes, and error detection using linear block codes are surveyed.

  5. Energy conservation with automatic flow control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.

    1984-12-01

    Automatic flow control valves are offered in a wide range of sizes starting at 1/2 in. with flow rates of 0.5 gpm and up. They are also provided with materials and end connections to meet virtually any fan-coil system requirement. Among these are copper sweat type valves; ductile iron threaded valves; male/female threaded brass valves; and combination flow control/ball valves with union ends.

  6. Automatic microscopy for mitotic cell location.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, J.; Ranshaw, R.; Castle, J.; Wald, N.

    1972-01-01

    Advances are reported in the development of an automatic microscope with which to locate hematologic or other cells in mitosis for subsequent chromosome analysis. The system under development is designed to perform the functions of: slide scanning to locate metaphase cells; conversion of images of selected cells into binary form; and on-line computer analysis of the digitized image for significant cytogenetic data. Cell detection criteria are evaluated using a test sample of 100 mitotic cells and 100 artifacts.

  7. Classification and automatic transcription of primate calls.

    PubMed

    Versteegh, Maarten; Kuhn, Jeremy; Synnaeve, Gabriel; Ravaux, Lucie; Chemla, Emmanuel; Cäsar, Cristiane; Fuller, James; Murphy, Derek; Schel, Anne; Dunbar, Ewan

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports on an automated and openly available tool for automatic acoustic analysis and transcription of primate calls, which takes raw field recordings and outputs call labels time-aligned with the audio. The system's output predicts a majority of the start times of calls accurately within 200 milliseconds. The tools do not require any manual acoustic analysis or selection of spectral features by the researcher. PMID:27475207

  8. What Automaticity Deficit? Activation of Lexical Information by Readers with Dyslexia in a Rapid Automatized Naming Stroop-Switch Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Manon W.; Snowling, Margaret J.; Moll, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Reading fluency is often predicted by rapid automatized naming (RAN) speed, which as the name implies, measures the automaticity with which familiar stimuli (e.g., letters) can be retrieved and named. Readers with dyslexia are considered to have less "automatized" access to lexical information, reflected in longer RAN times compared with…

  9. Automatic Telescope Search for Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.

    1998-01-01

    We are using automatic photoelectric telescopes at the Tennessee State University Center for Automated Space Science to search for planets around nearby stars in our galaxy. Over the past several years, wc have developed the capability to make extremely precise measurements of brightness changes in Sun-like stars with automatic telescopes. Extensive quality control and calibration measurements result in a precision of 0.l% for a single nightly observation and 0.0270 for yearly means, far better than previously thought possible with ground-based observations. We are able, for the first time, to trace brightness changes in Sun-like stars that are of similar amplitude to brightness changes in the Sun, whose changes can be observed only with space-based radiometers. Recently exciting discoveries of the first extrasolar planets have been announced, based on the detection of very small radial-velocity variations that imply the existence of planets in orbit around several Sun-like stars. Our precise brightness measurements have been crucial for the confirmation of these discoveries by helping to eliminate alternative explanations for the radial-velocity variations. With our automatic telescopes, we are also searching for transits of these planets across the disks of their stars in order to conclusively verify their existence. The detection of transits would provide the first direct measurements of the sizes, masses, and densities of these planets and, hence, information on their compositions and origins.

