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Sample records for adipokinetic hormone system

  1. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone and Adipokinetic Hormone Signaling Systems Share a Common Evolutionary Origin

    PubMed Central

    Lindemans, Marleen; Janssen, Tom; Beets, Isabel; Temmerman, Liesbet; Meelkop, Ellen; Schoofs, Liliane

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a critical and central hormone that regulates vertebrate reproduction. The high conservation of GnRH signaling within the chordates (deuterostomians) raises the important question as to whether its appearance might date back prior to the divergence of protostomian and deuterostomian lineages, about 700 million years ago. This leads to several important questions regarding the evolution of the GnRH family. Has GnRH been retained in most protostomian lineages? And was regulation of reproduction already a function of ancestral GnRH? The first question can undoubtedly be answered affirmatively since several GnRH-like sequences have been found in wide variety of protostomian and deuterostomian phyla. However, based on their different primary functions in different phyla – which implies a less unanimous answer on the second question – consistency in the nomenclature of this peptide family has been lost. A comparative and phylogenetic approach shows that the ecdysozoan adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), lophotrochozoan GnRHs and chordate GnRHs are structurally related and suggests that they all originate from a common ancestor. This review supports the view that the AKH–GnRH signaling system probably arose very early in metazoan evolution, prior to the divergence of protostomians and deuterostomians. PMID:22649364

  2. Discovery of a novel insect neuropeptide signaling system closely related to the insect adipokinetic hormone and corazonin hormonal systems.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Karina K; Stafflinger, Elisabeth; Schneider, Martina; Hauser, Frank; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael; Kollmann, Martin; Schachtner, Joachim; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2010-04-02

    Neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a central role in the physiology of insects. One large family of insect neuropeptides are the adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), which mobilize lipids and carbohydrates from the insect fat body. Other peptides are the corazonins that are structurally related to the AKHs but represent a different neuropeptide signaling system. We have previously cloned an orphan GPCR from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that was structurally intermediate between the A. gambiae AKH and corazonin GPCRs. Using functional expression of the receptor in cells in cell culture, we have now identified the ligand for this orphan receptor as being pQVTFSRDWNAamide, a neuropeptide that is structurally intermediate between AKH and corazonin and that we therefore named ACP (AKH/corazonin-related peptide). ACP does not activate the A. gambiae AKH and corazonin receptors and, vice versa, AKH and corazonin do not activate the ACP receptor, showing that the ACP/receptor couple is an independent and so far unknown peptidergic signaling system. Because ACP is structurally intermediate between AKH and corazonin and the ACP receptor between the AKH and corazonin receptors, this is a prominent example of receptor/ligand co-evolution, probably originating from receptor and ligand gene duplications followed by mutations and evolutionary selection, thereby yielding three independent hormonal systems. The ACP signaling system occurs in the mosquitoes A. gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex pipiens (Diptera), the silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera), the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera), the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera), and the bug Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera). However, the ACP system is not present in 12 Drosophila species (Diptera), the honeybee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera), the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera), the body louse Pediculus humanus (Phthiraptera), and the crustacean Daphnia pulex

  3. Discovery of a Novel Insect Neuropeptide Signaling System Closely Related to the Insect Adipokinetic Hormone and Corazonin Hormonal Systems*

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Karina K.; Stafflinger, Elisabeth; Schneider, Martina; Hauser, Frank; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael; Kollmann, Martin; Schachtner, Joachim; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a central role in the physiology of insects. One large family of insect neuropeptides are the adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), which mobilize lipids and carbohydrates from the insect fat body. Other peptides are the corazonins that are structurally related to the AKHs but represent a different neuropeptide signaling system. We have previously cloned an orphan GPCR from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae that was structurally intermediate between the A. gambiae AKH and corazonin GPCRs. Using functional expression of the receptor in cells in cell culture, we have now identified the ligand for this orphan receptor as being pQVTFSRDWNAamide, a neuropeptide that is structurally intermediate between AKH and corazonin and that we therefore named ACP (AKH/corazonin-related peptide). ACP does not activate the A. gambiae AKH and corazonin receptors and, vice versa, AKH and corazonin do not activate the ACP receptor, showing that the ACP/receptor couple is an independent and so far unknown peptidergic signaling system. Because ACP is structurally intermediate between AKH and corazonin and the ACP receptor between the AKH and corazonin receptors, this is a prominent example of receptor/ligand co-evolution, probably originating from receptor and ligand gene duplications followed by mutations and evolutionary selection, thereby yielding three independent hormonal systems. The ACP signaling system occurs in the mosquitoes A. gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex pipiens (Diptera), the silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera), the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera), the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera), and the bug Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera). However, the ACP system is not present in 12 Drosophila species (Diptera), the honeybee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera), the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera), the body louse Pediculus humanus (Phthiraptera), and the crustacean Daphnia pulex

  4. Energy Homeostasis Control in Drosophila Adipokinetic Hormone Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gáliková, Martina; Diesner, Max; Klepsatel, Peter; Hehlert, Philip; Xu, Yanjun; Bickmeyer, Iris; Predel, Reinhard; Kühnlein, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of biological functions under negative energy balance depends on mobilization of storage lipids and carbohydrates in animals. In mammals, glucagon and glucocorticoid signaling mobilizes energy reserves, whereas adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) play a homologous role in insects. Numerous studies based on AKH injections and correlative studies in a broad range of insect species established the view that AKH acts as master regulator of energy mobilization during development, reproduction, and stress. In contrast to AKH, the second peptide, which is processed from the Akh encoded prohormone [termed “adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptide” (APRP)] is functionally orphan. APRP is discussed as ecdysiotropic hormone or as scaffold peptide during AKH prohormone processing. However, as in the case of AKH, final evidence for APRP functions requires genetic mutant analysis. Here we employed CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering to create AKH and AKH plus APRP-specific mutants in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Lack of APRP did not affect any of the tested steroid-dependent processes. Similarly, Drosophila AKH signaling is dispensable for ontogenesis, locomotion, oogenesis, and homeostasis of lipid or carbohydrate storage until up to the end of metamorphosis. During adulthood, however, AKH regulates body fat content and the hemolymph sugar level as well as nutritional and oxidative stress responses. Finally, we provide evidence for a negative autoregulatory loop in Akh gene regulation. PMID:26275422

  5. The adipokinetic hormone of Mantodea in comparison to other Dictyoptera.

    PubMed

    Gäde, Gerd; Marco, Heather G

    2017-03-01

    Six species of the order Mantodea (praying mantises) are investigated for the presence and sequence of putative adipokinetic hormones (AKHs). The selected species span a wide evolutionary range of various families and subfamilies of the clade Mantodea. The corpora cardiaca of the different species are dissected, methanolic extracts prepared, peptides separated by liquid chromatography, and AKHs detected and sequenced by ion trap mass spectrometry. All six species investigated contain an octapeptide with the primary structure pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp amide, which is code-named Emppe-AKH and had been found earlier in three other species of Mantodea. Conspecific bioassays with the species Creoboter sp. (family Hymenopodidae) reveal an adipokinetic but not a hypertrehalosemic function of Emppe-AKH. Comparison with other members of the Dictyoptera (cockroaches, termites) show that Emppe-AKH is only found in certain termites, which have been recently placed into the Blattaria (cockroaches) as sister group to the family Cryptocercidae. Termites and cockroaches both show biodiversity in the sequence of AKHs, and some cockroach species even contain two AKHs. In contrast, all praying mantises-irrespective of their phylogenetic position-synthesize uniformly only one and the same octapeptide Emppe-AKH.

  6. The adipokinetic hormone family in Chrysomeloidea: structural and functional considerations *

    PubMed Central

    Gäde, Gerd; Marco, Heather G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The presented work is a hybrid of an overview and an original research paper on peptides belonging to the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family that are present in the corpora cardiaca of Chrysomeloidea. First, we introduce the AKH/red pigment-concentrating hormone (RPCH) peptide family. Second, we collate the available primary sequence data on AKH peptides in Cerambycidae and Chrysomelidae, and we present new sequencing data (from previously unstudied species) obtained by liquid-chromatography coupled with ion trap electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. Our expanded data set encompasses the primary structure of AKHs from seven species of Cerambycidae and three species of Chrysomelidae. All of these species synthesise the octapeptide code-named Peram-CAH-I (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Asn-Trp amide). Whereas this is the sole AKH peptide in Cerambycidae, Chrysomelidae demonstrate a probable event of AKH gene duplication, thereby giving rise to an additional AKH. This second AKH peptide may be either Emppe-AKH (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp amide) or Peram-CAH-II (pGlu-Leu-Thr-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp amide). The peptide distribution and structural data suggest that both families are closely related and that Peram-CAH-I is the ancestral peptide. We hypothesise on the molecular evolution of Emppe-AKH and Peram-CAH-II from the ancestral peptide due to nonsynonymous missense single nucleotide polymorphism in the nucleotide coding sequence of prepro-AKH. Finally, we review the biological significance of the AKH peptides as hyperprolinaemic hormones in Chrysomeloidea, i.e. they cause an increase in the circulating concentration of proline. The mobilisation of proline has been demonstrated during flight in both cerambycid and chrysomelid beetles. PMID:22303105

  7. The revolution in insect neuropeptides illustrated by the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family of peptides.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G

    1996-01-01

    The last decade has seen a surge in the knowledge on primary structures of insect neuropeptides. Particularly successful were isolations and sequence determinations of more than 30 members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family of peptides. This brief overview describes the techniques used to obtain data on purification and structure such as high performance liquid chromatography, Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry. Moreover, a short account on the precursors and on the multiple functions of the peptides of the AKH/RPCH family in various crustacean and insect species is given.

  8. The adipokinetic hormones of Odonata: a phylogenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Gäde, Gerd; Marco, Heather G

    2005-03-01

    Adipokinetic neuropeptides from the corpora cardiaca of the major families of all three suborders of the Odonata were identified by one or more of the following methods: (1) Isolation of the peptides from a methanolic extract of the corpora cardiaca by liquid chromatography, peak monitoring by fluorescence of the Trp residue and comparison of the retention time with those of known synthetic peptides of Odonata. (2) Hyperlipaemic bioassays of the HPLC-generated fractions either in Locusta migratoria or, in a few cases, in Anax imperator or Orthetrum julia. (3) Sequencing of the isolated, bioactive HPLAC fraction by Edman degradation. (4) Mass spectrometric measurement of the isolated, bioactive fraction. Sequence assignment revealed that the investigated Odonata species always contain only one adipokinetic peptide. This is always an octapeptide. The suborder Zygoptera contains the peptide code-named Psein-AKH, the Anisozygoptera and the families Aeshnidae, Cordulegastridae and Macromiidae of the Anisoptera contain Anaim-AKH, whereas Gomphidae, Corduliidae (with the exception of Syncordulia gracilis) and Libellulidae contain Libau-AKH; one species of Libellulidae has Erysi-AKH, a very conservative modification of Libau-AKH (one point mutation). When these structural data are interpreted in conjunction with existing phylogenies of Odonata, they support the following: (1) Zygoptera are monophyletic and not paraphyletic. (2) Anisozygoptera and Anisoptera are sister groups and contain the ancestral Anaim-AKH which is independently and convergently mutated to Libau-AKH in Gomphidae and Libellulidae. (3) The Corduliidae are of special interest. Only Corduliidae sensu stricto appear to contain Libau-AKH, other species placed into this family by most authorities contain the ancestral Anaim-AKH. Possibly, assignments of AKHs can untangle the paraphyly of this family.

  9. Adipokinetic hormones and their G protein-coupled receptors emerged in Lophotrochozoa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shizhong; Hauser, Frank; Skadborg, Signe K.; Nielsen, Stine V.; Kirketerp-Møller, Nikolaj; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Most multicellular animals belong to two evolutionary lineages, the Proto– and Deuterostomia, which diverged 640–760 million years (MYR) ago. Neuropeptide signaling is abundant in animals belonging to both lineages, but it is often unclear whether there exist evolutionary relationships between the neuropeptide systems used by proto- or deuterostomes. An exception, however, are members of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor superfamily, which occur in both evolutionary lineages, where GnRHs are the ligands in Deuterostomia and GnRH-like peptides, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), corazonin, and AKH/corazonin-related peptide (ACP) are the ligands in Protostomia. AKH is a well-studied insect neuropeptide that mobilizes lipids and carbohydrates from the insect fat body during flight. In our present paper, we show that AKH is not only widespread in insects, but also in other Ecdysozoa and in Lophotrochozoa. Furthermore, we have cloned and deorphanized two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca) that are activated by low nanomolar concentrations of oyster AKH (pQVSFSTNWGSamide). Our discovery of functional AKH receptors in molluscs is especially significant, because it traces the emergence of AKH signaling back to about 550 MYR ago and brings us closer to a more complete understanding of the evolutionary origins of the GnRH receptor superfamily. PMID:27628442

  10. Adipokinetic hormones provide inference for the phylogeny of odonata.

    PubMed

    Gäde, Gerd; Simek, Petr; Fescemyer, Howard W

    2011-01-01

    Adipokinetic neuropeptides from the corpora cardiaca of 17 species of Odonata encompassing mainly the families Corduliidae and Libellulidae were isolated and structurally elucidated using liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. It became evident that all species of the family Corduliidae studied express the peptide code-named Libau-AKH (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Ser-Trp amide), which is also present in all but one libellulid species, Erythemis simplicicollis which expresses Erysi-AKH (pGlu-Leu-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Ser-Trp amide). This divergence from all other Libellulids is due to a nonsynonymous missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the nucleotide coding sequence (CDS) of prepro-AKH CDS and supports the polyphyletic nature of Sympetrinae and other subfamilies of libellulids. Despite this exception, these findings then support the hypothesis that Corduliidae and Libellulidae are closely related as stated in most phylogenies. The presence of Anaim-AKH (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Ser-Trp amide) in Macromiidae likely distinguishes species in this family from Corduliidae. Current molecular genetic phylogenies and our AKH findings suggest that Syncordulia gracilis, which expresses Anaim-AKH, does not belong in Corduliidae. Evolution of AKHs in anisopteran Odonata are likely due to nucleotide substitution involving nonsynonymous missense SNPs in the CDS of prepro-AKH. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adipokinetic hormones concentrations in the haemolymph of Schistocerca gregaria, measured by radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Candy, D J

    2002-11-01

    A new procedure for the measurement of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) concentrations in locust (Schistocerca gregaria) haemolymph is described: Haemolymph is extracted with chloroform/methanol/water and the aqueous layer is fractionated with reverse-phase cartridges and HPLC. The fractions corresponding to AKH-I (Lom-AKH-I) and AKH-II (Scg-AKH-II) are then measured in a competitive binding assay using specific antibodies and [3H]AKHs. The procedures could be applied to any peptides containing N-terminal pyroglutamate residues including all members of the adipokinetic/hyperglycaemic/red pigment concentrating hormone family. Results show that the concentrations of both AKH-I and AKH-II increase within 5 min of initiation of flight and are maintained at approx. 15-fold (AKH-I) and 6-fold (AKH-II) the resting levels over flights of at least 60 min. Poisoning of locusts with either the insecticide deltamethrin or with potassium chloride also caused release of hormones. Starvation for 6 h caused elevation of hormone levels in 5th instar nymphs, but starvation for 6 or 20 h had little effect on hormones in adults, despite an increase in haemolymph diacylglycerols at 20 h.

