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Sample records for adipocyte-derived hormone leptin

  1. Role of the Adipocyte-derived Hormone Leptin in Reproductive Control

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Galiano, David; Allen, Susan J.; Elias, Carol F.

    2014-01-01

    Achievement of sexual maturation and maintenance of fertility in adulthood are functions sensitive to the metabolic status of the organism, particularly the magnitude of fat reserves. In this sense, the adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, plays a major role linking metabolic cues and the control of multiple neuroendocrine axes. The hypothalamus is a key site mediating leptin actions, including those involved in the modulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonads (HPG) axis at different stages of development and in different environmental conditions. In the present review, we intend to provide an update of the role of leptin in reproduction and to discuss its interactions with neurons, neurotransmitters and downstream targets of the reproductive axis, with a special emphasis on the actions of leptin in the central nervous system. We hope this review will contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms whereby metabolic signals, especially leptin, influence the reproductive neuroendocrine axis modulating its activity in different nutritional states. Special attention will be given to recent advances in the identification of key hypothalamic sites and signaling pathways relevant to leptin’s action in reproductive control. PMID:25390022

  2. Adipocyte-derived hormones in heroin addicts: the influence of methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Housová, J; Wilczek, H; Haluzík, M M; Kremen, J; Krízová, J; Haluzík, M

    2005-01-01

    Heroin addiction markedly affects the nutritional and metabolic status and frequently leads to malnutrition. The aim of our study was to compare circulating concentration of adipose tissue-derived hormones leptin, adiponectin and resistin in 12 patients with heroin addiction before and after one-year methadone maintenance treatment with the group of 20 age- and body mass index-matched healthy subjects. Basal serum leptin and adiponectin levels in heroin addicts were significantly decreased (3.4+/-0.4 vs. 4.5+/-0.6 ng/ml and 18.9+/-3.3 vs. 33.9+/-3.1 ng/microl, respectively; p 0.05) while serum resistin concentrations were increased compared to healthy subjects (10.1+/-1.2 vs. 4.6+/-0.3 ng/ml; p 0.05). Moreover, positive correlation of serum leptin levels with body mass index was lost in the addicts in contrast to control group. One year of methadone maintenance treatment normalized serum leptin, but not serum adiponectin and resistin concentrations. In conclusion, circulating concentrations of leptin, adiponectin and resistin are markedly altered in patients with chronic heroin addiction. These alterations appear to be relatively independent of nutritional status and insulin sensitivity.

  3. Leptin activates chicken growth hormone promoter without chicken STAT3 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Murase, Daisuke; Namekawa, Shoko; Ohkubo, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that not only regulates food intake and energy homeostasis but also induces growth hormone (GH) mRNA expression and release, thereby controlling growth and metabolism in mammals. The molecular mechanism of leptin-induced regulation of GH gene transcription is unclear. The current study investigated the effects of leptin on the chicken GH (cGH) promoter and the molecular mechanism underlying leptin-induced cGH gene expression in vitro. Leptin activated the cGH promoter in the presence of chPit-1α in CHO cells stably expressing the chicken leptin receptor. Promoter activation did not require STAT-binding elements in the cGH promoter or STAT3 activity. However, JAK2 activation was required for leptin-dependent activity. JAK2-dependent pathways include p42/44 MAPK and PI3K, and inhibition of these pathways partially blocked leptin-induced cGH gene transcription. Although CK2 directly activates JAK2, a CK2 inhibitor blocked leptin-dependent activation of the cGH gene without affecting JAK2 phosphorylation. The CK2 inhibitor suppressed Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. Additional data implicate Src family kinases in leptin-dependent cGH gene activation. These results suggest that leptin activates the cGH gene in the presence of chPit-1α via several leptin-activated kinases. Although further study is required, we suggest that the leptin-induced JAK2/p42/44 MAPK and JAK2/PI3K cascades are activated by Src-meditated CK2, leading to CBP phosphorylation and interaction with chPit-1α, resulting in transactivation of the cGH promoter.

  4. Behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of injected leptin.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Haque, Zeba; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin is viewed as an important target for developing novel therapeutics for obesity, depression/anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study therefore concerns behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of systemically injected leptin. Pharmacological doses (100 and 500 μg/kg) of leptin injected systemically decreased 24h cumulative food intake and body weight in freely feeding rats and improved acquisition and retention of memory in Morris water maze test. Potential anxiety reducing, hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of the peptide hormone were determined in a separate experiment. Animals injected with 100 or 500 μg/kg leptin were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze test 1h later. A significant increase in the number of entries and time passed in open arm of the elevated plus maze in leptin injected animals suggested pronounced anxiety reducing effect. Moreover, circulating levels of leptin correlated significantly with anxiety reducing effects of the peptide hormone. Serum serotonin increased and ghrelin decreased in leptin injected animals and correlated, positively and negatively respectively, with circulating leptin. Corticosterone increased at low dose and levels were normal at higher dose. Serotonin metabolism in the hypothalamus and hippocampus decreased only at higher dose of leptin. The results support a role of leptin in the treatment of obesity, anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. It is suggested that hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of leptin can alter treatment efficacy in particularly comorbid conditions.

  5. Monitoring blood plasma leptin and lactogenic hormones in pregnant sows.

    PubMed

    Saleri, R; Sabbioni, A; Cavalli, V; Superchi, P

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism of action of leptin in pregnant breeding sows, in which hyperphagia is managed through dietary strategies, is yet to be clarified. The aim of this study was to monitor leptin concentrations and their interactions with lactogenic hormones in Large White×Landrace breeding multiparous sows (n=15). All sows showed a normal body condition (mean body condition score: 2.96). Blood samples were collected the day after weaning the litters, at insemination, every 15 days up to day 45 of pregnancy and every 7 days from day 46 to farrowing. At delivery, the placenta was collected for the analysis of leptin and leptin receptor expressions. Plasma leptin levels increased from the end of mid gestation (day 72) and remained high until farrowing (P<0.05). As expected, plasma prolactin (PRL), low during most of pregnancy, increased during the 2 weeks before farrowing (P<0.05), whereas progesterone levels reached plateau at 30 days of gestation and decreased at farrowing (P<0.05). Cortisol levels peaked close to farrowing (P<0.05). Leptin was expressed in the placenta, where the receptor expression analysis showed the presence of the short form but not of the long form. A positive correlation was found between leptin and PRL concentrations during mid (r=0.430; P<0.001) and late (r=0.687; P<0.001) pregnancy, and with progesterone in early pregnancy (r=0.462; P<0.05). During late gestation, a positive correlation was observed between leptin and cortisol (r=0.585; P<0.001). Our results suggested that, in restrictively fed pregnant sows, the leptin levels increased from the end of mid pregnancy to delivery, confirming the presence of leptin resistance. We showed a correlation between leptin and lactogenic hormones during different stages of pregnancy in sows. Lactogenic hormones show pregnancy-specific changes in their secretion and all may become involved in modulating leptin signal.

  6. Drug targeting of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Meli, Rosaria

    2015-11-01

    Leptin regulates glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis as well as feeding behavior, serving as a bridge between peripheral metabolically active tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, this adipocyte-derived hormone, whose circulating levels mirror fat mass, not only exerts its anti-obesity effects mainly modulating the activity of specific hypothalamic neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb), but it also shows pleiotropic functions due to the activation of Ob-Rb in peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate leptin resistance, including obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, impairment of leptin access to CNS and the reduction in Ob-Rb signal transduction effectiveness, among others. During the onset and progression of obesity, the dampening of leptin sensitivity often occurs, preventing the efficacy of leptin replacement therapy from overcoming obesity and/or its comorbidities. This review focuses on obesity-associated leptin resistance and the mechanisms underpinning this condition, to highlight the relevance of leptin sensitivity restoration as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat common obesity and its complications. Interestingly, although promising strategies to counteract leptin resistance have been proposed, these pharmacological approaches have shown limited efficacy or even relevant adverse effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Therefore, the numerous findings from this review clearly indicate a lack of a single and efficacious treatment for leptin resistance, highlighting the necessity to find new therapeutic tools to improve leptin sensitivity, especially in patients with most severe disease profiles.

  7. The effects of protein supplement on leptin concentrations in lambs and meat goat kids grazing Bermudagrass pastures in Central Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lambs and kids weaned and pastured on bermudagrass (BG; Cynodon dactylon) may not receive enough protein to reach maximal growth during mid to late summer when protein in BG pastures declines. As an indicator of physiological status, leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that increases as body cond...

  8. Leptin resistance and hippocampal behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Van Doorn, Catherine; Macht, Victoria A; Grillo, Claudia A; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2017-03-04

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is an important regulator of body weight and metabolism through activation of brain leptin receptors expressed in regions such as the hypothalamus. Beyond these well described and characterized activities of leptin in the hypothalamus, it is becoming increasingly clear that the central activities of leptin extend to the hippocampus. Indeed, leptin receptors are expressed in the hippocampus where these receptors are proposed to mediate various aspects of hippocampal synaptic plasticity that ultimately impact cognitive function. This concept is supported by studies demonstrating that leptin promotes hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, as well as studies indicating that leptin resistance is associated with deficits in hippocampal-dependent behaviors and in the induction of depressive-like behaviors. The effects of leptin on cognitive/behavioral plasticity in the hippocampus may be regulated by direct activation of leptin receptors expressed in the hippocampus; additionally, leptin-mediated activation of synaptic networks that project to the hippocampus may also impact hippocampal-mediated behaviors. In view of these previous observations, the goal of this review will be to discuss the mechanisms through which leptin facilitates cognition and behavior, as well as to dissect the loci at which leptin resistance leads to impairments in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, including the development of cognitive deficits and increased risk of depressive illness in metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

  9. Role of leptin in pregnancy--a review.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, N; Yura, S; Itoh, H; Mise, H; Kakui, K; Korita, D; Takemura, M; Nuamah, M A; Ogawa, Y; Masuzaki, H; Nakao, K; Fujii, S

    2002-04-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that decreases food intake and body weight via its receptor in the hypothalamus. In rodents, it also modulates glucose metabolism by increasing insulin sensitivity. We previously reported that leptin is produced by human placental trophoblasts. We also revealed that leptin gene expression in the placenta was augmented in severe pre-eclampsia, and suggested that placental hypoxia may play a role in this augmentation. Maternal plasma leptin levels correlated well with mean blood pressure, but not with body mass index. Plasma leptin levels in pre-eclamptic women with IUGR were higher than those without IUGR (P< 0.05). We further examined the effects of hyperleptinemia on the course of pregnancy by using transgenic mice (Tg) overexpressing leptin. In pregnant Tg mice, food intake was significantly less than non-Tg, and the fetal body weights were reduced to approximately 70 per cent of those of non-Tg. Resistin is a novel adipocyte-derived hormone that decreases insulin sensitivity and increases plasma glucose concentration, thus contributing the development of obesity-related type II diabetes mellitus. We recently found that resistin gene is expressed in the human placenta as well as adipose tissue. In this review, possible roles of placental leptin and resistin are discussed.

  10. The Leptin Receptor Complex: Heavier Than Expected?

    PubMed Central

    Wauman, Joris; Zabeau, Lennart; Tavernier, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, leptin and the leptin receptor (ObR) regulate the body weight by balancing food intake and energy expenditure. However, this adipocyte-derived hormone also directs peripheral processes, including immunity, reproduction, and bone metabolism. Leptin, therefore, can act as a metabolic switch connecting the body’s nutritional status to high energy consuming processes. We provide an extensive overview of current structural insights on the leptin–ObR interface and ObR activation, coupling to signaling pathways and their negative regulation, and leptin functioning under normal and pathophysiological conditions (obesity, autoimmunity, cancer, … ). We also discuss possible cross-talk with other receptor systems on the receptor (extracellular) and signaling cascade (intracellular) levels. PMID:28270795

  11. Characteristics associated with fasting appetite hormones (obestatin, ghrelin, and leptin).

    PubMed

    Beasley, Jeannette M; Ange, Brett A; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Miller Iii, Edgar R; Holbrook, Janet T; Appel, Lawrence J

    2009-02-01

    Obestatin, derived from the same gene as the hunger hormone ghrelin, may reduce food intake in animals. The role of obestatin in human physiology is unclear. We evaluated cross-sectional associations between participant characteristics and fasting levels of obestatin as well two other hormones associated with energy balance, ghrelin and leptin. Data are from the baseline visit of the Optimal Macronutrient Intake Trial to Prevent Heart Disease (OMNI-Heart) Trial that enrolled adults with elevated blood pressure (systolic 120-159 mm Hg or a diastolic of 80-99 mm Hg) but who were otherwise healthy. Partial Spearman's correlations and linear regression models estimated the association between age, gender, BMI, physical activity, and smoking with fasting hormones. Obestatin was directly associated with ghrelin (r = 0.45, P < 0.05). On average, overweight (BMI 25-30) and obese (BMI > 30) individuals had obestatin concentrations that were 12.6 (s.d. 8.8) and 25.4 (s.d. 8.4) pg/ml lower compared to normal weight (BMI < 25) individuals, respectively (P for trend = 0.002). Overweight (BMI 25-30) and obese (BMI > 30) individuals had ghrelin concentrations that were 161.7 (s.d. 69.6) and 284.7 (s.d. 66.5) pg/ml lower compared to normal weight (BMI < 25) individuals, respectively (P for trend <0.0001). A 5 unit increase in BMI was associated with 41.3% (s.d. 4.3%) (P < 0.0001) higher leptin. Obestatin and ghrelin are directly correlated and share the same patterns of association with participant characteristics. Modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases, such as BMI, are associated with fasting levels of leptin, obestatin, and ghrelin.

  12. Leptin as immune mediator: Interaction between neuroendocrine and immune system.

    PubMed

    Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carbone, Fortunata; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone/cytokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Initially described as an anti-obesity hormone, leptin has subsequently been shown to exert pleiotropic effects, being also able to influence haematopoiesis, thermogenesis, reproduction, angiogenesis, and more importantly immune homeostasis. As a cytokine, leptin can affect both innate and adaptive immunity, by inducing a pro-inflammatory response and thus playing a key role in the regulation of the pathogenesis of several autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances on the role of leptin as immune-modulator in mammals and we also provide an overview on its main functions in non-mammalian vertebrates.

  13. Leptin as regulator of pulmonary immune responses: Involvement in respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vernooy, Juanita H.J.; Ubags, Niki D.J.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tavernier, Jan; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Joos, Guy F.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Bracke, Ken R.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone, recognized as a critical mediator of the balance between food intake and energy expenditure by signalling through its functional receptor (Ob-Rb) in the hypothalamus. Structurally, leptin belongs to the long-chain helical cytokine family, and is now known to have pleiotropic functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. The presence of the functional leptin receptor in the lung together with evidence of increased airspace leptin levels arising during pulmonary inflammation, suggests an important role for leptin in lung development, respiratory immune responses and eventually pathogenesis of inflammatory respiratory diseases. The purpose of this article is to review our current understanding of leptin and its functional role on the different resident cell types of the lung in health as well as in the context of three major respiratory conditions being chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and pneumonia. PMID:23542720

  14. Suprachiasmatic nuclei may regulate the rhythm of leptin hormone release in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Karakas, Alper; Gündüz, Bülent

    2006-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) generate the circadian rhythm of many hormones. The hormone leptin is a metabolic signal that informs the brain about fat and energy stores of the body. We investigated whether the rhythm of leptin hormone release in Syrian hamsters is directly controlled by the SCN. Three experiments were performed: in the first, hamsters were SCN-lesioned; in the second, hamsters were exposed to different feeding regimes; and in the third, hamsters were adrenalectomized and implanted with cortisol capsules to maintain constant glucocorticoid release. Blood samples were collected before and after the experiments at different clock times and examined for leptin levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Different feeding regimes and constant glucocorticoid release did not alter the rhythm of leptin release; whereas, SCN lesions abolished the rhythm. The results of the present study suggest the rhythm in leptin release in Syrian hamsters may be controlled by the SCN.

  15. Role of the Cytokine-like Hormone Leptin in Muscle-bone Crosstalk with Aging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The cytokine-like hormone leptin is a classic adipokine that is secreted by adipocytes, increases with weight gain, and decreases with weight loss. Additional studies have, however, shown that leptin is also produced by skeletal muscle, and leptin receptors are abundant in both skeletal muscle and bone-derived mesenchymal (stromal) stem cells. These findings suggest that leptin may play an important role in muscle-bone crosstalk. Leptin treatment in vitro increases the expression of myogenic genes in primary myoblasts, and leptin treatment in vivo increases the expression of microRNAs involved in myogenesis. Bone marrow adipogenesis is associated with low bone mass in humans and rodents, and leptin can reduce marrow adipogenesis centrally through its receptors in the hypothalamus as well as directly via its receptors in bone marrow stem cells. Yet, central leptin resistance can increase with age, and low circulating levels of leptin have been observed among the frail elderly. Thus, aging appears to significantly alter leptin-mediated crosstalk among various organs and tissues. Aging is associated with bone loss and muscle atrophy, contributing to frailty, postural instability, and the incidence of falls. Therapeutic interventions such as protein and amino acid supplementation that can increase muscle mass and muscle-derived leptin may have multiple benefits for the elderly that can potentially reduce the incidence of falls and fractures. PMID:28326295

  16. Role of the Cytokine-like Hormone Leptin in Muscle-bone Crosstalk with Aging.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Mark W

    2017-02-01

    The cytokine-like hormone leptin is a classic adipokine that is secreted by adipocytes, increases with weight gain, and decreases with weight loss. Additional studies have, however, shown that leptin is also produced by skeletal muscle, and leptin receptors are abundant in both skeletal muscle and bone-derived mesenchymal (stromal) stem cells. These findings suggest that leptin may play an important role in muscle-bone crosstalk. Leptin treatment in vitro increases the expression of myogenic genes in primary myoblasts, and leptin treatment in vivo increases the expression of microRNAs involved in myogenesis. Bone marrow adipogenesis is associated with low bone mass in humans and rodents, and leptin can reduce marrow adipogenesis centrally through its receptors in the hypothalamus as well as directly via its receptors in bone marrow stem cells. Yet, central leptin resistance can increase with age, and low circulating levels of leptin have been observed among the frail elderly. Thus, aging appears to significantly alter leptin-mediated crosstalk among various organs and tissues. Aging is associated with bone loss and muscle atrophy, contributing to frailty, postural instability, and the incidence of falls. Therapeutic interventions such as protein and amino acid supplementation that can increase muscle mass and muscle-derived leptin may have multiple benefits for the elderly that can potentially reduce the incidence of falls and fractures.

  17. Expression and immunohistochemical localization of leptin in human periapical granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Martín-González, Jénifer; Carmona-Fernández, Antonio; Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptin, initially described as an adipocyte-derived hormone to regulate weight control, is expressed in normal and inflamed human dental pulp, being up-regulated during pulp experimental inflammation. Leptin receptor (LER) has been identified in human periapical granulomas. The aim of this study was to analyze and characterize the expression of leptin in human periapical granulomas. Material and Methods Fifteen periapical inflammatory lesions were obtained from extracted human teeth and teeth which underwent periapical surgery. After their morphological categorization as periapical granulomas and gradation of the inflammatory infiltrate, they were examined by immunohistochemistry using human leptin policlonal antibodies. Leptin mRNA expression was also determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the amount of leptin protein was analyzed by immunoblot. Results All periapical lesions exhibited the characteristic of chronic granulomatous inflammatory process with inflammatory infiltrate grade III. Leptin+ cells were detected in 13 periapical granulomas (86.6%). The median number of Leptin+ cells in periapical granulomas was 1.70 (0.00-7.4). Amongst the inflammatory cells in the periapical granulomas, only macrophages were reactive to leptin antibodies. Western blot analysis revealed the presence in all samples of a protein with apparent molecular weight of approximately 16 kDa, corresponding to the estimated molecular weights of leptin. The expression of leptin mRNA was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis and the size of the amplified fragment (296 bp for leptin and 194 bp for cyclophilin) was assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Conclusions For the first time, it has been demonstrated that human periapical granuloma expresses the adipokine leptin. Key words: Apical granuloma, dental pulp, endodontics, leptin, leptin receptor, immune system, immunohistochemistry, periapical inflammatory response. PMID:25662559

  18. Serum leptin levels and leptin expression in growth hormone (GH)-deficient and healthy adults: influence of GH treatment, gender, and fasting.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, K; Pedersen, S B; Fisker, S; Nørrelund, H; Rosenfalck, A M; Jørgensen, J O; Richelsen, B

    1998-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is associated with a reduction in fat mass in healthy and GH-deficient (GHD) subjects. This is mainly mediated via a direct GH action on adipose cells and stimulation of lipolysis. Leptin is secreted from adipose tissue and may be involved in signaling information about adipose tissue stores to the brain. Hormonal regulation of leptin is still not fully elucidated, and in the present study, we investigated both the long-term (4-month) and short-term (28-hour) GH effects on serum leptin and leptin gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue. In GHD adults (n = 24), leptin correlated with most estimates of adiposity (r = .62 to .86), as previously found in healthy subjects. However, no correlation was observed with intraabdominal fat determined by computed tomographic (CT) scan (INTRA-CT). GH treatment for 4 months had no independent effect on either serum leptin or leptin gene expression. In a short-term study, we found that fasting gradually reduced leptin levels in both healthy men and GHD adults, with a maximum reduction of 58% to 60% (P < .01) after 31 hours. No independent effect of GH suppression or GH substitution on serum leptin was found during fasting. Adipose tissue leptin mRNA correlated with serum leptin (r = .51, P < .01) and the body mass index ([BMI] r = .55, P < .05). Serum leptin levels and gene expression were significantly higher in women compared with men (26.6 +/- 5.8 v 10.0 +/- 1.30 ng/mL, P < .05). However, in regression analysis accounting for the gender differences in subcutaneous femoral adipose tissue (FEM-CT), the difference in serum leptin disappeared, indicating that subcutaneous femoral fat or factors closely related to femoral fat (eg, sex hormones) may be causal factors for the gender difference in leptin.

  19. Percentage of REM sleep is associated with overnight change in leptin.

    PubMed

    Olson, Christy A; Hamilton, Nancy A; Somers, Virend K

    2016-08-01

    Sleep contributes importantly to energy homeostasis, and may impact hormones regulating appetite, such as leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone. There is increasing evidence that sleep duration, and reduced rapid eye movement sleep, are linked to obesity. Leptin has central neural effects beyond modulation of appetite alone. As sleep is not a unifrom process, interactions between leptin and sleep stages including rapid eye movement sleep may play a role in the relationship between sleep and obesity. This study examined the relationship between serum leptin and rapid eye movement sleep in a sample of healthy adults. Participants were 58 healthy adults who underwent polysomnography. Leptin was measured before and after sleep. It was hypothesized that a lower percentage of rapid eye movement sleep would be related to lower leptin levels during sleep. The relationship between percentage of rapid eye movement sleep and leptin was analysed using hierarchical linear regression. An increased percentage of rapid eye movement sleep was related to a greater reduction in leptin during sleep even when controlling for age, gender, percent body fat and total sleep time. A greater percentage of rapid eye movement sleep was accompanied by more marked reductions in leptin. Studies examining the effects of selective rapid eye movement sleep deprivation on leptin levels, and hence on energy homeostasis in humans, are needed.

  20. Growth and anabolic hormones, leptin, and neuromuscular performance in moderately trained prepubescent athletes and untrained boys.

    PubMed

    Tsolakis, Charilaos; Vagenas, George; Dessypris, Athanasios

    2003-02-01

    We investigated hormonal regulators of growth and development, leptin levels, body composition, neuromuscular performance, and the associations among them in trained prepubertal athletes (experimental group [EG]) and an untrained control group (CG). Informed consent was obtained from the children and their parents. Their maturation stage was evaluated according to Tanner's criteria. There were no differences between EG and CG in physical characteristics, body mass index (BMI), lean body mass, testosterone (T), sex hormone-binding globulin, free androgen index, growth hormone (GH), hand grip strength, and jumping performance. Leptin levels and percent fat of the EG were significantly lower than those of the CG (p < 0.05-0.005). Leptin levels were significantly correlated to body fat and BMI for both the EG and the CG (r = 0.51-0.79). There is little evidence that leptin has a positive effect on growth and anabolic factors. Sex hormone-binding globulin and GH may explain the variation of leptin in athletes with low T (R(2) = 0.43) and in CG (R(2) = 0.35), respectively. Leptin seems to be a permissive factor for the onset of puberty, and the training background needs an optimal biological maturation to produce significant differences in muscle and power performance.

  1. Fat-mass-related hormone, plasma leptin, predicts brain volumes in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Priya; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-01-23

    Leptin, a hormone produced by body fat tissue, acts on hypothalamic receptors in the brain to regulate appetite and energy expenditure, and on neurons in the arcuate nucleus to signal that an individual has had enough to eat. Leptin enters the central nervous system at levels that depend on an individual's body fat. Obese people, on average, show greater brain atrophy in old age, so it is valuable to know whether brain atrophy relates to leptin levels, which can be targeted by interventions. We therefore determined how plasma leptin levels, and BMI, relate to brain structure, and whether leptin levels might account for BMI's effect on the brain. We measured regional brain volumes using tensor-based morphometry, in MRI scans of 517 elderly individuals with plasma leptin measured (mean: 13.3±0.6 ng/ml; mean age: 75.2±7.3 years; 321 men/196 women). We related plasma leptin levels to brain volumes at every location in the brain after adjusting for age, sex, and diagnosis and, later, also BMI. Plasma leptin levels were significantly higher (a) in women than men, and (b) in obese versus overweight, normal or underweight individuals. People with higher leptin levels showed deficits in frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, brainstem, and the cerebellum, irrespective of age, sex, or diagnosis. These associations persisted after controlling for BMI. Greater brain atrophy may occur in people with central leptin insufficiency, a marker of obesity. Therapeutic manipulation of leptin may be a promising direction for slowing brain decline.

  2. Possible Integrative Actions of Leptin and Insulin Signaling in the Hypothalamus Targeting Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Mina; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most burdensome conditions in modern society. In this context, understanding the mechanisms controlling food intake is critical. At present, the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the pancreatic β-cell-derived hormone insulin are considered the principal anorexigenic hormones. Although leptin and insulin signal transduction pathways are distinct, their regulation of body weight maintenance is concerted. Resistance to the central actions of leptin or insulin is linked to the emergence of obesity and diabetes mellitus. A growing body of evidence suggests a convergence of leptin and insulin intracellular signaling at the insulin–receptor–substrate–phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase level. Moreover, numerous factors mediating the pathophysiology of leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 also contribute to insulin resistance. Recent studies have also indicated that insulin potentiates leptin-induced signaling. Thus, a greater understanding of the overlapping functions of leptin and insulin in the central nervous system is vital to understand the associated physiological and pathophysiological states. This mini-review focuses on the cross talk and integrative signaling of leptin and insulin in the regulation of energy homeostasis in the brain. PMID:27812350

  3. Leptin concentration in breast milk and its relationship to duration of lactation and hormonal status

    PubMed Central

    Ilcol, Yesim Ozarda; Hizli, Z Banu; Ozkan, Tanju

    2006-01-01

    Background Leptin, a hormone present in breast milk, is involved in energy regulation and metabolism. The objectives of this study were to assess leptin concentrations in breast milk during the first 180 days postpartum, and to determine the relationship between the concentrations of milk leptin and circulating hormone levels in lactating women. Methods Between April 2005 and January 2006, blood and breast milk samples were collected from 160 breastfeeding women enrolled either in the first three days (n = 37; colostrum), days 4–14 (n = 27; transitional milk), days 15–30 (n = 16; early mature milk), days 31–90 (n = 37; mature milk) or days 91–180 (n = 43; late mature milk) postpartum. Milk and serum leptin levels were measured by immunoradiometric assay. Cortisol was measured by radioimmunoassay method. Serum insulin, estradiol, prolactin and thyroxine were measured by chemiluminescent immunometric method. Results Leptin concentrations in breast milk were highest (3.28 ± 0.41 ng/ml) in colostrum, decreased during the first 180 days of lactation, showing a significant inverse relation (r = -0.694, p < 0.001) with the days of lactation. Colostrum leptin concentrations correlated with maternal serum leptin (r = 0.425, p < 0.01), cortisol (r = 0.549, p < 0.01) and thyroxine (r = -0.530, p < 0.01). Mature milk leptin concentrations correlated with maternal serum leptin (r = 0.547, p < 0.001), insulin (r = 0.331, p < 0.05) and thyroxine (r = -0.329, p < 0.01). Serum leptin concentrations correlated with serum insulin (r = 0.648, p < 0.001), estradiol (r = 0.639, p < 0.001), prolactin (r = 0.530, p < 0.001) and thyroxine (r = -0.327, p < 0.05) concentrations during days 1–3 postpartum. During 15–180 postpartum days, serum leptin concentrations correlated with serum insulin (r = 0.271, p < 0.01), and thyroxine (r = -0.345, p < 0.001). Conclusion Leptin concentrations in breast milk decrease with time during lactation and show significant relationships with

  4. Role of leptin on growth hormone and prolactin secretion by bovine pituitary explants.

    PubMed

    Accorsi, P A; Munno, A; Gamberoni, M; Viggiani, R; De Ambrogi, M; Tamanini, C; Seren, E

    2007-04-01

    Leptin is an important hormone regulating nutritional status in humans and animals. Its most relevant activity is at the hypothalamic level, where it modulates food behavior, thermogenesis, and secretion of several pituitary hormones. The exact mechanisms underlying these processes are unclear. The purpose of this study was to verify whether leptin could modulate growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion acting directly on bovine pituitary cells. Adenohypophyseal explants were cultured with different concentrations of leptin (50, 250, and 500 ng/mL); GH and PRL concentrations in culture media were determined by RIA. On tissues treated with 250 ng/mL of leptin, GH and PRL mRNA, as well as protein content, were estimated by reverse transcription-PCR and Western immunoblotting, respectively. Concentrations of GH in culture media containing 250 and 500 ng/mL of leptin were significantly higher than in controls: 1,063.5 +/- 141.2 (mean +/- SEM) and 1,018.8 +/- 88.4 vs. 748.9 +/- 74.0 ng/mg of tissue, respectively, after 1 h of treatment. Prolactin concentrations were significantly higher in culture media containing 50, 250, and 500 ng/mL of leptin than in controls after 2 h of treatment (547.1 +/- 50.3, 547.5 +/- 58.8, and 577.0 +/- 63.7 vs. 406.8 +/- 43.9 ng/mg of tissue, respectively). Tissues cultured with 250 ng/mL of leptin had significantly higher GH mRNA and lower GH protein content than controls (389.7 +/- 17.9 vs. 289.7 +/- 16.7; 1,601.5 +/- 90.1 vs. 2,212.7 +/- 55.6 arbitrary units, respectively) after 5 h of treatment. In contrast, no significant differences were found for PRL mRNA and protein content, possibly because of a delay in the leptin stimulation of PRL secretion. The results suggest that GH and PRL secretion in bovine pituitary explants can be directly regulated by leptin.

  5. Leptin is not the critical signal for kisspeptin or luteinising hormone restoration during exit from negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    True, C; Kirigiti, M A; Kievit, P; Grove, K L; Smith, M S

    2011-11-01

    Low levels of the adipocyte hormone leptin are considered to be the key signal contributing to inhibited gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release and reproductive acyclicity during negative energy balance. Hypoleptinaemia-induced inhibition of GnRH may be initiated with upstream inhibition of the secretagogue kisspeptin (Kiss1) because GnRH neurones do not express leptin receptors. The present study aimed to determine whether eliminating the hypoleptinaemia associated with caloric restriction (CR), by restoring leptin to normal basal levels, could reverse the suppression of the reproductive neuroendocrine axis. Fifty percent CR resulted in significant suppression of anteroventral periventricular Kiss1 mRNA, arcuate nucleus (ARH) Kiss1 and neurokinin B (NKB) mRNA levels and serum luteinising hormone (LH). Restoring leptin to normal basal levels did not restore Kiss1 or NKB mRNA or LH levels. Surprisingly, leptin did not activate expression of phosphorylated signal-transducer and activator of transcription-3 in ARC Kiss1 neurones, indicating that these neurones may not relay leptin signalling to GnRH neurones. Previous work in fasting models showing restoration of LH used a pharmacological dose of leptin. Therefore, in a 48-h fast study, replacement of leptin to pharmacological levels was compared with replacement of leptin to normal basal levels. Maintaining leptin at normal basal levels during the fast did not prevent inhibition of LH. By contrast, pharmacological levels of leptin did maintain LH at control values. These results suggest that, although leptin may be a permissive signal for reproductive function, hypoleptinaemia is unlikely to be the critical signal responsible for ARC Kiss1 and LH inhibition during negative energy balance.

  6. Obesity-induced hypertension: role of sympathetic nervous system, leptin, and melanocortins.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; da Silva, Alexandre A; do Carmo, Jussara M; Dubinion, John; Hamza, Shereen; Munusamy, Shankar; Smith, Grant; Stec, David E

    2010-06-04

    Excess weight gain contributes to increased blood pressure in most patients with essential hypertension. Although the mechanisms of obesity hypertension are not fully understood, increased renal sodium reabsorption and impaired pressure natriuresis play key roles. Several mechanisms contribute to altered kidney function and hypertension in obesity, including activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which appears to be mediated in part by increased levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin, stimulation of pro-opiomelanocortin neurons, and subsequent activation of central nervous system melanocortin 4 receptors.

  7. Body composition, leptin, and the leptin receptor and their relationship to the growth hormone (GH) axis in growing wethers treated with zeranol.

    PubMed

    Narro, L A; Thomas, M G; Silver, G A; Rozeboom, K J; Keisler, D H

    2003-04-01

    Age-related changes in body composition, leptin, and hypothalamic-pituitary expression of the leptin receptor and associative relationships of these factors to constituents of the growth hormone (GH) axis were evaluated. Seventy wethers were randomly assigned at birth to one of four treatment groups: control; treatment 1 implanted with the estrogenic compound zeranol (12 mg, Ralgro on days 0, 45, and 90; treatment 2 received zeranol on days 45 and 90; and treatment 3 received zeranol on day 90. Serum and tissues were collected from wethers (n > or = 5) from each group on days 28, 73, 118, and 135. Percent body fat and leptin increased linearly (P < 0.01) with age, but were not influenced (P > or = 0.14) by zeranol. The leptin receptor in the pituitary appeared to be differentially (P = 0.097) expressed across days 73-135, but no differences (P > or = 0.43) were detected in expression of this receptor in the hypothalamus among treatments and ages. Leptin and % body fat were negatively correlated (r > or = -0.52, P < 0.05) to mRNA levels of factors involved in pituitary synthesis and secretion of GH. Serum leptin increased with age as did percent body fat, but zeranol did not influence body composition, serum leptin, or expression of the leptin receptor in the hypothalamus or pituitary; however, the leptin receptor appeared to be differentially expressed among the hypothalamus and pituitary with level of body fat and leptin being inversely associated to transcriptional-factors involved in somatotrope synthesis and secretion of GH.

  8. Leptin alters the response of the growth hormone releasing factor- growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor-I axis to fasting.

    PubMed

    LaPaglia, N; Steiner, J; Kirsteins, L; Emanuele, M; Emanuele, N

    1998-10-01

    Proper nutritional status is critical for maintaining growth and metabolic function, playing an intimate role in neuroendocrine regulation. Leptin, the recently identified product of the obese gene, may very well be an integral signal which regulates neuroendocrine responses in times of food deprivation. The present study examines leptin's ability to regulate hormonal synthesis and secretion within the GRF-GH-IGF axis in the adult male rat during almost 3 days of fasting. Serum levels of GH and IGF-I were drastically suppressed by fasting. Daily leptin administration was able to fully prevent the fasting-induced fall in serum GH. Leptin failed to restore IGF-I to control levels, however, suggesting possible GH resistance. Fasting caused an insignificant increase in GH mRNA, while leptin injections significantly increased steady-state levels of this message. The GRF receptor (GRFr) message was not altered with fasting or leptin treatment. Leptin also exhibited effects at the hypothalamic level. Fasting induced a sharp fall in GRF mRNA expression and leptin injections partially prevented this fall. However, there were no observed changes in the hypothalamic GRF content. These results provide evidence that leptin may function as a neuromodulator of the GRF-GH-IGF axis communicating to this hormonal system the nutritional status of the animal.

  9. Leptin Responsive and GABAergic Projections to the Rostral Preoptic Area in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zuure, W A; Quennell, J H; Anderson, G M

    2016-03-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role in the control of reproduction via signalling in hypothalamic neurones. The drivers of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones, do not have the receptors for leptin. Therefore, intermediate leptin responsive neurones must provide leptin-to-GnRH signalling. We investigated the populations of leptin responsive neurones that provide input to the rostral preoptic area (rPOA) where GnRH cell bodies reside. Fluorescent retrograde tracer beads (RetroBeads; Lumafluor Inc., Naples, FL, USA) were injected into the rPOA of transgenic leptin receptor enhanced green fluorescent protein (Lepr-eGFP) reporter mice. Uptake of the RetroBeads by Lepr-eGFP neurones was assessed throughout the hypothalamus. RetroBead uptake was most evident in the medial arcuate nucleus (ARC), the dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) and the ventral premammillary nucleus (PMV) of the hypothalamus. The uptake of RetroBeads specifically by Lepr-eGFP neurones was highest in the medial ARC (18% of tracer-labelled neurones Lepr-eGFP-positive). Because neurones that are both leptin responsive and GABAergic play a critical role in the regulation of fertility by leptin, we next focussed on the location of these populations. To address whether GABAergic neurones in leptin-responsive hypothalamic regions project to the rPOA, the experiment was repeated in GABA neurone reporter mice (Vgat-tdTomato). Between 10% and 45% of RetroBead-labelled neurones in the ARC were GABAergic, whereas uptake of tracer by GABAergic neurones in the DMN and PMV was very low (< 5%). These results show that both leptin responsive and GABAergic neurones from the ARC project to the region of the GnRH cell bodies. Our findings suggest that LEPR-expressing GABA neurones from the ARC may be mediators of leptin-to-GnRH signalling.

  10. The effect of pinealectomy, melatonin and leptin hormones on ovarian follicular development in female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Karakaş, A; Kaya, Aliye; Gündüz, B

    2010-12-01

    We studied the effects of melatonin and leptin hormones on ovarian follicular development in intact and pinealectomized female Syrian hamsters. We first monitored the oestrous cycle of the hamsters by the vaginal smear samples throughout a ten day period to start the injections simultaneously in all groups and performed saline, melatonin and leptin hormone injection groups for both control and pinealectomized hamsters. Then the injections were applied for four days starting the oestrus phase of the cycle and the ovaries were removed for preparation of histological analysis. We measured the diameters and the numbers of the follicles and we classified the follicles according to the number of the granulosa cell layer. Leptin hormone injection increased melatonin hormone injection decreased the number and the diameter of the follicles. The stimulating effect of the leptin hormone was more pronounced in the pinealectomized group. The results of the present study indicate that the removal of the pineal gland and leptin hormone administration are playing a stimulatory while melatonin hormone administration is playing an inhibitory role on the follicular development in female Syrian hamsters.

  11. Leptin resistance is not the primary cause of weight gain associated with reduced sex hormone levels in female mice.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Regina P; Zampieri, Thais T; Pedroso, João A B; Nagaishi, Vanessa S; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M; Furigo, Isadora C; Câmara, Niels O; Frazão, Renata; Donato, Jose

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have shown that estrogens mimic leptin's effects on energy balance regulation. However, the findings regarding the consequences of reduced sex hormone levels on leptin sensitivity are divergent. In the present study, we employed different experimental paradigms to elucidate the interaction between estrogens, leptin, and energy balance regulation. We confirmed previous reports showing that ovariectomy caused a reduction in locomotor activity and energy expenditure leading mice to obesity and glucose intolerance. However, the acute and chronic anorexigenic effects of leptin were preserved in ovariectomized (OVX) mice despite their increased serum leptin levels. We studied hypothalamic gene expression at different time points after ovariectomy and observed that changes in the expression of genes involved in leptin resistance (suppressors of cytokine signaling and protein-tyrosine phosphatases) did not precede the early onset of obesity in OVX mice. On the contrary, reduced sex hormone levels caused an up-regulation of the long form of the leptin receptor (LepR), resulting in increased activation of leptin signaling pathways in OVX leptin-treated animals. The up-regulation of the LepR was observed in long-term OVX mice (30 d or 24 wk after ovariectomy) but not 7 days after the surgery. In addition, we observed a progressive decrease in the coexpression of LepR and estrogen receptor-α in the hypothalamus after the ovariectomy, resulting in a low percentage of dual-labeled cells in OVX mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that the weight gain caused by reduced sex hormone levels is not primarily caused by induction of a leptin-resistance state.

  12. Aging influences steroid hormone release by mink ovaries and their response to leptin and IGF-I.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Mertin, Dušan; Süvegová, Karin; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Kotwica, Jan

    2016-01-21

    The aim of our study was to understand whether ovarian steroid hormones, and their response to the metabolic hormones leptin and IGF-I leptin, could be involved in the control of mink reproductive aging via changes in basal release of ovarian progesterone and estradiol. For this purpose, we compared the release of progesterone and estradiol by ovarian fragments isolated from young (yearlings) and old (3-5 years of age) minks cultured with and without leptin and IGF-I (0, 1, 10 or 100 ng/ml). We observed that isolated ovaries of older animals produced less progesterone but not less estradiol than the ovaries of young animals. Leptin addition stimulated estradiol release by the ovarian tissue of young animals but inhibited it in older females. Leptin did not influence progesterone output by the ovaries of either young or older animals. IGF-I inhibited estradiol output in young but not old animals, whereas progesterone release was inhibited by IGF-I irrespective of the animal age. Our observations demonstrate the involvement of both leptin and IGF-I in the control of mink ovarian steroid hormones release. Furthermore, our findings suggest that reproductive aging in minks can be due to (a) reduction in basal progesterone release and (b) alterations in the response of estradiol but not of progesterone to leptin and IGF-I.

  13. Aging influences steroid hormone release by mink ovaries and their response to leptin and IGF-I

    PubMed Central

    Sirotkin, Alexander V.; Mertin, Dušan; Süvegová, Karin; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Kotwica, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of our study was to understand whether ovarian steroid hormones, and their response to the metabolic hormones leptin and IGF-I leptin, could be involved in the control of mink reproductive aging via changes in basal release of ovarian progesterone and estradiol. For this purpose, we compared the release of progesterone and estradiol by ovarian fragments isolated from young (yearlings) and old (3-5 years of age) minks cultured with and without leptin and IGF-I (0, 1, 10 or 100 ng/ml). We observed that isolated ovaries of older animals produced less progesterone but not less estradiol than the ovaries of young animals. Leptin addition stimulated estradiol release by the ovarian tissue of young animals but inhibited it in older females. Leptin did not influence progesterone output by the ovaries of either young or older animals. IGF-I inhibited estradiol output in young but not old animals, whereas progesterone release was inhibited by IGF-I irrespective of the animal age. Our observations demonstrate the involvement of both leptin and IGF-I in the control of mink ovarian steroid hormones release. Furthermore, our findings suggest that reproductive aging in minks can be due to (a) reduction in basal progesterone release and (b) alterations in the response of estradiol but not of progesterone to leptin and IGF-I. PMID:26794607

  14. Leptin is a potent stimulator of spontaneous pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion and the GH response to GH-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Gurd, W; Lapointe, M

    1998-09-01

    Pulsatile GH secretion is exquisitely sensitive to perturbations in nutritional status, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Leptin, a recently discovered adipose cell hormone, is thought to be a sensor of energy stores and to regulate body mass, appetite, and metabolism at the level of the brain. Receptors for leptin are abundantly expressed in hypothalamic nuclei known to be involved in GH regulation, suggesting that leptin may serve as an important hormonal signal to the GH neuroendocrine axis in normal animals. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular infusion of recombinant murine leptin, at a dose of 1.2 microg/day for 7 days, on both spontaneous and GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-stimulated GH secretion in free-moving adult male rats. Concomitant with suppressive effects on food intake, body weight, and basal plasma insulin-like growth factor I, insulin, and glucose concentrations, central infusion of leptin resulted in a 2- to 3-fold augmentation of GH pulse amplitude, 5-fold higher GH nadir levels, and a 2- to 3-fold increase in the integrated area under the 6-h GH response curve compared with those in vehicle-infused controls (P < 0.001). The intracerebroventricular infusion of leptin also produced a 3- to 4-fold increase in GHRH-induced GH release at GH trough times (P < 0.01). These studies demonstrate a potent stimulatory action of leptin on both spontaneous pulsatile GH secretion and the GH response to GHRH. The results suggest that the GH-releasing activity of leptin is mediated, at least in part, by an inhibition of hypothalamic somatostatin release. Thus, leptin may be a critical hormonal signal of nutritional status in the neuroendocrine regulation of pulsatile GH secretion.

  15. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award lecture: Molecular mechanisms underlying estrogen functions in trophoblastic cells--focus on leptin expression.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Y P; Maymó, J L; Pérez Pérez, A; Calvo, J C; Sánchez-Margalet, V; Varone, C L

    2012-02-01

    The steroid hormone 17β-estradiol is an estrogen that influences multiple aspects of placental function and fetal development in humans. During early pregnancy it plays a role in the regulation of blastocyst implantation, trophoblast differentiation and invasiveness, remodeling of uterine arteries, immunology and trophoblast production of hormones such as leptin. Estradiol exerts some effects through the action of classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, which act as ligand-activated transcription factors and regulate gene expression. In addition, estradiol can elicit rapid responses from membrane-associated receptors, like activation of protein-kinase pathways. Thus, the cellular effects of estradiol will depend on the specific receptors expressed and the integration of their signaling events. Leptin, the 16,000MW protein product of the obese gene, was originally considered an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule for the central control of metabolism. However, pleiotropic effects of leptin have been identified in reproduction and pregnancy. The leptin gene is expressed in placenta, where leptin promotes proliferation and survival of trophoblastic cells. Expression of leptin in placenta is highly regulated by key pregnancy molecules as hCG and estradiol. The aim of this paper is to review the molecular mechanisms underlying estrogen functions in trophoblastic cells; focusing on mechanisms involved in estradiol regulation of placental leptin expression.

  16. Leptin Dysfunction and Alzheimer's Disease: Evidence from Cellular, Animal, and Human Studies.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Matthew J; Ishii, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies that changes in body weight are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from mid-life obesity increasing the risk of developing AD to weight loss occurring at the earliest stages of AD. Therefore, factors that regulate body weight are likely to influence the development and progression of AD. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin has emerged as a major regulator of body weight mainly by activating hypothalamic neural circuits. Leptin also has several pleotropic effects including regulating cognitive function and having neuroprotective effects, suggesting a potential link between leptin and AD. Here, we will examine the relationship between leptin and AD by reviewing the recent evidence from cellular and animal models to human studies. We present a model where leptin has a bidirectional role in AD. Not only can alterations in leptin levels and function worsen cognitive decline and progression of AD pathology, but AD pathology, in of itself, can disrupt leptin signaling, which together would lead to a downward spiral of progressive neurodegeneration and worsening body weight and systemic metabolic deficits. Collectively, these studies serve as a framework to highlight the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the body weight and systemic metabolic deficits in AD, which has the potential to open new avenues that may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic targets and diagnostic tools.

  17. Insulin enhanced leptin-induced STAT3 signaling by inducing GRP78

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Mina; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, centrally regulates energy homeostasis. Overlaps in the regulation of glucose and energy homeostasis have been reported between leptin and insulin. However, the effects of insulin on leptin’s actions in the central nervous system (CNS) have not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we found that insulin potentiated leptin’s actions through GRP78 in the neuronal cell line, SH-SY5Y-ObRb. Since insulin induces GRP78, we speculated that it may also enhance leptin’s actions through this induction. We found that insulin enhanced leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and this effect was ameliorated by the knockdown of GRP78. The role of GRP78 in leptin’s actions was also confirmed by impairments in leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in HEK293-ObRb cells in which GRP78 was knocked down. Furthermore, we found that the overexpression of GRP78 enhanced leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. These results suggest that GRP78 plays an important role in leptin’s actions. Furthermore, insulin may enhance the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 by inducing GRP78, which may provide an important connection between insulin and leptin in the CNS. PMID:27677243

  18. Leptin dysfunction and Alzheimer’s disease: evidence from cellular, animal, and human studies

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Matthew J.; Ishii, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies that changes in body weight are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) from mid-life obesity increasing the risk of developing AD to weight loss occurring at the earliest stages of AD. Therefore, factors that regulate body weight are likely to influence the development and progression of AD. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin has emerged as a major regulator of body weight mainly by activating hypothalamic neural circuits. Leptin also has several pleotropic effects including regulating cognitive function and having neuroprotective effects, suggesting a potential link between leptin and AD. Here, we will examine the relationship between leptin and AD by reviewing the recent evidence from cellular and animal models to human studies. We present a model where leptin has a bidirectional role in AD. Not only can alterations in leptin levels and function worsen cognitive decline and progression of AD pathology, but AD pathology, in of itself, can disrupt leptin signaling, which together would lead to a downward spiral of progressive neurodegeneration and worsening body weight and systemic metabolic deficits. Collectively, these studies serve as a framework to highlight the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the body weight and systemic metabolic deficits in AD, which has the potential to open new avenues that may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic targets and diagnostic tools. PMID:26993509

  19. The regulation of IGF-1 by leptin in the pig is tissue specific and independent of changes in growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Ajuwon, Kolapo M; Kuske, Joanne L; Ragland, Darryl; Adeola, Olayiwola; Hancock, Deana L; Anderson, David B; Spurlock, Michael E

    2003-09-01

    A combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments were performed to determine the extent to which exogenous leptin regulates serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) concentrations, and the abundance of IGF-1 mRNA in major peripheral tissues. Initially (Experiment 1), a recombinant human leptin analog was administered i.m. to young growing pigs (approximately 27 kg body weight) for 15 days at 0 (control), 0.003, 0.01 and 0.03 mg. kg(-1). day(-1). Although there was no sustained effect of leptin on serum GH, there was a reduction (P < 0.02) in serum IGF-1 at the intermediate dose that paralleled a decrease (P < 0.09) in hepatic IGF-1 expression. Leptin, at these doses, did not reduce feed intake (P > 0.57), nor was there an effect of leptin on dietary nitrogen retention (P > 0.97). In a second experiment, pigs were injected with vehicle or a higher dose of leptin (0.05 mg. kg(-1). day(-1)) for 14 days. A third treatment group was injected with vehicle and pair-fed to the intake of the group treated with leptin. In this study, exogenous leptin resulted in a sustained increase in serum leptin (P < 0.0001) and reduction in feed intake of approximately 30% (P < 0.0001). Serum IGF-1 was depressed in both the leptin-treated and pair-fed groups, relative to the group allowed ad-libitum intake (P < 0.01). Furthermore, there was no difference among treatments in the relative abundance of IGF-1 mRNA in skeletal muscle (P > 0.42) or adipose tissue (P > 0.26), and liver mRNA abundance was actually increased (P < 0.01) by leptin, despite the lower feed intake. Finally, to determine whether leptin altered the secretion of IGF-1 by isolated pig hepatocytes, primary cultures were incubated with leptin for 24 to 48 hr (Experiment 3). Leptin (100 nM) caused a sharp reduction (P < 0.0001) in dexamethasone-induced IGF-1 secretion at 24 hr (47% reduction) and at 48 hr (40% reduction). Collectively, these data indicate that leptin may regulate hepatic IGF-1

  20. Leptin-dependent neurotoxicity via induction of apoptosis in adult rat neurogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Stéphanie; Efthimiadi, Laurie; Porcher, Christophe; Courtes, Sandrine; Coronas, Valérie; Krantic, Slavica; Moyse, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Adipocyte-derived hormone leptin has been recently implicated in the control of neuronal plasticity. To explore whether modulation of adult neurogenesis may contribute to leptin control of neuronal plasticity, we used the neurosphere assay of neural stem cells derived from the adult rat subventricular zone (SVZ). Endogenous expression of specific leptin receptor (ObRb) transcripts, as revealed by RT-PCR, is associated with activation of both ERK and STAT-3 pathways via phosphorylation of the critical ERK/STAT-3 amino acid residues upon addition of leptin to neurospheres. Furthermore, leptin triggered withdrawal of neural stem cells from the cell cycle as monitored by Ki67 labeling. This effect was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation thus demonstrating that ERK mediates leptin effects on neural stem cell expansion. Leptin-dependent withdrawal of neural stem cells from the cell cycle was associated with increased apoptosis, as detected by TUNEL, which was preceded by cyclin D1 induction. Cyclin D1 was indeed extensively colocalized with TUNEL-positive, apoptotic nuclei. Cyclin-D1 silencing by specific shRNA prevented leptin-induced decrease of the cell number per neurosphere thus pointing to the causal relationship between leptin actions on apoptosis and cyclin D1 induction. Leptin target cells in SVZ neurospheres were identified by double TUNEL/phenotypic marker immunocytofluorescence as differentiating neurons mostly. The inhibition of neural stem cell expansion via ERK/cyclin D1-triggered apoptosis defines novel biological action of leptin which may be involved in adiposity-dependent neurotoxicity. PMID:26441523

  1. Differential Role of Leptin as an Immunomodulator in Controlling Visceral Leishmaniasis in Normal and Leptin-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Radheshyam; Bhattacharya, Parna; Ismail, Nevien; Dagur, Pradeep K.; Joshi, Amritanshu B.; Razdan, Kundan; McCoy, J. Philip; Ascher, Jill; Dey, Ranadhir; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani. There are no vaccines and available drugs against leishmaniasis are toxic. Immunomodulators that specifically boost the anti-microbial activities of the immune cells could alleviate several of these limitations. Therefore, finding novel immunomodulators for VL therapy is a pressing need. This study is aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory role of leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone capable of regulating the immune response, in L. donovani-infected mice. We observed that recombinant leptin treatment reduced splenic parasite burden compared with non-treated infected normal mice. Decrease in parasite burden correlated with an induction of innate immune response in antigen-presenting cells that showed an increase in nitric oxide, enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine (interferon gamma [IFNγ], interleukin12 [IL]12, and IL1β) response in the splenocytes, indicating host-protecting Th1 response mediated by leptin. Moreover, in infected normal mice, leptin treatment induced IFNγ production from both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, compared with non-treated infected mice. Alternatively, leptin-deficient (Ob/Ob) mice had higher splenic and liver parasite burden compared with the infected normal mice. However, leptin treatment failed to reduce the splenic parasite burden and improve a host-protective cytokine response in these mice. In addition, in contrast to dendritic cells (DCs) from a normal mouse, Ob/Ob mouse–derived DCs showed a defect in the induction of innate immune response on Leishmania infection that could not be reversed by leptin treatment. Therefore, our findings reveal that leptin has a differential immunomodulatory effect in controlling VL in normal and Ob/Ob mice. PMID:27114296

  2. [Serum insulin, leptin and growth hormone levels are associated with body mass index and obesity index in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Molero-Conejo, Emperatriz; Morales, Luz Marina; Fernández, Virginia; Raleigh, Xiomara; Casanova, Angel; Connell, Lissette; Gómnez, Maria Esther; Ryder, Elena; Campos, Gilberto

    2006-03-01

    Leptin, insulin and growth hormone levels seem to regulate body composition, fat distribution and fat mass. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among insulin, leptin and growth hormone levels in a group of adolescents. Ninety five adolescents (31 boys and 64 girls) between 13 and 18 y. of age were studied. A medical and nutritional history was made which included body mass index (BMI) and subcutaneous skinfolds measurements. Basal levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C, VLDL-C, leptin, insulin and growth hormone were determined. The leptin and insulin levels were positively associated with body mass index (BMI) and obesity index (OBI). Insulin, leptin and obesity markers were negatively associated with growth hormone level. Fifty two percent of the adolescents with BMI = 21.09 kg/m2 were considered metabolically obese because they had elevated levels of insulin (18.68 +/- 1.52 vs. 10.08 +/- 0.38 microU/ml), HOMA IR (3.34 +/- 0.24 vs. 1.76 +/- 0.07), leptin (16.30 +/- 1.24 vs. 8.11 +/- 1.32 ng./dl) and triglycerides (78.56 +/- 4.38 vs. 64.39 +/- 5.48 mg/dl) and lower levels of HDL-C (39.09 +/- 1.27 vs. 43.30 +/- 2.38 mg/dl), compared with normal group. The same alterations were observed in the obese group, in which significative decrease in growth hormone level was added. We conclude that hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia and low growth hormone levels, may be established as risk factors related to obesity markers, lipid alterations and insulin resistance that can lead to an early development of Type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  3. Association of adiponectin and leptin with relative telomere length in seven independent cohorts including 11,448 participants.

    PubMed

    Broer, Linda; Raschenberger, Julia; Deelen, Joris; Mangino, Massimo; Codd, Veryan; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Beekman, Marian; de Craen, Anton J M; Gieger, Christian; Haun, Margot; Henneman, Peter; Herder, Christian; Hovatta, Iiris; Laser, Annika; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kollerits, Barbara; Moilanen, Eeva; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Quaye, Lydia; Rissanen, Aila; Roden, Michael; Surakka, Ida; Valdes, Ana M; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Thorand, Barbara; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Kaprio, Jaakko; Spector, Tim D; Slagboom, P Eline; Samani, Nilesh J; Kronenberg, Florian; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are major contributors to accelerated age-related relative telomere length (RTL) shortening. Both conditions are strongly linked to leptin and adiponectin, the most prominent adipocyte-derived protein hormones. As high leptin levels and low levels of adiponectin have been implicated in inflammation, one expects adiponectin to be positively associated with RTL while leptin should be negatively associated. Within the ENGAGE consortium, we investigated the association of RTL with adiponectin and leptin in seven independent cohorts with a total of 11,448 participants. We performed partial correlation analysis on Z-transformed RTL and LN-transformed leptin/adiponectin, adjusting for age and sex. In extended models we adjusted for body mass index (BMI) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Adiponectin showed a borderline significant association with RTL. This appeared to be determined by a single study and when the outlier study was removed, this association disappeared. The association between RTL and leptin was highly significant (r = -0.05; p = 1.81 × 10(-7)). Additional adjustment for BMI or CRP did not change the results. Sex-stratified analysis revealed no difference between men and women. Our study suggests that high leptin levels are associated with short RTL.

  4. Hormonal modulation of food intake in response to low leptin levels induced by hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, M. M.; Stein, T. P.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    A loss in fat mass is a common response to centrifugation and it results in low circulating leptin concentrations. However, rats adapted to hypergravity are euphagic. The focus of this study was to examine leptin and other peripheral signals of energy balance in the presence of a hypergravity-induced loss of fat mass and euphagia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged for 14 days at gravity levels of 1.25, 1.5, or 2 G, or they remained stationary at 1 G. Urinary catecholamines, urinary corticosterone, food intake, and body mass were measured on Days 11 to 14. Plasma hormones and epididymal fat pad mass were measured on Day 14. Mean body mass of the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than controls, and no differences were found in food intake (g/day/100 g body mass) between the hypergravity groups and controls. Epididymal fat mass was 14%, 14%, and 21% lower than controls in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups, respectively. Plasma leptin was significantly reduced from controls by 46%, 45%, and 65% in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2 G groups, respectively. Plasma insulin was significantly lower in the 1.25, 1.5, and 2.0 G groups than controls by 35%, 38%, and 33%. No differences were found between controls and hypergravity groups in urinary corticosterone. Mean urinary epinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Mean urinary norepinephrine was significantly higher in the 1.25, 1.5 and 2.0 G groups than in controls. Significant correlations were found between G load and body mass, fat mass, leptin, urinary epinephrine, and norepinephrine. During hypergravity exposure, maintenance of food intake is the result of a complex relationship between multiple pathways, which abates the importance of leptin as a primary signal.

  5. Leptin and Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells to Metastasis (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    1 Endocrine-Related Cancer Commentary Leptin and Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells to Metastasis Jiyoung Park 1 and Philipp E. Scherer...REPORT DATE JUN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Leptin And Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells To...interest. Recently several groups have addressed the functional roles of leptin , an adipocyte-derived adipokine, for mammary tumor progression. In this

  6. Leptin reduces plasma ANP level via nitric oxide-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kuichang; Yu, Jiahua; Shah, Amin; Gao, Shan; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Sung Zoo; Park, Byung-Hyun; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2010-04-01

    Leptin is a circulating adipocyte-derived hormone that influences blood pressure (BP) and metabolism. This study was designed to define the possible role of leptin in regulation of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system using acute and chronic experiments. Intravenous infusion of rat leptin (250 microg/kg injection plus 2 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) for 20 min) into Sprague-Dawley rats increased BP by 25 mmHg and decreased plasma level of ANP from 80.3 +/- 3.45 to 51.8 +/- 3.3 pg/ml. Reserpinization attenuated the rise in BP, but not the reduction of plasma ANP during leptin infusion. N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester prevented the effects of leptin on the reduction of ANP level. In hyperleptinemic rats that received adenovirus containing rat leptin cDNA (AdCMV-leptin), BP increased during first 2 days and then recovered to control value. Plasma concentration of ANP and expression of ANP mRNA, but not of atrial ANP, in hyperleptinemic rats were lower than in the control groups on the first and second week after administration of AdCMV-leptin. These effects were not observed by the pretreatment with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. No differences in renal function and ANP receptor density in the kidney were found between hyperleptinemic and control rats. Basal ANP secretion and isoproterenol-induced suppression of ANP secretion from isolated, perfused atria of hyperleptinemic rats were not different from those of other control groups. These data suggest that leptin inhibits ANP secretion indirectly through nitric oxide without changing basal or isoproterenol-induced ANP secretion.

  7. Ghrelin Induces Leptin Resistance by Activation of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 Expression in Male Rats: Implications in Satiety Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Heldsinger, Andrea; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, ShiYi; Lu, Yuanxu; Song, Il

    2014-01-01

    The anorexigenic adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the orexigenic hormone ghrelin act in opposition to regulate feeding behavior via the vagal afferent pathways. The mechanisms by which ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin are unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin activates the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), inducing increased SOCS3 expression, which negatively affects leptin signal transduction and neuronal firing in nodose ganglia (NG) neurons. We showed that 91 ± 3% of leptin receptor (LRb) –bearing neurons contained ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1a) and that ghrelin significantly inhibited leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation in rat NG neurons. Studies of the signaling cascades used by ghrelin showed that ghrelin caused a significant increase in Epac and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression in cultured rat NG neurons. Transient transfection of cultured NG neurons to silence SOCS3 and Epac genes reversed the inhibitory effects of ghrelin on leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation. Patch-clamp studies and recordings of single neuronal discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons showed that ghrelin markedly inhibited leptin-stimulated neuronal firing, an action abolished by silencing SOCS3 expression in NG. Plasma ghrelin levels increased significantly during fasting. This was accompanied by enhanced SOCS3 expression in the NG and prevented by treatment with a ghrelin antagonist. Feeding studies showed that silencing SOCS3 expression in the NG reduced food intake evoked by endogenous leptin. We conclude that ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin-stimulated neuronal firing by increasing SOCS3 expression. The SOCS3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in ghrelin's inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, neuronal firing, and feeding behavior. PMID:25060362

  8. Ghrelin induces leptin resistance by activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expression in male rats: implications in satiety regulation.

    PubMed

    Heldsinger, Andrea; Grabauskas, Gintautas; Wu, Xiaoyin; Zhou, ShiYi; Lu, Yuanxu; Song, Il; Owyang, Chung

    2014-10-01

    The anorexigenic adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the orexigenic hormone ghrelin act in opposition to regulate feeding behavior via the vagal afferent pathways. The mechanisms by which ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin are unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin activates the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), inducing increased SOCS3 expression, which negatively affects leptin signal transduction and neuronal firing in nodose ganglia (NG) neurons. We showed that 91 ± 3% of leptin receptor (LRb) -bearing neurons contained ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1a) and that ghrelin significantly inhibited leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation in rat NG neurons. Studies of the signaling cascades used by ghrelin showed that ghrelin caused a significant increase in Epac and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression in cultured rat NG neurons. Transient transfection of cultured NG neurons to silence SOCS3 and Epac genes reversed the inhibitory effects of ghrelin on leptin-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation. Patch-clamp studies and recordings of single neuronal discharges of vagal primary afferent neurons showed that ghrelin markedly inhibited leptin-stimulated neuronal firing, an action abolished by silencing SOCS3 expression in NG. Plasma ghrelin levels increased significantly during fasting. This was accompanied by enhanced SOCS3 expression in the NG and prevented by treatment with a ghrelin antagonist. Feeding studies showed that silencing SOCS3 expression in the NG reduced food intake evoked by endogenous leptin. We conclude that ghrelin exerts its inhibitory effects on leptin-stimulated neuronal firing by increasing SOCS3 expression. The SOCS3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in ghrelin's inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, neuronal firing, and feeding behavior.

  9. The brain subfornical organ mediates leptin-induced increases in renal sympathetic activity but not its metabolic effects.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin N; Morgan, Donald A; Butler, Scott D; Mark, Allyn L; Davisson, Robin L

    2013-03-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin acts within the central nervous system to decrease food intake and body weight and to increase renal and thermogenic brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Previous studies have focused on hypothalamic brain regions, although recent findings have identified leptin receptors (ObR) in a distributed brain network, including the circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain region devoid of a blood-brain barrier. We tested the hypothesis that ObR in the SFO are functionally linked to leptin-induced decreases in food intake and body weight and increases in SNA. SFO-targeted microinjections of an adenovirus encoding Cre-recombinase in ObR(flox/flox) mice resulted in selective ablation of ObR in the SFO. Interestingly, deletion of ObR in the SFO did not influence the decreases in either food intake or body weight in response to daily systemic or cerebroventricular administration of leptin. In line with these findings, reduction in SFO ObR did not attenuate leptin-mediated increases in thermogenic brown adipose tissue SNA. In contrast, increases in renal SNA induced by systemic or cerebroventricular administration of leptin were abolished in mice with SFO-targeted deletion of ObR. These results demonstrate that ObR in the SFO play an important role in leptin-induced renal sympathoexcitation, but not in the body weight, food intake, or brown adipose tissue SNA thermogenic effects of leptin. These findings highlight the concept of a distributed brain network of leptin action and illustrate that brain regions, including the SFO, can mediate distinct cardiovascular and metabolic responses to leptin.

  10. Ghrelin and its interactions with growth hormone, leptin and orexins: implications for the sleep-wake cycle and metabolism.

    PubMed

    García-García, Fabio; Juárez-Aguilar, Enrique; Santiago-García, Juan; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have shown that ghrelin administration promotes wakefulness in rodents, while in human males it induces sleep but has no effect in women. Ghrelin also plays an important role in metabolism and appetite regulation, and as described in this review may participate in the energy balance during sleep. In this review, we summarize some of the effects induced by ghrelin administration on the sleep-wake cycle in relation to the effects of other hormones, such as growth hormone, leptin, and orexin. Finally we discuss the relationship between sleep deprivation, obesity and ghrelin secretion pattern.