  10. Automatic target detection in cluttered IR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Markus; Korn, Axel

    1998-07-01

    Automatic target detection (ATR) generally refers to the localization of potential targets by computer processing of data from a variety of sensors. Automatic detection is applicable for data reduction purposes in the reconnaissance domain and is therefore aimed at reducing the workload on human operators. ATR covers activities such as the localization of individual objects in large areas or volumes for assessing the battlefield simulation. An increase of reliability and efficiency of the overall reconnaissance process is expected. The results of automatic image evaluation are offered to the image analyst as hypotheses. In this paper cluttered images from an infrared sensor are analyzed with the aim of finding Regions of Interest (ROIs), where hints for man-made objects have to be found. This analysis uses collateral data from acquisition time and location (e.g. day time, weather condition, resolution, sensor specification and orientation etc.). The assumed target size in the image is also compared by using collateral data. Based on the collateral data, the algorithm adjusts its parameters in order to find ROIs and to detect targets. Low contrast conditions can be successfully tackled if the directions of the grey value gradient are considered, which are nearly independent of the contrast. Blobs are generated by applying adaptive thresholds in the ROIs. Here the evaluation of histograms is very important for the extraction of structured features. The height, aspect angle, and camera parameters are approximately known for an estimation of target sizes in the image domain out of the collateral data.

  11. Automatic segmentation editing for cortical surface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Xu, Chenyang; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2001-07-01

    Segmentation and representation of the human cerebral cortex from magnetic resonance images is an important goal in neuroscience and medicine. Accurate cortical segmentation requires preprocessing of the image data to separate certain subcortical structures from the cortex in order to generate a good initial white-matter/gray-matter interface. This step is typically manual or semi-automatic. In this paper, we propose an automatic procedure that is based on a careful analysis of the brain anatomy. Following a fuzzy segmentation of the brain image, the method first extracts the ventricles using a geometric deformable surface model. A region force, derived from the cerebrospinal membership function, is used to deform the surface towards the boundary of the ventricles, while a curvature force controls the smoothness of the surface and prevents it from growing into the outer pial surface. Next, region-growing identifies and fills the subcortical regions in each cortical slice using the detected ventricles as seeds and the white matter and several automatically determined sealing lines as boundaries. To make the method robust to segmentation artifacts, a putamen mask drawn in the Talairach coordinate system is also used to help the region growing process. Visual inspection and initial results on 15 subjects show the success of the proposed method.

  12. Automatic Detection of Electric Power Troubles (ADEPT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Caroline; Zeanah, Hugh; Anderson, Audie; Patrick, Clint; Brady, Mike; Ford, Donnie

    1988-01-01

    Automatic Detection of Electric Power Troubles (A DEPT) is an expert system that integrates knowledge from three different suppliers to offer an advanced fault-detection system. It is designed for two modes of operation: real time fault isolation and simulated modeling. Real time fault isolation of components is accomplished on a power system breadboard through the Fault Isolation Expert System (FIES II) interface with a rule system developed in-house. Faults are quickly detected and displayed and the rules and chain of reasoning optionally provided on a laser printer. This system consists of a simulated space station power module using direct-current power supplies for solar arrays on three power buses. For tests of the system's ablilty to locate faults inserted via switches, loads are configured by an INTEL microcomputer and the Symbolics artificial intelligence development system. As these loads are resistive in nature, Ohm's Law is used as the basis for rules by which faults are located. The three-bus system can correct faults automatically where there is a surplus of power available on any of the three buses. Techniques developed and used can be applied readily to other control systems requiring rapid intelligent decisions. Simulated modeling, used for theoretical studies, is implemented using a modified version of Kennedy Space Center's KATE (Knowledge-Based Automatic Test Equipment), FIES II windowing, and an ADEPT knowledge base.

  13. Can we trust automatic sphygmomanometer validations?

    PubMed

    Turner, Martin J

    2010-12-01

    Hypertension is a leading risk factor for mortality. Detecting, treating and monitoring hypertensive patients require accurate blood pressure measurements. Protocols for validation of automatic sphygmomanometers exist, but quality control of validations is limited to peer review of published reports, which has severe limitations. An extensive international measurement framework provides quality assurance, traceability and laboratory accreditation for many measurements that are important to society, including industrial, scientific and trade measurements, medical imaging and medical laboratory testing. An important part of this quality assurance is external accreditation of laboratories that perform testing and calibration to the international standard ISO 17025 General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories. Automatic sphygmomanometer validation is a form of calibration and deserves quality control at least as good as other tests and calibrations that are important to society. It is suggested that laboratories that perform automatic sphygmomanometer validations should participate in the international measurement framework and be externally accredited by accrediting agencies that are members of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation.