  12. Adipokinetic hormone induces changes in the fat body lipid composition of the beetle Zophobas atratus.

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Marek; Cerkowniak, Magdalena; Urbanek, Aleksandra; Słocińska, Małgorzata; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    In insects, neuropeptide adipokinetic hormone (AKH) released from the corpora cardiaca mobilizes lipids and carbohydrates in the fat body. We examined the developmental differences in the action of Tenmo-AKH, a bioanalogue belonging to the adipokinetic/hypertrahelosemic family (AKH/HrTH), on the lipid composition of larval and pupal fat bodies in the beetle Zophobas atratus. Tenmo-AKH was administered to the beetle larvae and pupae either as a single dose or as two doses of 20 pmol during a 24h interval. Extracts of fat bodies were used to analyse the lipid composition by gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Control extracts were analyzed using the same method. Fatty acids (FA) and fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) were the most abundant compounds in the fat bodies from both developmental stages. We observed significant differences in their concentrations following hormonal treatment. Tenmo-AKH also induced a distinct increase in larval sterols, fatty alcohols and benzoic acid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Acute Administration of Adipokinetic Hormone on Depression, Anxiety, Pain, Locomotion and Memory in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Oguz; Ulak, Guner; Akar, Furuzan; Erden, Faruk; Celikyurt, Ipek Komsuoglu; Bektas, Emine; Tanyeri, Pelin; Kaya, Havva

    2017-04-30

    The neurosecretory cells in the corpus cardiacum of insects synthesize a set of hormones that are called adipokinetic, hypertrehalosemic or hyperprolinemic depending on the insect in question. They are the Adipokinetic Hormone/Red Pigment-Concentrating Hormone (AKH/RPCH) family of peptides. The present study investigated the effects of acute administration of Locusta Migratoria (Locmi-AKHII) and Anax Imperator (Anaim-AKH) on depression, anxiety, pain (analgesy), locomotion and memory in mice in forced swimming (FST), elevated plus maze (EPM), hot plate, locomotor activity and passive avoidance tests. Both Locmi-AKH-II (4 mg/kg) and Anaim-AKH (0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg) decreased immobility time (in sec, s) in the FST test. Anaim-AKH (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) increased the percentage of time spent in open arms/total time spent and the percentage of the number of open arm/total arm entries in the EPM test. Anaim-AKH (1 and 2 mg/kg) significantly increased latency (s) (initial time passed) for mice to lick their hind paws or jumping in the hot plate test. Anaim-AKH (4 mg/kg) significantly decreased the total distance (cm) moved, or the speed (cm/s) of movement of the animals in the locomotor activity test. Neither Locmi-AKH-II nor Anaim-AKH altered the retention latency (s) in the passive avoidance test. Both Locmi-AKH-II and Anaim-AKH exerted antidepressant effects, while only Anaim-AKH had anxiolytic and analgesic effects when administered acutely. Anaim-AKH diminished locomotion at higher doses while Locmi-AKH-II had no such effects. Neither Locmi-AKH-II nor Anaim-AKH disturbed learning and memory when acutely administered. Data of our studies suggest clinical potentials of AKH to be used in depression, anxiety and pain without disturbing memory.

  14. Adipokinetic hormone signaling through the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor modulates egg-laying in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lindemans, Marleen; Liu, Feng; Janssen, Tom; Husson, Steven J.; Mertens, Inge; Gäde, Gerd; Schoofs, Liliane

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a neuropeptide that stimulates the release of gonadotropins from the anterior pituitary. The existence of a putative functional equivalent of this reproduction axis in protostomian invertebrates has been a matter of debate. In this study, the ligand for the GnRH receptor in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Ce-GnRHR) was found using a bioinformatics approach. The peptide and its precursor are reminiscent of both insect adipokinetic hormones and GnRH-preprohormone precursors from tunicates and higher vertebrates. We cloned the AKH-GnRH-like preprohormone and the Ce-GnRHR and expressed the GPCR in HEK293T cells. The GnRHR was activated by the C. elegans AKH-GnRH-like peptide (EC50 = 150 nM) and by Drosophila AKH and other nematode AKH-GnRHs that we found in EST databases. Analogous to both insect AKH receptor and vertebrate GnRH receptor signaling, Ce-AKH-GnRH activated its receptor through a Gαq protein with Ca2+ as a second messenger. Gene silencing of Ce-GnRHR, Ce-AKH-GnRH, or both resulted in a delay in the egg-laying process, comparable to a delay in puberty in mammals lacking a normal dose of GnRH peptide or with a mutated GnRH precursor or receptor gene. The present data support the view that the AKH-GnRH signaling system probably arose very early in metazoan evolution and that its role in reproduction might have been developed before the divergence of protostomians and deuterostomians. PMID:19164555

  15. Structure-activity relationship of adipokinetic hormone analogs in the striped hawk moth, Hippotion eson.

    PubMed

    Marco, Heather G; Gäde, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    We showed previously that the sphingid moth Hippotion eson synthesizes the highest number of adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) ever recorded, viz. five, in its corpus cardiacum: two octa-, two nona- and one decapeptide. Further, the endogenous decapeptide (Manse-AKH-II) and the other four AKHs are all active in lipid mobilization, whereas a non-lepidopteran decapeptide (Lacsp-AKH, five amino acid substitutions compared with Manse-AKH-II), was inactive in H. eson. We tested the decapeptide, Lacol-AKH, from a noctuid moth for the first time in a bioassay and it shows a maximal AKH effect in H. eson. Lacol-AKH differs from Manse-AKH-II in three places and from Lacsp-AKH in four places. We, thus, used Lacol-AKH as a lead peptide on which a series of AKH analogs are based to represent: (a) single amino acid replacements (according to the substitutions in Lacsp-AKH), (b) shorter chain lengths, (c) modified termini, and (d) a replacement of Trp in position 8. These analogs, as well as a few naturally occurring AKHs from other lepidopterans were tested in in vivo adipokinetic assays to gain insight into the ligand-receptor interaction in H. eson. Our results show that the second and third amino acids are important for biological activity in the sphingid moth. Analogs with an N-[acetylated]Glu(1) (instead of a pyroGlu), or a free C-terminus, or Ala(8) were not active in the bioassays, while shortened Lacol-AKH analogs and the undecapeptide, non-amidated Vanca-AKH showed very reduced activity (below 25%). This information is important for the consideration of peptide mimetics to combat specific lepidopteran pest insects.

  16. Conformational study of insect adipokinetic hormones using NMR constrained molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Margie M.; Jackson, Graham E.; Gäde, Gerd

    2001-03-01

    Mem-CC (pGlu-Leu-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Pro-Asp-Trp-NH2), Tem-HrTH (pGlu-Leu-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Asn-Trp-NH2) and Del-CC (pGlu-Leu-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Asn-Trp-Gly-Asn-NH2) are adipokinetic hormones, isolated from the corpora cardiaca of different insect species. These hormones regulate energy metabolism during flight and so are intimately involved in an insect's mobility. Secondary structural elements of these peptides and the N7 analogue, [N7]-Mem-CC (pGlu-Leu-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Pro-Asn-Trp-NH2), have been determined in dimethylsulfoxide solution using NMR restrained molecular mechanic simulations. The neuropeptides were all found to have an extended structure for the first 4 residues and a β-turn between residues 4-8. For Tem-HrTH and Del-CC, asparagine (N7) which is postulated to be involved in receptor binding and/or activation, projects outward form the β-turn. Mem-CC does not have an asparagine at position 7 while, for [N7]-Mem-CC, the N7 sidechain folds inside the β-turn preventing its interaction with the receptor.

  17. Adipokinetic hormones of the two extant apterygotan insect orders, Archaeognatha and Zygentoma.

    PubMed

    Marco, Heather G; Šimek, Petr; Gäde, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Two extant apterygotan insect orders, Archaeognatha and Zygentoma, are investigated with respect to the identity of neuropeptides belonging to the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) peptide family; this is the first report on AKH peptide structures in the so-called primitive insects and the first of any peptide in the Archaeognatha. In the lepismatid, Thermobia domestica, and the machilid, Petrobius maritimus, a single AKH peptide is identified and sequenced from each species; neither sequence is novel and has previously been shown in corpora cardiaca (CC) of cockroaches (Peram-CAH-I) and dragonflies (Anaim-AKH), respectively. These octapeptides differ from each other only in one position (Asn(7) in the lepismatid and Ser(7) in the machilid). The biological relevance of these peptides was investigated and we speculate that they are likely involved in the mobilisation of lipids in the apterygotes. Immunocytochemistry with an antibody directed against an AKH revealed a well-developed pair of CC in T. domestica and another lepismatid, the fishmoth Ctenolepisma longicaudata; a cluster of immunopositive cells are located retrocerebrally in tissue sections of P. maritimus which may be the CC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Localization and functional characterization of a novel adipokinetic hormone in the mollusk, Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua I; Kavanaugh, Scott I; Nguyen, Cindy; Tsai, Pei-San

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), corazonin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), and red pigment-concentrating hormone all share common ancestry to form a GnRH superfamily. Despite the wide presence of these peptides in protostomes, their biological effects remain poorly characterized in many taxa. This study had three goals. First, we cloned the full-length sequence of a novel AKH, termed Aplysia-AKH, and examined its distribution in an opisthobranch mollusk, Aplysia californica. Second, we investigated in vivo biological effects of Aplysia-AKH. Lastly, we compared the effects of Aplysia-AKH to a related A. californica peptide, Aplysia-GnRH. Results suggest that Aplysia-AKH mRNA and peptide are localized exclusively in central tissues, with abdominal, cerebral, and pleural ganglia being the primary sites of Aplysia-AKH production. However, Aplysia-AKH-positive fibers were found in all central ganglia, suggesting diverse neuromodulatory roles. Injections of A. californica with Aplysia-AKH significantly inhibited feeding, reduced body mass, increased excretion of feces, and reduced gonadal mass and oocyte diameter. The in vivo effects of Aplysia-AKH differed substantially from Aplysia-GnRH. Overall, the distribution and biological effects of Aplysia-AKH suggest it has diverged functionally from Aplysia-GnRH over the course of evolution. Further, that both Aplysia-AKH and Aplysia-GnRH failed to activate reproduction suggest the critical role of GnRH as a reproductive activator may be a phenomenon unique to vertebrates.

  19. Two novel tyrosine-containing peptides (Tyr(4)) of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the families Coccinellidae and Silphidae.

    PubMed

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2015-11-01

    Novel members of the adipokinetic hormone family of peptides have been identified from the corpora cardiaca (CC) of two species of beetles representing two families, the Silphidae and the Coccinellidae. A crude CC extract (0.3 gland equivalents) of the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, was active in mobilizing trehalose in a heterologous assay using the cockroach Periplaneta americana, whereas the CC extract (0.5 gland equivalents) of the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, exhibited no hypertrehalosemic activity. Primary sequences of one adipokinetic hormone from each species were elucidated by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The multiple MS(N) electrospray mass data revealed an octapeptide with an unusual tyrosine residue at position 4 for each species: pGlu-Leu-Thr-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for N. vespilloides (code-named Nicve-AKH) and pGlu-Ile-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for H. axyridis (code-named Harax-AKH). Assignment of the correct sequences was confirmed by synthesis of the peptides and co-elution in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection or by LC-MS. Moreover, synthetic peptides were shown to be active in the heterologous cockroach assay system, but Harax-AKH only at a dose of 30 pmol, which explains the negative result with the crude CC extract. It appears that the tyrosine residue at position 4 can be used as a diagnostic feature for certain beetle adipokinetic peptides, because this feature has not been found in another order other than Coleoptera.

  20. Identification and Functional Characterization of Two Orphan G-protein-coupled Receptors for Adipokinetic Hormones from Silkworm Bombyx mori*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ying; Huang, Haishan; Deng, Xiaoyan; He, Xiaobai; Yang, Jingwen; Yang, Huipeng; Shi, Liangen; Mei, Lijuan; Gao, Jimin; Zhou, Naiming

    2011-01-01

    Adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) are the best studied insect neuropeptides with the function of mobilizing lipids and carbohydrates during energy-expensive activities and modulating fundamental physiological processes, such as sugar homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and reproduction. Three distinct cDNAs encoding the prepro-Bombyx AKH1–3 have been cloned and confirmed by mass spectrometric methods. Our previous research suggested the Bombyx AKH receptor is activated by AKH1 and AKH2 with high affinity but by AKH3 with quite low affinity. In this study, using stable functional expression of the receptors in HEK293 cells, we have now identified AKH3 as a specific ligand for two orphan G-protein-coupled receptors, and we therefore named them AKHR2a and AKHR2b, respectively. We demonstrated that both AKHR2a and AKHR2b were activated by AKH3 at high affinity and by AKH1 and AKH2 at low affinity, leading to an increase of intracellular cAMP levels and activation of ERK1/2 and receptor internalization, but they were not activated by Bombyx corazonin. Conversely, the Bombyx corazonin receptor was activated by corazonin but not by AKH1–3. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that AKHR2a and AKHR2b were both highly expressed in the testis but were also detected at low levels in other tissues. These results will lead to a better understanding of the AKH/AKHR system in the regulation of fundamental physiological processes. PMID:22009754

  1. Novel members of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the superfamily Scarabaeoidea.

    PubMed

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2016-12-01

    Eight beetle species of the superfamily Scarabaeoidea were investigated with respect to peptides belonging to the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family in their neurohemal organs, the corpora cardiaca (CC). The following beetle families are represented: Scarabaeidae, Lucanidae, and Geotrupidae. AKH peptides were identified through a heterospecific trehalose-mobilizing bioassay and by sequence analyses, using liquid chromatography coupled to positive electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) and analysis of the tandem MS(2) spectra obtained by collision-induced dissociation. All the beetle species have octapeptide AKHs; some have two AKHs, while others have only one. Novel AKH members were found in Euoniticellus intermedius and Circellium bacchus (family Scarabaeidae), as well as in Dorcus parallelipipedus (family Lucanidae). Two species of the family Geotrupidae and two species of the Scarabaeidae subfamily Cetoniinae contain one known AKH peptide, Melme-CC, while E. intermedius produces a novel peptide code named Euoin-AKH: pEINFTTGWamide. Two AKH peptides were each identified in CC of C. bacchus and D. parallelipipedus: the novel Cirba-AKH: pEFNFSAGWamide and the known peptide, Scade-CC-I in the former, and the novel Dorpa-AKH: pEVNYSPVW amide and the known peptide, Melme-CC in the latter. Kheper bonelli (subfamily Scarabaeinae) also has two AKHs, the known Scade-CC-I and Scade-CC-II. All the novel peptides were synthesized and the amino acid sequence assignments were unequivocally confirmed by co-elution of the synthetic peptides with their natural equivalent, and identical MS parameters of the two forms. The novel synthetic peptides are all active in inducing hypertrehalosemia in cockroaches.

  2. Primary structure of two neuropeptide hormones with adipokinetic and hypotrehalosemic activity isolated from the corpora cardiaca of horse flies (Diptera).