  11. Interrelationship between feeding level and the metabolic hormones leptin, ghrelin and obestatin in control of chicken egg laying and release of ovarian hormones.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Grossmann, Roland

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present experiment is to examine the role of nutritional status, metabolic hormones and their interrelationships in the control of chicken ovarian ovulatory and secretory activity. For this purpose, we identified the effect of food restriction, administration of leptin, ghrelin 1-18, obestatin and combinations of food restriction with these hormones for 3days on chicken ovulation (egg laying) rate and ovarian hormone release. The release of progesterone (P), testosterone (T), estradiol (E) and arginine-vasotocin (AVT) by isolated and cultured ovarian fragments was determined by EIA. It was observed that food restriction significantly reduced the egg-laying rate, T, E and AVT release and promoted P output by ovarian fragments. Leptin, administrated to ad libitum-fed chickens, did not change these parameters besides promoting E release. Nevertheless, administration of leptin was able to prevent the effect of food restriction on ovulation, T and E (but not P or AVT) release. Ghrelin 1-18 administration to ad libitum-fed birds did not affect the measured parameters besides a reduction in P release. Ghrelin 1-18 administration prevented the food restriction-induced decrease in ovarian T, E and AVT, but it did not change P output or egg laying. Obestatin administrated to control chicken promoted their ovarian P, E and inhibited ovarian AVT release but did not affect egg laying. It was able to promote the effect of food restriction on P, T and AVT, but not E release or egg laying. Our results (1) confirm an inhibitory effect of food restriction on chicken ovulation rate; (2) shows that food restriction-induced reduction in egg laying is associated with a decrease in ovarian T, E and AVT and an increase in ovarian P release; (3) confirm the involvement of metabolic hormones leptin, ghrelin and obestatin in the control of chicken ovarian hormones output; and (4) the ability of metabolic hormones to mimic/antagonize or prevent/promote the effects of food

  12. Pivotal roles of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and the melanocortin 4 receptor in leptin stimulation of prolactin secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, Hajime; Schiöth, Helgi B; Izumi, Junkichi

    2003-04-01

    Leptin, the obese gene product, was reported to stimulate prolactin (PRL) secretion, but the neuroendocrine mechanism underlying this hormonal response is largely unknown. Thus, in this study we examined the involvement of several important PRL regulators in the leptin-induced PRL secretion in male rats. Compared with the values in normally fed rats, food deprivation for 3 days significantly decreased both PRL and leptin levels in the plasma. These changes were reverted to normal by a 3-day constant infusion of 75 microg/kg/day of leptin to the fasted rats, while 225 microg/kg/day of leptin further elevated both PRL and leptin levels. These four groups of animals were used for the following experiments. Results of dopamine and serotonin turnover studies in the brain and the pituitary indicated that neither of these biogenic amines plays a primary role in mediating leptin's effects on PRL. Repeated intracerebroventricular injections over 72 h of neutralizing antibodies against vasoactive intestinal peptide, PRL-releasing peptide, or beta-endorphin, did not significantly suppress the leptin actions. However, both the blockade of the melanocortin (MC) 4 receptor (R) and the immunoquenching of brain alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) completely abolished the leptin-induced PRL release, and the stimulation of the MC4-R, but not the MC3-R, significantly elevated PRL levels in the fasted rats. These results suggest that alpha-MSH, a cleaved peptide from pro-opiomelanocortin of which synthesis is stimulated by leptin, may be the pivotal neuropeptide in the brain mediating the leptin's stimulatory influence on PRL secretion. It was also suggested that the MC4-R may be the primary subtype of the MC-Rs mediating this action of alpha-MSH.

  13. Effects of leptin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone release from hypothalamic-infundibular explants and gonadotropin release from adenohypophyseal primary cell cultures: further evidence that fully nourished cattle are resistant to leptin.

    PubMed

    Amstalden, M; Harms, P G; Welsh, T H; Randel, R D; Williams, G L

    2005-01-01

    In rodents and pigs, leptin stimulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from hypothalamus, gonadotropins from adenohypophyseal (AP) explants and cells, and luteinizing hormone (LH) from full-fed animals. In the current studies, we investigated whether leptin could stimulate the release of GnRH from bovine hypothalamic-infundibular (HYP) explants and gonadotropins from bovine adenohypophyseal cells. In Experiment 1A, HYP explants collected from 17 bulls and seven steers were incubated with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (KRB) containing 0, 10, 100, or 1000 ng/ml recombinant ovine leptin (oleptin) for 30 min after a 3-h period of equilibration. None of the doses of leptin affected (P > 0.05) GnRH release into the media. In Experiment 1B, HYP explants collected from six steers were incubated with KRB containing 0 or 1000 ng/ml oleptin for two consecutive 30-min periods and challenged with 60 mM K(+) afterwards. Leptin did not affect (P > 0.05) basal or K(+)-stimulated release of GnRH. In Experiment 2, adenohypophyses from steers were collected at slaughter and cells dispersed and cultured for 4 days. On day 5, cells were treated with media alone (control) or media containing 10(-11), 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8)M oleptin. Three independent replications were performed. None of the doses of leptin stimulated (P > 0.05) the release of LH. Although leptin at 10(-11), 10(-10), and 10(-9)M increased (P < 0.03) slightly the release of FSH compared to control-treated cells in one replicate, this effect was not confirmed in the other two replicates. Results support the hypothesis that leptin has limited effects on the release of GnRH and gonadotropins in full-fed cattle and reiterate important species differences in responsiveness to leptin.

  14. Leptin Mediates High-Fat Diet Sensitization of Angiotensin II-Elicited Hypertension by Upregulating the Brain Renin-Angiotensin System and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Zhongming; Guo, Fang; Beltz, Terry G; Thunhorst, Robert L; Felder, Robert B; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is characterized by increased circulating levels of the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin, which can increase sympathetic nerve activity and raise blood pressure. A previous study revealed that rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) have an enhanced hypertensive response to subsequent angiotensin II administration that is mediated at least, in part, by increased activity of brain renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines. This study tested whether leptin mediates this HFD-induced sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension by interacting with brain renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokine mechanisms. Rats fed an HFD for 3 weeks had significant increases in white adipose tissue mass, plasma leptin levels, and mRNA expression of leptin and its receptors in the lamina terminalis and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Central infusion of a leptin receptor antagonist during HFD feeding abolished HFD sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension. Furthermore, central infusion of leptin mimicked the sensitizing action of HFD. Concomitant central infusions of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist irbesartan, the tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis inhibitor pentoxifylline, or the inhibitor of microglial activation minocycline prevented the sensitization produced by central infusion of leptin. RT-PCR analysis indicated that either HFD or leptin administration upregulated mRNA expression of several components of the renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines in the lamina terminalis and paraventricular nucleus. The leptin antagonist and the inhibitors of angiotensin II type 1 receptor, tumor necrosis factor-α synthesis, and microglial activation all reversed the expression of these genes. The results suggest that HFD-induced sensitization of angiotensin II-elicited hypertension is mediated by leptin through upregulation of central renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines.

  15. Variability in leptin and adrenal response in juvenile Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in different seasons.

    PubMed

    Mashburn, Kendall L; Atkinson, Shannon

    2008-01-15

    Eight free-ranging juvenile Steller sea lions (SSL; 6 males, 2 females; 14-20 months) temporarily held under ambient conditions at the Alaska SeaLife Center were physiologically challenged through exogenous administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Four individuals (3 males, 1 female) underwent ACTH challenge in each of two seasons, summer and winter. Following ACTH injection serial blood and fecal samples were collected for up to 3 and 96 h, respectively. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was validated for leptin, and using a previously validated RIA for cortisol, collected sera were analyzed for both cortisol and leptin. ACTH injection resulted in a 2.9-fold increase (P=0.164) in leptin which preceded a 3.2-fold increase (P=0.0290) in cortisol by 105 min in summer. In winter, a 1.7-fold increase in leptin (P=0.020) preceded a 2.1-fold increase (P=0.001) in serum cortisol by 45 min. Mean fecal corticosteroid maxima were 10.4 and 16.7-fold above baseline 28 and 12 h post-injection and returned to baseline 52 and 32 h post-injection, in summer and winter, respectively. Data indicate acute activity in juvenile adrenal glands is detectable in feces approximately 12-24 h post-stimulus in either season, with a duration of approximately 40 h in summer and 20 h in winter. Changes in serum cortisol proved statistically significant both seasons and elevated concentrations were detected by 30 min post-stimulus (baseline 64.8+/-4.2; peak 209.5+/-18.3 ng/ml: summer; baseline 87.0+/-15.7; peak 237.6+/-10.0 ng/ml: winter), whereas the changes that occurred in serum leptin proved to be significant only in winter (baseline 6.4+/-0.6; peak 18.7+/-7.0 ng/ml: summer; baseline 4.2+/-0.5; peak 7.5+/-0.6 ng/ml: winter). Changes in fecal corticosteroids proved significant only in summer (baseline 117.8+/-36.7; peak 1219.3+/-298.4 ng/g, P=0.038: summer; baseline 71.8+/-13.7; peak 1198.6+/-369.9 ng/g, P=0.053: winter) due to a high degree of individual variability in winter months. The

  16. Hormone and metabolic factors associated with leptin mRNA expression in pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Martha E; Malacara, Juan M; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia G; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2004-06-01

    Recent information has extended leptin's action, beyond the control of appetite, to various sites of metabolic regulation. To better understand leptin's role we studied its production in subcutaneous and visceral fat compartments before and after menopause. During elective abdominal surgery, biopsies of subcutaneous and omental tissues were taken from 20 women at pre- (BMI 28.4 +/- 4.5 kg/m2) and 10 at postmenopause (BMI 30.6 +/- 7.7 kg/m2). In both groups serum leptin levels were similar, and highly correlated with BMI. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, leptin mRNA expression was significantly higher in pre- than in postmenopausal women (50.4 +/- 20.5 amol/microg total RNA versus 34.5 +/- 24.9 amol/microg total RNA, respectively). Leptin mRNA expression in subcutaneous tissue was independently correlated with fasting glucose (R = 0.89, P < 0.006) at premenopause, and with serum estradiol (R = 0.77, P < 0.04) at postmenopause. Leptin mRNA expression in visceral fat was correlated with DHEAS (R = 0.86, P < 0.001), at premenopause. These results indicate that in both compartments, leptin production is sensitive to different but overlapping stimuli, conveying information about energy availability to central and peripheral sites under different conditions of estrogen exposure.

  17. Effects of dietary energy and protein density on plasma concentrations of leptin and metabolic hormones in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Chelikani, P K; Ambrose, D J; Keisler, D H; Kennelly, J J

    2009-04-01

    The hormonal and metabolic signals that communicate the level of body energy reserves to the reproductive-mammary axis remain undefined in dairy cattle; consequently, our hypothesis was that leptin may fulfill this role. Our objectives were to determine the effects of diets differing in energy and protein density on dry matter intake (DMI), growth traits [body weight (BW), body condition score (BCS), back-fat (BF) thickness], and temporal changes in plasma concentrations of leptin, insulin, growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), glucose, and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) in dairy heifers during the pre- and postpubertal periods. In period 1, heifers were randomly allotted (n = 10/diet) at 103 kg of BW to diets for a predicted average daily gain of 1.10 (high, H), 0.80 (medium, M), or 0.50 kg/d (low, L). Five heifers in each of the H and L groups were further studied during period 2, either at 12 mo of age (HA, LA) or at 330 kg of BW (HW, LW). The data provide evidence that 1) DMI (18%), BW (17%), and BF (5%) together explained 40% of the variation in plasma leptin concentrations (r(2) = 0.396); 2) unlike the acute postprandial increase in plasma insulin as a result of increased nutrient density (H 1.42 +/- 0.09, M 1.02 +/- 0.09, L 0.68 +/- 0.11 ng/mL), plasma leptin concentrations did not respond acutely with a distinct postprandial profile; 3) although plasma leptin concentrations increased with age, leptin at puberty did not differ among treatment groups (H 5.63 +/- 2.48, M 4.28 +/- 0.55, L 4.12 +/- 0.72 ng/mL) and there was no evidence of an abrupt transition in prepubertal plasma leptin concentrations; 4) plasma leptin concentrations may not be a critical trigger for puberty in rapidly growing heifers, but are apparently essential for puberty in heifers with normal or restricted growth rates; and 5) plasma concentrations of insulin (H 0.59 +/- 0.07, M 0.43 +/- 0.09, L 0.30 +/- 0.09 ng/mL), IGF-1 (H 151.08 +/- 16.47, L 82.51 +/- 17.47 ng

  18. Genetic polymorphisms and protein structures in growth hormone, growth hormone receptor, ghrelin, insulin-like growth factor 1 and leptin in Mehraban sheep.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, A; Behzadi, Sh; Miraei-Ashtiani, S R; Roh, S-G; Katoh, K

    2013-09-15

    The somatotropic axis, the control system for growth hormone (GH) secretion and its endogenous factors involved in the regulation of metabolism and energy partitioning, has promising potentials for producing economically valuable traits in farm animals. Here we investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the genes of factors involved in the somatotropic axis for growth hormone (GH1), growth hormone receptor (GHR), ghrelin (GHRL), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) and leptin (LEP), using polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing methods in 452 individual Mehraban sheep. A nonradioactive method to allow SSCP detection was used for genomic DNA and PCR amplification of six fragments: exons 4 and 5 of GH1; exon 10 of GH receptor (GHR); exon 1 of ghrelin (GHRL); exon 1 of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and exon 3 of leptin (LEP). Polymorphisms were detected in five of the six PCR products. Two electrophoretic patterns were detected for GH1 exon 4. Five conformational patterns were detected for GH1 exon 5 and LEP exon 3, and three for IGF-I exon 1. Only GHR and GHRL were monomorphic. Changes in protein structures due to variable SNPs were also analyzed. The results suggest that Mehraban sheep, a major breed that is important for the animal industry in Middle East countries, has high genetic variability, opening interesting prospects for future selection programs and preservation strategies.

  19. Study of the correlation between growth hormone deficiency and serum leptin, adiponectin, and visfatin levels in adults.

    PubMed

    Li, Z-P; Zhang, M; Gao, J; Zhou, G-Y; Li, S-Q; An, Z-M

    2014-02-14

    We aimed to determine the significance and changes in leptin, adiponectin (ADP), and visfatin levels in adults with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Forty adults (19 men, 21 women) who had been diagnosed with GHD comprised the observation group, while 36 healthy adults (18 men, 18 women) were used as the control group. Fasting venous blood was collected to detect leptin, ADP, and visfatin levels. There was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) between the GHD group and the control group in terms of gender ratio, age, and body mass index. The waist-to-hip ratio (0.894 ± 0.061 vs 0.830 ± 0.481), cholesterol (4.99 ± 1.046 vs 4.18 ± 0.683), triglyceride (1.97 ± 1.428 vs 1.08 ± 0.403), LDL (2.91 ± 0.980 vs 2.29 ± 0.540), leptin (3.00 ± 1.233 vs 1.89 ± 1.554), ADP (15.26 ± 6.449 vs 10.24 ± 7.608), and visfatin levels (10.42 ± 3.715 vs 5.87 ± 3.90) in the GHD group were significantly higher than those in the control group (all P < 0.05). The levels of growth hormone (1.68 ± 1.67 vs 15.53 ± 6.23), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, 22.64 ± 16.41 vs 61.85 ± 28.48), IGF-binding protein-3 (4889 ± 2962 vs 6866 ± 3823), and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (1.466 ± 1.804 vs 6.000 ± 2.767) in the GHD group were significantly lower than those in the control group (all P < 0.05). Correlation analysis demonstrated that leptin level was positively correlated to ADP and visfatin in both the GHD and control groups and negatively correlated to IGF-1 (r = 0.332, P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that leptin, ADP, and visfatin were independent risk factors for adults with GHD.

  20. Effect of fat supplementation on leptin, insulin-like growth factor I, growth hormone, and insulin in cattle.

    PubMed

    Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; García-Tornadú, Isabel; Shroeder, Guillermo; Salado, Eloy E; Gagliostro, Gerardo; Delavaud, Carole; Chilliard, Yves; Lacau-Mengido, Isabel M

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the effect of fat supplementation on plasma levels of hormones related to metabolism, with special attention to leptin, in cows in early lactation and in feedlot steers. In experiment 1, 34 lactating cows received no fat or else 0.5 or 1.0 kg of partially hydrogenated oil per day in addition to their basal diet from day 20 before the expected calving date to day 70 postpartum. In experiment 2, part of the corn in the basal concentrate was replaced with 0.7 kg of the same oil such that the diets were isocaloric; 18 cows received the fat-substituted diet and 18 a control diet from day 20 before the expected calving date to day 75 postpartum. In experiment 3, calcium salts of fatty acids were added to the basal diet of 14 feedlot steers for 80 d; another 14 steers received a control diet. The basal plasma levels of leptin were higher in the cows than in the steers. Dietary fat supplementation did not affect the leptin levels in the lactating cows but lowered the levels in the feedlot steers despite greater energy intake and body fatness (body weight) in the steers receiving the supplement than in those receiving the control diet. The levels of insulin-like growth factor I and insulin were decreased with dietary fat supplementation in the lactating cows but were unaffected in the steers, suggesting that responses to fat ingestion depend on the physiological state of the animal, including age and sex. Finally, no effects of supplementary fat on the level of growth hormone were demonstrated in any of the models.

  1. Effects of season, food deprivation and re-feeding on leptin, ghrelin and growth hormone in arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) on Svalbard, Norway.

    PubMed

    Fuglei, E; Mustonen, A-M; Nieminen, P

    2004-03-01

    The arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) is a medium-sized predator of the high Arctic experiencing extreme seasonal fluctuations in food availability, photoperiod and temperature. In this study, the plasma leptin, ghrelin and growth hormone (GH) concentrations of male arctic foxes were determined during a food deprivation period of 13 days and the subsequent recovery in November and May. Leptin, ghrelin and GH were present in arctic fox plasma in amounts comparable to other carnivores. The plasma leptin concentrations did not react to food deprivation unlike in humans and rodents. However, the leptin levels increased during re-feeding as an indicator of increasing energy reserves. The relatively high ghrelin-leptin ratio, decrease in the plasma ghrelin concentration, an increase in the circulating GH concentrations and the observed negative correlation between plasma ghrelin and free fatty acid levels during fasting suggest that these hormones take part in the weight-regulation and energy metabolism of this species by increasing fat utilisation during food deprivation. The results strengthen the hypothesis that the actions of these weight-regulatory hormones are species-specific and depend on seasonality and the life history of the animals.

  2. Leptin and cancer: from cancer stem cells to metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Scherer, Philipp E

    2011-08-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity is a risk factor of cancer incidence and mortality. Hence, the identification of the mechanistic links between obesity and cancer progression is emerging as a topic of widespread interest. Recently, several groups have addressed the functional roles of leptin, an adipocyte-derived adipokine, for mammary tumor progression. In this issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, Zheng et al. study the role of leptin on tumor growth in a xenograft model of MMTV-Wnt1-derived cancer cells. They study growth of these cancer cells in the context of obese animals, such as ob/ob mice (lacking leptin) and db/db mice (lacking functional leptin receptors (LEPR)) and find that leptin triggers LEPR-positive cancer stem cell differentiation, thereby promoting tumor cell survival. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential for leptin and leptin signaling in the context of mammary tumor growth.

  3. Leptin-responsive GABAergic neurons regulate fertility through pathways that result in reduced kisspeptinergic tone.

    PubMed

    Martin, Cecilia; Navarro, Víctor M; Simavli, Serap; Vong, Linh; Carroll, Rona S; Lowell, Bradford B; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2014-04-23

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role in the central transmission of energy balance to modulate reproductive function. However, the neurocircuitry underlying this interaction remains elusive, in part due to incomplete knowledge of first-order leptin-responsive neurons. To address this gap, we explored the contribution of predominantly inhibitory (GABAergic) neurons versus excitatory (glutamatergic) neurons in the female mouse by selective ablation of the leptin receptor in each neuronal population: Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) and Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice, respectively. Female Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) but not Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice were obese. Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice had delayed or absent vaginal opening, persistent diestrus, and atrophic reproductive tracts with absent corpora lutea. In contrast, Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) females exhibited reproductive maturation and function comparable to Lepr(lox/lox) control mice. Intracerebroventricular administration of kisspeptin-10 to Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) female mice elicited robust gonadotropin responses, suggesting normal gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal and gonadotrope function. However, adult ovariectomized Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice displayed significantly reduced levels of Kiss1 (but not Tac2) mRNA in the arcuate nucleus, and a reduced compensatory luteinizing hormone increase compared with control animals. Estradiol replacement after ovariectomy inhibited gonadotropin release to a similar extent in both groups. These animals also exhibited a compromised positive feedback response to sex steroids, as shown by significantly lower Kiss1 mRNA levels in the AVPV, compared with Lepr(lox/lox) mice. We conclude that leptin-responsive GABAergic neurons, but not glutamatergic neurons, act as metabolic sensors to regulate fertility, at least in part through modulatory effects on kisspeptin neurons.

  4. Difference in leptin hormone response to nutritional status in normal adult male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Sowyan, Noorah S

    2009-01-15

    The present study investigated the effect of 14 days diet, enriched in butter, vitamin E (vit. E) and green tea, on the major regulators of energy expenditure. Leptin is the product OB gene. This 16 KDa protein is produced by mature adipocytes and is secreted in plasma. Its plasma levels are strongly correlated with adipose mass in rodents as well as in humans. Leptin inhibit food intake, reduces body weight and stimulates energy expenditure. In order to evaluate the effect of diet enriched in butter, vit. E and green tea on body weight, adipose tissue weight and organs weight, serum lipids, lipoproteins content and serum leptin levels in male albino rats supplemented for 14 days on the previous diet. This study showed that high fat diet significantly increased body weight and adipose tissue weight, while vit. E and green tea enriched diet significantly lowered body weight and adipose tissue weight, kidney and spleen weights didn't show significant changes in all the experimental groups. While liver weight decreased in diet supplemented with high fat diet. Also, the results showed that high fat diet and vit. E supplemented diet induced significant increase in total cholesterol, LDLc., triglyceride level with significant decrease in HDLc. level as compared to normal control rats. Finally green tea supplemented diet induced significant decrease in total cholesterol, LDLc., triglyceride level with insignificant increase in HDLc. level in control rats. On the other hand, high fat supplemented diet significantly increased serum leptin levels in rats compared to control group, while vit. E and green tea enriched diet significantly lowered serum leptin levels at the end of experimental period. In conclusion, improving the biological activity of leptin by diet modification may exist as a practical strategy for the treatment of obesity and related disorders and a diet rich in green tea to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) obesity and also protect the liver

  5. Leptin Promotes Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Johnathan E.; Cook, Nicholas J.; Rovin, Richard A.; Winn, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The hormone leptin has a variety of functions. Originally known for its role in satiety and weight loss, leptin more recently has been shown to augment tumor growth in a variety of cancers. Within gliomas, there is a correlation between tumor grade and tumor expression of leptin and its receptor. This suggests that autocrine signaling within the tumor microenvironment may promote the growth of high-grade gliomas. Leptin does this through stimulation of cellular pathways that are also advantageous for tumor growth and recurrence: antiapoptosis, proliferation, angiogenesis, and migration. Conversely, a loss of leptin expression attenuates tumor growth. In animal models of colon cancer and melanoma, a decline in the expression and secretion of leptin resulted in a reduction of tumor growth. In these models, positive mental stimulation through environmental enrichment decreased leptin secretion and improved tumor outcome. This review explores the link between leptin and glioblastoma. PMID:22263109

  6. Leptin Alters Adrenal Responsiveness by Decreasing Expression of ACTH-R, StAR, and P450c21 in Hypoxemic Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yixin; Carey, Luke C.; Pulgar, Victor M.

    2012-01-01

    The late gestation increase in adrenal responsiveness to adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is dependent upon the upregulation of the ACTH receptor (ACTH-R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and steroidogenic enzymes in the fetal adrenal. Long-term hypoxia decreases the expression of these and adrenal responsiveness to ACTH in vivo. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone which attenuates the peripartum increase in fetal plasma cortisol is elevated in hypoxic fetuses. Therefore, we hypothesized that increases in plasma leptin will inhibit the expression of the ACTH-R, StAR, and steroidogenic enzymes and attenuate adrenal responsiveness in hypoxic fetuses. Spontaneously hypoxemic fetal sheep (132 days of gestation, PO2 ∼15 mm Hg) were infused with recombinant human leptin (n = 8) or saline (n = 7) for 96 hours. An ACTH challenge was performed at 72 hours of infusion to assess adrenal responsiveness. Plasma cortisol and ACTH were measured daily and adrenals were collected after 96 hours infusion for messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression measurement. Plasma cortisol concentrations were lower in leptin- compared with saline-infused fetuses (14.8 ± 3.2 vs 42.3 ± 9.6 ng/mL, P < .05), as was the cortisol:ACTH ratio (0.9 ± 0.074 vs 46 ± 1.49, P < .05). Increases in cortisol concentrations were blunted in the leptin-treated group after ACTH1-24 challenge (F = 12.2, P < .0001). Adrenal ACTH-R, StAR, and P450c21 expression levels were reduced in leptin-treated fetuses (P < .05), whereas the expression of Ob-Ra and Ob-Rb leptin receptor isoforms remained unchanged. Our results indicate that leptin blunts adrenal responsiveness in the late gestation hypoxemic fetus, and this effect appears mediated by decreased adrenal ACTH-R, StAR, and P450c21 expression. PMID:22534336

  7. Endocrine factors in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake in females: a review of the physiological roles and interactions of ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, V; Gyorffy, A; Scalise, T J; Kiss, D S; Goszleth, G; Bartha, T; Frenyo, V L; Zsarnovszky, A

    2011-06-01

    Controlling energy homeostasis involves modulating the desire to eat and regulating energy expenditure. The controlling machinery includes a complex interplay of hormones secreted at various peripheral endocrine endpoints, such as the gastrointestinal tract, the adipose tissue, thyroid gland and thyroid hormone-exporting organs, the ovary and the pancreas, and, last but not least, the brain itself. The peripheral hormones that are the focus of the present review (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin) play integrated regulatory roles in and provide feedback information on the nutritional and energetic status of the body. As peripheral signals, these hormones modulate central pathways in the brain, including the hypothalamus, to influence food intake, energy expenditure and to maintain energy homeostasis. Since the growth of the literature on the role of various hormones in the regulation of energy homeostasis shows a remarkable and dynamic expansion, it is now becoming increasingly difficult to understand the individual and interactive roles of hormonal mechanisms in their true complexity. Therefore, our goal is to review, in the context of general physiology, the roles of the five best-known peripheral trophic hormones (ghrelin, leptin, thyroid hormones, oestrogen and insulin, respectively) and discuss their interactions in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake.

  8. Profile of leptin, adiponectin, and body fat in patients with hyperprolactinemia: Response to treatment with cabergoline

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Nazir Ahmad; Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Misgar, Raiz Ahmad; Shah, Zaffar Amin; Gojwari, Tariq A.; Dar, Tariq A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Though hypoadiponectinemia and leptin resistance have been proposed as potential factors for weight gain in patients with hyperprolactinemia (HPL), the effects of HPL and cabergoline on these adipocyte-derived hormones are not clear. Aims of this study were (i) to assess the alterations of body fat, leptin, and adiponectin in patients with HPL (ii) effect of cabergoline treatment on these parameters. Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients with prolactinoma (median prolactin [PRL] 118.6 (interquartile range: 105.3) μg/L) and 20 controls were studied in a nonrandomized matched prospective design. The controls were age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) matched. Anthropometric data, metabolic variables, leptin, and adiponectin were studied at baseline and 3 and 6 months after cabergoline treatment. Results: Patients with prolactinoma had increased level of fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.001) as compared to age-, gender-, and BMI-matched healthy controls. Estradiol concentration of controls was higher than that of patients (P = 0.018). Patients with prolactinoma had higher levels of leptin (P = 0.027) as compared to healthy controls without a significant difference in adiponectin levels. There was a significant decrease of body weight at 3 months (P = 0.029), with a further decline at 6 months (P < 0.001) of cabergoline therapy. Furthermore, there was a significant decrement of BMI (P < 0.001), waist circumference (P = 0.003), waist-hip ratio (P = 0.03), total body fat (P = 0.003), plasma glucose (P < 0.001), leptin levels (P = 0.013), and an increase in estradiol concentration (P = 0.03) at 6 months of cabergoline treatment. Conclusion: Patients with prolactinoma have adverse metabolic profile compared to matched controls. Normalization of PRL with cabergoline corrects all the metabolic abnormalities. PMID:27042412

  9. Hypothalamic Leptin Gene Therapy Reduces Bone Marrow Adiposity in ob/ob Mice Fed Regular and High-Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Branscum, Adam J.; Kalra, Satya P.; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2016-01-01

    Low bone mass is often associated with elevated bone marrow adiposity. Since osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from the same mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) progenitor, adipocyte formation may increase at the expense of osteoblast formation. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone known to regulate energy and bone metabolism. Leptin deficiency and high-fat diet-induced obesity are associated with increased marrow adipose tissue (MAT) and reduced bone formation. Short-duration studies suggest that leptin treatment reduces MAT and increases bone formation in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice fed a regular diet. Here, we determined the long-duration impact of increased hypothalamic leptin on marrow adipocytes and osteoblasts in ob/ob mice following recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene therapy. Eight- to 10-week-old male ob/ob mice were randomized into four groups: (1) untreated, (2) rAAV-Lep, (3) rAAV-green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP), or (4) pair-fed to rAAV-Lep. For vector administration, mice were injected intracerebroventricularly with either rAAV-leptin gene therapy (rAAV-Lep) or rAAV-GFP (9 × 107 particles) and maintained for 30 weeks. In a second study, the impact of increased hypothalamic leptin levels on MAT was determined in mice fed high-fat diets; ob/ob mice were randomized into two groups and treated with either rAAV-Lep or rAAV-GFP. At 7 weeks post-vector administration, half the mice in each group were switched to a high-fat diet for 8 weeks. Wild-type (WT) controls included age-matched mice fed regular or high-fat diet. High-fat diet resulted in a threefold increase in MAT in WT mice, whereas MAT was increased by leptin deficiency up to 50-fold. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast perimeter and osteoclast perimeter with minor change in cancellous bone architecture. The gene therapy decreased MAT levels in ob/ob mice fed regular or high-fat diet to values similar to WT mice fed regular diet. These findings suggest

  10. Effect of recombinant growth hormone on expression of growth hormone receptor, insulin-like growth factor mRNA and serum level of leptin in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingfu; Zhao, Zhihui; Ni, Yingdong; Zhao, Ruqian; Chen, Jie

    2003-04-01

    Sixteen Large White x Landrace castrated male pigs were allotted into treatment and control group. The treatment group was injected intramuscularly with recombinant porcine growth hormone (rpGH, 4 mg d(-1)) and the control group with vehicle for 28 days. Animals were slaughtered 4 h after final injection for liver, longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle and blood sampling. Serum concentration of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) and leptin were determined by RIA. The total RNA was extracted from tissues to measure the abundance of growth hormone receptor (GHR), IGF-I mRNA by RT-PCR with 18S rRNA internal standard. Results showed that rpGH enhanced the average daily weight gain by 26.1% (P < 0.05), the serum IGF-I concentration by 70.94% (P < 0.01), decreased serum leptin by 34.8% (P < 0.01). The relative abundance of GHR and IGF-I mRNA in liver were increased by 24.45% (P < 0.05) and 45.30% (P < 0.01), respectively, but no difference of GHR (P > 0.05) and IGF-I mRNA (P > 0.05) in LD between GH treated and control group was found. These results suggest that rpGH can up-regulate hepatic GHR and IGF-I gene expression and improve animal growth. However the effect of rpGH on GHR and IGF-I gene expression are tissue-specific.

  11. Serum leptin, thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels interact to affect cognitive function among US adults: evidence from a large representative survey.

    PubMed

    Beydoun, May A; Beydoun, Hind A; Shroff, Monal R; Kitner-Triolo, Melissa H; Zonderman, Alan B

    2012-08-01

    Neuroanatomical connections point to possible interactions between areas influencing energy homeostasis and those influencing cognition. We assessed whether serum leptin, thyroxine, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels are associated with and interact to influence cognitive performance among US adults. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994) were used. Measures included a battery of neuropsychological tests and serum leptin, thyroxine, and TSH levels (20-59-year-old: n = 1114-2665; 60-90-year-old: n = 1365-5519). Among those 20-59-year-old, the middle tertile of leptin (vs. first tertile) was inversely related to the number of errors on the symbol digits substitution test. Increased thyroxine level was associated with a poorer performance on the serial digits test in the 20-59-year-old, but a better performance on the math test in 60-90-year-old group. TSH was associated with poor performance on various tests in the 20-59-year-old, but better performance in the 60-90-year-old group. Significant antagonistic interactions were found in both age groups between thyroxine, TSH, and leptin for a number of tests, including between leptin and thyroxine in the 60-90-year-old group in their association with word recall-correct score. We found significant associations of our main exposures with cognitive function among US adults, going in opposite directions between age groups in the cases of thyroid hormonal levels, as well as some interactive effects between exposures. It is important to conduct prospective cohort studies to provide further insight into potential interventions that would assess interactive effects of various hormonal replacement regimens.

  12. Leptin and the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Sone, M; Osamura, R Y

    2001-01-01

    -CSF) receptor, and the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor. The leptin receptor is known to have at least six existing isoforms (Ob-Ra, b, c, d, e, f) from the difference in splicing. (Homozygote Mutation of Leptin and Leptin Receptor :Hormone Secretion Disorders) The point mutation of ob/ob mouse and the splicing mutation of db/db mouse show remarkable obesity and hyperphagia. These obesity models show a reproduction disorder with both the male and the female, and they develop with homozygote. The cause is thought to be the gonadotropin secretory abnormality in pituitary. Three family lines report the cases of this deficiency, and it is considered that the secretory abnormality in pituitary develops into hypogonadotropic. These patients show low value in plasma FSHbeta (follicle stimulating hormone-beta and LHbeta (luteinizing hormone-beta which are produced from pituitary, and the plasma GnRH (gonadotropin releasing hormone) level is also low. Furthermore, the leptin receptor deficient family line was reported in 1998, in which case only the homozygote developed. The plasma leptin concentration of normal human is about 8.0 ng/ml, and this case with leptin receptor deficiency has high value of 500-700 ng/ml, which is the equivalent to the db/db mouse. (Role of Leptin in Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Periphery Function) The role of leptin which regulates pituitary hormones suggests the promotion the GHRH (growth hormone releasing hormone) secretion in hypothalamus-pituitary axis, with the possibility of the rise in secretion of GH (growth hormone) in pituitary, i.e. effects of icv (intracerebroventricular) infusion of leptin has spontaneously stimulated GHRH, which promotes GH secretion in the normal rats. On the other hand, topical treatment of GH3 (derived from a rat pituitary GH-secreting cell line) with leptin directly inhibits cell proliferation. The obesity model animals (ob/ob, db/db, fa/fa) have equally plump body compared to the normal models, which shows signs of

  13. Leptin stimulates hepatic growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor gene expression in a teleost fish, the hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Won, Eugene T; Douros, Jonathan D; Hurt, David A; Borski, Russell J

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide hormone that circulates as an indicator of adiposity in mammals, and functions to maintain energy homeostasis by balancing feeding and energy expenditure. In fish, leptin tends to be predominantly expressed in the liver, another important energy storing tissue, rather than in fat depots as it is in mammals. The liver also produces the majority of circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), which comprise the mitogenic component of the growth hormone (GH)-IGF endocrine growth axis. Based on similar regulatory patterns of leptin and IGFs that we have documented in previous studies on hybrid striped bass (HSB: Morone saxatilis×Morone chrysops), and considering the co-localization of these peptides in the liver, we hypothesized that leptin might regulate the endocrine growth axis in a manner that helps coordinate somatic growth with energy availability. Using a HSB hepatocyte culture system to simulate autocrine or paracrine exposure that might occur within the liver, this study examines the potential for leptin to modulate metabolism and growth through regulation of IGF gene expression directly, or indirectly through the regulation of GH receptors (GHR), which mediate GH-induced IGF expression. First, we verified that GH (50nM) has a classical stimulatory effect on IGF-1 and additionally show it stimulates IGF-2 transcription in hepatocytes. Leptin (5 and/or 50nM) directly stimulated in vitro GHR2 gene expression within 8h of exposure, and both GHR1 and GHR2 as well as IGF-1 and IGF-2 gene expression after 24h. Cells were then co-incubated with submaximal concentrations of leptin and GH (25nM each) to test if they had a synergistic effect on IGF gene expression, possibly through increased GH sensitivity following GHR upregulation by leptin. In combination, however, the treatments only had an additive effect on stimulating IGF-1 mRNA despite their capacity to increase GHR mRNA abundance. This suggests that leptin's stimulatory

  14. Polymorphisms of the porcine cathepsins, growth hormone-releasing hormone and leptin receptor genes and their association with meat quality traits in Ukrainian Large White breed.

    PubMed

    Balatsky, Viktor; Bankovska, Irina; Pena, Ramona N; Saienko, Artem; Buslyk, Tetyana; Korinnyi, Sergii; Doran, Olena

    2016-06-01

    Cathepsins, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes have been receiving increasing attention as potential markers for meat quality and pig performance traits. This study investigated the allele variants in four cathepsin genes (CTSB, CTSK, CTSL, CTSS), GHRH and LEPR in pure-bred Ukrainian Large White pigs and evaluated effects of the allele variants on meat quality characteristics. The study was conducted on 72 pigs. Genotyping was performed using PCR-RFLP technique. Meat quality characteristics analysed were intramuscular fat content, tenderness, total water content, ultimate pH, crude protein and ashes. A medium level of heterozygosity values was established for GHRH and LEPR genes which corresponded to very high levels of informativeness indexes. Cathepsins CTSL, CTSB and CTSK had a low level of heterozygosity, and CTSS did not segregate in this breed. Association studies established that intramuscular fat content and tenderness were affected by the allele variance in GHRH and LEPR but not by CTSB and CTSL genes. The GHRH results could be particularly relevant for the production of lean prime cuts as the A allele is associated with both, a lower meat fat content and better tenderness values, which are two attributes highly regarded by consumers. Results of this study suggest that selective breeding towards GHRH/AA genotype would be particularly useful for improving meat quality characteristics in the production systems involving lean Large White lines, which typically have less than 2 % intramuscular fat content.

  15. Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) is linked to higher plasma levels of the hunger hormone ghrelin and lower serum levels of the satiety hormone leptin in older adults.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Christian; Axelsson, Tomas; Söderberg, Stefan; Larsson, Anders; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms through which common polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) drive the development of obesity in humans are poorly understood. Using cross-sectional data from 985 older people (50% females) who participated at age 70 years in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS), circulating levels of ghrelin and leptin were measured after an overnight fast. In addition, subjects were genotyped for FTO rs17817449 (AA, n = 345 [35%]; AC/CA, n = 481 [48.8%]; CC, n = 159 [16.1%]). Linear regression analyses controlling for sex, self-reported physical activity level, fasting plasma glucose, and BMI were used. A positive relationship between the number of FTO C risk alleles and plasma ghrelin levels was found (P = 0.005; relative plasma ghrelin difference between CC and AA carriers = ∼ 9%). In contrast, serum levels of the satiety-enhancing hormone leptin were inversely linked to the number of FTO C risk alleles (P = 0.001; relative serum leptin difference between CC and AA carriers = ∼ 11%). These associations were also found when controlling for waist circumference. The present findings suggest that FTO may facilitate weight gain in humans by shifting the endocrine balance from the satiety hormone leptin toward the hunger-promoting hormone ghrelin.

  16. Changes in leptin, ghrelin, growth hormone and neuropeptide-Y after an acute model of MDMA and methamphetamine exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobeissy, Firas H; Jeung, Jennifer A; Warren, Matthew W; Geier, Jacqueline E; Gold, Mark S

    2008-03-01

    Club drug abuse is a growing problem in the United States. Beyond addiction and toxicity are endocrine effects which are not well characterized. Specifically, the changes in appetite following exposure to drugs of abuse are an interesting but poorly understood phenomenon. Serum hormones such as leptin, ghrelin, growth hormone (GH), and neuropeptide-Y (NP-Y) are known to affect appetite, but have not been studied extensively with drugs of abuse. In this work, we examine the effects of club drugs 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) (ecstasy) and methamphetamine (METH) (doses of 5, 20 and 40 mg/kg) on serum concentrations of these hormones in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after drug administration. In a dose-dependent manner, MDMA was shown to cause transient significant decreases in serum leptin and GH followed by a base line recovery after 24 hours. Conversely, serum ghrelin increased and normalized after 24 hours. Interestingly, serum NP-Y showed a steady decrease in both treatment of MDMA and METH at different time points and dosages. In humans, abuse of these drugs reduces eating. As evident from these data, acute administration of METH and MDMA had significant effects on different serum hormone levels involved in appetite regulation. Future studies should be performed to see how chronic, low dose drug administration would affect hormone levels and try to answer questions about the physiological mechanisms involved in the anorexic paradigm observed in drug use.

  17. Association of polymorphisms in growth hormone and leptin candidate genes with live weight traits of Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Hernández, N; Martínez-González, J C; Parra-Bracamonte, G M; Sifuentes-Rincón, A M; López-Villalobos, N; Morris, S T; Briones-Encinia, F; Ortega-Rivas, E; Pacheco-Contreras, V I; L A Meza-García, And

    2016-09-02

    Polymorphisms in candidate genes can produce significant and favorable changes in the phenotype, and therefore are useful for the identification of the best combination of favorable variants for marker-assisted selection. In the present study, an assessment to evaluate the effect of 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes on live weight traits of registered Brahman cattle was performed. Data from purebred bulls were used in this assessment. The dataset included birth (BW), weaning (WW), and yearling (YW) weights. A panel of 11 SNP markers, selected by their formerly reported or apparent direct and indirect association with live weight traits, was included in an assessment previously confirming their minimum allele frequency (<0.05). Live weights were adjusted BW (aBW), WW (aWW), and YW (aYW) using a generalized linear model, which included the fixed effects of herd and season of birth and the random effect of the sire and year of birth. An SNP in a growth hormone gene (GH4.1) was significantly related to aWW (P = 0.035) with an estimate substitution effect of 3.97 kg (P = 0.0210). In addition, a leptin SNP (LEPg.978) was significantly associated with aYW (P = 0.003) with an estimate substitution effect of 9.57 kg (P = 0.0007). The results suggest that markers GH4.1 and LEPg.978 can be considered as candidate loci for assisted genetic improvement programs in Mexican Brahman cattle.

  18. A role for leptin in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and in immune response, an update.

    PubMed

    Waelput, W; Brouckaert, P; Broekaert, D; Tavernier, J

    2006-01-01

    Leptin was originally identified as an adipocyte-derived cytokine with a key role in the regulation of the energy balance. Subsequent research revealed that leptin's biological action is not restricted to its effects on appetite and food intake, but instead has a much more pleiotropic character. There is now ample evidence that leptin has important functions in reproduction, hematopoiesis, HPA-axis endocrinology and angiogenesis. In this review we have focused on the effects of leptin in the antigen-specific immunity and in the inflammatory effector system.

  19. Characterisation of adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicles released pre- and post-adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Katherine D.; Guschina, Irina A.; Yeung, Vincent; Clayton, Aled; Draman, Mohd Shazli; Von Ruhland, Christopher; Ludgate, Marian; James, Philip E.; Rees, D. Aled

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are submicron vesicles released from many cell types, including adipocytes. EVs are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-driven cardiovascular disease, although the characteristics of adipocyte-derived EVs are not well described. We sought to define the characteristics of adipocyte-derived EVs before and after adipogenesis, hypothesising that adipogenesis would affect EV structure, molecular composition and function. Using 3T3-L1 cells, EVs were harvested at day 0 and day 15 of differentiation. EV and cell preparations were visualised by electron microscopy and EVs quantified by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). EVs were then assessed for annexin V positivity using flow cytometry; lipid and phospholipid composition using 2D thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography; and vesicular protein content by an immuno-phenotyping assay. Pre-adipogenic cells are connected via a network of protrusions and EVs at both time points display classic EV morphology. EV concentration is elevated prior to adipogenesis, particularly in exosomes and small microvesicles. Parent cells contain higher proportions of phosphatidylserine (PS) and show higher annexin V binding. Both cells and EVs contain an increased proportion of arachidonic acid at day 0. PREF-1 was increased at day 0 whilst adiponectin was higher at day 15 indicating EV protein content reflects the stage of adipogenesis of the cell. Our data suggest that EV production is higher in cells before adipogenesis, particularly in vesicles <300 nm. Cells at this time point possess a greater proportion of PS (required for EV generation) whilst corresponding EVs are enriched in signalling fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, and markers of adipogenesis, such as PREF-1 and PPARγ. PMID:26609807

  20. Endogenous sulfur dioxide is a novel adipocyte-derived inflammatory inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Huang, Yaqian; Bu, Dingfang; Chen, Selena; Tang, Chaoshu; Wang, Guang; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether sulfur dioxide (SO2) could be endogenously produced in adipocyte and served as a novel adipocyte-derived inflammatory inhibitor. SO2 was detected in adipose tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. SO2 synthase aspartate aminotransferase (AAT1 and AAT2) mRNA and protein expressions in adipose tissues were measured. For in vitro study, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were cultured, infected with adenovirus carrying AAT1 gene or lentivirus carrying shRNA to AAT1, and then treated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We found that endogenous SO2/AAT pathway existed in adipose tissues including perivascular, perirenal, epididymal, subcutaneous and brown adipose tissue. AAT1 overexpression significantly increased SO2 production and inhibited TNF-α-induced inflammatory factors, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. By contrast, AAT1 knockdown decreased SO2 production and exacerbated TNF-α-stimulated MCP-1 and IL-8 secretion. Mechanistically, AAT1 overexpression attenuated TNF-α-induced IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation, while AAT1 knockdown aggravated TNF-α-activated NF-κB pathway, which was blocked by SO2. NF-κB inhibitors, PDTC or Bay 11-7082, abolished excessive p65 phosphorylation and adipocyte inflammation induced by AAT1 knockdown. This is the first report to suggest that endogenous SO2 is a novel adipocyte-derived inflammatory inhibitor. PMID:27246393

  1. Inflammatory markers and adipokines alter adipocyte-derived ASP production through direct and indirect immune interaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Gauvreau, D; Tom, F-Q; Lapointe, M; Luo, X P; Cianflone, K

    2013-04-01

    Obesity and related metabolic diseases are associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, characterized by increased pro-inflammatory proteins. Several studies have demonstrated increases in acylation stimulating protein (ASP) and its precursor protein C3 in obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia. To evaluate the effects of acute inflammatory factors and adipokines on ASP production and potential mechanisms of action, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated for 24 h with adipokines, cytokines, macrophage-conditioned media and direct co-culture with J774 macrophages. ASP and C3 in the media were evaluated in relation to changes in adipocyte lipid metabolism (cellular triglyceride stores). Leptin, adiponectin, IL-10, LPS and TNF-α increased ASP production (151%, 153%, 190%, 318%, 134%, P<0.05, respectively,). C5a and RANTES (Regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted) decreased ASP production ( - 34%, - 47%, P<0.05), which was also associated with a decrease in the precursor protein C3 ( - 39% to - 51%, P<0.01), while keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC; murine IL-8 ortholog) had no effect on ASP and C3 secretion. By contrast, apelin, omentin and visfatin also decreased ASP ( - 27%, - 49%, - 22%, P<0.05), but without changes in precursor protein C3 secretion. Macrophage-conditioned media alone had little effect on C3 or ASP, while co-culture of adipocytes with macrophages markedly increased ASP and C3 production (272%, 167%, P<0.05). These in vitro results suggest various metabolic hormones and inflammatory factors can affect ASP production through increased precursor C3 production and/or by changing the rate of C3 conversion to ASP. As an adipokine, ASP could constitute a new link between adipocytes and macrophages.

  2. Leptin, resistin and visfatin: the missing link between endocrine metabolic disorders and immunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is still regarded as a principle site for lipid storage and mobilizing tissue with an important role in the control of energy homeostasis. Additionally, adipose tissue-secreted hormones such as leptin, visfatin, resistin, apelin, omentin, sex steroids, and various growth factors are now regarded as a functional part of the endocrine system. These hormones also play an important role in the immune system. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested the complex role of adipocyte-derived hormones in immune system and inflammation. Adipokines mediate beneficial and detrimental effects in immunity and inflammation. Many of these adipocytokines have a physiological role in metabolism. The uncontrolled secretions of several adipocytokines were associated with the stimulation of inflammatory processes leading to metabolic disorders including obesity, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Obesity leads to the dysfunction of adipocytes andcorrelated with the imbalance of adipokines levels. In obese and diabetic conditions, leptin deficiency inhibited the Jak/Stat3/PI3K and insulin pathways. In this review, ample evidence exists to support the recognition of the adipocyte’s role in various tissues and pathologies. New integral insights may add dimensions to translate any potential agents into the future clinical armamentarium of chronic endocrine metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Functional balance of both adipocytes and immune cells is important to exert their effects on endocrine metabolic disorders; furthermore, adipose tissue should be renamed not only as a functional part of the endocrine system but also as a new part of the immune system. PMID:23634778

  3. A role for leptin in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and in immune response.

    PubMed

    Waelput, W; Brouckaert, P; Broekaert, D; Tavernier, J

    2002-09-01

    Leptin was originally identified as an adipocyte-derived cytokine with a key role in the regulation of the energy balance. Subsequent research has, however, revealed that leptin's biological action is not restricted to its effects on appetite and food intake, but rather has a much more pleiotropic character. Evidence is now accumulating that it has important functions in reproduction, hematopoiesis, HPA-axis endocrinology and angiogenesis. In this review, we have focused on the effects of leptin in the immune system, which can be found in both the antigen-specific immunity and in the inflammatory effector system.

  4. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance index, leptin and thyroid hormone levels in the general population of Merida (Venezuela).

    PubMed

    Uzcátegui, Euderruh; Valery, Lenin; Uzcátegui, Lilia; Gómez Pérez, Roald; Marquina, David; Baptista, Trino

    2015-06-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular events, but scarce information exists about its frequency in Venezuela. In this cross-sectional study, we quantified the prevalence of the MetSyn in a probabilistic, stratified sample of 274 subjects aged > or =18 years from the Libertador district in Merida, Venezuela. Secondary outcomes were the measurement of thyroid hormones (free T4 and TSH), leptin levels, and insulin resistance index (HOMA2-IR). The frequency of MetSyn (percentage +/- 95% confidence interval) according to several diagnostic criteria was as follows: National Cholesterol Education Panel (NCEP, original): 27.4% (22.1-32.7); modified NCEP: 31.8% (26.3-37.3); International Diabetes Federation: 40.9% (35.1-46.7); Latin American Diabetes Association: 27% (21.7-32.3), and Venezuelan criteria: 31.8% (26.3-37.3). The MetSyn was more frequent in males than in females with most diagnostic criteria. The estimated prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was 2.9% either according to the patients' self reports or to fasting glucose level found to be above 126 mg/dL. Abnormal HOMA2-IR index, free T4 and TSH (above the 95th percentile) were detected in 4.5%, 4.4% and 5.1% of the sample, respectively. Free T4 and TSH levels below the 5th percentile were detected in 4.4% and 4.7% of subjects respectively. These values are presented for comparisons with forthcoming studies in specific clinical populations. While studies are being conducted about the different definitions of the MetSyn in Venezuela, we recommend analyzing and publishing local research data with all the available criteria so as to allow comparisons with the results already reported in the literature.

  5. Molecular Cloning and Gene Expression Analysis of the Leptin Receptor in the Chinese Mitten Crab Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Ren, Fei; Sun, Jiangling; He, Lin; Li, Weiwei; Xie, Yannan; Wang, Qun

    2010-01-01

    Background Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone with multiple functions that regulates energy homeostasis and reproductive functions. Increased knowledge of leptin receptor function will enhance our understanding of the physiological roles of leptin in animals. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, a full-length leptin receptor (lepr) cDNA, consisting of 1,353 nucleotides, was cloned from Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) following the identification of a single expressed sequence tag (EST) clone in a cDNA library. The lepr cDNA consisted of a 22-nucleotide 5′-untranslated region (5′ UTR), a 402-nucleotide open reading frame (ORF) and a 929-nucleotide 3′ UTR. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that Chinese mitten crab lepr shared a conserved vacuolar protein sorting 55 (Vps55) domain with other species. Chinese mitten crab lepr expression was determined in various tissues and at three different reproductive stages using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Lepr expression was highest in the intestine, thoracic ganglia, gonad, and accessory gonad, moderate in hepatopancreas and cranial ganglia, and low in muscle, gill, heart, haemocytes, and stomach. Furthermore, lepr expression was significantly higher in the intestine, gonad and thoracic ganglia in immature crabs relative to precocious and mature crabs. In contrast, lepr expression was significantly lower in the hepatopancreas of immature crabs relative to mature crabs. Conclusions/Significance We are the first to identify the lepr gene and to determine its gene expression patterns in various tissues and at three different reproductive stages in Chinese mitten crab. Taken together, our results suggest that lepr may be involved in the nutritional regulation of metabolism and reproduction in Chinese mitten crabs. PMID:20567508

  6. Leptin in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Henson, M C; Castracane, V D

    2000-11-01

    Leptin is a polypeptide hormone that aids in the regulation of body weight and energy homeostasis and is linked to a variety of reproductive processes in both animals and humans. Thus, leptin may help regulate ovarian development and steroidogenesis and serve as either a primary signal initiating puberty or as a permissive regulator of sexual maturation. Perhaps significantly, peripheral leptin concentrations, adjusted for adiposity, are dramatically higher in females than in males throughout life. During primate pregnancy, maternal levels that arise from adipose stores and perhaps the placenta increase with advancing gestational age. Proposed physiological roles for leptin in pregnancy include the regulation of conceptus growth and development, fetal/placental angiogenesis, embryonic hematopoiesis, and hormone biosynthesis within the maternal-fetoplacental unit. The specific localization of both leptin and its receptor in the syncytiotrophoblast implies autocrine and/or paracrine relationships in this endocrinologically active tissue. Interactions of leptin with mechanisms regulating pre-eclampsia and maternal diabetes have also been suggested. Collectively, therefore, reports suggest that a better understanding of the regulation of leptin and its role(s) throughout gestation may eventually impact those causes of human perinatal morbidity and mortality that are exacerbated by intrauterine growth retardation, macrosomia, placental insufficiency, or prematurity.

  7. The long road to leptin.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    Leptin is an adipose tissue hormone that functions as an afferent signal in a negative feedback loop that maintains homeostatic control of adipose tissue mass. This endocrine system thus serves a critical evolutionary function by protecting individuals from the risks associated with being too thin (starvation) or too obese (predation and temperature dysregulation). Mutations in leptin or its receptor cause massive obesity in mice and humans, and leptin can effectively treat obesity in leptin-deficient patients. Leptin acts on neurons in the hypothalamus and elsewhere to elicit its effects, and mutations that affect the function of this neural circuit cause Mendelian forms of obesity. Leptin levels fall during starvation and elicit adaptive responses in many other physiologic systems, the net effect of which is to reduce energy expenditure. These effects include cessation of menstruation, insulin resistance, alterations of immune function, and neuroendocrine dysfunction, among others. Some or all of these effects are also seen in patients with constitutively low leptin levels, such as occur in lipodystrophy. Leptin is an approved treatment for generalized lipodystrophy, a condition associated with severe metabolic disease, and has also shown potential for the treatment of other types of diabetes. In addition, leptin restores reproductive capacity and increases bone mineral density in patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea, an infertility syndrome in females. Most obese patients have high endogenous levels of leptin, in some instances as a result of mutations in the neural circuit on which leptin acts, though in most cases, the pathogenesis of leptin resistance is not known. Obese patients with leptin resistance show a variable response to exogenous leptin but may respond to a combination of leptin plus amylin. Overall, the identification of leptin has provided a framework for studying the pathogenesis of obesity in the general population, clarified the nature of the

  8. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Adipocyte-Derived Stem Cells in Rat.

    PubMed

    Jumabay, Medet; Moon, Jeremiah H; Yeerna, Huwate; Boström, Kristina I

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects the adipose tissue and mesenchymal stem cells derived from the adipose stroma and other tissues. Previous reports suggest that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is involved in diabetic complications, at the same time playing an important role in the maintenance of stem cells. In this study, we used rats transgenic for human islet amyloid polypeptide (HIP rats), a model of type 2 diabetes, to study the effect of diabetes on adipocyte-derived stem cells, referred to as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. Our results show that BMP4 expression in inguinal adipose tissue is significantly increased in HIP rats compared to controls, whereas matrix Gla protein (MGP), an inhibitor of BMP4 is decreased as determined by quantitative PCR, and immunofluorescence. In addition, adipose vascularity and expression of multiple endothelial cell markers was increased in the diabetic tissue, visualized by immunofluorescence for endothelial markers. The endothelial markers co-localized with the enhanced BMP4 expression, suggesting that vascular cells play a role BMP4 induction. The DFAT cells are multipotent stem cells derived from white mature adipocytes that undergo endothelial and adipogenic differentiation. DFAT cells prepared from the inguinal adipose tissue in HIP rats exhibited enhanced proliferative capacity compared to wild type. In addition, their ability to undergo both endothelial cell and adipogenic lineage differentiation was enhanced, as well as their response to BMP4, as assessed by lineage marker expression. We conclude that the DFAT cells are affected by diabetic changes and may contribute to the adipose dysfunction in diabetes.

  9. Purpurin inhibits adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase and angiogenesis in a zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyomi; Shim, Joong Sup; Kim, Beom Seok; Jung, Hye Jin; Huh, Tae-Lin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2014-07-18

    Adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (A-LAP) is a novel member of the M1 family of zinc metallopeptidases, which has been reported to play a crucial role in angiogenesis. In the present study, we conducted a target-based screening of natural products and synthetic chemical libraries using the purified enzyme to search novel inhibitors of A-LAP. Amongst several hits isolated, a natural product purpurin was identified as one of the most potent inhibitors of A-LAP from the screening. In vitro enzymatic analyses demonstrated that purpurin inhibited A-LAP activity in a non-competitive manner with a Ki value of 20 M. In addition, purpurin showed a strong selectivity toward A-LAP versus another member of M1 family of zinc metallopeptidase, aminopeptidase N (APN). In angiogenesis assays, purpurin inhibited the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Moreover, purpurin inhibited in vivo angiogenesis in zebrafish embryo without toxicity. These data demonstrate that purpurin is a novel specific inhibitor of A-LAP and could be developed as a new anti-angiogenic agent.

  10. Leptin promotes proliferation and metastasis of human gallbladder cancer through OB-Rb leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hao; Liu, Yunxia; Wei, Dong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Kun; Huang, Songquan; Liu, Lixin; Li, Yuehua; Ge, Jiayun; Li, Xiao; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lianmin; Zhao, Songling; Zhang, Xiaowen; Wang, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine that is closely associated with obesity, play a significant role in carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis. However, its impact on gallbladder cancer (GBC) remains unclear. In this study, we firstly found that leptin and its functional receptor OB-Rb were significantly co-expressed in human GBC tissues and cell lines, the content of which were higher than those in normal human gallbladder tissues. Treatment with leptin promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of GBC cells, which were attenuated by OB-Rb shRNA. Blocking in the G2/M period of cell cycle, increasing of MMP3 and MMP9, increasing of VEGF-C/D, activation of SOCS3/JAK2/p-STAT3 pathway was demonstrated after treatment with leptin. All of these positive responses were attenuated by OB-Rb receptor shRNA. Taken together, our findings suggest that leptin promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of GBC cells by increasing OB-Rb expression through the SOCS3/JAK2/p-STAT3 signal pathway. Targeting the leptin/OB-Rb axis could be an attractive therapeutic strategy for treatment of GBC.

  11. Leptin signaling and leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingjiang; Rui, Liangyou

    2013-06-01

    Leptin is secreted into the bloodstream by adipocytes and is required for the maintenance of energy homeostasis and body weight. Leptin deficiency or genetic defects in the components of the leptin signaling pathways cause obesity. Leptin controls energy balance and body weight mainly through leptin receptor b (LEPRb)-expressing neurons in the brain, particularly in the hypothalamus. These LEPRb-expressing neurons function as the first-order neurons that project to the second-order neurons located within and outside the hypothalamus, forming a neural network that controls the energy homeostasis and body weight. Multiple factors, including inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, contribute to leptin resistance. Leptin resistance is the key risk factor for obesity. This review is focused on recent advance about leptin action, leptin signaling, and leptin resistance.

  12. [Leptin Signalings and Leptin Resistance].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Wang Bing-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Gong; Zheng, Rui-Mao

    2015-10-01

    Leptin plays a critical role in the regulation of energy balance and metabolic homeostasis. Impairment of leptin function is closely involved in the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes mellitus and some other metabolic diseases. Leptin initiates intracellular signal transductions in the leptin-receptor-expressing neurons in the central nervous system to exert its physiological functions. The fact that high circulating levels of leptin partially or completely fail to promote weight loss in obesity has given rise to the notion of "leptin resistance". Recently, the impairment of leptin signalings in the hypothalamus has been regarded as a critical contributor to leptin resistance. In this review, the studies on leptin signaling and leptin resistance are summarized with an emphasis on the progress made during the last five years.

  13. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Adipocyte-Derived Stem Cells in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jumabay, Medet; Moon, Jeremiah H.; Yeerna, Huwate; Boström, Kristina I.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects the adipose tissue and mesenchymal stem cells derived from the adipose stroma and other tissues. Previous reports suggest that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)4 is involved in diabetic complications, at the same time playing an important role in the maintenance of stem cells. In this study, we used rats transgenic for human islet amyloid polypeptide (HIP rats), a model of type 2 diabetes, to study the effect of diabetes on adipocyte-derived stem cells, referred to as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. Our results show that BMP4 expression in inguinal adipose tissue is significantly increased in HIP rats compared to controls, whereas matrix Gla protein (MGP), an inhibitor of BMP4 is decreased as determined by quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. In addition, adipose vascularity and expression of multiple endothelial cell markers was increased in the diabetic tissue, visualized by immunofluorescence for endothelial markers. The endothelial markers co-localized with the enhanced BMP4 expression, suggesting that vascular cells play a role BMP4 induction. The DFAT cells are multipotent stem cells derived from white mature adipocytes that undergo endothelial and adipogenic differentiation. DFAT cells prepared from the inguinal adipose tissue in HIP rats exhibited enhanced proliferative capacity compared to wild type. In addition, their ability to undergo both endothelial cell and adipogenic lineage differentiation was enhanced, as well as their response to BMP4, as assessed by lineage marker expression. We conclude that the DFAT cells are affected by diabetic changes and may contribute to the adipose dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:25854185

  14. Adipocyte-derived PAMM suppresses macrophage inflammation by inhibiting MAPK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; He, Hui; Fu, Zhi-Chao; Huang, Shengping; Chen, Tingtao; Papasian, Christopher J.; Morse, Leslie R.; Xu, Yan; Battaglino, Ricardo A.; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Zhisheng; Xin, Hong-Bo; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages within adipose tissue play a key role in mediating inflammatory responses in adipose tissue that are associated with obesity-related metabolic complications. In an effort to identify novel proteins secreted from adipocytes that may negatively regulate macrophage inflammation, we found that peroxiredoxin (PRX)-like 2 activated in M-CSF stimulated monocytes (PAMM), a CXXC-type PRX-like 2 domain-containing redox regulatory protein, is a novel secreted protein with potent anti-inflammatory properties. PAMM is secreted from mature human adipocytes but not preadipocytes. Overexpression of PAMM significantly attenuated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage inflammation. Incubation of macrophages with adipocyte-conditional medium treated with anti-PAMM antibody significantly enhanced LPS-induced interleukin-12 (IL-12) expression in Raw264.7 cells. In addition, incubation of Raw264.7 cells with purified PAMM protein had a similar anti-inflammatory effect. Moreover, forced expression of PAMM in Raw264.7 cells resulted in decreased LPS-induced ERK1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, suggesting that PAMM exerted the anti-inflammatory function probably by suppressing the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. Mutations in the CXXC motif of PAMM that suppressed its anti-redox activity were still able to suppress production of inflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated macrophages, suggesting that PAMM’s anti-inflammatory properties may be independent of its antioxidant properties. Finally, PAMM was highly expressed in both white (WAT) and brown adipose tissues (BAT) and further increased in obesity status. Our results suggest that adipocyte-derived PAMM may suppress macrophage activation by inhibiting MAPK signalling pathway. PMID:26438880

  15. Leptin in human physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Mantzoros, Christos S; Magkos, Faidon; Brinkoetter, Mary; Sienkiewicz, Elizabeth; Dardeno, Tina A; Kim, Sang-Yong; Hamnvik, Ole-Petter R; Koniaris, Anastasia

    2011-10-01

    Leptin, discovered through positional cloning 15 years ago, is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with pleiotropic effects in the physiology and pathophysiology of energy homeostasis, endocrinology, and metabolism. Studies in vitro and in animal models highlight the potential for leptin to regulate a number of physiological functions. Available evidence from human studies indicates that leptin has a mainly permissive role, with leptin administration being effective in states of leptin deficiency, less effective in states of leptin adequacy, and largely ineffective in states of leptin excess. Results from interventional studies in humans demonstrate that leptin administration in subjects with congenital complete leptin deficiency or subjects with partial leptin deficiency (subjects with lipoatrophy, congenital or related to HIV infection, and women with hypothalamic amenorrhea) reverses the energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine and metabolic abnormalities associated with these conditions. More specifically, in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea, leptin helps restore abnormalities in hypothalamic-pituitary-peripheral axes including the gonadal, thyroid, growth hormone, and to a lesser extent adrenal axes. Furthermore, leptin results in resumption of menses in the majority of these subjects and, in the long term, may increase bone mineral content and density, especially at the lumbar spine. In patients with congenital or HIV-related lipoatrophy, leptin treatment is also associated with improvements in insulin sensitivity and lipid profile, concomitant with reduced visceral and ectopic fat deposition. In contrast, leptin's effects are largely absent in the obese hyperleptinemic state, probably due to leptin resistance or tolerance. Hence, another emerging area of research pertains to the discovery and/or usefulness of leptin sensitizers. Results from ongoing studies are expected to further increase our understanding of the role of leptin and the potential clinical

  16. Comparison of Weight Loss, Ghrelin, and Leptin Hormones After Ligation of Left Gastric Artery and Sleeve Gastrectomy in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Erkan; Bozkurt, Suleyman; Cengiz, Merve Busra; Malya, Fatma Umit

    2017-01-01

    Background Ligation of the left gastric artery (LLGA), which supplies the fundus of the stomach, may reduce the appetite hormone ghrelin, resulting in weight control. The aim of this study was to compare LLGA and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) in terms of postoperative outcomes in a rat model. Material/Methods Fifteen male Wistar albino rats, weighing >350 grams (range 350–525 grams), were enrolled in LLGA (N=5), SG (N=5), and control (N=5) groups. Blood samples were drawn preoperatively and also during the first and fourth week postoperatively to assay ghrelin and leptin hormone levels. Body weight was measured in each group. Results The maximum reduction in ghrelin level (41.5%) was found in the LLGA group. Considerable% total weight loss (TWL) (mean 24.1%) was observed in the SG group, and slight%TWL was noted in the control and LLGA groups (means of 0.1% and 2.1%, respectively). There was no significant difference in mean percent weight change between the LLGA and the SG groups (p=0.08). Blood sample analysis revealed no statistically significant changes in ghrelin or leptin levels between the groups (p=0.9 and p=0.3, respectively). Conclusions We present evidence that LLGA causes the same reduction in ghrelin hormone levels as SG at 4 weeks after surgery in a rat model. However, LLGA did not cause the same%TWL as SG. The mechanism of weight loss in SG is most likely due to restriction and to the effects of the procedure, rather than due to neurohormonal changes. PMID:28339424

  17. [The evaluation of changes in concentration of ghrelin, somatotropin, insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, leptin and thyroid hormones in mother and umbilical blood in case of physiologic pregnancy with normosomia and macrosomia of fetus].