  14. Automatic Detection of Dominance and Expected Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalera, Sergio; Pujol, Oriol; Radeva, Petia; Vitrià, Jordi; Anguera, M. Teresa

    2010-12-01

    Social Signal Processing is an emergent area of research that focuses on the analysis of social constructs. Dominance and interest are two of these social constructs. Dominance refers to the level of influence a person has in a conversation. Interest, when referred in terms of group interactions, can be defined as the degree of engagement that the members of a group collectively display during their interaction. In this paper, we argue that only using behavioral motion information, we are able to predict the interest of observers when looking at face-to-face interactions as well as the dominant people. First, we propose a simple set of movement-based features from body, face, and mouth activity in order to define a higher set of interaction indicators. The considered indicators are manually annotated by observers. Based on the opinions obtained, we define an automatic binary dominance detection problem and a multiclass interest quantification problem. Error-Correcting Output Codes framework is used to learn to rank the perceived observer's interest in face-to-face interactions meanwhile Adaboost is used to solve the dominant detection problem. The automatic system shows good correlation between the automatic categorization results and the manual ranking made by the observers in both dominance and interest detection problems.

  15. Action of ATP on ventricular automaticity.

    PubMed

    Stark, G; Domanowits, H; Sterz, F; Stark, U; Bachernegg, M; Kickenweiz, E; Decrinis, M; Laggner, A N; Tritthart, H A

    1994-11-01

    ATP is an effective treatment of supraventricular tachycardia when the atrioventricular (AV) node is part of the reentrant circuit. However, the lower a pace-maker in the pacemaker hierarchy, the more sensitive it is to adenosine. Therefore, we investigated the effects of ATP on ventricular automaticity in in vivo and in vitro conditions. Wide and narrow QRS complex tachycardia in 46 patients was treated with 6, 12, and 18 mg ATP as sequential intravenous (i.v.) bolus. ATP terminated tachycardias in 67%. Bolus infusion ATP caused < or = 6.4-s asystole that was self-limited. Perfusion of isolated spontaneously beating guinea pig heart with 100 microM ATP completely suppressed ventricular automaticity. After ATP-infusion was discontinued, the first ventricular beat was evident after 3.1 +/- 0.9 s and sinus node activity recovered with a time constant of 3.0 +/- 1.1 s. Because sinus node and ventricular automaticity recovered within seconds after ATP infusion was discontinued in vitro, recovery in vivo is also likely to be determined by the short half-life (+1/2) of ATP. PMID:7532751

  16. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis.

    PubMed

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction of the left ventricle. Despite all the effort placed on automatic cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, suffers from high interobserver variability. As a result, an automatic algorithm for basal slice identification is required. Guidelines published in 2013 identify the basal slice based on the percentage of myocardium surrounding the blood cavity in the short-axis view. Existing methods, however, assume that the basal slice is the first short-axis view slice below the mitral valve and are consequently at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that utilizes the two-chamber view to determine the basal slice while following the guidelines. To this end, an active shape model is trained to segment the two-chamber view and create temporal binary profiles from which the basal slice is identified. From the 51 tested cases, our method obtains 92% and 84% accurate basal slice detection for the end-systole and the end-diastole, respectively. PMID:27660805

  17. Gaussian curvature analysis allows for automatic block placement in multi-block hexahedral meshing.

    PubMed

    Ramme, Austin J; Shivanna, Kiran H; Magnotta, Vincent A; Grosland, Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Musculoskeletal finite element analysis (FEA) has been essential to research in orthopaedic biomechanics. The generation of a volumetric mesh is often the most challenging step in a FEA. Hexahedral meshing tools that are based on a multi-block approach rely on the manual placement of building blocks for their mesh generation scheme. We hypothesise that Gaussian curvature analysis could be used to automatically develop a building block structure for multi-block hexahedral mesh generation. The Automated Building Block Algorithm incorporates principles from differential geometry, combinatorics, statistical analysis and computer science to automatically generate a building block structure to represent a given surface without prior information. We have applied this algorithm to 29 bones of varying geometries and successfully generated a usable mesh in all cases. This work represents a significant advancement in automating the definition of building blocks.