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, H; Raina, A K; Riley, C T; Fraser, B A; Nachman, R J; Vogel, V W; Zhang, Y S; Hayes, D K

    1989-01-01

    The primary structures of two neuropeptides, Tabanus atratus adipokinetic hormone (Taa-AKH) and Tabanus atratus hypotrehalosemic hormone (Taa-HoTH), from the corpora cardiaca of horse flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) have been determined. Amino acid sequences of Taa-AKH (less than Glu-Leu-Thr-Phe-Thr-Pro-Gly-Trp-NH2) and Taa-HoTH (less than Glu-Leu-Thr-Phe-Thr-Pro-Gly-Trp-Gly-Tyr-NH2) (where less than Glu = pyroglutamic acid) were determined by automated gas-phase Edman degradation of the peptides deblocked by pyroglutamate aminopeptidase and by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The hormones were synthesized, and the natural and synthetic peptides exhibited identical chromatographic, spectroscopic, and biological properties. When assayed in adult face fly males, Taa-AKH and Taa-HoTH demonstrated hyperlipemic activity, in addition, Taa-HoTH also demonstrated a significant hypotrehalosemic activity. PMID:2813385

  3. Role of adipokinetic hormone and adenosine in the anti-stress response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zemanová, Milada; Stašková, Tereza; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The role of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and adenosine in the anti-stress response was studied in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and adults carrying a mutation in the Akh gene (Akh(1)), the adenosine receptor gene (AdoR(1)), or in both of these genes (Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant). Stress was induced by starvation or by the addition of an oxidative stressor paraquat (PQ) to food. Mortality tests revealed that the Akh(1) mutant was the most resistant to starvation, while the AdoR(1) mutant was the most sensitive. Conversely, the Akh(1) AdoR(1) double mutant was more sensitive to PQ toxicity than either of the single mutants. Administration of PQ significantly increased the Drome-AKH level in w(1118) and AdoR(1) larvae; however, this was not accompanied by a simultaneous increase in Akh gene expression. In contrast, PQ significantly increased the expression of the glutathione S-transferase D1 (GstD1) gene. The presence of both a functional adenosine receptor and AKH seem to be important for the proper control of GstD1 gene expression under oxidative stress, however, the latter appears to play more dominant role. On the other hand, differences in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity among the strains, and between untreated and PQ-treated groups were minimal. In addition, the glutathione level was significantly lower in all untreated AKH- or AdoR-deficient mutant flies as compared with the untreated control w(1118) flies and further declined following treatment with PQ. All oxidative stress characteristics modified by mutations in Akh gene were restored or even improved by 'rescue' mutation in flies which ectopically express Akh. Thus, the results of the present study demonstrate the important roles of AKH and adenosine in the anti-stress response elicited by PQ in a D. melanogaster model, and provide the first evidence for the involvement of adenosine in the anti-oxidative stress response in insects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyperprolinaemia caused by novel members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family of peptides isolated from corpora cardiaca of onitine beetles.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G

    1997-01-01

    Two novel members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family of peptides were identified in dung beetles of the genus Onitis using heterologous (measuring lipid and carbohydrate mobilization in locusts and cockroaches) and a homologous (measuring proline increase in the haemolymph) bioassay(s). Isolation of the peptides was achieved by single-step reverse-phase HPLC of corpora cardiaca extracts. The primary structure was elucidated by automated Edman degradation and by electrospray MS. Both peptides are blocked octapeptides containing three aromatic amino acids. Peptide 1, designated Ona-CC-I, is pGlu-Tyr-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp-NH2, and peptide 2, designated Ona-CC-II, is pGlu-Phe-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Pro-Asp-Trp-NH2. The synthetic peptides were chromatographically indistinguishable from the natural compounds. They both had a hyperprolinaemic effect in the dung beetle. Moreover, flight experiments established that proline is an important fuel to power flight metabolism in Onitis species. Therefore, it is concluded that these novel and unique peptides are involved in regulating proline-based flight metabolism.

  5. UCP4 expression changes in larval and pupal fat bodies of the beetle Zophobas atratus under adipokinetic hormone treatment.

    PubMed

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Antos-Krzeminska, Nina; Golebiowski, Marek; Kuczer, Mariola; Stepnowski, Piotr; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the influence of adipokinetic hormone (AKH), an insect neurohormone, on uncoupling protein 4 (ZaUCP4) expression and activity in larval and pupal fat body mitochondria of the beetle Zophobas atratus in relation to intermediary metabolism. Homologous Tenmo-AKH was administered to the beetle larvae and pupae as either a single dose or as two doses of 20pmol during a 24h interval. In the larval and pupal fat bodies, downregulation of ZaUCP4 expression at the mRNA and protein levels was observed 24h and 48h after AKH treatment, respectively. In both developmental stages, ZaUCP4 activity was lowered in fat body mitochondria 48h after AKH treatment. In the AKH-injected larvae, changes in ZaUCP4 expression were accompanied by the mobilization of carbohydrate reserves, no change in the concentration of total lipids and an increase in the free fatty acid level. In contrast, AKH had no effect on carbohydrate metabolism in the pupal fat body but induced lipid mobilization. It seems that AKH influences ZaUCP4 expression by triggering multiple events and that it has different physiological roles in controlling intermediary metabolism in the fat body of the beetle larvae and pupae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adipokinetic hormone receptor gene identification and its role in triacylglycerol mobilization and sexual behavior in the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis).

    PubMed

    Hou, Qiu-Li; Chen, Er-Hu; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wei, Dan-Dan; Gui, Shun-Hua; Wang, Jin-Jun; Smagghe, Guy

    2017-09-15

    Energy homeostasis requires continuous compensation for fluctuations in energy expenditure and availability of food resources. In insects, energy mobilization is under control of the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) where it is regulating the nutritional status by supporting the mobilization of lipids. In this study, we characterized the gene coding for the AKH receptor (AKHR) and investigated its function in the oriental fruit fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) that is economically one of the most important pest insects of tropical and subtropical fruit. Bacdo-AKHR is a typical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that Bacdo-AKHR is closely related to insect AKHRs from other species. When expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, Bacdo-AKHR exhibited a high sensitivity and selectivity for AKH peptide (EC50 = 19.3 nM). Using qPCR, the developmental stage and tissue-specific expression profiles demonstrated that Bacdo-AKHR was highly expressed in both the larval and adult stages, and also specifically in the fat body and midgut of the adult with no difference in sex. To investigate the role of AKHR in B. dorsalis, RNAi assays were performed with dsRNA against Bacdo-AKHR in adult flies of both sexes and under starvation and feeding condition. As major results, the knockdown of this gene resulted in triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation. With RNAi-males, we observed a severe decrease in their sexual courtship activity when starved, but there was a partial rescue in copulation when refed. Also in RNAi-males, the tethered-flight duration declined compared with the control group when starved, which is confirming the dependency on energy metabolism. In RNAi-females, the sexual behavior was not affected, but their fecundity was decreased. Our findings indicate an interesting role of AKHR in the sexual behavior of males specifically. The effects are associated with TAG accumulation, and we also reported that the conserved role of AKH-mediated system

  7. Unique roles of glucagon and glucagon-like peptides: Parallels in understanding the functions of adipokinetic hormones in stress responses in insects.

    PubMed

    Bednářová, Andrea; Kodrík, Dalibor; Krishnan, Natraj

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon is conventionally regarded as a hormone, counter regulatory in function to insulin and plays a critical anti-hypoglycemic role by maintaining glucose homeostasis in both animals and humans. Glucagon performs this function by increasing hepatic glucose output to the blood by stimulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in response to starvation. Additionally it plays a homeostatic role by decreasing glycogenesis and glycolysis in tandem to try and maintain optimal glucose levels. To perform this action, it also increases energy expenditure which is contrary to what one would expect and has actions which are unique and not entirely in agreement with its role in protection from hypoglycemia. Interestingly, glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and GLP-2) from the major fragment of proglucagon (in non-mammalian vertebrates, as well as in mammals) may also modulate response to stress in addition to their other physiological actions. These unique modes of action occur in response to psychological, metabolic and other stress situations and mirror the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) in insects which perform a similar function. The findings on the anti-stress roles of glucagon and glucagon-like peptides in mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates may throw light on the multiple stress responsive mechanisms which operate in a concerted manner under regulation by AKH in insects thus functioning as a stress responsive hormone while also maintaining organismal homeostasis.

  8. Hemolymph sugar homeostasis and starvation-induced hyperactivity affected by genetic manipulations of the adipokinetic hormone-encoding gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyunghee; Park, Jae H

    2004-01-01

    Adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) are metabolic neuropeptides, mediating mobilization of energy substrates from the fat body in many insects. In delving into the roles of the Drosophila Akh (dAkh) gene, its developmental expression patterns were examined and the physiological functions of the AKH-producing neurons were investigated using animals devoid of AKH neurons and ones with ectopically expressing dAkh. The dAkh gene is expressed exclusively in the corpora cardiaca from late embryos to adult stages. Projections emanating from the AKH neurons indicated that AKH has multiple target tissues as follows: the prothoracic gland and aorta in the larva and the crop and brain in the adult. Studies using transgenic manipulations of the dAkh gene demonstrated that AKH induced both hypertrehalosemia and hyperlipemia. Starved wild-type flies displayed prolonged hyperactivity prior to death; this novel behavioral pattern could be associated with food-searching activities in response to starvation. In contrast, flies devoid of AKH neurons not only lacked this type of hyperactivity, but also displayed strong resistance to starvation-induced death. From these findings, we propose another role for AKH in the regulation of starvation-induced foraging behavior. PMID:15166157

  9. The adipokinetic hormones in the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda: cDNA cloning, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis, and gene specific localization.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latief, Mohatmed; Hoffmann, Klaus H

    2007-10-01

    Small neuropeptides of the adipokinetic/red pigment-concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family regulate energy metabolism in insects. Within lepidopterans, the nonapeptide Manduca sexta AKH (Manse-AKH) represents a widely occurring AKH, whereas the decapeptide Helze-HrTH (at first isolated from Helicoverpa zea) seems to be restricted to moths. Here we report the identification of the Manse-AKH-like Spofr-AKH 1 and the Helze-HrTH-like Spofr-AKH 2 prohormone precursors from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. Moreover, by PCR screening of a random primer cDNA library and by RACE, three 668, 835 and 1008 bp cDNA sequences were obtained, which encode putative translation products of 67-74 amino acids, each containing one copy of a peptide sequence that in its processed form has the sequence of QLTFSSGW-amide (Spofr-AKH 3). Another cDNA sequence of 634 bp encodes a putative translation product of 40 amino acids, potentially leading to one copy of an elongated, non-amidated Helze-HrTH (pQLTFSSGWGNCTS-OH; Spofr-AKH 4). Q-RT-PCR analysis showed that the Spofr-AKH mRNAs are expressed in 2d-old female brain/corpora cardiaca complexes, but also in ovaries, midgut, fat body, accessory glands and muscle tissues. Expression was also found in the ovaries of 4d-old females. Whole-mount in situ RT-PCR analysis with ovaries from 2d-old females showed that the Spofr-AKH 2 and Spofr-AKH 4 were mainly localized in the germarium (phase 3), whereas the Spofr-AKH 1, and the three mRNA isoforms of Spofr-AKH 3 were localized at the end of the vitellarium and in the fully developed oocytes (phase 1 and 2). The results suggest that Spofr-AKH genes play a role in the regulation of oocyte maturation in S. frugiperda.

  10. [Hormones and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Lacka, Katarzyna; Czyzyk, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Hormones have an influence on many tissues and organs, including the cardio-vascular system (CVS). Depending on their activity on CVS, they can be divided into 4 groups: having hypertensive or hypotensive influence and chronotropic positive or negative action. Endocrine regulation in CVS may occur in many ways. Apart from hormones usually connected with CVS regulation, other more recently, discovered ones can act on it. A few of these act directly through specific receptors in heart or vessel wall cells, whereas some act indirectly - stimulating other neuroendocrine factors. Additionally, novel mechanisms of signal transduction have been discovered for steroid and thyroid hormones, which are independent of gene transcription regulation and are - known as "nongenomic". Hormones which increase blood pressure include: urotensin II, endothelins, angiotensin II, catecholamines, aldosterone, antidiuretic hormone, glucocorticosteroids, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and leptin. On the other hand, blood pressure can be decreased by: natriuretic peptides, the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, angiotensin 1-7, substance P, neurokinin A, ghrelin, Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), oxytocin, and, sex hormones. Hormones which when appearing in excess increase the heart rate are: catecholamines, endothelins, glucocorticosteroids, thyroid hormones, leptin and PTHrP. Those which decrease the heart rate include: natriuretic peptides, substance P, neurokinin A, oxytocin, angiotensin 1-7. This paper describes the contemporary view of the functions of hormones which act on the vessel tree and heart. The particular effect of mediator depends on many circumstances i.e.: hormone concentration, receptor type. It may also undergo contraregulation. The majority of those hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of CVS diseases', which can result in the development of new medicines.

  11. Hormonal contraception and cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Brito, Milena Bastos; Nobre, Fernando; Vieira, Carolina Sales

    2011-04-01

    Hormonal contraception is the most widely used method to prevent unplanned pregnancies. The literature has shown an association between cardiovascular risk and use of hormone therapy. With the purpose of providing better guidelines on contraception methods for women with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, we have reviewed the literature on the subject. This review describes the latest data from the scientific literature concerning the influence of hormonal contraceptives on arterial thrombosis, venous thrombosis and systemic high blood pressure, which are diseases that have become increasingly prevalent among young females.

  12. Intracisternal granules in the adipokinetic cells of locusts are not degraded and apparently function as supplementary stores of secretory material.

    PubMed

    Harthoorn, L F; Diederen, J H; Oudejans, R C; Verstegen, M M; Vullings, H G; Van der Horst, D J

    2000-01-01

    The intracisternal granules in locust adipokinetic cells appear to represent accumulations of secretory material within cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. An important question is whether these granules are destined for degradation or represent stores of (pro)hormones. Two strategies were used to answer this question. First, cytochemistry was applied to elucidate the properties of intracisternal granules. The endocytic tracers horseradish peroxidase and wheat-germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase were used to facilitate the identification of endocytic, autophagic, and lysosomal organelles, which may be involved in the degradation of intracisternal granules. No intracisternal granules could be found within autophagosomes, and granules fused with endocytic and lysosomal organelles were not observed, nor could tracer be found within the granules. The lysosomal enzyme acid phosphatase was absent from the granules. Second, biochemical analysis of the content of intracisternal granules revealed that these granules contain prohormones as well as hormones. Prohormones were present in relatively higher amounts compared with ordinary secretory granules. Since the intracisternal granules in locust adipokinetic cells are not degraded and contain intact (pro)hormones it is concluded that they function as supplementary stores of secretory material.

  13. Endocrine archeology: do insects retain ancestrally inherited counterparts of the vertebrate releasing hormones GnRH, GHRH, TRH, and CRF?