    PubMed

    Shul'ga, A S; Butenko, E V; Aleksandrova, A A; Gutnikova, L V; Rymashevskiĭ, A A; Shestopalov, A V; Shkurat, T P

    2013-02-01

    The sample of women with physiologic pregnancy consisting of 40 females with fetus normosomia and 8 females with fetus macrosomia were examined. The examination covered the evaluation of changes in concentration of ghrelin, somatotropin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, leptin and thyroid hormones in mother and umbilical blood. In females with fetus macrosomia the changes in concentration of hormones regulating trophism, energy balance and anabolic processes in organisms of mother and fetus were detected

  18. Leptin Regulation of Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Caitlin; Petri, William A

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is a regulatory hormone with multiple roles in the immune system. We favor the concept that leptin signaling 'licenses' various immune cells to engage in immune responses and/or to differentiate. Leptin is an inflammatory molecule that is capable of activating both adaptive and innate immunity. It can also 'enhance' immune functions, including inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages, granulocyte chemotaxis, and increased Th17 proliferation. Leptin can also 'inhibit' cells; CD4(+) T cells are inhibited from differentiating into regulatory T cells in the presence of elevated leptin, while NK cells can exhibit impaired cytotoxicity under the same circumstances. Consequently, understanding the effect of leptin signaling is important to appreciate various aspects of immune dysregulation observed in malnutrition, obesity, and autoimmunity.

  19. Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat cells can trans-differentiate into osteoblasts in vitro and in vivo only by all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Oki, Yoshinao; Watanabe, Saiko; Endo, Tuyoshi; Kano, Koichiro

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether de-differentiated fat (DFAT) cells, a mature adipocyte-derived preadipocyte cell line, can be induced to trans-differentiate into osteoblasts in vitro and in vivo. All-trans retinoic acid (RA) induced expression of osteoblast-specific mRNAs encoding Cbfa1/Runx2, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, parathyroid hormone receptor, and osteocalcin in the DFAT cells, but did not induce the expression of adipocyte-specific mRNAs encoding PPARgamma2, C/EBPalpha, and GLUT4. Moreover, alkaline phosphatase activity was expressed in DFAT cells and the cells underwent mineralization of the bone matrix in vitro. Furthermore, when DFAT cells were transplanted subcutaneously into C57BL/6N mice in diffusion chambers, these cells formed ectopic osteoid tissue without any host cell-invasion of the chambers. These results indicate that DFAT cells derived from mature adipocytes can be converted into fully differentiated osteoblasts in vitro and in vivo using RA. DFAT cells provide a unique model for studying the lineage commitment of the adipocytes and osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal stem cells. Identification of the pathways that regulate these processes could lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for control of unwarranted growth of bone and adipose tissue.

  20. Appliance-induced osteopenia of dentoalveolar bone in the rat: effect of reduced bone strains on serum bone markers and the multifunctional hormone leptin.

    PubMed

    Vinoth, Jayaseelan K; Patel, Kaval J; Lih, Wei-Song; Seow, Yian-San; Cao, Tong; Meikle, Murray C

    2013-12-01

    To understand, in greater detail, the molecular mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between mechanical strain and alveolar bone metabolism during orthodontic treatment, passive cross-arch palatal springs were bonded to the maxillary molars of 6-wk-old rats, which were killed after 4 and 8 d. Outcome measures included serum assays for markers of bone formation and resorption and for the multifunctional hormone leptin, and histomorphometry of the inter-radicular bone. The concentration of the bone-formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was significantly reduced at both time points in the appliance group, accompanied by a 50% reduction in inter-radicular bone volume; however, osteocalcin (bone Gla protein) levels remained unaffected. Bone collagen deoxypyridinoline (DPD) crosslinks increased 2.3-fold at 4 d only, indicating a transient increase in bone resorption; in contrast, the level of the osteoclast-specific marker, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP 5b), was unchanged. Leptin levels closely paralleled ALP reductions at both time points, suggesting an important role in the mechanostat negative-feedback loop required to normalize bone mass. These data suggest that an orthodontic appliance, in addition to remodeling the periodontal ligament (PDL)-bone interface, may exert unexpected side-effects on the tooth-supporting alveolar bone, and highlights the importance of recognizing that bone strains can have negative, as well as positive, effects on bone mass.

  1. Goldfish Leptin-AI and Leptin-AII: Function and Central Mechanism in Feeding Control.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ai-Fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun; Cai, Yi-Ming; Liu, Fang; Tang, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-30

    In mammals, leptin is a peripheral satiety factor that inhibits feeding by regulating a variety of appetite-related hormones in the brain. However, most of the previous studies examining leptin in fish feeding were performed with mammalian leptins, which share very low sequence homologies with fish leptins. To elucidate the function and mechanism of endogenous fish leptins in feeding regulation, recombinant goldfish leptin-AI and leptin-AII were expressed in methylotrophic yeast and purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). By intraperitoneal (IP) injection, both leptin-AI and leptin-AII were shown to inhibit the feeding behavior and to reduce the food consumption of goldfish in 2 h. In addition, co-treatment of leptin-AI or leptin-AII could block the feeding behavior and reduce the food consumption induced by neuropeptide Y (NPY) injection. High levels of leptin receptor (lepR) mRNA were detected in the hypothalamus, telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum of the goldfish brain. The appetite inhibitory effects of leptins were mediated by downregulating the mRNA levels of orexigenic NPY, agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and orexin and upregulating the mRNA levels of anorexigenic cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), cholecystokinin (CCK), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in different areas of the goldfish brain. Our study, as a whole, provides new insights into the functions and mechanisms of leptins in appetite control in a fish model.

  2. Goldfish Leptin-AI and Leptin-AII: Function and Central Mechanism in Feeding Control

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ai-Fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun; Cai, Yi-Ming; Liu, Fang; Tang, Dong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, leptin is a peripheral satiety factor that inhibits feeding by regulating a variety of appetite-related hormones in the brain. However, most of the previous studies examining leptin in fish feeding were performed with mammalian leptins, which share very low sequence homologies with fish leptins. To elucidate the function and mechanism of endogenous fish leptins in feeding regulation, recombinant goldfish leptin-AI and leptin-AII were expressed in methylotrophic yeast and purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). By intraperitoneal (IP) injection, both leptin-AI and leptin-AII were shown to inhibit the feeding behavior and to reduce the food consumption of goldfish in 2 h. In addition, co-treatment of leptin-AI or leptin-AII could block the feeding behavior and reduce the food consumption induced by neuropeptide Y (NPY) injection. High levels of leptin receptor (lepR) mRNA were detected in the hypothalamus, telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum of the goldfish brain. The appetite inhibitory effects of leptins were mediated by downregulating the mRNA levels of orexigenic NPY, agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and orexin and upregulating the mRNA levels of anorexigenic cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), cholecystokinin (CCK), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in different areas of the goldfish brain. Our study, as a whole, provides new insights into the functions and mechanisms of leptins in appetite control in a fish model. PMID:27249000

  3. Dysregulation of leptin signaling in Alzheimer disease: evidence for neuronal leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonda, David J; Stone, Jeremy G; Torres, Sandy L; Siedlak, Sandra L; Perry, George; Kryscio, Richard; Jicha, Gregory; Casadesus, Gemma; Smith, Mark A; Zhu, Xiongwei; Lee, Hyoung-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Leptin signaling has received considerable attention in the Alzheimer disease (AD) field. Within the past decade, the peptide hormone has been demonstrated to attenuate tau hyperphosphorylation in neuronal cells and to be modulated by amyloid-β. Moreover, a role in neuroprotection and neurogenesis within the hippocampus has been shown in animal models. To further characterize the association between leptin signaling and vulnerable regions in AD, we assessed the profile of leptin and the leptin receptor in AD and control patients. We analyzed leptin levels in CSF, and the concentration and localization of leptin and leptin receptor in the hippocampus. Significant elevations in leptin levels in both CSF and hippocampal tissue of AD patients, compared with age-matched control cases, indicate a physiological up-regulation of leptin in AD. However, the level of leptin receptor mRNA decreased in AD brain and the leptin receptor protein was localized to neurofibrillary tangles, suggesting a severe discontinuity in the leptin signaling pathway. Collectively, our results suggest that leptin resistance in the hippocampus may play a role in the characteristic changes associated with the disease. These findings are the first to demonstrate such dysregulated leptin-signaling circuitry and provide novel insights into the possible role of aberrant leptin signaling in AD. In this study, increased leptin was found in CSF and hippocampus in Alzheimer disease indicating its physiological up-regulation, yet leptin receptor mRNA was decreased and leptin receptor protein was localized to neurofibrillary tangles, suggesting a discontinuity in the leptin signaling pathway. The lack of leptin signaling within degenerating neurons may represent a novel neuronal leptin resistance in Alzheimer disease.

  4. Genetic variation in the insulin, insulin-like growth factor, growth hormone, and leptin pathways in relation to breast cancer in African-American women: the AMBER consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Hong, Chi-Chen; Haddad, Stephen; Yao, Song; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Bensen, Jeannette T; Bandera, Elisa V; Haiman, Christopher A; Troester, Melissa A; Ambrosone, Christine B; Rosenberg, Lynn; Palmer, Julie R

    2016-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system and related pathways such as growth hormone, and leptin signaling have a key role in cancer development. It is unclear how germline variation in these pathways affects breast cancer risk. We conducted gene-based analyses of 184 genes in the insulin/IGF, growth hormone, and leptin pathways to identify genetic variation associated with risk of breast cancer overall, and for estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes. Tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for each gene were selected and genotyped on a customized Illumina SNP array. Imputation was carried out using 1000 Genomes haplotypes. The analysis included 91,627 SNPs genotyped or imputed in 3,663 breast cancer cases, (1,983 ER-positive and 1,098 ER-negative) and 4,687 controls from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk consortium, a collaborative project of four large studies of breast cancer in African-American women (Carolina Breast Cancer Study, Black Women's Health Study, Women's Circle of Health Study, and Multiethnic Cohort). We used a multi-locus adaptive joint test to determine the association of each gene with overall breast cancer and ER subtypes. The most significant gene associations (P ≤ 0.01) were BAIAP2 and CALM2 for overall breast cancer; BAIAP2 and CSNK2A1 for ER+ breast cancer; and BRAF, BAD, and MAPK3 for ER− breast cancer. The association of BAD with ER− breast cancer was explained by a two-SNP risk model; all other associations were best explained by one-SNP risk models. In total, six genes and seven SNPs had suggestive associations with overall breast cancer or ER subtypes in African-American women. PMID:27942580

  5. Role of leptin in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Siloşi, Isabela; Rogoz, Suzana

    2013-03-01

    Leptin represents a link between metabolism, nutritional status, and immune responses. Leptin is important for optimal functioning of the immune system. Leptin is a cytokine-like hormone with proinflammatory properties linked to autoimmune diseases. Moreover, there has been increasing evidence that leptin is involved in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. Leptin has been shown to enhance immune reactions in autoimmune diseases that are commonly associated with inflammatory responses. Both high and low levels of leptin might contribute to autoimmune diseases. Leptin has been explored as a potential target for therapeutic development in treating autoimmune diseases. In this review, we review here the most recent advances on the role of leptin in autoimmunity and in immune-rheumatological diseases.

  6. Leptin and leptin receptor in pig spermatozoa: evidence of their involvement in sperm capacitation and survival.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Saveria; Rago, Vittoria; Guido, Carmela; Casaburi, Ivan; Zupo, Silvia; Carpino, Amalia

    2008-07-01

    Several studies have recently investigated the role of leptin, the adipocyte-secreted hormone, in the growth and reproduction of rodents, humans, and domestic animals. The present study was designed to explore the expression of leptin and its receptor in pig spermatozoa. Successful Western blot evidenced a 16 kDa band for leptin and six isoforms, ranging from 120 to 40 kDa, for the leptin receptor. Both leptin and leptin receptor were interestingly located at sperm acrosomal level, suggesting their involvement in the oocyte fertilization events. In fact, both capacitation indexes and acrosin activity were enhanced by leptin, and these effects were reduced by the anti-leptin receptor antibody. Afterwards, we investigated the main transduction pathways regulated by the hormone. Our results showed that, in pig sperm, leptin can trigger the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, a classical component of cytokine signal transduction pathways, whose expression has not been previously reported in male gamete; in addition it was found constitutively activated. Besides, leptin was able to induce the activation of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase 3 and MAP kinase pathways as well as of BCL2, a known antiapoptotic protein. These data address to a role of leptin and its receptor on pig sperm survival. The presence of leptin and its receptor in pig sperm suggests that they, through an autocrine short loop, may induce signal transduction and molecular changes associated with sperm capacitation and survival.

  7. Leptin Enhances Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Giammarco; Alpini, Gianfranco; Rychlicki, Chiara; Saccomanno, Stefania; DeMorrow, Sharon; Trozzi, Luciano; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Venter, Julie; Di Sario, Antonio; Marzioni, Marco; Bearzi, Italo; Glaser, Shannon; Alvaro, Domenico; Marucci, Luca; Francis, Heather; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Benedetti, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a strongly aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Effective therapeutic strategies are lacking because molecular mechanisms regulating cholangiocarcinoma cell growth are unknown. Furthermore, experimental in vivo animal models useful to study the pathophysiologic mechanisms of malignant cholangiocytes are lacking. Leptin, the hormone regulating caloric homeostasis, which is increased in obese patients, stimulates the growth of several cancers, such as hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to define if leptin stimulates cholangiocarcinoma growth. We determined the expression of leptin receptors in normal and malignant human cholangiocytes. Effects on intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (HuH-28) cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the in vitro exposure to leptin, together with the intracellular pathways, were then studied. Moreover, cholangiocarcinoma was experimentally induced in obese fa/fa Zucker rats, a genetically established animal species with faulty leptin receptors, and in their littermates by chronic feeding with thioacetamide, a potent carcinogen. After 24 weeks, the effect of leptin on cholangiocarcinoma development and growth was assessed. Normal and malignant human cholangiocytes express leptin receptors. Leptin increased the proliferation and the metastatic potential of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro through a signal transducers and activators of transcription 3–dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Leptin increased the growth and migration, and was antiapoptotic for cholangiocarcinoma cells. Moreover, the loss of leptin function reduced the development and the growth of cholangiocarcinoma. The experimental carcinogenesis model induced by thioacetamide administration is a valid and reproducible method to study cholangiocarcinoma pathobiology. Modulation of the leptin-mediated signal could be considered a valid tool for the prevention and treatment of

  8. Biology of leptin in the pig.

    PubMed

    Barb, C R; Hausman, G J; Houseknecht, K L

    2001-11-01

    The recently discovered protein, leptin, which is secreted by fat cells in response to changes in body weight or energy, has been implicated in regulation of feed intake, energy expenditure and the neuroendocrine axis in rodents and humans. Leptin was first identified as the gene product found deficient in the obese ob/ob mouse. Administration of leptin to ob/ob mice led to improved reproduction as well as reduced feed intake and weight loss. The porcine leptin receptor has been cloned and is a member of the class 1 cytokine family of receptors. Leptin has been implicated in the regulation of immune function and the anorexia associated with disease. The leptin receptor is localized in the brain and pituitary of the pig. The leptin response to acute inflammation is uncoupled from anorexia and is differentially regulated among swine genotypes. In vitro studies demonstrated that the leptin gene is expressed by porcine preadipocytes and leptin gene expression is highly dependent on dexamethasone induced preadipocyte differentiation. Hormonally driven preadipocyte recruitment and subsequent fat cell size may regulate leptin gene expression in the pig. Expression of CCAAT-enhancer binding proteinalpha (C/EBPalpha) mediates insulin dependent preadipocyte leptin gene expression during lipid accretion. In contrast, insulin independent leptin gene expression may be maintained by C/EBPalpha auto-activation and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Adipogenic hormones may increase adipose tissue leptin gene expression in the fetus indirectly by inducing preadipocyte recruitment and subsequent differentiation. Central administration of leptin to pigs suppressed feed intake and stimulated growth hormone (GH) secretion. Serum leptin concentrations increased with age and estradiol-induced leptin mRNA expression in fat was age and weight dependent in prepuberal gilts. This occurred at the time of expected puberty in intact contemporaries and was associated with greater LH secretion

  9. Leptin resistance in obesity: An epigenetic landscape.

    PubMed

    Crujeiras, Ana B; Carreira, Marcos C; Cabia, Begoña; Andrade, Sara; Amil, Maria; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2015-11-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that inhibits food intake and stimulates energy expenditure through interactions with neuronal pathways in the brain, particularly pathways involving the hypothalamus. Intact functioning of the leptin route is required for body weight and energy homeostasis. Given its function, the discovery of leptin increased expectations for the treatment of obesity. However, most obese individuals and subjects with a predisposition to regain weight after losing it have leptin concentrations than lean individuals, but despite the anorexigenic function of this hormone, appetite is not effectively suppressed in these individuals. This phenomenon has been deemed leptin resistance and could be the result of impairments at a number of levels in the leptin signalling pathway, including reduced access of the hormone to its receptor due to changes in receptor expression or changes in post-receptor signal transduction. Epigenetic regulation of the leptin signalling circuit could be a potential mechanism of leptin function disturbance. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms, particularly the epigenetic regulation mechanisms, involved in leptin resistance associated with obesity and the therapeutic potential of these molecular mechanisms in the battle against the obesity pandemic.

  10. Hypothyroidism compromises hypothalamic leptin signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Groba, Claudia; Mayerl, Steffen; van Mullem, Alies A; Visser, Theo J; Darras, Veerle M; Habenicht, Andreas J; Heuer, Heike

    2013-04-01

    The impact of thyroid hormone (TH) on metabolism and energy expenditure is well established, but the role of TH in regulating nutritional sensing, particularly in the central nervous system, is only poorly defined. Here, we studied the consequences of hypothyroidism on leptin production as well as leptin sensing in congenital hypothyroid TRH receptor 1 knockout (Trhr1 ko) mice and euthyroid control animals. Hypothyroid mice exhibited decreased circulating leptin levels due to a decrease in fat mass and reduced leptin expression in white adipose tissue. In neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, hypothyroid mice showed increased leptin receptor Ob-R expression and decreased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 transcript levels. In order to monitor putative changes in central leptin sensing, we generated hypothyroid and leptin-deficient animals by crossing hypothyroid Trhr1 ko mice with the leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Hypothyroid Trhr1/ob double knockout mice showed a blunted response to leptin treatment with respect to body weight and food intake and exhibited a decreased activation of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as well as a up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 upon leptin treatment, particularly in the arcuate nucleus. These data indicate alterations in the intracellular processing of the leptin signal under hypothyroid conditions and thereby unravel a novel mode of action by which TH affects energy metabolism.

  11. Leptin regulation of hippocampal synaptic function in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    The endocrine hormone leptin plays a key role in regulating food intake and body weight via its actions in the hypothalamus. However, leptin receptors are highly expressed in many extra-hypothalamic brain regions and evidence is growing that leptin influences many central processes including cognition. Indeed, recent studies indicate that leptin is a potential cognitive enhancer as it markedly facilitates the cellular events underlying hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, including effects on glutamate receptor trafficking, neuronal morphology and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. However, the ability of leptin to regulate hippocampal synaptic function markedly declines with age and aberrant leptin function has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we review the evidence supporting a cognitive enhancing role for the hormone leptin and discuss the therapeutic potential of using leptin-based agents to treat AD. PMID:24298156

  12. Endometrial expression of leptin receptor and members of the growth hormone-Insulin-like growth factor system throughout the estrous cycle in heifers.

    PubMed

    Sosa, C; Carriquiry, M; Chalar, C; Crespi, D; Sanguinetti, C; Cavestany, D; Meikle, A

    2010-12-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is expressed in bovine uterus during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy and is acknowledged to play an important role in regulating the development of the embryo and uterus. The leptin receptor (LEPR) is also expressed in the bovine uterus although it is not known whether its expression varies during the estrous cycle. In this study, the expression of the IGF-I and -II, the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R), GH receptor (GHR) and LEPR transcripts was determined on endometrial transcervical biopsies collected on days 0 (estrus), 5, 12 and 19 of the cow estrous cycle (n=8). The expression of mRNA was determined by RT real time PCR using ribosomal protein L19 as a housekeeping gene. It has been demonstrated for the first time that LEPR mRNA is expressed in the bovine uterus throughout the estrous cycle and that it presents a cycle-dependent variation, with higher levels observed during the luteal phase. The expression of IGF-I mRNA was greatest at estrus and day 5 (100%), and decreased on days 12 and 19 to 47% and 35% of the initial values. IGF-II mRNA increased on day 12 and decreased sharply thereafter (to one-third of day 12 values). Interestingly, IGF-1R showed the same pattern as IGF-II: increased 50% on day 12 compared to values at estrus and presented a sharp decrease on day 19. The expression of GHR transcript was greatest at estrus and on day 5 and progressively decreased thereafter. These results show that the GH-IGF system components are distinctively regulated during the estrous cycle suggesting that modulation of the IGF system may influence uterine activity during this period. The increase in the uterine sensitivity to IGFs during the late luteal phase - as demonstrated by the increased IGF-1R expression - concomitant with the increased IGF-II mRNA expression may reinforce the role of IGF-II during early pregnancy. Moreover, leptin is also likely to play roles during early embryo development.

  13. Presence and distribution of leptin and leptin receptor in the canine gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungin; Lee, Aeri; Kweon, Oh-Kyeong; Kim, Wan Hee

    2016-09-01

    The hormone leptin is produced by mature adipocytes and plays an important role in regulating food intake and energy metabolism through its interaction with the leptin receptor. In addition to roles in obesity and obesity-related diseases, leptin has been reported to affect the components and secretion of bile in leptin-deficient mice. Furthermore, gallbladder diseases such as cholelithiasis are known to be associated with serum leptin concentrations in humans. We hypothesized that the canine gallbladder is a source of leptin and that the leptin receptor may be localized in the gallbladder, where it plays a role in regulating the function of this organ. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the presence and expression patterns of leptin and its receptors in normal canine gallbladders using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Clinically normal gallbladder tissue samples were obtained from four healthy beagle dogs with similar body condition scores. RT-PCR and sequencing of the amplified PCR products revealed the presence of leptin mRNA and its receptors in the gallbladder. Immunohistochemical investigations demonstrated the expression of leptin and its receptors in the luminal single columnar and tubuloalveolar glandular epithelial cells. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrated the presence of leptin and its receptors in the gallbladders of dogs. Leptin and its receptor were both localized throughout the cytoplasm of luminal and glandular epithelial cells. These results suggested that the gallbladder is not only a source of leptin, but also a target of leptin though autocrine/paracrine mechanisms. The results of this study could increase the understanding of both the normal physiological functions of the gallbladder and the pathophysiological mechanisms of gallbladder diseases characterized by leptin system dysfunction.

  14. Adipose tissue hyperplasia with enhanced adipocyte-derived stem cell activity in Tc1(C8orf4)-deleted mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hayoung; Kim, Minsung; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Jungtae; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Kim, Kyung Won; Song, Kyuyoung; Lee, Inchul

    2016-10-24

    Adipose tissue hyperplasia with increased number of adipocytes is implicated in a protective rather than deleterious effect on obesity-associated metabolic disorder. It is poorly understood how the adipose tissue cellularity is regulated. Tc1 is a gene of vertebrates that regulates diverse downstream genes. Young Tc1-deleted mice fed on standard chow diet show expanded adipose tissue with smaller adipocytes in size compared to wild type controls, representing adipose tissue hyperplasia. Tc1(-/-) mice show enhanced glucose tolerance and reduced serum lipids. Adipocyte-derived stem cells (ADSCs) from Tc1(-/-) mice show enhanced proliferative and adipogenic capacity compared to wild type controls, suggesting that the adipose hyperplasia is regulated at the stem cell level. PPARγ and CEBPα are up-regulated robustly in Tc1(-/-) ADSCs upon induction for adipogenesis. Wisp2 and Dlk1, inhibitors of adipogenesis, are down-regulated in Tc1(-/-) ADSCs compared to controls. Tc1-transfected NIH3T3 cells show higher β-catenin reporter signals than vector transfected controls, suggesting a role of canonical Wnt signaling in the Tc1-dependent adipose regulation. Our data support that Tc1 is a novel regulator for adipose stem cells. Adipose tissue hyperplasia may be implicated in the metabolic regulation of Tc1(-/-) mice.

  15. Adipose tissue hyperplasia with enhanced adipocyte-derived stem cell activity in Tc1(C8orf4)-deleted mice

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hayoung; Kim, Minsung; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Jungtae; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Kim, Kyung Won; Song, Kyuyoung; Lee, Inchul

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue hyperplasia with increased number of adipocytes is implicated in a protective rather than deleterious effect on obesity-associated metabolic disorder. It is poorly understood how the adipose tissue cellularity is regulated. Tc1 is a gene of vertebrates that regulates diverse downstream genes. Young Tc1-deleted mice fed on standard chow diet show expanded adipose tissue with smaller adipocytes in size compared to wild type controls, representing adipose tissue hyperplasia. Tc1−/− mice show enhanced glucose tolerance and reduced serum lipids. Adipocyte-derived stem cells (ADSCs) from Tc1−/− mice show enhanced proliferative and adipogenic capacity compared to wild type controls, suggesting that the adipose hyperplasia is regulated at the stem cell level. PPARγ and CEBPα are up-regulated robustly in Tc1−/− ADSCs upon induction for adipogenesis. Wisp2 and Dlk1, inhibitors of adipogenesis, are down-regulated in Tc1−/− ADSCs compared to controls. Tc1-transfected NIH3T3 cells show higher β-catenin reporter signals than vector transfected controls, suggesting a role of canonical Wnt signaling in the Tc1-dependent adipose regulation. Our data support that Tc1 is a novel regulator for adipose stem cells. Adipose tissue hyperplasia may be implicated in the metabolic regulation of Tc1−/− mice. PMID:27775060

  16. Distribution of adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (A-LAP)/ER-aminopeptidase (ERAP)-1 in human uterine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Daijiro; Ando, Hisao; Iwase, Akira; Nagasaka, Tetsuro; Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Mizutani, Shigehiko

    2004-09-01

    Adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (A-LAP, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1) is specialized to produce peptides presented on the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) by trimming epitopes to eight or nine residues, in addition to its enzymatic activity to degrade angiotensin II. Previously we identified placental leucine aminopeptidase (P-LAP), another member of the oxytocinase subfamily of aminopeptidases, in human uterine endometrial epithelial cells. Here we analyzed the distribution of A-LAP in human cyclic endometrium. Western blotting analysis showed that A-LAP was present in the endometrial tissue throughout the menstrual cycle. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of A-LAP showed a similar distribution to that of P-LAP. A-LAP was localized predominantly in the endometrial glands and the luminal surface epithelium. However, the intracellular localization change that accompanied apocrine secretion, which was observed in P-LAP, was not shown in A-LAP. Subcellular localization of A-LAP, demonstrated by immunofluorescence, was ER in the cultured glandular epithelial cells. Our results indicate that A-LAP may fit the endometrial localization as an antigen-presenting ER aminopeptidase. Further understanding of the function(s) of A-LAP in the endometrium appear likely to yield insights into the cyclic changes during the normal endometrial cycle.

  17. Leptin regulates gonadotropins and steroid receptors in the rats ovary.

    PubMed

    Silveira Cavalcante, Fernanda; Aiceles, Verónica; da Fonte Ramos, Cristiane

    2013-01-01

    The leptin hormone is important to satiety and an important link between the nutritional status and reproductive processes. Owing to the contradictory effects of leptin on the ovary and the failure to clarify the precise mechanism by which leptin affects the ovary, our aim was to contribute to evaluation if leptin can directly regulate the gene expression of leptin itself and its receptors, and the expression of several genes related to the ovary function by a model of tissue culture. Ovaries from Wistar dams were used at 90 days of age and were submitted to medium with presence and absence of leptin. The results can demonstrate that leptin regulates gonadotropins and steroid receptors, which could suggest that the ovarian leptin role could be secondary to the changes in these receptors expression in rats.

  18. Leptin and the brain.

    PubMed

    Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús

    2011-10-01

    Leptin, which comes from the Greek root leptos meaning thin, has been the focus of intense investigation since its discovery in 1994. This hormone belongs to the cytokine family and is produced by adipocytes and circulates in proportion to fat mass, thus serving as a satiety signal and informing central metabolic control centers as to the status of peripheral energy stores. However, it participates in numerous other functions both peripherally and centrally, as indicated by the wide distribution of its various receptor isoforms. Leptin is involved in brain development, most notably in development of hypothalamic centers that control metabolism, but also in other brain areas. It acts as a nutritional cue to indicate adequacy of energy stores for pubertal development and reproductive capacity. The effects of this hormone on behavior and cognition are less well studied, but it clearly is involved in specific aspects of these physiological phenomena. As obesity is a major health problem in many areas of the world, the search for pharmacological treatments to decrease appetite and increase energy expenditure is intense. Understanding the mechanisms of actions of all physiological effects of this hormone is of great interest in the pursuit of such treatment.

  19. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways.

  20. Abalation of Ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis compared to Ghrelin-abalated Leptin-deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is produced predominantly in stomach and is known to be the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Ghrelin is a GH stimulator and an orexigenic hormone. In contrast, leptin is an anorexic hormone, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are obese and diabetic. To study...

  1. Leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity: central and peripheral actions of leptin.

    PubMed

    Sáinz, Neira; Barrenetxe, Jaione; Moreno-Aliaga, María J; Martínez, José Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that represents one of the most serious global health burdens associated to an excess of body fat resulting from an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, which is regulated by environmental and genetic interactions. The adipose-derived hormone leptin acts via a specific receptor in the brain to regulate energy balance and body weight, although this protein can also elicit a myriad of actions in peripheral tissues. Obese individuals, rather than be leptin deficient, have in most cases, high levels of circulating leptin. The failure of these high levels to control body weight suggests the presence of a resistance process to the hormone that could be partly responsible of disturbances on body weight regulation. Furthermore, leptin resistance can impair physiological peripheral functions of leptin such as lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and nutrient intestinal utilization. The present document summarizes those findings regarding leptin resistance development and the role of this hormone in the development and maintenance of an obese state. Thus, we focused on the effect of the impaired leptin action on adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle and intestinal function and the accompanying relationships with diet-induced obesity. The involvement of some inflammatory mediators implicated in the development of obesity and their roles in leptin resistance development are also discussed.

  2. Dexamethasone and Acetate Modulate Cytoplasmic Leptin in Bovine Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, Shinichi; Hirota, Shohei; Tokutake, Yukako; Rose, Michael T.; Katoh, Kazuo; Aso, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Hormonal and nutrient signals regulate leptin synthesis and secretion. In rodents, leptin is stored in cytosolic pools of adipocytes. However, not much information is available regarding the regulation of intracellular leptin in ruminants. Recently, we demonstrated that leptin mRNA was expressed in bovine intramuscular preadipocyte cells (BIP cells) and that a cytoplasmic leptin pool may be present in preadipocytes. In the present study, we investigated the expression of cytoplasmic leptin protein in BIP cells during differentiation as well as the effects of various factors added to the differentiation medium on its expression in BIP cells. Leptin mRNA expression was observed only at 6 and 8 days after adipogenic induction, whereas the cytoplasmic leptin concentration was the highest on day 0 and decreased gradually thereafter. Cytoplasmic leptin was detected at 6 and 8 days after adipogenic induction, but not at 4 days after adipogenic induction. The cytoplasmic leptin concentration was reduced in BIP cells at 4 days after treatment with dexamethasone, whereas cytoplasmic leptin was not observed at 8 days after treatment. In contrast, acetate significantly enhanced the cytoplasmic leptin concentration in BIP cells at 8 days after treatment, although acetate alone did not induce adipocyte differentiation in BIP cells. These results suggest that dexamethasone and acetate modulate the cytoplasmic leptin concentration in bovine preadipocytes. PMID:25049989

  3. 20 years of leptin: role of leptin in human reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Chou, Sharon H; Mantzoros, Christos

    2014-10-01

    Leptin, as a key hormone in energy homeostasis, regulates neuroendocrine function, including reproduction. It has a permissive role in the initiation of puberty and maintenance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This is notable in patients with either congenital or acquired leptin deficiency from a state of chronic energy insufficiency. Hypothalamic amenorrhea is the best-studied, with clinical trials confirming a causative role of leptin in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Implications of leptin deficiency have also emerged in the pathophysiology of hypogonadism in type 1 diabetes. At the other end of the spectrum, hyperleptinemia may play a role in hypogonadism associated with obesity, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. In these conditions of energy excess, mechanisms of reproductive dysfunction include central leptin resistance as well as direct effects at the gonadal level. Thus, reproductive dysfunction due to energy imbalance at both ends can be linked to leptin.

  4. Preventive effects of chronic exogenous growth hormone levels on diet-induced hepatic steatosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by hepatic steatosis, can be reversed by early treatment. Several case reports have indicated that the administration of recombinant growth hormone (GH) could improve fatty liver in GH-deficient patients. Here, we investigated whether chronic exogenous GH levels could improve hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet in rats, and explored the underlying mechanisms. Results High-fat diet-fed rats developed abdominal obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance. Chronic exogenous GH improved fatty liver, by reversing dyslipidaemia, fat accumulation and insulin resistance. Exogenous GH also reduced serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels, and ameliorated hepatic lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. Hepatic fat deposition was also reduced by exogenous GH levels, as was the expression of adipocyte-derived adipokines (adiponectin, leptin and resistin), which might improve lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis. Exogenous GH seems to improve fatty liver by reducing fat weight, improving insulin sensitivity and correcting oxidative stress, which may be achieved through phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of a group of signal transducers and activators of hepatic signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Chronic exogenous GH has positive effects on fatty liver and may be a potential clinical application in the prevention or reversal of fatty liver. However, chronic secretion of exogenous GH, even at a low level, may increase serum glucose and insulin levels in rats fed a standard diet, and thus increase the risk of insulin resistance. PMID:20653983

  5. Milk Leptin Surge and Biological Rhythms of Leptin and Other Regulatory Proteins in Breastmilk.

    PubMed

    Nozhenko, Yuriy; Asnani-Kishnani, Madhu; Rodríguez, Ana M; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of chronic diseases are linked to perinatal nutrition, and prevention may be associated to naturally occurring components of breast milk. One key hormone in breast milk is leptin, related with the protection from obesity in the adulthood, thus knowing its changes through the day or lactation is crucial. We aimed to investigate the daily rhythms in the milk levels of leptin, together with other two related hormones, ghrelin and adiponectin, during lactation (days 5, 10 and 15) in rat dams, and the relation with morphometric parameters (dams and pups). Summarizing the main results, the existence of biological rhythms, but not daily and maybe circasemidian, was confirmed for the three hormones at the earliest period of lactation. The correlations performed generally showed a possible dependence of milk hormone levels on plasma levels at the early phase of lactation, while with the progression of lactation this dependence may fade and the hormone levels are suggested to be more dependent on mammary gland production/maturation. There was also a correlation between milk leptin and adiponectin levels, especially in the first half of lactation, suggesting a possible parallel regulation. Interestingly, we describe a milk leptin surge around the mid of lactation (at day 10) which may be related with pup's growth (males and females) and with the well-known (in the literature) plasma leptin surge in pups. All this knowledge may be crucial for future applications in the development of formula milk and in relation with the role of leptin surge during lactation.

  6. Leptin receptor in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    De Ambrogi, Marco; Spinaci, Marcella; Galeati, Giovanna; Tamanini, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    Leptin is active in both metabolism and reproduction. In fact, it seems to exert an inhibitory action on gonadal functions by reducing testosterone production. The presence of leptin in human and boar seminal plasma and in human spermatozoa has been demonstrated; recently, leptin receptors (Ob-R) have been localized in human spermatozoa, thus suggesting a possible action of this hormone even on these cells. Our aim was to verify whether leptin receptor [the long form (Ob-Rb)] is present in boar spermatozoa. Immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques were employed. RNA was extracted from boar spermatozoa and a specific band (382 bp) for Ob-Rb was detected after RT-PCR. Ob-Rb was detected on acrosome, subequatorial area and either on the midpiece or on the whole tail. These localizations were maintained even in semen washed twice to eliminate seminal plasma. We conclude that Ob-R is present in boar spermatozoa where seminal plasma leptin can exert its effects.

  7. Leptin: A biomarker for sleep disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihong; Kastin, Abba J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Leptin, a pleiotropic protein hormone produced mainly by fat cells, regulates metabolic activity and many other physiological functions. The intrinsic circadian rhythm of blood leptin is modulated by gender, development, feeding, fasting, sleep, obesity, and endocrine disorders. Hyperleptinemia is implicated in leptin resistance. To determine the specificity and sensitivity of leptin concentrations in sleep disorders, we summarize here the alterations of leptin in four conditions in animal and human studies: short duration of sleep, sleep fragmentation, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and after use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat OSA. The presence and causes of contradictory findings are discussed. Though sustained insufficient sleep lowers fasting blood leptin and therefore probably contributes to increased appetite, obesity and OSA independently result in hyperleptinemia. Successful treatment of OSA by CPAP is predicted to decrease hyperleptinemia, making leptin an ancillary biomarker for treatment efficacy. Current controversies also call for translational studies to determine how sleep disorders regulate leptin homeostasis and how the information can be used to improve sleep treatment. PMID:24080454

  8. The role of leptin in human physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Janeckova, R

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on current knowledge of leptin biology and the role of leptin in various physiological and pathophysiological states. Leptin is involved in the regulation of body weight. Serum leptin can probably be considered as one of the best biological markers reflecting total body fat in both animals and humans. Obesity in man is accompanied by increased circulating leptin concentrations. Gender differences clearly exist. Leptin is not only correlated to a series of endocrine parameters such as insulin, glucocorticoids, thyroid hormones, testosterone, but it also seems to be involved in mediating some endocrine mechanisms (onset of puberty, insulin secretion) and diseases (obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome). It has also been suggested that leptin can act as a growth factor in the fetus and the neonate.

  9. Leptin, from fat to inflammation: old questions and new insights.

    PubMed

    Otero, Miguel; Lago, Rocío; Lago, Francisca; Casanueva, Felipe F; Dieguez, Carlos; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gualillo, Oreste

    2005-01-17

    Leptin is 16 kDa adipokine that links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune functions. Initially thought to be a satiety factor that regulates body weight by inhibiting food intake and stimulating energy expenditure, leptin is a pleiotropic hormone whose multiple effects include regulation of endocrine function, reproduction, and immunity. Leptin can be considered as a pro-inflammatory cytokine that belongs to the family of long-chain helical cytokines and has structural similarity with interleukin-6, prolactin, growth hormone, IL-12, IL-15, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and oncostatin M. Because of its dual nature as a hormone and cytokine, leptin links the neuroendocrine and the immune system. The role of leptin in the modulation of immune response and inflammation has recently become increasingly evident. The increase in leptin production that occurs during infection and inflammation strongly suggests that leptin is a part of the cytokine network which governs the inflammatory-immune response and the host defense mechanisms. Leptin plays an important role in inflammatory processes involving T cells and has been reported to modulate T-helper cells activity in the cellular immune response. Several studies have implicated leptin in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory conditions, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and intestinal inflammation. Very recently, a key role for leptin in osteoarthritis has been demonstrated: leptin indeed exhibits, in concert with other pro-inflammatory cytokines, a detrimental effect on articular cartilage by promoting nitric oxide synthesis in chondrocytes. Here, we review the recent advances regarding leptin biology with a special focus on those actions relevant to the role of leptin in the pathophysiology of inflammatory processes and immune responses.

  10. A higher response of plasma neuropeptide Y, growth hormone, leptin levels and extracellular glycerol levels in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue to Acipimox during exercise in patients with bulimia nervosa: single-blind, randomized, microdialysis study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important central orexigenic hormone predominantly produced by the hypothalamus, and recently found to be secreted in adipose tissue (AT). Acipimox (Aci) inhibits lipolysis in AT and reduces plasma glycerol and free fatty acid (FFA) levels. Exercise and Aci are enhancers of growth hormone (GH) and NPY secretion and exercise may alter leptin levels. We expect to find abnormal neuropeptidergic response in plasma and AT in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN). We hypothesize that Aci influences these peptides via a FFA-independent mechanism and that Aci inhibits lipolysis through a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent pathway. Dysregulations of the AT-brain axis peptides might be involved in binge eating as is the case in BN. Methods The objective of this study was to determine the responses of plasma NPY, GH, leptin, FFA and glycerol levels to exercise in BN patients and healthy women (C) given the anti-lipolytic drug Aci or placebo. The secondary objective of this study was to compare the responses of extracellular glycerol levels and plasma glycerol levels to exercise alone or together with Aci administration in BN patients and C women. Extracellular glycerol was measured in vivo in subcutaneous (sc) abdominal AT using microdialysis. Eight BN and eight C women were recruited for this single-blind, randomized study. Aci or placebo was given 1 hour before the exercise (45 min, 2 W/kg of lean body mass [LBM]). NPY, GH, leptin, FFA, glycerol plasma and AT glycerol levels were measured using commercial kits. Results The primary outcome of this study was that the exercise with Aci administration resulted in plasma NPY and GH increase (after a 45-minute exercise) and leptin (after a 90-minute post-exercise recovering phase) increased more in BN patients. The secondary outcomes of this study were that the exercise with Aci administration induced a higher decrease of extracellular glycerol in BN patients compared to the C group

  11. Phenomenon of leptin resistance in seasonal animals: the failure of leptin action in the brain.

    PubMed

    Szczesna, M; Zieba, D A

    2015-07-01

    The core of the leptin resistance hypothesis promulgated several years ago to explain obesity as a result of environmental causes consists of 2 tenets: the extinction of leptin-induced intracellular signaling downstream of leptin binding to the long form of the neuronal receptor LTRb in the hypothalamus and the impedance to leptin entry imposed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A recent comprehensive investigation concluded that a central leptin insufficiency associated with obesity can be attributed to a decreased efficiency of BBB leptin transport and not to leptin insensitivity within the hypothalamus. Interestingly, anorectic leptin's effects are counteracted in some individuals by a natural resistance associated with hyperleptinemia, which is related to changes in hypothalamic sensitivity to leptin (eg, due to malnutrition, obesity, or seasonal variations due to day-length-dependent reproduction changes). In sheep, it has been observed that the hypothalamus is resistant to leptin in some periods, which is related to the adaptation of these animals to annual changes in energy supply and demand. However, a broad range of ambiguities exists regarding the implications that the intracellular signaling of signal transducer and activator of transcription-2/suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (STAT2/SOCS3) imparts central leptin resistance. Furthermore, several plausible alternative possibilities have been proposed, such as compensatory functional and anatomic reorganizations in the appetite regulating network, rearrangements in the afferent hormonal feedback signaling involved in weight homeostasis, and modifications in leptin transport to the hypothalamus across the BBB. Taken together, these observations suggest that the contention that impaired intracellular signaling downstream of leptin entry into the appetite regulating network expedites environmentally induced obesity remains unsubstantiated and requires further evidence. Furthermore, pregnancy decreases

  12. Induction of central leptin resistance in hyperphagic pseudopregnant rats by chronic prolactin infusion.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Rachael A; Grattan, David R

    2008-03-01

    Pregnancy in rats is associated with hyperphagia, increased fat deposition, and elevated plasma leptin concentrations. Elevated leptin would be expected to inhibit food intake, but hypothalamic leptin resistance develops around midpregnancy, allowing hyperphagia to be maintained and excess energy to be stored as fat in preparation for future metabolic demands of lactation. To investigate the hormonal mechanisms inducing leptin resistance during pregnancy, the anorectic response to leptin was examined during pseudopregnancy. Pseudopregnant rats have identical hormonal profiles to early pregnancy, but no placenta formation, allowing differentiation of maternal and placental hormone effects on appetite. To investigate the effect of leptin on food intake, d-9 pseudopregnant rats were injected with leptin (4 microg) via an intracerebroventricular (icv) cannula, and then food intake was measured 24 h later. Pseudopregnant rats were hyperphagic but had normal anorectic responses to leptin. We therefore hypothesized that a longer exposure time to high concentrations of progesterone might be required to mimic the leptin resistance that occurs on d 14 of pregnancy. Pseudopregnant rats were given progesterone to prolong pseudopregnancy beyond the time that leptin resistance develops during pregnancy. However, rats remained responsive to icv leptin. To model the placental lactogen secretion that occurs during pregnancy, pseudopregnant rats were given progesterone and chronic icv ovine prolactin infusion. Central icv injection of leptin had no effect on food intake in pseudopregnant rats receiving chronic ovine prolactin. These results suggest that chronically high lactogen levels, secreted by the placenta during the second half of pregnancy, induce central leptin resistance.

  13. Synchronicity of frequently sampled thyrotropin (TSH) and leptin concentrations in healthy adults and leptin-deficient subjects: evidence for possible partial TSH regulation by leptin in humans.

    PubMed

    Mantzoros, C S; Ozata, M; Negrao, A B; Suchard, M A; Ziotopoulou, M; Caglayan, S; Elashoff, R M; Cogswell, R J; Negro, P; Liberty, V; Wong, M L; Veldhuis, J; Ozdemir, I C; Gold, P W; Flier, J S; Licinio, J

    2001-07-01

    Leptin signals the status of energy reserves to the brain. Leptin stimulates biosynthesis of TRH in vitro and influences the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis in vivo in rodents. Because blood levels of both leptin and TSH display diurnal variation with a distinct nocturnal rise, we sought to determine whether a relationship exists between fluctuations in circulating leptin and TSH. We measured serum leptin and TSH levels every 7 min for 24 h in five healthy men and found that both leptin and TSH levels are highly organized and pulsatile. A similar pattern of leptin and TSH rhythms was observed, with TSH and leptin levels reaching a nadir in late morning and a peak in the early morning hours. Importantly, cosinor analysis on the absolute leptin and TSH levels revealed a statistically significant fit for a 24-h period and the two hormones showed similar probabilities of rhythm and superimposable peak values. Furthermore, this study shows a strong positive Pearson correlation between the 24-h patterns of variability of leptin and TSH in healthy subjects. Finally, the ultradian fluctuations in leptin levels showed pattern synchrony with those of TSH as determined by cross-correlation analysis, by cross-approximate enthropy and Bayessian analysis applied independently. To further explore whether these associations could reflect an underlying regulation of TSH secretion by leptin, we also studied frequently sampled leptin and TSH levels in four brothers, members of a family with leptin deficiency (one normal homozygote, two heterozygotes, and one leptin-deficient homozygote). Leptin levels of the homozygous leptin-deficient subject are detectable but bioinactive, and the rhythm of his TSH is disorganized. 24-h pattern of leptin and TSH variability in the heterozygous subjects, although significantly correlated, showed a weaker correlation compared with the strong correlation in the normal subjects. These data are consistent with the possibility that

  14. Plasma leptin during reproduction in European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptin, a systemic hormone produced by adipocytes or fat cells, has been widely studied in mammals, and is known to play diverse roles in body mass regulation, immune function, reproduction, etc. However we know very little about avian leptin, especially in free-living birds; indeed, this remains a ...

  15. Novel expression of resistin in rat testis: functional role and regulation by nutritional status and hormonal factors.

    PubMed

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Barreiro, M Luz; Caminos, Jorge E; Gaytán, Francisco; Suominen, Janne S; Navarro, Victor M; Casanueva, Felipe F; Aguilar, Enrique; Toppari, Jorma; Diéguez, Carlos; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2004-07-01

    Resistin, a recently cloned adipose-secreted factor, is primarily involved in the modulation of insulin sensitivity and adipocyte differentiation. However, additional metabolic or endocrine functions of this molecule remain largely unexplored. In this study, a series of experiments were undertaken to explore the potential expression, regulation and functional role of this novel adipocytokine in rat testis. Resistin gene expression was demonstrated in rat testis throughout postnatal development, with maximum mRNA levels in adult specimens. At this age, resistin peptide was immunodetected in interstitial Leydig cells and Sertoli cells within seminiferous tubules. Testicular expression of resistin was under hormonal regulation of pituitary gonadotropins and showed stage-specificity, with peak expression values at stages II-VI of the seminiferous epithelial cycle. In addition, testicular resistin mRNA was down-regulated by the selective agonist of PPARgamma, rosiglitazone, in vivo and in vitro. Similarly, fasting and central administration of the adipocyte-derived factor, leptin, evoked a significant reduction in testicular resistin mRNA levels, whereas they remained unaltered in a model of diet-induced obesity. From a functional standpoint, resistin, in a dose-dependent manner, significantly increased both basal and choriogonadotropin-stimulated testosterone secretion in vitro. Overall, our present results provide the first evidence for the expression, regulation and functional role of resistin in rat testis. These data underscore a reproductive facet of this recently cloned molecule, which may operate as a novel endocrine integrator linking energy homeostasis and reproduction.

  16. Duplicated Leptin Receptors in Two Species of Eel Bring New Insights into the Evolution of the Leptin System in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Morini, Marina; Pasquier, Jérémy; Dirks, Ron; van den Thillart, Guido; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Rousseau, Karine; Dufour, Sylvie; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R). Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR). In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R. PMID:25946034

  17. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Morini, Marina; Pasquier, Jérémy; Dirks, Ron; van den Thillart, Guido; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Rousseau, Karine; Dufour, Sylvie; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R). Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR). In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R.

  18. Crosstalk Between Leptin Receptor and IGF-IR in Breast Cancer: A Potential Mediator of Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    the connection between obesity and breast cancer (5). Leptin , a product of the obese (ob) gene, is an adipocytokine that regulates appetite , bone... Leptin Receptor and IGF-IR in Breast Cancer: A Potential Mediator of Chemoresistance Dr. Rita Nahta Emory University Atlanta, GA 30322 Obesity...hormones IGF-I and leptin and their receptors, IGF-IR and leptin receptor (Ob-R), are elevated in breast cancer. Co-immunoprecipitation and

  19. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the ...

  20. Resistance to antidepressant treatment is associated with polymorphisms in the leptin gene, decreased leptin mRNA expression, and decreased leptin serum levels.

    PubMed

    Kloiber, Stefan; Ripke, Stephan; Kohli, Martin A; Reppermund, Simone; Salyakina, Daria; Uher, Rudolf; McGuffin, Peter; Perlis, Roy H; Hamilton, Steven P; Pütz, Benno; Hennings, Johannes; Brückl, Tanja; Klengel, Torsten; Bettecken, Thomas; Ising, Marcus; Uhr, Manfred; Dose, Tatjana; Unschuld, Paul G; Zihl, Josef; Binder, Elisabeth; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Holsboer, Florian; Lucae, Susanne

    2013-07-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone from adipose tissue and key player in weight regulation, has been suggested to be involved in sleep and cognition and to exert antidepressant-like effects, presumably via its action on the HPA-axis and hippocampal function. This led us to investigate whether genetic variants in the leptin gene, the level of leptin mRNA-expression and leptin serum concentrations are associated with response to antidepressant treatment. Our sample consisted of inpatients from the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) project with weekly Hamilton Depression ratings, divided into two subsamples. In the exploratory sample (n=251) 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the leptin gene region were genotyped. We found significant associations of several SNPs with impaired antidepressant treatment outcome and impaired cognitive performance after correction for multiple testing. The SNP (rs10487506) showing the highest association with treatment response (p=3.9×10(-5)) was analyzed in the replication sample (n=358) and the association could be verified (p=0.021) with response to tricyclic antidepressants. In an additional meta-analysis combining results from the MARS study with data from the Genome-based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) and the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR(⁎)D) studies, nominal associations of several polymorphisms in the upstream vicinity of rs10487506 with treatment outcome were detected (p=0.001). In addition, we determined leptin mRNA expression in lymphocytes and leptin serum levels in subsamples of the MARS study. Unfavorable treatment outcome was accompanied with decreased leptin mRNA and leptin serum levels. Our results suggest an involvement of leptin in antidepressant action and cognitive function in depression with genetic polymorphisms in the leptin gene, decreased leptin gene expression and leptin deficiency in serum being risk factors for resistance to antidepressant

  1. Dietary components in the development of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Vasselli, Joseph R; Scarpace, Philip J; Harris, Ruth B S; Banks, William A

    2013-03-01

    Classically, leptin resistance has been associated with increased body fat and circulating leptin levels, and the condition is believed to contribute to the onset and/or maintenance of obesity. Although a great deal is known about the central nervous system mechanisms mediating leptin resistance, considerably less is known about the role of diet in establishing and maintaining this altered hormonal state. An exciting new finding has recently been published demonstrating the existence of leptin resistance in normal-weight rats with lean leptin levels by feeding them a high-concentration-fructose diet. This finding has opened the possibility that specific macronutrients may be capable of inducing leptin resistance, independently of the amount of body fat or circulating leptin present in the treated animals. This review describes several lines of research that have recently emerged indicating that specific types of dietary sugars and fats are capable of inducing leptin resistance in experimental rodent models. The results further show that diet-induced leptin resistance is capable of increasing energy intake and elevating body weight gain under appropriate dietary challenges. It appears that biological mechanisms on multiple levels may underlie the dietary induction of leptin resistance, including alterations in the leptin blood-to-brain transport system, in peripheral glucose metabolism, and in central leptin receptor signaling pathways. What is clear from the findings reviewed here is that diet-induced leptin resistance can occur in the absence of elevated circulating leptin levels and body weight, rendering it a potential cause and/or predisposing factor to excess body weight gain and obesity.

  2. Dietary Components in the Development of Leptin Resistance123

    PubMed Central

    Vasselli, Joseph R.; Scarpace, Philip J.; Harris, Ruth B. S.; Banks, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Classically, leptin resistance has been associated with increased body fat and circulating leptin levels, and the condition is believed to contribute to the onset and/or maintenance of obesity. Although a great deal is known about the central nervous system mechanisms mediating leptin resistance, considerably less is known about the role of diet in establishing and maintaining this altered hormonal state. An exciting new finding has recently been published demonstrating the existence of leptin resistance in normal-weight rats with lean leptin levels by feeding them a high-concentration-fructose diet. This finding has opened the possibility that specific macronutrients may be capable of inducing leptin resistance, independently of the amount of body fat or circulating leptin present in the treated animals. This review describes several lines of research that have recently emerged indicating that specific types of dietary sugars and fats are capable of inducing leptin resistance in experimental rodent models. The results further show that diet-induced leptin resistance is capable of increasing energy intake and elevating body weight gain under appropriate dietary challenges. It appears that biological mechanisms on multiple levels may underlie the dietary induction of leptin resistance, including alterations in the leptin blood-to-brain transport system, in peripheral glucose metabolism, and in central leptin receptor signaling pathways. What is clear from the findings reviewed here is that diet-induced leptin resistance can occur in the absence of elevated circulating leptin levels and body weight, rendering it a potential cause and/or predisposing factor to excess body weight gain and obesity. PMID:23493533

  3. Leptin sustains spontaneous remyelination in the adult central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Matoba, Ken; Muramatsu, Rieko; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2017-01-01

    Demyelination is a common feature of many central nervous system (CNS) diseases and is associated with neurological impairment. Demyelinated axons are spontaneously remyelinated depending on oligodendrocyte development, which mainly involves molecules expressed in the CNS environment. In this study, we found that leptin, a peripheral hormone secreted from adipocytes, promoted the proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Leptin increased the OPC proliferation via in vitro phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK); whereas leptin neutralization inhibited OPC proliferation and remyelination in a mouse model of toxin-induced demyelination. The OPC-specific leptin receptor long isoform (LepRb) deletion in mice inhibited both OPC proliferation and remyelination in the response to demyelination. Intrathecal leptin administration increased OPC proliferation. These results demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism by which leptin sustained OPC proliferation and remyelination in a pathological CNS. PMID:28091609

  4. Leptin: A Novel Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne; Harvey, Jenni

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that the hormone leptin circulates in the plasma in amounts proportional to body fat content and it regulates food intake and body weight via its actions in the hypothalamus. However, numerous studies have shown that leptin receptors are widely expressed throughout the CNS and evidence is growing that leptin plays a role in modulating a variety of neuronal processes. In particular, recent studies have highlighted a potential cognitive enhancing role for leptin as it regulates diverse aspects of hippocampal synaptic function that are thought to underlie learning and memory processes including glutamate receptor trafficking, dendritic morphology, and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Characterisation of the novel actions of leptin in limbic brain regions is providing valuable insights into leptin's role in higher cognitive functions in health and disease. PMID:22254146

  5. Leptin's effect on taste bud calcium responses and transmitter secretion.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Tricia L; Corcoran, Alan; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-05-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone released by adipose tissue, acts on the hypothalamus to control cravings and appetite. Leptin also acts to decrease taste responses to sweet substances, though there is little detailed information regarding where leptin acts in the taste transduction cascade. The present study examined the effects of leptin on sweet-evoked responses and neuro transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Our results indicate that leptin moderately decreased sweet-evoked calcium mobilization in isolated mouse taste buds. We also employed Chinese hamster ovary biosensor cells to examine taste transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Leptin reduced ATP and increased serotonin release in response to sweet stimulation. However, leptin has no effect on bitter-evoked transmitter release, further showing that the action of leptin is sweet specific. Our results support those of previous studies, which state that leptin acts on taste tissue via the leptin receptor, most likely on Type II (Receptor) cells, but also possibly on Type III (Presynaptic) cells.

  6. Association of Leptin with Body Pain in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kapphahn, Kristopher; Brennan, Kathleen; Sullivan, Shannon D.; Stefanick, Marcia L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leptin, an appetite-regulatory hormone, is also known to act as a proinflammatory adipokine. One of the effects of increased systemic leptin concentrations may be greater sensitivity to pain. We report the results of two studies examining the association between leptin and pain: a small pilot longitudinal study, followed by a large cross-sectional study. In Study 1, three women with physician-diagnosed fibromyalgia provided blood draws daily for 25 consecutive days, as well as daily self-reported musculoskeletal pain. Daily fluctuations in serum leptin were positively associated with pain across all three participants (F (1,63) = 12.8, p < 0.001), with leptin predicting ∼49% of the pain variance. In Study 2, the relationship between leptin and body pain was examined in a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of 5676 generally healthy postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative. Leptin levels obtained from single blood draws were tested for a relationship with self-reported body pain. Body mass index (BMI) was also included as a predictor of pain. Both leptin and BMI were found to be independently associated with self-reported pain (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), with higher leptin levels and greater BMI each being associated with greater pain. Leptin appears to be a predictor of body pain both within- and between-individuals and may be a driver of generalized pain states such as fibromyalgia. PMID:27028709

  7. Selective leptin resistance revisited.

    PubMed

    Mark, Allyn L

    2013-09-15

    In addition to effects on appetite and metabolism, leptin influences many neuroendocrine and physiological systems, including the sympathetic nervous system. Building on my Carl Ludwig Lecture of the American Physiological Society, I review the sympathetic and cardiovascular actions of leptin. The review focuses on a critical analysis of the concept of selective leptin resistance (SLR) and the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced hypertension in both experimental animals and humans. We introduced the concept of SLR in 2002 to explain how leptin might increase blood pressure (BP) in obese states, such as diet-induced obesity (DIO), that are accompanied by partial leptin resistance. This concept, analogous to selective insulin resistance in the metabolic syndrome, holds that in several genetic and acquired models of obesity, there is preservation of the renal sympathetic and pressor actions of leptin despite attenuation of the appetite and weight-reducing actions. Two potential overlapping mechanisms of SLR are reviewed: 1) differential leptin molecular signaling pathways that mediate selective as opposed to universal leptin action and 2) brain site-specific leptin action and resistance. Although the phenomenon of SLR in DIO has so far focused on preservation of sympathetic and BP actions of leptin, consideration should be given to the possibility that this concept may extend to preservation of other actions of leptin. Finally, I review perplexing data on the effects of leptin on sympathetic activity and BP in humans and its role in human obesity-induced hypertension.

  8. Differential distribution and expression of leptin and the functional leptin receptor in major salivary glands of humans.

    PubMed

    Bohlender, J; Rauh, M; Zenk, J; Gröschl, M

    2003-08-01

    Leptin plays a central role in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure in rodents. However, it has become clear that this hormone has more than only a satiety-inducing function, and that there are other sources of leptin, such as the central nervous system, placenta and the gastrointestinal tract in addition to adipose tIssue. Knowing about the important role of the salivary glands in food intake and digestion, it was the objective of the present study to investigate how leptin and its receptor are expressed and distributed in the major salivary glands of humans. We found leptin distributed throughout the major salivary glands with obvious intracellular concentrations in granula. In contrast, immunostaining for the leptin receptor was found exclusively in the membranes of the glandular cells. A high density of the leptin receptor was localised in the epithelia of the duct lumen. PCR analysis proved the autonomous expression of leptin by the salivary glands independently from adipocytes. Accordingly the long receptor isoform was expressed by any examined tIssue. In the light of recent findings of leptin influencing the growth of rodent salivary glands, the presence and distribution of leptin and its receptor suggests an autocrine role of salivary leptin within the glands.

  9. Drug Insight: the role of leptin in human physiology and pathophysiology--emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Aoife M; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2006-06-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with a key role in energy homeostasis. Studies in animal models, in humans with congenital complete leptin deficiency, and observational and interventional studies in humans with relative leptin deficiency (lower than normal leptin levels) have all indicated that leptin regulates multiple physiological functions, primarily in states of energy deficiency. This information led to proof-of-concept clinical trials involving leptin administration to individuals with relative or complete leptin deficiency. These conditions include congenital complete leptin deficiency, due to mutations in the leptin gene, and states of relative leptin deficiency including lipoatrophy and some forms of hypothalamic amenorrhea. Leptin, in replacement doses, normalizes neuroendocrine, metabolic and immune function in patients with these conditions, but further clinical studies are required to determine its long-term efficacy and safety. Management of leptin-deficient states with replacement doses of leptin holds promise as a therapeutic option. In addition, elucidation of the mechanisms underlying leptin resistance, which characterizes hyperleptinemic states such as human obesity and diabetes, might provide novel therapeutic targets for these prevalent clinical problems.

  10. Mexico City normal weight children exposed to high concentrations of ambient PM2.5 show high blood leptin and endothelin-1, vitamin D deficiency, and food reward hormone dysregulation versus low pollution controls. Relevance for obesity and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Rodríguez-Díaz, Joel; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Chao, Chih-kai; Thompson, Charles; Mukherjee, Partha S; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Perry, George

    2015-07-01

    Millions of Mexico, US and across the world children are overweight and obese. Exposure to fossil-fuel combustion sources increases the risk for obesity and diabetes, while long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) above US EPA standards is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mexico City Metropolitan Area children are chronically exposed to PM2.5 and O3 concentrations above the standards and exhibit systemic, brain and intrathecal inflammation, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We investigated adipokines, food reward hormones, endothelial dysfunction, vitamin D and apolipoprotein E (APOE) relationships in 80 healthy, normal weight 11.1±3.2 year olds matched by age, gender, BMI and SES, low (n: 26) versus high (n:54) PM2.5 exposures. Mexico City children had higher leptin and endothelin-1 (p<0.01 and p<0.000), and decreases in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP 1), ghrelin, and glucagon (<0.02) versus controls. BMI and leptin relationships were significantly different in low versus high PM2.5 exposed children. Mexico City APOE 4 versus 3 children had higher glucose (p=0.009). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D<30 ng/mL was documented in 87% of Mexico City children. Leptin is strongly positively associated to PM 2.5 cumulative exposures. Residing in a high PM2.5 and O3 environment is associated with 12h fasting hyperleptinemia, altered appetite-regulating peptides, vitamin D deficiency, and increases in ET-1 in clinically healthy children. These changes could signal the future trajectory of urban children towards the development of insulin resistance, obesity, type II diabetes, premature cardiovascular disease, addiction-like behavior, cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Increased efforts should be made to decrease pediatric PM2.5 exposures, to deliver health interventions prior to the development of obesity and to identify and mitigate environmental factors influencing obesity and Alzheimer

  11. Leptin regulation of neuronal morphology and hippocampal synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jenni

    2013-01-01

    The central actions of the hormone leptin in regulating energy homeostasis via the hypothalamus are well documented. However, evidence is growing that this hormone can also modify the structure and function of synapses throughout the CNS. The hippocampus is a region of the forebrain that plays a crucial role in associative learning and memory and is an area also highly vulnerable to neurodegenerative processes. Recent studies indicate that leptin is a potential cognitive enhancer as it modulates the cellular processes underlying hippocampal-dependent learning and memory including dendritic morphology, glutamate receptor trafficking and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here, we review the recent evidence implicating the hormone leptin as a key regulator of hippocampal synaptic function and discuss the role of leptin receptor-driven lipid signaling pathways involved in this process. PMID:23964236

  12. Role of leptin in energy homeostasis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Michael; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2015-01-01

    The hyperphagia, low sympathetic nervous system tone, and decreased circulating concentrations of bioactive thyroid hormones that are common to states of congenital leptin deficiency and hypoleptinemia following and during weight loss suggest that the major physiological function of leptin is to signal states of negative energy balance and decreased energy stores. In weight-reduced humans, these phenotypes together with pronounced hypometabolism and increased parasympathetic nervous system tone create the optimal circumstance for weight regain. Based on the weight loss induced by leptin administration in states of leptin deficiency (obese) and observed similarity of phenotypes in states of congenital and dietary-induced states of hypoleptinemia (reduced obese), it has been suggested that exogenous leptin could potentially be useful in initiating, promoting, and sustaining weight reduction. However, the responses of human beings to exogenous leptin administration are dependent not only on extant energy stores but also on energy balance. Leptin administration to humans at usual weight has little, if any, effect on body weight while leptin administration during weight loss mitigates hunger, especially if given in supraphysiological doses during severe caloric restriction. Leptin repletion is most effective following weight loss by dietary restriction. In this state of weight stability but reduced energy stores, leptin at least partially reverses many of the metabolic, autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral adaptations that favor weight regain. The major physiological function of leptin is to signal states of negative energy balance and decreased energy stores. Leptin, and pharmacotherapies affecting leptin signaling pathways, is likely to be most useful in sustaining weight loss. PMID:25063755

  13. Leptin, its Implication in Physical Exercise and Training: A Short Review

    PubMed Central

    Bouassida, Anissa; Zalleg, Dalenda; Bouassida, Semi; Zaouali, Monia; Feki, Youssef; Zbidi, Abdelkarim; Tabka, Zouhair

    2006-01-01

    Leptin, a hormone synthesized by fat tissue had been noted to regulate energy balance and metabolism and thus to influence body weight. The influence of acute exercise and chronic exercise training on circulating leptin and its relationship with hormonal and metabolic changes that induce energy balance are presented. Research that has examined the influence of exercise under various experimental conditions on leptin and the conflicts in the literature are presented. It appears that a significant caloric perturbation (> 800 kcals) is necessary for acute exercise to result in a significant reduction in leptin. In contrast, exercise training can result in a leptin decline but typically this manifests a reduction in adipose tissue stores. In addition, future directions are presented. Key Points Physical exercise and training have both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on leptin. Exercise with energy expenditure higher than 800 kcal can decrease leptinemia. Acute training may cause a decline in circulating leptin levels. PMID:24259989

  14. Sex Differences in Somatotrope Dependency on Leptin Receptors in Young Mice: Ablation of LEPR Causes Severe Growth Hormone Deficiency and Abdominal Obesity in Males

    PubMed Central

    Odle, Angela; Haney, Anessa; Childs, Gwen

    2015-01-01

    Leptin receptor (LEPR) signaling controls appetite and energy expenditure. Somatotrope-specific deletion of the LEPRb signaling isoform causes GH deficiency and obesity. The present study selectively ablated Lepr exon 1 in somatotropes, which removes the signal peptide, causing the loss of all isoforms of LEPR. Excision of Lepr exon 1 was restricted to the pituitary, and mutant somatotropes failed to respond to leptin. Young (2–3 mo) males showed a severe 84% reduction in serum GH levels and more than 60% reduction in immunolabeled GH cells compared with 41%–42% reductions in GH and GH cells in mutant females. Mutant males (35 d) and females (45 d) weighed less than controls and males had lower lean body mass. Image analysis of adipose tissue by magnetic resonance imaging showed that young males had a 2-fold increase in abdominal fat mass and increased adipose tissue density. Young females had only an overall increase in adipose tissue. Both males and females showed lower energy expenditure and higher respiratory quotient, indicating preferential carbohydrate burning. Young mutant males slept less and were more restless during the dark phase, whereas the opposite was true of females. The effects of a Cre-bearing sire on his non-Cre-recombinase bearing progeny are seen by increased respiratory quotient and reduced litter sizes. These studies elucidate clear sex differences in the extent to which somatotropes are dependent on all isoforms of LEPR. These results, which were not seen with the ablation of Lepr exon 17, highlight the severe consequences of ablation of LEPR in male somatotropes. PMID:26168341

  15. Leptin as an uremic toxin: Deleterious role of leptin in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Alix, Pascaline M; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Soulage, Christophe O

    2014-10-01

    White adipose tissue secretes a large variety of compounds named adipokines amongst which, leptin exhibits pleiotropic metabolic actions. Leptin is an anorexigenic hormone, secreted in proportion of fat mass, with additional effects on the regulation of inflammation, cardiovascular system, immunity, hematopoiesis and bone metabolism. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by an increase of plasma leptin concentration that may be explained by a lack of renal clearance. Hyperleptinemia plays a key role in the pathogenesis of complications associated with CKD such as cachexia, protein energy wasting, chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, cardiovascular damages and bone complications. Leptin is also involved in the progression of renal disease through its pro-fibrotic and pro-hypertensive actions. Most of the adverse effects of leptin have been documented both experimentally and clinically. Leptin may therefore be considered as an uremic toxin in CKD. The aim of this review is to summarize the pathophysiological and clinical role of leptin in in vitro studies, experimental models, as well as in patients suffering from CKD.