  18. NASA automatic subject analysis technique for extracting retrievable multi-terms (NASA TERM) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, J.; Williamson, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Current methods for information processing and retrieval used at the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Facility are reviewed. A more cost effective computer aided indexing system is proposed which automatically generates print terms (phrases) from the natural text. Satisfactory print terms can be generated in a primarily automatic manner to produce a thesaurus (NASA TERMS) which extends all the mappings presently applied by indexers, specifies the worth of each posting term in the thesaurus, and indicates the areas of use of the thesaurus entry phrase. These print terms enable the computer to determine which of several terms in a hierarchy is desirable and to differentiate ambiguous terms. Steps in the NASA TERMS algorithm are discussed and the processing of surrogate entry phrases is demonstrated using four previously manually indexed STAR abstracts for comparison. The simulation shows phrase isolation, text phrase reduction, NASA terms selection, and RECON display.

  19. Gaussian curvature analysis allows for automatic block placement in multi-block hexahedral meshing.

    PubMed

    Ramme, Austin J; Shivanna, Kiran H; Magnotta, Vincent A; Grosland, Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    Musculoskeletal finite element analysis (FEA) has been essential to research in orthopaedic biomechanics. The generation of a volumetric mesh is often the most challenging step in a FEA. Hexahedral meshing tools that are based on a multi-block approach rely on the manual placement of building blocks for their mesh generation scheme. We hypothesise that Gaussian curvature analysis could be used to automatically develop a building block structure for multi-block hexahedral mesh generation. The Automated Building Block Algorithm incorporates principles from differential geometry, combinatorics, statistical analysis and computer science to automatically generate a building block structure to represent a given surface without prior information. We have applied this algorithm to 29 bones of varying geometries and successfully generated a usable mesh in all cases. This work represents a significant advancement in automating the definition of building blocks. PMID:20924860

  20. Automatic thermocouple positioner for use in vacuum furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Mee, David K.; Stephens, Albert E.

    1981-01-01

    The invention is a simple and reliable mechanical arrangement for automatically positioning a thermocouple-carrying rod in a vacuum-furnace assembly of the kind including a casing, a furnace mounted in the casing, and a charge-containing crucible mounted in the furnace for vertical movement between a lower (loading) position and a raised (charge-melting) position. In a preferred embodiment, a welded-diaphragm metal bellows is mounted above the furnace, the upper end of the bellows being fixed against movement and the lower end of the bellows being affixed to support means for a thermocouple-carrying rod which is vertically oriented and extends freely through the furnace lid toward the mouth of the crucible. The support means and rod are mounted for relative vertical movement. Before pumpdown of the furnace, the differential pressure acting on the bellows causes it to contract and lift the thermocouple rod to a position where it will not be contacted by the crucible charge when the crucible is elevated to its raised position. During pumpdown, the bellows expands downward, lowering the thermocouple rod and its support. The bellows expands downward beyond a point where downward movement of the thermocouple rod is arrested by contact with the crucible charge and to a point where the upper end of the thermocouple extends well above the thermocouple support. During subsequent melting of the charge, the thermocouple sinks into the melt to provide an accurate measurement of melt temperatures.

  1. Automatic thermocouple positioner for use in vacuum furnaces

    DOEpatents

    Mee, D.K.; Stephens, A.E.