    PubMed

    De Loof, Arnold; Lindemans, Marleen; Liu, Feng; De Groef, Bert; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-05-15

    Vertebrate releasing hormones include gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), corticotropin releasing hormone (CRF), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). They are synthesized in the hypothalamus and stimulate the release of pituitary hormones. Here we review the knowledge on hormone releasing systems in the protostomian lineage. We address the question: do insects have peptides that may be phylogenetically related to an ancestral GnRH, GHRH, TRH, and CRF? Such endocrine archeology has become possible thanks to the growing list of fully sequenced genomes as well as to the continuously improving bioinformatic tool set. It has recently been shown that the ecdysozoan (nematodes and arthropods) adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), the lophotrochozoan (annelids and mollusks) GnRHs as well as the protochordate GnRHs are structurally related. The adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptides (APRPs), in locusts encoded by the same gene that contains the AKH-coding region, have been forwarded as the structural counterpart of GHRH of vertebrates. CRF is relatively well conserved in insects, in which it functions as a diuretic hormone. Members of TRH-receptor family seem to have been conserved in some arthropods, but other elements of the thyroid hormone signaling system are not. A challenging idea is that in insects the functions of the thyroid hormones were taken over by juvenile hormone (JH). Our reconstruction suggests that, perhaps, the ancestral releasing hormone precursors played a role in controlling energy metabolism and water balance, and that releasing hormone functions as present in extant vertebrates were probably secondarily acquired. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary structure of a novel neuropeptide isolated from the corpora cardiaca of periodical cicadas having adipokinetic and hypertrehalosemic activities.

    PubMed

    Raina, A; Pannell, L; Kochansky, J; Jaffe, H

    1995-09-01

    A new neuropeptide hormone was isolated from the corpora cardiaca of the periodical cicadas, Magicicada species. Primary structure of the peptide as determined by a combination of automated Edman degradation after enzymatic deblocking with pyroglutamate aminopeptidase and mass spectrometry is: pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Ser-Trp-Gly-Asn-NH2. Synthetic peptide assayed in the green stink bug Nezara viridula caused a 112% increase in hemolymph lipids at a dose of 0.625 pmol, and a 67% increase in hemolymph carbohydrates at a dose of 2.5 pmol. Based on these results we designate this peptide, a first from order Homoptera, as Magicicada species-adipokinetic hormone (Mcsp-AKH).

  15. [Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Límanová, Zdeňka; Jiskra, Jan

    Cardiovascular system is essentially affected by thyroid hormones by way of their genomic and non-genomic effects. Untreated overt thyroid dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. Although it has been studied more than 3 decades, in subclinical thyroid dysfunction the negative effect on cardiovascular system is much more controversial. Large meta-analyses within last 10 years have shown that subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with higher cardiovascular risk than subclinical hypothyroidism. Conversely, in patients of age > 85 years subclinical hypothyroidism was linked with lower mortality. Therefore, subclinical hyperthyroidism should be rather treated in the elderly while subclinical hypothyroidism in the younger patients and the older may be just followed. An important problem on the border of endocrinology and cardiology is amiodarone thyroid dysfunction. Effective and safe treatment is preconditioned by distinguishing of type 1 and type 2 amiodarone induced hyperthyroidism. The type 1 should be treated with methimazol, therapeutic response is prolonged, according to recent knowledge immediate discontinuation of amiodarone is not routinely recommended and patient should be usually prepared to total thyroidectomy, or rather rarely 131I radioiodine ablation may be used if there is appropriate accumulation. In the type 2 there is a promt therapeutic response on glucocorticoids (within 1-2 weeks) with permanent remission or development of hypothyroidism. If it is not used for life-threatening arrhytmias, amiodarone may be discontinuated earlier (after several weeks). Amiodarone induced hypothyroidism is treated with levothyroxine without amiodarone interruption.Key words: amiodarone induced thyroid dysfunction - atrial fibrillation - cardiovascular risk - heart failure - hyperthyroidism - hypothyroidism - thyroid stimulating hormone.

  16. Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormone has profound effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. This article describes the cellular mechanisms by which thyroid hormone acts at the level of the cardiac myocyte and the vascular smooth muscle cell to alter phenotype and physiology. Because it is well established that thyroid hormone, specifically T(3), acts on almost every cell and organ in the body, studies on the regulation of thyroid hormone transport into cardiac and vascular tissue have added clinical significance. The characteristic changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics and metabolism that accompany thyroid disease states can then be best understood at the cellular level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Is the titer of adipokinetic peptides in Leptinotarsa decemlineata fed on genetically modified potatoes increased by oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Krishnan, Natraj; Habustová, Oxana

    2007-05-01

    The level of adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) (Peram-CAH-I and II) in the corpora cardiaca and the hemolymph of Leptinotarsa decemlineata enormously increases in the adults fed on genetically modified potatoes containing either GNA lectin or Cry 3Aa toxin concomitant with increased oxidative stress in gut tissues. A similar enhancement of the AKH titer is achieved when the adults are injected with paraquat that evokes oxidative stress. On the other hand, an injection of exogenous AKH reduces oxidative stress biomarkers in the hemolymph by reducing protein carbonyls and enhancing reduced glutathione levels. These facts indicate that there is a feedback regulation between an oxidative stressor action and the level of AKH in the insect body, and that AKHs might be involved in the activation of an antioxidant protection mechanism. These results are to our knowledge, the first evidence for the involvement of AKHs in oxidative stress mitigation, in addition to a plethora of other roles.

  18. [Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Takasu, Nobuyuki

    2006-12-01

    Thyroid hormone has many effects on the heart and vascular system. Many of the clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism are due to the ability of thyroid hormone to alter cardiovascular hemodynamics. The hemodynamic effects of hypothyroidism are opposite to those of hyperthyroidism, although the clinical manifestations are less obvious. This review will integrate what is known about the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action on the heart with recent observations from both experimental and clinical studies of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid hormone has both direct and indirect actions on the cardiovascular system. Patients with thyroid disease, especially those with hyperthyroidism, often have symptoms and signs indicating changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics. Indeed, symptoms and signs referable to the cardiovascular system may be the only manifestations of thyroid dysfunction, and thyroid function should therefore be assessed by the measurement of serum thyrotropin concentrations in all patients with cardiovascular disease. Some suggest that the administration of triiodothyronine may benefit some patients with cardiovascular disease.

  19. [Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Magdalena Maria; Łacka, Katarzyna

    2014-09-01

    It is well established that thyroid hormones affect the cardiovascular system through genomic and nongenomic actions. TRalpha1 is the major thyroid hormone receptor in the heart. T3 suppresses increased mitotic activity of stimulated cardiomyocytes. Hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state, which is associated with enhanced left ventricular systolic and diastolic function and the chronotropic and inotropic properties of thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism, however, is characterized by opposite changes. In addition, thyroid hormones decrease peripheral vascular resistance, influence the rennin-angiotensin system (RAS), and increase blood volume and erythropoetin secretion with subsequent increased preload and cardiac output. Thyroid hormones play an important role in cardiac electrophysiology and have both pro- and anti-arrhytmic potential. Thyroid hormone deficiency is associated with a less favorable lipid profile. Selective modulation of the TRbeta1 receptor is considered as a potential therapeutic target to treat dyslipidemia without cardiac side effects. Thyroid hormones have a beneficial effect on limiting myocardial ischemic injury, preventing and reversing cardiac remodeling and improving cardiac hemodynamics in endstage heart failure. This is crucial because a low T3 syndrome accompanies both acute and chronic cardiac diseases.

  20. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  3. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  5. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  6. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  8. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1545 - Parathyroid hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parathyroid hormone test system. 862.1545 Section... Systems § 862.1545 Parathyroid hormone test system. (a) Identification. A parathyroid hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of parathyroid hormone in serum and plasma....

  10. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1690 - Thyroid stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. 862.1690... Systems § 862.1690 Thyroid stimulating hormone test system. (a) Identification. A thyroid stimulating hormone test system is a device intended to measure thyroid stimulating hormone, also known...

  12. Hormonal and systemic regulation of sclerostin.

    PubMed

    Drake, Matthew T; Khosla, Sundeep

    2017-03-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays an essential role in osteoblast biology. Sclerostin is a soluble antagonist of Wnt/β-catenin signaling secreted primarily by osteocytes. Current evidence indicates that sclerostin likely functions as a local/paracrine regulator of bone metabolism rather than as an endocrine hormone. Nonetheless, circulating sclerostin levels in humans often reflect changes in the bone microenvironment, although there may be exceptions to this observation. Using existing assays, circulating sclerostin levels have been shown to be altered in response to both hormonal stimuli and across a variety of normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In both rodents and humans, parathyroid hormone provided either intermittently or continuously suppresses sclerostin levels. Likewise, most evidence from both human and animal studies supports a suppressive effect of estrogen on sclerostin levels. Efforts to examine non-hormonal/systemic regulation of sclerostin have in general shown less consistent findings or have provided associations rather than direct interventional information, with the exception of mechanosensory studies which have consistently demonstrated increased sclerostin levels with skeletal unloading, and conversely decreases in sclerostin with enhanced skeletal loading. Herein, we will review the existent literature on both hormonal and non-hormonal/systemic factors which have been studied for their impact on sclerostin regulation.

  13. Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Danzi, S; Klein, I

    2004-09-01

    Thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cardiac function and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Triiodothyronine, (T(3)), the physiologically active form of thyroid hormone, binds to nuclear receptor proteins and mediates the expression of several important cardiac genes, inducing transcription of the positively regulated genes including alpha-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase. Negatively regulated genes include beta-MHC and phospholamban, which are down regulated in the presence of normal serum levels of thyroid hormone. T(3) mediated effects on the systemic vasculature include relaxation of vascular smooth muscle resulting in decreased arterial resistance and diastolic blood pressure. In hyperthyroidism, cardiac contractility and cardiac output are enhanced and systemic vascular resistance is decreased, while in hypothyroidism, the opposite is true. Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism manifest many of the same cardiovascular changes, but to a lesser degree than that which occurs in overt hypothyroidism. Cardiac disease states are sometimes associated with the low T(3) syndrome. The phenotype of the failing heart resembles that of the hypothyroid heart, both in cardiac physiology and in gene expression. Changes in serum T(3) levels in patients with chronic congestive heart failure are caused by alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism suggesting that patients may benefit from T(3) replacement in this setting.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test...

  17. [Thyroid hormone and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Weinbrenner, C; Gerbert, B; Strasser, R H

    2005-09-30

    Thyroid hormone has many effects on the heart and vascular system. In hyperthyroidism changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics explain many of the clinical manifestations induced by thyroid hormones. In hypothyroidism the cardiovascular effects are opposite to those observed in hyperthyroidism, although the clinical manifestations are less obvious. This review will focus on the cardiovascular system in hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. In particular the subclinical dysfunctions of the thyroid gland, which occurs especially in older age, will be discussed. The clinical relevance and the necessity of diagnostic and therapy in subclinical thyroid disease are not clarified yet. In the United States an expert group has published a scientific review and guideline for the diagnosis and management of subclinical thyroid disease in 2004, which will also be outlined.

  18. Sex hormones in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Roger Lyrio; da Silva, Fabrício Bragança; Ribeiro, Rogério Faustino; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2014-05-01

    Gender-associated differences in the development of cardiovascular diseases have been described in humans and animals. These differences could explain the low incidence of cardiovascular disease in women in the reproductive period, such as stroke, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. The cardiovascular protection observed in females has been attributed to the beneficial effects of estrogen on endothelial function. Besides estrogen, sex hormones are able to modulate blood pressure by acting on important systems as cardiovascular, renal, and neural. They can have complementary or antagonistic actions. For example, testosterone can raise blood pressure by stimulating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, whereas estrogen alone or combined with progesterone has been associated with decreased blood pressure. The effects of testosterone in the development of cardiovascular disease are contradictory. Although some researchers suggest a positive effect, others indicate negative actions of testosterone. Estrogens physiologically stimulate the release of endothelium-derived vasodilator factors and inhibit the renin-angiotensin system. Although the cardioprotective effects of estrogen are widely appreciated, little is known about the effects of progesterone, which is commonly used in hormone replacement therapy. Progesterone has both vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive effects in the vasculature, depending on the location of the vessel and the level of exposure. Nevertheless, the mechanisms through which sex hormones modulate blood pressure have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the characterization of those could lead to a better understanding of hypertension in women and men and perhaps to improved forms of therapy.

  19. Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    AD-All? 395 REGULATION OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM DY HYPOTHALAMIC 1/1 RELEASING HORMONES (U) TEXAS UNIV MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON E M SMITH S1 NOV 6? fW...441F004 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Eric M. Smith...34Hypothalamic releasing hormones , stress, immune system,. L08 ACTH, endorphins, corticosteroids, monokines, neuroimmunomodulation *’" . - " - 19 ABSTRACT

  20. Secretory granule formation and membrane recycling by the trans-Golgi network in adipokinetic cells of Locusta migratoria in relation to flight and rest.

    PubMed

    Diederen, J H; Vullings, H G

    1995-03-01

    The influence of flight activity on the formation of secretory granules and the concomitant membrane recycling by the trans-Golgi network in the peptidergic neurosecretory adipokinetic cells of Locusta migratoria was investigated by means of ultrastructural morphometric methods. The patterns of labelling of the trans-Golgi network by the exogenous adsorptive endocytotic tracer wheat-germ agglutinin-conjugated horse-radish peroxidase and by the endogenous marker enzyme acid phosphatase were used as parameters and were measured by an automatic image analysis system. The results show that endocytosed fragments of plasma membrane with bound peroxidase label were transported to the trans-Golgi network and used to build new secretory granules. The amounts of peroxidase and especially of acid phosphatase within the trans-Golgi network showed a strong tendency to be smaller in flight-stimulated cells than in non-stimulated cells. The amounts of acid phosphatase in the immature secretory granules originating from the trans-Golgi network were significantly smaller in stimulated cells. The number of immature secretory granules positive for acid phosphatase tended to be higher in stimulated cells. Thus, flight stimulation of adipokinetic cells for 1 h influences the functioning of the trans-Golgi network; this most probably results in a slight enhancement of the production of secretory granules by the trans-Golgi network.

  1. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  2. Clinical implications of thyroid hormones effects on nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Carreón-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormones have an important role throughout prenatal and postnatal nervous system development. They are involved in several processes such as neurogenesis, gliogenesis, myelination, synaptogenesis, etc., as shown in many cases of deficiency like congenital hypothyroidism or hypothyroxinemia. Those pathologies if untreated could lead to severe damages in cognitive, motor, neudoendocrine functions among other effects. Some could be reversed after adequate supplementation of thyroid hormones at birth, however there are other cellular processes highly sensitive to low levels of thyroid hormones and lasting a limited period of time during which if thyroid hormone action is lacking or deficient, the functional and structural damages would produce permanent defects.

  3. [Lysosomal system in hormonal mechanisms. Review].

    PubMed

    Duran Reyes, G; González Macías, G; Hicks, J J

    1995-02-01

    The role of lysosomes in the intracellular mechanism of action of several steroid an proteic hormones has been demonstrated. In presence of the specific hormone the target cell induce membranal changes and the lysosomes are moved toward the nucleus; after this the lysosomal enzymes are released in the perinuclear space. For the moment it is not possible to know the biochemical role of this enzymatic activities upon the nucleic acids function and des-repretion process of specific genes, but the inhibition of lysosomes movement utilizing hormone antagonist or dexamethasone inhibits some reproductive process like the implantation of the mammalian egg. We present herein a review related with the mode action of some hormones through the lysosomes in reproductive processes.

  4. Histological organization of the central nervous system and distribution of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptide in the blue crab, Portunus pelagicus.