  16. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Lai, Ching Tat; Gridneva, Zoya; Mark, Peter J.; Geddes, Donna T.; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-01-01

    Human milk (HM) contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p < 0.0001, n = 287). No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287), supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89). These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding. PMID:27834797

  17. Leptin's Role in Lipodystrophic and Nonlipodystrophic Insulin-Resistant and Diabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyun-Seuk; Dalamaga, Maria; Kim, Sang-Yong; Polyzos, Stergios A.; Hamnvik, Ole-Petter; Magkos, Faidon; Paruthi, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that has been proposed to regulate energy homeostasis as well as metabolic, reproductive, neuroendocrine, and immune functions. In the context of open-label uncontrolled studies, leptin administration has demonstrated insulin-sensitizing effects in patients with congenital lipodystrophy associated with relative leptin deficiency. Leptin administration has also been shown to decrease central fat mass and improve insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin and glucose levels in HIV-infected patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced lipodystrophy, insulin resistance, and leptin deficiency. On the contrary, the effects of leptin treatment in leptin-replete or hyperleptinemic obese individuals with glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus have been minimal or null, presumably due to leptin tolerance or resistance that impairs leptin action. Similarly, experimental evidence suggests a null or a possibly adverse role of leptin treatment in nonlipodystrophic patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In this review, we present a description of leptin biology and signaling; we summarize leptin's contribution to glucose metabolism in animals and humans in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo; and we provide insights into the emerging clinical applications and therapeutic uses of leptin in humans with lipodystrophy and/or diabetes. PMID:23475416

  18. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution.

    PubMed

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Lai, Ching Tat; Gridneva, Zoya; Mark, Peter J; Geddes, Donna T; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-11-08

    Human milk (HM) contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p < 0.0001, n = 287). No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287), supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89). These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  19. Measurement of immunofunctional leptin to detect and monitor patients with functional leptin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pridzun, Lutz; Ranke, Michael; von Schnurbein, Julia; Moss, Anja; Brandt, Stephanie; Kohlsdorf, Katja; Moepps, Barbara; Schaab, Michael; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Gierschik, Peter; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Flehmig, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    Context and aims Functional leptin deficiency is characterized by high levels of circulating immunoreactive leptin (irLep), but a reduced bioactivity of the hormone due to defective receptor binding. As a result of the fact that affected patients can be successfully treated with metreleptin, it was aimed to develop and validate a diagnostic tool to detect functional leptin deficiency. Methods An immunoassay capable of recognizing the functionally relevant receptor-binding complex with leptin was developed (bioLep). The analytical quality of bioLep was validated and compared to a conventional assay for immune-reactive leptin (irLep). Its clinical relevance was evaluated in a cohort of lean and obese children and adults as well as in children diagnosed with functional leptin deficiency and their parents. Results In the clinical cohort, a bioLep/irLep ratio of 1.07 (range: 0.80–1.41) was observed. Serum of patients with non-functional leptin due to homozygous amino acid exchanges (D100Y or N103K) revealed high irLep but non-detectable bioLep levels. Upon treatment of these patients with metreleptin, irLep levels decreased, whereas levels of bioLep increased continuously. In patient relatives with heterozygous amino acid exchanges, a bioLep/irLep ratio of 0.52 (range: 0.48–0.55) being distinct from normal was observed. Conclusions The new bioLep assay is able to diagnose impaired leptin bioactivity in severely obese patients with a homozygous gene defect and in heterozygous carriers of such mutations. The assay serves as a diagnostic tool to monitor leptin bioactivity during treatment of these patients. PMID:28007844

  20. Identification of targets of leptin action in rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, M W; Seeley, R J; Campfield, L A; Burn, P; Baskin, D G

    1996-01-01

    The hypothesis that leptin (OB protein) acts in the hypothalamus to reduce food intake and body weight is based primarily on evidence from leptin-deficient, ob/ob mice. To investigate whether leptin exerts similar effects in normal animals, we administered leptin intracerebroventricularly (icv) to Long-Evans rats. Leptin administration (3.5 microg icv) at the onset of nocturnal feeding reduced food intake by 50% at 1 h and by 42% at 4 h, as compared with vehicle-treated controls (both P < 0.05). To investigate the basis for this effect, we used in situ hybridization (ISH) to determine whether leptin alters expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in energy homeostasis. Two injections of leptin (3.5 microg icv) during a 40 h fast significantly decreased levels of mRNA for neuropeptide Y (NPY, which stimulates food intake) in the arcuate nucleus (-24%) and increased levels of mRNA for corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH, an inhibitor of food intake) in the paraventricular nucleus (by 38%) (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle-treated controls). To investigate the anatomic basis for these effects, we measured leptin receptor gene expression in rat brain by ISH using a probe complementary to mRNA for all leptin receptor splice variants. Leptin receptor mRNA was densely concentrated in the arcuate nucleus, with lower levels present in the ventromedial and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei and other brain areas involved in energy balance. These findings suggest that leptin action in rat hypothalamus involves altered expression of key neuropeptide genes, and implicate leptin in the hypothalamic response to fasting. PMID:8787671

  1. Effects of leptin on FSH cells in the pituitary gland of Podarcis siculus.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Ida; Monaco, Antonio; Grimaldi, Maria Consiglio

    2015-03-01

    Leptin is the hormone synthesised by adipocytes, which plays an important role in regulating appetite and metabolism. In mammals, this pleiotropic hormone also plays a key role in controlling gonadotropin secretion by stimulatory hypothalamic and pituitary actions. However, little is known about leptin in lower vertebrates and particularly few studies are available on reptiles. In the present work, we analysed the action of recombinant human leptin on FSH cells in the pituitary gland of Podarcis siculus female lizards exposed to four different concentrations of the hormone. FSH cells showed a dose-dependent reaction. The data are indicative of the role played by leptin in modulating the cellular activity of such cells in the pituitary gland of P. siculus, similar to what was already reported in mammals. A functional receptor is evidently able to respond to leptin in this lizard, but further comparative studies are needed to understand the role of this hormone in ectothermic vertebrates.

  2. PET imaging of leptin biodistribution and metabolism in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Ceccarini, Giovanni; Flavell, Robert R; Butelman, Eduardo R; Synan, Michael; Willnow, Thomas E; Bar-Dagan, Maya; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Kreek, Mary J; Kothari, Paresh; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Muir, Tom W; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2009-08-01

    We have determined the systemic biodistribution of the hormone leptin by PET imaging. PET imaging using (18)F- and (68)Ga-labeled leptin revealed that, in mouse, the hormone was rapidly taken up by megalin (gp330/LRP2), a multiligand endocytic receptor localized in renal tubules. In addition, in rhesus monkeys, 15% of labeled leptin localized to red bone marrow, which was consistent with hormone uptake in rodent tissues. These data confirm a megalin-dependent mechanism for renal uptake in vivo. The significant binding to immune cells and blood cell precursors in bone marrow is also consistent with prior evidence showing that leptin modulates immune function. These experiments set the stage for similar studies in humans to assess the extent to which alterations of leptin's biodistribution might contribute to obesity; they also provide a general chemical strategy for (18)F labeling of proteins for PET imaging of other polypeptide hormones.

  3. Differential regulation of metabolic, neuroendocrine, and immune function by leptin in humans.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jean L; Matarese, Giuseppe; Shetty, Greeshma K; Raciti, Patricia; Kelesidis, Iosif; Aufiero, Daniela; De Rosa, Veronica; Perna, Francesco; Fontana, Silvia; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2006-05-30

    To elucidate whether the role of leptin in regulating neuroendocrine and immune function during short-term starvation in healthy humans is permissive, i.e., occurs only when circulating leptin levels are below a critical threshold level, we studied seven normal-weight women during a normoleptinemic-fed state and two states of relative hypoleptinemia induced by 72-h fasting during which we administered either placebo or recombinant methionyl human leptin (r-metHuLeptin) in replacement doses. Fasting for 72 h decreased leptin levels by approximately = 80% from a midphysiologic (14.7 +/- 2.6 ng/ml) to a low-physiologic (2.8 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) level. Administration of r-metHuLeptin during fasting fully restored leptin to physiologic levels (28.8 +/- 2.0 ng/ml) and reversed the fasting-associated decrease in overnight luteinizing hormone pulse frequency but had no effect on fasting-induced changes in thyroid-stimulating hormone pulsatility, thyroid and IGF-1 hormone levels, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and renin-aldosterone activity. FSH and sex steroid levels were not altered. Short-term reduction of leptin levels decreased the number of circulating cells of the adaptive immune response, but r-metHuLeptin did not have major effects on their number or in vitro function. Thus, changes of leptin levels within the physiologic range have no major physiologic effects in leptin-replete humans. Studies involving more severe and/or chronic leptin deficiency are needed to precisely define the lower limit of normal leptin levels for each of leptin's physiologic targets.

  4. Signal transduction mechanism for glucagon-induced leptin gene expression in goldfish liver

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ai-fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Tang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Xiao; Huang, Wen; Ren, Chun-hua; Hu, Chao-qun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peripheral satiety hormone that also plays important roles in energy homeostasis in vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. In teleost fish, however, the regulatory mechanism for leptin gene expression still remains unclear. In this study, we found that glucagon, a key hormone in glucose homeostasis, was effective at elevating the leptin-AI and leptin-AII transcript levels in goldfish liver via both in vivo intraperitoneal injection and in vitro cells incubation approaches. The responses of leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA to glucagon treatment were highly comparable. In contrast, blockade of local glucagon action could reduce the basal and induced leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA expression. The stimulation of leptin levels by glucagon was caused by the activation of adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic-AMP (cAMP)/ protein kinase A (PKA), and probably cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) cascades. Our study described the effect and signal transduction mechanism of glucagon on leptin gene expression in goldfish liver, and may also provide new insight into leptin as a mediator in the regulatory network of energy metabolism in the fish model. PMID:27994518

  5. Signal transduction mechanism for glucagon-induced leptin gene expression in goldfish liver.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ai-Fen; Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Tang, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Xiao; Huang, Wen; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a peripheral satiety hormone that also plays important roles in energy homeostasis in vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. In teleost fish, however, the regulatory mechanism for leptin gene expression still remains unclear. In this study, we found that glucagon, a key hormone in glucose homeostasis, was effective at elevating the leptin-AI and leptin-AII transcript levels in goldfish liver via both in vivo intraperitoneal injection and in vitro cells incubation approaches. The responses of leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA to glucagon treatment were highly comparable. In contrast, blockade of local glucagon action could reduce the basal and induced leptin-AI and leptin-AII mRNA expression. The stimulation of leptin levels by glucagon was caused by the activation of adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic-AMP (cAMP)/ protein kinase A (PKA), and probably cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) cascades. Our study described the effect and signal transduction mechanism of glucagon on leptin gene expression in goldfish liver, and may also provide new insight into leptin as a mediator in the regulatory network of energy metabolism in the fish model.

  6. Leptin regulates striatal regions and human eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I Sadaf; Bullmore, Edward; Keogh, Julia; Gillard, Jonathan; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Fletcher, Paul C

    2007-09-07

    Studies of the fat-derived hormone leptin have provided key insights into the molecular and neural components of feeding behavior and body weight regulation. An important challenge lies in understanding how the rewarding properties of food interact with, and can override, physiological satiety signals and promote overeating. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain responses in two human patients with congenital leptin deficiency who were shown images of food before and after 7 days of leptin replacement therapy. Leptin was found to modulate neural activation in key striatal regions, suggesting that the hormone acts on neural circuits governing food intake to diminish the perception of food reward while enhancing the response to satiety signals generated during food consumption.

  7. Hyperphagia and central mechanisms for leptin resistance during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, M L; Spuch, C; Carro, E; Señarís, R

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the central mechanisms involved in food intake regulation and leptin resistance during gestation in the rat. Sprague Dawley rats of 7, 13, and 18 d of pregnancy [days of gestation (G) 7, G13, and G18] were used and compared with nonpregnant animals in diestrus-1. Food intake was already increased in G7, before hyperleptinemia and central leptin resistance was established in midpregnancy. Leptin resistance was due to a reduction in leptin transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to alterations in leptin signaling within the hypothalamus based on an increase in suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 levels and a blockade of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 phosphorylation (G13), followed by a decrease in LepRb and of Akt phosphorylation (G18). In early gestation (G7), no change in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), or proopiomelanocortin (POMC) expression was shown. Nevertheless, an increase in NPY and AgRP and a decrease in POMC mRNA were observed in G13 and G18 rats, probably reflecting the leptin resistance. To investigate the effect of maternal vs. placental hormones on these mechanisms, we used a model of pseudogestation. Rats of 9 d of pseudogestation were hyperphagic, showing an increase in body and adipose tissue weight, normoleptinemia, and normal responses to iv/intracerebroventricular leptin on hypothalamic leptin signaling, food intake, and body weight. Leptin transport through the BBB, and hypothalamic NPY, AgRP and POMC expression were unchanged. Finally, the transport of leptin through the BBB was assessed using a double-chamber culture system of choroid plexus epithelial cells or brain microvascular endothelial cells. We found that sustained high levels of prolactin significantly reduced leptin translocation through the barrier, whereas progesterone and β-estradiol did not show any effect. Our data demonstrate a dual mechanism of leptin resistance during mid

  8. Facilitation of breathing by leptin effects in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bassi, M; Furuya, W I; Zoccal, D B; Menani, J V; Colombari, D S A; Mulkey, D K; Colombari, E

    2016-03-15

    With the global epidemic of obesity, breathing disorders associated with excess body weight have markedly increased. Respiratory dysfunctions caused by obesity were originally attributed to mechanical factors; however, recent studies have suggested a pathophysiological component that involves the central nervous system (CNS) and hormones such as leptin produced by adipocytes as well as other cells. Leptin is suggested to stimulate breathing and leptin deficiency causes an impairment of the chemoreflex, which can be reverted by leptin therapy. This facilitation of the chemoreflex may depend on the action of leptin in the hindbrain areas involved in the respiratory control such as the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), a site that receives chemosensory afferents, and the ventral surface of the medulla that includes the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a central chemosensitive area, and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Although the mechanisms and pathways activated by leptin to facilitate breathing are still not completely clear, evidence suggests that the facilitatory effects of leptin on breathing require the brain melanocortin system, including the POMC-MC4R pathway, a mechanism also activated by leptin to modulate blood pressure. The results of all the studies that have investigated the effect of leptin on breathing suggest that disruption of leptin signalling as caused by obesity-induced reduction of central leptin function (leptin resistance) is a relevant mechanism that may contribute to respiratory dysfunctions associated with obesity.

  9. Leptin in chronic kidney disease: a link between hematopoiesis, bone metabolism, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Ningning

    2014-06-01

    Anemia, dyslipidemia, malnutrition, together with mineral and bone disorders are common complications in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). All are associated with increased risk of mortality. Leptin is a small peptide hormone that is mainly but not exclusively produced in adipose tissue. It is also secreted by normal human osteoblasts, subchondral osteoblasts, placental syncytiotrophoblasts, and the gastric epithelium. Leptin binds to its receptors in the hypothalamus to regulate bone metabolism and food intake. Leptin also has several other important metabolic effects on peripheral tissues, including the liver, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow. Leptin is cleared principally by the kidney. Not surprisingly, serum leptin appears to increase concurrently with declines in the glomerular filtration rate in patients with CKD. A growing body of evidence suggests that leptin might be closely related to hematopoiesis, nutrition, and bone metabolism in CKD patients. Results are conflicting regarding leptin in patients with CKD, in whom both beneficial and detrimental effects on uremia outcome are found. This review elucidates the discovery of leptin and its receptors, changes in serum or plasma leptin levels, the functions of leptin, relationships between leptin and the complications mentioned above, and pharmaceutical interventions in serum leptin levels in patients with CKD.

  10. Facilitation of breathing by leptin effects in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, W. I.; Zoccal, D. B.; Menani, J. V.; Colombari, D. S. A.; Mulkey, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With the global epidemic of obesity, breathing disorders associated with excess body weight have markedly increased. Respiratory dysfunctions caused by obesity were originally attributed to mechanical factors; however, recent studies have suggested a pathophysiological component that involves the central nervous system (CNS) and hormones such as leptin produced by adipocytes as well as other cells. Leptin is suggested to stimulate breathing and leptin deficiency causes an impairment of the chemoreflex, which can be reverted by leptin therapy. This facilitation of the chemoreflex may depend on the action of leptin in the hindbrain areas involved in the respiratory control such as the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), a site that receives chemosensory afferents, and the ventral surface of the medulla that includes the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a central chemosensitive area, and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Although the mechanisms and pathways activated by leptin to facilitate breathing are still not completely clear, evidence suggests that the facilitatory effects of leptin on breathing require the brain melanocortin system, including the POMC–MC4R pathway, a mechanism also activated by leptin to modulate blood pressure. The results of all the studies that have investigated the effect of leptin on breathing suggest that disruption of leptin signalling as caused by obesity‐induced reduction of central leptin function (leptin resistance) is a relevant mechanism that may contribute to respiratory dysfunctions associated with obesity. PMID:26095748

  11. Differential Role of Leptin and Adiponectin in Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Ghantous, C. M.; Azrak, Z.; Hanache, S.; Abou-Kheir, W.; Zeidan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin and adiponectin are differentially expressed adipokines in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. Leptin levels are directly associated with adipose tissue mass, while adiponectin levels are downregulated in obesity. Although significantly produced by adipocytes, leptin is also produced by vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. Plasma leptin concentrations are elevated in cases of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, and myocardial infarction. As for the event of left ventricular hypertrophy, researchers have been stirring controversy about the role of leptin in this form of cardiac remodeling. In this review, we discuss how leptin has been shown to play an antihypertrophic role in the development of left ventricular hypertrophy through in vitro experiments, population-based cross-sectional studies, and longitudinal cohort studies. Conversely, we also examine how leptin may actually promote left ventricular hypertrophy using in vitro analysis and human-based univariate and multiple linear stepwise regression analysis. On the other hand, as opposed to leptin's generally detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system, adiponectin is a cardioprotective hormone that reduces left ventricular and vascular hypertrophy, oxidative stress, and inflammation. In this review, we also highlight adiponectin signaling and its protective actions on the cardiovascular system. PMID:26064110

  12. Plasma Leptin Levels in Children Hospitalized with Cholera in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Falkard, Brie; Uddin, Taher; Rahman, M Arifur; Franke, Molly F; Aktar, Amena; Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Leung, Daniel T; Charles, Richelle C; Larocque, Regina C; Harris, Jason B; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T

    2015-08-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the cause of cholera, induces both innate and adaptive immune responses in infected humans. Leptin is a hormone that plays a role in both metabolism and mediating immune responses. We characterized leptin levels in 11 children with cholera in Bangladesh, assessing leptin levels on days 2, 7, 30, and 180 following cholera. We found that patients at the acute stage of cholera had significantly lower plasma leptin levels than matched controls, and compared with levels in late convalescence. We then assessed immune responses to V. cholerae antigens in 74 children with cholera, correlating these responses to plasma leptin levels on day 2 of illness. In multivariate analysis, we found an association between day 2 leptin levels and development of later anti-cholera toxin B subunit (CtxB) responses. This finding appeared to be limited to children with better nutritional status. Interestingly, we found no association between leptin levels and antibody responses to V. cholerae lipopolysaccharide, a T cell-independent antigen. Our results suggest that leptin levels may be associated with cholera, including the development of immune responses to T cell-dependent antigens.

  13. Transplantation of mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat cells promotes locomotor functional recovery by remyelination and glial scar reduction after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiromi; Ito, Daisuke; Oki, Yoshinao; Kitagawa, Masato; Matsumoto, Taro; Watari, Tosihiro; Kano, Koichiro

    2014-11-14

    Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat cells (DFAT) have a potential to be useful as new cell-source for cell-based therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI), but the mechanisms remain unclear. The objective of this study was to examine whether DFAT-induced functional recovery is achieved through remyelination and/or glial scar reduction in a mice model of SCI. To accomplish this we subjected adult female mice (n=22) to SCI. On the 8th day post-injury locomotor tests were performed, and the mice were randomly divided into two groups (control and DFAT). The DFAT group received stereotaxic injection of DFAT, while the controls received DMEM medium. Functional tests were conducted at repeated intervals, until the 36th day, and immunohistochemistry or staining was performed on the spinal cord sections. DFAT transplantation significantly improved locomotor function of their hindlimbs, and promoted remyelination and glial scar reduction, when compared to the controls. There were significant and positive correlations between promotion of remyelination or/and reduction of glial scar, and recovery of locomotor function. Furthermore, transplanted DFAT expressed markers for neuron, astrocyte, and oligodendrocyte, along with neurotrophic factors, within the injured spinal cord. In conclusion, DFAT-induced functional recovery in mice after SCI is probably mediated by both cell-autonomous and cell-non-autonomous effects on remyelination of the injured spinal cord.

  14. Mature adipocyte-derived cells, dedifferentiated fat cells (DFAT), promoted functional recovery from spinal cord injury-induced motor dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yuki; Takenaga, Mitsuko; Tokura, Yukie; Hamaguchi, Akemi; Matsumoto, Taro; Kano, Koichiro; Mugishima, Hideo; Okano, Hideyuki; Igarashi, Rie

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of mature adipocyte-derived cells (dedifferentiated fat cells) led to marked functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced motor dysfunction in rats. When mature adipocytes were isolated from rat adipose tissue and grown in ceiling culture, transformation into fibroblast-like cells without lipid droplets occurred. These fibroblast-like cells, termed dedifferentiated fat cells (DFAT), could proliferate and could also differentiate back into adipocytes. DFAT expressed neural markers such as nestin, betaIII tubulin, and GFAP. Allografting of DFAT into SCI-induced rats led to significant recovery from hindlimb dysfunction. Grafted cells were detected at the injection site, and some of these cells expressed betaIII tubulin. DFAT expressed neurotrophic factors such as BDNF and GDNF prior to transplantation, and grafted cells were also positive for these factors. Therefore, these neurotrophic factors derived from grafted DFAT might have contributed to the promotion of functional recovery. These findings also suggest that mature adipocytes could become a new source for cell replacement therapy to treat central nervous system disorders.

  15. Metabolic effects of a stabilizing peptide fusion protein of leptin in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Park, H; Lee, S-B; Koh, J; Kim, J

    2012-06-01

    Leptin is a protein hormone produced by adipocytes. It is secreted into the blood stream and plays a key role in regulating body energy homeostasis by inhibiting feeding behavior followed by decreased body weight. Because protein aggregation is a major problem in therapeutic proteins, we previously demonstrated that a stabilizing peptide (SP) fusion protein of leptin (SP-leptin) appeared to resist aggregation induced by agitation, freezing/thawing, or heat stress. In this study, we fused mouse leptin with the stabilizing peptide and compared the biological activities of leptin and SP-leptin in vivo using a male C57Bl mouse model and ex vivo using MCF7 breast cancer cell lines. Each group of mice was treated with saline, leptin, and SP-leptin for 20 days and the differences in body weight, food intake, abdominal fat contents, and TG concentration were measured. The SP-leptin appeared to decrease the body weight and food intake in male C57Bl mice more significantly than wild type leptin, and the SP-leptin treated MCF7 cells displayed better cell proliferation than leptin. As a consequence of decreased body weight, the SP-leptin treated mouse group showed decreased abdominal fat contents and low triglyceride (TG) concentration. Moreover, the SP-leptin treated mouse group had fewer lipid droplets in liver and reduced lipid droplet size when analyzed by Oil red O and H & E staining. These results demonstrated that SP-leptin is more effective than wild type leptin in normal mice in lowering their body weight and fat contents in the abdominal region, the serum, and the liver.

  16. Leptin and the brain: influences on brain development, cognitive functioning and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Farr, Olivia M; Tsoukas, Michael A; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2015-01-01

    Receptors of leptin, the prototypical adipokine, are expressed throughout the cortex and several other areas of the brain. Although typically studied for its role in energy intake and expenditure, leptin plays a critical role in many other neurocognitive processes and interacts with various other hormones and neurotransmitters to perform these functions. Here, we review the literature on how leptin influences brain development, neural degradation, Alzheimer's disease, psychiatric disorders, and more complicated cognitive functioning and feeding behaviors. We also discuss modulators of leptin and the leptin receptor as they relate to normal cognitive functioning and may mediate some of the actions of leptin in the brain. Although we are beginning to better understand the critical role leptin plays in normal cognitive functioning, there is much to be discovered.

  17. Crosstalk between Leptin Receptor and Igf-Ir in Breast Cancer: A Potential Mediator of Chemoresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0452 TITLE: Crosstalk between Leptin Receptor and Igf...NUMBER Crosstalk between Leptin Receptor and Igf-Ir in Breast Cancer: A Potential Mediator of Chemoresistance 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1...cancer, and is associated with reduced treatment response and reduced overall survival. The obesity-associated hormones IGF-I and leptin and their

  18. Hormonal regulation of energy partitioning.

    PubMed

    Rohner-Jeanrenaud, F

    2000-06-01

    A loop system exists between hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peripheral adipose tissue leptin to maintain normal body homeostasis. When hypothalamic NPY levels are increased by fasting or by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion, food intake and body weight increase. NPY has genuine hormono-metabolic effects. It increases insulin and corticosterone secretion relative to controls. These hormonal changes, acting singly or combined, favor adipose tissue lipogenic activity, while producing muscle insulin resistance. They also promote leptin release from adipose tissue. When infused i.c.v. to normal rats to mimic its central effects, leptin decreases NPY levels, thus food intake and body weight. Leptin i.c.v. has also genuine hormono-metabolic effects. It decreases insulinemia and adipose tissue storage ability, enhancing glucose disposal. Leptin increases the expression of uncoupling proteins (UCP-1, -2, -3) and thus energy dissipation. Leptin-induced changes favor oxidation at the expense of storage. Circadian fluctuations of NPY and leptin levels maintain normal body homeostasis. In animal obesity, defective hypothalamic leptin receptor activation prevent leptin from acting, with resulting obesity, insulin and leptin resistance.

  19. Leptin in early life: a key factor for the development of the adult metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    Leptin levels during the perinatal period are important for the development of metabolic systems involved in energy homeostasis. In rodents, there is a postnatal leptin surge, with circulating leptin levels increasing around postnatal day (PND) 5 and peaking between PND 9 and PND 10. At this time circulating leptin acts as an important trophic factor for the development of hypothalamic circuits that control energy homeostasis and food seeking and reward behaviors. Blunting the postnatal leptin surge results in long-term leptin insensitivity and increased susceptibility to diet-induced obesity during adulthood. Pharmacologically increased leptin levels in the postnatal period also have long-term effects on metabolism. Nevertheless, this effect is controversial as postnatal hyperleptinemia is reported to both increase and decrease the predisposition to obesity in adulthood. The different effects reported in the literature could be explained by the different moments at which this hormone was administered, suggesting that modifications of the neonatal leptin surge at specific time points could selectively affect the development of central and peripheral systems that are undergoing modifications at this moment resulting in different metabolic and behavioral outcomes. In addition, maternal nutrition and the hormonal environment during pregnancy and lactation may also modulate the offspring's response to postnatal modifications in leptin levels. This review highlights the importance of leptin levels during the perinatal period in the development of metabolic systems that control energy homeostasis and how modifications of these levels may induce long-lasting and potentially irreversible effects on metabolism.

  20. Leptin as a Marker of Body Fat and Hyperinsulinemia in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempf, Angela M.; Strother, Myra L.; Li, Chaoyang; Kaur, Harsohena; Huang, Terry T-K.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about obesity and insulin resistance in college students. Leptin is a hormone secreted by fat cells and has been shown to strongly correlate with both obesity and insulin resistance in children and adults. We investigated associations of leptin with insulin secretion and action in 119 normal-weight students aged 18-24 years. Leptin…

  1. Exercise-Associated Amenorrhea: Are Altered Leptin Levels an Early Warning Sign?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michelle P.; Ramos, Russalind H.; Bronson, Emily M.

    2002-01-01

    Although the exact cause of the female athlete triad (amenorrhea, disordered eating, and osteoporosis) is unknown, recent research implicates leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes. Leptin may be an important indicator of nutritional status and may play a role in reproductive function. Physicians who develop a plan for early recognition and…

  2. Leptin treatment: facts and expectations.

    PubMed

    Paz-Filho, Gilberto; Mastronardi, Claudio A; Licinio, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Leptin has key roles in the regulation of energy balance, body weight, metabolism, and endocrine function. Leptin levels are undetectable or very low in patients with lipodystrophy, hypothalamic amenorrhea, and congenital leptin deficiency (CLD) due to mutations in the leptin gene. For these patients, leptin replacement therapy with metreleptin (a recombinant leptin analog) has improved or normalized most of their phenotypes, including normalization of endocrine axes, decrease in insulin resistance, and improvement of lipid profile and hepatic steatosis. Remarkable weight loss has been observed in patients with CLD. Due to its effects, leptin therapy has also been evaluated in conditions where leptin levels are normal or high, such as common obesity, diabetes (types 1 and 2), and Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome. A better understanding of the physiological roles of leptin may lead to the development of leptin-based therapies for other prevalent disorders such as obesity-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, depression and dementia.

  3. Role of leptin in female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Maymó, Julieta; Dueñas, José L; Varone, Cecilia; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive function is dependent on energy resources. The role of weight, body composition, fat distribution and the effect of diet have been largely investigated in experimental female animals as well as in women. Any alteration in diet and/or weight may induce abnormalities in timing of sexual maturation and fertility. However, the cellular mechanisms involved in the fine coordination of energy balance and reproduction are largely unknown. The brain and hypothalamic structures receive endocrine and/or metabolic signals providing information on the nutritional status and the degree of fat stores. Adipose tissue acts both as a store of energy and as an active endocrine organ, secreting a large number of biologically important molecules termed adipokines. Adipokines have been shown to be involved in regulation of the reproductive functions. The first adipokine described was leptin. Extensive research over the last 10 years has shown that leptin is not only an adipose tissue-derived messenger of the amount of energy stores to the brain, but also a crucial hormone/cytokine for a number of diverse physiological processes, such as inflammation, angiogenesis, hematopoiesis, immune function, and most importantly, reproduction. Leptin plays an integral role in the normal physiology of the reproductive system with complex interactions at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis. In addition, leptin is also produced by placenta, where it plays an important autocrine function. Observational studies have demonstrated that states of leptin excess, deficiency, or resistance can be associated with abnormal reproductive function. This review focuses on the leptin action in female reproduction.

  4. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules reverse leptin resistance induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Qinggao; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seul-Ki; Uddin, Md Jamal; Rhew, Hyunyul; Kim, Taeksang; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-04-01

    Leptin, a circulating hormone, regulates food intake and body weight. While leptin resistance represents a major cause of obesity, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress can contribute to leptin resistance. Carbon monoxide (CO), a gaseous molecule, exerts antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of tissue injury. We hypothesized that CO could inhibit leptin resistance during ER stress. Thapsigargin or tunicamycin was used to induce ER stress in human cells expressing the leptin receptor. These agents markedly inhibited leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, confirming that ER stress induces leptin resistance. The CO-releasing molecule CORM-2 blocked the ER stress-dependent inhibition of leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. CORM-2 treatment induced the phosphorylation of protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α and enhanced PERK phosphorylation during ER stress. Furthermore, CORM-2 inhibited X-box binding protein-1 expression, activating transcription factor-6 cleavage, and inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE)1α phosphorylation induced by ER stress. IRE1α knockdown rescued leptin resistance, whereas PERK knockdown blocked CO-dependent regulation of IRE1α. In vivo, CO inhalation normalized body weight in animals fed high-fat diets. Furthermore, CO modulated ER stress pathways and rescued leptin resistance in vivo. In conclusion, the pathological mechanism of leptin resistance may be ameliorated by the pharmacological application of CO.

  5. Leptin and its receptors in the course of pregnancy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Szczepankiewicz, Dawid; Wojciechowicz, Tatiana; Kaczmarek, Przemyslaw; Nowak, Krzysztof W

    2006-01-01

    Control of processes responsible for food intake and regulation of energy homeostasis during pregnancy is crucial for mother as well as for fetus development. Leptin is one of the main hormonal factors involved in regulation these processes in organisms. During pregnancy leptin regulates mother's energy balance and may also affect fetus growth and development, particularly via receptors in hypothalamus arcuate nuclei (ARC), pituitary and placenta. In the present study, serum leptin levels and expression of both short (ObRs) and long (ObRb) form of leptin receptor in the hypothalamus, pituitary and placenta were measured in the course of pregnancy. The results of these studies indicate that leptin concentration in serum increases during pregnancy and decreases 24 h after the delivery. The expression of both short and long forms of the leptin receptor in the hypothalamus decreases in the course of pregnancy and increases after the delivery. In the pituitary, however, a decrease of leptin receptor mRNA during pregnancy was observed only for ObRb. Analysis of placental leptin receptor expression demonstrated an increase of ObRb and constant high levels of ObRs mRNA. Our results suggest that changes in leptin level and its receptor expression may influence the energy homeostasis during pregnancy. In addition, changes in ObR expression are suggestive for: i) leptin resistance in the hypothalamus and pituitary; and ii) an increased leptin-dependent signaling in the placenta.

  6. Towards a pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory emerging role of leptin.

    PubMed

    Otero, M; Lago, R; Gomez, R; Dieguez, C; Lago, F; Gómez-Reino, J; Gualillo, O

    2006-08-01

    Leptin is a 16 kDa adipocyte-secreted hormone that regulates weight centrally and links nutritional status with neuroendocrine and immune function. Since its cloning in 1994, leptin's role in regulating immune and inflammatory response has become increasingly evident. Actually, the increase of leptin production that occurs during infection and inflammation strongly suggests that leptin is a part of the cytokines loop which governs the inflammatory-immune response and the host defence mechanism. Indeed, leptin stimulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from cultured monocytes and enhances the production of Th1 type cytokines from stimulated lymphocytes. Several studies have implicated leptin in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory conditions such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and chronic bowel disease. Obesity is characterized by elevated circulating leptin levels which might contribute significantly to the so called low-grade systemic inflammation, making obese individuals more susceptible to the increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes or inflammatory articular degenerative disease such as osteorathritis (OA). As a matter of fact, a key role for leptin in OA has been recently demonstrated since leptin exhibits, in synergy with other pro-inflammatory cytokines, a detrimental effect on articular cartilage cells by promoting nitric oxide synthesis. This review will focus prevalently on the complex relationships existing among leptin, inflammatory response and immunity, trying to provide surprising insights into leptin's role and to discuss challenges and prospects for the future.

  7. Leptin secretion and leptin receptor in the human stomach

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, I; Bado, A; Vissuzaine, C; Buyse, M; Kermorgant, S; Laigneau, J; Attoub, S; Lehy, T; Henin, D; Mignon, M; Lewin, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM—The circulating peptide leptin produced by fat cells acts on central receptors to control food intake and body weight homeostasis. Contrary to initial reports, leptin expression has also been detected in the human placenta, muscles, and recently, in rat gastric chief cells. Here we investigate the possible presence of leptin and leptin receptor in the human stomach.
METHODS—Leptin and leptin receptor expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and western blot analysis on biopsy samples from 24 normal individuals. Fourteen (10 healthy volunteers and four patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia and normal gastric mucosa histology) were analysed for gastric secretions. Plasma and fundic mucosa leptin content was determined by radioimmunoassay.
RESULTS—In fundic biopsies from normal individuals, immunoreactive leptin cells were found in the lower half of the fundic glands. mRNA encoding ob protein was detected in the corpus of the human stomach. The amount of fundic leptin was 10.4 (3.7) ng leptin/g mucosa, as determined by radioimmunoassay. Intravenous infusions of pentagastrin or secretin caused an increase in circulating leptin levels and leptin release into the gastric juice. The leptin receptor was present in the basolateral membranes of fundic and antral gastric cells. mRNA encoding Ob-RL was detected in both the corpus and antrum, consistent with a protein of ~120 kDa detected by immunoblotting.
CONCLUSION—These data provide the first evidence of the presence of leptin and leptin receptor proteins in the human stomach and suggest that gastric epithelial cells may be direct targets for leptin. Therefore, we conclude that leptin may have a physiological role in the human stomach, although much work is required to establish this.


Keywords: leptin; leptin receptor; human stomach; gastrin; secretin PMID:10896907

  8. Intranasal delivery of N-terminal modified leptin-pluronic conjugate for treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongfen; Yi, Xiang; Zhao, Yuling; Poon, Chi-Duen; Bullock, Kristin M; Hansen, Kim M; Salameh, Therese S; Farr, Susan A; Banks, William A; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2017-03-24

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that is delivered via a specific transport system across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to the brain where it acts on the hypothalamus receptors to control appetite and thermogenesis. Peripheral resistance to leptin due to its impaired brain delivery prevents therapeutic use of leptin in overweight and moderately obese patients. To address this problem, we modified the N-terminal amine of leptin with Pluronic P85 (LepNP85) and administered this conjugate intranasally using the nose-to-brain (INB) route to bypass the BBB. We compared this conjugate with the native leptin, the N-terminal leptin conjugate with poly(ethylene glycol) (LepNPEG5K), and two conjugates of leptin with Pluronic P85 attached randomly to the lysine amino groups of the hormone. Compared to the random conjugates of leptin with P85, LepNP85 has shown higher affinity upon binding with the leptin receptor, and similarly to native hormone activated hypothalamus receptors after direct injection into brain. After INB delivery, LepNP85 conjugate was transported to the brain and accumulated in the hypothalamus and hippocampus to a greater extent than the native leptin and LepNPEG5K and activated leptin receptors in hypothalamus at lower dose than native leptin. Our work suggests that LepNP85 can access the brain directly after INB delivery and confirms our hypothesis that the improvement in brain accumulation of this conjugate is due to its enhanced brain absorption. In conclusion, the LepNP85 with optimized conjugation chemistry is a promising candidate for treatment of obesity.

  9. Leptin effects on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal cells.

    PubMed

    Nokhbehsaim, Marjan; Keser, Sema; Nogueira, Andressa Vilas Boas; Jäger, Andreas; Jepsen, Søren; Cirelli, Joni Augusto; Bourauel, Christoph; Eick, Sigrun; Deschner, James

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is increasing throughout the globe and characterized by excess adipose tissue, which represents a complex endocrine organ. Adipose tissue secrets bioactive molecules called adipokines, which act at endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine levels. Obesity has recently been shown to be associated with periodontitis, a disease characterized by the irreversible destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues, that is, periodontium, and also with compromised periodontal healing. Although the underlying mechanisms for these associations are not clear yet, increased levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, as found in obese individuals, might be a critical pathomechanistic link. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of leptin on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and also to study the local leptin production by these cells. Leptin caused a significant downregulation of growth (TGFβ1, and VEGFA) and transcription (RUNX2) factors as well as matrix molecules (collagen, and periostin) and inhibited SMAD signaling under regenerative conditions. Moreover, the local expression of leptin and its full-length receptor was significantly downregulated by inflammatory, microbial, and biomechanical signals. This study demonstrates that the hormone leptin negatively interferes with the regenerative capacity of PDL cells, suggesting leptin as a pathomechanistic link between obesity and compromised periodontal healing.

  10. Linking zinc and leptin in chronic kidney disease: future directions.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Julie Calixto; Aranha, Luciana Nicolau; Moraes, Cristiane; Brito, Luciana Catunda; Mafra, Denise

    2012-04-01

    Anorexia is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with the development of malnutrition and an increased risk of mortality. Several compounds are linked to anorexia in these patients; however, the mechanisms are unknown. Zinc (Zn) deficiency is associated with decreased food intake and has been observed in CKD patients. In addition, leptin is an anorexigenic peptide, and patients with CKD present generally high levels of this hormone. Studies have suggested an association between Zn and leptin status in human and rats; however, the results are inconsistent. Some claimed that Zn supplementation does not change leptin release or that there is no significant relationship between Zn and leptin. Others have reported that Zn might be a mediator of leptin production. CKD patients have hyperleptinemia and hypozincemia, but the relationship between Zn deficiency and leptin levels in CKD patients has been poorly understood until now. The aim of this review is to integrate knowledge on leptin and Zn actions to provide a cohesive clinical perspective regarding their interactions in CKD patients.

  11. Serum leptin levels in gastric cancer patients and the relationship with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Mehmet; Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Emre, Habib; Kemik, Ahu; Kemik, Ozgur; Esen, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Serum leptin levels have been examined in various cancers, with conflicting results. However, there is limited information regarding serum leptin levels and insulin resistance in gastric cancer patients. Therefore, we aimed to investigate serum leptin levels, performance status, insulin levels and insulin resistance in patients with gastric cancer. In addition, we examined the relationship between these measurements and leptin levels. Material and methods Thirty-nine patients with gastric cancer and 30 control subjects were enrolled in the study. Serum leptin, total protein, albumin, growth hormone, insulin and glucose levels were measured. The homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was used to assess insulin resistance. Results Serum levels of insulin, glucose and growth hormone and insulin resistance were significantly lower in gastric cancer patients than controls (p < 0.05 for all). In the Pearson correlation analysis, insulin resistance was found to be significantly correlated with serum leptin levels in gastric cancer patients (r = 0.320, p = 0.047). We observed a significant negative correlation between performance status and insulin resistance in patients with cachexia (r = –0.512, p = 0.030), while no association was found in non-cachectic patients. Conclusions We concluded that serum leptin levels are significantly lower in gastric cancer patients. In addition, gastric cancer patients have decreases in insulin levels, insulin resistance and growth hormone levels. This study found a positive association between serum leptin levels and insulin resistance. Moreover, there is a negative association between serum leptin levels and growth hormone levels. Thus, low insulin and growth hormone levels may suppress the production of leptin in gastric cancer patients. PMID:25995751

  12. Two isoforms of leptin in the White-clouds Mountain minnow (Tanichthys albonubes): Differential regulation by estrogen despite similar response to fasting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Chen, Shuang; Ren, Chunhua; Hu, Chaoqun; Tang, Dongsheng; Yan, Aifen

    2016-01-01

    Leptin has been well-established as a canonical anorexic peptide hormone in mammals, though much of its function in fish remains obscure. In this study, the cDNAs of two leptin isoforms (leptin-A and leptin-B) were cloned from the liver of a small cyprinid fish, Tanichthys albonubes. The two T. albonubes leptins, sharing low primary amino acid sequence homology with their mammalian counterparts, and between themselves, are highly conserved in three-dimensional protein structures and gene structures. Liver is a major source of leptin mRNA in T. albonubes with leptin-A being the dominant form. The expression of hepatic leptin-A but not leptin-B mRNA in female fish is significantly higher than in male fish. Transcriptional hepatic levels of leptin-A and leptin-B in both male and female fish were demonstrated to increase after long-term fasting (10-25days) but decline upon re-feeding (3days). Strikingly, estrogen (E2) administration induced only leptin-A but not leptin-B hepatic mRNA expression in both male and female fish. Our study here provides the first evidence for differential regulation of two leptins in fish, and sheds new light on the possible origin of leptin in lower vertebrates.

  13. Human breast milk and adipokines--A potential role for the soluble leptin receptor (sOb-R) in the regulation of infant energy intake and development.

    PubMed

    Zepf, F D; Rao, P; Moore, J; Stewart, R; Ladino, Yuli Martinez; Hartmann, B T

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of different adipokines in human breast milk are thought to be able to affect energy intake of the infant. Leptin is a hormone synthesized by adipose tissue and the human placenta and favors satiety. The availability of leptin in breast milk is influenced by epithelial cells of the mammary gland that are known to be able to produce leptin, as well as leptin from maternal circulation that is transported to the breast milk, and which can thus in turn reach neonatal blood after absorption. Research so far as mainly focused on leptin concentrations in breast milk. However, evidence suggests that in addition to leptin concentrations levels of the so-called soluble leptin receptor (sOb-R), the main high-affinity binding protein for leptin in humans, are necessary in order to calculate the free leptin index (FLI) and to assess function of the leptin axis. FLI is calculated from the ratio of leptin to the sOb-R, and serves as the main parameter for assessing function of the leptin axis throughout maturation and development. Here we propose that assessing sOb-R levels in addition to leptin concentrations in breast milk could serve as a valuable tool to investigate effects of the leptin axis in breast milk because sOb-R concentrations can impact available leptin levels, and which in turn can have significant implications for infant energy intake and related development.

  14. Hypothalamic ER stress: A bridge between leptin resistance and obesity.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Sara; Claret, Marc

    2015-06-22

    The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide at an alarming rate. However, non-invasive pharmacological treatments remain elusive. Leptin resistance is a general feature of obesity, thus strategies aimed at enhancing the sensitivity to this hormone may constitute an excellent therapeutical approach to counteract current obesity epidemics. Nevertheless, the etiology and neuronal basis of leptin resistance remains an enigma. A recent hypothesis gaining substantial experimental support is that hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a causal role in the development of leptin resistance and obesity. The objective of this review article is to provide an updated view on current evidence connecting hypothalamic ER stress with leptin resistance. We discuss the experimental findings supporting this hypothesis, as well as the potential causes and underlying mechanisms leading to this metabolic disorder. Understanding these mechanisms may provide key insights into the development of novel intervention approaches.

  15. No Kiss1ng by leptin during puberty?

    PubMed

    Ahima, Rexford S

    2011-01-01

    Leptin exerts a permissive action on puberty by stimulating release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the hypothalamus. However, GnRH neurons lack leptin receptor (LepR), indicating that leptin must indirectly regulate these neurons. The Kiss1 gene produces kisspeptins that stimulate GnRH secretion. Because Kiss1 neurons express LepR and inactivation of Kiss1 causes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, Donato et al., in this issue of the JCI, assessed whether deletion of LepR from Kiss1 neurons would prevent sexual maturation. Unexpectedly, mice lacking LepR in Kiss1 neurons had normal pubertal development and fertility. In contrast, deletion of LepR from the ventral premammillary nucleus, a region of the brain involved in sexual behavior, prevented puberty and fertility. These findings highlight the complex biology of leptin in reproduction.

  16. Lateral Thinking About Leptin: A Review of Leptin Action via the Lateral Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Leinninger, Gina M.

    2011-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was initially described as a “feeding center” but we are now beginning to understand that the LHA contributes to other aspects of physiology as well. Indeed, the best-characterized neuronal populations of the LHA (which contain melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) or the hypocretins/orexins (OX) are not strictly orexigenic, but also have roles in regulation of the autonomic and sympathetic nervous systems as well as in modulating motivated behavior. Leptin is an anorectic hormone that regulates energy homeostasis and the mesolimbic DA system (which transduces the wanting of food, drugs of abuse and sex) in part, via actions at the LHA. At least three populations of LHA neurons are regulated by leptin: those containing MCH, OX or the long form of the leptin receptor, LepRb. The emerging picture of leptin interaction with these LHA populations suggests that the LHA is not merely regulating feeding, but is a crucial integrator of energy balance and motivated behavior. PMID:21550356

  17. Lateral thinking about leptin: a review of leptin action via the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Leinninger, Gina M

    2011-09-26

    The lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was initially described as a "feeding center" but we are now beginning to understand that the LHA contributes to other aspects of physiology as well. Indeed, the best-characterized neuronal populations of the LHA (which contain melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) or the hypocretins/orexins (OX)) are not strictly orexigenic, but also have roles in regulation of the autonomic and sympathetic nervous systems as well as in modulating motivated behavior. Leptin is an anorectic hormone that regulates energy homeostasis and the mesolimbic DA system (which transduces the wanting of food, drugs of abuse, and sex) in part, via actions at the LHA. At least three populations of LHA neurons are regulated by leptin: those containing MCH, OX or the long form of the leptin receptor, LepRb. The emerging picture of leptin interaction with these LHA populations suggests that the LHA is not merely regulating feeding, but is a crucial integrator of energy balance and motivated behavior.

  18. Leptin induces CYP1B1 expression in MCF-7 cells through ligand-independent activation of the ERα pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Khanal, Tilak; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Do, Minh Truong; Choi, Jae Ho; Won, Seong Su; Kang, Wonku; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-05-15

    Leptin, a hormone with multiple biological actions, is produced predominantly by adipose tissue. Among its functions, leptin can stimulate tumour cell growth. Oestrogen receptor α (ERα), which plays an essential role in breast cancer development, can be transcriptionally activated in a ligand-independent manner. In this study, we investigated the effect of leptin on CYP1B1 expression and its mechanism in breast cancer cells. Leptin induced CYP1B1 protein, messenger RNA expression and promoter activity in ERα-positive MCF-7 cells but not in ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Additionally, leptin increased 4-hydroxyoestradiol in MCF-7 cells. Also, ERα knockdown by siRNA significantly blocked the induction of CYP1B1 expression by leptin, indicating that leptin induced CYP1B1 expression via an ERα-dependent mechanism. Transient transfection with CYP1B1 deletion promoter constructs revealed that the oestrogen response element (ERE) plays important role in the up-regulation of CYP1B1 by leptin. Furthermore, leptin stimulated phosphorylation of ERα at serine residues 118 and 167 and increased ERE-luciferase activity, indicating that leptin induced CYP1B1 expression by ERα activation. Finally, we found that leptin activated ERK and Akt signalling pathways, which are upstream kinases related to ERα phosphorylation induced by leptin. Taken together, our results indicate that leptin-induced CYP1B1 expression is mediated by ligand-independent activation of the ERα pathway as a result of the activation of ERK and Akt in MCF-7 cells. - Highlights: • Leptin increased 4-hydroxyoestradiol in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. • Leptin activated ERK and Akt kinases related to ERα phosphorylation. • Leptin induces phosphorylation of ERα at serine residues 118 and 167. • Leptin induces ERE-luciferase activity.

  19. Leptin, GH, PRL, insulin and metabolic parameters throughout the dry period and lactation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Accorsi, P A; Govoni, N; Gaiani, R; Pezzi, C; Seren, E; Tamanini, C

    2005-06-01

    Leptin may play a role in the endocrine-metabolic processes that guarantee the physiological course of lactation in dairy cattle. This study was aimed at determining the changes in plasma concentrations of leptin and some of the main hormones and metabolites involved in the lactogenetic process in high-yielding dairy cows throughout lactation; we also wanted to assess whether leptin secretion is subjected to seasonal influences. Blood samples were collected from 23 Italian Friesian dairy cows from the end of a lactation to the ninth month of the subsequent one; in addition, blood was sampled from 47 dairy cows in different phases of lactation during February and July. Plasma concentrations of leptin, growth hormone (GH), insulin, prolactin (PRL), glucose, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and urea were quantified by either validated radioimmunoassay (RIA) or enzymatic colorimetric methods. At the beginning of lactation, GH concentrations significantly increased, while a significant reduction occurred in leptin and insulin. This endocrine condition, such as the significant increase in NEFA plasma concentrations, is indicative of a marked lipid mobilization. In the more advanced stages of lactation, when both energy and protein balances become positive, leptin plasma concentrations increased, whereas GH and NEFA concentrations declined. During the summer months, a significant increase in leptin plasma concentrations, irrespective of the phase of lactation, was observed. Collectively, our findings suggest that, in dairy cows, leptin may represent a 'metabolic signal' of animal's status of fattening and nutritional level; in addition, leptin seems to be influenced by photoperiod and environmental temperature.

  20. Leptin signaling in GFAP-expressing adult glia cells regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim1, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesus; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R.; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that synaptic re-organization of hypothalamic feeding circuits in response to metabolic shifts involves astrocytes, cells that can directly respond to the metabolic hormone, leptin, in vitro. It is not known whether the role of glia cells in hypothalamic synaptic adaptions is active or passive. Here we show that leptin receptors are expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that conditional, adult deletion of leptin receptors in astrocytes leads to altered glial morphology, decreased glial coverage and elevated synaptic inputs onto pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)- and Agouti-related protein (AgRP)-producing neurons. Leptin-induced suppression of feeding was diminished, while rebound feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data unmask an active role of glial cells in the initiation of hypothalamic synaptic plasticity and neuroendocrine control of feeding by leptin. PMID:24880214

  1. Leptin potentiates GABAergic synaptic transmission in the developing rodent hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Damien; Diabira, Diabe; Porcher, Christophe; Bader, Francesca; Ferrand, Nadine; Zhu, Mingyan; Appleyard, Suzanne M.; Wayman, Gary A.; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that leptin is not only a hormone regulating energy homeostasis but also a neurotrophic factor impacting a number of brain regions, including the hippocampus. Although leptin promotes the development of GABAergic transmission in the hypothalamus, little is known about its action on the GABAergic system in the hippocampus. Here we show that leptin modulates GABAergic transmission onto developing CA3 pyramidal cells of newborn rats. Specifically, leptin induces a long-lasting potentiation (LLP-GABAA) of miniature GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic current (GABAA-PSC) frequency. Leptin also increases the amplitude of evoked GABAA-PSCs in a subset of neurons along with a decrease in the coefficient of variation and no change in the paired-pulse ratio, pointing to an increased recruitment of functional synapses. Adding pharmacological blockers to the recording pipette showed that the leptin-induced LLP-GABAA requires postsynaptic calcium released from internal stores, as well as postsynaptic MAPK/ERK kinases 1 and/or 2 (MEK1/2), phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and calcium-calmodulin kinase kinase (CaMKK). Finally, study of CA3 pyramidal cells in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice revealed a reduction in the basal frequency of miniature GABAA-PSCs compared to wild type littermates. In addition, presynaptic GAD65 immunostaining was reduced in the CA3 stratum pyramidale of mutant animals, both results converging to suggest a decreased number of functional GABAergic synapses in ob/ob mice. Overall, these results show that leptin potentiates and promotes the development of GABAergic synaptic transmission in the developing hippocampus likely via an increase in the number of functional synapses, and provide insights into the intracellular pathways mediating this effect. This study further extends the scope of leptin's neurotrophic action to a key regulator of hippocampal development and function, namely GABAergic transmission. PMID:25177272

  2. Narrative review: the role of leptin in human physiology: emerging clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, Theodore; Kelesidis, Iosif; Chou, Sharon; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2010-01-19

    Leptin is a hormone secreted by adipose tissue in direct proportion to amount of body fat. The circulating leptin levels serve as a gauge of energy stores, thereby directing the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, and metabolism. Persons with congenital deficiency are obese, and treatment with leptin results in dramatic weight loss through decreased food intake and possible increased energy expenditure. However, most obese persons are resistant to the weight-reducing effects of leptin. Recent studies suggest that leptin is physiologically more important as an indicator of energy deficiency, rather than energy excess, and may mediate adaptation by driving increased food intake and directing neuroendocrine function to converse energy, such as inducing hypothalamic hypogonadism to prevent fertilization. Current studies investigate the role of leptin in weight-loss management because persons who have recently lost weight have relative leptin deficiency that may drive them to regain weight. Leptin deficiency is also evident in patients with diet- or exercise-induced hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. Replacement of leptin in physiologic doses restores ovulatory menstruation in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and improves metabolic dysfunction in patients with lipoatrophy, including lipoatrophy associated with HIV or highly active antiretroviral therapy. The applications of leptin continue to grow and will hopefully soon be used therapeutically.

  3. Leptin inhibits food-deprivation-induced increases in food intake and food hoarding.

    PubMed

    Keen-Rhinehart, Erin; Bartness, Timothy J

    2008-12-01

    Food deprivation stimulates foraging and hoarding and to a much lesser extent, food intake in Siberian hamsters. Leptin, the anorexigenic hormone secreted primarily from adipocytes, may act in the periphery, the brain, or both to inhibit these ingestive behaviors. Therefore, we tested whether leptin given either intracerebroventricularly or intraperitoneally, would block food deprivation-induced increases in food hoarding, foraging, and intake in animals with differing foraging requirements. Hamsters were trained in a running wheel-based food delivery foraging system coupled with simulated burrow housing. We determined the effects of food deprivation and several peripheral doses of leptin on plasma leptin concentrations. Hamsters were then food deprived for 48 h and given leptin (0, 10, 40, or 80 microg ip), and additional hamsters were food deprived for 48 h and given leptin (0, 1.25, 2.5, or 5.0 microg icv). Foraging, food intake, and hoarding were measured postinjection. Food deprivation stimulated food hoarding to a greater degree and duration than food intake. In animals with a foraging requirement, intracerebroventricular leptin almost completely blocked food deprivation-induced increased food hoarding and intake, but increased foraging. Peripheral leptin treatment was most effective in a sedentary control group, completely inhibiting food deprivation-induced increased food hoarding and intake at the two highest doses, and did not affect foraging at any dose. Thus, the ability of leptin to inhibit food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behaviors differs based on foraging effort (energy expenditure) and the route of administration of leptin administration.

  4. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels.

    PubMed

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Carli, Jayne F Martin; Skowronski, Alicja A; Sun, Qi; Kriebel, Jennifer; Feitosa, Mary F; Hedman, Åsa K; Drong, Alexander W; Hayes, James E; Zhao, Jinghua; Pers, Tune H; Schick, Ursula; Grarup, Niels; Kutalik, Zoltán; Trompet, Stella; Mangino, Massimo; Kristiansson, Kati; Beekman, Marian; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Eriksson, Joel; Henneman, Peter; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Luan, Jian'an; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Pasko, Dorota; Renström, Frida; Willems, Sara M; Mahajan, Anubha; Rose, Lynda M; Guo, Xiuqing; Liu, Yongmei; Kleber, Marcus E; Pérusse, Louis; Gaunt, Tom; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Ju Sung, Yun; Ramos, Yolande F; Amin, Najaf; Amuzu, Antoinette; Barroso, Inês; Bellis, Claire; Blangero, John; Buckley, Brendan M; Böhringer, Stefan; I Chen, Yii-Der; de Craen, Anton J N; Crosslin, David R; Dale, Caroline E; Dastani, Zari; Day, Felix R; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela E; Demirkan, Ayse; Finucane, Francis M; Ford, Ian; Garcia, Melissa E; Gieger, Christian; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E; Havulinna, Aki S; Herder, Christian; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Hunter, David J; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Jansson, John-Olov; Jenny, Nancy S; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Karlsson, Magnus; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraft, Peter; Kwekkeboom, Joanneke; Laatikainen, Tiina; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; LeDuc, Charles A; Lowe, Gordon; Lu, Yingchang; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meisinger, Christa; Menni, Cristina; Morris, Andrew P; Myers, Richard H; Männistö, Satu; Nalls, Mike A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peters, Annette; Pradhan, Aruna D; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rice, Treva K; Brent Richards, J; Ridker, Paul M; Sattar, Naveed; Savage, David B; Söderberg, Stefan; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Heemst, Diana; Uh, Hae-Won; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Walker, Mark; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Widén, Elisabeth; Wood, Andrew R; Yao, Jie; Zeller, Tanja; Zhang, Yiying; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Sarzynski, Mark A; Rao, D C; Jousilahti, Pekka; Vartiainen, Erkki; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G; Heliövaara, Markku; Knekt, Paul B; Koskinen, Seppo; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Huupponen, Risto K; Viikari, Jorma S; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Mellström, Dan; Lorentzon, Mattias; Casas, Juan P; Bandinelli, Stefanie; März, Winfried; Isaacs, Aaron; van Dijk, Ko W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Harris, Tamara B; Bouchard, Claude; Allison, Matthew A; Chasman, Daniel I; Ohlsson, Claes; Lind, Lars; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Borecki, Ingrid B; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergmann, Sven; Waeber, Gérard; Vollenweider, Peter; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Hu, Frank B; Eline Slagboom, P; Grallert, Harald; Spector, Tim D; Jukema, J W; Klein, Robert J; Schadt, Erik E; Franks, Paul W; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Leibel, Rudolph L; Loos, Ruth J F

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of circulating leptin levels from 32,161 individuals and followed up loci reaching P<10(-6) in 19,979 additional individuals. We identify five loci robustly associated (P<5 × 10(-8)) with leptin levels in/near LEP, SLC32A1, GCKR, CCNL1 and FTO. Although the association of the FTO obesity locus with leptin levels is abolished by adjustment for BMI, associations of the four other loci are independent of adiposity. The GCKR locus was found associated with multiple metabolic traits in previous GWAS and the CCNL1 locus with birth weight. Knockdown experiments in mouse adipose tissue explants show convincing evidence for adipogenin, a regulator of adipocyte differentiation, as the novel causal gene in the SLC32A1 locus influencing leptin levels. Our findings provide novel insights into the regulation of leptin production by adipose tissue and open new avenues for examining the influence of variation in leptin levels on adiposity and metabolic health.

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels

    PubMed Central

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Carli, Jayne F. Martin; Skowronski, Alicja A.; Sun, Qi; Kriebel, Jennifer; Feitosa, Mary F; Hedman, Åsa K.; Drong, Alexander W.; Hayes, James E.; Zhao, Jinghua; Pers, Tune H.; Schick, Ursula; Grarup, Niels; Kutalik, Zoltán; Trompet, Stella; Mangino, Massimo; Kristiansson, Kati; Beekman, Marian; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Eriksson, Joel; Henneman, Peter; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Luan, Jian'an; Greco M, Fabiola Del; Pasko, Dorota; Renström, Frida; Willems, Sara M.; Mahajan, Anubha; Rose, Lynda M.; Guo, Xiuqing; Liu, Yongmei; Kleber, Marcus E.; Pérusse, Louis; Gaunt, Tom; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Ju Sung, Yun; Ramos, Yolande F.; Amin, Najaf; Amuzu, Antoinette; Barroso, Inês; Bellis, Claire; Blangero, John; Buckley, Brendan M.; Böhringer, Stefan; I Chen, Yii-Der; de Craen, Anton J. N.; Crosslin, David R.; Dale, Caroline E.; Dastani, Zari; Day, Felix R.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela E.; Demirkan, Ayse; Finucane, Francis M.; Ford, Ian; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gieger, Christian; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Havulinna, Aki S; Herder, Christian; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hunter, David J.; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Jansson, John-Olov; Jenny, Nancy S.; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Karlsson, Magnus; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraft, Peter; Kwekkeboom, Joanneke; Laatikainen, Tiina; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; LeDuc, Charles A.; Lowe, Gordon; Lu, Yingchang; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meisinger, Christa; Menni, Cristina; Morris, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard H.; Männistö, Satu; Nalls, Mike A.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peters, Annette; Pradhan, Aruna D.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rice, Treva K.; Brent Richards, J; Ridker, Paul M.; Sattar, Naveed; Savage, David B.; Söderberg, Stefan; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Heemst, Diana; Uh, Hae-Won; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Walker, Mark; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Widén, Elisabeth; Wood, Andrew R.; Yao, Jie; Zeller, Tanja; Zhang, Yiying; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Rao, D. C.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Vartiainen, Erkki; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G.; Heliövaara, Markku; Knekt, Paul B.; Koskinen, Seppo; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Huupponen, Risto K.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T.; Mellström, Dan; Lorentzon, Mattias; Casas, Juan P.; Bandinelli, Stefanie; März, Winfried; Isaacs, Aaron; van Dijk, Ko W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Bouchard, Claude; Allison, Matthew A.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ohlsson, Claes; Lind, Lars; Scott, Robert A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Bergmann, Sven; Waeber, Gérard; Vollenweider, Peter; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Hu, Frank B.; Eline Slagboom, P; Grallert, Harald; Spector, Tim D.; Jukema, J.W.; Klein, Robert J.; Schadt, Erik E; Franks, Paul W.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Leibel, Rudolph L.; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of circulating leptin levels from 32,161 individuals and followed up loci reaching P<10−6 in 19,979 additional individuals. We identify five loci robustly associated (P<5 × 10−8) with leptin levels in/near LEP, SLC32A1, GCKR, CCNL1 and FTO. Although the association of the FTO obesity locus with leptin levels is abolished by adjustment for BMI, associations of the four other loci are independent of adiposity. The GCKR locus was found associated with multiple metabolic traits in previous GWAS and the CCNL1 locus with birth weight. Knockdown experiments in mouse adipose tissue explants show convincing evidence for adipogenin, a regulator of adipocyte differentiation, as the novel causal gene in the SLC32A1 locus influencing leptin levels. Our findings provide novel insights into the regulation of leptin production by adipose tissue and open new avenues for examining the influence of variation in leptin levels on adiposity and metabolic health. PMID:26833098

  6. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  7. In vivo but not in vitro leptin enhances lymphocyte proliferation in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Demas, Gregory E

    2010-04-01

    Mounting an immune response requires a relatively substantial investment of energy and marked reductions in energy availability can suppress immune function and presumably increase disease susceptibility. We have previously demonstrated that a moderate reduction in energy stores by partial surgical lipectomy impairs humoral immunity of Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) and is mediated, in part, by changes in the adipose tissue hormone leptin. The goals of the present study were to assess the role of leptin in cell-mediated immunity and to determine if the potential effects of leptin on immunity are via the direct actions of this hormone on lymphocytes, or indirect, via the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). In Experiment 1, hamsters received osmotic minipumps containing either murine leptin (0.5 microl/h) or vehicle alone for 10 days and splenocyte proliferation in response to the T-cell mitogen Concanavalin A (Con A) was determined. In Experiment 2, Con A-induced splenocyte proliferation was tested in the presence or absence of leptin in vitro. In Experiment 3, exogenous leptin was administered to intact or sympathetically denervated hamsters. Hamsters treated with in vivo leptin displayed increased splenocyte proliferation compared with control hamsters receiving vehicle. In contrast, in vitro leptin had no effect on splenocyte proliferation. Sympathetic denervation attenuated, but did not block, leptin-induced increases in immunity. Taken together, these results are consistent with the idea that leptin can enhance cell-mediated immunity; the SNS appears to contribute, least in part, to leptin-induced increases in immunity. Importantly, these findings confirm previous studies that leptin serves as an important endocrine link between energy balance and immunity.