    1980-06-06

    The invention is a simple and reliable mechanical arrangement for automatically positioning a thermocouple-carrying rod in a vacuum-furnace assembly of the kind including a casing, a furnace mounted in the casing, and a charge-containing crucible mounted in the furnace for vertical movement between a lower (loading) position and a raised (charge-melting) position. In a preferred embodiment, a welded-diaphragm metal bellows is mounted above the furnace, the upper end of the bellows being fixed against movement and the lower end of the bellows being affixed to support means for a thermocouple-carrying rod which is vertically oriented and extends freely through the furnace lid toward the mouth of the crucible. The support means and rod are mounted for relative vertical movement. Before pumpdown of the furnace, the differential pressure acting on the bellows causes it to contract and lift the thermocouple rod to a position where it will not be contacted by the crucible charge when the crucible is elevated to its raised position. During pumpdown, the bellows expands downward, lowering the thermocouple rod and its support. The bellows expands downward beyond a point where downward movement of the thermocouple rod is arrested by contact with the crucible charge and to a point where the upper end of the thermocouple extends well above the thermocouple support. During subsequent melting of the charge, the thermocouple sinks into the melt to provide an accurate measurement of melt temperatures.

  2. Automatic gender detection of dream reports: A promising approach.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christina; Amini, Reza; De Koninck, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    A computer program was developed in an attempt to differentiate the dreams of males from females. Hypothesized gender predictors were based on previous literature concerning both dream content and written language features. Dream reports from home-collected dream diaries of 100 male (144 dreams) and 100 female (144 dreams) adolescent Anglophones were matched for equal length. They were first scored with the Hall and Van de Castle (HVDC) scales and quantified using DreamSAT. Two male and two female undergraduate students were asked to read all dreams and predict the dreamer's gender. They averaged a pairwise percent correct gender prediction of 75.8% (κ=0.516), while the Automatic Analysis showed that the computer program's accuracy was 74.5% (κ=0.492), both of which were higher than chance of 50% (κ=0.00). The prediction levels were maintained when dreams containing obvious gender identifiers were eliminated and integration of HVDC scales did not improve prediction. PMID:27344136

  3. Automatic thermocouple positioner for use in vacuum furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, D.K.; Stephens, A.E.

    1981-08-04

    The invention is a simple and reliable mechanical arrangement for automatically positioning a thermocouple-carrying rod in a vacuum-furnace assembly of the kind including a casing, a furnace mounted in the casing, and a charge-containing crucible mounted in the furnace for vertical movement between a lower (loading) position and a raised (charge-melting) position. In a preferred embodiment, a welded-diaphragm metal bellows is mounted above the furnace, the upper end of the bellows being fixed against movement and the lower end of the bellows being affixed to support means for a thermocouple-carrying rod which is vertically oriented and extends freely through the furnace lid toward the mouth of the crucible. The support means and rod are mounted for relative vertical movement. Before pumpdown of the furnace, the differential pressure acting on the bellows causes it to contract and lift the thermocouple rod to a position where it will not be contacted by the crucible charge when the crucible is elevated to its raised position. During pumpdown, the bellows expands downward, lowering the thermocouple rod and its support. The bellows expands downward beyond a point where downward movement of the thermocouple rod is arrested by contact with the crucible charge and to a point where the upper end of the thermocouple extends well above the thermocouple support. During subsequent melting of the charge, the thermocouple sinks into the melt to provide an accurate measurement of melt temperatures.

  4. Automatic decoding of facial movements reveals deceptive pain expressions

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Littlewort, Gwen C.; Frank, Mark G.; Lee, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Summary In highly social species such as humans, faces have evolved to convey rich information for social interaction, including expressions of emotions and pain [1–3]. Two motor pathways control facial movement [4–7]. A subcortical extrapyramidal motor system drives spontaneous facial expressions of felt emotions. A cortical pyramidal motor system controls voluntary facial expressions. The pyramidal system enables humans to simulate facial expressions of emotions not actually experienced. Their simulation is so successful that they can deceive most observers [8–11]. Machine vision may, however, be able to distinguish deceptive from genuine facial signals by identifying the subtle differences between pyramidally and extrapyramidally driven movements. Here we show that human observers could not discriminate real from faked expressions of pain better than chance, and after training, improved accuracy to a modest 55%. However a computer vision system that automatically measures facial movements and performs pattern recognition on those movements attained 85% accuracy. The machine system’s superiority is attributable to its ability to differentiate the dynamics of genuine from faked expressions. Thus by revealing the dynamics of facial action through machine vision systems, our approach has the potential to elucidate behavioral fingerprints of neural control systems involved in emotional signaling. PMID:24656830