    PubMed

    Saetan, Jirawat; Senarai, Thanyaporn; Tamtin, Montakan; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Chavadej, Jittipan; Hanna, Peter J; Parhar, Ishwar; Sobhon, Prasert; Sretarugsa, Prapee

    2013-09-01

    We present a detailed histological description of the central nervous system (CNS: brain, subesophageal ganglion, thoracic ganglia, abdominal ganglia) of the blue crab, Portunus pelagicus. Because the presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in crustaceans has been disputed, we examine the presence and localization of a GnRH-like peptide in the CNS of the blue crab by using antibodies against lamprey GnRH (lGnRH)-III, octopus GnRH (octGnRH) and tunicate GnRH (tGnRH)-I. These antibodies showed no cross-reactivity with red-pigment-concentrating hormone, adipokinetic hormone, or corazonin. In the brain, strong lGnRH-III immunoreactivity (-ir) was detected in small (7-17 μm diameter) neurons of clusters 8, 9 and 10, in medium-sized (21-36 μm diameter) neurons of clusters 6, 7 and 11 and in the anterior and posterior median protocerebral neuropils, olfactory neuropil, median and lateral antenna I neuropils, tegumentary neuropil and antenna II neuropil. In the subesophageal ganglion, lGnRH-III-ir was detected in medium-sized neurons and in the subesophageal neuropil. In the thoracic and abdominal ganglia, lGnRH-III-ir was detected in medium-sized and small neurons and in the neuropils. OctGnRH-ir was observed in neurons of the same clusters with moderate staining, particularly in the deutocerebrum, whereas tGnRH-I-ir was only detected in medium-sized neurons of cluster 11 in the brain. Thus, anti-lGnRH-III shows greater immunoreactivity in the crab CNS than anti-octGnRH and anti-tGnRH-I. Moreover, our functional bioassay demonstrates that only lGnRH-III has significant stimulatory effects on ovarian growth and maturation. We therefore conclude that, although the true identity of the crab GnRH eludes us, crabs possess a putative GnRH hormone similar to lGnRH-III. The identification and characterization of this molecule is part of our ongoing research.

  5. Immunoendocrinology: faulty hormonal imprinting in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2014-06-01

    Hormonal imprinting is an epigenetic process which is taking place perinatally at the first encounter between the developing hormone receptors and their target hormones. The hormonal imprinting influences the binding capacity of receptors, the hormone synthesis of the cells, and other hormonally regulated functions, as sexual behavior, aggressivity, empathy, etc. However, during the critical period, when the window for imprinting is open, molecules similar to the physiological imprinters as synthetic hormone analogs, other members of the hormone families, environmental pollutants, etc. can cause faulty imprinting with life-long consequences. The developing immune system, the cells of which also have receptors for hormones, is very sensitive to faulty imprinting, which causes alterations in the antibody and cytokine production, in the ratio of immune cells, in the defense against bacterial and viral infections as well as against malignant tumors. Immune cells (lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes and mast cells) are also producing hormones which are secreted into the blood circulation as well as are transported locally (packed transport). This process is also disturbed by faulty imprinting. As immune cells are differentiating during the whole life, faulty imprinting could develop any time, however, the most decisive is the perinatal imprinting. The faulty imprinting is inherited to the progenies in general and especially in the case of immune system. In our modern world the number and amount of artificial imprinters (e.g. endocrine disruptors and drugs) are enormously increasing. The effects of the faulty imprinters most dangerous to the immune system are shown in the paper. The present and future consequences of the flood of faulty imprintings are unpredictable however, it is discussed.

  6. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates plant hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Aaron; Estelle, Mark

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants utilize the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to modulate nearly every aspect of growth and development. Ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through the action of three enzymes known as E1, E2, and E3. The ultimate outcome of this post-translational modification depends on the nature of the ubiquitin linkage and the extent of polyubiquitination. In most cases, ubiquitination results in degradation of the target protein in the 26S proteasome. During the last 10 years it has become clear that the UPS plays a prominent regulatory role in hormone biology. E3 ubiquitin ligases in particular actively participate in hormone perception, de-repression of hormone signaling pathways, degradation of hormone specific transcription factors, and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. It is certain that additional functions will be discovered as more of the nearly 1200 potential E3s in plants are elucidated. PMID:20409276

  7. Emergence of plant vascular system: roles of hormonal and non-hormonal regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunwoo; Dang, Tuong Vi T; Hwang, Ildoo

    2017-02-01

    The divergence of land plants followed by vascular plants has entirely changed the terrestrial ecology. The vascular system is a prerequisite for this evolutionary event, providing upright stature and communication for sink demand-source capacity and facilitating the development of plants and colonization over a wide range of environmental habitats. Various hormonal and non-hormonal regulatory networks have been identified and reviewed as key processes for vascular formation; however, how these factors have evolutionarily emerged and interconnected to trigger the emergence of the vascular system still remains elusive. Here, to understand the intricacy of cross-talks among these factors, we highlight how core hormonal signaling and transcriptional networks are coalesced into the appearance of vascular plants during evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gustatory perception and fat body energy metabolism are jointly affected by vitellogenin and juvenile hormone in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Brent, Colin S; Fennern, Erin; Amdam, Gro V

    2012-06-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) provide a system for studying social and food-related behavior. A caste of workers performs age-related tasks: young bees (nurses) usually feed the brood and other adult bees inside the nest, while older bees (foragers) forage outside for pollen, a protein/lipid source, or nectar, a carbohydrate source. The workers' transition from nursing to foraging and their foraging preferences correlate with differences in gustatory perception, metabolic gene expression, and endocrine physiology including the endocrine factors vitellogenin (Vg) and juvenile hormone (JH). However, the understanding of connections among social behavior, energy metabolism, and endocrine factors is incomplete. We used RNA interference (RNAi) to perturb the gene network of Vg and JH to learn more about these connections through effects on gustation, gene transcripts, and physiology. The RNAi perturbation was achieved by single and double knockdown of the genes ultraspiracle (usp) and vg, which encode a putative JH receptor and Vg, respectively. The double knockdown enhanced gustatory perception and elevated hemolymph glucose, trehalose, and JH. We also observed transcriptional responses in insulin like peptide 1 (ilp1), the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR), and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, or "foraging gene" Amfor). Our study demonstrates that the Vg-JH regulatory module controls changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but not lipid metabolism, when worker bees shift from nursing to foraging. The module is also placed upstream of ilp1, AKHR, and PKG for the first time. As insulin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), and PKG pathways influence metabolism and gustation in many animals, we propose that honey bees have conserved pathways in carbohydrate metabolism and conserved connections between energy metabolism and gustatory perception. Thus, perhaps the bee can make general contributions to the understanding of food-related behavior and metabolic disorders.

  9. Gustatory Perception and Fat Body Energy Metabolism Are Jointly Affected by Vitellogenin and Juvenile Hormone in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Brent, Colin S.; Fennern, Erin; Amdam, Gro V.

    2012-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) provide a system for studying social and food-related behavior. A caste of workers performs age-related tasks: young bees (nurses) usually feed the brood and other adult bees inside the nest, while older bees (foragers) forage outside for pollen, a protein/lipid source, or nectar, a carbohydrate source. The workers' transition from nursing to foraging and their foraging preferences correlate with differences in gustatory perception, metabolic gene expression, and endocrine physiology including the endocrine factors vitellogenin (Vg) and juvenile hormone (JH). However, the understanding of connections among social behavior, energy metabolism, and endocrine factors is incomplete. We used RNA interference (RNAi) to perturb the gene network of Vg and JH to learn more about these connections through effects on gustation, gene transcripts, and physiology. The RNAi perturbation was achieved by single and double knockdown of the genes ultraspiracle (usp) and vg, which encode a putative JH receptor and Vg, respectively. The double knockdown enhanced gustatory perception and elevated hemolymph glucose, trehalose, and JH. We also observed transcriptional responses in insulin like peptide 1 (ilp1), the adipokinetic hormone receptor (AKHR), and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG, or “foraging gene” Amfor). Our study demonstrates that the Vg–JH regulatory module controls changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but not lipid metabolism, when worker bees shift from nursing to foraging. The module is also placed upstream of ilp1, AKHR, and PKG for the first time. As insulin, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), and PKG pathways influence metabolism and gustation in many animals, we propose that honey bees have conserved pathways in carbohydrate metabolism and conserved connections between energy metabolism and gustatory perception. Thus, perhaps the bee can make general contributions to the understanding of food-related behavior and metabolic disorders. PMID

  10. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Learn About Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ...

  11. Male sex hormones and systemic inflammation in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Butchart, Joe; Birch, Brian; Bassily, Ramy; Wolfe, Laura; Holmes, Clive

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the levels of sex hormones in men with Alzheimer disease (AD) differ from men without AD. Therefore, male sex hormones have been postulated as risk modifiers in AD, possibly through immunomodulatory effects on known inflammatory AD risk factors, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). We conducted a cross-sectional study of sex hormones and TNF-α levels in 94 community-dwelling men with AD. Comparisons were made with normal values derived from the literature. Men with AD had lower free testosterone levels than non-AD men (1-sample t test: age <80, P=0.0002; age ≥80, P<0.0001), and higher luteinizing hormone (LH) levels (Wilcoxon signed rank test: age <80, P=0.001; age ≥80, P<0.0001). Within the cohort of men with AD, there was a positive correlation between LH and TNF-α (Spearman r=0.25, P=0.019), and this remained significant after correcting for age (partial r=0.21, P=0.05). These data support the hypothesis that sex hormones and the immune system influence each other in AD. Furthermore, modulatory effects between LH and TNF-α may provide a mechanism for an effect of male sex hormones on AD risk.

  12. Mouse hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin responses to probes of signal transduction systems.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1993-01-01

    Signal transduction mechanisms involved in mouse growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) release were investigated using an in vitro perifusion system. Hypothalamic fragments were exposed to depolarizing agents, protein kinase A and C activators, and a calcium ionophore. The depolarizing agents, KCl (60 mM) and veratridine (50 microM), induced similar patterns of GRH and SRIH release. Somatostatin release in response to both agents was twofold greater than that of GRH. Forskolin (10 microM and 100 microM), an adenylate cyclase activator, stimulated both GRH and SRIH release, though with different secretory profiles. The SRIH response was prolonged and persisted beyond removal of the drug from the system, while the GRH response was brief, ending even prior to forskolin removal. Neither GRH nor SRIH were stimulated by 1,9-dideoxy-forskolin (100 microM), a forskolin analog with cAMP-independent actions. A23187 (5 microM), a calcium ionophore, stimulated the release of SRIH to a much greater extent than that of GRH. The GRH and SRIH secretory responses to PMA (1 microM), a protein kinase C activator, were similar, though delayed. The results suggest that 1) GRH and SRIH secretion are regulated by both protein kinase A and C pathways, and 2) depolarizing agents are important for the release of both hormones.

  13. Somatostatin system: molecular mechanisms regulating anterior pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Eigler, Tamar; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-08-01

    The somatostatin (SRIF) system, which includes the SRIF ligand and receptors, regulates anterior pituitary gland function, mainly inhibiting hormone secretion and to some extent pituitary tumor cell growth. SRIF-14 via its cognate G-protein-coupled receptors (subtypes 1-5) activates multiple cellular signaling pathways including adenylate cyclase/cAMP, MAPK, ion channel-dependent pathways, and others. In addition, recent data have suggested SRIF-independent constitutive SRIF receptor activity responsible for GH and ACTH inhibition in vitro. This review summarizes current knowledge on ligand-dependent and independent SRIF receptor molecular and functional effects on hormone-secreting cells in the anterior pituitary gland.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section 862.1485 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section 862.1485 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section 862.1485 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  4. Common origin and phylogenetic diversification of animal hormonal systems.

    PubMed

    Bückmann, D

    1987-01-01

    The comparative view leads to the following main conclusions: Hormones are intercellular messengers in multicellular organisms. However, the receptor mechanism, the ability of forming receptors to substances in the cell's environment and the ability to synthesize most of the substances which serve as hormones in metazoans, are present in unicellular organisms, too. The main achievement of multicellular organisms in evolving hormonal mechanisms is due to their ability of differentiation. Though the whole genome and the ability to synthesize certain substances is, in principle, common to all body cells, the forming of certain substances and the ability to react to them in a certain way is delegated to certain cell groups only. This may be common to many intercellular messenger substances such as chalons, prostaglandins, morphogenetic and tissue-specific growth substances. A special feature in hormonal systems is that the two sites of release and reaction are distinct and are located at a distance from each other. Possibly this is the main or even the only difference from other intercellular messengers. However, it is of great functional importance because it enables hormones to control the temporal coordination of entirely different processes in different tissues located at a distance from each other or distributed all over the body. This feature is common to all compounds presently known as hormones. While the localization of receptors in target cells, as well as the nature of the releasing tissue or the mode of transport through the blood, may be too marrow borders for a definition (for instance in animal groups without a closed blood circulation system) the fact that there is transport over a distance is not. The fact that release and reaction sites are located at a distance from each other within the multicellular body may serve as a definition of "hormones' based on a common phylogenetic root and functional importance. On this common base different animal phyla

  5. The stress hormone system in various sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Lattova, Zuzana; Keckeis, Marietta; Maurovich-Horvat, Eszter; Wetter, Thomas C; Wilde-Frenz, Johanna; Schuld, Andreas; Pollmächer, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-system activity is regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the primary endogenous circadian pacemaker. In addition, sleep plays an important modulatory role. However, data on HPA-system activity in sleep disorders are quite conflicting. A sensitive challenge test to assess negative feedback sensitivity of the HPA-system like the dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing-hormone (DEX/CRH)-test has never been used so far in sleep disorders. Therefore we studied 25 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, 18 restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients, 21 patients with primary insomnia and compared them to 33 healthy controls. The dynamic response of the HPA-system was assessed by the DEX/CRH-test which combines suppression (dexamethasone) and stimulation (CRH) of the stress hormone system. After HPA-axis suppression the number of non-suppressors did not differ among groups indicating normal negative feedback sensitivity. In RLS patients ACTH levels were slightly lower compared to controls while cortisol levels were similar between groups. Following CRH stimulation we did not detect differences in ACTH- or cortisol levels and adrenocortical responsitivity to ACTH was comparable between groups. These results for the first time document normal HPA-system feedback sensitivity in various sleep disorders and suggest that abnormalities of the stress hormone system in affective disorders are unlikely due to concomitant sleep problems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of abnormal anterior pituitary hormones-growth hormone and prolactin in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Shujuan; Huang, Wen; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of anterior pituitary hormones in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains controversial. Aims and Objectives: We determined the expression levels of human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and their receptors in subjects presenting with SLE, and modulation of disease severity. Materials and methods: Forty-seven subjects and ten healthy controls were assessed for possible association between SLE disease activity and levels of serum PRL, GH and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), specific binding and mRNA expression of receptors for GH (GHR), and PRL (PRLR) were determined by receptor-ligand binding assay (RLBA) and RT-PCR. PBMC of recruited subjects were treated with hPRL and rhGH to assess IgG production and antibodies against dsDNA. Results: In active SLE subjects we found elevated PRL and GH levels. Study subject PBMCs displayed augmented GHR and PRLR protein and mRNA expression. Study subjects also showed a positive correlation in serum PRL levels and specific antibodies against dsDNA, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and proteinuria. However, a negative correlation was found between serum PRL levels and complement component C3. We found a positive correlation between specific binding rates of PRLR and GHR and both SLE activity and dsDNA antibody titers. Enhanced IgG and anti-dsDNA secretion was observed in cultured PBMC stimulated by PRL or GH with/without PHA, PWM, IL-2 or IL-10. In active SLE, a close association was found between augmented PRL and GH levels, expression and specific binding activities of PRLR and GHR, and changes in the specific titer of anti-dsDNA. Conclusion: Anterior pituitary hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. High levels of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in pathogenesis of SLE, which is correlated with SLE disease activity and antibodies against dsDNA. The mechanism of GH and PRL in SLE was complicated and should

  7. Thyroid hormones and the cardiovascular system: pathophysiology and interventions.

    PubMed

    Cini, G; Carpi, A; Mechanick, J; Cini, L; Camici, M; Galetta, F; Giardino, R; Russo, M A; Iervasi, G

    2009-12-01

    Thyroid dysfunction, however mild, can significantly affect the cardiovascular (CV) system. The effects of thyroid hormones may be viewed as genomic and non-genomic, with the former occurring over a longer time scale and both affecting structural and functional proteins in CV tissue. As the interplay between thyroid function and the CV system becomes elucidated, particularly in the context of a system biology approach, the heart failure phenotype is better understood. Symptomatology is related to disturbance in inotropic and chronotropic function. Moreover, biochemical changes reflected by thyroid function testing with the non-thyroidal illness syndrome can prognosticate and guide therapy in heart failure. In addition, empiric treatment with thyroid hormone analogues or T3 represent emergent and highly controversial interventions.