  8. CNS Regulation of Energy Metabolism: Ghrelin versus Leptin

    PubMed Central

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    In this brief review, we introduce some major themes in the regulation of energy, lipid and glucose metabolism by the central nervous system (CNS). Rather than comprehensively discussing the field, we instead will discuss some of the key findings made regarding the interaction of the hormones ghrelin and leptin with the CNS. PMID:18448790

  9. The leptin system and its expression at different nutritional and pregnant stages in lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huixian; Qin, Geng; Zhang, Yanhong; Li, Shuisheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leptin is an essential hormone for the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake in vertebrate animals. To better understand the physiological roles of leptin in nutrient regulation in paternal ovoviviparous fish (family Syngnathidae), the present study cloned the full-length of leptin-a and leptin receptor (lepr) genes in lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus). Results showed that there was a 576-bp intron between two exons in leptin-a gene but no leptin-b gene in seahorse. Although the primary amino acid sequence conservation of seahorse leptin-a was very low, the 3-D structure modeling of seahorse leptin-a revealed strong conservation of tertiary structure with other vertebrates. Seahorse leptin-a mRNA was highly expressed in brain, whereas lepr mRNA was mainly expressed in ovary and gill. Interestingly, both leptin-a and lepr mRNA were expressed in the brood pouch of male seahorse, suggesting the leptin system plays a role during the male pregnancy. Physiological experiments showed that the expression of hepatic leptin-a and lepr mRNA in unfed seahorses was significantly higher than that in those fed 100%, as well as 60%, of their food during the fasting stage, showing that seahorse might initiate the leptin system to regulate its energy metabolism while starving. Moreover, the expression of leptin-a in the brood pouch of pregnant seahorse was significantly upregulated compared with non-pregnant seahorse, whereas the expression of lepr was downregulated, suggesting that the leptin system might be involved in the male pregnancy. In conclusion, the leptin system plays a role in the energy metabolism and food intake, and might provide new insights into molecular regulation of male pregnancy in seahorse. PMID:27628034

  10. Effects of nutritional status on plasma leptin levels and in vitro regulation of adipocyte leptin expression and secretion in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Salmerón, Cristina; Johansson, Marcus; Angotzi, Anna R; Rønnestad, Ivar; Jönsson, Elisabeth; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; Gutiérrez, Joaquim; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación

    2015-01-01

    As leptin has a key role on appetite, knowledge about leptin regulation is important in order to understand the control of energy balance. We aimed to explore the modulatory effects of adiposity on plasma leptin levels in vivo and the role of potential regulators on leptin expression and secretion in rainbow trout adipocytes in vitro. Fish were fed a regular diet twice daily ad libitum or a high-energy diet once daily at two ration levels; satiation (SA group) or restricted (RE group) to 25% of satiation, for 8weeks. RE fish had significantly reduced growth (p<0.001) and adipose tissue weight (p<0.001), and higher plasma leptin levels (p=0.022) compared with SA fish. Moreover, plasma leptin levels negatively correlated with mesenteric fat index (p=0.009). Adipocytes isolated from the different fish were treated with insulin, ghrelin, leucine, eicosapentaenoic acid or left untreated (control). In adipocytes from fish fed regular diet, insulin and ghrelin increased leptin secretion dose-dependently (p=0.002; p=0.033, respectively). Leptin secretion in control adipocytes was significantly higher in RE than in SA fish (p=0.022) in agreement with the in vivo findings, indicating that adipose tissue may contribute to the circulating leptin levels. No treatment effects were observed in adipocytes from the high-energy diet groups, neither in leptin expression nor secretion, except that leptin secretion was significantly reduced by leucine in RE fish adipocytes (p=0.025). Overall, these data show that the regulation of leptin in rainbow trout adipocytes by hormones and nutrients seems to be on secretion, rather than at the transcriptional level.

  11. High insulin and leptin increase resistin and inflammatory cytokine production from human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tsiotra, Panayoula C; Boutati, Eleni; Dimitriadis, George; Raptis, Sotirios A

    2013-01-01

    Resistin and the proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β , produced by adipocytes, and macrophages, are considered to be important modulators of chronic inflammation contributing to the development of obesity and atherosclerosis. Human monocyte-enriched mononuclear cells, from ten healthy individuals, were exposed to high concentrations of insulin, leptin, and glucose (alone or in combination) for 24 hours in vitro. Resistin, TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β production was examined and compared to that in untreated cells. High insulin and leptin concentrations significantly upregulated resistin and the cytokines. The subsequent addition of high glucose significantly upregulated resistin and TNF- α mRNA and protein secretion, while it did not have any effect on IL-6 or IL-1 β production. By comparison, exposure to dexamethasone reduced TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β production, while at this time point it increased resistin protein secretion. These data suggest that the expression of resistin, TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β from human mononuclear cells, might be enhanced by the hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia and possibly by the hyperglycemia in metabolic diseases as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Therefore, the above increased production may contribute to detrimental effects of their increased adipocyte-derived circulating levels on systemic inflammation, insulin sensitivity, and endothelial function of these patients.

  12. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR in ovariectomized rats, but its effects were normalized with 4 days of oestrogen treatment. Bilateral nanoinjection of SHU9119 into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), to block α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) type 3 and 4 receptors, decreased LSNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus but not dioestrus rats. Unlike leptin, i.c.v. insulin infusion increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA and HR similarly in pro-oestrus and dioestrus rats; these responses did not differ from those in male rats. We conclude that, in female rats, leptin's stimulatory effects on SNA are differentially enhanced by oestrogen, at least in part via an increase in α-MSH activity in the PVN. These data further suggest that the actions of leptin and insulin to increase the activity of various sympathetic nerves occur via different neuronal pathways or cellular mechanisms. These results may explain the poor correlation in females of SNA with adiposity, or of MAP with leptin.

  13. Role of leptin and leptin receptors in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Shahab; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose-derived cytokine that has an important role in bodyweight homeostasis and energy balance. There are a number of studies which have suggested that leptin and its receptors dysregulation play a critical role in the development of malignancies including hematological malignancies, mainly via activation of the JAK/STAT pathway which regulates downstream signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT signaling and ERK1/2. In this review, current understandings of leptin/leptin receptors mediated pathogenesis in various lymphoid malignancies are described. Blocking of the leptin receptor might be a unique therapeutic approach for many hematological malignancies.

  14. Caffeine attenuated ER stress-induced leptin resistance in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Toru; Toyoda, Keisuke; Nakatsu, Kanako; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2014-05-21

    Exposing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to stress causes the accumulation of unfolded proteins, and subsequently results in ER stress. ER stress may be involved in various disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Leptin is an important circulating hormone, that inhibits food intake and accelerates energy consumption, which suppresses body weight gain. Recent studies demonstrated that leptin resistance is one of the main factors involved in the development of obesity. We and other groups recently reported the role of ER stress in the development of leptin resistance. Therefore, identifying drugs that target ER stress may be a promising fundamental strategy for the treatment of obesity. In the present study, we investigated whether caffeine could affect ER stress and the subsequent development of leptin resistance. We showed that caffeine exhibited chaperone activity, which attenuated protein aggregation. Caffeine also inhibited the ER stress-induced activation of IRE1 and PERK, which suggested the attenuation of ER stress. Moreover, caffeine markedly improved ER stress-induced impairments in the leptin-induced phosphorylation of STAT3. Therefore, these results suggest caffeine may have pharmacological properties that ameliorate leptin resistance by reducing ER stress.

  15. Separate systems for serotonin and leptin in appetite control.

    PubMed

    Halford, J C; Blundell, J E

    2000-04-01

    Appetite control involves an integration of the drive signals arising form energy stores in the body with the satiety signals generated by periodic episodes of food consumption. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been implicated in the processes of within-meal satiation and postmeal satiety (5-HT1B and 5-HT2C postsynaptic receptors) which are concerned with the signals arising form the pattern of food intake. Central nervous system (CNS) 5-HT is sensitive to circulating levels of the precursor tryptophan, certain macronutrients and peripheral satiety factors such as cholecystokinin (CCK) and enterostatin. Hypothalamic 5-HT receptor systems inhibit neuropeptide Y (NPY), a potent stimulator of hunger and food intake. In contrast to the linking of 5-HT with the consequences of food ingestion, the hormone leptin (OB protein) is regarded as a signal linking adipose tissue status with a number of key CNS circuits. Leptin itself stimulates CNS leptin receptors (OB-r receptor) which link with pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)/ MC-4 receptors. The effects of leptin may also be modulated by factors such as the corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), orexins and galanin. Very little evidence exists to support any direct link between the actions of 5-HT and leptin, suggesting that they are separate systems. 5-HT is a part of an integrated network for short-acting satiety signals (episodic in nature), and leptin is a hormonal indicator of long-term (tonic) energy reserves. At a conceptual level, these may represent the distinction between 'satiety' and 'drive'. Interestingly, both 5-HT and leptin modulate the action of NPY, which may form a part of a common output pathway for the expression of appetite.

  16. Leptin and body mass index in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian, Nasrin; Haghnazari, Lida; Rasolinia, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder associated with obesity. Human and animal studies showed a direct relationship between leptin level and obesity, however, results from different studies were mixed. This study investigated the status of leptin level in PCOS and its relationship with body mass index (BMI) in a group of Iranian women with PCOS. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 40 women with PCOS and 36 healthy women were assigned to experimental and control groups, respectively. Those in the PCOS group were not prescribed any medications for 3 months prior to the study. Fasting blood samples were then collected during the 2nd or 3rd day of menstruation for laboratory measurement of serum total leptin, blood glucose (fasting blood sugar), serum insulin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone (LH). Results: Mean BMI of the PCOS and control groups were 26.62 ± 4.03 kg/m2 and 23.52 ± 2.52 kg/m2, respectively (P = 0.006). The mean total leptin in the PCO group was also 10.69 ± 5.37 ng/mL and 5.73 ± 2.36 ng/mL in the control group (P = 0.0001). A significant relationship was found between leptin level and BMI as well as LH level among women with PCOS (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between leptin and insulin (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study indicated an increased leptin level among women with PCOS that positively associated with BMI and LH. PMID:27186548

  17. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold.

  18. Moderate physical activity correlates with elevated leptin in physically active 10-12-year-old boys with normal BMI.

    PubMed

    Cicchella, Antonio; Stefanelli, Claudio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Saar, Meeli; Purge, Priit

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relations between physical activity of differing intensity and duration with body energy-balance hormone leptin in 10-12-year-old boys (N = 94) who participated in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity at least four to five times per week. The boys reported their physical activity using a questionnaire. They had normal body mass index (BMI, kg/ m2), and were at Tanner Stage 2 of development. Boys were divided into three subgroups by leptin levels: normal serum leptin (M +/- .5 SD, n = 44, 1.2-3.9 ng/ml), low leptin (< or = M - .5 SD; n = 31, < 1.2 ng/ml), and high leptin (> or = M + .5 SD; n = 19, > 3.9 ng/ml). There were significant differences between subgroups in anthropometric parameters and serum leptin levels, but not in physical activity. A significant correlation was found between leptin and moderate physical activity of at least five times per week for at least 30 minutes each time in the high leptin group (r = .61). In conclusion, the correlations between physical activity and leptin are weak; only moderate physical activity was correlated with leptin levels in the high leptin

  19. Leptin and reproductive function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue plays a dynamic role in whole-body homeostasis by acting as an endocrine organ. Collective evidence indicates a strong link between neural influences and adipocyte expression and secretion of leptin. Developmental changes in these relationships are considered important for pubertal ...

  20. Autoadjusting-CPAP effect on serum Leptin concentrations in Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Marta; Winck, João C; Guimarães, João T; Santos, Ana C; Almeida, João; Marques, José A

    2008-01-01

    Background Leptin is an hormone that regulates body weight. Studies have shown increasing leptin concentrations according to body mass index (BMI) and intermittent hypoxia. Our aim is to evaluate the basal leptin levels in OSA patients and its possible relation to OSA severity, independently of confounders and investigate the Autoadjusting-CPAP effect on leptin values. Methods In ninety eight male patients with moderate to severe OSA leptin serum levels were evaluated before therapy, 9 days and 6 months after therapy. Results In this group mean age was 55.3 years, mean BMI was 33.2 Kg/m2 and mean Apnoea- Hypopnea Index (AHI) was 51.7/h. Mean basal serum leptin value was 12.1 ug/L. Univariate analysis showed a significant correlation between serum leptin values and BMI (R = 0.68; p < 0.001), waist-hip ratio (R = 0.283; p = 0.004) and AHI (R = 0.198; p = 0.048); in stepwise multiple regression analysis only BMI (p < 0.001) was a predictor of serum leptin values. One week after therapy, mean leptin serum level decreased to 11.0 ug/L and 6 months after it was 11.4 ug/L. (p = 0.56 and p = 0.387, respectively) Conclusion Baseline leptin serum levels positively correlate with BMI, fat distributioand OSA severity. BMI is the only predictor of basal leptin levels. Treatment with Autoadjusting-CPAP has a small effect on leptin levels. PMID:18828917

  1. Reduction of obesity, as induced by leptin, reverses endothelial dysfunction in obese (Lep(ob)) mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, B.; Mo, Z.; Brooks-Asplund, E.; Kim, S.; Shoukas, A.; Li, D.; Nyhan, D.; Berkowitz, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Obesity is a major health care problem and is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity. Leptin, a neuroendocrine hormone released by adipose tissue, is important in modulating obesity by signaling satiety and increasing metabolism. Moreover, leptin receptors are expressed on vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and mediate angiogenesis. We hypothesized that leptin may also play an important role in vasoregulation. We investigated vasoregulatory mechanisms in the leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mouse model and determined the influence of leptin replacement on endothelial-dependent vasorelaxant responses. The direct effect of leptin on EC nitric oxide (NO) production was also tested by using 4, 5-diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate staining and measurement of nitrate and nitrite concentrations. Vasoconstrictor responses to phenylephrine, norepinephrine, and U-46619 were markedly enhanced in aortic rings from ob/ob mice and were modulated by NO synthase inhibition. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were markedly attenuated in mesenteric microvessels from ob/ob mice. Leptin replacement resulted in significant weight loss and reversal of the impaired endothelial-dependent vasorelaxant responses observed in ob/ob mice. Preincubation of ECs with leptin enhanced the release of NO production. Thus leptin-deficient ob/ob mice demonstrate marked abnormalities in vasoregulation, including impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilation, which is reversed by leptin replacement. These findings may be partially explained by the direct effect of leptin on endothelial NO production. These vascular abnormalities are similar to those observed in obese, diabetic, leptin-resistant humans. The ob/ob mouse may, therefore, be an excellent new model for the study of the cardiovascular effects of obesity.

  2. Leptin, Insulin, and Cinnamon Polyphenols Attenuate Glial Swelling and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Ischemic Injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is a major risk factor for stroke, and tissue injury following a stroke may be more severe in the obese. A key feature of obesity is increased serum levels of obesity-related hormones including leptin and insulin, indicating a state of resistance to these hormones. Insulin resistance is gen...

  3. [ROLE OF LEPTIN IN THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY AMENORRHEA IN ADOLESCENT GIRLS].

    PubMed

    Levenets, S A; Nachotova, T A; Kashkalda, D A

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the role of leptin in the formation of secondary amenorrhea (SA) during puberty, 78 girls aged from 13 to 17 years with SA and 74 girls of the same age with regular menstrual cycle have been examined with the estimation of body mass index (BMI) and hormonal/metabolic state. The obtained data show a strong connection between leptin level, BMI and parameters of energetic metabolic state (insulin; HOMA index); regression analysis results indicated the participation of leptin in steroidogenesis. Odds ratio (OR) values indicated an important role of leptin in the formation of SA during body weight deficit and normal BMI. It has been found that various clinical types of SA have different patterns of leptin influence.

  4. Taste bud leptin: sweet dampened at initiation site.

    PubMed

    Travers, Susan P; Frank, Marion E

    2015-05-01

    The intriguing observation that leptin decreases sweet-evoked peripheral gustatory responses has aroused much interest (Kawai K, Sugimoto K, Nakashima K, Miura H, Ninomiya Y. 2000. Leptin as a modulator of sweet taste sensitivities in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 97(20):11044-11049.) due to its implied importance in controlling appetite. The effects of this anorexic hormone, however, appear more conditional than originally believed. In this issue of Chemical Senses, a careful study by Glendinning and colleagues, find no effects of leptin on sweet-evoked chorda tympani responses, whereas an equally careful study by Meredith and colleagues, find decreased release of ATP and increased release of 5-HT from taste buds in response to sweet stimuli.

  5. A mathematical model of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jacquier, Marine; Soula, Hédi A; Crauste, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is often associated with leptin resistance, which leads to a physiological system with high leptin concentration but unable to respond to leptin signals and to regulate food intake. We propose a mathematical model of the leptin-leptin receptors system, based on the assumption that leptin is a regulator of its own receptor activity, and investigate its qualitative behavior. Based on current knowledge and previous models developed for body weight dynamics in rodents, the model includes the dynamics of leptin, leptin receptors and the regulation of food intake and body weight. It displays two stable equilibria, one representing a healthy state and the other one an obese and leptin resistant state. We show that a constant leptin injection can lead to leptin resistance and that a temporal variation in some parameter values influencing food intake can induce a change of equilibrium and a pathway to leptin resistance and obesity.

  6. 20 years of leptin: connecting leptin signaling to biological function.

    PubMed

    Allison, Margaret B; Myers, Martin G

    2014-10-01

    Hypothalamic leptin action promotes negative energy balance and modulates glucose homeostasis, as well as serving as a permissive signal to the neuroendocrine axes that control growth and reproduction. Since the initial discovery of leptin 20 years ago, we have learned a great deal about the molecular mechanisms of leptin action. An important aspect of this has been the dissection of the cellular mechanisms of leptin signaling, and how specific leptin signals influence physiology. Leptin acts via the long form of the leptin receptor LepRb. LepRb activation and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation recruits and activates multiple signaling pathways, including STAT transcription factors, SHP2 and ERK signaling, the IRS-protein/PI3Kinase pathway, and SH2B1. Each of these pathways controls specific aspects of leptin action and physiology. Important inhibitory pathways mediated by suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins and protein tyrosine phosphatases also limit physiologic leptin action. This review summarizes the signaling pathways engaged by LepRb and their effects on energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and reproduction. Particular emphasis is given to the multiple mouse models that have been used to elucidate these functions in vivo.

  7. Serum leptin levels and anthropometric correlates in Ache Amerindians of eastern Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Bribiescas, R G

    2001-08-01

    Leptin is a recently discovered peptide hormone secreted primarily from adipocytes in humans and other mammals; it is a reflection of fat stores, and has been associated with reproductive function. However, few leptin measurements are available from nonindustrialized populations, including contemporary hunter/gatherer communities undergoing the transition to sedentary agriculture. This investigation reports single-sample serum leptin measurements in healthy Ache Amerindian males (n = 21; average age, 32.8 +/- 3.4 SE) and females (n = 12; average age, 31.3 +/- 4.3) in eastern Paraguay. Ache leptin concentrations were much lower than in industrialized populations, although significant sexual dimorphism was evident (female 5.64 ng/ml +/- 0.91 SE vs. male 1.13 ng/ml +/- 0.08; P < 0.0001). Indeed, female leptin levels were similar to those of anorexic women, despite apparently adequate adiposity. Controlling for fat percentage, no significant sex difference was evident, suggesting that adiposity was the primary source of leptin variation. Body fat percentage was highly correlated with leptin in females (r2 = 0.72; P < 0.0005) but not males, who exhibited a modest negative correlation (r2 = 0.25; P < 0.03). Weight (r2 = 0.45; P = 0.02) and BMI (kg/m2) (r2 = 0.81; P < 0.0001) were also significantly correlated in females but not males. These results suggest that: 1) clinical leptin norms based on industrialized populations may represent the highest range of human variation and may not be representative of most human populations; 2) hormonal priming may underlie population variation in leptin profiles; and 3) the relative importance of leptin as a proximate mechanism regulating reproductive effort during human evolution may have been modest.

  8. Leptin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis, but not adipostasis, in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Michel, Maximilian; Page-McCaw, Patrick S; Chen, Wenbiao; Cone, Roger D

    2016-03-15

    Leptin is the primary adipostatic factor in mammals. Produced largely by adipocytes in proportion to total adipose mass, the hormone informs the brain regarding total energy stored as triglycerides in fat cells. The hormone acts on multiple circuits in the brain to regulate food intake, autonomic outflow, and endocrine function to maintain energy balance. In addition to regulating adipose mass, mammalian leptin also plays a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and as a gating factor in reproductive competence. Leptin-deficient mice and people exhibit early onset profound hyperphagia and obesity, diabetes, and infertility. Although leptin and the leptin receptor are found in fish, the hormone is not expressed in adipose tissue, but is found in liver and other tissues. Here, we show that adult zebrafish lacking a functional leptin receptor do not exhibit hyperphagia or increased adiposity, and exhibit normal fertility. However, leptin receptor-deficient larvae have increased numbers of β-cells and increased levels of insulin mRNA. Furthermore, larval zebrafish have been shown to exhibit β-cell hyperplasia in response to high fat feeding or peripheral insulin resistance, and we show here that leptin receptor is required for this response. Adult zebrafish also have increased levels of insulin mRNA and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Thus, a role for leptin in the regulation of β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis appears to be conserved across vertebrates, whereas its role as an adipostatic factor is likely to be a secondary role acquired during the evolution of mammals.

  9. Leptin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis, but not adipostasis, in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Maximilian; Page-McCaw, Patrick S.; Chen, Wenbiao; Cone, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is the primary adipostatic factor in mammals. Produced largely by adipocytes in proportion to total adipose mass, the hormone informs the brain regarding total energy stored as triglycerides in fat cells. The hormone acts on multiple circuits in the brain to regulate food intake, autonomic outflow, and endocrine function to maintain energy balance. In addition to regulating adipose mass, mammalian leptin also plays a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and as a gating factor in reproductive competence. Leptin-deficient mice and people exhibit early onset profound hyperphagia and obesity, diabetes, and infertility. Although leptin and the leptin receptor are found in fish, the hormone is not expressed in adipose tissue, but is found in liver and other tissues. Here, we show that adult zebrafish lacking a functional leptin receptor do not exhibit hyperphagia or increased adiposity, and exhibit normal fertility. However, leptin receptor-deficient larvae have increased numbers of β-cells and increased levels of insulin mRNA. Furthermore, larval zebrafish have been shown to exhibit β-cell hyperplasia in response to high fat feeding or peripheral insulin resistance, and we show here that leptin receptor is required for this response. Adult zebrafish also have increased levels of insulin mRNA and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Thus, a role for leptin in the regulation of β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis appears to be conserved across vertebrates, whereas its role as an adipostatic factor is likely to be a secondary role acquired during the evolution of mammals. PMID:26903647

  10. Influence of weeks of circadian misalignment on leptin levels

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, June; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of circadian, wakefulness–sleep, and feeding systems interact to influence energy homeostasis. Sleep and circadian disruptions are reported to be associated with increased risk of diabetes and obesity, yet the roles of energy balance hormones in these associations are largely unknown. Therefore, in the current study we aimed to assess the influence of several weeks of circadian misalignment (sleep and wakefulness occurring at an inappropriate biological time) on the anorexigenic adipocyte hormone leptin. We utilized data from a previous study designed to assess physiological and cognitive consequences of changes in day length and light exposure as may occur during space flight, including exploration class space missions and exposure to the Martian Sol (day length). We hypothesized that circadian misalignment during an exploration class spaceflight simulation would reduce leptin levels. Following a three-week ~8 hours per night home sleep schedule, 14 healthy participants lived in the laboratory for more than one month. After baseline data collection, participants were scheduled to either 24.0 or 24.6 hours of wakefulness–sleep schedules for 25 days. Changes in the phase of the circadian melatonin rhythm, sleep, and leptin levels were assessed. Half of participants analyzed exhibited circadian misalignment with an average change in phase angle from baseline of ~4 hours and these participants showed reduced leptin levels, sleep latency, stage 2 and total sleep time (7.3 to 6.6 hours) and increased wakefulness after sleep onset (all P < 0.05). The control group remained synchronized and showed significant increases in sleep latency and leptin levels. Our findings indicate that weeks of circadian misalignment, such as that which occurs in circadian sleep disorders, alters leptin levels and therefore may have implications for appetite and energy balance. PMID:23524972

  11. Influence of weeks of circadian misalignment on leptin levels

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, June; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of circadian, wakefulness-sleep, and feeding systems interact to influence energy homeostasis. Sleep and circadian disruptions are reported to be associated with increased risk of diabetes and obesity, yet the roles of energy balance hormones in these associations are largely unknown. Therefore, in the current study we aimed to assess the influence of several weeks of circadian misalignment (sleep and wakefulness occurring at an inappropriate biological time) on the anorexigenic adipocyte hormone leptin. We utilized data from a previous study designed to assess physiological and cognitive consequences of changes in day length and light exposure as may occur during space fight, including exploration class space missions and exposure to the Martian Sol (day length). We hypothesized that circadian misalignment during an exploration class spaceflight simulation would reduce leptin levels. Following a three-week ~8 hours per night home sleep schedule, 14 healthy participants lived in the laboratory for more than one month. After baseline data collection, participants were scheduled to either 24.0 or 24.6 hours of wakefulness-sleep schedules for 25 days. Changes in the phase of the circadian melatonin rhythm, sleep, and leptin levels were assessed. Half of participants analyzed exhibited circadian misalignment with an average change in phase angle from baseline of ~4 hours and these participants showed reduced leptin levels, sleep latency, stage 2 and total sleep time (7.3 to 6.6 hours) and increased wakefulness after sleep onset (all P< 0.05). The control group remained synchronized and showed significant increases in sleep latency and leptin levels. Our findings indicate that weeks of circadian misalignment, such as that which occurs in circadian sleep disorders, alters leptin levels and therefore may have implications for appetite and energy balance. PMID:23616693

  12. Mesolimbic leptin signaling negatively regulates cocaine-conditioned reward.

    PubMed

    Shen, M; Jiang, C; Liu, P; Wang, F; Ma, L

    2016-12-06

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the response to addictive drugs are complex, and increasing evidence indicates that there is a role for appetite-regulating pathways in substance abuse. Leptin, an important adipose hormone that regulates energy balance and appetite, exerts its physiological functions via leptin receptors. However, the role of leptin signaling in regulating the response to cocaine remains unclear. Here we examined the potential role of leptin signaling in cocaine reward using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure. Our results showed that inhibition of leptin signaling by intracerebroventricular infusion of the leptin receptor (LepR) antagonist SMLA during cocaine conditioning increased the cocaine-CPP and upregulated the level of dopamine and its metabolites in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We then selectively knocked down the LepR in the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area (VTA), NAc core and central amygdala (CeA) by injecting AAV-Cre into Lepr(flox/flox) mice. LepR deletion in the VTA increased the dopamine levels in the NAc and enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward. LepR deletion in the NAc core enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward and impaired the effect of the D2-dopamine receptor on cocaine-CPP, whereas LepR deletion in the CeA had no effect on cocaine-CPP but increased the anxiety level of mice. In addition, prior exposure to saccharin increased LepR mRNA and STAT3 phosphorylation in the NAc and VTA and impaired cocaine-CPP. These results indicate that leptin signaling is critically involved in cocaine-conditioned reward and the regulation of drug reward by a natural reward and that these effects are dependent on mesolimbic LepR.

  13. Mesolimbic leptin signaling negatively regulates cocaine-conditioned reward

    PubMed Central

    Shen, M; Jiang, C; Liu, P; Wang, F; Ma, L

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the response to addictive drugs are complex, and increasing evidence indicates that there is a role for appetite-regulating pathways in substance abuse. Leptin, an important adipose hormone that regulates energy balance and appetite, exerts its physiological functions via leptin receptors. However, the role of leptin signaling in regulating the response to cocaine remains unclear. Here we examined the potential role of leptin signaling in cocaine reward using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure. Our results showed that inhibition of leptin signaling by intracerebroventricular infusion of the leptin receptor (LepR) antagonist SMLA during cocaine conditioning increased the cocaine-CPP and upregulated the level of dopamine and its metabolites in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We then selectively knocked down the LepR in the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area (VTA), NAc core and central amygdala (CeA) by injecting AAV-Cre into Leprflox/flox mice. LepR deletion in the VTA increased the dopamine levels in the NAc and enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward. LepR deletion in the NAc core enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward and impaired the effect of the D2-dopamine receptor on cocaine-CPP, whereas LepR deletion in the CeA had no effect on cocaine-CPP but increased the anxiety level of mice. In addition, prior exposure to saccharin increased LepR mRNA and STAT3 phosphorylation in the NAc and VTA and impaired cocaine-CPP. These results indicate that leptin signaling is critically involved in cocaine-conditioned reward and the regulation of drug reward by a natural reward and that these effects are dependent on mesolimbic LepR. PMID:27922639

  14. Ghrelin and leptin pathophysiology in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gunta, Sujana S; Mak, Robert H

    2013-04-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone with additional effects on the regulation of inflammation and the cardiovascular system. It may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cachexia/protein-energy wasting (PEW), inflammation and cardiovascular complications in chronic kidney disease (CKD). There are three circulating gene products of ghrelin, namely, acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and obestatin, each with individual distinct functions. Perturbations of these circulating ghrelin proteins impact the overall milieu of CKD. Leptin is an anorexigenic hormone which is secreted from the adipocytes and interacts with ghrelin and other appetite-regulating hormones. Leptin also plays a role in regulating inflammation and the cardiovascular system. Indeed, ghrelin and leptin may play yin-and-yang roles in CKD pathophysiology. Clinical trials involving the use of the mimetics or antagonists of these hormones are limited to short-term phase I/II studies. Further understanding of their interactions in CKD pathophysiology is needed for potential large-scale clinical trials, which may impact the quality of life and survival of patients with CKD.

  15. Role of leptin resistance in the development of obesity in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Sophie; Caron, Alexandre; Richard, Denis; Picard, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with aging-like cellular processes; in both aging and obesity, resistance to hormones such as insulin and leptin can be observed. Leptin is a circulating hormone/cytokine with central and peripheral effects that is released mainly by subcutaneous white adipose tissue. Centrally, leptin controls food intake, energy expenditure, and fat distribution, whereas it controls (among several others) insulin sensitivity, free fatty acids (FFAs) oxidation, and lipolysis in the periphery. Aging is associated with important changes in both the distribution and the composition of adipose tissue. Fat is redistributed from the subcutaneous to the visceral depot and increased inflammation participates in adipocyte dysfunction. This redistribution of adipose tissue in favor of visceral fat influences negatively both longevity and healthy aging as shown in numerous animal models. These modifications observed during aging are also associated with leptin resistance. This resistance blunts normal central and peripheral functions of leptin, which leads to a decrease in neuroendocrine function and insulin sensitivity, an imbalance in energy regulation, and disturbances in lipid metabolism. Here, we review how age-related leptin resistance triggers metabolic disturbances and affects the longevity of obese patients. Furthermore, we discuss the potential impacts of leptin resistance on the decline of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis observed in elderly individuals. PMID:23869170

  16. Role of leptin resistance in the development of obesity in older patients.

    PubMed

    Carter, Sophie; Caron, Alexandre; Richard, Denis; Picard, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with aging-like cellular processes; in both aging and obesity, resistance to hormones such as insulin and leptin can be observed. Leptin is a circulating hormone/cytokine with central and peripheral effects that is released mainly by subcutaneous white adipose tissue. Centrally, leptin controls food intake, energy expenditure, and fat distribution, whereas it controls (among several others) insulin sensitivity, free fatty acids (FFAs) oxidation, and lipolysis in the periphery. Aging is associated with important changes in both the distribution and the composition of adipose tissue. Fat is redistributed from the subcutaneous to the visceral depot and increased inflammation participates in adipocyte dysfunction. This redistribution of adipose tissue in favor of visceral fat influences negatively both longevity and healthy aging as shown in numerous animal models. These modifications observed during aging are also associated with leptin resistance. This resistance blunts normal central and peripheral functions of leptin, which leads to a decrease in neuroendocrine function and insulin sensitivity, an imbalance in energy regulation, and disturbances in lipid metabolism. Here, we review how age-related leptin resistance triggers metabolic disturbances and affects the longevity of obese patients. Furthermore, we discuss the potential impacts of leptin resistance on the decline of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis observed in elderly individuals.

  17. The role of leptin in diabetes: metabolic effects.

    PubMed

    Meek, Thomas H; Morton, Gregory J

    2016-05-01

    While it is well established that the adiposity hormone leptin plays a key role in the regulation of energy homeostasis, growing evidence suggests that leptin is also critical for glycaemic control. In this review we examine the role of the brain in the glucose-lowering actions of leptin and the potential mediators responsible for driving hyperglycaemia in states of uncontrolled insulin-deficient diabetes (uDM). These considerations highlight the possibility of targeting leptin-sensitive pathways as a therapeutic option for the treatment of diabetes. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Is leptin coming back?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Christoffer Clemmensen and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3906-7 , and by Gerald Shulman and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3909-4 ) and an overview by the Session Chair, Ulf Smith (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3894-7 ).

  18. Interpersonal Stressors Predict Ghrelin and Leptin Levels in Women

    PubMed Central

    Jaremka, Lisa M.; Belury, Martha A.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Malarkey, William B.; Glaser, Ronald; Christian, Lisa; Emery, Charles F.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Stressful events enhance risk for weight gain and adiposity. Ghrelin and leptin, two hormones that are implicated in appetite regulation, may link stressful events to weight gain; a number of rodent studies suggest that stressors increase ghrelin production. The present study investigated the links among daily stressors, ghrelin and leptin, and dietary intake in humans. Method Women (N = 50) completed three study appointments that were scheduled at least 2 weeks apart. At each visit, women arrived fasting and ate a standardized breakfast and lunch. Blood samples were collected 45 minutes after each meal. Women completed a self-report version of the Daily Inventory of Stressful Events (DISE) at each appointment. Two composites were created from the DISE data, reflecting the number of stressors that did and did not involve interpersonal tension. Results Women who experienced more stressors involving interpersonal tension had higher ghrelin and lower leptin levels than those who experienced fewer interpersonal stressors. Furthermore, women who experienced more interpersonal stressors had a diet that was higher in calories, fat, carbohydrates, protein, sugar, sodium, and fiber, and marginally higher in cholesterol, vegetables (but not fruits), vitamin A, and vitamin C. Stressors that did not involve interpersonal tension were unrelated to ghrelin and leptin levels or any of the dietary components examined. Conclusions These data suggest that ghrelin and leptin may link daily interpersonal stressors to weight gain and obesity. PMID:25032903

  19. Temporal changes in nutritional state affect hypothalamic POMC peptide levels independently of leptin in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Aaron J; Stuart, Ronald C; Attard, Courtney A; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Nillni, Eduardo A; Low, Malcolm J

    2014-04-15

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons constitute a critical anorexigenic node in the central nervous system (CNS) for maintaining energy balance. These neurons directly affect energy expenditure and feeding behavior by releasing bioactive neuropeptides but are also subject to signals directly related to nutritional state such as the adipokine leptin. To further investigate the interaction of diet and leptin on hypothalamic POMC peptide levels, we exposed 8- to 10-wk-old male POMC-Discosoma red fluorescent protein (DsRed) transgenic reporter mice to either 24-48 h (acute) or 2 wk (chronic) food restriction, high-fat diet (HFD), or leptin treatment. Using semiquantitative immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassays, we discovered that acute fasting and chronic food restriction decreased the levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and β-endorphin in the hypothalamus, together with decreased DsRed fluorescence, compared with control ad libitum-fed mice. Furthermore, acute but not chronic HFD or leptin administration selectively increased α-MSH levels in POMC fibers and increased DsRed fluorescence in POMC cell bodies. HFD and leptin treatments comparably increased circulating leptin levels at both time points, suggesting that transcription of Pomc and synthesis of POMC peptide products are not modified in direct relation to the concentration of plasma leptin. Our findings indicate that negative energy balance persistently downregulated POMC peptide levels, and this phenomenon may be partially explained by decreased leptin levels, since these changes were blocked in fasted mice treated with leptin. In contrast, sustained elevation of plasma leptin by HFD or hormone supplementation did not significantly alter POMC peptide levels, indicating that enhanced leptin signaling does not chronically increase Pomc transcription and peptide synthesis.

  20. Temporal changes in nutritional state affect hypothalamic POMC peptide levels independently of leptin in adult male mice

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Stuart, Ronald C.; Attard, Courtney A.; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Nillni, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons constitute a critical anorexigenic node in the central nervous system (CNS) for maintaining energy balance. These neurons directly affect energy expenditure and feeding behavior by releasing bioactive neuropeptides but are also subject to signals directly related to nutritional state such as the adipokine leptin. To further investigate the interaction of diet and leptin on hypothalamic POMC peptide levels, we exposed 8- to 10-wk-old male POMC-Discosoma red fluorescent protein (DsRed) transgenic reporter mice to either 24–48 h (acute) or 2 wk (chronic) food restriction, high-fat diet (HFD), or leptin treatment. Using semiquantitative immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassays, we discovered that acute fasting and chronic food restriction decreased the levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and β-endorphin in the hypothalamus, together with decreased DsRed fluorescence, compared with control ad libitum-fed mice. Furthermore, acute but not chronic HFD or leptin administration selectively increased α-MSH levels in POMC fibers and increased DsRed fluorescence in POMC cell bodies. HFD and leptin treatments comparably increased circulating leptin levels at both time points, suggesting that transcription of Pomc and synthesis of POMC peptide products are not modified in direct relation to the concentration of plasma leptin. Our findings indicate that negative energy balance persistently downregulated POMC peptide levels, and this phenomenon may be partially explained by decreased leptin levels, since these changes were blocked in fasted mice treated with leptin. In contrast, sustained elevation of plasma leptin by HFD or hormone supplementation did not significantly alter POMC peptide levels, indicating that enhanced leptin signaling does not chronically increase Pomc transcription and peptide synthesis. PMID:24518677

  1. The role of falling leptin levels in the neuroendocrine and metabolic adaptation to short-term starvation in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jean L; Heist, Kathleen; DePaoli, Alex M; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2003-05-01

    To elucidate the role of leptin in regulating neuroendocrine and metabolic function during an acute fast, six to eight healthy, lean men were studied under four separate conditions: a baseline fed state and three 72-hour fasting studies with administration of either placebo, low-dose recombinant-methionyl human leptin (r-metHuLeptin), or replacement-dose r-metHuLeptin designed to maintain serum leptin at levels similar to those in the fed state. Replacement-dose r-metHuLeptin administered during fasting prevents the starvation-induced changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and, in part, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and IGF-1 binding capacity in serum. Thus, in normal men, the fall in leptin with fasting may be both necessary and sufficient for the physiologic adaptations of these axes, which require leptin levels above a certain threshold for activation. In contrast to findings in mice, fasting-induced changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, renin-aldosterone, and growth hormone-IGF-1 axes as well as fuel utilization may be independent of leptin in humans. The role of leptin in normalizing several starvation-induced neuroendocrine changes may have important implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of eating disorders and obesity.

  2. Association of Increased Serum Leptin with Ameliorated Anemia and Malnutrition in Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients after Parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Jingjing; Yuan, Yanggang; Zha, Xiaoming; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Shen, Zhixiang; Qin, Chao; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Xu, Xueqiang; Ge, Yifei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lina; Cheng, Chen; Yin, Caixia; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Huimin; Ma, Haoyang; Wang, Ningning

    2016-06-16

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates various metabolism, but its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), remains obscure. Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is recommended for severe SHPT patients. Here, the associations between circulating leptin and clinical characteristics in CKD patients were investigated. Effects of PTX on leptin production were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Controls and CKD patients had approximate serum leptin levels in that a larger proportion of CKD patients with body mass index (BMI) <23 kg/m(2). Serum leptin was related to anemia, albumin, and bone metabolism disorders in CKD patients. Lower intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related with higher leptin in PTX patients group. Severe SHPT inhibited uremia-enhanced leptin production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which was attenuated after PTX. High levels of PTH were found to reduce Akt phosphorylation and leptin production in vitro but high levels of calcium and phosphorus were not. Successful PTX was found to improve anemia and malnutrition in severe SHPT patients, and this was correlated with increased circulating leptin levels via up-regulated Akt signaling in adipocytes. These findings indicated the therapeutic potential of leptin and related target pathway for improving survival and quality of life in CKD.

  3. Estradiol and Estrogen Receptor Agonists Oppose Oncogenic Actions of Leptin in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Minqian; Shi, Haifei

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for certain cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Leptin, a hormone secreted by white adipose tissue, precipitates HCC development. Epidemiology data show that men have a much higher incidence of HCC than women, suggesting that estrogens and its receptors may inhibit HCC development and progression. Whether estrogens antagonize oncogenic action of leptin is uncertain. To investigate potential inhibitory effects of estrogens on leptin-induced HCC development, HCC cell line HepG2 cells were treated with leptin in combination with 17 β-estradiol (E2), estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) selective agonist PPT, ER-β selective agonist DPN, or G protein-coupled ER (GPER) selective agonist G-1. Cell number, proliferation, and apoptosis were determined, and leptin- and estrogen-related intracellular signaling pathways were analyzed. HepG2 cells expressed a low level of ER-β mRNA, and leptin treatment increased ER-β expression. E2 suppressed leptin-induced HepG2 cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally E2 reversed leptin-induced STAT3 and leptin-suppressed SOCS3, which was mainly achieved by activation of ER-β. E2 also enhanced ERK via activating ER-α and GPER and activated p38/MAPK via activating ER-β. To conclude, E2 and its receptors antagonize the oncogenic actions of leptin in HepG2 cells by inhibiting cell proliferation and stimulating cell apoptosis, which was associated with reversing leptin-induced changes in SOCS3/STAT3 and increasing p38/MAPK by activating ER-β, and increasing ERK by activating ER-α and GPER. Identifying roles of different estrogen receptors would provide comprehensive understanding of estrogenic mechanisms in HCC development and shed light on potential treatment for HCC patients. PMID:26982332

  4. Serum Leptin Is a Biomarker of Malnutrition in Decompensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Rachakonda, Vikrant; Borhani, Amir A.; Dunn, Michael A.; Andrzejewski, Margaret; Martin, Kelly; Behari, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Malnutrition is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. There is no consensus as to the optimal approach for identifying malnutrition in end-stage liver disease. The aim of this study was to measure biochemical, serologic, hormonal, radiographic, and anthropometric features in a cohort of hospitalized cirrhotic patients to characterize biomarkers for identification of malnutrition. Design In this prospective observational cohort study, 52 hospitalized cirrhotic patients were classified as malnourished (42.3%) or nourished (57.7%) based on mid-arm muscle circumference < 23 cm and dominant handgrip strength < 30 kg. Anthropometric measurements were obtained. Appetite was assessed using the Simplified Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) score. Fasting levels of serum adipokines, cytokines, and hormones were determined using Luminex assays. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine features independently associated with malnutrition. Results Subjects with and without malnutrition differed in several key features of metabolic phenotype including wet and dry BMI, skeletal muscle index, visceral fat index and HOMA-IR. Serum leptin levels were lower and INR was higher in malnourished subjects. Serum leptin was significantly correlated with HOMA-IR, wet and dry BMI, mid-arm muscle circumference, skeletal muscle index, and visceral fat index. Logistic regression analysis revealed that INR and log-transformed leptin were independently associated with malnutrition. Conclusions Low serum leptin and elevated INR are associated with malnutrition in hospitalized patients with end-stage liver disease. PMID:27583675

  5. Roles of leptin in bone metabolism and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu Xu; Yang, Tianfu

    2015-09-01

    Adipose tissue has been more accepted as an active contributor to whole body homeostasis, rather than just a fat depot, since leptin, a 16 kDa protein, was discovered as the product of the obese gene in 1994. With more and more studies conducted on this hormone, it has been shown that there is a close relationship between adipose tissue and bone, which have important effects on each other. Bone is the source of many hormones, such as osteocalcin, that can affect energy metabolism and then the anabolism or catabolism of fat tissue. In contrast, the adipose tissue synthesizes and releases a series of adipokines, which are involved in bone metabolism through direct or indirect effects on bone formation and resorption. Interestingly, leptin, one of the most important cytokines derived from fat tissue, seems to account for the largest part of effects on bone, through direct or indirect involvement in bone remodeling and by playing a significant role in many bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis, bone tumors and even fractures. In this review, we will discuss the progress in leptin research, particularly focusing on the roles of leptin in bone diseases.

  6. Postnatal leptin is necessary for maturation of numerous organs in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Attig, Linda; Larcher, Thibaut; Gertler, Arieh; Abdennebi-Najar, Latifa; Djiane, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The postnatal leptin surge, described particularly in rodents, has been demonstrated to be crucial for hypothalamic maturation and brain development. In the present study, the possible general effects of this hormone on maturation of numerous peripheral organs have been explored. To test this hypothesis, we used a leptin antagonist (L39A/D40A/F41A) to investigate the effects of the blockage of postnatal leptin action on neonatal growth and maturation of organs involved in metabolism regulation, reproduction and immunity. For that purpose, newborn female pups were subcutaneously injected from days 2-13 with either saline or leptin antagonist and sacrificed at weaning. Organs were submitted to histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Leptin antagonist treatment clearly impaired the maturation of pancreas, kidney, thymus and ovary. All these alterations, at the organ level, occurred without changes in the whole-body mass of the animals. Leptin antagonist treatment induced: (1) a reduction in b cell area and a concomitant increase of a cells in Langherans islets in the pancreas, (2) a reduction in the number of glomeruli and a persistence of immature glomeruli in kidney, (3) an increase in the thymic cortical layer thickness, reflecting an unmatured stage, (4) a drastic reduction of the pool of primordial follicles, in ovaries. All these results strongly argue for a crucial role of leptin for the achievement of organ maturation, opening new perspectives in the field of leptin physiology and organ development.

  7. A role for the central histaminergic system in the leptin-mediated increase in cardiovascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sumangala P; Dunbar, Joseph C

    2005-01-15

    The central nervous system (CNS) histaminergic neurons have been shown to regulate feeding behavior and are a target of leptin in the brain. The present study aimed to examine the involvement of the histaminergic system in the leptin-mediated regulation of cardiovascular dynamics. We investigated the cardiovascular responses to the CNS administration of histamine, leptin and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) both in the presence and absence of the histamine H1 antagonist, chlorpheniramine. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine resulted in an immediate increase in both mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and vasoconstricted the iliac, renal and superior mesenteric vessels. The i.c.v. pretreatment with chlorpheniramine attenuated the histamine-induced increase in MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. The i.c.v. administration of leptin increased MAP and HR and decreased vascular conductance. The i.c.v. pretreatment with chlorpheniramine decreased the leptin-induced increase in MAP and the leptin-mediated iliac vasoconstriction. The i.c.v. administration of alpha-MSH also increased MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. However, pretreatment with chlorpheniramine did not influence the central alpha-MSH-mediated increase in MAP, HR and decreased vascular conductance. These results indicate that the central histaminergic system mediated by H1 receptors have a role in the central signaling pathway and is involved in leptin's regulation of cardiovascular dynamics. It appears that leptin directly or indirectly stimulates histaminergic neurons that lead to increased cardiovascular activity.

  8. Postnatal leptin is necessary for maturation of numerous organs in newborn rats

    PubMed Central

    Larcher, Thibaut; Gertler, Arieh; Abdennebi-Najar, Latifa

    2011-01-01

    The postnatal leptin surge, described particularly in rodents, has been demonstrated to be crucial for hypothalamic maturation and brain development. In the present study, the possible general effects of this hormone on maturation of numerous peripheral organs have been explored. To test this hypothesis, we used a leptin antagonist (L39A/D40A/F41A) to investigate the effects of the blockage of postnatal leptin action on neonatal growth and maturation of organs involved in metabolism regulation, reproduction and immunity. For that purpose, newborn female pups were subcutaneously injected from days 2–13 with either saline or leptin antagonist and sacrificed at weaning. Organs were submitted to histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Leptin antagonist treatment clearly impaired the maturation of pancreas, kidney, thymus and ovary. All these alterations, at the organ level, occurred without changes in the whole-body mass of the animals. Leptin antagonist treatment induced: (1) a reduction in β cell area and a concomitant increase of α cells in Langherans islets in the pancreas, (2) a reduction in the number of glomeruli and a persistence of immature glomeruli in kidney, (3) an increase in the thymic cortical layer thickness, reflecting an unmatured stage, (4) a drastic reduction of the pool of primordial follicles, in ovaries. All these results strongly argue for a crucial role of leptin for the achievement of organ maturation, opening new perspectives in the field of leptin physiology and organ development. PMID:21378499

  9. Neuroprotective effects of leptin in the context of obesity and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cecilia; Mudd, Jeremy; Hawkins, Meredith

    2014-12-01

    As the population of the world ages, the prevalence of neurodegenerative disease continues to rise, accompanied by increases in disease burden related to obesity and metabolic disorders. Thus, it will be essential to develop tools for preventing and slowing the progression of these major disease entities. Epidemiologic studies have shown strong associations between obesity, metabolic dysfunction, and neurodegeneration, while animal models have provided insights into the complex relationships between these conditions. Experimentally, the fat-derived hormone leptin has been shown to act as a neuroprotective agent in various animal models of dementia, toxic insults, ischemia/reperfusion, and other neurodegenerative processes. Specifically, leptin minimizes neuronal damage induced by neurotoxins and pro-apoptotic conditions. Leptin has also demonstrated considerable promise in animal models of obesity and metabolic disorders via modulation of glucose homeostasis and energy intake. However, since obesity is known to induce leptin resistance, we hypothesize that resistance to the neuroprotective effects of leptin contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated neurodegenerative diseases. This review aims to explore the literature pertinent to the role of leptin in the protection of neurons from the toxic effects of aging, obesity and metabolic disorders, to investigate the physiological state of leptin resistance and its causes, and to consider how leptin might be employed therapeutically in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

  10. Cross-talk between reproduction and energy homeostasis: central impact of estrogens, leptin and kisspeptin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nestor, Casey C; Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system receives hormonal cues (e.g., estrogens and leptin, among others) that influence reproduction and energy homeostasis. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion via classical steroid signaling and rapid non-classical membrane-initiated signaling. Because GnRH neurons are void of leptin receptors, the actions of leptin on these neurons must be indirect. Although it is clear that the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus is the primary site of overlap between these two systems, it is still unclear which neural network(s) participate in the cross-talk of E2 and leptin, two hormones essential for reproductive function and metabolism. Herein we review the progress made in understanding the interactions between reproduction and energy homeostasis by focusing on the advances made to understand the cellular signaling of E2 and leptin on three neural networks: kisspeptin, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Although critical in mediating the actions of E2 and leptin, considerable work still remains to uncover how these neural networks interact in vivo. PMID:25372735

  11. Cross-talk between reproduction and energy homeostasis: central impact of estrogens, leptin and kisspeptin signaling.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Casey C; Kelly, Martin J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2014-03-01

    The central nervous system receives hormonal cues (e.g., estrogens and leptin, among others) that influence reproduction and energy homeostasis. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion via classical steroid signaling and rapid non-classical membrane-initiated signaling. Because GnRH neurons are void of leptin receptors, the actions of leptin on these neurons must be indirect. Although it is clear that the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus is the primary site of overlap between these two systems, it is still unclear which neural network(s) participate in the cross-talk of E2 and leptin, two hormones essential for reproductive function and metabolism. Herein we review the progress made in understanding the interactions between reproduction and energy homeostasis by focusing on the advances made to understand the cellular signaling of E2 and leptin on three neural networks: kisspeptin, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Although critical in mediating the actions of E2 and leptin, considerable work still remains to uncover how these neural networks interact in vivo.

  12. Effects of estrogen on food intake, serum leptin levels and leptin mRNA expression in adipose tissue of female rats.

    PubMed

    Fungfuang, Wirasak; Terada, Misao; Komatsu, Noriyuki; Moon, Changjong; Saito, Toru R

    2013-09-01

    The integration of metabolism and reproduction involves complex interactions of hypothalamic neuropeptides with metabolic hormones, fuels, and sex steroids. Of these, estrogen influences food intake, body weight, and the accumulation and distribution of adipose tissue. In this study, the effects of estrogen on food intake, serum leptin levels, and leptin mRNA expression were evaluated in ovariectomized rats. Seven-week-old female Wistar-Imamichi rats were ovariectomized and divided into three treatment groups: group 1 (the control group) received sesame oil, group 2 was given 17β-estradiol benzoate, and group 3 received 17β-estradiol benzoate plus progesterone. The body weight and food consumption of each rat were determined daily. Serum leptin levels and leptin mRNA expression were measured by ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Food consumption in the control group was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that in groups 2 and 3, although body weight did not significantly differ among the three groups. The serum leptin concentration and leptin mRNA expression were significantly higher (P<0.05) in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1, but no significant difference existed between groups 2 and 3. In conclusion, estrogen influenced food intake via the modulation of leptin signaling pathway in ovariectomized rats.

  13. Menstrual cycle hormones, food intake, and cravings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Food craving and intake are affected by steroid hormones during the menstrual cycle, especially in the luteal phase, when craving for certain foods has been reported to increase. However, satiety hormones such as leptin have also been shown to affect taste sensitivity, and therefore food ...

  14. From the conceptual basis to the discovery of leptin.

    PubMed

    Fève, Bruno; Bastard, Jean-Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Two years ago, the Lasker Award was shared by Douglas Coleman and Jeffrey Friedman for their discovery of leptin, a hormone that exerts a key role in the central regulation of appetite and body weight. Douglas Coleman is recognized as the researcher who raised the hypothesis and predicted that a circulating satiety factor was lacking in the ob/ob mouse, and predicted that this factor acted at the hypothalamic level to modulate food intake. After three decades, in an attempt to identify the genes that were mutated in the ob/ob mouse, Jeffrey Friedman found that the ob gene encodes a protein hormone that reverses obesity and other abnormalities of this genetic rodent model of obesity. This discovery was a landmark event in physiology, and revolutionized our understanding of energy homeostasis. This short review aims to summarize the main steps that lead to the identification of leptin, the product of the ob gene.

  15. In vivo regulation of intestinal absorption of amino acids by leptin.

    PubMed

    Fanjul, Carmen; Barrenetxe, Jaione; De Pablo-Maiso, Lorena; Lostao, María Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by the gastric mucosa and is able to reach the intestinal lumen and bind to its receptors located in the apical membranes of enterocytes. We have previously demonstrated that apical leptin inhibits uptake of amino acids in rat intestine in vitro and in Caco-2 cells. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of leptin on absorption of amino acids using in vivo techniques, which generate situations closer to physiological conditions. In vivo intestinal absorption of amino acids in rats was measured by isolating a jejunal loop and using the single-pass perfusion system. Disappearance of glutamine (Gln), proline (Pro), and β-alanine (β-Ala) from the perfusate, in the absence or presence of leptin, was measured using a radioactivity method. Luminal leptin (25 nM) inhibited the absorption of 2 mM Pro, 5 mM β-Ala, and 5 mM Gln by approximately 45% after 5-15 min; the effect remained constant until the end of the experiment (80 min) and was rapidly and completely reversed when leptin was removed from the perfusion medium. Moreover, leptin was able to regulate the absorption of galactose and Gln in the same animal, indicating a direct action of the hormone on the specific transporters implicated in the uptake of each nutrient. The results of the present work indicate that luminal leptin decreases absorption of amino acids in vivo in a short-term manner and in a reversible way. These results, together with our previous findings, make it evident that leptin can be considered as a hormone which provides the intestine with a control mechanism to handle absorption of nutrients.

  16. Leptin mediates seasonal variation in some but not all symptoms of sickness in Siberian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Elizabeth D.; Demas, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Many seasonally breeding species, including Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), exhibit seasonal variation in sickness responses. One hypothesis regarding the mechanism of this variation is that sickness intensity tracks an animal's energetic state, such that sickness is attenuated in the season that an animal has the lowest fat stores. Energetic state may be signaled via leptin, an adipose hormone that provides a signal of fat stores. Siberian hamsters respond to extended housing in short, winter-like days by reducing fat stores and leptin levels, relative to those housed in long, summer-like days. Sickness responses are also attenuated in short-day hamsters as compared to long-day hamsters. We hypothesized that leptin provides a physiological signal by which seasonally breeding animals modulate sickness responses, such that animals with higher leptin levels show increased sickness intensity. To test this, we provided short-day hamsters with a long-day-like leptin signal and assessed their responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a sickness-inducing antigen. We compared these responses to short-day vehicle-, long-day vehicle-, and long-day leptin-treated hamsters. Unexpectedly, LPS induced a hypothermic response (rather than fever) in all groups. Short-day vehicle-treated hamsters exhibited the greatest LPS-induced hypothermia, and leptin treatment attenuated this response, making hypothermia more long-day-like. Contrary to our hypothesis, short-day leptin-treated hamsters showed the least pronounced LPS-induced anorexia among all groups. These results suggest that leptin may mediate some but not all aspects of seasonal sickness variation in this species. Future studies should be targeted at determining roles of other energetic hormones in regulating seasonal sickness response variation. PMID:25461974

  17. Leptin mediates seasonal variation in some but not all symptoms of sickness in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Elizabeth D; Demas, Gregory E

    2014-11-01

    Many seasonally breeding species, including Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), exhibit seasonal variation in sickness responses. One hypothesis regarding the mechanism of this variation is that sickness intensity tracks an animal's energetic state, such that sickness is attenuated in the season that an animal has the lowest fat stores. Energetic state may be signaled via leptin, an adipose hormone that provides a signal of fat stores. Siberian hamsters respond to extended housing in short, winter-like days by reducing fat stores and leptin levels, relative to those housed in long, summer-like days. Sickness responses are also attenuated in short-day hamsters as compared to long-day hamsters. We hypothesized that leptin provides a physiological signal by which seasonally breeding animals modulate sickness responses, such that animals with higher leptin levels show increased sickness intensity. To test this, we provided short-day hamsters with a long-day-like leptin signal and assessed their responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a sickness-inducing antigen. We compared these responses to short-day vehicle-, long-day vehicle-, and long-day leptin-treated hamsters. Unexpectedly, LPS induced a hypothermic response (rather than fever) in all groups. Short-day vehicle-treated hamsters exhibited the greatest LPS-induced hypothermia, and leptin treatment attenuated this response, making hypothermia more long-day-like. Contrary to our hypothesis, short-day leptin-treated hamsters showed the least pronounced LPS-induced anorexia among all groups. These results suggest that leptin may mediate some but not all aspects of seasonal sickness variation in this species. Future studies should be targeted at determining roles of other energetic hormones in regulating seasonal sickness response variation.

  18. Endogenous leptin contributes to baroreflex suppression within the solitary tract nucleus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Diz, Debra I

    2014-12-01

    The decline in cardiovagal baroreflex function that occurs with aging is accompanied by an increase in circulating leptin levels. Our previous studies showed that exogenous leptin impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate in younger rats, but the contribution of this hormone to baroreflex dysfunction during aging is unknown. Thus we assessed the effect of bilateral leptin microinjection (500 fmol/60 nl) within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) on the baroreflex sensitivity in older (66 ± 2 wk of age) urethane/chloralose anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats with elevated circulating leptin levels. In contrast to the 63% reduction observed in younger rats, leptin did not alter the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia evoked by phenylephrine in older rats (0.76 ± 0.19 baseline vs. 0.71 ± 0.15 ms/mmHg after leptin; P = 0.806). We hypothesized that this loss of sensitivity reflected endogenous suppression of the baroreflex by elevated leptin, rather than cardiovascular resistance to the peptide. Indeed, NTS administration of a leptin receptor antagonist (75 pmol/120 nl) improved the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in older rats (0.73 ± 0.13 baseline vs. 1.19 ± 0.26 at 10 min vs. 1.87 ± 0.32 at 60 min vs. 1.22 ± 0.54 ms/mmHg at 120 min; P = 0.002), with no effect in younger rats. There was no effect of the leptin antagonist on the baroreflex sensitivity for tachycardia, responses to cardiac vagal chemosensitive fiber activation, or resting hemodynamics in older rats. These findings suggest that the actions of endogenous leptin within the NTS, either produced locally or derived from the circulation, contribute to baroreflex suppression during aging.

  19. Acute effects of leptin on 5'-deiodinases are modulated by thyroid state of fed rats.

    PubMed

    Cabanelas, A; Lisboa, P C; Moura, E G; Pazos-Moura, C C

    2007-11-01

    Leptin has been shown to modulate deiodinase type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) enzymes responsible for thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) conversion. Previously, it was demonstrated that a single injection of leptin in euthyroid fed rats rapidly increased liver, pituitary, and thyroid D1 activity, and simultaneously decreased brown adipose tissue (BAT) and hypothalamic D2 activity. We have now examined D1 and D2 activities, two hours after a single subcutaneous injection of leptin (8 microg/100 g BW) into hypo- and hyperthyroid rats. In hypothyroid rats, leptin did not modify pituitary, liver and thyroid D1, and thyroid D2 activity, while pituitary D2 was decreased by 41% (p<0.05) and hypothalamic D2 showed a 1.5-fold increase. In hyperthyroid rats, thyroid and pituitary D1, and pituitary and hypothalamic D2 were not affected by leptin injection, while liver D1 showed a 42% decrease (p<0.05). BAT D2 was decreased by leptin injection both in hypo- and hyperthyroid states (42 and 48% reduction, p<0.001). Serum TH and TSH showed the expected variations of hypo- and hyperthyroid state, and leptin had no effect. Serum insulin was lower in hypothyroid than in hyperthyroid rats and remained unchanged after leptin. Therefore, acute effects of leptin on D1 and D2 activity, expect for BAT D2, were abolished or modified by altered thyroid state, in a tissue-specific manner, showing an IN VIVO interplay of thyroid hormones and leptin in deiodinase regulation.

  20. Evaluation of Salivary Leptin Levels in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Advanced Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Bayani, Mojtaba; Torabi, Sepehr; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Mohammadnejhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Leptin is a hormone-like protein produced by the adipose tissue. It plays an important role in protection of host against inflammation and infection. Some studies have reported changes in leptin levels in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), saliva and blood serum of patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to compare the salivary leptin levels in patients with advanced periodontitis and healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, the salivary samples of healthy individuals and patients with advanced periodontitis with clinical attachment loss >5mm were obtained using a standardized method and the leptin levels were measured in the salivary samples by means of ELISA. The effects of the periodontal status and sex on the salivary leptin levels of both groups were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA. Results: The means ± standard deviation (SD) of salivary leptin levels in healthy subjects and patients with advanced periodontitis were 34.27±6.88 and 17.87±5.89 pg/mL, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of sex on the salivary leptin levels was not significant (P=0.91), while the effect of advanced periodontitis on the salivary leptin levels was significant compared to healthy individuals (P<0.0001). Conclusions: In patients with advanced periodontitis, the salivary leptin levels were significantly lower compared to healthy individuals. Thus, assessment of salivary leptin can be done as a non-invasive and simple method to determine the susceptibility of patients to advanced periodontitis. PMID:27536322

  1. Autophagy induction by leptin contributes to suppression of apoptosis in cancer cells and xenograft model: involvement of p53/FoxO3A axis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Saroj; Kim, Mi Jin; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Sohn, Dong-Hwan; Lee, Sung Hee; Song, Kyung; Choi, Dong Young; Lee, Eung Seok; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2015-03-30

    Leptin, a hormone mainly produced from adipose tissue, has been shown to induce proliferation of cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptin-induced tumor progression have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in leptin-induced cancer cell proliferation using human hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Herein, we showed that leptin treatment caused autophagy induction as assessed by increase in expression of autophagy-related genes, including beclin-1, Atg5 and LC3 II, further induction of autophagosome formation and autophagic flux. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagic process by treatment with inhibitors and LC3B gene silencing blocked leptin-induced increase in cell number and suppression of apoptosis, indicating a crucial role of autophagy in leptin-induced tumor progression. Moreover, gene silencing of p53 or FoxO3A prevented leptin-induced LC3 II protein expression, suggesting an involvement of p53/FoxO3A axis in leptin-induced autophagy activation. Leptin administration also accelerated tumor growth in BALB/c nude mice, which was found to be autophagy dependent. Taken together, our results demonstrate that leptin-induced tumor growth is mediated by autophagy induction and autophagic process would be a promising target to regulate development of cancer caused by leptin production.

  2. Serum leptin as an indicator of fat levels in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the southeastern USA.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, M Colter; Phillips, Shannon P; Whisnant, Scott; Tyndall, James; Lashley, Marcus A; DePerno, Christopher S

    2014-10-01

    Leptin is a hormone that plays a key role in regulating energy intake, appetite, and metabolism. In some mammals, leptin has been shown to circulate at levels proportional to body fat, which could make it useful for nonlethal evaluation of body condition. Leptin's usefulness for estimating fat levels (i.e., body condition) of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is unknown. We quantified serum leptin concentrations in a sample of free-ranging, female deer collected in July 2008 and March 2009 from coastal North Carolina, USA. We compared leptin concentrations with kidney fat index, femur marrow fat index, and kidney fat mass. Additionally, we assessed differences in leptin concentrations between the two seasons, lactating and nonlactating females, and gestating and nongestating females. Leptin concentrations were similar between seasons but were lower in lactating and gestating females. We did not detect significant relationships between leptin and the body fat metrics, indicating that leptin may have limited value for estimating fat reserves in white-tailed deer.

  3. Investigation of the leptin levels in the blood serum of Cyprinus carpio (Linnaeus, 1758) and Capoeta trutta (Heckel, 1843).

    PubMed

    Köprücü, S; Algül, S

    2015-06-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone secreted by adipose tissues in the various teleost fish and vertebrates. Leptin has been suggested to have an important role in a range physiological function, including regulation of food intake, reproduction, immune function, energy expenditure, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In this study, leptin levels in the blood serum of Cyprinus carpio and Capoeta trutta were determined. Then the results were compared between two species and between sexes of each species. In addition, leptin levels were also compared with the body weight and length of both C. carpio and C. trutta. Leptin level was analysed using available enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit (Rat leptin ELISA kit, catalog no: SK00050-08). Leptin levels showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) that in relation to between two species and between sexes of each species. It has been shown that not significantly correlated when examined correlations between the leptin level in blood serum and body weight (r = 0.192, p = 0.380) or length (r = 0.102, p = 0.644) of C. carpio. Similarly, the correlations between leptin level in blood serum and body weight (r = 0.021, p = 0.959) or length (r = 0.123, p = 0.595) of C. trutta were also not significant.

  4. Beyond Leptin: Emerging Candidates for the Integration of Metabolic and Reproductive Function during Negative Energy Balance.