  5. Mental Imagery Affects Subsequent Automatic Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hagenaars, Muriel A.; Mesbah, Rahele; Cremers, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Automatic defense responses promote survival and appropriate action under threat. They have also been associated with the development of threat-related psychiatric syndromes. Targeting such automatic responses during threat may be useful in populations with frequent threat exposure. Here, two experiments explored whether mental imagery as a pre-trauma manipulation could influence fear bradycardia (a core characteristic of freezing) during subsequent analog trauma (affective picture viewing). Image-based interventions have proven successful in the treatment of threat-related disorders and are easily applicable. In Experiment 1, 43 healthy participants were randomly assigned to an imagery script condition. Participants executed a passive viewing task with blocks of neutral, pleasant, and unpleasant pictures after listening to an auditory script that was either related (with a positive or a negative outcome) or unrelated to the unpleasant pictures from the passive viewing task. Heart rate was assessed during script listening and during passive viewing. Imagining negative related scripts resulted in greater bradycardia (neutral-unpleasant contrast) than imagining positive scripts, especially unrelated. This effect was replicated in Experiment 2 (n = 51), again in the neutral-unpleasant contrast. An extra no-script condition showed that bradycardia was not induced by the negative-related script, but rather that a positive script attenuated bradycardia. These preliminary results might indicate reduced vigilance after unrelated positive events. Future research should replicate these findings using a larger sample. Either way, the findings show that highly automatic defense behavior can be influenced by relatively simple mental imagery manipulations. PMID:26089801

  6. Automatic image classification for the urinoculture screening.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Paolo; Bonechi, Simone; Bianchini, Monica; Garzelli, Andrea; Mecocci, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are considered to be the most common bacterial infection and, actually, it is estimated that about 150 million UTIs occur world wide yearly, giving rise to roughly $6 billion in healthcare expenditures and resulting in 100,000 hospitalizations. Nevertheless, it is difficult to carefully assess the incidence of UTIs, since an accurate diagnosis depends both on the presence of symptoms and on a positive urinoculture, whereas in most outpatient settings this diagnosis is made without an ad hoc analysis protocol. On the other hand, in the traditional urinoculture test, a sample of midstream urine is put onto a Petri dish, where a growth medium favors the proliferation of germ colonies. Then, the infection severity is evaluated by a visual inspection of a human expert, an error prone and lengthy process. In this paper, we propose a fully automated system for the urinoculture screening that can provide quick and easily traceable results for UTIs. Based on advanced image processing and machine learning tools, the infection type recognition, together with the estimation of the bacterial load, can be automatically carried out, yielding accurate diagnoses. The proposed AID (Automatic Infection Detector) system provides support during the whole analysis process: first, digital color images of Petri dishes are automatically captured, then specific preprocessing and spatial clustering algorithms are applied to isolate the colonies from the culture ground and, finally, an accurate classification of the infections and their severity evaluation are performed. The AID system speeds up the analysis, contributes to the standardization of the process, allows result repeatability, and reduces the costs. Moreover, the continuous transition between sterile and external environments (typical of the standard analysis procedure) is completely avoided. PMID:26780249