  8. Connexin-dependent signaling in neuro-hormonal systems.

    PubMed

    Potolicchio, Ilaria; Cigliola, Valentina; Velazquez-Garcia, Silvia; Klee, Philippe; Valjevac, Amina; Kapic, Dina; Cosovic, Esad; Lepara, Orhan; Hadzovic-Dzuvo, Almira; Mornjacovic, Zakira; Meda, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    The advent of multicellular organisms was accompanied by the development of short- and long-range chemical signalling systems, including those provided by the nervous and endocrine systems. In turn, the cells of these two systems have developed mechanisms for interacting with both adjacent and distant cells. With evolution, such mechanisms have diversified to become integrated in a complex regulatory network, whereby individual endocrine and neuro-endocrine cells sense the state of activity of their neighbors and, accordingly, regulate their own level of functioning. A consistent feature of this network is the expression of connexin-made channels between the (neuro)hormone-producing cells of all endocrine glands and secretory regions of the central nervous system so far investigated in vertebrates. This review summarizes the distribution of connexins in the mammalian (neuro)endocrine systems, and what we know about the participation of these proteins on hormone secretion, the life of the producing cells, and the action of (neuro)hormones on specific targets. The data gathered since the last reviews on the topic are summarized, with particular emphasis on the roles of Cx36 in the function of the insulin-producing beta cells of the endocrine pancreas, and of Cx40 in that of the renin-producing juxta-glomerular epithelioid cells of the kidney cortex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Communicating junctions, composition, structure and characteristics.

  9. Effects of thyroid hormone on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Serafino; Palmieri, Emiliano A; Lombardi, Gaetano; Biondi, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    Increased or reduced action of thyroid hormone on certain molecular pathways in the heart and vasculature causes relevant cardiovascular derangements. It is well established that overt hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state (high cardiac output with low systemic vascular resistance), which is associated with a faster heart rate, enhanced left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function, and increased prevalence of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias - namely, atrial fibrillation - whereas overt hypothyroidism is characterized by the opposite changes. However, whether changes in cardiac performance associated with overt thyroid dysfunction are due mainly to alterations of myocardial contractility or to loading conditions remains unclear. Extensive evidence indicates that the cardiovascular system responds to the minimal but persistent changes in circulating thyroid hormone levels, which are typical of individuals with subclinical thyroid dysfunction. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased heart rate, atrial arrhythmias, increased LV mass, impaired ventricular relaxation, reduced exercise performance, and increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with impaired LV diastolic function and subtle systolic dysfunction and an enhanced risk for atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. Because all cardiovascular abnormalities are reversed by restoration of euthyroidism ("subclinical hypothyroidism") or blunted by beta-blockade and L-thyroxine (L-T4) dose tailoring ("subclinical hyperthyroidism"), timely treatment is advisable in an attempt to avoid adverse cardiovascular effects. Interestingly, some data indicate that patients with acute and chronic cardiovascular disorders and those undergoing cardiac surgery may have altered peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism that, in turn, may contribute to altered cardiac function. Preliminary clinical investigations suggest that administration of

  10. Ammonia: its effects on biological systems, metabolic hormones, and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Visek, W J

    1984-03-01

    The physical, chemical properties of ammonia, its sources and detoxification, its effects in biological systems, its influence upon insulin action and glucose metabolism, and its possible effects on reproduction are discussed. Present chemical methods do not distinguish nonionic from ionic forms. At physiological pH, nonionic ammonia concentrations remain low but are primarily responsible for toxic effects. Thus, biologically significant changes of ammonia concentrations may not be revealed by determinations of ammonia in blood plasma. For these and other reasons the subacute toxicity of ammonia often is unrecognized, and its effects on intermediary metabolism and the hormonal milieu in normal and disease states remain poorly understood. Effects of ammonia may be stimulatory at low concentrations and inhibitory as concentrations rise or exposure is extended. Extensive experiments in eight ureotelic species, including man, show that urinary excretion of orotic acid becomes significantly elevated when the quantity of ammonia presented to the liver exceeds the capacity for normal detoxification. Present evidence with arginine and other intermediates of the urea cycle suggest that these substances influence glucose metabolism and insulin action. Recent studies of dairy cattle provide speculative evidence that high protein feeding or forms of protein that lead to elevated ammonia concentrations in tissue decrease conception rates and increase the calving to conception interval of dairy cows. Limited data concerning luteinizing hormone concentrations and steroid hormone metabolism are insufficient to establish whether differences in reproductive performance are due to changes of hormonal physiology, intrauterine environment, or metabolism.

  11. Modeling the Nonlinear Time Dynamics of Multidimensional Hormonal Systems*

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Daniel M.; Wang, Xin; Pincus, Steven M.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.

    2012-01-01

    In most hormonal systems (as well as many physiological systems more generally), the chemical signals from the brain, which drive much of the dynamics, can not be observed in humans. By the time the molecules reach peripheral blood, they have been so diluted so as to not be assayable. It is not possible to invasively (surgically) measure these agents in the brain. This creates a difficult situation in terms of assessing whether or not the dynamics may have changed due to disease or aging. Moreover, most biological feedforward and feedback interactions occur after time delays, and the time delays need to be properly estimated. We address the following two questions: (1) Is it possible to devise a combination of clinical experiments by which, via exogenous inputs, the hormonal system can be perturbed to new steady-states in such a way that information about the unobserved components can be ascertained; and, (2) Can one devise methods to estimate (possibly, time-varying) time delays between components of a multidimensional nonlinear time series, which are more robust than traditional methods? We present methods for both questions, using the Stress (ACTH-cortisol) hormonal system as a prototype, but the approach is more broadly applicable. PMID:22977290

  12. Regulation of the Immune System by Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-14

    mechanisms of lymphokine induction. @• Depletion of macrophages from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) caused a marked decrease in...Harbour- McMenamin , D.V., E.M. Smith and J.E. Blalock. 1985. Endotoxin induction of leukocyte-derived proopiomelanocortin related peptides. Infect. immun...48:813-817. 3. Blalock, J.E., D.V. McMenamin , and E.M. Smith. 1985. Peptide hormones shared by the neuroendocrine and immune systems. J Immunol. 135

  13. Genomics, transcriptomics, and peptidomics of neuropeptides and protein hormones in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Predel, Reinhard; Neupert, Susanne; Hauser, Frank; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Verleyen, Peter; Schoofs, Liliane; Schachtner, Joachim; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J.P.; Park, Yoonseong

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides and protein hormones are ancient molecules that mediate cell-to-cell communication. The whole genome sequence from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, along with those from other insect species, provides an opportunity to study the evolution of the genes encoding neuropeptide and protein hormones. We identified 41 of these genes in the Tribolium genome by using a combination of bioinformatic and peptidomic approaches. These genes encode >80 mature neuropeptides and protein hormones, 49 peptides of which were experimentally identified by peptidomics of the central nervous system and other neuroendocrine organs. Twenty-three genes have orthologs in Drosophila melanogaster: Sixteen genes in five different groups are likely the result of recent gene expansions during beetle evolution. These five groups contain peptides related to antidiuretic factor-b (ADF-b), CRF-like diuretic hormone (DH37 and DH47 of Tribolium), adipokinetic hormone (AKH), eclosion hormone, and insulin-like peptide. In addition, we found a gene encoding an arginine-vasopressin-like (AVPL) peptide and one for its receptor. Both genes occur only in Tribolium and not in other holometabolous insects with a sequenced genome. The presence of many additional osmoregulatory peptides in Tribolium agrees well with its ability to live in very dry surroundings. In contrast to these extra genes, there are at least nine neuropeptide genes missing in Tribolium, including the genes encoding the prepropeptides for corazonin, kinin, and allatostatin-A. The cognate receptor genes for these three peptides also appear to be absent in the Tribolium genome. Our analysis of Tribolium indicates that, during insect evolution, genes for neuropeptides and protein hormones are often duplicated or lost. PMID:18025266

  14. Muscle Directs Diurnal Energy Homeostasis through a Myokine-Dependent Hormone Module in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao; Karpac, Jason

    2017-07-10

    Inter-tissue communication is critical to control organismal energy homeostasis in response to temporal changes in feeding and activity or external challenges. Muscle is emerging as a key mediator of this homeostatic control through consumption of lipids, carbohydrates, and amino acids, as well as governing systemic signaling networks. However, it remains less clear how energy substrate usage tissues, such as muscle, communicate with energy substrate storage tissues in order to adapt with diurnal changes in energy supply and demand. Using Drosophila, we show here that muscle plays a crucial physiological role in promoting systemic synthesis and accumulation of lipids in fat storage tissues, which subsequently impacts diurnal changes in circulating lipid levels. Our data reveal that the metabolic transcription factor Foxo governs expression of the cytokine unpaired 2 (Upd2) in skeletal muscle, which acts as a myokine to control glucagon-like adipokinetic hormone (AKH) secretion from specialized neuroendocrine cells. Circulating AKH levels in turn regulate lipid homeostasis in fat body/adipose and the intestine. Our data also reveal that this novel myokine-dependent hormone module is critical to maintain diurnal rhythms in circulating lipids. This tissue crosstalk provides a putative mechanism that allows muscle to integrate autonomous energy demand with systemic energy storage and turnover. Together, these findings reveal a diurnal inter-tissue signaling network between muscle and fat storage tissues that constitutes an ancestral mechanism governing systemic energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Alcohol inhibits luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release by activating the endocannabinoid system

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Solari, Javier; Scorticati, Camila; Mohn, Claudia; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Billi, Silvia; Franchi, Ana; McCann, Samuel M.; Rettori, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    We hypothesized that ethanol (EtOH) might act through the endocannabinoid system to inhibit luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) release. Therefore, we examined the mechanism by which EtOH and anandamide (AEA), an endogenous cannabinoid, inhibit LHRH release from incubated medial basal hypothalamic explants. In previous work, we demonstrated that EtOH inhibits the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-stimulated release of LHRH by increasing the release of two neurotransmitters: β-endorphin and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In the present work, bicuculline, a GABAergic antagonist, completely prevented the inhibition of AEA (10-9M) on N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced LHRH release, but naltrexone, a μ-opioid receptor antagonist, had no effect. AEA also significantly increased GABA release but had no effect on β-endorphin release. Therefore, AEA could inhibit LHRH release by increasing GABA but not β-endorphin release. Because EtOH and AEA acted similarly to inhibit LHRH release, we investigated whether both substances would affect the adenylate cyclase activity acting through the same GTP-coupled receptors, the cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1-rs). AEA and EtOH (10-1M) reduced the forskolin-stimulated accumulation of cAMP, but AM251, a specific antagonist of CB1-r, significantly blocked that inhibition. Additionally we investigated whether CB1-r is involved in the inhibition of LHRH by EtOH and AEA. AEA and EtOH reduced forskolin-stimulated LHRH release, but AM251 significantly blocked that inhibition. Also, we demonstrated that EtOH did not act by increasing AEA synthase activity to inhibit LHRH release in our experimental conditions. Therefore, our results indicate that EtOH inhibits the release of LHRH acting through the endocannabinoid system. PMID:14981261

  16. The stress response and immune system share, borrow, and reconfigure their physiological network elements: Evidence from the insects.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Shelley A

    2017-02-01

    The classic biomedical view is that stress hormone effects on the immune system are largely pathological, especially if the stress is chronic. However, more recent interpretations have focused on the potential adaptive function of these effects. This paper examines stress response-immune system interactions from a physiological network perspective, using insects because of their simpler physiology. For example, stress hormones can reduce disease resistance, yet activating an immune response results in the release of stress hormones in both vertebrates and invertebrates. From a network perspective, this phenomenon is consistent with the 'sharing' of the energy-releasing ability of stress hormones by both the stress response and the immune system. Stress-induced immunosuppression is consistent with the stress response 'borrowing' molecular components from the immune system to increase the capacity of stress-relevant physiological processes (i.e. a trade off). The insect stress hormones octopamine and adipokinetic hormone can also 'reconfigure' the immune system to help compensate for the loss of some of the immune system's molecular resources (e.g. apolipophorin III). This view helps explain seemingly maladaptive interactions between the stress response and immune system. The adaptiveness of stress hormone effects on individual immune components may be apparent only from the perspective of the whole organism. These broad principles will apply to both vertebrates and invertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... Learn About Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ...

  18. Multigenic control of thyroid hormone functions in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Jacques; Celi, Francesco S.; Ng, Lily; Forrest, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Summary Thyroid hormone (TH) has a remarkable range of actions in the development and function of the nervous system. A multigenic picture is emerging of the mechanisms that specify these diverse functions in target tissues. Distinct responses are mediated by α and β isoforms of TH receptor which act as ligand-regulated transcription factors. Receptor activity can be regulated at several levels including that of uptake of TH ligand and the activation or inactivation of ligand by deiodinase enzymes in target tissues. Processes under the control of TH range from learning and anxiety-like behaviour to sensory function. At the cellular level, TH controls events as diverse as axonal outgrowth, hippocampal synaptic activity and the patterning of opsin photopigments necessary for colour vision. Overall, TH coordinates this variety of events in both central and sensory systems to promote the function of the nervous system as a complete entity. PMID:18448240

  19. Contraceptive efficacy of the personal hormone monitoring system Persona.

    PubMed

    Trussell, J

    1999-07-01

    This is a commentary on the contraceptive effectiveness of the personal hormone-monitoring system Persona; it points out the various errors committed in computing method pregnancy rates. The modifications presented by Bonnar et al. on the incorrect procedure for computing method pregnancy rates are criticized as erroneous because the denominator includes cycles in which there is no risk of a method pregnancy according to the authors' algorithm for classifying pregnancy in an imperfect-use cycle. It is also claimed that the new exercise is a more complicated and less accurate way of computing for pregnancy rates by comparison with the simpler alternative. Since this new algorithm, used in the Persona system, is based on flawed logic, the annual risk of pregnancy is actually higher than the estimated 6% among women using Persona and having intercourse in each cycle except on red days.