    PubMed

    True, Cadence; Grove, Kevin L; Smith, M Susan

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive status is tightly coupled to metabolic state in females, and ovarian cycling in mammals is halted when energy output exceeds energy input, a metabolic condition known as negative energy balance. This inhibition of reproductive function during negative energy balance occurs due to suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release in the hypothalamus. The GnRH secretagogue kisspeptin is also inhibited during negative energy balance, indicating that inhibition of reproductive neuroendocrine circuits may occur upstream of GnRH itself. Understanding the metabolic signals responsible for the inhibition of reproductive pathways has been a compelling research focus for many years. A predominant theory in the field is that the status of energy balance is conveyed to reproductive neuroendocrine circuits via the adipocyte hormone leptin. Leptin is stimulatory for GnRH release and lower levels of leptin during negative energy balance are believed to result in decreased stimulatory drive for GnRH cells. However, recent evidence found that restoring leptin to physiological levels did not restore GnRH function in three different models of negative energy balance. This suggests that although leptin may be an important permissive signal for reproductive function as indicated by many years of research, factors other than leptin must critically contribute to negative energy balance-induced reproductive inhibition. This review will focus on emerging candidates for the integration of metabolic status and reproductive function during negative energy balance.

  5. Beyond Leptin: Emerging Candidates for the Integration of Metabolic and Reproductive Function during Negative Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    True, Cadence; Grove, Kevin L.; Smith, M. Susan

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive status is tightly coupled to metabolic state in females, and ovarian cycling in mammals is halted when energy output exceeds energy input, a metabolic condition known as negative energy balance. This inhibition of reproductive function during negative energy balance occurs due to suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release in the hypothalamus. The GnRH secretagogue kisspeptin is also inhibited during negative energy balance, indicating that inhibition of reproductive neuroendocrine circuits may occur upstream of GnRH itself. Understanding the metabolic signals responsible for the inhibition of reproductive pathways has been a compelling research focus for many years. A predominant theory in the field is that the status of energy balance is conveyed to reproductive neuroendocrine circuits via the adipocyte hormone leptin. Leptin is stimulatory for GnRH release and lower levels of leptin during negative energy balance are believed to result in decreased stimulatory drive for GnRH cells. However, recent evidence found that restoring leptin to physiological levels did not restore GnRH function in three different models of negative energy balance. This suggests that although leptin may be an important permissive signal for reproductive function as indicated by many years of research, factors other than leptin must critically contribute to negative energy balance-induced reproductive inhibition. This review will focus on emerging candidates for the integration of metabolic status and reproductive function during negative energy balance. PMID:22645510

  6. Reduced fasting-induced activation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons is associated with hyperleptinemia and increased leptin sensitivity in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Fasting increases c-Fos expression in neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) in lean, but not in hyperleptinemic mice with late-onset obesity (LOO). Although obesity is associated with leptin resistance, we hypothesized that under fasting conditions, leptin sensitivity might be restored and that hyperleptinemia may counteract the neuronal response to fasting. We investigated whether the reduced fasting response of ARC neurons in LOO is paralleled by an increase in leptin sensitivity, as measured by leptin-induced STAT-3 phosphorylation. To assess leptin's role in the modulation of the fasting-induced ARC activation, we investigated c-Fos responses and hormone and metabolite levels in hyperleptinemic diet-induced obese (DIO) and in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Leptin induced a stronger STAT-3 phosphorylation in fasted LOO and lean mice than in ad libitum-fed animals. Similar to LOO, hyperleptinemic DIO mice showed no c-Fos response after fasting, while ob/ob mice showed a stronger response than lean control mice. Mimicking hyperleptinemia by repeated leptin injections in lean mice during fasting attenuated the fasting-induced c-Fos expression. Our findings indicate that high leptin levels prevent the fasting-induced activation of ARC neurons in mice. Moreover, leptin sensitivity is dynamic in obese subjects and depends on the feeding status. During short-term increases in leptin sensitivity, e.g., during fasting, leptin signaling appears to be effective, even in hyperleptinemic obesity. As reflected by the blockade of the fasting-induced ARC activation, fasting seems to interfere with the responsiveness of the ARC to signals related to the status of energy intake.

  7. Effect of intravenous infusion of recombinant ovine leptin on feed intake and serum concentrations of GH, LH, insulin, IGF-1, cortisol, and thyroxine in growing prepubertal ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Morrison, C D; Wood, R; McFadin, E L; Whitley, N C; Keisler, D H

    2002-04-01

    In sheep, serum concentrations of leptin change congruently with increases or decreases in nutritional status, while intracerebroventricular infusions of leptin dramatically suppress feed intake in well-fed lambs, and may also increase growth hormone (GH), and/or luteinizing hormone (LH) in undernourished lambs. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of peripherally delivered ovine leptin, via intravenous infusions, on feed intake and serum concentrations of GH, LH, insulin, IGF-1, cortisol, and thyroxine. Twelve ewe lambs weighing 29.4 +/- 0.7 kg were infused intravenously with a linearly increasing dose of leptin or saline (n = 6 per group) for 10 days, reaching a maximum dose delivered of 0.5mg/h on day 10. Feed intake was assessed twice daily, and blood samples were collected every 10 min for 6 h on days 0, 2, 5, 8, and 10. Serum concentrations of leptin increased in leptin-treated lambs by day 2 (P = 0.05), and continued to increase to concentrations 9-fold greater than saline-infused lambs by day 10 (P < 0.001). Despite the substantial increase in serum leptin, feed intake did not differ between leptin and saline-infused lambs except on day 3.5 (P = 0.01). Furthermore, intravenous infusions of leptin did not significantly influence serum concentrations of insulin, cortisol, IGF-1, thyroxine, LH, or GH. Collectively, these observations contrast with the potent hypophagic effects of leptin when delivered intracerebroventricularly into well-fed lambs. The reasons for the disparate response of lambs treated intravenously with leptin, versus that reported for lambs treated intracerebroventricularly with leptin are not known, but may provide insight into the mechanism(s) of leptin resistance.

  8. Leptin increases L-type Ca2+ channel expression and GnRH-stimulated LH release in LβT2 gonadotropes

    PubMed Central

    Avelino-Cruz, José E.; Flores, Amira; Cebada, Jorge; Mellon, Pamela L.; Felix, Ricardo; Monjaraz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Leptin, a mediator of long-term regulation of energy balance, has been implicated in the release of adenohypophyseal gonadotropins by regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the hypothalamus. However, a direct effect of leptin on hormone release from gonadotropes remains virtually unexplored. In the current report, we assessed the long-term (48 h) actions of leptin on voltage-gated channel activity and luteinizing hormone (LH) production in mouse pituitary gonadotrope LβT2 cells. Electrophysiological recordings showed that leptin treatment significantly increased whole-cell patch clamp Ba2+ current through L-type Ca2+ channels. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed increased levels of L-type (α1D) Ca2+ channel mRNA. Likewise, radioimmunoassays using specific antibodies provided evidence that leptin alone had no effect on LH release but did enhance GnRH-induced secretion of the hormone. Leptin had no apparent effects on LH gene transcription in absence of GnRH, as measured by transient transfection assays using a LH promoter-reporter gene and real time RT-PCR. These observations suggest that leptin might affect LH release by acting directly on the gonadotropes, favoring hormone production by enhancing responsiveness to GnRH as a result of increased Ca2+ channel expression. PMID:18834922

  9. Role of leptin in energy-deprivation states: normal human physiology and clinical implications for hypothalamic amenorrhoea and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jean L; Mantzoros, Christos S

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that plays a key part in energy homoeostasis. Advances in leptin physiology have established that the main role of this hormone is to signal energy availability in energy-deficient states. Studies in animals and human beings have shown that low concentrations of leptin are fully or partly responsible for starvation-induced changes in neuroendocrine axes, including low reproductive, thyroid, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) hormones. Disease states such as exercise-induced hypothalamic amenorrhoea and anorexia nervosa are also associated with low concentrations of leptin and a similar spectrum of neuroendocrine abnormalities. We have recently shown in an interventional, proof-of-concept study that leptin can restore ovulatory menstrual cycles and improve reproductive, thyroid, and IGF hormones and bone markers in hypothalamic amenorrhoea. Further studies are warranted to establish the safety and effectiveness of leptin for the infertility and osteoporosis associated with hypothalamic amenorrhoea, and to clarify its role in anorexia nervosa.

  10. Does leptin signal adiposity in the egg-laying mammal, Tachyglossus aculeatus?

    PubMed

    Sprent, Jenny; Jones, Susan M; Nicol, Stewart C

    2012-09-01

    Leptin is a peptide hormone best known for its role in feedback regulation of adiposity in eutherian mammals. Normally an increase in adipose tissue mass leads to an increase in circulating leptin which increases energy expenditure and limits food intake, but in hibernating eutherian mammals this relationship may change to allow prehibernatory fattening. The echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) is a monotreme mammal which accumulates significant fat reserves before entering hibernation, and mates immediately at the end of hibernation. We hypothesised that echidnas would show a strong relationship between body mass and plasma leptin for most of the year which would change during the pre-hibernatory period. We measured plasma leptin and body mass in free-ranging echidnas over several reproductive and hibernation cycles. There were significant seasonal variations in plasma leptin in both sexes, with the highest levels occurring in hibernation and in mating females. The lowest levels were found in males when they were foraging maximally after the reproductive period. We used mass%, body mass at the time of sampling as a percentage of long term mean mass, as a proxy for adiposity. There was a weak negative relationship between mass% and plasma leptin, from which we infer a weak negative relationship between adiposity and plasma leptin as has been found in reptiles and birds, rather than the strong positive relationship found in other mammals.

  11. Leptin intake during lactation prevents obesity and affects food intake and food preferences in later life.

    PubMed

    Palou, Andreu; Picó, Catalina

    2009-02-01

    Breast milk is practically the only food ingested during the first months of life in fully breastfed infants and it is assumed to match the infant's nutritional needs. Epidemiological data suggest that breastfeeding compared with infant formula feeding confers protection against several chronic diseases later on in life and, particularly, against obesity and related medical complications. However, causality has not been related to any specific compound of breast milk. Recent data in our laboratory have identified leptin as the specific compound that is responsible for some of these beneficial effects of breastfeeding. The hormone leptin was identified as a key candidate because it is present in breast milk, but is not present in infant formula, and when ingested during the suckling period can be absorbed by the immature stomach exerting biological effects. Evidence of the beneficial effects of breast milk leptin was obtained from human studies, showing that milk-borne maternal leptin appeared to give moderate protection to infants from excess weight gain. Direct cause-effect evidence was obtained in rats, where oral leptin supplementation during the suckling period resulted in a decrease in food intake, affected food preferences in favour of carbohydrates versus fat, and protected against overweight in adulthood, with an improvement of related parameters such as leptin and insulin sensitivity. These findings open a new area of research on the use of leptin in the design of more appropriate infant formula, which is significant considering the increasing incidence of obesity and its associated medical complications.

  12. Role of Leptin Deficiency, Inefficiency, and Leptin Receptors in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wasim, Muhammad; Awan, Fazli Rabbi; Najam, Syeda Sadia; Khan, Abdul Rehman; Khan, Haq Nawaz

    2016-10-01

    Leptin protein consists of 167 amino acids, which is mainly secreted from the white adipose tissue. This protein acts on the hypothalamic regions of the brain which control eating behavior, thus playing a significant role in maintaining body's metabolism. Leptin receptors belong to glycoprotein 130 (gp130) family of cytokine receptors and exist in six isoforms (LEPR a-f), and all the isoforms are encoded by LEPR gene; out of these isoforms, the LEPR-b receptor is the 'longest form,' and in most of the cases, mutations in this isoform cause severe obesity. Also, mutations in the leptin gene (LEP) or its receptors gene can lead to obesity. Some biochemical pathways affect the bioactivity of leptin and/or its receptors. To date, eleven pathogenic mutations have been reported in the LEP which are p.L72S, p.N103K, p.R105W, p.H118L, p.S141C, p.W121X c.104_106delTCA, c.135del3bp, c.398delG, c.481_482delCT, and c.163C>T. Different mutations in the LEPR have also been reported as c.2396-1 G>T, c.1675 G>A, p.P316T, etc. In some studies, where leptin was deficient, leptin replacement therapy has shown positive impact by preventing weight gain and obesity.

  13. The role of cannabinoids and leptin in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Agar, E

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoids exert a neuroprotective influence on some neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists or compounds can provide symptom relief or control the progression of neurological diseases. However, the molecular mechanism and the effectiveness of these agents in controlling the progression of most of these diseases remain unclear. Cannabinoids may exert effects via a number of mechanisms and interactions with neurotransmitters, neurotropic factors and neuropeptides. Leptin is a peptide hormone involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance via its actions on specific hypothalamic nuclei. Leptin receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, especially in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, cortex and cerebellum. Leptin has also shown neuroprotective properties in a number of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Therefore, cannabinoid and leptin hold therapeutic potential for neurological diseases. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects on these agents may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  14. Leptin, a mediator of cardiac damage associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, E; Jurado-López, R; Cervantes-Escalera, P; Cachofeiro, V; Miana, M

    2014-04-01

    Obesity and excess of adipose tissue are associated with the development of cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. At the cardiac level, various morphological adaptations in cardiac structure and function occur in obese individuals. Different mechanisms linking obesity to these modifications have been postulated. Adipose tissue and epicardial fat releases a large number of cytokines and bioactive mediators such as leptin. Leptin circulates in proportion to body fat mass, thus serving as a satiety signal and informing central metabolic control centers as to the status of peripheral energy stores. It participates in numerous other functions both peripherally and centrally, as indicated by the wide distribution of leptin and the different isoforms of its receptor in different tissues including the heart. This hormone has distinct effects on the reproductive, cardiovascular, and immune systems; however, its role in the heart could mediate wide physiological effects observed in obese individuals. Oxidative stress is associated with obesity and may be considered to be a unifying mechanism in the development of obesity-related comorbidities. It has been reported that obesity may induce systemic oxidative stress; in turn, oxidative stress is associated with an irregular production of adipokines. We herein review the current knowledge of cardiac effects of leptin and the possible mechanisms that are involved, including oxidative stress that plays a major role in the development of cardiovascular damage.

  15. Role of the neural pathway from hindbrain to hypothalamus in interaction of GLP1 and leptin in rats.

    PubMed

    Akieda-Asai, Sayaka; Poleni, Paul-Emile; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Date, Yukari

    2014-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) and leptin are anorectic hormones. Previously, we have shown that i.p. coadministration of subthreshold GLP1 with leptin dramatically reduced food intake in rats. In this study, by using midbrain-transected rats, we investigated the role of the neural pathway from the hindbrain to the hypothalamus in the interaction of GLP1 and leptin in reducing food intake. Food intake reduction induced by coinjection of GLP1 and leptin was blocked in midbrain-transected rats. These findings indicate that the ascending neural pathway from the hindbrain plays an important role in transmitting the anorectic signals provided by coinjection of GLP1 and leptin.

  16. Leptin in human physiology and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dardeno, Tina A; Chou, Sharon H; Moon, Hyun-Seuk; Chamberland, John P; Fiorenza, Christina G; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2010-07-01

    Leptin regulates energy homeostasis and reproductive, neuroendocrine, immune, and metabolic functions. In this review, we describe the role of leptin in human physiology and review evidence from recent "proof of concept" clinical trials using recombinant human leptin in subjects with congenital leptin deficiency, hypoleptinemia associated with energy-deficient states, and hyperleptinemia associated with garden-variety obesity. Since most obese individuals are largely leptin-tolerant or -resistant, therapeutic uses of leptin are currently limited to patients with complete or partial leptin deficiency, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. Leptin administration in these energy-deficient states may help restore associated neuroendocrine, metabolic, and immune function and bone metabolism. Leptin treatment is currently available for individuals with congenital leptin deficiency and congenital lipoatrophy. The long-term efficacy and safety of leptin treatment in hypothalamic amenorrhea and acquired lipoatrophy are currently under investigation. Whether combination therapy with leptin and potential leptin sensitizers will prove effective in the treatment of garden-variety obesity and whether leptin may have a role in weight loss maintenance is being greatly anticipated.

  17. Hippocampal leptin suppresses methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2010-10-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide which is synthesized in white adipose tissue. The actions of leptin are mediated by the leptin receptor which is abundantly localized in the hypothalamus and is involved in energy regulation and balance. Recently, there has been evidence suggesting that the leptin receptor is also present in the hippocampus and may be involved with hippocampal excitability and long-term depression. To investigate the physiological function of leptin signalling in the hippocampus, we studied the effects of leptin on methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity by utilizing intra-hippocampal infusion (i.h.) in mice. Our results show that the infusion of leptin (5 ng each bilaterally i.h.) does not affect the basal ambulatory activity but significantly suppresses methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity as compared to saline-infused controls. Interestingly, higher dose of leptin increases the suppression of the methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity. The i.h. infusion of leptin did not activate the JAK-STAT pathway, which is the cellular signalling pathway through which leptin acts in the hypothalamus. The infusion of leptin also did not affect activation of p42/44 MAPK which is known to be another leptin-induced signalling pathway in the brain. These results demonstrate that leptin has a novel potential suppressive effect on methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and also suggest that there must be an alternative pathway in the hippocampus through which leptin signalling is being mediated.

  18. Leptin in Human Physiology and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dardeno, Tina A.; Chou, Sharon H.; Moon, Hyun-Seuk; Chamberland, John P.; Fiorenza, Christina G.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2010-01-01

    Leptin regulates energy homeostasis and reproductive, neuroendocrine, immune, and metabolic functions. In this review, we describe the role of leptin in human physiology and review evidence from recent “proof of concept” clinical trials using recombinant human leptin in subjects with congenital leptin deficiency, hypoleptinemia associated with energy-deficient states, and hyperleptinemia associated with garden-variety obesity. Since most obese individuals are largely leptin-tolerant or -resistant, therapeutic uses of leptin are currently limited to patients with complete or partial leptin deficiency, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. Leptin administration in these energy-deficient states may help restore associated neuroendocrine, metabolic, and immune function and bone metabolism. Leptin treatment is currently available for individuals with congenital leptin deficiency and congenital lipoatrophy. The long-term efficacy and safety of leptin treatment in hypothalamic amenorrhea and acquired lipoatrophy are currently under investigation. Whether combination therapy with leptin and potential leptin sensitizers will prove effective in the treatment of garden-variety obesity and whether leptin may have a role in weight loss maintenance is being greatly anticipated. PMID:20600241

  19. Sam68 Mediates the Activation of Insulin and Leptin Signalling in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Vilariño-García, Teresa; de la Cruz, Luis; Virizuela, Juan A.; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. High insulin and leptin levels seem to have a role modulating the growth of these tumours. Sam68 is an RNA-binding protein with signalling functions that has been found to be overexpressed in breast cancer. Moreover, Sam68 may be recruited to insulin and leptin signalling pathways, mediating its effects on survival, growth and proliferation in different cellular types. We aimed to study the expression of Sam68 and its phosphorylation level upon insulin and leptin stimulation, and the role of Sam68 in the proliferative effect and signalling pathways that are activated by insulin or leptin in human breast adenocarcinoma cells. In the human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and BT-474, Sam68 protein quantity and gene expression were increased upon leptin or insulin stimulation, as it was checked by qPCR and immunoblot. Moreover, both insulin and leptin stimulation promoted an increase in Sam68 tyrosine phosphorylation and negatively regulated its RNA binding capacity. siRNA was used to downregulate Sam68 expression, which resulted in lower proliferative effects of both insulin and leptin, as well as a lower activation of MAPK and PI3K pathways promoted by both hormones. These effects may be partly explained by the decrease in IRS-1 expression by down-regulation of Sam68. These results suggest the participation of Sam68 in both leptin and insulin receptor signaling in human breast cancer cells, mediating the trophic effects of these hormones in proliferation and cellular growth. PMID:27415018

  20. Adiponectin, leptin, and yoga practice.

    PubMed

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; Christian, Lisa M; Andridge, Rebecca; Hwang, Beom Seuk; Malarkey, William B; Belury, Martha A; Emery, Charles F; Glaser, Ronald

    2012-12-05

    To address the mechanisms underlying hatha yoga's potential stress-reduction benefits, we compared adiponectin and leptin data from well-matched novice and expert yoga practitioners. These adipocytokines have counter-regulatory functions in inflammation; leptin plays a proinflammatory role, while adiponectin has anti-inflammatory properties. Fifty healthy women (mean age=41.32, range=30-65), 25 novices and 25 experts, provided fasting blood samples during three separate visits. Leptin was 36% higher among novices compared to experts, P=.008. Analysis of adiponectin revealed a borderline effect of yoga expertise, P=.08; experts' average adiponectin levels were 28% higher than novices across the three visits. In contrast, experts' average adiponectin to leptin ratio was nearly twice that of novices, P=.009. Frequency of self-reported yoga practice showed significant negative relationships with leptin; more weeks of yoga practice over the last year, more lifetime yoga sessions, and more years of yoga practice were all significantly associated with lower leptin, with similar findings for the adiponectin to leptin ratio. Novices and experts did not show even marginal differences on behavioral and physiological dimensions that might represent potential confounds, including BMI, central adiposity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and diet. Prospective studies addressing increased risk for type II diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease have highlighted the importance of these adipocytokines in modulating inflammation. Although these health risks are clearly related to more extreme values then we found in our healthy sample, our data raise the possibility that longer-term and/or more intensive yoga practice could have beneficial health consequences by altering leptin and adiponectin production.

  1. Leptin pharmacokinetics in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, Robin C; Agnew, Linda L; Smart, Neil A; McFarlane, James R

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of leptin in mammals has not been studied in detail and only one study has examined more than one time point in non-mutant mice and this was in a female mice. This is the first study to describe leptin distribution over a detailed time course in normal male mice. A physiologic dose (12 ng) of radiolabelled leptin was injected into adult male mice via the lateral tail vein and tissues were dissected out and measured for radioactivity over a time course of up to two hours. Major targets were the digestive tract, kidneys, skin and lungs. The brain was not a major target, and 0.15% of the total dose was recovered from the brain 5 min after administration. Major differences appear to exist in the distribution of leptin between the male and female mice, indicating a high degree of sexual dimorphism. Although the half-lives were similar between male and female mice, almost twice the proportion of leptin was recovered from the digestive tract of male mice in comparison to that reported previously for females. This would seem to indicate a major difference in leptin distribution and possibly function between males and females. PMID:27998953

  2. Leptin deficiency in maltreated children.

    PubMed

    Danese, A; Dove, R; Belsky, D W; Henchy, J; Williams, B; Ambler, A; Arseneault, L

    2014-09-23

    Consistent with findings from experimental research in nonhuman primates exposed to early-life stress, children exposed to maltreatment are at high risk of detrimental physical health conditions, such as obesity and systemic inflammation. Because leptin is a key molecule involved in the regulation of both energy balance and immunity, we investigated abnormalities in leptin physiology among maltreated children. We measured leptin, body mass index and C-reactive protein in 170 12-year-old children members of the Environmental-Risk Longitudinal Twin Study, for whom we had prospectively-collected information on maltreatment exposure. We found that maltreated children exhibited blunted elevation in leptin levels in relation to increasing levels of physiological stimuli, adiposity and inflammation, compared with a group of non-maltreated children matched for gender, zygosity and socioeconomic status. These findings were also independent of key potential artifacts and confounders, such as time of day at sample collection, history of food insecurity, pubertal maturation and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, using birth weight as a proxy measure for leptin, we found that physiological abnormalities were presumably not present at birth in children who went on to be maltreated but only emerged over the course of childhood, after maltreatment exposure. Leptin deficiency may contribute to onset, persistence and progression of physical health problems in maltreated children.

  3. Leptin Matures Aspects of Lung Structure and Function in the Ovine Fetus.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Miles J; Boije, Maria; Kempster, Sarah L; Smith, Gordon C S; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Denyer, Alice; Hughes, Alexandra; Wooding, F B Peter; Blache, Dominique; Fowden, Abigail L; Forhead, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    In human and ovine fetuses, glucocorticoids stimulate leptin secretion, although the extent to which leptin mediates the maturational effects of glucocorticoids on pulmonary development is unclear. This study investigated the effects of leptin administration on indices of lung structure and function before birth. Chronically catheterized singleton sheep fetuses were infused iv for 5 days with either saline or recombinant ovine leptin (0.5 mg/kg · d leptin (LEP), 0.5 LEP or 1.0 mg/kg · d, 1.0 LEP) from 125 days of gestation (term ∼145 d). Over the infusion, leptin administration increased plasma leptin, but not cortisol, concentrations. On the fifth day of infusion, 0.5 LEP reduced alveolar wall thickness and increased the volume at closing pressure of the pressure-volume deflation curve, interalveolar septal elastin content, secondary septal crest density, and the mRNA abundance of the leptin receptor (Ob-R) and surfactant protein (SP) B. Neither treatment influenced static lung compliance, maximal lung volume at 40 cmH2O, lung compartment volumes, alveolar surface area, pulmonary glycogen, protein content of the long form signaling Ob-Rb or phosphorylated signal transducers and activators of transcription-3, or mRNA levels of SP-A, C, or D, elastin, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, angiotensin-converting enzyme, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, or parathyroid hormone-related peptide. Leptin administration in the ovine fetus during late gestation promotes aspects of lung maturation, including up-regulation of SP-B.

  4. Leptin regulated calcium channels of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin neurons by activation of different signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-H; Wang, F; Yang, M-J; Yu, D-F; Wu, W-N; Liu, J; Ma, L-Q; Cai, F; Chen, J-G

    2008-09-22

    The fat-derived hormone leptin regulates food intake and body weight in part by modulating the activity of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). To investigate the electrophysiological activity of these neurons and their responses to leptin, we recorded whole-cell calcium currents on NPY and POMC neurons in the ARC of rats, which we identified by morphologic features and immunocytochemical identification at the end of recording. Leptin decreased the peak amplitude of high voltage-activated calcium currents (I(HVA)) in the isolated neurons from ARC, which were subsequently shown to be immunoreactive for NPY. The inhibition was prevented by pretreatment with inhibitors of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). In contrast, leptin increased the amplitude of I(HVA) in POMC-containing neurons. The stimulations of I(HVA) were inhibited by blockers of JAK2 and phosphatidylino 3-kinase (PI3-k). Both of these effects were counteracted by the L-type calcium channel antagonist nifedipine, suggesting that L-type calcium channels were involved in the regulation induced by leptin. These data indicated that leptin exerted opposite effects on these two classes of neurons. Leptin directly inhibited I(HVA) in NPY neurons via leptin receptor (LEPR) -JAK2-MAPK pathways, whereas evoked I(HVA) in POMC neurons by LEPR-JAK2-PI3-k pathways. These neural pathways and intracellular signaling mechanisms may play key roles in regulating NPY and POMC neuron activity, anorectic action of leptin and, thereby, feeding.

  5. Growth restriction, leptin, and the programming of adult behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Lauritz R; Zhu, Vivian; Miller, Alise; Roghair, Robert D

    2014-12-15

    Prematurity and neonatal growth restriction (GR) are risk factors for autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Leptin production is suppressed during periods of undernutrition, and we have shown that isolated neonatal leptin deficiency leads to adult hyperactivity while neonatal leptin supplementation normalizes the brain morphology of GR mice. We hypothesized that neonatal leptin would prevent the development of GR-associated behavioral abnormalities. From postnatal day 4-14, C57BL/6 mice were randomized to daily injections of saline or leptin (80ng/g), and GR was identified by a weanling weight below the tenth percentile. The behavioral phenotypes of GR and control mice were assessed beginning at 4 months. Within the tripartite chamber, GR mice had significantly impaired social interaction. Baseline escape times from the Barnes maze were faster for GR mice (65+/-6s vs 87+/-7s for controls, p<0.05), but GR mice exhibited regression in their escape times on days 2 and 3 (56% regressed vs 22% of control saline mice, p<0.05). Compared to controls, GR mice entered the open arms of the elevated plus maze more often and stayed there longer (72+/-10s vs 36+/-5s, p<0.01). Neonatal leptin supplementation normalized the behavior of GR mice across all behavioral assays. In conclusion, GR alters the social interactions, learning and activity of mice, and supplementation with the neurotrophic hormone leptin mitigates these effects. We speculate neonatal leptin deficiency may contribute to the adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with postnatal growth restriction, and postnatal leptin therapy may be protective.

  6. Ghrelin levels are not regulated by recombinant leptin administration and/or three days of fasting in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jean L; Bullen, John; Lee, Jennifer H; Yiannakouris, Nikos; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2004-01-01

    Ghrelin, a stomach-derived orexigenic peptide, and leptin, a fat-derived anorexigenic hormone, act primarily in the hypothalamus to regulate energy homeostasis and have been reported to be regulated in opposite directions by acute and chronic changes in nutritional state. Nutritional, anthropometric, and hormonal predictors of circulating ghrelin have not yet been fully elucidated, and whether ghrelin is regulated by leptin in humans remains unknown. To address these questions, we performed cross-sectional and interventional studies. In 120 healthy men and women, ghrelin was negatively associated with leptin as well as overall and central adiposity, but not with total energy or specific macronutrient intake. The sexual dimorphism in ghrelin levels (higher levels in women than in men) and the negative correlation between ghrelin and insulin are largely mediated by central adiposity. In six lean men, complete fasting for 3 d resulted in a low leptin state without a major change in fat mass and abolished the meal-related secretory pattern of ghrelin without increasing 24-h ghrelin levels. In addition, recombinant human leptin administration in physiological and pharmacological doses did not regulate ghrelin over several hours to a few days. These data do not support a role for regulation of circulating ghrelin by leptin levels independently of changes in adiposity and suggest that the leptin and ghrelin systems for energy homeostasis function independently of each other in healthy humans.

  7. Molecular cloning and expression of leptin in gray and harbor seal blubber, bone marrow, and lung and its potential role in marine mammal respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    Hammond, John A; Bennett, Kimberley A; Walton, Michael J; Hall, Ailsa J

    2005-08-01

    Leptin is a multifunctional hormone, produced predominantly in adipocytes. It regulates energy balance through its impact on appetite and fat metabolism, and its concentration indicates the size of body fat reserves. Leptin also plays a vital role in stretch-induced surfactant production during alveolar development in the fetus. The structure, expression pattern, and role of leptin have not previously been explored in marine mammals. Phocid seals undergo cyclical changes in body composition as a result of prolonged fasting and intensive foraging bouts and experience rapid, dramatic, and repeated changes in lung volume during diving. Here, we report the tissue-specific expression pattern of leptin in these animals. This is the first demonstration of leptin expression in the lung tissue of a mature mammal, in addition to its expression in the blubber and bone marrow, in common with other animals. We propose a role for leptin in seal pulmonary surfactant production, in addition to its likely role in long-term energy balance. We identify substitutions in the phocine leptin sequence in regions normally highly conserved between widely distinct vertebrate groups, and, using a purified seal leptin antiserum, we confirm the presence of the leptin protein in gray seal lung and serum fractions. Finally, we report the substantial inadequacies of using heterologous antibodies to measure leptin in unextracted gray seal serum.

  8. Leptin reduces gentamicin-induced apoptosis in rat renal tubular cells via the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Sue, Yuh-Mou; Cheng, Chung-Yi; Chen, Tzen-Wen

    2011-05-11

    Leptin, a circulating hormone secreted mainly from adipose tissues, possesses protective effects on many cell types. Serum leptin concentration increases in patients with chronic renal failure and those undergoing maintenance dialysis. Gentamicin, a widely used antibiotic for the treatment of bacterial infection, can cause nephrotoxicity. In the present study, we intended to investigate the influence of leptin on apoptotic pathways and its mechanism in rat renal tubular cells treated with gentamicin. By using Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double staining, we found that leptin expressed a dose-dependent protective effect against gentamicin-induced apoptosis in rat renal tubular cells (NRK-52E) within 24h. Pretreatment of the cells with 50 or 100 ng/ml of leptin induced Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L), increased the phosphorylation of Bad, and decreased the cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 in gentamicin-treated NRK-52E cells. Leptin also suppressed the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and upregulated Akt activation in gentamicin-treated NRK-52E cells. We found that leptin activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway as demonstrated by the suppression of the anti-apoptotic effect of leptin by wortmannin. The treatment of wortmannin suppressed the leptin-induced phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, phospho-Bad as well as Bcl-x(L), and recovered the leptin-reduced cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9. Based on our results, we suggested that leptin can attenuate gentamicin-induced apoptotic injury in rat renal tubular cells through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  9. Oncogenic role of leptin and Notch interleukin-1 leptin crosstalk outcome in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipsey, Crystal C; Harbuzariu, Adriana; Daley-Brown, Danielle; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global pandemic characterized by high levels of body fat (adiposity) and derived-cytokines (i.e., leptin). Research shows that adiposity and leptin provide insight on the link between obesity and cancer progression. Leptin’s main function is to regulate energy balance. However, obese individuals routinely develop leptin resistance, which is the consequence of the breakdown in the signaling mechanism controlling satiety resulting in the accumulation of leptin. Therefore, leptin levels are often chronically elevated in human obesity. Elevated leptin levels are related to higher incidence, increased progression and poor prognosis of several human cancers. In addition to adipose tissue, cancer cells can also secrete leptin and overexpress leptin receptors. Leptin is known to act as a mitogen, inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factor that induces cancer cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, leptin signaling induces cancer stem cells, which are involved in cancer recurrence and drug resistance. A novel and complex signaling crosstalk between leptin, Notch and interleukin-1 (IL-1) [Notch, IL-1 and leptin crosstalk outcome (NILCO)] seems to be an important driver of leptin-induced oncogenic actions. Leptin and NILCO signaling mediate the activation of cancer stem cells that can affect drug resistance. Thus, leptin and NILCO signaling are key links between obesity and cancer progression. This review presents updated data suggesting that adiposity affects cancer incidence, progression, and response to treatment. Here we show data supporting the oncogenic role of leptin in breast, endometrial, and pancreatic cancers. PMID:27019796

  10. Effects of leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha on degranulation and superoxide production of polymorphonuclear neutrophils from Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Soliman, Mohamed; Yamaji, Daisuke; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Makondo, Kennedy; Inanami, Osamu; Saito, Masayuki

    2007-02-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone regulating food intake and energy expenditure, has been shown to directly modulate human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) functions or indirectly through the action of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Bovine PMN have considerable different characteristics from human PMN. For example, it does not respond to N-formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-phenylalanine, a well known human PMN activator. In the present study, we tested the effects of leptin and TNF-alpha on superoxide production and degranulation of bovine peripheral PMN, in which both long isoform of leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) and TNF receptor 1 were expressed. Human leptin, human TNF-alpha, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan particles (OZP) did not stimulate degranulation responses, while zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) did. Neither leptin nor TNF-alpha enhanced the ZAS-induced degranulation responses. TNF-alpha, PMA, OZP and ZAS increased superoxide production in different magnitudes, whereas leptin did not. TNF-alpha, but not leptin, enhanced OZP- and ZAS-induced superoxide production, possibly, in part due to facilitating translocation of p47(phox), a component of NADPH oxidase. These results indicate that, unlike in human PMN, leptin does not have any direct effect on degranulation and superoxide production in bovine PMN, although TNF-alpha influences superoxide production.

  11. Changes in leptin and metabolite concentrations over time in finishing beef steers and heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptin is a hormone produced in adipocytes that is involved in the control of feed intake, growth, and carcass composition. Composite breed cows were bred to working ranch bulls representing Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Limousin, Red Angus, and Simmental breeds to produce calves with a wide range in...

  12. Ghrelin and leptin interplay in prevention of testicular damage due to cryptochidism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin, the endogenous ligand to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (ghsr), is centrally implicated in body weight homeostasis. A novel murine model for ghrelin and its physiologic antagonist, leptin, was developed at this institution. Mice with a deletion of ghsr (ghsr -/-) or a targeted dis...

  13. IGF-I mediated inhibition of leptin receptor expression in porcine hepatocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to elucidate hormonal control of leptin receptor gene expression in primary cultures of porcine hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from pigs (52 kg) and seeded into collagen-coated T-25 flasks. Monolayer cultures were established in medium containing fetal bovine serum fo...

  14. Brief Report: Plasma Leptin Levels Are Elevated in Autism: Association with Early Onset Phenotype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashwood, Paul; Kwong, Christina; Hansen, Robin; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Croen, Lisa; Krakowiak, Paula; Walker, Wynn; Pessah, Isaac N.; Van de Water, Judy

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence of both immune dysregulation and autoimmune phenomena in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We examined the hormone/cytokine leptin in 70 children diagnosed with autism (including 37 with regression) compared with 99 age-matched controls including 50 typically developing (TD) controls, 26 siblings without autism, and…

  15. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital leptin deficiency congenital leptin ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions leptin receptor deficiency leptin receptor ...

  17. Adipokine adiponectin is a potential protector to human bronchial epithelial cell for regulating proliferation, wound repair and apoptosis: comparison with leptin and resistin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Lin; Qin, Xiao Qun; Xiang, Yang; Tan, Yu Rong; Qu, Xiang Pin; Liu, Hui Jun

    2013-02-01

    Epidemiological data indicate an increasing incidence of asthma in the obese individuals recent decades, while very little is known about the possible association between them. Here, we compared the roles of adipocyte-derived factors, including leptin, adiponectin and resistin on proliferation, wound repair and apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) which play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The results showed that exogenous globular adiponectin (gAd) promoted proliferation, cell-cycle and wound repair of HBECs. This effect may be relevant to Ca(2+)/calmodulin signal pathway. Besides, gAd inhibited apoptosis induced by ozone and release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of HBECs via regulated adipoR1 and reactive oxygen species. No effects of leptin or resistin on proliferation, wound repair and apoptosis of HBECs were detectable. These data indicate that airway epithelium is the direct target of gAd which plays an important role in protecting HBECs from mechanical or oxidant injuries and may have therapeutic implications in the treatment of asthma.

  18. The expression of leptin, hypothalamic neuropeptides and UCP1 before, during and after fattening in the Daurian ground squirrel (Spermophilus dauricus).

    PubMed

    Xing, Xin; Yang, Ming; Wang, De-Hua

    2015-06-01

    The Daurian ground squirrel (Spermophilus dauricus) accumulates large amounts of body fat during pre-hibernation fattening. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, plays important roles in energy balance and thermogenesis. We predicted that body fat accumulation would lead to the elevation of leptin concentration while its effect on satiety would be suppressed in hypothalamus during fattening. In addition, the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) would increase and correlated positively with leptin concentration before hibernation. Here, we measured serum leptin concentration and leptin mRNA in white adipose tissue (WAT), hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in energy regulation and UCP1 in BAT before, during and after fattening in squirrels. The fat mass gradually increased during fattening but serum leptin increased mainly in the late phase of fattening, which was consistent with leptin mRNA expression in WAT. During fattening, the mRNA of hypothalamic leptin receptor was up-regulated and correlated positively with serum leptin. Orexigenic neuropeptide Y mRNA increased by 67%; however agouti-related peptide remained unchanged before hibernation. There was no significant change in anorexigenic neuropeptide mRNA. No change in suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 and protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B was detected. UCP1 mRNA expression and protein content in BAT increased significantly after fattening. These changes were independent of environmental conditions and serum leptin concentration. Our results suggest that the dissociation of leptin production and adiposity during fattening may facilitate fat accumulation. No evidence of suppressed leptin signal was found in fattening squirrels. The UCP1 recruitment in post-fattening squirrels could occur without winter-like acclimation and increased leptin.

  19. Melanocortins Mimic the Effects of Leptin to Restore Reproductive Function in Lean Hypogonadotropic Ewes

    PubMed Central

    Backholer, Kathryn; Bowden, Marissa; Gamber, Kevin; Bjørbæk, Christian; Iqbal, Javed; Clarke, Iain J.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Leptin restores gonadotropic function in lean hypogonadotropic animals by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to test the hypothesis that restoration of gonadotropic function is a result of an upregulation of central acetylated melanocortin production. Methods and Results Lean ovariectomised (OVX) ewes received intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusions of leptin (or vehicle) for 3 days, which upregulated proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA and restored pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. A melanocortin agonist (MTII), but not naloxone treatment, reinstated pulsatile LH secretion in lean OVX ewes. We treated (i.c.v.) lean OVX ewes with leptin (or vehicle) and measured peptide levels and post-translational modification in the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Levels of β-endorphin (β-END) were lower in lean animals, with no effect of leptin treatment. Desacetyl-α-MSH was the predominant form of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in the ARC and levels were similar in all groups. In another group of lean and normal-weight OVX ewes, we measured the different forms of α-MSH in ARC, hypothalamus (ARC-removed) and the preoptic area (POA). Acetylated α-MSH levels were lower in lean animals in the terminal beds of the hypothalamus and POA but not the ARC. Conclusions Leptin corrects the hypogonadotropic state in the lean condition by upregulation of POMC gene expression, and may increase transport and acetylation of melanocortins to target cells in the brain. Melanocortin treatment restores LH secretion in lean animals. PMID:19923792

  20. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea: leptin treatment, dietary intervention and counselling as alternatives to traditional practice - systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kyriakidis, M; Caetano, L; Anastasiadou, N; Karasu, T; Lashen, H

    2016-03-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (FHA) is a neuroendocrine disorder caused by an energy deficit and characterized by low leptin levels. Based on this, previous studies have suggested that leptin administration may play a crucial role in FHA treatment. However, FHA is also associated with abnormal psychosocial and dietary behaviour that needs to be addressed. In this context, this systematic review examined the efficacy of leptin treatment, non-pharmacological therapy and nutritional interventions in FHA. PubMed, Medline and Cochrane Library databases were searched in order to find relevant papers, including randomized controlled trials, clinical trials, prospective studies and case reports. The effects of different treatments on reproductive function, hormonal status and bone markers were recorded. Studies regarding other forms of treatment were excluded. In total, 111 papers were retrieved. After the removal of 29 duplicate papers, the abstracts and titles of 82 papers were examined. Subsequently, 53 papers were excluded based on title, and seven papers were omitted based on abstract. The remaining 11 papers were used: three based on leptin treatment, three regarding non-pharmacological treatment and five regarding dietary intervention. This literature review indicates that all of these treatment strategies improved reproductive function and hormonal status significantly, although conclusive results could not be drawn on bone markers. While leptin may be a promising new treatment, social aspects of FHA should also be addressed. As a result, a multifaceted therapeutic approach should be applied to treat affected women.

  1. Relation between leptin and estradiol levels in Egyptian lactating Arab mares during foaling heat.

    PubMed

    El-Maaty, Amal M Abo; Gabr, Faten I

    2010-01-01

    Sixteen Arab lactating mares belonging to Al-Zahraa Arab Horse Stud underwent two ultrasound examinations at 3 weeks interval starting from the day of demonstration of foaling heat. In addition, daily blood samples were collected from parturition until after exhibiting first postpartum estrus (day 11) with daily observation of estrous signs. Both leptin and estradiol hormones were assayed. Mean day of foaling heat was 8.9+/-0.9 day. Most mares came in foaling heat during days 9 and 10 had high conception rate compared to those who came in estrus earlier or later. Estradiol levels were high after day of foaling then decrease after expression of foaling heat. But leptin levels increase from day 8 to day 10 compared to other days before and after the first ovulation. A significant positive correlation was found between estradiol and leptin (r=0.58, p<0.025). The positive correlation between leptin and estradiol led us to suggest that leptin hormone plays an important role in ovulation of the first postpartum estrus in mares.

  2. Discovery of a novel functional leptin protein (LEP) in zebra finches: evidence for the existence of an authentic avian leptin gene predominantly expressed in the brain and pituitary.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guian; Li, Juan; Wang, Hongning; Lan, Xinyu; Wang, Yajun

    2014-09-01

    Leptin (LEP) is reported to play important roles in controlling energy balance in vertebrates, including birds. However, it remains an open question whether an authentic "LEP gene" exists and functions in birds. Here, we identified and characterized a LEP gene (zebra finch LEP [zbLEP]) encoding a 172-amino acid precursor in zebra finches. Despite zbLEP showing limited amino acid sequence identity (26%-29%) to human and mouse LEPs, synteny analysis proved that zbLEP is orthologous to mammalian LEP. Using a pAH32 luciferase reporter system and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that the recombinant zbLEP protein could potently activate finch and chicken LEP receptors (zbLEPR; cLEPR) expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and enhance signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation, further indicating that zbLEP is a functional ligand for avian LEPRs. Interestingly, quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that zbLEP mRNA is expressed nearly exclusively in the pituitary and various brain regions but undetectable in adipose tissue and liver, whereas zbLEPR mRNA is widely expressed in adult finch tissues examined with abundant expression noted in pituitary, implying that unlike mammalian LEP, finch LEP may not act as an adipocyte-derived signal to control energy balance. As in finches, a LEP highly homologous to zbLEP was also identified in budgerigar genome. Strikingly, finch and budgerigar LEPs show little homology with chicken LEP (cLEP) previously reported, suggesting that the so-called cLEP is incorrect. Collectively, our data provide convincing evidence for the existence of an authentic functional LEP in avian species and suggest an important role of brain- and pituitary-derived LEP played in vertebrates.

  3. The different satiating capacity of CHO and fats can be mediated by different effects on leptin and ghrelin systems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Juana; Cladera, María Magdalena; Llopis, Marina; Palou, Andreu; Picó, Catalina

    2010-12-01

    Leptin and ghrelin are known to be the main hormones involved in the control of food intake, with opposite effects. Here we aimed to assess whether changes in leptin and ghrelin systems can be involved in the different satiating capacities of carbohydrates (CHO) and fat. Adult male Wistar rats were studied under 24h fasting conditions and after 24h fasting followed by a 12h re-feeding period with 64 kcal of CHO or fat, consisting of a mixture of wheat starch and sucrose or bacon, respectively. Serum levels of leptin and ghrelin, and mRNA levels of leptin and ObRb in the retroperitoneal and inguinal adipose tissue and of NPY, POMC, ObRb and GSHR in the hypothalamus were measured. CHO re-feeding resulted in higher leptin mRNA expression levels in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue and in higher circulating leptin levels compared with those after fat re-feeding. Moreover, circulating ghrelin levels and ghrelin/leptin ratio were significantly higher after fat re-feeding compared with CHO re-feeding, and hypothalamic expression levels of ghrelin receptor increased after fat, but not after CHO, re-feeding. Hence, expression levels of hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in food intake control and regulated by these hormones, particularly the orexigenic NPY and the anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, were also differently affected by CHO and fat re-feeding, resulting in a significantly lower NPY/POMC ratio after CHO re-feeding than after fat re-feeding. In conclusion, different effects on the leptin and ghrelin systems can account, at least in part, for the lower satiating capacity of fat compared to CHO.

  4. Expression of leptin and leptin receptor during the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Otte, C; Otte, J-M; Strodthoff, D; Bornstein, S R; Fölsch, U R; Mönig, H; Kloehn, S

    2004-01-01

    Leptin is involved in the regulation of food intake and is mainly secreted by adipocytes. Major secretagogues are cytokines such as TNF-alpha or IL-1. Leptin in turn upregulates inflammatory immune responses. Elevated leptin serum levels have been detected in patients with liver cirrhosis, a disease frequently associated with elevated levels of circulating cytokines as well as hypermetabolism and altered body weight. Recently, leptin has been detected in activated hepatic stellate cells in vitro and an involvement of leptin in liver fibrogenisis has been suggested. The current study was designed to further clarify the role of leptin in liver disease by characterizing leptin and leptin receptor expression in the development and onset of experimental liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis was induced in rats by use of phenobarbitone and increasing doses of CCl (4). Leptin and leptin receptor mRNA expression was determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR, protein expression by Western blot analysis and localization of leptin and its receptor by immunohistochemistry. Normal liver tissue does not express leptin, but leptin receptor mRNA. Increasing levels of leptin mRNA were detected in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers correlated to the degree of fibrosis. Leptin receptor mRNA expression was not significantly altered in damaged livers. Increasing levels of leptin were detected in fibrotic and cirrhotic livers, whereas protein expression of the receptor remained unchanged. Throughout different stages of liver fibrosis, leptin immunoreactivity was localized in activated hepatic stellate cells only, whereas immunoreactivity for the receptor was mainly seen on hepatocytes. In conclusion, leptin is expressed at increasing levels in activated hepatic stellate cells in vivo, which may therefore be a source of increased leptin tissue and serum levels contributing to the pathophysiology and morphological changes of chronic liver disease.

  5. Blockage of neonatal leptin signaling induces changes in the hypothalamus associated with delayed pubertal onset and modifications in neuropeptide expression during adulthood in male rats.

    PubMed

    Mela, Virginia; Jimenez, Sara; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Barrios, Vicente; Marco, Eva-María; Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana-Belén; Argente, Jesús; Viveros, María-Paz; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-12-01

    The neonatal leptin surge, occurring from postnatal day (PND) 5 to 13 and peaking at PND9 in rodents, is important for the development of neuroendocrine circuits involved in metabolic control and reproductive function. We previously demonstrated that treatment with a leptin antagonist from PND 5 to 9, coincident with peak leptin levels in the neonatal surge, modified trophic factors and markers of cell turnover and neuronal maturation in the hypothalamus of peri-pubertal rats. The kisspeptin system and metabolic neuropeptide and hormone levels were also modified. Here our aim was to investigate if the timing of pubertal onset is altered by neonatal leptin antagonism and if the previously observed peripubertal modifications in hormones and neuropeptides persist into adulthood and affect male sexual behavior. To this end, male Wistar rats were treated with a pegylated super leptin antagonist (5mg/kg, s.c.) from PND 5 to 9 and killed at PND102-103. The appearance of external signs of pubertal onset was delayed. Hypothalamic kiss1 mRNA levels were decreased in adult animals, but sexual behavior was not significantly modified. Although there was no effect on body weight or food intake, circulating leptin, insulin and triglyceride levels were increased, while hypothalamic leptin receptor, POMC and AgRP mRNA levels were decreased. In conclusion, alteration of the neonatal leptin surge can modify the timing of pubertal onset and have long-term effects on hypothalamic expression of reproductive and metabolic neuropeptides.

  6. Exploring the structure and conformational landscape of human leptin. A molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Chimal-Vega, Brenda; Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Carrillo Vazquez, Jonathan; Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge L; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G

    2015-11-21

    Leptin is a hormone that regulates energy homeostasis, inflammation, hematopoiesis and immune response, among other functions (Houseknecht et al., 1998; Zhang et al., 1995; Paz-Filho et al., 2010). To obtain its crystallographic structure, it was necessary to substitute a tryptophan for a glutamic acid at position 100, thus creating a mutant leptin that has been reported to have biological activity comparable to the activity of the wild type but that crystallizes more readily. Here, we report a comparative study of the conformational space of WT and W100E leptin using molecular dynamics simulations performed at 300, 400, and 500 K. We detected differences between the interactions of the two proteins with local and distal effects, resulting in changes in the conformation, accessible surface area, compactness, electrostatic potential and dynamic behavior. Additionally, the series of unfolding events that occur when leptin is subjected to high temperature differs for the two constructs. We observed that both proteins are mostly unstructured after 20 ns of MD simulation at 500 K. However, WT leptin maintains a significant amount of secondary structure in helix α2, while the most stable region of W100E leptin is helix α3. Furthermore, we found that the region between residues 25 and 42 might adopt interconverting secondary structures ranging from α-helices and random coils to β-strand structures. Thus, this region can be considered an intrinsically disordered region. This atomistic description supports our understanding of leptin signaling and consequently might facilitate the use of leptin in treatments for the pathophysiologies in which it is implicated.

  7. Leptin/LepRb in the Ventral Tegmental Area Mediates Anxiety-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, has been implicated in emotional regulation. We have previously shown that systemic administration of leptin produces anxiolytic-like effects and deletion of the leptin receptor, LepRb, in midbrain dopamine neurons leads to an anxiogenic phenotype. This study investigated whether activation or deletion of LepRb in the ventral tegmental area of adult mice is capable of inducing anxiolytic and anxiogenic effects, respectively. Methods: Mice were cannulated in the ventral tegmental area and received bilateral intra-ventral tegmental area infusions of leptin or the JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor AG490. Anxiety-like behaviors were assessed using the elevated plus-maze, light-dark box, and novelty suppressed feeding tests. Deletion of LepRb in the ventral tegmental area was achieved by bilateral injection of AAV-Cre into the ventral tegmental area of adult Leprflox/flox mice. Anxiety-related behaviors were evaluated 3 weeks after viral injection. Results: Intra-ventral tegmental area infusions of leptin reduced anxiety-like behaviors, as indicated by increased percent open-arm time and open-arm entries in the elevated plus-maze test, increased time spent in the light side and decreased latency to enter the light side of the light-dark box, and decreased latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test. Blockade of JAK2/STAT3 signaling in the ventral tegmental area by AG490 attenuated the anxiolytic effect produced by systemic administration of leptin. Leprflox/flox mice injected with AAV-Cre into the ventral tegmental area showed decreased leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and enhanced anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus-maze test and the novelty suppressed feeding test. Conclusions: These findings suggest that leptin-LepRb signaling in the ventral tegmental area plays an important role in the regulation of anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:26438799

  8. Stimulation of leptin secretion by insulin

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Minglun; Asakawa, Akihiro; Amitani, Haruka; Inui, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Leptin has a crucial role in regulating food intake and maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Although little is known about the process of leptin secretion, insulin, which has an important role in the metabolism of glucose and lipids, is believed to regulate leptin secretion through a posttranscriptional mechanism in the short term, and via glucose metabolism in the long term. The gastric mucosa secretes leptin, but this mechanism has not been completely elucidated. Understanding the mechanism of insulin-regulated leptin secretion could lead to the development of new treatment methods for obesity and its comorbidities, which are serious public health concerns. PMID:23565488

  9. Higher ghrelin and lower leptin secretion are associated with lower LH secretion in young amenorrheic athletes compared with eumenorrheic athletes and controls

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Kathryn E.; Slusarz, Katherine; Guereca, Gabriela; Pierce, Lisa; Slattery, Meghan; Mendes, Nara; Herzog, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Amenorrhea is common in young athletes and is associated with low fat mass. However, hormonal factors that link decreased fat mass with altered gonadotropin pulsatility and amenorrhea are unclear. Low levels of leptin (an adipokine) and increased ghrelin (an orexigenic hormone that increases as fat mass decreases) impact gonadotropin pulsatility. Studies have not examined luteinizing hormone (LH) secretory dynamics in relation to leptin or ghrelin secretory dynamics in adolescent and young adult athletes. We hypothesized that 1) young amenorrheic athletes (AA) would have lower LH and leptin and higher ghrelin secretion than eumenorrheic athletes (EA) and nonathletes and 2) higher ghrelin and lower leptin would be associated with lower LH secretion. This was a cross-sectional study. We examined ghrelin and leptin secretory patterns (over 8 h, from 11 PM to 7 AM) in relation to LH secretory patterns in AA, EA, and nonathletes aged 14–21 yr. Ghrelin and leptin were assessed every 20 min and LH every 10 min. Groups did not differ for age, bone age, or BMI. However, fat mass was lower in AA than in EA and nonathletes. AA had lower LH and higher ghrelin pulsatile secretion and AUC than nonathletes and lower leptin pulsatile secretion and AUC than EA and nonathletes. Percent body fat was associated positively with LH and leptin secretion and inversely with ghrelin. In a regression model, ghrelin and leptin secretory parameters were associated independently with LH secretory parameters. We conclude that higher ghrelin and lower leptin secretion in AA related to lower fat mass may contribute to altered LH pulsatility and amenorrhea. PMID:22252944

  10. Daily rhythms of plasma melatonin, but not plasma leptin or leptin mRNA, vary between lean, obese and type 2 diabetic men.

    PubMed

    Mäntele, Simone; Otway, Daniella T; Middleton, Benita; Bretschneider, Silvia; Wright, John; Robertson, M Denise; Skene, Debra J; Johnston, Jonathan D

    2012-01-01

    Melatonin and leptin exhibit daily rhythms that may contribute towards changes in metabolic physiology. It remains unclear, however, whether this rhythmicity is altered in obesity or type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We tested the hypothesis that 24-hour profiles of melatonin, leptin and leptin mRNA are altered by metabolic status in laboratory conditions. Men between 45-65 years old were recruited into lean, obese-non-diabetic or obese-T2DM groups. Volunteers followed strict sleep-wake and dietary regimes for 1 week before the laboratory study. They were then maintained in controlled light-dark conditions, semi-recumbent posture and fed hourly iso-energetic drinks during wake periods. Hourly blood samples were collected for hormone analysis. Subcutaneous adipose biopsies were collected 6-hourly for gene expression analysis. Although there was no effect of subject group on the timing of dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), nocturnal plasma melatonin concentration was significantly higher in obese-non-diabetic subjects compared to weight-matched T2DM subjects (p<0.01) and lean controls (p<0.05). Two T2DM subjects failed to produce any detectable melatonin, although did exhibit plasma cortisol rhythms comparable to others in the group. Consistent with the literature, there was a significant (p<0.001) effect of subject group on absolute plasma leptin concentration and, when expressed relative to an individual's 24-hour mean, plasma leptin showed significant (p<0.001) diurnal variation. However, there was no difference in amplitude or timing of leptin rhythms between experimental groups. There was also no significant effect of time on leptin mRNA expression. Despite an overall effect (p<0.05) of experimental group, post-hoc analysis revealed no significant pair-wise effects of group on leptin mRNA expression. Altered plasma melatonin rhythms in weight-matched T2DM and non-diabetic individuals supports a possible role of melatonin in T2DM aetiology. However, neither obesity nor T2DM

  11. Leptin and adiponectin levels in girls with central precocious puberty before and during GnRH agonist treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jae Won; Song, Chun Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) treatment on the energy metabolism in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP) are controversial. We focused the changes and related factors of serum levels of leptin and adiponectin in girls with CPP before and during GnRHa treatment. Methods Thirty girls with idiopathic CPP were enrolled in the study. Their auxological data and fasting blood were collected at the baseline and after six months of GnRHa treatment. Results After treatment, height (P<0.001), weight (P<0.001), and serum leptin levels (P=0.033) were significantly increased, whereas body mass index (BMI), homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance, serum adiponectin levels, and adiponectin/leptin ratio exhibited no significant changes. A Pearson correlation analysis showed that height, weight, BMI, and their standard deviation scores (SDSs), but not basal LH, FSH, and estradiol, were significantly correlated with serum leptin levels before and after GnRHa treatment. After a multiple linear regression analysis, only BMI was associated with serum leptin levels. Moreover, leptin SDSs adjusted for BMI were not significantly different before and after GnRHa. The Δ leptin levels (r2=0.207, P=0.012), but not with Δ leptin SDS (r2=0.019, P=0.556), during GnRHa treatment were positively correlated with Δ BMI. Conclusion These results suggest that GnRHa treatment in girls with CPP does not affect serum levels of leptin and adiponectin and insulin resistance. Serum leptin levels were depend on the changes in BMI during GnRHa treatment. PMID:28164072

  12. Time Course of Leptin in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa during Inpatient Treatment: Longitudinal Relationships to BMI and Psychological Factors

    PubMed Central

    Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Wesche, Daniela; Kopf, Stefan; Herzog, Wolfgang; Wild, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, appears to play a major role in the homeostasis of body weight and psychobiological processes associated with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, there is scarce data on its exact influence on this disorder, in particular data over time. Objective The present study addresses whether leptin changes during inpatient treatment play a role for treatment outcome and psychological factors in underweight AN patients. Methods In order to understand whether leptin’s role differs in relation to AN severity, data were assessed from 11 patients with a very low BMI and a higher chronicity (high severity group; HSS; mean BMI at the beginning of the study = 13.6; mean duration of illness = 5.1 years) vs. nine with less severe symptoms (LSS; mean BMI = 16.2; mean duration of illness = 3.7 years). During the course of treatment, serum leptin concentrations were assessed weekly while weight (BMI) was assessed twice per week. Concomitantly, psychological variables were obtained by means of electronic diaries. Unconditional linear growth models were calculated to evaluate the temporal course of leptin in relation to BMI. For HSS patients, two phases of treatment (BMI < 16 and BMI ≥ 16 kg/m2) were investigated. Results Leptin increased significantly with BMI in both groups of patients. For HSS patients, the increase of leptin in the first treatment phase did not predict later increases in BMI. Furthermore, the relationship of leptin and psychological factors was modulated by symptom severity. In HSS patients, higher leptin levels were associated with greater feelings of depression, anxiety, and stress whereas in LSS patients a higher leptin level showed the trend to be associated with lower psychological symptom burden. Conclusions Our results suggest that leptin changes are differently associated with weight gain and psychological symptoms depending on the severity of starvation. PMID:28030575

  13. Male fertility and obesity: are ghrelin, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 pharmacologically relevant?

    PubMed

    Alves, Marco G; Jesus, Tito T; Sousa, Mário; Goldberg, Erwin; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is rising to unprecedented numbers, affecting a growing number of children, adolescents and young adult men. These individuals face innumerous health problems, including subfertility or even infertility. Overweight and obese men present severe alterations in their body composition and hormonal profile, particularly in ghrelin, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. It is well known that male reproductive health is under the control of the individual's nutritional status and also of a tight network of regulatory signals, particularly hormonal signaling. However, few studies have been focused on the effects of ghrelin, leptin and GLP-1 in male reproduction and how energy homeostasis and male reproductive function are linked. These hormones regulate body glucose homeostasis and several studies suggest that they can serve as targets for anti-obesity drugs. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms of action of these hormones has grown significantly. Curiously, their effect on male reproductive potential, that is highly dependent of the metabolic cooperation established between testicular cells, remains a matter of debate. Herein, we review general concepts of male fertility and obesity, with a special focus on the effects of ghrelin, leptin and GLP-1 on male reproductive health. We also discuss the possible pharmacological relevance of these hormones to counteract the fertility problems that overweight and obese men face.

  14. Leptin controls rabbit ovarian function in vivo and in vitro: possible interrelationships with ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, A V; Rafay, J; Kotwica, J

    2009-10-01

    The aim of these in vivo and in vitro studies was to examine the role of leptin in the control of plasma hormone concentrations, reproduction, and secretory activity of ovarian granulosa cells. In in vivo experiments, 15 female European domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were treated with leptin (5 microg animal(-1)d(-1) for 1 wk before induction of ovulation with 25 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin and 0.25 IU human chorionic gonadotropin), and 15 females constituted the control group (treated with phosphate-buffered saline). Plasma concentrations of progesterone (P(4)), testosterone (T), estradiol (E(2)), estrone sulfate (ES), and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) were determined at the estimated day of ovulation by radioimmunoassay (RIA), and number, viability, and body weight of newborns were recorded at parturition. In in vitro experiments, granulosa cells were isolated from periovulatory ovarian follicles of five control and five females treated with ghrelin (10 microg animal(-1)d(-1) for 1 wk before induced ovulation). Isolated cells were cultured for 2 d with and without leptin (0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/mL medium). Secretion of P(4), T, E(2), IGF-I, and prostaglandin F (PGF) was assessed in culture medium by RIA. In in vivo experiments, leptin administrations reduced plasma P(4), T, E(2), ES, and IGF-I levels. Leptin treatments did not affect ovarian weight or total number and body mass of newborns, but the proportion of pregnant females and number of live newborns were significantly higher in leptin-treated females than that in control females. In in vitro experiments, leptin significantly decreased (at 1 and 10 ng/mL) or increased (at 100 ng/mL) P(4) secretion, promoted E(2) and IGF-I (both at 100 ng/mL) secretion, and reduced T (at 1 and 10 ng/mL) and PGF (at 10 ng/mL) secretion. Granulosa cells from ghrelin-treated animals secreted less P(4), T, E(2), and PGF, but not IGF-I, than that secreted by granulosa cells from control animals. Furthermore

  15. SERUM LEPTIN LEVENS AND HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA: REVIEW ARTICLE

    PubMed Central

    ANDRIGHETTO, Luiza Vitelo; POZIOMYCK, Aline Kirjner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most frequent types of malignant tumors in the world. There is growing evidence of the relationship between it development and obesity. The mechanism that links obesity to cancer is still not fully understood; however, it is essential to the understanding the adipose tissue in metabolic changes related to obesity and hepatocellular carcinoma. Objective: To review the influence of serum leptin levels in patients with hepatocelular carcinoma. Method: Systematic review of the literature based on the methodology of the Cochrane Institute. The search for articles was in the database: Science Direct, Scielo, Medline, Lilacs e Pubmed. The key words used were hepatocellular carcinoma, leptin, adipokine. Results: After evaluation of individual studies, were selected seven studies. The results previously studied are still inconsistent and contradictory, and leptin can be effectively involved in the occurrence and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Conclusion: Therefore, it is necessary to develop prospective, well-designed and conducted focusing on the role and specific mechanisms of this hormone in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, so that new correlations can be properly supported. PMID:28076486

  16. Serum leptin and cortisol, related to acutely perceived academic examination stress and performance in female university students.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Inam, Qurrat-Ul-Aen; Haider, Saida; Perveen, Tahira; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin, identified as an antiobesity hormone, also has important role in responses to stress and processing of memory. This study was designed to determine effects of academic examination stress-induced changes in serum leptin and its impact on academic performance. Eighty five healthy female students (age 19-21 years; BMI 21.9 ± 1.6) were recruited for the study. Serum leptin and cortisol were monitored at base line (beginning of academic session) and on the day of examination; using a standardized ELISA kit. Acute perception of academic examination stress was determined with the help of a questionnaire derived from Hamilton Anxiety Scale and self report of stress perception. Academic performance was evaluated by the percentage of marks obtained in the examination. Serum cortisol levels were positively correlated (p < 0.01) with the subjective perception of examination stress but not with academic performance. There was an inverted U-shape relationship between level of stress and academic performance. Leptin increased in all stress groups and correlated (p < 0.01) positively with academic performance. There was an inverted U-shape relationship between level of stress and circulating leptin. The findings suggest the peptide hormone, leptin, is a biomarker of stress perception and a mediator of facilitating effects of stress on cognition.

  17. Overview of the physiology and pathophysiology of leptin with special emphasis on its role in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Mona P; Ziyadeh, Fuad N

    2013-01-01

    The adipocyte product leptin is a pleiotropic adipokine and hormone, with a role extending beyond appetite suppression and increased energy expenditure. This review summarizes the biology of the leptin system and the roles of its different receptors in a multitude of cellular functions in different organs, with special emphasis on the kidney. Leptin's physiological functions as well as deleterious effects in states of leptin deficiency or hyperleptinemia are emphasized. Chronic hyperleptinemia can increase blood pressure through the sympathetic nervous system and renal salt retention. The concept of selective leptin resistance in obesity is emerging, whereby leptin's effect on appetite and energy expenditure is blunted, with a concomitant increase in leptin's other effects as a result of the accompanying hyperleptinemia. The divergence in response likely is explained by different receptors and post-receptor activating mechanisms. Chronic kidney disease is a known cause of hyperleptinemia. There is an emerging view that the effect of hyperleptinemia on the kidney can contribute to the development and/or progression of chronic kidney disease in selective resistance states such as in obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanisms of renal injury are likely the result of exaggerated and undesirable hemodynamic influences as well as profibrotic effects.

  18. Changes in circulating leptin levels during acute stress and associations with craving in abstinent smokers: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Potretzke, Sheena; Nakajima, Motohiro; Cragin, Tiffany; al'Absi, Mustafa

    2014-09-01

    Recent research suggests a role for the appetite hormone leptin in cigarette smoking. This study examined patterns of change in leptin in response to stress and associations with craving during the initial phase of a quit attempt. Thirty-six smokers (average age±SEM, 33.4±2.4) interested in smoking cessation set a quit day and were required to be abstinent for 24h. After, they completed a laboratory session including public speaking and cognitive challenges, and attended 4 weekly post-cessation assessments. Blood samples and self-report measures were collected throughout the laboratory session. The results indicated that leptin levels significantly increased following exposure to acute stress. We also found positive correlations between leptin and craving for cigarettes. No differences were observed in leptin levels between smokers who maintained abstinence for 4 weeks and those who relapsed during this period. These findings suggest that leptin levels may change in response to stress and that leptin could be a useful marker of craving for smoking.