  7. A Cost Effective Automatic Balloon Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Berrigan J. Michael

    2000-06-08

    Approximately 800,000 balloon-borne radiosondes are hand-launched each year, a cost and labor-intensive procedure. Development of a low-cost Automatic Radiosonde Launcher would allow the manual procedure to be replaced with a reliable and less expensive process. Balloon-borne radiosondes provide essential meteorological data used by forecasters and researchers around the globe. The National Weather service alone launches tens of thousands of sondes from sites across the US. Although worldwide launching of radiosondes has been done for many years, it remains a labor intensive and therefore expensive operation. Using its own funding and, more recently with the help of a Phase I SBIR grant, Visidyne, Inc. has begun investigating the feasibility of building an Automatic Radiosonde Launcher (ARL) that can be built at a cost that will be acceptable to the commercial marketplace. That work has led to the issuing of four patents covering important innovations that will allow us to meet that goal. Under the recent Phase I effort, solutions to many of the key problems have been tested in the laboratory and in real-world demonstrations in the field. The balloon filling, battery wetting, and launch release mechanisms were designed, built, and tested. A breadboard launcher was constructed and tested to prove feasibility of key system elements. Demonstration launches of radiosondes were performed using the breadboard launcher from the National Weather Service facility in Gray, ME, and from Hanscom AFB in Lexington, MA. The cost and size of a full scale shelter prevented us from building one during Phase I, however, we do have a design that will accomplish our goals. The Automatic Radiosonde Launcher will significantly reduce the cost of launching balloon-borne instruments. US and foreign weather services and atmospheric, climatological, and meteorological researchers will all benefit from this innovation.

  8. Automatic centerline extraction for virtual colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ming; Liang, Zhengrong; Ke, Qi; Hong, Lichan; Bitter, Ingmar; Kaufman, Arie

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a concise and concrete definition of an accurate colon centerline and provide an efficient automatic means to extract the centerline and its associated branches (caused by a forceful touching of colon and small bowel or a deep fold in twisted colon lumen). We further discuss its applications on fly-through path planning and endoscopic simulation, as well as its potential to solve the challenging touching and colon collapse problems in virtual colonoscopy. Experimental results demonstrated its centeredness, robustness, and efficiency.

  9. Automatic focusing system of BSST in Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peng-Yi; Liu, Jia-Jing; Zhang, Guang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Automatic focusing (AF) technology plays an important role in modern astronomical telescopes. Based on the focusing requirement of BSST (Bright Star Survey Telescope) in Antarctic, an AF system is set up. In this design, functions in OpenCV is used to find stars, the algorithm of area, HFD or FWHM are used to degree the focus metric by choosing. Curve fitting method is used to find focus position as the method of camera moving. All these design are suitable for unattended small telescope.

  10. Automatic gas burner block for thermal units

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhanovskii, K.S.; Senatov, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe a new computerized control system and gas burner configuration for natural gas furnaces used for the heat treatment of ceramics and porcelain which is designed to control and monitor combustion and temperature regimes in the furnace and optimize fuel efficiency. The system permits simultaneous operation and thermal load control of up to 12 burners, automatic maintenance of the desired fuel-air ratio over the entire temperature range, and protection of the furnace against overload by the use of a fuel cutoff switch. Specifications on productivity and efficiency and results of performance evaluations are listed.

  11. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Automatic Parametric Testing Of Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Glenn A.; Pina, Cesar A.

    1989-01-01

    Computer program for parametric testing saves time and effort in research and development of integrated circuits. Software system automatically assembles various types of test structures and lays them out on silicon chip, generates sequency of test instructions, and interprets test data. Employs self-programming software; needs minimum of human intervention. Adapted to needs of different laboratories and readily accommodates new test structures. Program codes designed to be adaptable to most computers and test equipment now in use. Written in high-level languages to enhance transportability.

  13. Automatic target detection using binary template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Dong-San; Sun, Sun-Gu; Park, HyunWook

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a new automatic target detection (ATD) algorithm to detect targets such as battle tanks and armored personal carriers in ground-to-ground scenarios. Whereas most ATD algorithms were developed for forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images, we have developed an ATD algorithm for charge-coupled device (CCD) images, which have superior quality to FLIR images in daylight. The proposed algorithm uses fast binary template matching with an adaptive binarization, which is robust to various light conditions in CCD images and saves computation time. Experimental results show that the proposed method has good detection performance.