  20. The hormonal system of the unicellular Tetrahymena: a review with evolutionary aspects.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2012-06-01

    The unicellular ciliate, Tetrahymena has receptors for hormones of the higher ranked animals, these hormones (e.g. insulin, triiodothyronine, ACTH, histamine, etc.) are also produced by it and it has signal pathways and second messengers for signal transmission. These components are chemically and functionally very similar to that of mammalian ones. The exogenously given hormones regulate different functions, as movement, phagocytosis, chemotaxis, cell growth, secretion, excretion and the cells' own hormone production. The receptors are extremely sensitive, certain hormones are sensed (and response is provoked) at 10-21 M concentration, which makes likely that the function could work by the effect of hormones produced by the Tetrahymena itself. The signal reception is selective, it can differentiate between closely related hormones. The review is listing the hormones produced by the Tetrahymena, the receptors which can receive signals and the signal pathways and second messengers as well, as the known effects of mammalian hormones to the life functions of Tetrahymena. The possible and justified role of hormonal system in the Tetrahymena as a single cell and inside the Tetrahymena population, as a community is discussed. The unicellular hormonal system and mammalian endocrine system are compared and evolutionary conclusions are drawn.

  1. Mechanisms of crosstalk between endocrine systems: regulation of sex steroid hormone synthesis and action by thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are well-known regulators of development and metabolism in vertebrates. There is increasing evidence that THs are also involved in gonadal differentiation and reproductive function. Changes in TH status affect sex ratios in developing fish and frogs and reproduction (e.g., fertility), hormone levels, and gonad morphology in adults of species of different vertebrates. In this review, we have summarized and compared the evidence for cross-talk between the steroid hormone and thyroid axes and present a comparative model. We gave special attention to TH regulation of sex steroid synthesis and action in both the brain and gonad, since these are important for gonad development and brain sexual differentiation and have been studied in many species. We also reviewed research showing that there is a TH system, including receptors and enzymes, in the brains and gonads in developing and adult vertebrates. Our analysis shows that THs influences sex steroid hormone synthesis in vertebrates, ranging from fish to pigs. This concept of crosstalk and conserved hormone interaction has implications for our understanding of the role of THs in reproduction, and how these processes may be dysregulated by environmental endocrine disruptors.

  2. The cardiovascular system in growth hormone excess and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, G; Di Somma, C; Grasso, L F S; Savanelli, M C; Colao, A; Pivonello, R

    2012-12-01

    The clinical conditions associated with GH excess and GH deficiency (GHD) are known to be associated with an increased risk for the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, suggesting that either an excess or a deficiency in GH and/or IGF-I is deleterious for cardiovascular system. In patients with acromegaly, chronic GH and IGF-I excess commonly causes a specific cardiomyopathy characterized by a concentric cardiac hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction and, in later stages, with systolic dysfunction ending in heart failure if GH/IGF-I excess is not controlled. Abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and anomalies of cardiac valves can also occur. Moreover, the increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance, as well as dyslipidemia, confer an increased risk for vascular atherosclerosis. Successful control of the disease is accompanied by a decrease of the cardiac mass and improvement of cardiac function and an improvement in cardiovascular risk factors. In patients with hypopituitarism, GHD has been considered the under- lying factor of the increased mortality when appropriate standard replacement of the pituitary hormones deficiencies is given. Either childhood-onset or adulthood-onset GHD are characterized by a cluster of abnormalities associated with an increased cardiovascular risk, including altered body composition, unfavorable lipid profile, insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction and vascular atherosclerosis, a decrease in cardiac mass together with an impairment of systolic function mainly after exercise. Treatment with recombinant GH in patients with GHD is followed by an improvement of the cardiovascular risk factors and an increase in cardiac mass together with an improvement in cardiac performance. In conclusion, acromegaly and GHD are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the control of GH/IGF-I secretion reverses cardiovascular

  3. The rat mammary gland: morphologic changes as an indicator of systemic hormonal perturbations induced by xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Julia N; Rudmann, Daniel G; Credille, Kelly M; Irizarry, Armando R; Peter, Augustine; Snyder, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    The development and morphology of the rat mammary gland are dependent upon several hormones including estrogens, androgens, progesterone, growth hormone and prolactin. In toxicology studies, treatment with xenobiotics may alter these hormones resulting in changes in the morphology of reproductive tissues such as the mammary gland. In the rat, male and female mammary glands exhibit striking morphologic differences that can be altered secondary to hormonal perturbations. Recognizing these morphologic changes can help the pathologist predict potential xenobiotic-induced perturbations in the systemic hormonal milieu. This review examines the development of the rat mammary gland and the influence of sex hormones on the morphology of the adult male and female rat mammary gland. Specific case examples from the literature and data from our laboratory highlight the dynamic nature of the rat mammary gland in response to hormonal changes.

  4. Distribution of PER protein, pigment-dispersing hormone, prothoracicotropic hormone, and eclosion hormone in the cephalic nervous system of insects.

    PubMed

    Závodská, Radka; Sauman, Ivo; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2003-04-01

    Investigations performed on adult insects revealed that putative components of the central pacemaker, the protein Period (PER) and the pigment-dispersing hormone (PDH), are immunocytochemically detectable in discrete sets of brain neurons throughout the class of Insecta, represented by a bristletail, mayfly, damselfly, 2 locust species, stonefly, 2 bug species, goldsmith beetle, caddisfly, honeybee, and 2 blowfly species. The PER-positive cells are localized in the frontal protocerebrum and in most species also in the optic lobes, which are their only location in damselfly and goldsmith beetle. Additional PER-positive cells occur in a few species either in the deuto- and tritocerebrum or in the suboesophageal ganglion. The PER staining was always confined to the cytoplasm. The PDH immunoreactivity consistently occurs in a cluster of perikarya located frontoventrally at the proximal edge of the medulla. The mayfly and both locust species possess additional PDH neurons in 2 posterior cell clusters at the proximal edge of the medulla, and mayfly, waterstrider, and 1 of the blowfly species in the central brain. PDH-positive fibers form a fanlike arrangement over the frontal side of the medulla. Two or just 1 bundle of PDH-positive fibers run from the optic lobe to the protocerebrum, with collaterals passing over to the contralateral optic lobe. Antisera to the prothoracicotropic (PTTH) and the eclosion (EH) hormones, which in some insects regulate the molting and ecdysis rhythms, respectively, typically react with a few neurons in the frontal protocerebrum. However, the PTTH-positive neurons of the mayfly and the damselfly and the EH-positive neurons of the caddisfly are located in the suboesophageal ganglion. No PTTH-like antigen was detected in locusts, and no EH-like antigens were detected in the damselfly, stonefly, locusts, and the honeybee. There are no signs of co-localization of the PER-, PDH-, PTTH-, and EH-like antigens in identical neurons.

  5. Water scorpions (Heteroptera, Nepidae) and giant water bugs (Heteroptera, Belostomatidae): sources of new members of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone family.

    PubMed

    Gäde, Gerd; Simek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2007-07-01

    Two novel octapeptide members of the AKH/RPCH family have been identified from the corpora cardiaca (CC) of two species of water bugs. The giant water bug Lethocerus indicus (family: Belostomatidae) contains a peptide code-named Letin-AKH with the sequence pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Tyr-Trp amide, and the water scorpion Nepa cinerea (family: Nepidae) has the peptide code-named Nepci-AKH with the sequence pGlu-Leu/Ile-Asn-Phe-Ser-Ser-Gly-Trp amide. The sequences were deduced from the multiple MS(N) electrospray mass data from crude CC extracts. Synthetic peptides were made and co-elution on reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with the natural peptide from crude gland extract confirmed the accuracy of the deduced sequence for Letin-AKH and demonstrated that Nepci-AKH contains a Leu residue at position 2 and not an Ile residue. A previously characterized member of the AKH/RPCH family was identified in the stick water scorpion Ranatra linearis by mass spectrometry: Grybi-AKH (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide) has the same mass (919 Da) as Nepci-AKH and differs in two positions from Nepci-AKH (residues 2 and 6). The apparent function of the peptides is to achieve lipid mobilization in the species under investigation; indications for this came from conspecific bioassays using the appropriate synthetic peptides for injecting into the insects. This function is very likely linked to dispersal flight metabolism of water bugs. Swimming activity in N. cinerea also results in an increase in lipid concentration in the hemolymph.

  6. Comparative peptidomics of four related hemipteran species: Pyrokinins, myosuppressin, corazonin, adipokinetic hormone, sNPF, and periviscerokinins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We performed the first comprehensive peptidomic analysis of neurohormones from hemipteran insects by analyzing the neuropeptides of two major neurohemal organs, namely the corpora cardiaca and abdominal perisympathetic organs. For the experiments we selected four related species of polyphagous stin...

  7. Impact of Endocrine Disruptors on the Thyroid Hormone System.

    PubMed

    Gutleb, Arno C; Cambier, Sébastien; Serchi, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone (TH) system plays a central role in central physiological processes of many species, including mammals and humans, ranging from growth and cell differentiation, energy metabolism, thermoregulation and phasing of hibernation or annual movements of migratory species, metamorphosis from larvae to adult forms, brain development, reproduction, or the cardiovascular system. Several chemicals are known to be TH-disrupting compounds (THDCs) and have been shown to interact with virtually all elements of TH homeostasis such as feedback mechanisms with the hypothalamus-pituitary axis, TH synthesis, TH storage and release from the thyroid gland, transport protein binding and TH distribution in tissues and organs, cellular TH uptake, intracellular TH metabolism, and TH receptor binding. Therefore, chemicals interfering with the TH homeostasis have the potential to interact with many of these important processes, and especially early-life stage exposure results in permanent alterations of tissue organization and homeostatic regulation of adaptive processes. This is not only of theoretical importance as the reported plasma concentrations of THDCs in human plasma fall well within the range of reported in vitro effect concentrations, and this is of even higher importance as the developing fetus and young children are in a sensitive developmental stage. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Pulsatile Release of Parathyroid Hormone from an Implantable Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohua; Pettway, Glenda J.; McCauley, Laurie K.; Ma, Peter X.

    2007-01-01

    Intermittent (pulsatile) administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) is known to improve bone micro-architecture, mineral density and strength. Therefore, daily injection of PTH has been clinically used for the treatment of osteoporosis. However, this regimen of administration is not convenient and is not a favorable choice of patients. In this study, an implantable delivery system has been developed to achieve pulsatile release of PTH. A well-defined cylindrical device was first fabricated with a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic acid) (PLLA), using a reverse solid free form fabrication technique. Three-component polyanhydrides composed of sebacic acid, 1,3-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy) propane and poly(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and used as isolation layers. The polyanhydride isolation layers and PTH-loaded alginate layers were then stacked alternately within the delivery device. The gap between the stacked PTH-releasing core and the device frame was filled with PLLA to seal. Multi-pulse PTH release was achieved using the implantable device. The lag time between two adjacent pulses were modulated by the composition and the film thickness of the polyanhydride. The released PTH was demonstrated to be biologically active using an in vitro assay. Timed sequential release of multiple drugs has also been demonstrated. The implantable device holds promise for both systemic and local therapies. PMID:17576005

  9. Hormones in the immune system and their possible role. A critical review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2014-09-01

    Immune cells synthesize, store and secrete hormones, which are identical with the hormones of the endocrine glands. These are: the POMC hormones (ACTH, endorphin), the thyroid system hormones (TRH, TSH, T3), growth hormone (GH), prolactin, melatonin, histamine, serotonin, catecholamines, GnRH, LHRH, hCG, renin, VIP, ANG II. This means that the immune cells contain all of the hormones, which were searched at all and they also have receptors for these hormones. From this point of view the immune cells are similar to the unicells (Tetrahymena), so it can be supposed that these cells retained the properties characteristic at a low level of phylogeny while other cells during the evolution accumulated to form endocrine glands. In contrast to the glandular endocrine cells, immune cells are polyproducers and polyreceivers. As they are mobile cells, they are able to transport the stored hormone to different places (packed transport) or attracted by local factors, accumulate in the neighborhood of the target, synthesizing and secreting hormones locally. This is taking place, e.g. in the case of endorphin, where the accumulating immune cells calms pain caused by the inflammation. The targeted packed transport is more economical than the hormone-pouring to the blood circulation of glandular endocrines and the targeting also cares the other receptor-bearing cells timely not needed the effect. Mostly the immune-effects of immune-cell derived hormones were studied (except endorphin), however, it is not exactly cleared, while the system could have scarcely studied important roles in other cases. The evolutionary aspects and the known as well, as possible roles of immune-endocrine system and their hormones are listed and discussed.

  10. MODULATION OF GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTOR ABUNDANCE AND FUNCTION: ROLES FOR THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Stuart J.; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Growth hormone plays an important role in regulating numerous functions in vertebrates. Several pathways that negatively regulate the magnitude and duration of its signaling (including expression of tyrosine phosphatases, SOCS and PIAS proteins) are shared between signaling induced by growth hormone itself and by other cytokines. Here we overview downregulation of the growth hormone receptor as the most specific and potent mechanism of restricting cellular responses to growth hormone and analyze the role of several proteolytic systems and, specifically, ubiquitin-dependent pathways in this regulation. PMID:18586085

  11. Secretory pattern of GH, TSH, thyroid hormones, ACTH, cortisol, FSH, and LH in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome following systemic injection of the relevant hypothalamic-releasing hormones.

    PubMed

    Riedel, W; Layka, H; Neeck, G

    1998-01-01

    To study the hormonal perturbations in FMS patients we injected sixteen FMS patients and seventeen controls a cocktail of the hypothalamic releasing hormones: Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and observed the hormonal secretion pattern of the pituitary together with the hormones of the peripheral endocrine glands. We found in FMS patients elevated basal values of ACTH and cortisol, lowered basal values of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and of triiodothyronine (T3), elevated basal values of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and lowered basal values of estrogen. Following injection of the four releasing-hormones, we found in FMS patients an augmented response of ACTH, a blunted response of TSH, while the prolactin response was exaggerated. The effects of LHRH stimulation were investigated in six FMS patients and six controls and disclosed a significantly blunted response of LH in FMS. We explain the deviations of hormonal secretion in FMS patients as being caused by chronic stress, which, after being perceived and processed by the central nervous system (CNS), activates hypothalamic CRH neurons. CRH, on the one hand, activates the pituitary-adrenal axis, but also stimulates at the hypothalamic level somatostatin secretion which, in turn, causes inhibition of GH and TSH at the pituitary level. The suppression of gonadal function may also be attributed to elevated CRH by its ability to inhibit hypothalamic LHRH release, although it could act also directly on the ovary by inhibiting FSH-stimulated estrogen production. We conclude that the observed pattern of hormonal deviations in FMS patients is a CNS adjustment to chronic pain and stress, constitutes a specific entity of FMS, and is primarily evoked by activated CRH neurons.

  12. Molecular Analysis of the Developmental and Hormonal Systems Regulating Fruit Ripening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ripening and development of fleshy fruits is regulated by environmental, hormonal and developmental cues. Ethylene is the key ripening hormone of climacteric fruits and can influence ripening in many non-climacteric fruits. Our laboratory uses tomato as a model system to understand ripening re...