  19. Correlation of leptin and soluble leptin receptor levels with anthropometric parameters in mother-newborn pairs

    PubMed Central

    Marino-Ortega, Linda A; Molina-Bello, Adiel; Polanco-García, Julio C; Muñoz-Valle, José F; Salgado-Bernabé, Aralia B; Guzmán-Guzmán, Iris P; Parra-Rojas, Isela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if anthropometric parameters are associated with both leptin and soluble leptin receptor (sLEPR) levels in newborns and their mothers. This cross-sectional study was performed in 118 mother-newborn pairs. The venous blood sample of mothers was taken before delivery and immediately after delivery an umbilical cord blood sample was collected. Levels of leptin and sLEPR in maternal and umbilical cord sera were assessed by ELISA. Maternal serum concentration of leptin and sLEPR (6.2 and 25.7 ng/ml, respectively) were higher than in umbilical cord blood (2.4 and 14.2 ng/ml, respectively). However, the newborns and their mothers had higher sLEPR levels than leptin levels. In mothers was observed that leptin levels increase with weight gain in pregnancy and decreased sLEPR levels. Cord leptin levels correlated with neonatal birth weight and length, the body circumferences, placental weight and maternal leptin levels. Cord sLEPR levels correlated with maternal sLEPR and leptin levels. Maternal serum concentration of leptin correlated with pre-pregnancy BMI, weight gain, cord sLEPR and leptin levels. Maternal sLEPR concentration correlated with cord sLEPR levels. The leptin and sLEPR levels in mother-newborn pairs are related with anthropometric parameters and an inverse correlation between leptin levels and sLEPR was observed in pairs. PMID:26379933

  20. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  1. A chicken leptin-specific radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Dridi, S; Williams, J; Bruggeman, V; Onagbesan, M; Raver, N; Decuypere, E; Djiane, J; Gertler, A; Taouis, M

    2000-04-01

    Recombinant chicken leptin was used to produce an antiserum in order to develop a specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) for chicken leptin in plasma and serum. We have used either murine or chicken leptin as tracer and competition curves were performed using recombinant chicken leptin. Variations in leptin plasma levels in different chicken strains and various nutritional states were correlated with the physiological status. Leptin plasma concentrations were regulated by the nutritional state with higher levels in the fed state as compared to the fasted state (3.36 +/- 0. 13 versus 2.78 +/- 0.11 ng/ml) and being dependent upon the age. Higher leptin levels were found in 22 week-old as compared to 15 week-old layer chickens (2.709 +/- 0.172 versus 1.478 +/- 0.102 ng/ml). We have also shown that the multispecies leptin RIA kit (LINCO Inc.) underestimated leptinemia compared to the chicken leptin- specific RIA reported here. In conclusion the RIA developed in the present study is specific to the chicken and thus may be considered as powerful tool for investigating the physiological significance of leptin in chickens.

  2. Possible involvement of 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 in the development of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Toru; Matsuzaki, Syu; Miyahara, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Kaori; Hasegawa, Yuki; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem that urgently needs to be solved. Leptin is an anti-obesity hormone that activates satiety signals to the brain. Evidence to suggest that leptin resistance is involved in the development of obesity is increasing; however, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. We herein demonstrated that 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ) was involved in the development of leptin resistance. A treatment with 15d-PGJ2 inhibited the leptin-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y-Ob-Rb cells). Furthermore, the intracerebroventricular administration of 15d-PGJ2 reversed the inhibitory effects of leptin on food intake in rats. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist, GW9662, slightly reversed the inhibitory effects of 15d-PGJ2 on the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 in neuronal cells. The PPAR-γ agonist, rosiglitazone, also inhibited leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. Therefore, the inhibitory effects of 15d-PGJ2 may be mediated through PPAR-γ. On the other hand, 15d-PGJ2 -induced leptin resistance may not be mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress or suppressor of cytokine signaling 3. The results of the present study suggest that 15d-PGJ2 is a novel factor for the development of leptin resistance in obesity. Leptin resistance, an insensitivity to the actions of leptin, is involved in the development of obesity. Here, we found 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ) may be involved in the development of leptin resistance. The present results suggest that the 15d-PGJ2 may be a novel factor for the development of leptin resistance in obesity. 15d-PGJ2 , 15-Deoxy-Δ(12,14) -prostaglandin J2; STAT3, signal tranducer and activator of transcription 3.

  3. Circadian Dysfunction Induces Leptin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Nicole M; Mayo, Sara A; Hua, Jack; Lee, Choogon; Moore, David D; Fu, Loning

    2015-09-01

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt overall energy homeostasis and Leptin signaling. We found that BMAL1/CLOCK generates circadian rhythm of C/EBPα-mediated leptin transcription in adipose. Per and Cry mutant mice show similar disruption of peripheral clock and deregulation of leptin in fat, but opposite body weight and composition phenotypes that correlate with their distinct patterns of POMC neuron deregulation in the arcuate nucleus. Chronic jet lag is sufficient to disrupt the endogenous adipose clock and also induce central Leptin resistance in wild-type mice. Thus, coupling of the central and peripheral clocks controls Leptin endocrine feedback homeostasis. We propose that Leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity in humans, plays a key role in circadian dysfunction-induced obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  4. Leptin regulates energy intake but fails to facilitate hibernation in fattening Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus).

    PubMed

    Xing, Xin; Tang, Gang-Bin; Sun, Ming-Yue; Yu, Chao; Song, Shi-Yi; Liu, Xin-Yu; Yang, Ming; Wang, De-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Body fat storage before hibernation affects the timing of immergence in Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus). Leptin is an adipose signal and plays vital role in energy homeostasis mainly by action in brain. To test the hypothesis that leptin plays a role in facilitating the process of hibernation, squirrels were administrated with recombinant murine leptin (1μg/day) through intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection for 12 days during fattening. From day 7 to 12, animals were moved into a cold room (5±1°C) with constant darkness which functioned as hibernaculum. Energy intake, body mass and core body temperature (Tb) were continuously monitored throughout the course of experiment. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured under both warm and cold conditions. At the end of leptin administration, we measured the serum concentration of hormones related to energy regulation, mRNA expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Our results showed that during leptin administration, the cumulative food intake and increase of body mass were suppressed while Tb and RMR were unaltered. The proportion of torpid squirrels was not different between two groups. At the end of leptin administration, the expressions of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y and agouti gene-related protein were suppressed. There were no differences in UCP1 mRNA expression or protein content in BAT between groups. Our data suggest that leptin can affect energy intake via hypothalamic neuropeptides, but is not involved in the initiation of hibernation in fattening Daurian ground squirrels.

  5. Triiodothyronine modulates the expression of leptin and adiponectin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Miriane; Síbio, Maria Teresa De; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Moretto, Fernanda Cristina Fontes; Luvizotto, Renata de Azevedo Melo; Nogueira, Celia Regina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of different doses of triiodothyronine on gene expression of the adipokines leptin and adiponectin, at different times, and to evaluate the difference in expression between the two adipokines in each group. Methods 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated with triiodothyronine at physiological dose (10nM) and supraphysiological doses (100nM or 1,000nM), or without triiodothyronine (control, C) for 0.5, 6, or 24 hours. Leptin and adiponectin mRNA was detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). One-way analyses of variance, Tukey’s test or Student’s t test, were used to analyze data, and significance level was set at 5%. Results Leptin levels decreased in the 1,000nM-dose group after 0.5 hour. Adiponectin levels dropped in the 10nM-dose group, but increased at the 100nM dose. After 6 hours, both genes were suppressed in all hormone concentrations. After 24 hours, leptin levels increased at 10, 100 and 1,000nM groups as compared to the control group; and adiponectin levels increased only in the 100nM group as compared to the control group. Conclusion These results demonstrated fast actions of triiodothyronine on the leptin and adiponectin expression, starting at 0.5 hour, at a dose of 1,000nM for leptin and 100nM for adiponectin. Triiodothyronine stimulated or inhibited the expression of adipokines in adipocytes at different times and doses which may be useful to assist in the treatment of obesity, assuming that leptin is increased and adiponectin is decreased, in obesity cases. PMID:25993072

  6. Novel molecular aspects of ghrelin and leptin in the control of adipobiology and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Amaia

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin and leptin show opposite effects on energy balance. Ghrelin constitutes a gut hormone that is secreted to the bloodstream in two major forms, acylated and desacyl ghrelin. The isoforms of ghrelin not only promote adiposity by the activation of hypothalamic orexigenic neurons but also directly stimulate the expression of several fat storage-related proteins in adipocytes, including ACC, FAS, LPL and perilipin, thereby stimulating intracytoplasmic lipid accumulation. Moreover, both acylated and desacyl ghrelin reduce TNF-α-induced apoptosis and autophagy in adipocytes, suggesting an anti-inflammatory role of ghrelin in human adipose tissue. On the other hand, leptin is an adipokine with lipolytic effects. In this sense, leptin modulates via PI3K/Akt/mTOR the expression of aquaglyceroporins such as AQP3 and AQP7 that facilitate glycerol efflux from adipocytes in response to the lipolytic stimuli via its translocation from the cytosolic fraction (AQP3) or lipid droplets (AQP7) to the plasma membrane. Ghrelin and leptin also participate in the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. Ghrelin operates as a cardioprotective factor with increased circulating acylated ghrelin concentrations in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) causally related to LV remodeling during the progression to LVH. Additionally, leptin induces vasodilation by inducible NO synthase expression (iNOS) in the vascular wall. In this sense, leptin inhibits the angiotensin II-induced Ca(2+) increase, contraction and proliferation of VSMC through NO-dependent mechanisms. Together, dysregulation of circulating ghrelin isoforms and leptin resistance associated to obesity, type 2 diabetes, or the metabolic syndrome contribute to cardiometabolic derangements observed in these pathologies.

  7. Relation of Increased Leptin Concentrations to History of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke in the US Population

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Romero-Corral, Abel; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Gami, Apoor Suresh; Kuniyoshi, Fatima Helena Sert; Wolk, Robert; Somers, Virend Kristen

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, an adipose tissue-derived hormone, has been linked to cardiovascular outcomes; however data are limited in the US population, especially in women. To assess the association between leptin concentrations and history of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. We analyzed data from 6,239 subjects (mean age 47 years; 3,336 women) with measurements of serum leptin and full assessment of cardiovascular risk factors from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III. Logistic regression was used to estimate the cross-sectional association of leptin concentrations (highest quartile versus lowest quartile) and history of MI, stroke and the composite endpoint of MI or stroke (MI/stroke). Sex-specific models of leptin were adjusted for age, race, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, smoking and obese status. There were 212 men with MI/stroke (5.4%), 154 with MI (4.1%), and 82 with stroke (1.7%). There were 135 women with MI/stroke (2.6%), 74 with MI (1.5%), and 78 with stroke (1.4%). In multivariate analysis, high leptin was significantly and independently associated with MI/stroke in both men (OR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.20 to 4.93) and women (OR, 4.26; 95% CI, 1.75-10.73); with MI in men (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.40 to 7.37) and women (OR, 3.96; 95% CI, 1.29 to 12.72); and with stroke in women (OR, 3.20; 95% CI, 1.04-10.54) but not in men (OR, 1.37; 95% CI.0.38 to 3.88). In conclusion, in the US population, increased leptin concentrations are significantly associated with MI/stroke in men and women, independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and obese status. PMID:17631076

  8. Leptin is a coactivator of TGF-beta in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kümpers, Philipp; Gueler, Faikah; Rong, Song; Mengel, Michael; Tossidou, Irini; Peters, Imke; Haller, Hermann; Schiffer, Mario

    2007-10-01

    Progressive tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the common end point leading to end-stage renal disease in experimental and clinical settings. Since the peptide hormone leptin is involved not only in the regulation of obesity but also in the regulation of inflammation and fibrosis, we tested the hypothesis whether leptin deficiency has an impact on tubulointerstitial fibrosis in mice. Leptin-deficient (ob/ob) and leptin receptor-deficient mice (db/db) were exposed to 14 days of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). The degree of fibrosis and inflammation was compared with that in sham-operated mice by performing immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR, and Western blotting. We found that tubulointerstitial fibrosis was significantly reduced in the obstructed kidneys of ob/ob compared with db/db mice or control mice. Detailed analysis of infiltrating inflammatory cells by immunohistochemistry revealed a significant reduction of CD4(+) cells at 14 days after UUO in both ob/ob and db/db mice. In contrast, we could not detect significant differences in CD8(+) cells and macrophage content. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta mRNA levels, TGF-beta-induced Smad-2/3 activation, and the upregulation of downstream target genes were significantly reduced in ob/ob mice. In addition, we demonstrated that leptin could enhance TGF-beta signaling in normal rat kidney fibroblasts in vitro. We conclude that leptin can serve as a cofactor of TGF-beta activation and thus plays an important role in renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Therefore, selective blockade of the leptin axis might provide a therapeutic possibility to prevent or delay fibrotic kidney disease.

  9. Concerted Trafficking Regulation of Kv2.1 and KATP Channels by Leptin in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Shyng, Show-Ling; Chen, Pei-Chun

    2015-12-11

    In pancreatic β-cells, voltage-gated potassium 2.1 (Kv2.1) channels are the dominant delayed rectifier potassium channels responsible for action potential repolarization. Here, we report that leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes known to inhibit insulin secretion, causes a transient increase in surface expression of Kv2.1 channels in rodent and human β-cells. The effect of leptin on Kv2.1 surface expression is mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of AMPK mimics whereas inhibition of AMPK occludes the effect of leptin. Inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β, a known upstream kinase of AMPK, also blocks the effect of leptin. In addition, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is involved in Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation. Inhibition of PKA prevents leptin or AMPK activators from increasing Kv2.1 channel density, whereas stimulation of PKA is sufficient to promote Kv2.1 channel surface expression. The increased Kv2.1 surface expression by leptin is dependent on actin depolymerization, and pharmacologically induced actin depolymerization is sufficient to enhance Kv2.1 surface expression. The signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation by leptin mirror those reported recently for ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, which are critical for coupling glucose stimulation with membrane depolarization. We show that the leptin-induced increase in surface KATP channels results in more hyperpolarized membrane potentials than control cells at stimulating glucose concentrations, and the increase in Kv2.1 channels leads to a more rapid repolarization of membrane potential in cells firing action potentials. This study supports a model in which leptin exerts concerted trafficking regulation of KATP and Kv2.1 channels to coordinately inhibit insulin secretion.

  10. Dynamic changes in leptin distribution in the progression from ovum to blastocyst of the pre-implantation mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Laura C; Roberts, R Michael

    2011-06-01

    The hormone leptin, which is primarily produced by adipose tissue, is a critical permissive factor for multiple reproductive events in the mouse, including implantation. In the CD1 strain, maternally derived leptin from the oocyte becomes differentially distributed among the blastomeres of pre-implantation embryos to create a polarized pattern, a feature consistent with a model of development in which blastomeres are biased toward a particular fate as early as the two-cell stage. In this study, we have confirmed that embryonic leptin is of maternal origin and re-examined leptin distribution in two distinct strains in which embryos were derived after either normal ovulation or superovulation. A polarized pattern of leptin distribution was found in the majority of both CD1 and CF1 embryos (79.1 and 76.9% respectively) collected following superovulation but was reduced, particularly in CF1 embryos (29.8%; P<0.0001), after natural ovulation. The difference in leptin asymmetries in the CF1 strain arose between ovulation and the first cleavage division and was not affected by removal of the zona pellucida. The presence or absence of leptin polarization was not linked to differences in the ability of embryos to normally develop to blastocyst. In the early blastocyst, leptin was confined subcortically to trophectoderm, but on blastocoel expansion, it was lost from the cells. Throughout development, leptin co-localized with LRP2, a multi-ligand transport protein, and its patterning resembled that noted for the maternal-effect proteins OOEP, NLRP5, and PADI6, suggesting that it is a component of the subcortical maternal complex with as yet unknown significance in pre-implantation development.

  11. Association between maternal urinary arsenic species and infant cord blood leptin levels in a New Hampshire Pregnancy Cohort.

    PubMed

    Gossai, Anala; Lesseur, Corina; Farzan, Shohreh; Marsit, Carmen; Karagas, Margaret R; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is an important pleiotropic hormone involved in the regulation of nutrient intake and energy expenditure, and is known to influence body weight in infants and adults. High maternal levels of arsenic have been associated with reduced infant birth weight, but the mechanism of action is not yet understood. This study aimed to investigate the association between in utero arsenic exposure and infant cord blood leptin concentrations within 156 mother-infant pairs from the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study (NHBCS) who were exposed to low to moderate levels of arsenic through well water and diet. In utero arsenic exposure was obtained from maternal second trimester urinary arsenic concentration, and plasma leptin levels were assessed through immunoassay. Results indicate that urinary arsenic species concentrations were predictive of infant cord blood leptin levels following adjustment for creatinine, infant birth weight for gestational age percentile, infant sex, maternal pregnancy-related weight gain, and maternal education level amongst 149 white mother-infant pairs in multivariate linear regression models. A doubling or 100% increase in total urinary arsenic concentration (iAs+MMA+DMA) was associated with a 10.3% (95% CI: 0.8-20.7%) increase in cord blood leptin levels. A 100% increase in either monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) or dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was also associated with an 8.3% (95% CI: -1.0-18.6%) and 10.3% (95% CI: 1.2-20.2%) increase in cord blood leptin levels, respectively. The association between inorganic arsenic (iAs) and cord blood leptin was of similar magnitude and direction as other arsenic species (a 100% increase in iAs was associated with a 6.5% (95% CI: -3.4-17.5%) increase in cord blood leptin levels), albeit not significant. These results suggest in utero exposure to low levels of arsenic influences cord blood leptin concentration and presents a potential mechanism by which arsenic may impact early childhood growth.

  12. Mother and Infant Body Mass Index, Breast Milk Leptin and Their Serum Leptin Values

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Francesco; Sardo, Allegra; Rossi, Lorenza; Benetti, Stefania; Savino, Andrea; Silvestro, Leandra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates correlations between mother and infant Body Mass Index (BMI), their serum leptin values and breast milk leptin concentration in early infancy. Subjects and Methods: We determined serum leptin values in 58 healthy infants and leptin values in their mothers’ breast milk, using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Infant and maternal anthropometrics were measured. Results: Median leptin concentration was 3.9 ng/mL (interquartile range (IQR): 2.75) in infant serum, 4.27 ng/mL (IQR: 5.62) in maternal serum and 0.89 ng/mL (IQR: 1.32) in breast milk. Median maternal BMI and weight were 24 kg/m2 (IQR: 4.41) and 64 kg (IQR: 15). Median infant BMI was 15.80 kg/cm2 (IQR: 4.02), while average weight was 5.130 kg (IQR: 1.627). Infants serum leptin values positively correlated with infants’ BMI (p = 0.001; r = 0.213) and breast milk leptin (p = 0.03; r = 0.285). Maternal serum leptin values positively correlated with maternal BMI (p = 0.000, r = 0.449) and breast milk leptin ones (p = 0.026; r = 0.322). Conclusion: Breast milk leptin and maternal BMI could influence infant serum leptin values. Further studies are needed to better elucidate the role of genetics and environment on infant leptin production and risk of obesity later in life. PMID:27338468

  13. HER2/Leptin Crosstalk in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    obtained in HEK 293T kidney cells engineered to overexpress ObR and HER2 suggested that leptin can transactivate HER2 [22]. Thus, we examined whether...TITLE: HER2/ Leptin crosstalk in breast cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Eva Surmacz, Ph.D...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) September 1, 2007-August 30, 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HER2/ Leptin crosstalk in breast cancer

  14. HER2/Leptin Crosstalk in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    in human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells engineered to coexpress HER2 and ObRs or ObRl suggested that leptin , acting through either ObR isoform, can...obtained in HEK 293T kidney cells engineered to overexpress ObR and HER2 suggested that leptin can transactivate HER2 [22]. Thus, we examined whether...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-07-1-0603 TITLE: HER2/ Leptin Crosstalk in Breast Cancer

  15. Steroidogenic genes expressions are repressed by high levels of leptin and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in MA-10 Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Landry, David A; Sormany, François; Haché, Josée; Roumaud, Pauline; Martin, Luc J

    2017-03-25

    The adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ secreting numerous peptide hormones, including leptin. Increased circulating levels of leptin, as a result of hormonal resistance in obese individuals, may contribute to lower androgen production in obese males. However, the molecular mechanisms involved need to be better defined. Androgens are mainly produced by Leydig cells within the testis. In male rodents, activation of the leptin receptor modulates a cascade of intracellular signal transduction pathways which may lead to regulation of transcription factors having influences on steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. Thus, as a result of high leptin levels interacting with its receptor and modulating the activity of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway, the activity of transcription factors important for steroidogenic genes expressions may be inhibited in Leydig cells. Here we show that Lepr is increasingly expressed within Leydig cells according to postnatal development. Although high levels of leptin (corresponding to obesity condition) alone had no effect on Leydig cells' steroidogenic genes expression, it downregulated cAMP-dependent activations of the cholesterol transporter Star and of the rate-limiting steroidogenic enzyme Cyp11a1. Our results suggest that STAT transcriptional activity is downregulated by high levels of leptin, leading to reduced cAMP-dependent steroidogenic genes (Star and Cyp11a1) expressions in MA-10 Leydig cells. However, other transcription factors such as members of the SMAD and NFAT families may be involved and need further investigation to better define how leptin regulates their activities and their relevance for Leydig cells function.

  16. Counterregulation of insulin by leptin as key component of autonomic regulation of body weight

    PubMed Central

    Borer, Katarina T

    2014-01-01

    A re-examination of the mechanism controlling eating, locomotion, and metabolism prompts formulation of a new explanatory model containing five features: a coordinating joint role of the (1) autonomic nervous system (ANS); (2) the suprachiasmatic (SCN) master clock in counterbalancing parasympathetic digestive and absorptive functions and feeding with sympathetic locomotor and thermogenic energy expenditure within a circadian framework; (3) interaction of the ANS/SCN command with brain substrates of reward encompassing dopaminergic projections to ventral striatum and limbic and cortical forebrain. These drive the nonhomeostatic feeding and locomotor motivated behaviors in interaction with circulating ghrelin and lateral hypothalamic neurons signaling through melanin concentrating hormone and orexin-hypocretin peptides; (4) counterregulation of insulin by leptin of both gastric and adipose tissue origin through: potentiation by leptin of cholecystokinin-mediated satiation, inhibition of insulin secretion, suppression of insulin lipogenesis by leptin lipolysis, and modulation of peripheral tissue and brain sensitivity to insulin action. Thus weight-loss induced hypoleptimia raises insulin sensitivity and promotes its parasympathetic anabolic actions while obesity-induced hyperleptinemia supresses insulin lipogenic action; and (5) inhibition by leptin of bone mineral accrual suggesting that leptin may contribute to the maintenance of stability of skeletal, lean-body, as well as adipose tissue masses. PMID:25317239

  17. Presence and distribution of leptin and its receptor in the minor salivary glands of the donkey.

    PubMed

    Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Bazzucchi, Cinzia; Mercati, Francesca; Ceccarelli, Piero

    2015-04-01

    Leptin is a hormone widely diffused in the mammalian body in which it plays functions that go far beyond control of appetite and energy metabolism. The finding that it is present in the major salivary glands of various animal species is of interest for the functional implications that it may imply. Since there are no data on the presence of leptin and its receptor in the minor salivary glands, the aim of this study was to demonstrate their presence and distribution in such glands of donkeys. This latter was chosen as species of reference because the monogastric herbivore shows intense salivation during their masticatory activity. Tissue samples were collected from four adult donkeys, of both sexes, following slaughter. Samples were fixed, embedded in paraffin, and processed for immunohistochemical analysis using primary antibodies directed against leptin and its receptor. Controls for non-specific staining were always included. Leptin and its receptor were found in the minor salivary glands. Their distribution was similar to that described in the major salivary glands of animal species that have been investigated to date. We hypothesized that leptin can play a role in regulating gland function, via an autocrine/paracrine mechanism.

  18. Effect of weight reduction on leptin, total ghrelin and obestatin concentrations in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, T; Gitto, E; Ferraù, V; Munafò, C; Alibrandi, A; Marseglia, G L; Salpietro, A; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Leonardi, S; Ciprandi, G; Salpietro, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate fasting levels of glucose, insulin, leptin, total ghrelin, and obestatin in a group of prepubescent obese children before and after weight loss. We enrolled 64 prepubescent obese children, but only 35 completed the study (mean age 7.6 +- 0.9 years, 19 females) and 20 normal-weight prepubescent children as controls. Fasting plasma concentration of glucose, insulin, Homeostasis Model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and leptin, total ghrelin, and obestatin levels were measured at baseline and after a 6-month lifestyle intervention (i.e. improved nutrition and increased physical activity). At baseline, obese children showed significantly (p less than 0.001) higher leptin and obestatin levels, and lower total ghrelin concentrations than control subjects. Weight loss significantly (p less than 0.001) diminished plasma leptin and insulin levels and increased ghrelin and obestatin concentrations. Weight loss in prepubescent children is associated with a significant change in leptin, ghrelin and obestatin concentrations. These results confirm the hypothesis that levels of these hormones are closely associated with obesity in childhood and might take part, as consequence but not as a cause, in glucose, fat, and energy metabolism.

  19. Increased risk of cardiovascular complications in chronic kidney disease: a possible role of leptin.

    PubMed

    Korolczuk, Agnieszka; Dudka, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a small peptide hormone (16 kDa), a product of the obesity gene (Ob), and is mainly synthesized and secreted by adipocytes. It is removed from the blood by the kidneys. The kidney is not only a site of leptin clearance, but also a target organ for its action in different pathophysiological states. Several studies have documented a strong relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and accelerated cardiovascular disease (CVD) defined as a cardiorenal syndrome. Patients with stage 3 and 4 CKD develop cardiovascular complications and are at increased risk of death from CVD. Renal dysfunction promotes several mechanisms responsible for exacerbation of cardiovascular disease. These include activation of the renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, elevated asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), low-grade inflammation with increased circulating cytokines, and dyslipidemia. Recently, it has been observed that plasma leptin level is elevated in patients with cardiorenal syndrome. In obesity, hyperleptinemia combined with selective leptin resistance appear to have a critical role in the development and progression of kidney disease, CVD and metabolic syndrome. This has clinical implications for the treatment of obesity-related hypertension and kidney disease. In this paper the role of leptin in chronic kidney disease and accelerated cardiovascular disease is out lined. The link between hyperleptinemia and development and progression of morphologic changes that effect kidney in obese patients is also discussed.

  20. Leptin upregulates beta3-integrin expression and interleukin-1beta, upregulates leptin and leptin receptor expression in human endometrial epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R R; Leavis, P

    2001-10-01

    Human endometrium and endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) either cultured alone or cocultured with human embryos express leptin and leptin receptor. This study compares the effect of leptin with that of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) on the expression of beta3-EEC integrin, a marker of endometrial receptivity. Both cytokines increased the expression of beta3-EEC at concentrations in the range of 0.06-3 nM; however, leptin exhibited a significantly greater effect than IL-1beta. We also determined the regulatory effects of IL-1beta on leptin secretion and on the expression of leptin and leptin receptor at the protein level in both EEC and endometrial stromal cell (ESC) cultures. In EEC cultures, IL-1beta upregulated secretion of leptin and expression of both leptin and leptin receptors. No effect of IL-1beta was found in the ESC cultures. However, leptin exhibited marginal upregulation of leptin receptor. The upregulation of beta3-integrin and leptin/leptin receptor expression by IL-1beta in EEC cultures indicates that both cytokines may be implicated in embryonic-maternal cross-talk during the early phase of human implantation. Our present data also raise the possibility that leptin is an endometrial molecular effector of IL-1beta action on beta3-integrin upregulation. Thus, a new role for leptin in human reproduction as an autocrine/paracrine regulator of endometrial receptivity is proposed.

  1. Physiology of leptin: energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong-Kyu; Ahima, Rexford S.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and regulates energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine function, metabolism, immune function and other systems through its effects on the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Leptin administration has been shown to restore metabolic and neuroendocrine abnormalities in individuals with leptin-deficient states, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and lipoatrophy. In contrast, obese individuals are resistant to leptin. Recombinant leptin is beneficial in patients with congenital leptin deficiency or generalized lipodystrophy. However, further research on molecular mediators of leptin resistance is needed for the development of targeted leptin sensitizing therapies for obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:25199978

  2. Leptin potentiates astrogenesis in the developing hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Rottkamp, Daniele M.; Rudenko, Ivan A.; Maier, Matthew T.; Roshanbin, Sahar; Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Perez, Luz; Valdearcos, Martin; Chua, Streamson; Koliwad, Suneil K.; Xu, Allison W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The proper establishment of hypothalamic feeding circuits during early development has a profound influence on energy homeostasis, and perturbing this process could predispose individuals to obesity and its associated consequences later in life. The maturation of hypothalamic neuronal circuitry in rodents takes place during the initial postnatal weeks, and this coincides with a dramatic surge in the circulating level of leptin, which is known to regulate the outgrowth of key neuronal projections in the maturing hypothalamus. Coincidently, this early postnatal period also marks the rapid proliferation and expansion of astrocytes in the brain. Methods Here we examined the effects of leptin on the proliferative capacity of astrocytes in the developing hypothalamus by treating postnatal mice with leptin. Mutant mice were also generated to conditionally remove leptin receptors from glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells in the postnatal period. Results and conclusions We show that GFAP-expressing cells in the periventricular zone of the 3rd ventricle were responsive to leptin during the initial postnatal week. Leptin enhanced the proliferation of astrocytes in the postnatal hypothalamus and conditional removal of leptin receptors from GFAP-expressing cells during early postnatal period limited astrocyte proliferation. While increasing evidence demonstrates a direct role of leptin in regulating astrocytes in the adult brain, and given the essential function of astrocytes in modulating neuronal function and connectivity, our study indicates that leptin may exert its metabolic effects, in part, by promoting hypothalamic astrogenesis during early postnatal development. PMID:26629411

  3. [A new mutation c.422C>G (p.S141C) in homo- and heterozygous forms of the human leptin gene].

    PubMed

    Chekhranova, M K; Karpova, S K; Iatsyshina, S B; Pankov, Iu A

    2008-01-01

    Mutation g.15409C>G, c.422C>G (p.S141C) in homo- and heterozygous forms of the human LEP gene was identified among some patients of the high mountain village of Karaul, Ashkhabad oblast, Turkmenistan, some of which suffer from adiposity. It causes the substitution S120C in the secreted leptin. The mature leptin molecule (146 aa) has only two Cys residues (C96 and C146) forming an S-S bridge, which is important for the hormone function. A third mutation, C120, in the molecule might disturb the correct formation of the S-S bond and could alter the leptin activity.

  4. Roles of leptin in reproduction, pregnancy and polycystic ovary syndrome: consensus knowledge and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, María Jesús; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    As an essential function for perpetuation of species, reproduction, including puberty onset, is sensitive to the size of body energy stores and the metabolic state of the organism. Accordingly, impaired energy homeostasis, ranging from extreme leanness, such as in anorexia or cachexia, to morbid obesity has an impact on the timing of puberty and is often associated to fertility problems. The neuroendocrine basis for such phenomenon is the close connection between numerous metabolic hormones and nutritional cues with the various elements of the so-called hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Yet, despite previous fragmentary knowledge, it was only the discovery of the adipose-hormone, leptin, in 1994 what revolutionized our understanding on how metabolic and reproductive systems closely interplay and allowed the definition of the neurohormonal causes of perturbations of puberty and fertility in conditions of impaired body energy homeostasis. In this article, we aim to provide a synoptic view of the mechanisms whereby leptin engages in the regulation of different elements of the HPG axis, with special attention to its effects and mechanisms of action on the different elements of the reproductive brain and its proven direct effects in the gonads. In addition, we will summarize the state-of-the-art regarding the putative roles of leptin during gestation, including its potential function as placental hormone. Finally, comments will be made on the eventual leptin alterations in reproductive disorders, with special attention to the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a disease in which reproductive, metabolic and neuroendocrine alterations are commonly observed. All in all, we intend to provide an updated account of our knowledge on the physiological roles of leptin in the metabolic regulation of the reproductive axis and its eventual pathophysiological implications in prevalent reproductive disorders, such as PCOS.

  5. Leptin, a tool of parasites?

    PubMed Central

    Lõhmus, Mare; Moalem, Sharon; Björklund, Mats

    2012-01-01

    One common physiological phenomenon that is involved both in infectious and in malignant processes is the reduction in appetite: disease anorexia. An increase in plasma levels of leptin with inflammation is thought to be involved in this process. However, from an evolutionary perspective, in certain cases, it would be more adaptive for an internal parasite to stimulate the appetite of the host instead of causing its suppression. We tested whether a parasitic infection with the larvae of the helminth parasite Taenia taeniaformis affects the levels of appetite-regulating proteins, such as leptin, ghrelin and neuropeptide-Y (NPY) in wild yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis). We found that infected mice had lower plasma levels of leptin and increased levels of NPY than the uninfected subjects. Ghrelin levels were not associated with the occurrence of the parasites; however, these levels strongly correlated with the levels of NPY. This study suggests a possible manipulation by parasitic larvae of appetite regulation in infected subjects. PMID:22740641

  6. Leptin status in adolescence is associated with academic performance in high school: a cross-sectional study in a Chilean birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Burrows, Paulina; Blanco, Estela; Reyes, Marcela; Castillo, Marcela; Peirano, Patricio; Algarín, Cecilia; Lozoff, Betsy; Gahagan, Sheila; Burrows, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone associated with learning and memory via brain receptors. However, elevated plasma leptin levels may impair cognitive and memory functions. Since individual differences in memory performance affect students’ ability to learn, we aimed to study the relation between leptin status in adolescence and school performance. Design and setting We studied 568 adolescents aged 16–17 years from Santiago. A cross-sectional analysis was carried out on a birth cohort conducted in Santiago (Chile). Primary and secondary outcome measures We measured serum leptin concentration using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cut-offs from the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) Study for 16-year-olds were used to define abnormally high leptin levels (hyperleptinaemia). Academic performance was measured using high-school grades and grade point average (GPA). Data were collected in 2009–2012; data analysis was performed in 2014. Results 15% of participants had hyperleptinaemia. They had significantly lower school grades and GPA compared with participants with normal leptin levels (eg, GPA mean difference=33.8 points). Leptin levels were negative and significantly correlated with school grades in 9th, 10th and 12th. Similarly, it was negatively correlated with high-school GPA. After controlling for health, sociodemographic and education confounders, the chances of having a performance ≥75th centile in students having hyperleptinaemia were 32% (95% CI 0.19% to 0.89%) that of students having normal serum leptin concentration. Conclusions In high school students, abnormally high levels of leptin were associated with poorer academic performance. These findings support the idea of a relationship between leptin and cognition. Further research is needed on the cognitive effects of leptin in younger populations. PMID:27797980

  7. Leptin-Induced Endothelium-Dependent Vasorelaxation of Peripheral Arteries in Lean and Obese Rats: Role of Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Gertler, Arieh; Solomon, Gili; Wood, Mark E.; Whiteman, Matthew; Bełtowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue hormone leptin induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation mediated by nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHF). Previously it has been demonstrated that in short-term obesity the NO-dependent and the EDHF-dependent components of vascular effect of leptin are impaired and up-regulated, respectively. Herein we examined the mechanism of the EDHF-dependent vasodilatory effect of leptin and tested the hypothesis that alterations of acute vascular effects of leptin in obesity are accounted for by chronic hyperleptinemia. The study was performed in 5 groups of rats: (1) control, (2) treated with exogenous leptin for 1 week to induce hyperleptinemia, (3) obese, fed highly-palatable diet for 4 weeks, (4) obese treated with pegylated superactive rat leptin receptor antagonist (PEG-SRLA) for 1 week, (5) fed standard chow and treated with PEG-SRLA. Acute effect of leptin on isometric tension of mesenteric artery segments was measured ex vivo. Leptin relaxed phenylephrine-preconstricted vascular segments in NO- and EDHF-dependent manner. The NO-dependent component was impaired and the EDHF-dependent component was increased in the leptin-treated and obese groups and in the latter group both these effects were abolished by PEG-SRLA. The EDHF-dependent vasodilatory effect of leptin was blocked by either the inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase, propargylglycine, or a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) scavenger, bismuth (III) subsalicylate. The results indicate that NO deficiency is compensated by the up-regulation of EDHF in obese rats and both effects are accounted for by chronic hyperleptinemia. The EDHF-dependent component of leptin-induced vasorelaxation is mediated, at least partially, by H2S. PMID:24475175

  8. Feeding and insulin increase leptin translation. Importance of the leptin mRNA untranslated regions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Jeong; Yang, Rong-Ze; Gong, Da-Wei; Fried, Susan K

    2007-01-05

    The post-transcriptional mechanisms by which feeding and insulin increase leptin production are poorly understood. Starvation of 6-7-week-old rats for 14 h decreased leptin mRNA level by only 22% but decreased plasma levels, adipose tissue leptin content, and release by over 75%. The decreased leptin with starvation was explained by >85% decrease in relative rates of leptin biosynthesis measured by metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation. In vitro insulin treatment of adipose tissue from fed or starved rats for 2 h increased relative rates of leptin biosynthesis by 2-3-fold, and the effect was blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or mammalian target of rapamycin. Consistent with the hypothesis that feeding/insulin increases leptin translation, more leptin mRNA was associated with polysomes in adipose tissue of fed than starved rats, and in vitro incubation of adipose tissue of starved rats with insulin shifted leptin mRNA into polysomes. To assess the mechanisms regulating leptin translation, chimeric human leptin untranslated region (UTR) reporter constructs were transiently transfected into differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The 5'-UTR of leptin mRNA increased luciferase reporter activity 2-3-fold, whereas the full-length 3'-UTR (nucleotides 1-2804) was inhibitory (-65%). Sequences between nucleotides 462 and 1130 of the leptin 3'-UTR conferred most of the inhibitory effect. Insulin stimulated the expression of constructs that included both the full-length 5'-UTR and the inhibitory 3'-UTR, and the effect was blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or mammalian target of rapamycin. Our data suggest that insulin derepresses leptin translation by a mechanism that requires both the 5'-UTR and the 3'-UTR and may contribute to the increase in leptin production with feeding.

  9. IMPLICATIONS OF CROSSTALK BETWEEN LEPTIN AND INSULIN SIGNALING DURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF DIET INDUCED OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Christopher D; Huypens, Peter; Stewart, Laura K; Gettys, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Insulin and leptin play complementary roles in regulating the consumption, uptake, oxidation and storage of nutrients. Chronic consumption of diets that contain a high proportion of calories from saturated fat induces a progressive deterioration in function of both hormones. Certain rat lines and strains of mice are particularly sensitive to the obesogenic and diabetogenic effects of high fat diets, and have been used extensively to study the developmental progression of insulin and leptin resistance in relation to the increasing adiposity that is characteristic of their response to these diets. Some aspects of the diminished efficacy of each hormone are secondary to increased adiposity but a consensus is emerging to support the view that direct effects of dietary components or their metabolites, independent of the resulting obesity, play important roles in development of insulin and leptin resistance. In this minireview, we will examine the implications of crosstalk between leptin and insulin signaling during the development of diet-induced obesity, emphasizing potential interactions between pathways that occur among target sites, and exploring how these interactions may influence the progression of obesity and diabetes. PMID:18852044

  10. Effect of cyproheptadine on serum leptin levels.

    PubMed

    Calka, Omer; Metin, Ahmet; Dülger, Haluk; Erkoç, Reha

    2005-01-01

    Leptin is a 167 amino acid protein encoded by the obesity gene that is synthesized in adipose tissue and interacts with receptors in the hypothalamus linked to the regulation of appetite and metabolism. It is known to suppress appetite and increase energy expenditure. Cyproheptadine is a piperidine antihistamine that increases appetite through its antiserotonergic effect on 5-HT2 receptors in the brain. Although both leptin and cyproheptadine are effective in controlling appetite, their interaction has not been addressed in clinical studies. This study evaluated serum leptin concentrations in patients who received cyproheptadine to treat a variety of disorders. Sixteen patients aged 7 to 71 years (mean, 26.25 years) were given cyproheptadine 2 to 6 mg/day for a minimum of 7 days. Body weight was measured and blood samples were obtained at baseline and after 1 week of treatment. Serum leptin levels were determined by leptin radioimmunoassay. The mean body weight at baseline (52.59 kg) did not differ significantly from that at 1 week after treatment (52.84 kg; P > .05), but the mean leptin level after 1 week of treatment with cyproheptadine (3.14 ng/mL) was 14.2% higher than that at baseline (2.75 ng/mL; P < .05). This increase may suggest that both leptin and cyproheptadine may affect appetite via similar receptors and that cyproheptadine does not impair leptin activity through these receptors. Further study will be necessary to clarify this relationship.

  11. Leptin and the cardiovascular system: a review.

    PubMed

    Ashwin, Patel J; Dilipbhai, Patel J

    2007-06-01

    Obesity is an increasing health problem not only in the industrialized western countries but, also in the developing countries like India. The adipose tissue specific obese (ob) gene and its peptide product leptin were discovered in 1994. Leptin binding to specific receptors in the hypothalamus results in altered expression of orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides that regulate neuroendocrine functions and energy homeostasis. Recent patents and experimental evidence suggest that leptin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity and eating disorders. Central leptin action also includes regulation of blood pressure, bone mass, and immune function. Peripherally also, leptin plays an important role in direct regulation of immune cells, pancreatic beta cells, adipocytes and muscle cells. Leptin receptors are present on human endothelial cells, and it has been shown to induce angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Further, leptin appears to be a potential pressure and volume regulating factor and may function pathophysiologically as a common link to obesity and hypertension. Obesity is also a risk factor for several other cardiovascular diseases like myocardial hypertrophy, myocardial infarction, coronary atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent progress in understanding central and peripheral leptin receptor signaling pathways may provide potential new targets to combat obesity, hypertension etc.

  12. Leptin suppresses non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic rat cardiomyocytes by reduction of iPLA{sub 2} activity

    SciTech Connect

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-07-17

    Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death is an important therapeutic target in myocardial ischemia. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, is known to exhibit cytoprotective effects on the ischemic heart, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In this research, we found that pretreatment of leptin strongly suppressed ischemic-augmented nuclear shrinkage and non-apoptotic cell death on cardiomyocytes. Leptin was also shown to significantly inhibit the activity of iPLA{sub 2}, which is considered to play crucial roles in non-apoptotic cell death, resulting in effective prevention of ischemia-induced myocyte death. These findings provide the first evidence of a protective mechanism of leptin against ischemia-induced non-apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. - Highlights: • Myocardial ischemia-model induces in caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin strongly inhibits ischemic-augmented non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin reduces iPLA{sub 2} activity, leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic cell death.

  13. Minireview: CNS Mechanisms of Leptin Action

    PubMed Central

    Flak, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocytokine that circulates in proportion to body fat to signal the repletion of long-term energy stores. Leptin acts via its receptor, LepRb, on specialized neuronal populations in the brain (mainly in the hypothalamus and brainstem) to alter motivation and satiety, as well as to permit energy expenditure and appropriate glucose homeostasis. Decreased leptin, as with prolonged caloric restriction, promotes a powerful orexigenic signal, decreases energy use via a number of neuroendocrine and autonomic axes, and disrupts glucose homeostasis. Here, we review what is known about cellular leptin action and focus on the roles for specific populations of LepRb-expressing neurons for leptin action. PMID:26484582

  14. [Leptin: a link between obesity and osteoarthritis?].

    PubMed

    Terlain, Bernard; Presle, Nathalie; Pottie, Pascale; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    In addition to aging, obesity is one of the most common underlying causes of osteoarthritis (OA). Mechanical loading, together with biochemical and systemic factors linked to altered lipid metabolism, are thought to contribute to the onset of OA. It has been suggested that OA is a systemic metabolic disease associated with lipid disorders affecting joint homeostasis. These gradual changes may be due to the local effect of adipokines, and especially leptin. Indeed, their relative levels in joints differ from that found in plasma. In particular, leptin levels are increased and adiponectin and resistin levels are reduced This hypothesis is supported by--leptin overexpression in OA cartilage and its correlation with the degree of cartilage destruction,--abundant leptin synthesis by osteophytes, and--the high leptin levels found in OA joints from female patients. This link between OA and adipokines provides new leads regarding the prevention of OA and the identification of new drug targets.

  15. Identification of the Long-Sought Leptin in Chicken and Duck: Expression Pattern of the Highly GC-Rich Avian leptin Fits an Autocrine/Paracrine Rather Than Endocrine Function.

    PubMed

    Seroussi, Eyal; Cinnamon, Yuval; Yosefi, Sara; Genin, Olga; Smith, Julia Gage; Rafati, Nima; Bornelöv, Susanne; Andersson, Leif; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2016-02-01

    More than 20 years after characterization of the key regulator of mammalian energy balance, leptin, we identified the leptin (LEP) genes of chicken (Gallus gallus) and duck (Anas platyrhynchos). The extreme guanine-cytosine content (∼70%), the location in a genomic region with low-complexity repetitive and palindromic sequence elements, the relatively low sequence conservation, and low level of expression have hampered the identification of these genes until now. In vitro-expressed chicken and duck leptins specifically activated signaling through the chicken leptin receptor in cell culture. In situ hybridization demonstrated expression of LEP mRNA in granular and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, anterior pituitary, and in embryonic limb buds, somites, and branchial arches, suggesting roles in adult brain control of energy balance and during embryonic development. The expression patterns of LEP and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were explored in chicken, duck, and quail (Coturnix japonica) using RNA-sequencing experiments available in the Short Read Archive and by quantitative RT-PCR. In adipose tissue, LEP and LEPR were scarcely transcribed, and the expression level was not correlated to adiposity. Our identification of the leptin genes in chicken and duck genomes resolves a long lasting controversy regarding the existence of leptin genes in these species. This identification was confirmed by sequence and structural similarity, conserved exon-intron boundaries, detection in numerous genomic, and transcriptomic datasets and characterization by PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and bioassays. Our results point to an autocrine/paracrine mode of action for bird leptin instead of being a circulating hormone as in mammals.

  16. Leptin is required for hypothalamic regulation of miRNAs targeting POMC 3'UTR.

    PubMed

    Derghal, Adel; Djelloul, Mehdi; Airault, Coraline; Pierre, Clément; Dallaporta, Michel; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Tillement, Vanessa; Tardivel, Catherine; Bariohay, Bruno; Trouslard, Jérôme; Mounien, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) monitors modifications in metabolic parameters or hormone levels and elicits adaptive responses such as food intake regulation. Particularly, within the hypothalamus, leptin modulates the activity of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons which are critical regulators of energy balance. Consistent with a pivotal role of the melanocortin system in the control of energy homeostasis, disruption of the POMC gene causes hyperphagia and obesity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally repress the expression of genes by binding to 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTR) of the target mRNAs. However, little is known regarding the role of miRNAs that target POMC 3'UTR in the central control energy homeostasis. Particularly, their interaction with the leptin signaling pathway remain unclear. First, we used common prediction programs to search for potential miRNAs target sites on 3'UTR of POMC mRNA. This screening identified a set of conserved miRNAs seed sequences for mir-383, mir-384-3p, and mir-488. We observed that mir-383, mir-384-3p, and mir-488 are up-regulated in the hypothalamus of leptin deficient ob/ob mice. In accordance with these observations, we also showed that mir-383, mir-384-3p, and mir-488 were increased in db/db mice that exhibit a non-functional leptin receptor. The intraperitoneal injection of leptin down-regulated the expression of these miRNAs of interest in the hypothalamus of ob/ob mice showing the involvement of leptin in the expression of mir-383, mir-384-3p, and mir-488. Finally, the evaluation of responsivity to intracerebroventricular administration of leptin exhibited that a chronic treatment with leptin decreased mir-488 expression in hypothalamus of C57BL/6 mice. In summary, these results suggest that leptin modulates the expression of miRNAs that target POMC mRNA in hypothalamus.

  17. Leptin is required for hypothalamic regulation of miRNAs targeting POMC 3′UTR

    PubMed Central

    Derghal, Adel; Djelloul, Mehdi; Airault, Coraline; Pierre, Clément; Dallaporta, Michel; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Tillement, Vanessa; Tardivel, Catherine; Bariohay, Bruno; Trouslard, Jérôme; Mounien, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) monitors modifications in metabolic parameters or hormone levels and elicits adaptive responses such as food intake regulation. Particularly, within the hypothalamus, leptin modulates the activity of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons which are critical regulators of energy balance. Consistent with a pivotal role of the melanocortin system in the control of energy homeostasis, disruption of the POMC gene causes hyperphagia and obesity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally repress the expression of genes by binding to 3′-untranslated regions (3′UTR) of the target mRNAs. However, little is known regarding the role of miRNAs that target POMC 3′UTR in the central control energy homeostasis. Particularly, their interaction with the leptin signaling pathway remain unclear. First, we used common prediction programs to search for potential miRNAs target sites on 3′UTR of POMC mRNA. This screening identified a set of conserved miRNAs seed sequences for mir-383, mir-384-3p, and mir-488. We observed that mir-383, mir-384-3p, and mir-488 are up-regulated in the hypothalamus of leptin deficient ob/ob mice. In accordance with these observations, we also showed that mir-383, mir-384-3p, and mir-488 were increased in db/db mice that exhibit a non-functional leptin receptor. The intraperitoneal injection of leptin down-regulated the expression of these miRNAs of interest in the hypothalamus of ob/ob mice showing the involvement of leptin in the expression of mir-383, mir-384-3p, and mir-488. Finally, the evaluation of responsivity to intracerebroventricular administration of leptin exhibited that a chronic treatment with leptin decreased mir-488 expression in hypothalamus of C57BL/6 mice. In summary, these results suggest that leptin modulates the expression of miRNAs that target POMC mRNA in hypothalamus. PMID:25999818

  18. [Role of leptin in human reproduction (anorexia, bulimia)].

    PubMed

    Pilka, L; Rumpík, D; Pilka, R

    2012-12-01

    Leptin may act as the critical link between adipose tissue and the reproductive system, indicating whether adequate energy reserves are presenting for normal reproductive functions. Future interventional studies involving leptin administration are excepted to further clarify this role of leptin and may provide new therapeutic options for the reproductive dysfunctions associated with states of relative leptin deficiency or resistance.

  19. Inhibition of immobilization stress-induced anorexia, behavioral deficits, and plasma corticosterone secretion by injected leptin in rats.

    PubMed

    Haque, Zeba; Akbar, Nazia; Yasmin, Farzana; Haleem, Muhammad A; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2013-05-01

    Leptin, originally identified as an anti-obesity hormone, also has an important role in the regulation of mood and emotion. The present study was designed to monitor effects of injected leptin on immobilization stress-induced anorexia, behavioral deficits, and plasma corticosterone secretion in rats. Exposure to 2 h immobilization stress decreased food intake and body weight in saline-injected animals. Animals exposed to open field, elevated plus maze, and light-dark transition tests the day following immobilization exhibited anxiety-like behavior. Leptin injected at doses of 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg also decreased food intake and body weight in unstressed animals and elicited anxiolytic effects at dose of 0.5 mg/kg, monitored on the following day. Immobilization-induced decreases in food intake, body weight, as well as stress-induced behavioral deficits in the open field, elevated plus maze, and light-dark transition test were reversed by exogenous leptin in a dose-dependent (0.1-0.5 mg/kg) manner. Acute exposure to 2 h immobilization produced a fourfold rise in plasma levels of corticosterone. Animals injected with leptin at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg, but not at dose of 0.5 mg/kg, exhibited a marginal increase in plasma corticosterone. Immobilization-induced increases of plasma corticosterone were reversed by leptin injected at doses of 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg. The data suggest that exogenous leptin can reduce stress perception, resulting in an inhibition of stress effects on the activity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and behavior. The reported pharmacological effects of leptin represent an innovative approach for the treatment of stress-related disorders.

  20. Complex regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in the basomedial hypothalamus by leptin and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneida C; Münzberg, Heike; Cota, Daniela; Leshan, Rebecca L; Kopp, Keely; Ishida-Takahashi, Ryoko; Jones, Justin C; Fingar, Diane C; Seeley, Randy J; Myers, Martin G

    2009-10-01

    The medial basal hypothalamus, including the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH), integrates signals of energy status to modulate metabolism and energy balance. Leptin and feeding regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hypothalamus, and hypothalamic mTORC1 contributes to the control of feeding and energy balance. To determine the mechanisms by which leptin modulates mTORC1 in specific hypothalamic neurons, we immunohistochemically assessed the mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (pS6). In addition to confirming the modulation of ARC mTORC1 activity by acute leptin treatment, this analysis revealed the robust activation of mTORC1-dependent ARC pS6 in response to fasting and leptin deficiency in leptin receptor-expressing Agouti-related protein neurons. In contrast, fasting and leptin deficiency suppress VMH mTORC1 signaling. The appropriate regulation of ARC mTORC1 by mutant leptin receptor isoforms correlated with their ability to suppress the activity of Agouti-related protein neurons, suggesting the potential stimulation of mTORC1 by the neuronal activity. Indeed, fasting- and leptin deficiency-induced pS6-immunoreactivity (IR) extensively colocalized with c-Fos-IR in ARC and VMH neurons. Furthermore, ghrelin, which activates orexigenic ARC neurons, increased ARC mTORC1 activity and induced colocalized pS6- and c-Fos-IR. Thus, neuronal activity promotes mTORC1/pS6 in response to signals of energy deficit. In contrast, insulin, which activates mTORC1 via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, increased ARC and VMH pS6-IR in the absence of neuronal activation. The regulation of mTORC1 in the basomedial hypothalamus thus varies by cell and stimulus type, as opposed to responding in a uniform manner to nutritional and hormonal perturbations.

  1. Novel leptin OB3 peptide-induced signaling and progression in thyroid cancers: Comparison with leptin

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Ke, Chien-Chih; Crawford, Dana R.; Lee, Oscar K.; Fu, Earl; Mousa, Shaker A.; Grasso, Patricia; Liu, Leroy F.; Chang, Heng-Yu; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity results in increased secretion of cytokines from adipose tissue and is a risk factor for various cancers. Leptin is largely produced by adipose tissue and cancer cells. It induces cell proliferation and may serve to induce various cancers. OB3-leptin peptide (OB3) is a new class of functional leptin peptide. However, its mitogenic effect has not been determined. In the present study, because of a close link between leptin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, OB3 was compared with leptin in different thyroid cancer cells for gene expression, proliferation and invasion. Neither agent stimulated cell proliferation. Leptin stimulated cell invasion, but reduced adhesion in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Activated ERK1/2 and STAT3 contributed to leptin-induced invasion. In contrast, OB3 did not affect expression of genes involved in proliferation and invasion. In vivo studies in the mouse showed that leptin, but not OB3, significantly increased circulating levels of thyrotropin (TSH), a growth factor for thyroid cancer. In summary, OB3 is a derivative of leptin that importantly lacks the mitogenic effects of leptin on thyroid cancer cells. PMID:27050378

  2. Possible involvement of leptin and leptin receptor in developing gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Shen, Zhi-Xiang; Luo, He-Sheng; Shen, Lei

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of leptin and leptin receptor (ob-R) in intestinal-type gastric cancer and precancerous lesions, and to explore the possible mechanism and role of the leptin system in developing intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of leptin and leptin receptor in archival samples of gastric adenocarcinoma and preneoplastic lesions, including intestinal metaplasia and mild to severe gastric epithelial dysplasia. Positive staining was identified and percentage of positive staining was graded. RESULTS: Dual expression of leptin and leptin receptor were detected in 80% (16/20) intestinal metaplasia, 86.3% (25/30) mild gastric epithelial dysplasia, 86.7% (26/30) moderate gastric epithelial dysplasia, 93.3% (28/30) severe gastric epithelial dysplasia, 91.3% (55/60) intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma and 30.0% (9/30) diffuse-type gastric carcinoma. The percentage of dual expression of leptin and leptin receptor in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than that in diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinoma (χ2 = 37.022, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Our results indicate the presence of an autocrine loop of leptin system in the development of intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:16437696

  3. Prenatal lipid-based nutrient supplements increase cord leptin concentration in pregnant women from rural Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Huybregts, Lieven; Roberfroid, Dominique; Lanou, Hermann; Meda, Nicolas; Taes, Youri; Valea, Innocent; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Kolsteren, Patrick; Van Camp, John

    2013-05-01

    In developing countries, prenatal lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) were shown to increase birth size; however, the mechanism of this effect remains unknown. Cord blood hormone concentrations are strongly associated with birth size. Therefore, we hypothesize that LNSs increase birth size through a change in the endocrine regulation of fetal development. We compared the effect of daily prenatal LNSs with multiple micronutrient tablets on cord blood hormone concentrations using a randomized, controlled design including 197 pregnant women from rural Burkina Faso. Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II, their binding proteins IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3, leptin, cortisol, and insulin were quantified in cord sera using immunoassays. LNS was associated with higher cord blood leptin mainly in primigravidae (+57%; P = 0.02) and women from the highest tertile of BMI at study inclusion (+41%; P = 0.02). We did not find any significant LNS effects on other measured cord hormones. The observed increase in cord leptin was associated with a significantly higher birth weight. Cord sera from small-for-gestational age newborns had lower median IGF-I (-9 μg/L; P = 0.003), IGF-II (-79 μg/L; P = 0.003), IGFBP-3 (-0.7 μg/L; P = 0.007), and leptin (-1.0 μg/L; P = 0.016) concentrations but higher median cortisol (+18 μg/L; P = 0.037) concentrations compared with normally grown newborns. Prenatal LNS resulted in increased cord leptin concentrations in primigravidae and mothers with higher BMI at study inclusion. The elevated leptin concentrations could point toward a higher neonatal fat mass.

  4. Leptin in the regulation of immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, G; Faggioni, R

    2000-10-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob gene, is a pleiotropic molecule that regulates food intake as well as metabolic and endocrine functions. Leptin also plays a regulatory role in immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis. Alterations in immune and inflammatory responses are present in leptin- or leptin-receptor-deficient animals, as well as during starvation and malnutrition, two conditions characterized by low levels of circulating leptin. Both leptin and its receptor share structural and functional similarities with the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. Leptin exerts proliferative and antiapoptotic activities in a variety of cell types, including T lymphocytes, leukemia cells, and hematopoietic progenitors. Leptin also affects cytokine production, the activation of monocytes/macrophages, wound healing, angiogenesis, and hematopoiesis. Moreover, leptin production is acutely increased during infection and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of leptin in the modulation of the innate immune response, inflammation, and hematopoiesis.

  5. Advances in understanding the interrelations between leptin resistance and obesity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haitao; Guo, Jiao; Su, Zhengquan

    2014-05-10

    Obesity, which has developed into a global epidemic, is a risk factor in most chronic diseases and some forms of malignancy. The discovery of leptin in 1994 has opened a new field in obesity research. Currently, we know that leptin is the primary signal from energy stores and exerts negative feedback effects on energy intake. However, most individuals with diet-induced obesity (DIO) develop leptin resistance, which is characterized by elevated circulating leptin levels and decreased leptin sensitivity. To date, though various mechanisms have been proposed to explain leptin resistance, the exact mechanisms of leptin resistance in obesity are poorly understood. Consequently, it's an important issue worth discussing regarding what the exact interrelations between leptin resistance and obesity are. Here, we review the latest advancements in the molecular mechanisms of leptin resistance and the exact interrelations between leptin resistance, obesity, and obesity-related diseases, in order to supply new ideas for the study of obesity.

  6. Exploring Leptin Antagonism in Ophthalmic Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Coroniti, Roberta; Otvos, Laszlo; Surmacz, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests that angiogenic and pro-inflammatory cytokine leptin might be implicated in ocular neovascularization. However, the potential of inhibiting leptin function in ophthalmic cells has never been explored. Here we assessed mitogenic, angiogenic, and signaling leptin activities in retinal and corneal endothelial cells and examined the capability of a specific leptin receptor (ObR) antagonist, Allo-aca, to inhibit these functions. Methods and Results The experiments were carried out in monkey retinal (RF/6A) and bovine corneal (BCE) endothelial cells. Leptin at 50-250 ng/mL stimulated the growth of both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal mitogenic response (35±7 and 27±3% in RF6A and BCE cells, respectively) was noted at 24 h of 250 ng/mL leptin treatments. Leptin-dependent proliferation was reduced to base levels with 10 and 100 nM Allo-aca in BCE and RF6A cells, respectively. In both cell lines, leptin promoted angiogenic responses, with the maximal increase in tube formation (163±10 and 133±8% in RF6A and BCE cultures, respectively) observed under a 250 ng/mL leptin treatment for 3 h. Furthermore, in both cell lines 250 ng/mL leptin modulated the activity or expression of several signaling molecules involved in proliferation, inflammatory activity and angiogenesis, such as STAT3, Akt, and ERK1/2, COX2, and NFκB. In both cell lines, leptin-induced angiogenic and signaling responses were significantly inhibited with 100 nM Allo-aca. We also found that leptin increased its own mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines, and this autocrine effect was abolished by 100-250 nM Allo-aca. Conclusions Our data provide new insights into the role of leptin in ocular endothelial cells and represent the first original report on targeting ObR in ophthalmic cell models. PMID:24098500

  7. Region-specific diet-induced and leptin-induced cellular leptin resistance includes the ventral tegmental area in rats.

    PubMed

    Matheny, M; Shapiro, A; Tümer, N; Scarpace, P J

    2011-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) results in region-specific cellular leptin resistance in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus in one strain of mice and in several medial basal hypothalamic regions in another. We hypothesized that the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is also likely susceptible to diet-induced and leptin-induced leptin resistance in parallel to that in hypothalamic areas. We examined two forms of leptin resistance in F344xBN rats, that induced by 6-months of high fat (HF) feeding and that induced by 15-months of central leptin overexpression by use of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery of rat leptin. Cellular leptin resistance was assessed by leptin-stimulated phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) in medial basal hypothalamic areas and the VTA. The regional pattern and degree of leptin resistance with HF was distinctly different than that with leptin overexpression. Chronic HF feeding induced a cellular leptin resistance that was identified in the ARC and VTA, but absent in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), and dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). In contrast, chronic central leptin overexpression induced cellular leptin resistance in all areas examined. The identification of leptin resistance in the VTA, in addition to the leptin resistance in the hypothalamus, provides one potential mechanism, underlying the increased susceptibility of leptin resistant rats to HF-induced obesity.

  8. Diurnal Intermittent Fasting during Ramadan: The Effects on Leptin and Ghrelin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Alzoghaibi, Mohammed A.; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Sharif, Munir M.; BaHammam, Ahmed S.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of Islamic intermittent fasting, during and outside of Ramadan, on plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin while controlling for several potential confounding variables. Eight healthy male volunteers with a mean age of 26.6±4.9 years reported to the sleep disorders center (SDC) at King Saud University on four occasions: 1) adaptation; 2) 4 weeks before Ramadan while performing Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting) (BLF); 3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline) (BL); and 4) during the second week of Ramadan while fasting. Plasma leptin and ghrelin levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays at 22:00, 02:00, 04:00, 06:00, and 11:00. During BLF, there were significant reductions in plasma leptin concentrations at 22:00 and 02:00 compared with the baseline concentrations (at 22:00: 194.2±177.2 vs. 146.7±174.5; at 02:00: 203.8±189.5 vs. 168.1±178.1; p<0.05). During Ramadan, there was a significant reduction in plasma leptin levels at 22:00 (194.2±177.2 vs. 132.6±130.4, p<0.05). No significant difference in plasma ghrelin concentrations was detected during the BL, BLF, or Ramadan periods. Cosinor analyses of leptin and ghrelin plasma levels revealed no significant changes in the acrophases of the hormones during the three periods. The nocturnal reduction in plasma leptin levels during fasting may be the result of the changes in meal times during fasting. PMID:24637892

  9. Diurnal intermittent fasting during Ramadan: the effects on leptin and ghrelin levels.

    PubMed

    Alzoghaibi, Mohammed A; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Sharif, Munir M; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of Islamic intermittent fasting, during and outside of Ramadan, on plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin while controlling for several potential confounding variables. Eight healthy male volunteers with a mean age of 26.6±4.9 years reported to the sleep disorders center (SDC) at King Saud University on four occasions: 1) adaptation; 2) 4 weeks before Ramadan while performing Islamic fasting for 1 week (baseline fasting) (BLF); 3) 1 week before Ramadan (non-fasting baseline) (BL); and 4) during the second week of Ramadan while fasting. Plasma leptin and ghrelin levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays at 22:00, 02:00, 04:00, 06:00, and 11:00. During BLF, there were significant reductions in plasma leptin concentrations at 22:00 and 02:00 compared with the baseline concentrations (at 22:00: 194.2±177.2 vs. 146.7±174.5; at 02:00: 203.8±189.5 vs. 168.1±178.1; p<0.05). During Ramadan, there was a significant reduction in plasma leptin levels at 22:00 (194.2±177.2 vs. 132.6±130.4, p<0.05). No significant difference in plasma ghrelin concentrations was detected during the BL, BLF, or Ramadan periods. Cosinor analyses of leptin and ghrelin plasma levels revealed no significant changes in the acrophases of the hormones during the three periods. The nocturnal reduction in plasma leptin levels during fasting may be the result of the changes in meal times during fasting.

  10. Leptin effects on testis and epididymis in the lizard Podarcis sicula, during summer regression.

    PubMed

    Putti, Rosalba; Varricchio, Ettore; Gay, Flaminia; Elena, Coccia; Paolucci, Marina

    2009-01-15

    In this study we assessed the effect of leptin treatment on testicular morphology, spermatogenesis, Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor (PPAR) alpha, 17beta-hydroxysteroide dehydrogenase, 17beta-estradiol and testosterone levels in the testis and blood of the lizard Podarcis sicula at the beginning of summer regression before entering the refractory period, when lizards no longer respond to hormonal and environmental stimuli. Lizards treated with five injections of leptin showed seminiferous tubules with germinal cells at all stages and wider lumina with respect to the controls. After 10 injections, the diameter of the lumina increased compared to the controls and 5 injection-group. After 10 injections plus 20 days before the sacrifice, the seminiferous tubules with open lumina and germinal cells were less abundant than in the 5 and 10 injection-groups. In all groups, the epididymis epithelium was higher than in the controls, with mitosis and binucleated cells. In both the control and treated animals secondary spermatocytes and spermatids were immunoreactive to leptin receptor and PPARalpha. In treated animals the interstitial cells and peritubular fibrocytes were also leptin receptor immunoreactive, while PPARalpha immunoreactivity translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. 17beta-HSD immunoreactivity was present in the spermatids and interstitial cells of control lizards and in secondary spermatocytes and spermatids of treated lizards. Leptin treatment had no statistically significant effect on testicular and circulating 17beta-estradiol and testosterone levels. These observations indicate that leptin brings about a delay in testis summer regression in Podarcis sicula, playing a regulatory role in reproduction in this species as already hypothesized for mammals.