  14. Automatic violence detection in digital movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Stephan

    1996-11-01

    Research on computer-based recognition of violence is scant. We are working on the automatic recognition of violence in digital movies, a first step towards the goal of a computer- assisted system capable of protecting children against TV programs containing a great deal of violence. In the video domain a collision detection and a model-mapping to locate human figures are run, while the creation and comparison of fingerprints to find certain events are run int he audio domain. This article centers on the recognition of fist- fights in the video domain and on the recognition of shots, explosions and cries in the audio domain.

  15. Automatic Mode Switch (AMS) Causes Less Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Jorat, Mohammadvahid; Nikoo, Mohammadhossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac resynchronization devices are part of modern heart failure management. After implantation, we analyze and program devices in an attempt to ensure their success. Biventricular pacing should be 98% or more for the lowest mortality and best symptom improvement. Case Presentation: In this case series, we present a combination of far field sensing and automatic mode switching (AMS) in six patients. It is found that this combination causes ventricular sensing (VS) episodes with wide QRS and no synchronization. We turn off the AMS and alleviate the problem. Conclusions: Switching AMS off may increase biventricular pacing in some patients. PMID:26949695

  16. Automatic system for computer program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. B.; Elliott, R. W.; Arseven, S.; Colunga, D.

    1972-01-01

    Work done on a project to design an automatic system for computer program documentation aids was made to determine what existing programs could be used effectively to document computer programs. Results of the study are included in the form of an extensive bibliography and working papers on appropriate operating systems, text editors, program editors, data structures, standards, decision tables, flowchart systems, and proprietary documentation aids. The preliminary design for an automated documentation system is also included. An actual program has been documented in detail to demonstrate the types of output that can be produced by the proposed system.

  17. Draft Automatic Data Acquisition System Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    This Automatic Data Acquisition System (ADAS) Plan has been prepared in support of the requirement for detailed site characterization of the Deaf Smith County candidate repository site in salt, and describes the data acquisition system which will be used for unattended data collection from the geotechnical instrumentation installed at the site. Section 1.1 discusses the programmatic background to the plan, Section 1.2 presents the scope and purpose of the plan, and the organization of the document is given in Section 1.3. 31 refs., 34 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. A method for automatically abstracting visual documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorvig, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    Visual documents--motion sequences on film, videotape, and digital recording--constitute a major source of information for the Space Agency, as well as all other government and private sector entities. This article describes a method for automatically selecting key frames from visual documents. These frames may in turn be used to represent the total image sequence of visual documents in visual libraries, hypermedia systems, and training algorithm reduces 51 minutes of video sequences to 134 frames; a reduction of information in the range of 700:1.

  19. Planning, scheduling, and control for automatic telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Mark; Swanson, Keith; Philips, Andy; Levinson, Rich; Bresina, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an argument for the appropriateness of Entropy Reduction Engine (ERE) technology to the planning, scheduling, and control components of Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT) management. The paper is organized as follows. In the next section, we give a brief summary of the planning and scheduling requirements for APTs. Following this, in section 3, we give an ERE project precis, couched primarily in terms of project objectives. Section 4 gives a sketch of the match-up between problem and technology, and section 5 outlines where we want to go with this work.

  20. Image understanding research for automatic target recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Bhanu, B. ); Jones, T.L. )

    1993-10-01

    Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) is an extremely important capability for defense applications. Many aspects of Image Understanding (IU) research are traditionally used to solve ATR problems. In this paper, the authors discuss ATR applications and problems in developing real-world ATR systems, and present the status of technology for these systems. They identify several IU problems that need to be resolved in order to enhance the effectiveness of ATR-based weapon systems. Finally, they conclude that technological gains in developing robust ATR systems will also lead to significant advances in many other areas of applications of image understanding.