  11. Correlation between serum leptin and bone mineral density in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghorban-Sabbagh, Mahin; Nazemian, Fatemeh; Naghibi, Massih; Shakeri, Mohammad-Taghi; Ahmadi-Simab, Saeedeh; Javidi-Dasht-Bayaz, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: For diagnosing of specific types of bone lesions in hemodialysis (HD) patients, it is necessary to conduct a bone biopsy as the gold standard method. However, it is an invasive procedure. While different markers have been suggested as alternative methods, none of them has been selected. The frequency of hip fractures is 80 fold in HD patients who have two-fold mortality as compared with general population. Objectives: Recently, serum leptin has been suggested as a bone density marker. This study tries to confirm this proposal. Patients and Methods: In this study about 104 HD patients (53.8% male and 46.2% female) were enrolled. The average age was 38.28±7.89 years. Serum leptin, bone alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25(OH)D, calcium, phosphorus and bone mineral density (BMD) (at the femoral neck and lumbar spine, as measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry [DXA]) were assessed. Results: Analysis by polynomial regression revealed no correlation between BMD Z-score at two points and serum leptin level. According to the thresholds of 25 ng/mL and 18-24 ng/mL in some studies, we detected 25 ng/mL as the threshold in our patients. Under this threshold, the leptin effect on bone mass was negative, and above the threshold of 25 ng/mL, we found leptin had positive effect on bone mass. Conclusion: In this investigation, we found, leptin has a bimodal effect on bone mass. Cortical bones assessment may be a better option for assessment. PMID:27689105

  12. High-fat diet induces leptin resistance in leptin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Koch, C E; Lowe, C; Pretz, D; Steger, J; Williams, L M; Tups, A

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence of type II diabetes is highly correlated with obesity, although the mechanisms linking the two conditions are incompletely understood. Leptin is a potent insulin sensitiser and, in leptin-deficient, insulin insensitive, Lep(ob/ob) mice, leptin improves glucose tolerance, indicating that leptin resistance may link obesity to insulin insensitivity. Leptin resistance occurs in response to a high-fat diet (HFD) and both hyperleptinaemia and inflammation have been proposed as causative mechanisms. Scrutinising the role of hyperleptinaemia in this process, central hyperleptinaemia in Lep(ob/ob) mice was induced by chronic i.c.v. infusion of leptin (4.2 μg/day) over 10 days. This treatment led to a dramatic decline in body weight and food intake, as well as an improvement in glucose tolerance. Transfer to HFD for 4 days markedly arrested the beneficial effects of leptin on these parameters. Because Lep(ob/ob) mice are exquisitely sensitive to leptin, the possibility that leptin could reverse HFD-induced glucose intolerance in these animals was investigated. HFD led to increased body weight and glucose intolerance compared to a low-fat diet (LFD). Older and heavier Lep(ob/ob) mice were used as body weight-matched controls. Mice in each group received either i.p. leptin (1.25 mg/kg) or vehicle, and glucose tolerance, food intake and the number of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (pSTAT)3 immunoreactive cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) were analysed. Leptin improved glucose tolerance (P = 0. 019) and reduced food intake in Lep(ob/ob) mice on LFD (P ≤ 0.001) but was ineffective in mice on HFD. Furthermore, when leptin was administered centrally, the glucose tolerance of Lep(ob/ob) mice on HFD was significantly impaired (P = 0.007). Although leptin induced the number of pSTAT3 immunoreactive cells in the ARC and VMH of Lep(ob/ob) mice on LFD, HFD was associated with elevated pSTAT3

  13. Leptin Improves Sperm Cryopreservation via Antioxidant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Fontoura, Paula; Mello, Mariana Duque; Gallo-Sá, Paulo; Erthal-Martins, Maria Cecília; Cardoso, Maria Cecília Almeida; Ramos, Cristiane

    2017-01-01

    Background: Leptin and its receptor are present in spermatozoa; however, the role of leptin in sperm function is still controversial. Our present study aimed at demonstrating the effect of cryopreservation on sperm DNA fragmentation (DNAf) and investigating the possible effects of sperm capacitation techniques and leptin in vitro incubation on frozen-thawed sperm DNAf and oxidative stress. Methods: Samples of 45 normospermic men attending for infertility investigation at Vida Centro de Fertilidade, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were frozen and thawed with or without capacitation and leptin incubation prior to freezing. Sperm DNA fragmentation was evaluated by Sperm Chromatin Dispersion Assay before and after cryopreservation and oxidative stress parameters were measured by spectrophotometry with and without leptin incubation. Statistical analysis was performed using paired t test to compare DNAf between groups before and after freeze-thaw cycle, to compare groups before and after capacitation and leptin incubation and oxidative measurements before and after leptin incubation. Statistical significance was considered when p≤0.05. Results: Our results revealed a significant post-thaw rise in sperm DNAf compared with fresh samples (p=0.0003). Sperm DNAf was significantly reduced when sperm capacitation was performed before freezing, when compared to those frozen with no previous capacitation (p=0.01). The addition of leptin to capacitated sperm before freezing reduced DNAf (p<0.0001) and enhanced superoxide dismutase (p=0.001) and glutathione peroxidase (p=0.02) antioxidant enzymes activity. Conclusion: The addition of leptin to capacitated sperm can improve sperm DNA quality following cryopreservation, possibly by inducing the activity of certain antioxidant enzymes. PMID:28377896

  14. Two leptin genes and a leptin receptor gene of female chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus): Molecular cloning, tissue distribution and expression in different obesity indices and pubertal stages.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Hirofumi; Matsumori, Kojiro; Kodama, Ryoko; Kitano, Hajime; Nagano, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Michiya

    2015-10-01

    Leptin is a hormone produced by fat cells that regulates the amount of fat stored in the body and conveys nutritional status to the reproductive axis in mammals. In the present study we identified two subtypes of leptin genes (lepa and lepb) and a leptin receptor gene (lepr) from chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) and there gene expression under different feeding conditions (control and high-feed) and pubertal development stages was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. The protein lengths of LepA, LepB and LepR were 161 amino acids (aa), 163 aa and 1149 aa, respectively and both leptin subtypes shared only 15% similarity in aa sequences. In pubertal females, lepa was expressed in the brain, pituitary gland, liver, adipose tissue and ovary; however, in adult (gonadal maturation after the second in the life) females, lepa was expressed only in the liver. lepb was expressed primarily in the brain of all fish tested and was expressed strongly in the adipose tissue of adults. lepr was characterized by expression in the pituitary. The high-feed group showed a high conditioning factor level; unexpectedly, hepatic lepa and brain lepr were significantly more weakly expressed compared with the control-feed group. Furthermore, the expression levels of lepa, lepb and lepr genes showed no significant differences between pre-pubertal and post-pubertal fish. On the other hand, pituitary fshβ and lhβ showed no significant differences between different feeding groups of pre-pubertal fish. In contrast, fshβ and lhβ expressed abundantly in the post-pubertal fish of control feed group. Based on these results, whether leptin plays an important role in the nutritional status and pubertal onset of chub mackerel remains unknown.

  15. Novel Regulatory Mechanisms for Generation of the Soluble Leptin Receptor: Implications for Leptin Action

    PubMed Central

    Schaab, Michael; Kausch, Henriette; Klammt, Juergen; Nowicki, Marcin; Anderegg, Ulf; Gebhardt, Rolf; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Juergen; Thiery, Joachim; Kratzsch, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Background The adipokine leptin realizes signal transduction via four different membrane-anchored leptin receptor (Ob-R) isoforms in humans. However, the amount of functionally active Ob-R is affected by constitutive shedding of the extracellular domain via a so far unknown mechanism. The product of the cleavage process the so-called soluble leptin receptor (sOb-R) is the main binding protein for leptin in human blood and modulates its bioavailability. sOb-R levels are differentially regulated in metabolic disorders like type 1 diabetes mellitus or obesity and can, therefore, enhance or reduce leptin sensitivity. Methodology/Principal Findings To describe mechanisms of Ob-R cleavage and to investigate the functional significance of differential sOb-R levels we established a model of HEK293 cells transiently transfected with different human Ob-R isoforms. Using siRNA knockdown experiments we identified ADAM10 (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 10) as a major protease for constitutive and activated Ob-R cleavage. Additionally, the induction of lipotoxicity and apoptosis led to enhanced shedding shown by increased levels of the soluble leptin receptor (sOb-R) in cell supernatants. Conversely, high leptin concentrations and ER stress reduced sOb-R levels. Decreased amounts of sOb-R due to ER stress were accompanied by impaired leptin signaling and reduced leptin binding. Conclusions Lipotoxicity and apoptosis increased Ob-R cleavage via ADAM10-dependent mechanisms. In contrast high leptin levels and ER stress led to reduced sOb-R levels. While increased sOb-R concentrations seem to directly block leptin action, reduced amounts of sOb-R may reflect decreased membrane expression of Ob-R. These findings could explain changes of leptin sensitivity which are associated with variations of serum sOb-R levels in metabolic diseases. PMID:22545089

  16. 20 years of leptin: leptin and reproduction: past milestones, present undertakings, and future endeavors.

    PubMed

    Chehab, Farid F

    2014-10-01

    The association between leptin and reproduction originated with the leptin-mediated correction of sterility in ob/ob mice and initiation of reproductive function in normal female mice. The uncovering of a central leptin pathway regulating food intake prompted the dissection of neuroendocrine mechanisms involving leptin in the metabolic control of reproduction. The absence of leptin receptors on GnRH neurons incited a search for intermediary neurons situated between leptin-responsive and GnRH neurons. This review addresses the most significant findings that have furthered our understanding of recent progress in this new field. The role of leptin in puberty was impacted by the discovery of neurons that co-express kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin and these could act as leptin intermediates. Furthermore, the identification of first-order leptin-responsive neurons in the premammilary ventral nucleus and other brain regions opens new avenues to explore their relationship to GnRH neurons. Central to these advances is the unveiling that agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y neurons project onto GnRH and kisspeptin neurons, allowing for a crosstalk between food intake and reproduction. Finally, while puberty is a state of leptin sensitivity, mid-gestation represents a state of leptin resistance aimed at building energy stores to sustain pregnancy and lactation. The mechanisms underlying leptin resistance in pregnancy have lagged; however, the establishment of this natural state is significant. Reproduction and energy balance are tightly controlled and backed up by redundant mechanisms that are critical for the survival of our species. It will be the goal of the following decade to shed new light on these complex and essential pathways.

  17. Modulation of the cardiovascular system by leptin.

    PubMed

    Abel, E Dale; Sweeney, Gary

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that individuals with the metabolic syndrome have a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and much effort has been expended to elicit the underlying mechanisms. Various studies have proposed that excessive or deficient physiological effects mediated by leptin make an important contribution, yet many paradoxical observations often preclude a clear definition of the role of leptin. This review article will briefly discuss principal and most recent evidence on direct and indirect regulation of the cardiovascular system by leptin, focusing on cardiac structural and functional as well as vascular effects.

  18. Genetic variants in leptin: Determinants of obesity and leptin levels in South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Shruti; Salman, Mohammed; Siddalingaiah, Lokesh B; Lakshmi, GL; Xaviour, D; Sreenath, Jwalapuram

    2014-01-01

    The revelation of leptin action mechanisms has led to various attempts to establish the association of polymorphisms in the leptin gene with obesity-related phenotypes. But, outcomes have been contradicting, which made the information on the role of the leptin gene in regulating the mechanism of pathophysiology of obesity inexplicable. Moreover, none of the studies are known to have similar implications on the Indian population. To address such contradictions, our study aims to evaluate the association of leptin gene polymorphism with obesity and leptin levels in a South Indian Population. A total of 304 cases (BMI≥27.5) and 309 controls (BMI≤23) from local inhabitants of Mysore, Karnataka were recruited for the study. The leptin gene variants rs7799039, rs2167270 and rs4731426 independently, as well as in 4 haplotype combinations, were found to be significantly associated with the risk of obesity. An increasing trend in BMI and leptin levels was observed with every addition of A and C minor alleles of exonic variant (rs2167270) and intronic variant (rs4731426) respectively. However, only AA genotype of SNP rs7799039 was positively associated with BMI. None of the SNPs were associated with fat percentage and waist to hip ratio. On a whole, this data suggests that the common polymorphisms in the leptin gene are strong predictors of obesity and leptin levels in South Indians. PMID:26167411

  19. Effects of a short-term reduction in brain serotonin synthesis on the availability of the soluble leptin receptor in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Zepf, F D; Dingerkus, V L S; Helmbold, K; Bubenzer-Busch, S; Biskup, C S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Schaab, M; Kratzsch, J; Eisert, A; Rink, L; Hagenah, U; Gaber, T J

    2015-03-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) and the hormone leptin have been linked to the underlying neurobiology of appetite regulation with evidence coming from animal and cellular research, but direct evidence linking these two pathways in humans is lacking. We examined the effects of reduced brain 5-HT synthesis due to acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) on levels of soluble leptin receptor (sOb-R), the main high-affinity leptin binding protein, in healthy adults using an exploratory approach. Women, but not men, showed reduced sOb-R concentrations after ATD administration. With females showing reduced baseline levels of central 5-HT synthesis compared to males diminished brain 5-HT synthesis affected the leptin axis through the sOb-R in females, thereby potentially influencing their vulnerability to dysfunctional appetite regulation and co-morbid mood symptoms.

  20. The Expression of Leptin, Estrogen Receptors, and Vitellogenin mRNAs in Migrating Female Chum Salmon, Oncorhynchus keta: The Effects of Hypo-osmotic Environmental Changes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jae; Kim, Na Na; Shin, Hyun Suk; Choi, Cheol Young

    2014-04-01

    Leptin plays an important role in energy homeostasis and reproductive function in fish, especially in reproduction. Migrating fish, such as salmonoids, are affected by external environmental factors, and salinity changes are a particularly important influence on spawning migrations. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in salinity affect the expression of leptin, estrogen receptors (ERs), and vitellogenin (VTG) in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). The expression and activity of leptin, the expression of ERs and VTG, and the levels of estradiol-17β and cortisol increased after the fish were transferred to FW, demonstrating that changes in salinity stimulate the HPG axis in migrating female chum salmon. These findings reveal details about the role of elevated leptin levels and sex steroid hormones in stimulating sexual maturation and reproduction in response to salinity changes in chum salmon.

  1. The effect of Ramadan fasting on LH, FSH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Khoshdel, A; Kheiri, S; Hashemi-Dehkordi, E; Nasiri, J; Shabanian-Borujeni, S; Saedi, E

    2014-10-01

    Many pregnant Muslim women fast during Ramadan. Leptin has an important role in the reproductive system and hormones. In this study, FSH, LH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin were measured in the first, second and fourth week of Ramadan and the second week post-Ramadan, in 30 fasting pregnant women. Data were analysed using repeated measures ANOVA by SPSS. The weight and BMI did not change during the study. A significant change in FSH, oestrogen, progesterone and leptin was observed (p < 0.05). The lowest value of FSH was in the second week of Ramadan. Progesterone increased at the end of Ramadan and the second week after. Oestrogen increased significantly during Ramadan and decreased after Ramadan. A decreasing trend was seen in LH during the Ramadan and 2 weeks after (p < 0.1). Leptin decreased significantly 2 weeks after Ramadan. We found poor weight gain and hypoleptinaemia in pregnant fasted women during the study. Food restriction in pregnant fasted women during Ramadan may induce poor weight gain during pregnancy. These data confirm that Ramadan fasting by pregnant women may have potential risks during pregnancy. We recommend further study to evaluate long-term effects of Ramadan fasting during pregnancy in different countries with different food habits and traditions, to obtain reliable and documented data.

  2. An intrinsic gut leptin-melanocortin pathway modulates intestinal microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Li, Xiaosong; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Chan, Lawrence; Schwartz, Gary J; Chua, Streamson C; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2010-07-01

    Fat is delivered to tissues by apoB-containing lipoproteins synthesized in the liver and intestine with the help of an intracellular chaperone, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, acts in the brain and on peripheral tissues to regulate fat storage and metabolism. Our aim was to identify the role of leptin signaling in MTP regulation and lipid absorption using several mouse models deficient in leptin receptor (LEPR) signaling and downstream effectors. Mice with spontaneous LEPR B mutations or targeted ablation of LEPR B in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) or agouti gene related peptide (AGRP) expressing cells had increased triglyceride in plasma, liver, and intestine. Furthermore, melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) knockout mice expressed a similar triglyceride phenotype, suggesting that leptin might regulate intestinal MTP expression through the melanocortin pathway. Mechanistic studies revealed that the accumulation of triglyceride in the intestine might be secondary to decreased expression of MTP and lipid absorption in these mice. Surgical and chemical blockade of vagal efferent outflow to the intestine in wild-type mice failed to alter the triglyceride phenotype, demonstrating that central neural control mechanisms were likely not involved in the observed regulation of intestinal MTP. Instead, we found that enterocytes express LEPR, POMC, AGRP, and MC4R. We propose that a peripheral, local gut signaling mechanism involving LEPR B and MC4R regulates intestinal MTP and controls intestinal lipid absorption.

  3. Leptin down-regulates insulin action through phosphorylation of serine-318 in insulin receptor substrate 1.

    PubMed

    Hennige, Anita M; Stefan, Norbert; Kapp, Katja; Lehmann, Rainer; Weigert, Cora; Beck, Alexander; Moeschel, Klaus; Mushack, Joanne; Schleicher, Erwin; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. A mechanism for impaired insulin signaling in peripheral tissues is the inhibition of insulin action through serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (Irs) proteins that abolish the coupling of Irs proteins to the activated insulin receptor. Recently, we described serine-318 as a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation site in Irs1 (Ser-318) activated by hyperinsulinemia. Here we show in various cell models that the adipose hormone leptin, a putative mediator in obesity-related insulin resistance, promotes phosphorylation of Ser-318 in Irs1 by a janus kinase 2, Irs2, and PKC-dependent pathway. Mutation of Ser-318 to alanine abrogates the inhibitory effect of leptin on insulin-induced Irs1 tyrosine phosphorylation and glucose uptake in L6 myoblasts. In C57Bl/6 mice, Ser-318 phosphorylation levels in muscle tissue were enhanced by leptin and insulin administration in lean animals while in diet-induced obesity Ser-318 phosphorylation levels were already up-regulated in the basal state, and further stimulation was diminished. In analogy, in lymphocytes of obese hyperleptinemic human subjects basal Ser-318 phosphorylation levels were increased compared to lean individuals. During a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, the increment in Ser-318 phosphorylation observed in lean individuals was absent in obese. In summary, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Ser-318 in Irs1 mediates the inhibitory signal of leptin on the insulin-signaling cascade in obese subjects.

  4. Leptin Level and Skipping Breakfast: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III).

    PubMed

    Asao, Keiko; Marekani, Amandine Sambira; VanCleave, Jessica; Rothberg, Amy E

    2016-02-25

    Skipping breakfast is a common dietary habit considered to be unhealthy. However, the mechanisms underlying skipping breakfast have not been fully explored. Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy storage and secretes in a diurnal rhythm with lowest levels in the morning. We examined the association between the serum leptin level and skipping breakfast in 5714 adults in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994. We defined breakfast as any food or beverage consumed between 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. using a single 24-h recall. Skipped breakfast was seen in 13.1%. In the logistic regression models with and without adjusting for adiposity and sex, leptin levels were not associated with skipping breakfast. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and time of venipuncture, the association remained insignificant. After further adjusting for potential confounders: physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking and diabetes and after further adjusting for: dietary factors, insulin and glucose levels, there was a 9% and 11%-12%, respectively, statistically significantly higher likelihood of skipping breakfast if the leptin level was more than 50% greater. Further investigation into the biological reasons for skipping breakfast may be useful for promoting healthy lifestyles.

  5. Leptin Level and Skipping Breakfast: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III)

    PubMed Central

    Asao, Keiko; Marekani, Amandine Sambira; VanCleave, Jessica; Rothberg, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Skipping breakfast is a common dietary habit considered to be unhealthy. However, the mechanisms underlying skipping breakfast have not been fully explored. Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy storage and secretes in a diurnal rhythm with lowest levels in the morning. We examined the association between the serum leptin level and skipping breakfast in 5714 adults in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988–1994. We defined breakfast as any food or beverage consumed between 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. using a single 24-h recall. Skipped breakfast was seen in 13.1%. In the logistic regression models with and without adjusting for adiposity and sex, leptin levels were not associated with skipping breakfast. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and time of venipuncture, the association remained insignificant. After further adjusting for potential confounders: physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking and diabetes and after further adjusting for: dietary factors, insulin and glucose levels, there was a 9% and 11%–12%, respectively, statistically significantly higher likelihood of skipping breakfast if the leptin level was more than 50% greater. Further investigation into the biological reasons for skipping breakfast may be useful for promoting healthy lifestyles. PMID:26927164

  6. Diminished leptin signaling can alter circadian rhythm of metabolic activity and feeding.

    PubMed

    Hsuchou, Hung; Wang, Yuping; Cornelissen-Guillaume, Germaine G; Kastin, Abba J; Jang, Eunjin; Halberg, Franz; Pan, Weihong

    2013-10-01

    Leptin, a hormone mainly produced by fat cells, shows cell-specific effects to regulate feeding and metabolic activities. We propose that an important feature of metabolic dysregulation resulting in obesity is the loss of the circadian rhythm of biopotentials. This was tested in the pan-leptin receptor knockout (POKO) mice newly generated in our laboratory. In the POKO mice, leptin no longer induced pSTAT-3 signaling after intracerebroventricular injection. Three basic phenotypes were observed: the heterozygotes had similar weight and adiposity as the wild-type (WT) mice (>60% of the mice); the homozygotes were either fatter (∼30%), or rarely leaner (<5%) than the WT mice. By early adulthood, the POKO mice had higher average body weight and adiposity than their respective same-sex WT littermate controls, and this was consistent among different batches. The homozygote fat POKO showed significant reduction of midline estimating statistic of rhythm of circadian parameters, and shifts of ultradian rhythms. The blunted circadian rhythm of these extremely obese POKO mice was also seen in their physical inactivity, longer feeding bouts, and higher food intake. The extent of obesity correlated with the blunted circadian amplitude, accumulative metabolic and locomotor activities, and the severity of hyperphagia. This contrasts with the heterozygote POKO mice which showed little obesity and metabolic disturbance, and only subtle changes of the circadian rhythm of metabolic activity without alterations in feeding behavior. The results provide a novel aspect of leptin resistance, almost manifesting as an "all or none" phenomenon.

  7. Role of leptin during perinatal metabolic programming and obesity.

    PubMed

    Djiane, J; Attig, L

    2008-08-01

    The incidence of obesity is rapidly increasing all over the world in epidemic proportions.The epidemia now affects young children and accumulative evidences suggest that the origin of the disease may occur during foetal development and early life. This has introduced the concept of "developmental programming" supported by experimental studies in animal models and numerous epidemiological data. This concept supports the idea that nutritional and hormonal status during pregnancy and early life could interfere irreversibly on the development of the organs involved in the control of food intake and metabolism and particularly the hypothalamic structures responsible of the establishment of the ingestive behaviour and regulation of energy expenditure. The mechanisms responsible of this developmental programming remain poorly documented. However, recent research indicate that the adipokine leptin plays a critical role in this programming.

  8. New insights in leptin resistance mechanisms in mice.

    PubMed

    Balland, Eglantine; Cowley, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Leptin resistance is one of the main challenges of obesity. To date, two levels of resistance have been identified, first a decreased rate of leptin uptake into the brain and secondly a diminished central response to leptin. New findings have identified the mechanisms of leptin transport and demonstrated that it can be rescued in obesity, but it did not overcome the problem of central resistance. Alteration in the actions of leptin following diet-induced obesity (DIO) appears to be a multifactorial condition. Several phosphatases are inhibiting leptin signaling pathways in a pathological way. Besides, hypothalamic inflammation alters the neuronal circuits that control metabolism. Recent studies describing both mechanisms (inhibition of leptin signaling and inflammation), have provided key insights to potential new targets for treatment. However, recent data showing that DIO mice may conserve a cellular and physiological response to endogenous leptin, highlights the need to redefine the concept of "leptin resistance".

  9. Benefits of leptin therapy in HIV patients

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Uma; Sinharay, Keshab; Sengupta, Nilanjan; Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta

    2012-01-01

    Leptin therapy in human recombinant form has recently been used in HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome on experimental basis in some small short-term clinical trials. It has shown its beneficial effects only in hypoleptinemic HIV-infected patients by causing definite improvement in their insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, lipid status, and truncal obesity. Leptin prevents lipotoxicity and activates insulin signaling pathways through several postulated mechanisms. Central leptin insufficiency with peripheral hyperleptinemia has come out to be a significant contributor to the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. In this article, we will review the basis of leptin therapy in HIV patients, with its promises. However, further larger clinical trials are needed to prove its long-term efficacy in the control of metabolic complications related to HIV therapy. PMID:23565500

  10. Leptin in Anorexia and Cachexia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Diana R.; Garcia, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is a product of the obese (OB) gene secreted by adipocytes in proportion to fat mass. It decreases food intake and increases energy expenditure by affecting the balance between orexigenic and anorexigenic hypothalamic pathways. Low leptin levels are responsible for the compensatory increase in appetite and body weight and decreased energy expenditure (EE) following caloric deprivation. The anorexia-cachexia syndrome is a complication of many chronic conditions including cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and aging, where the decrease in body weight and food intake is not followed by a compensatory increase in appetite or decreased EE. Crosstalk between leptin and inflammatory signaling known to be activated in these conditions may be responsible for this paradox. This manuscript will review the evidence and potential mechanisms mediating changes in the leptin pathway in the setting of anorexia and cachexia associated with chronic diseases. PMID:22518191

  11. The adipokine leptin increases skeletal muscle mass and significantly alters skeletal muscle miRNA expression profile in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, Mark W.; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; He, Hong-Zhi; Shiver, Austin; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhou, Li; Isales, Carlos M.; and others

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Aging is associated with muscle atrophy and loss of muscle mass, known as the sarcopenia of aging. {yields} We demonstrate that age-related muscle atrophy is associated with marked changes in miRNA expression in muscle. {yields} Treating aged mice with the adipokine leptin significantly increased muscle mass and the expression of miRNAs involved in muscle repair. {yields} Recombinant leptin therapy may therefore be a novel approach for treating age-related muscle atrophy. -- Abstract: Age-associated loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia, contributes directly to frailty and an increased risk of falls and fractures among the elderly. Aged mice and elderly adults both show decreased muscle mass as well as relatively low levels of the fat-derived hormone leptin. Here we demonstrate that loss of muscle mass and myofiber size with aging in mice is associated with significant changes in the expression of specific miRNAs. Aging altered the expression of 57 miRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle, and many of these miRNAs are now reported to be associated specifically with age-related muscle atrophy. These include miR-221, previously identified in studies of myogenesis and muscle development as playing a role in the proliferation and terminal differentiation of myogenic precursors. We also treated aged mice with recombinant leptin, to determine whether leptin therapy could improve muscle mass and alter the miRNA expression profile of aging skeletal muscle. Leptin treatment significantly increased hindlimb muscle mass and extensor digitorum longus fiber size in aged mice. Furthermore, the expression of 37 miRNAs was altered in muscles of leptin-treated mice. In particular, leptin treatment increased the expression of miR-31 and miR-223, miRNAs known to be elevated during muscle regeneration and repair. These findings suggest that aging in skeletal muscle is associated with marked changes in the expression of specific miRNAs, and that nutrient

  12. Developmental Responses of the Lateral Hypothalamus to Leptin in Neonatal Rats, and its Implications for the Development of Functional Connections with the Ventral Tegmental Area.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, E; Long, H; Richard, D; Walker, C-D

    2016-03-01

    Food intake is regulated by a close communication between the hypothalamus and the mesocorticolimbic pathways, which are still developing during the perinatal period in the rat, and are known targets for peripheral metabolic hormones such as leptin. A key region for this communication is the lateral hypothalamus (LH), although the onset of leptin responsiveness in the LH is unknown. We examined the activation of cellular signalling molecules in identified LH neurones on postnatal day (PND)10 and 16 and determined whether leptin directly targets orexin A (ORX-A) or neurotensin (NT) LH neurones through the detection of leptin receptors (ObRb) mRNA on these neurones. Next, using retrograde labelling in PND6 pups, we tested whether phenotypically identified neurones of the LH that respond to leptin project to ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurones. Leptin significantly induced phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)1/2 and phosphorylated signal transducer activator of transcription (pSTAT)3 in the LH on PND16, whereas, on PND10, modest pERK1/2- and sparse pSTAT3-positive cells were identified. On PND16, most pERK1/2-activated neurones contain ORX-A and leptin-induced pSTAT3 was observed in other unidentified neurones. Afferents to the VTA were observed on PND6, including a large input from the LH, which contained both ORX-A-positive and non-ORX-A neurones, with some of these ORX-A neurones being activated by leptin treatment. Leptin receptor (ObRb) mRNA in the LH did not colocalise with ORX-A neurones on PND10, and only a few NT-positive neurones displayed ObRb mRNA expression. Thus, functional responsiveness to leptin in LH neurones is only partially achieved prior to the onset of independent feeding on PND16, and ORX-A neurones are indirectly activated by leptin. The presence of anatomical connections between the LH and the VTA in the first week of life, prior to the development of leptin responsiveness in both structures, suggests that tissue

  13. Leptin and leptin receptor are detectable in equine spermatozoa but are not involved in in vitro fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Lange-Consiglio, Anna; Corradetti, Bruna; Perrini, Claudia; Bizzaro, Davide; Cremonesi, Fausto

    2016-04-01

    In human and swine, leptin (OB) has been identified in seminal plasma and leptin receptors (OB-R) on the cell surface of spermatozoa, indicating that spermatozoa are a target for OB. This hormone has also been detected in follicular fluid (FF) in women and mares, although its role requires further study. The aims of this study were to investigate the immunolocalisation and the expression of OB and OB-R in equine spermatozoa and to evaluate the involvement of OB in equine in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Since progesterone (P) and OB are both found in FF, the individual and combined effects of these two hormones were studied in equine IVF and compared with the results obtained from the use of FF for in vitro sperm preparation. For the first time, we were able to identify OB and OB-R mRNA and their corresponding proteins in equine spermatozoa. When spermatozoa were treated with OB, there was a decrease in the three motility parameters VSL, STR and LIN, commonly associated with hyperactivation, whilst the acrosome reaction rate increased (P<0.05). The fertilisation rate was 51% with FF, 46.15% with P, 43.64% with P+OB and 0% with OB alone. The percentage of eight-cell stage embryos was 18.7% with FF, 17.1% with P and 16.7% with OB+P. OB alone did not permit oocyte fertilisation, indicating that, in the horse, OB is involved in capacitation and hyperactivation but not in sperm penetration.

  14. Obesity is associated with increased seminal insulin and leptin alongside reduced fertility parameters in a controlled male cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity appears to be associated with male reproductive dysfunction and infertility, although this has been inconsistent and inconclusive. Insulin and leptin are known mediators and modulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-testes axis, contributing to the regulation of male reproductive potential and overall wellbeing. These hormones are also present in semen influencing sperm functions. Although abdominal obesity is closely associated with insulin resistance (hyperinsulinaemia), hyperleptinaemia and glucose dysfunction, changes in seminal plasma concentrations of insulin, leptin and glucose in obese males has not previously been investigated. Methods This small case controlled study assessed serum and seminal concentrations of insulin, leptin and glucose in obese (BMI > =30; n = 23) and non-obese (BMI < 30; n = 19) males. Following a detailed medical history and examination, participants meeting the inclusion criteria were entered for data analysis. Body parameters such as BMI, waist and hip circumference and the waist hip ratio were measured. Serum and semen samples were collected and assayed for insulin, leptin and glucose. Semen samples also underwent a standard semen analysis, with sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and DNA fragmentation (DF). Results Obesity was associated with increased serum and seminal insulin and leptin, with no significant difference in seminal glucose. Serum and seminal concentrations of insulin and leptin were positively correlated. Furthermore, obesity was associated with decreased sperm concentration, sperm vitality and increased MMP and DF, with a non-significant impact on motility and morphology. Conclusions Hyperinsulinaemia and hyperleptinaemia are associated with increased seminal insulin and leptin concentrations, which may negatively impact male reproductive function in obesity. Insulin was also found to be highly concentrated in the seminal plasma of both groups. This data will contribute

  15. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Feng, Lianshi; Xie, Minhao; Zhang, Li; Xu, Jianfang; He, Zihong; You, Tongjian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n = 10 each): control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1-4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4), living, and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1-4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4), and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1-4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4). Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3-4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P < 0.05-0.01), and higher expression of leptin and leptin receptor (P < 0.05-0.01) in adipose tissue. Conclusion: In a rodent model of altitude training, living, and exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions.

  16. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingli; Feng, Lianshi; Xie, Minhao; Zhang, Li; Xu, Jianfang; He, Zihong; You, Tongjian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n = 10 each): control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1–4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4), living, and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1–4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4), and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1–4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4). Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3–4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P < 0.05–0.01), and higher expression of leptin and leptin receptor (P < 0.05–0.01) in adipose tissue. Conclusion: In a rodent model of altitude training, living, and exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions. PMID:27932989

  17. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal–leptin axis and metabolic health: a systems approach to resilience, robustness and control

    PubMed Central

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Tomiyama, A. Janet; Jain, Shamini; Epel, Elissa; Doyle, Francis J.; van der Greef, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids contribute to obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, the mechanisms are unclear, and prognostic measures are unavailable. A systems level understanding of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA)–leptin axis may reveal novel insights. Eighteen obese premenopausal women provided blood samples every 10 min over 24 h, which were assayed for cortisol, adrenocorticotropin releasing hormone (ACTH) and leptin. A published personalized HPA systems model was extended to incorporate leptin, yielding three parameters: (i) cortisol inhibitory feedback signalling, (ii) ACTH–adrenal signalling, and (iii) leptin–cortisol antagonism. We investigated associations between these parameters and metabolic risk profiles: fat and lean body mass (LBM; using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), and insulin resistance. Decreased cortisol inhibitory feedback signalling was significantly associated with greater fat (kg; p = 0.01) and insulin resistance (p = 0.03) but not LBM. Leptin significantly antagonized cortisol dynamics in eight women, who exhibited significantly lower 24 h mean leptin levels, LBM and higher ACTH–adrenal signalling nocturnally (all p < 0.05), compared with women without antagonism. Traditional neuroendocrine measures did not predict metabolic health, whereas a dynamic systems approach revealed that lower central inhibitory cortisol feedback signalling was significantly associated with greater metabolic risk. While exploratory, leptin–cortisol antagonism may reflect a ‘neuroendocrine starvation’ response. PMID:25285198

  18. Interaction between energy homeostasis and reproduction: central effects of leptin and ghrelin on the reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M

    2013-12-01

    Reproductive maturation and function are sensitive to the metabolic state of the organism and the magnitude of body fuel reserves; hence, conditions ranging from energy insufficiency to morbid obesity impact the timing of puberty and are frequently linked to fertility problems. This phenomenon is the result of the close interplay between a diversity of nutritional cues and metabolic signals (including hormones) with different elements of the so-called hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In this review, we will focus our attention on the 'reproductive' roles of 2 key metabolic hormones, namely, the adipose signal, leptin, and the gut hormone, ghrelin. These 2 factors, which have been proposed to operate as functional antagonists in the control of metabolism and energy homeostasis, are also provided with important, and in many cases opposite, roles in the regulation of puberty onset and gonadal function. We will provide herein an update view of the reproductive effects of leptin and ghrelin, with a major emphasis on the actions of these 2 key hormones upon the central elements of the HPG axis, including their putative effects on Kiss1 and other reproductive neuronal networks. This will help to understand the mechanisms whereby reproductive function is gated and dynamically regulated by metabolic signals at different key developmental stages, such as puberty and adulthood.

  19. Identification of a soluble leptin receptor in crucian carp with different binding affinity to leptin-a and leptin-b.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feifei; Li, Xin; Huang, Saifan; Li, Jiyuan; Guo, Xiaopin; Cao, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Soluble leptin receptor (sLepR) is the main leptin-binding protein in plasma and contributes to activation of circulating leptin. In this study, we identified a sLepR in plasma of crucian carp (Carassius carassius) using a pull-down assay, and the interaction of sLepR with its ligand is confirmed by a cross-linking study. In addition, we found that leptin-a has higher affinity than leptin-b for sLepR. According to our knowledge, this is the first experimental report about the main ligand of sLepR in teleost.

  20. Active ghrelin levels across time and associations with leptin and anthropometrics in healthy ache Amerindian women of Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Bribiescas, Richard G; Betancourt, Jaime; Torres, Angélica M; Reiches, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Active (acylated) ghrelin is a peptide hormone secreted primarily by the stomach, positively associated with fasting, orexigenic, and promotes growth hormone secretion. It is therefore important to energy intake management. The objective of this pilot research was to (1) compare active ghrelin with previous measurements of leptin and anthropometrics; (2) assess the consistency of active ghrelin across time in this population; (3) extend our understanding of potential population variation in active ghrelin. Two serum samples separated by 10 days at the same time between meals were collected from healthy Ache women (n = 12, mean age 32.2 +/- 14.0 SD) to determine consistency over time, associations with leptin, and anthropmetric values. Mean active ghrelin was 72.9 +/- 23.0 pg/ml, highly correlated (r(2) = 0.95, P < 0.0001) between collections, and showed no paired mean differences (P < 0.18). There was no significant correlation with leptin, age, or anthropometric measures. Active ghrelin appears to be consistent over time in this population, perhaps reflecting regimented meal schedules and less interpopulation variation compared to leptin.

  1. Flurbiprofen ameliorated obesity by attenuating leptin resistance induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Hosoi, Toru; Yamaguchi, Rie; Noji, Kikuko; Matsuo, Suguru; Baba, Sachiko; Toyoda, Keisuke; Suezawa, Takahiro; Kayano, Takaaki; Tanaka, Shinpei; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, caused by the accumulation of unfolded proteins, is involved in the development of obesity. We demonstrated that flurbiprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), exhibited chaperone activity, which reduced protein aggregation and alleviated ER stress-induced leptin resistance, characterized by insensitivity to the actions of the anti-obesity hormone leptin. This result was further supported by flurbiprofen attenuating high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. The other NSAIDs tested did not exhibit such effects, which suggested that this anti-obesity action is mediated independent of NSAIDs. Using ferriteglycidyl methacrylate beads, we identified aldehyde dehydrogenase as the target of flurbiprofen, but not of the other NSAIDs. These results suggest that flurbiprofen may have unique pharmacological properties that reduce the accumulation of unfolded proteins and may represent a new class of drug for the fundamental treatment of obesity. Subject Categories Metabolism; Pharmacology & Drug Discovery PMID:24421337

  2. Antagonistic interplay between hypocretin and leptin in the lateral hypothalamus regulates stress responses.

    PubMed

    Bonnavion, Patricia; Jackson, Alexander C; Carter, Matthew E; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-02-19

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functions to coordinate behavioural and physiological responses to stress in a manner that depends on the behavioural state of the organism. However, the mechanisms through which arousal and metabolic states influence the HPA axis are poorly understood. Here using optogenetic approaches in mice, we show that neurons that produce hypocretin (Hcrt)/orexin in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) regulate corticosterone release and a variety of behaviours and physiological hallmarks of the stress response. Interestingly, we found that Hcrt neuronal activity and Hcrt-mediated stress responses were inhibited by the satiety hormone leptin, which acts, in part, through a network of leptin-sensitive neurons in the LHA. These data demonstrate how peripheral metabolic signals interact with hypothalamic neurons to coordinate stress and arousal and suggest one mechanism through which hyperarousal or altered metabolic states may be linked with abnormal stress responses.

  3. Antagonistic interplay between hypocretin and leptin in the lateral hypothalamus regulates stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Bonnavion, Patricia; Jackson, Alexander C.; Carter, Matthew E.; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis functions to coordinate behavioural and physiological responses to stress in a manner that depends on the behavioural state of the organism. However, the mechanisms through which arousal and metabolic states influence the HPA axis are poorly understood. Here using optogenetic approaches in mice, we show that neurons that produce hypocretin (Hcrt)/orexin in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) regulate corticosterone release and a variety of behaviours and physiological hallmarks of the stress response. Interestingly, we found that Hcrt neuronal activity and Hcrt-mediated stress responses were inhibited by the satiety hormone leptin, which acts, in part, through a network of leptin-sensitive neurons in the LHA. These data demonstrate how peripheral metabolic signals interact with hypothalamic neurons to coordinate stress and arousal and suggest one mechanism through which hyperarousal or altered metabolic states may be linked with abnormal stress responses. PMID:25695914

  4. Osteocalcin as a negative regulator of serum leptin concentration in humans: insight from triathlon competitions.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Ara, Ignacio; Dorado, Cecilia; Vicente-Rodríguez, German; Perez-Gomez, Jorge; Cabrero, Javier Chavarren; Serrano-Sanchez, José A; Santana, Alfredo; Calbet, Jose A L

    2010-10-01

    Osteocalcin is a hormone produced by osteoblasts which acts as a negative regulator of fat mass, protecting against diet induced obesity and insulin resistance in rodents. To determine if an acute increase in osteocalcin concentration is associated with opposed changes in circulating leptin levels and insulin resistance we studied 15 middle and long distance male triathletes, (age 32.1 ± 6.9 years), before and 48 h after an Olympic (OT) or an Ironman (IT) triathlon competition. Muscle power, anaerobic capacity, body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), and serum concentrations of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, osteocalcin, leptin, glucose, insulin and insulin resistance (HOMA) were determined pre- and post-race. Pre- and 48 h post-race total and regional lean body mass was not altered, but fat mass was similarly increased (~250 g) 48 h after the competitions. This elicited an increase in plasma leptin of 33% after the IT while it remained unchanged after the OT, likely due to a 25% increase in plasma osteocalcin which occurred only after the OT (all p < 0.05). Post-race HOMA remained unchanged in OT and IT. Performance was normalized 48 h after the competitions, with the exception of a slightly lower jumping capacity after the IT. Serum testosterone concentration tended to decrease by 10% after the IT whilst dihydrotestosterone was reduced by 24% after the IT. In conclusion, an acute increase in serum osteocalcin concentration blunts the expected increase of serum leptin concentration that should occur with fat mass gain. This study provides evidence for osteocalcin as a negative regulator of serum leptin in humans.

  5. Selective leptin insensitivity and alterations in female-reproductive patterns linked to hyperleptinemia during infancy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Mariana; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga; Weller, Aron

    2013-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the prevalence of childhood obesity worldwide makes the investigation of its early developmental stages and effective prevention strategies an urgent issue. CCK1 deficient OLETF rats are a model of obesity previously used to study the early phases of this disorder. Here, we exposed wild type (LETO) females to an early obesogenic environment and genetically obese OLETF females to a lean postnatal environment, to assess long term alterations in leptin sensitivity, predisposition to diet induced obesity and adult female health. We found that genetically lean females reared by obese mothers presented early postnatal hyperleptemia, selectively reduced response to leptin and sensitivity to diet induced obesity when exposed to a high palatable diet as adults. The estrous cycle structure and intake profile were permanently disrupted, despite presenting normal adiposity/body weight/food intake. Genetically obese females reared by lean dams showed normalized early levels of leptin and reduced body weight, food intake and body fat at adulthood; normalized estrous cycle structure and food intake across the cycle, improved hormonal profile and peripheral leptin sensitivity and a remarkable progress in self-control when exposed to a high fat/palatable diet. Altogether, it appears that the early postnatal environment plays a critical role in determining later life coping with metabolic challenges and has an additive effect on the genetic predisposition that makes OLETF females morbidly obese as adults. This work also links, for the first time, alterations in the leptin system during early development to later life abnormalities related to female reproduction and health.

  6. Leptin and Hunger Levels in Young Healthy Adults After One Night of Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pejovic, Slobodanka; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Basta, Maria; Tsaoussoglou, Marina; Zoumakis, Emanuel; Vgontzas, Angeliki; Bixler, Edward O.; Chrousos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Short-term sleep curtailment associated with activation of the stress system in healthy, young adults has been shown to be associated with decreased leptin levels, impaired insulin sensitivity and increased hunger and appetite. To assess the effects of one night of sleep loss in a less stressful environment on hunger, leptin, adiponectin, cortisol, and blood pressure/heart rate and whether a 2-hour mid-afternoon nap reverses the changes associated with sleep loss, 21 young healthy individuals (10 men, 11 women) participated in a 7-day sleep deprivation experiment (4 consecutive nights followed by a night of sleep loss and 2 recovery nights). Half of the subjects were randomly assigned to take a mid-afternoon nap (1400–1600) the day following the night of total sleep loss. Serial 24-hour blood sampling and hunger scales were completed on the fourth (pre-deprivation) and sixth day (post-deprivation). Leptin levels were significantly increased after one night of total sleep loss, whereas adiponectin, cortisol levels, blood pressure/heart rate, and hunger were not affected. Daytime napping did not influence the effects of sleep loss on leptin, adiponectin or hunger. Acute sleep loss, in a less stressful environment, influences leptin levels in an opposite manner from that of short-term sleep curtailment associated with activation of the stress system. It appears that sleep loss associated with activation of the stress system but not sleep loss per se may lead to increased hunger and appetite and hormonal changes which ultimately may lead to increased consumption of “comfort” food and obesity. PMID:20545838

  7. Leptin and hunger levels in young healthy adults after one night of sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Pejovic, Slobodanka; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Basta, Maria; Tsaoussoglou, Marina; Zoumakis, Emmanuel; Vgontzas, Angeliki; Bixler, Edward O; Chrousos, George P

    2010-12-01

    Short-term sleep curtailment associated with activation of the stress system in healthy, young adults has been shown to be associated with decreased leptin levels, impaired insulin sensitivity, and increased hunger and appetite. To assess the effects of one night of sleep loss in a less stressful environment on hunger, leptin, adiponectin, cortisol and blood pressure/heart rate, and whether a 2-h mid-afternoon nap reverses the changes associated with sleep loss, 21 young healthy individuals (10 men, 11 women) participated in a 7-day sleep deprivation experiment (four consecutive nights followed by one night of sleep loss and two recovery nights). Half of the subjects were randomly assigned to take a mid-afternoon nap (14:00-16:00 hours) the day following the night of total sleep loss. Serial 24-h blood sampling and hunger scales were completed on the fourth (predeprivation) and sixth day (postdeprivation). Leptin levels were significantly increased after one night of total sleep loss, whereas adiponectin, cortisol levels, blood pressure/heart rate, and hunger were not affected. Daytime napping did not influence the effects of sleep loss on leptin, adiponectin, or hunger. Acute sleep loss, in a less stressful environment, influences leptin levels in an opposite manner from that of short-term sleep curtailment associated with activation of the stress system. It appears that sleep loss associated with activation of the stress system but not sleep loss per se may lead to increased hunger and appetite and hormonal changes, which ultimately may lead to increased consumption of 'comfort' food and obesity.

  8. The effects of long-term leptin administration on morphometrical changes of mice testicular tissue

    PubMed Central

    Esmaili-Nejad, Mohammad-Reza; Babaei, Homayoon; Kheirandish, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Leptin is a novel and interesting hormone for anyone trying to lose weight, but its effects on male gonad structure in longitudinal study is unknown. The present study was designed to explore morphometrical changes of mouse testicular tissue after long-term administration of leptin. Materials and Methods: Thirty healthy mature male mice were randomly assigned to either control (n=15) or treatment (n=15) groups. Leptin was intraperitoneally injected to the treatment group (0.1 µg/100 µl of physiological saline) once a day for 30 consecutive days, and control animals received normal saline with the same volume and route. Five mice from each experimental group were sacrificed at 15, 30 and 60 days after the beginning of treatments. Left testes were removed, weighted and then fixed in 10% buffered formalin, and stained with hematoxylin and eosine for morphometrical assays. Results: Except for sertoli cell nucleus diameter, which was affected from 30th day, evaluation of other morphometrical parameters such as Johnsen’s score, meiotic index, spermatogenesis, epithelial height, seminiferous tubules diameter and spermatogonial nucleus diameter revealed significant decrease from 15th day after leptin administration compare to those of the control group (P<0.05). Thus, meiotic index and spermatogonial cell nucleus diameter were two parameters that were further disturbed on 30th day compare to the day 15 (3.09±0.03 vs. 3.23±0.03, P=0.006 and 5.50±0.09 vs. 6.08±0.14, P=0.007, respectively). Conclusion: Our results showed that long-term administration of leptin could disturb testicular tissue structure and delay spermatogenesis process. PMID:26877846

  9. Leptin targets in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael M; Lachey, Jennifer L; Sternson, Scott M; Lee, Charlotte E; Elias, Carol F; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Elmquist, Joel K

    2009-06-10

    The central actions of leptin are essential for homeostatic control of adipose tissue mass, glucose metabolism, and many autonomic and neuroendocrine systems. In the brain, leptin acts on numerous different cell types via the long-form leptin receptor (LepRb) to elicit its effects. The precise identification of leptin's cellular targets is fundamental to understanding the mechanism of its pleiotropic central actions. We have systematically characterized LepRb distribution in the mouse brain using in situ hybridization in wildtype mice as well as by EYFP immunoreactivity in a novel LepRb-IRES-Cre EYFP reporter mouse line showing high levels of LepRb mRNA/EYFP coexpression. We found substantial LepRb mRNA and EYFP expression in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic sites described before, including the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventral premammillary nucleus, ventral tegmental area, parabrachial nucleus, and the dorsal vagal complex. Expression in insular cortex, lateral septal nucleus, medial preoptic area, rostral linear nucleus, and in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus was also observed and had been previously unreported. The LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to chemically characterize a population of leptin receptor-expressing neurons in the midbrain. Tyrosine hydroxylase and Cre reporter were found to be coexpressed in the ventral tegmental area and in other midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Lastly, the LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to map the extent of peripheral leptin sensing by central nervous system (CNS) LepRb neurons. Thus, we provide data supporting the use of the LepRb-IRES-Cre line for the assessment of the anatomic and functional characteristics of neurons expressing leptin receptor.

  10. Role of leptin in reverse epidemiology in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Leptin is mainly produced by adipocytes and metabolized in the kidney. Leptin is taken up into the central nervous system by a saturable transport system, and controls appetite in rodents and in healthy subjects. Leptin acts on peripheral tissue and increases the inflammatory response by stimulating the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-12. In healthy humans, serum leptin concentration is related to the size of adipose tissue mass in the body. The majority of obese subjects have inappropriately high levels of circulating plasma leptin concentrations, indicating leptin resistance. In healthy subjects increased leptin concentration constitutes a biomarker for increased cardiovascular risk. On the other hand, a recent prospective long-term study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy showed that reduced serum leptin concentration is an independent risk factor for mortality in these patients.

  11. Leptin regulates bone formation via the sympathetic nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Shu; Elefteriou, Florent; Levasseur, Regis; Liu, Xiuyun; Zhao, Liping; Parker, Keith L.; Armstrong, Dawna; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that leptin inhibits bone formation by an undefined mechanism. Here, we show that hypothalamic leptin-dependent antiosteogenic and anorexigenic networks differ, and that the peripheral mediators of leptin antiosteogenic function appear to be neuronal. Neuropeptides mediating leptin anorexigenic function do not affect bone formation. Leptin deficiency results in low sympathetic tone, and genetic or pharmacological ablation of adrenergic signaling leads to a leptin-resistant high bone mass. beta-adrenergic receptors on osteoblasts regulate their proliferation, and a beta-adrenergic agonist decreases bone mass in leptin-deficient and wild-type mice while a beta-adrenergic antagonist increases bone mass in wild-type and ovariectomized mice. None of these manipulations affects body weight. This study demonstrates a leptin-dependent neuronal regulation of bone formation with potential therapeutic implications for osteoporosis.

  12. The impact of leptin on perinatal development and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Valleau, Jeanette C; Sullivan, Elinor L

    2014-11-01

    Leptin has long been associated with metabolism as it is a critical regulator of both food intake and energy expenditure, but recently, leptin dysregulation has been proposed as a mechanism of psychopathology. This review discusses the evidence supporting a role for leptin in mental health disorders and describes potential mechanisms that may underlie this association. Leptin plays a critical role in pregnancy and in fetal growth and development. Leptin's role and profile during development is examined in available human studies, and the validity of applying studies conducted in animal models to the human population are discussed. Rodents experience a postnatal leptin surge, which does not occur in humans or larger animal models. This suggests that further research using large mammal models, which have a leptin profile across pregnancy and development similar to humans, are of high importance. Maternal obesity and hyperleptinemia correlate with increased leptin levels in the umbilical cord, placenta, and fetus. Leptin levels are thought to impact fetal brain development; likely by activating proinflammatory cytokines that are known to impact many of the neurotransmitter systems that regulate behavior. Leptin is likely involved in behavioral regulation as leptin receptors are widely distributed in the brain, and leptin influences cortisol release, the mesoaccumbens dopamine pathway, serotonin synthesis, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In humans, both high and low levels of leptin are reported to be associated with psychopathology. This inconsistency is likely due to differences in the metabolic state of the study populations. Leptin resistance, which occurs in the obese state, may explain how both high and low levels of leptin are associated with psychopathology, as well as the comorbidity of obesity with numerous mental illnesses. Leptin resistance is likely to influence disorders such as depression and anxiety where high leptin levels have been correlated

  13. Fenugreek, A Potent Hypoglycaemic Herb Can Cause Central Hypothyroidism Via Leptin - A Threat To Diabetes Phytotherapy.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Jayjeet; Chakraborty, Pratip; Mitra, Analava; Sarkar, Nirmal Kumar; Sarkar, Supriti

    2017-04-13

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum), a medicinal herb with potent antihyperglycaemic and hypoglycaemic effects, is used to treat diabetes. This study is aimed to explore the interaction of fenugreek seed extract (FSE) and HPT (hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid) axis in context of leptin secretion which have important role in normal and type-1 diabetic subjects. FSE (confirmed to contain trigonelline, diosgenin, 4 hydroxyisoleucine) was gavaged (0.25 gm/kg body weight/day) to normal and alloxan-induced type-1 diabetic rats for 4 weeks. Expression of hypothalamic prepro-TRH (Thyrotropin releasing hormone) mRNA, serum levels of TRH, TSH (Thyroid stimulating hormone), fT3, fT4, insulin, leptin, glucose; thyroperoxidase activity and growth of thyroid gland, food intake, adiposity index were also studied FSE significantly down regulated prepro-TRH mRNA expression; decreased serum TRH, TSH, fT3, fT4 levels, and regressed thyroid gland in FSE-fed normal and diabetic rats than those observed in normal diet-fed control and diabetic rats. FSE decreased (p<0.005-0.001) adiposity index and leptin secretion, increased food intake and body weight in all FSE-fed rats. FSE improved insulin secretion, decreased glucose level but impaired HPT axis in diabetic rats, indicating insulin-independent central hypothyroidism. Results suggested that the dominant signal to hypothalamus suppressing HPT axis is the fall in leptin level which i resulted from decreased adiposity index following FSE feeding. Fenugreek simultaneously having hypoglycaemic and hypothyroidal actions raises questions whether it can be safely used to treat diabetes and/or hyperthyroidism as was suggested by many workers.

  14. Leptin signaling in astrocytes regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesús; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H; Horvath, Tamas L

    2014-07-01

    We found that leptin receptors were expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that their conditional deletion led to altered glial morphology and synaptic inputs onto hypothalamic neurons involved in feeding control. Leptin-regulated feeding was diminished, whereas feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data reveal an active role of glial cells in hypothalamic synaptic remodeling and control of feeding by leptin.

  15. Effect of zinc supplementation on serum leptin levels and insulin resistance of obese women.

    PubMed

    Marreiro, Dilina do Nascimento; Geloneze, Bruno; Tambascia, Marcos A; Lerário, Antonio C; Halpern, Alfredo; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato

    2006-08-01

    Leptin is thought to be a lipostatic signal that contributes to body weight regulation. Zinc might play an important role in appetite regulation and its administration stimulates leptin production. However, there are few reports in the literature on its role on leptin levels in the obese population. The present work assesses the effect of zinc supplementation on serum leptin levels in insulin resistance (IR). A prospective double-blind, randomized, clinical, placebo-controlled study was conducted. Fifty-six normal glucose-tolerant obese women (age: 25-45 yr, body mass index [BMI] = 36.2 +/- 2.3 kg/m2) were randomized for treatment with 30 mg zinc daily for 4 wk. Baseline values of both groups were similar for age, BMI, caloric intake, insulin concentration, insulin resistance, and zinc concentration in diet, plasma, urine, and erythrocytes. Insulin and leptin were measured by radioimmunoassay and IR was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). The determinations of zinc in plasma, erythrocytes, and 24- h urine were performed by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. After 4 wk, BMI, fasting glucose, and zinc concentration in plasma and erythrocyte did not change in either group, although zinc concentration in the urine increased from 385.9 +/- 259.3 to 470.2 +/- 241.2 +/- microg/24 h in the group with zinc supplementation (p < 0.05). Insulin did not change in the placebo group, whereas there was a significant decrease of this hormone in the supplemented group. HOMA also decreased from 5.8 +/- 2.6 to 4.3 +/- 1.7 (p < 0.05) in the zinc-supplemented group but did not change in the placebo group. Leptin did not change in the placebo group. In the zinc group, leptin was 23.6 +/- 12.3 microg/L and did not change. More human data from a unique population of obese individuals with documented insulin resistance would be useful in guiding future studies on zinc supplementation (with higher doses or longer intervals) or different measures.

  16. Molecular mechanisms linking adipokines to obesity-related colon cancer: focus on leptin.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is linked to increased risk of colon cancer, currently the third most common cancer. Consequently rising levels of obesity worldwide are likely to significantly impact on obesity-related colon cancers in the decades to come. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby obesity increases colon cancer risk is thus a focus for research to inform strategies to prevent the increasing trend in obesity-related cancers. This review will consider research on deregulation of adipokine signalling, a consequence of altered adipokine hormone secretion from excess adipose tissue, with a focus on leptin, which has been studied extensively as a potential mediator of obesity-related colon cancer. Numerous investigations using colon cell lines in vitro, in vivo studies in rodents and investigations of colon cancer patients illuminate the complexity of the interactions of leptin with colon tissues via leptin receptors expressed by the colon epithelium. Although evidence indicates a role for leptin in proliferation of colon epithelial cells in vitro, this has been contradicted by studies in rodent models. However, recent studies have indicated that leptin may influence inflammatory mediators linked with colon cancer and also promote cell growth dependent on genotype and is implicated in growth promotion of colon cancer cells. Studies in human cancer patients indicate that there may be different tumour sub-types with varying levels of leptin receptor expression, indicating the potential for leptin to induce variable responses in the different tumour types. These studies have provided insights into the complex interplay of adipokines with responsive tissues prone to obesity-related colon cancer. Deregulation of adipokine signalling via adipokine receptors located in the colon appears to be a significant factor in obesity-related colon cancer. Molecular profiling of colon tumours will be a useful tool in future strategies to characterise the influence that adipokines may have

  17. Renaissance of leptin for obesity therapy.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Carmelo; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel A; Tschöp, Matthias H; Clemmensen, Christoffer

    2016-05-01

    Diet-induced obesity and its metabolic comorbidities constitute an overwhelming health crisis and there is an urgent need for safe and effective pharmacological interventions. Being largely shelved for decades, scientists are now revisiting the anti-obesity virtues of leptin. Whereas it remains evident that leptin as a stand-alone therapy is not an effective approach, the potential for employing sensitising pharmacology to unleash the weight-lowering properties of leptin has injected new hope into the field. Fascinatingly, these leptin-sensitising agents seem to act via distinct metabolic pathways and may thus, in parallel with their clinical development, serve as important research tools to progress our understanding of the molecular, physiological and behavioural pathways underlying energy homeostasis and obesity pathophysiology. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Is leptin coming back?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Thomas Meek and Gregory Morton, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3898-3 , and by Gerald Shulman and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3909-4 ) and an overview by the Session Chair, Ulf Smith (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3894-7 ).

  18. Environment, leptin sensitivity, and hypothalamic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mainardi, Marco; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Maffei, Margherita

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of feeding behavior has been a crucial step in the interplay between leptin and the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC). On one hand, the basic mechanisms regulating central and peripheral action of leptin are becoming increasingly clear. On the other hand, knowledge on how brain sensitivity to leptin can be modulated is only beginning to accumulate. This point is of paramount importance if one considers that pathologically obese subjects have high levels of plasmatic leptin. A possible strategy for exploring neural plasticity in the ARC is to act on environmental stimuli. This can be achieved with various protocols, namely, physical exercise, high-fat diet, caloric restriction, and environmental enrichment. Use of these protocols can, in turn, be exploited to isolate key molecules with translational potential. In the present review, we summarize present knowledge about the mechanisms of plasticity induced by the environment in the ARC. In addition, we also address the role of leptin in extrahypothalamic plasticity, in order to propose an integrated view of how a single diffusible factor can regulate diverse brain functions.

  19. Knockdown of Leptin A Expression Dramatically Alters Zebrafish Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Dalman, Mark; Chen, Yun; Akhter, Mashal; Brahmandam, Sravya; Patel, Yesha; Lowe, Josef; Thakkar, Mitesh; Gregory, Akil-Vuai; Phelps, Daryllanae; Riley, Caitlin; Londraville, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Using morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO) technology, we blocked leptin A or leptin receptor expression in embryonic zebrafish, and analyzed consequences of leptin knock-down on fish development. Embryos injected with leptin A or leptin receptor MOs (leptin A or leptin receptor morphants) had smaller bodies and eyes, undeveloped inner ear, enlarged pericardial cavity, curved body and/or tail and larger yolk compared to control embryos of the same stages. The defects persisted in 6-9 day old larvae. We found that blocking leptin A function had little effect on the development of early brain (1 day old), but differentiation of both the morphant dorsal brain and retinal cells was severely disrupted in older (2 day old) embryos. Despite the enlarged pericardial cavity, differentiation of cardiac cells appeared to be similar to control embryos. Formation of the morphants’ inner ear is also severely disrupted, which corroborates existing reports of leptin receptor expression in inner ear of both zebrafish and mammals. Co-injection of leptin A MO and recombinant leptin results in partial rescue of the wild-type phenotype. Our results suggest that leptin A plays distinct roles in zebrafish development. PMID:22841760

  20. Transcriptional Characterization of Porcine Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Fernández, Almudena; Barragán, Carmen; Noguera, Jose L.; Folch, Josep M.; Rodríguez, M. Carmen; Óvilo, Cristina; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I.

    2013-01-01

    The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) regulate food intake and energy balance through hypothalamic signaling. However, the LEP-LEPR axis seems to be more complex and its expression regulation has not been well described. In pigs, LEP and LEPR genes have been widely studied due to their relevance. Previous studies reported significant effects of SNPs located in both genes on growth and fatness traits. The aim of this study was to determine the expression profiles of LEP and LEPR across hypothalamic, adipose, hepatic and muscle tissues in Iberian x Landrace backcrossed pigs and to analyze the effects of gene variants on transcript abundance. To our knowledge, non porcine LEPR isoforms have been described rather than LEPRb. A short porcine LEPR isoform (LEPRa), that encodes a protein lacking the intracellular residues responsible of signal transduction, has been identified for the first time. The LEPRb isoform was only quantifiable in hypothalamus while LEPRa appeared widely expressed across tissues, but at higher levels in liver, suggesting that both isoforms would develop different roles. The unique LEP transcript showed expression in backfat and muscle. The effects of gene variants on transcript expression revealed interesting results. The LEPRc.1987C>T polymorphism showed opposite effects on LEPRb and LEPRa hypothalamic expression. In addition, one out of the 16 polymorphisms identified in the LEPR promoter region revealed high differential expression in hepatic LEPRa. These results suggest a LEPR isoform-specific regulation at tissue level. Conversely, non-differential expression of LEP conditional on the analyzed polymorphisms could be detected, indicating that its regulation is likely affected by other mechanisms rather than gene sequence variants. The present study has allowed a transcriptional characterization of LEP and LEPR isoforms on a range of tissues. Their expression patterns seem to indicate that both molecules develop peripheral roles apart from

  1. Effects of exogenous leptin on satiety and satiation in patients with lipodystrophy and leptin insufficiency.

    PubMed

    McDuffie, Jennifer R; Riggs, Patti A; Calis, Karim A; Freedman, Renee J; Oral, Elif A; DePaoli, Alex M; Yanovski, Jack A

    2004-09-01

    To examine leptin's role in human appetite regulation, we studied recombinant methionyl human leptin's effects on satiation and satiety in a model of leptin insufficiency, lipodystrophy. Eight females with hypoleptinemia and lipodystrophy were given sc injections of A-100 (maximal dose, 200% of that predicted to normalize serum leptin) for 4 months. Satiation and satiety were determined before and again during leptin treatment. Satiation was measured as the time to voluntary cessation of eating from a standardized food array after a 12-h fast. Satiety was determined as the time to hunger sufficient to consume a full meal after consumption of a standardized preload. During leptin treatment, satiation time decreased (41.2 +/- 18.2 to 19.5 +/- 10.6 min; P = 0.01), satiety time increased (62.9 +/- 64.8 to 137.8 +/- 91.6 min; P = 0.04), energy consumed to produce satiation decreased (2034 +/- 405 to 1135 +/- 432 kcal or 8.5 +/- 1.7 to 4.7 +/- 1.8 MJ; P < 0.01), and the amount of food desired in the postabsorptive state decreased (P < 0.02). Ghrelin concentrations also decreased during leptin administration (284.3 +/- 127.9 to 140.6 +/- 104.5 pmol/liter; P < 0.002). We conclude that increased leptin in patients with lipodystrophy results in less caloric, shorter, more satiating meals and longer-lived satiety. These data support the hypothesis that leptin plays an important, permissive role in human appetite regulation.

  2. The Impact of Leptin on Perinatal Development and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Valleau, Jeanette C.; Sullivan, Elinor L.

    2014-01-01

    Leptin has long been associated with metabolism as it is a critical regulator of both food intake and energy expenditure, but recently, leptin dysregulation has been proposed as a mechanism of psychopathology. This review discusses the evidence supporting a role for leptin in mental health disorders and describes potential mechanisms that may underlie this association. Leptin plays a critical role in pregnancy and in fetal growth and development. Leptin’s role and profile during development is examined in available human studies and the validity of applying studies conducted in animal models to the human population are discussed. Rodents experience a postnatal leptin surge, which does not occur in humans or larger animal models. This suggests that further research using large mammal models, which have a leptin profile across pregnancy and development similar to humans, are of high importance. Maternal obesity and hyperleptinemia correlate with increased leptin levels in the umbilical cord, placenta, and fetus. Leptin levels are thought to impact fetal brain development; likely by activating proinflammatory cytokines that are known to impact many of the neurotransmitter systems that regulate behavior. Leptin is likely involved in behavioral regulation as leptin receptors are widely distributed in the brain, and leptin influences cortisol release, the mesoaccumbens dopamine pathway, serotonin synthesis, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In humans, both high and low levels of leptin are reported to be associated with psychopathology. This inconsistency is likely due to differences in the metabolic state of the study populations. Leptin resistance, which occurs in the obese state, may explain how both high and low levels of leptin are associated with psychopathology, as well as the comorbidity of obesity with numerous mental illnesses. Leptin resistance is likely to influence disorders such as depression and anxiety where both high and low leptin levels have been

  3. Insulin, leptin, and adiponectin receptors in colon: regulation relative to differing body adiposity independent of diet and in response to dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E; Farquharson, Andrew J; Padidar, Sara; Duthie, Garry G; Mercer, Julian G; Arthur, John R; Morrice, Philip C; Barrera, Lawrence N

    2007-10-01

    Obesity has recently become a focus of research to elucidate diet and lifestyle factors as important risk factors for colon cancer. Altered levels of insulin, leptin, and adiponectin have been identified as potential candidates increasing colon cancer risk within the preva