  13. The sensory system: More than just a window to the external world.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Christi M; Chung, Brian Y; Pletcher, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    While the traditional importance of the sensory system lies in its ability to perceive external information about the world, emerging discoveries suggest that sensory perception has a greater impact on health and longevity than was previously appreciated. These effects are conserved across species. In this mini-review, we discuss the specific sensory cues that have been identified to significantly impact organismal physiology and lifespan. Ongoing work in the aging field has begun to identify the downstream molecules that mediate the broad effects of sensory signals. Candidates include FOXO, neuropeptide F (NPF), adipokinetic hormone (AKH), dopamine, serotonin, and octopamine. We then discuss the many implications that arise from our current understanding of the effects of sensory perception on health and longevity.

  14. Evaluation of an immunoenzymometric assay (IEMA) using automated system for determination of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, E; Mason, M; Galván, R E; Pascoe, D; Ochoa, R; Hernández, M; Zárate, A

    1997-01-01

    It has been proposed that automated systems for immunoenzymometric assay (IEMA) may substitute traditional radioimmunoassay (RIA) for measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in blood due to the advantage of being more rapid, higher sensitivity, lower cost and not requiring radioactive reagents. The study was designed to evaluate both systems using serum samples to determine luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations. The automatic system (ES-300) for IEMA utilized two monoclonal antibodies, one of them on the solid phase was the specific extractant for the antigen, and the other was a peroxidase labeled antibody which recognizes a different epitope in the antigen molecule, specifically bound in linear proportion to the antigen concentration. Blood samples were obtained from patients who were treated at the hospital for various clinical problems ("problem group") as well as blood samples from patients in whom FSH and LH concentrations were already known ("high", "medium" and "low" levels) by previous RIA ("control group"). IEMA showed a higher sensitivity, 0.42 and 0.96 mIU/ml for FSH and LH, respectively, whereas RIA was 1.95 mIU/ml for both hormones. Intra- and interassay coefficient of variation were below 10% within the range of 15-150 mIU/ml for FSH and 5-100 mIU/ml for LH; however, the coefficient of variation was 15-25% at lower concentrations of FSH and LH. Accuracy of IEMA was evaluated by recovery percentage, thus when high and medium concentrations of FSH and LH were analyzed the recovery was between 99-104%. On the other hand, the recovery was 110% when low levels of FSH and LH were used. In conclusion, IEMA resulted reliable when FSH and LH concentrations are in the middle and high range; likewise, the detection limit of IEMA was lower than RIA, particularly for FSH. On the bases of these results, IEMA showed several advantages over RIA, but its reliability diminishes when serum

  15. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-01-01

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems PMID:27420076

  16. 2,4,6-Tribromophenol Interferes with the Thyroid Hormone System by Regulating Thyroid Hormones and the Responsible Genes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongoh; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2016-07-12

    2,4,6-Tribromophenol (TBP) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR). Based on its affinity for transthyretin, TBP could compete with endogenous thyroid hormone. In this study, the effects of TBP on the thyroid hormone system were assessed in mice. Briefly, animals were exposed to 40 and 250 mg/kg TBP. Thyroid hormones were also administered with or without TBP. When mice were treated with TBP, deiodinase 1 (Dio1) and thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 2 (Thrβ2) decreased in the pituitary gland. The levels of deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and growth hormone (Gh) mRNA increased in response to 250 mg/kg of TBP, and the relative mRNA level of thyroid stimulating hormone β (Tshβ) increased in the pituitary gland. Dio1 and Thrβ1 expression in the liver were not altered, while Dio1 decreased in response to co-treatment with thyroid hormones. The thyroid gland activity decreased in response to TBP, as did the levels of free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine in serum. Taken together, these findings indicate that TBP can disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis and the presence of TBP influenced thyroid actions as regulators of gene expression. These data suggest that TBP interferes with thyroid hormone systems.

  17. GABA and GAD expression in the X-organ sinus gland system of the Procambarus clarkii crayfish: inhibition mediated by GABA between X-organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Polanco, Paola; Garduño, Julieta; Cebada, Jorge; Zarco, Natanael; Segovia, José; Lamas, Mónica; García, Ubaldo

    2011-09-01

    In crustaceans, the X-organ-sinus gland (XO-SG) neurosecretory system is formed of distinct populations of neurons that produce two families of neuropeptides: crustacean hyperglycemic hormone and adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone. On the basis of electrophysiological evidence, it has been proposed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) regulates both electrical and secretory activity of the XO-SG system. In this work we observed that depolarizing current pulses to neurons located in the external rim of the X-organ induced repetitive firing that suppressed the spontaneous firing of previously active X-organ neurons. Picrotoxin reversibly blocked this inhibitory effect suggesting that the GABA released from the stimulated neuron inhibited neighboring cells. Immunoperoxidase in X-organ serial sections showed co-localization of GABA and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) including the aforementioned neurons. Immunofluorescence in whole mount preparations showed that two subpopulations of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-containing neurons colocalized with GABA. The expression of GAD mRNA was determined in crayfish tissue and X-organ single cells by RT-PCR. Bioinformatics analysis shows, within the amplified region, 90.4% consensus and 41.9% identity at the amino acid level compared with Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We suggest that crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-GABA-containing neurons can regulate the excitability of other X-organ neurons that produce different neurohormones.

  18. The role of thyroid hormone signaling in the prevention of digestive system cancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Simmen, Rosalia C M; Simmen, Frank A

    2013-08-06

    Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations have examined its role in the occurrence and progression of cancers in various tissues of this organ system. The present review summarizes current findings regarding the effects of thyroid hormone signaling on cancers of the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and colon. Particular attention is given to the roles of different thyroid hormone receptor isoforms, the novel integrin αVβ3 receptor, and thyroid hormone-related nutrients as possible protective agents and therapeutic targets. Future investigations geared towards a better understanding of thyroid hormone signaling in digestive system cancers may provide preventive or therapeutic strategies to diminish risk, improve outcome and avert recurrence in afflicted individuals.

  19. Effects of iodination on the distribution of peptide hormones in aqueous two-phase polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Desbuquois, B; Aurbach, G D

    1974-10-01

    1. The effect of iodination on the distribution of peptide hormones into the aqueous two-phase dextran-polyethylene glycol system and on the solubility of these hormones in aqueous polyethylene glycol and in water was assessed. Hormones that were studied included insulin, glucagon and parathyroid hormone. 2. The partition coefficient of native insulin in the dextran-polyethylene glycol system showed a minimum (about 1) near the isoelectric point of the hormone (pH 5). Partial iodination of insulin (one atom per molecule) caused little change in the distribution of the hormone. More extensive iodination markedly decreased the partition coefficient in the region of the isoelectric point and displaced the pH value at which the partition coefficient was a minimum towards lower values. 3. The solubility of native insulin in aqueous polyethylene glycol and in water showed a pH-dependence similar to that observed for the distribution in the dextran-polyethylene glycol system. Iodination of insulin decreased the solubility of the hormone in polyethylene glycol and in water in parallel, and decreased the pH value at which solubility was a minimum. The changes in solubility correlated with the degree of iodination and accounted for the changes in distribution observed at high concentrations of insulin. 4. Comparable effects of iodination on distribution and solubility were also observed with glucagon. 5. At concentrations of insulin below its maximum solubility, serum proteins caused a decrease in the partition coefficient of iodinated hormone, but not of native hormone. These effects correlated with the degree of iodination and resulted from a co-precipitation of iodinated insulin with serum proteins.

  20. Effects of spaceflight on hypothalamic peptide systems controlling pituitary growth hormone dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1992-01-01

    Possible effects of reduced gravity on central hypophysiotropic systems controlling growth hormone (GH) secretion were investigated in rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellites. Immunohistochemical (IHC)staining for the growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), somatostatin (SS), and other hypothalamic hormones was performed on hypothalami obtained from rats. IHC analysis was complemented by quantitative in situ assessments of mRNAs encoding the precursors for these hormones. Data obtained suggest that exposure to microgravity causes a preferential reduction in GRF peptide and mRNA levels in hypophysiotropic neurons, which may contribute to impared GH secretion in animals subjected to spaceflight. Effects of weightlessness are not mimicked by hindlimb suspension in this system.

  1. Effects of spaceflight on hypothalamic peptide systems controlling pituitary growth hormone dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1992-01-01

    Possible effects of reduced gravity on central hypophysiotropic systems controlling growth hormone (GH) secretion were investigated in rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellites. Immunohistochemical (IHC)staining for the growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), somatostatin (SS), and other hypothalamic hormones was performed on hypothalami obtained from rats. IHC analysis was complemented by quantitative in situ assessments of mRNAs encoding the precursors for these hormones. Data obtained suggest that exposure to microgravity causes a preferential reduction in GRF peptide and mRNA levels in hypophysiotropic neurons, which may contribute to impared GH secretion in animals subjected to spaceflight. Effects of weightlessness are not mimicked by hindlimb suspension in this system.

  2. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    The endocrine system is made up of organs and tissues that produce hormones. Hormones are natural chemicals produced in one ... hormones that control the other structures in the endocrine system. The amount of these regulating hormones stays about ...

  3. Hormones and hibernation: possible links between hormone systems, winter energy balance and white-nose syndrome in bats.

    PubMed

    Willis, Craig K R; Wilcox, Alana

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Hibernation allows mammals to survive in cold climates and during times of reduced food availability. Drastic physiological changes are required to maintain the energy savings that characterize hibernation. These changes presumably enable adjustments in endocrine activity that control metabolism and body temperature, and ultimately influence expression of torpor and periodic arousals. Despite challenges that exist when examining hormonal pathways in small-bodied hibernators, bats represent a potential model taxon for comparative neuroendocrinological studies of hibernation due to their diversity of species and the reliance of many species on heterothermy. Understanding physiological mechanisms underlying hibernation in bats is also important from a conservation physiology perspective due to white-nose syndrome, an emerging infectious disease causing catastrophic mortality among hibernating bats in eastern North America. Here we review the potential influence of three key hormonal mechanisms--leptin, melatonin and glucocorticoids--on hibernation in mammals with an emphasis on bats. We propose testable hypotheses about potential effects of WNS on these systems and their evolution.

  4. Extrapituitary growth hormone in the chicken reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Luna, Maricela; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ahumada-Solórzano, Marisela S; Harvey, Steve; Carranza, Martha; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence shows that growth hormone (GH) expression is not limited to the pituitary, as it can be produced in many other tissues. It is known that growth hormone (GH) plays a role in the control of reproductive tract development. Acting as an endocrine, paracrine and/or autocrine regulator, GH influences proliferation, differentiation and function of reproductive tissues. In this review we substantiate the local expression of GH mRNA and GH protein, as well as the GH receptor (GHR) in both male and female reproductive tract, mainly in the chicken. Locally expressed GH was found to be heterogeneous, with a 17 kDa variant being predominant. GH secretagogues, such as GHRH and TRH co-localize with GH expression in the chicken testis and induce GH release. In the ovarian follicular granulosa cells, GH and GHR are co-expressed and stimulate progesterone production, which was neutralized by a specific GH antibody. Both testicular and follicular cells in primary cultures were able to synthesize and release GH to the culture medium. We also characterized GH and GH mRNA expression in the hen's oviduct and showed that it had 99.6% sequence identity with pituitary GH. Data suggest local reproductive GH may have important autocrine/paracrine effects.

  5. Systemic corazonin signalling modulates stress responses and metabolism in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kubrak, Olga I.; Lushchak, Oleh V.; Zandawala, Meet

    2016-01-01

    Stress triggers cellular and systemic reactions in organisms to restore homeostasis. For instance, metabolic stress, experienced during starvation, elicits a hormonal response that reallocates resources to enable food search and readjustment of physiology. Mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its insect orthologue, adipokinetic hormone (AKH), are known for their roles in modulating stress-related behaviour. Here we show that corazonin (Crz), a peptide homologous to AKH/GnRH, also alters stress physiology in Drosophila. The Crz receptor (CrzR) is expressed in salivary glands and adipocytes of the liver-like fat body, and CrzR knockdown targeted simultaneously to both these tissues increases the fly's resistance to starvation, desiccation and oxidative stress, reduces feeding, alters expression of transcripts of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs), and affects gene expression in the fat body. Furthermore, in starved flies, CrzR-knockdown increases circulating and stored carbohydrates. Thus, our findings indicate that elevated systemic Crz signalling during stress coordinates increased food intake and diminished energy stores to regain metabolic homeostasis. Our study suggests that an ancient stress-peptide in Urbilateria evolved to give rise to present-day GnRH, AKH and Crz signalling systems. PMID:27810969

  6. A lophotrochozoan-specific nuclear hormone receptor is required for reproductive system development in the planarian

    PubMed Central

    Tharp, Marla E.; Collins, James J.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Germ cells of sexually reproducing organisms receive an array of cues from somatic tissues that instruct developmental processes. Although the nature of these signals differs amongst organisms, the importance of germline-soma interactions is a common theme. Recently, peptide hormones from the nervous system have been shown to regulate germ cell development in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea; thus, we sought to investigate a second class of hormones with a conserved role in reproduction, the lipophilic hormones. In order to study these signals, we identified a set of putative lipophilic hormone receptors, known as nuclear hormone receptors, and analyzed their functions in reproductive development. We found one gene, nhr-1, belonging to a small class of functionally uncharacterized lophotrochozoan-specific receptors, to be essential for the development of differentiated germ cells. Upon nhr-1 knockdown, germ cells in the testes and ovaries fail to mature, and remain as undifferentiated germline stem cells. Further analysis revealed that nhr-1 mRNA is expressed in the accessory reproductive organs and is required for their development, suggesting that this transcription factor functions cell non-autonomously in regulating germ cell development. Our studies identify a role for nuclear hormone receptors in planarian reproductive maturation and reinforce the significance of germline-soma interactions in sexual reproduction across metazoans. PMID:25278423

  7. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum group hormone in humans during sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.; Young, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Plasma growth hormone concentrations during sleep were determined experimentally. An elevated level of plasma growth hormone was observed during the initial phase of sleep and remained elevated for approximately 3 hr before returning to the steady-state level. Moreover, subsequent to a prolonged interruption of sleep, of the order of 2-3 hr, an elevated level of plasma growth hormone was again observed during the initial phase of resumed sleep. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum growth hormone in humans was used to account for the growth hormone responses observed.

  8. Transport of Steroid Hormones, Phytoestrogens, and Estrogenic Activity across a Swine Lagoon/Sprayfield System

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Erin E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Williams, C. Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.

    2017-01-01

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet; particularly daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at two months post-application. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a lagoon/sprayfield system, and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system. PMID:25148584

  9. Identification of Thyroid Hormones and Functional Characterization of Thyroid Hormone Receptor in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Provide Insight into Evolution of the Thyroid Hormone System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in development, metamorphosis, and metabolism in vertebrates. During the past century, TH functions were regarded as a synapomorphy of vertebrates. More recently, accumulating evidence has gradually convinced us that TH functions also occur in invertebrate chordates. To date, however, TH-related studies in non-chordate invertebrates have been limited. In this study, THs were qualitatively detected by two reliable methods (HPLC and LC/MS) in a well-studied molluscan species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Quantitative measurement of THs during the development of C. gigas showed high TH contents during embryogenesis and that oyster embryos may synthesize THs endogenously. As a first step in elucidating the TH signaling cascade, an ortholog of vertebrate TH receptor (TR), the most critical gene mediating TH effects, was cloned in C. gigas. The sequence of CgTR has conserved DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains that normally characterize these receptors. Experimental results demonstrated that CgTR can repress gene expression through binding to promoters of target genes and can interact with oyster retinoid X receptor. Moreover, CgTR mRNA expression was activated by T4 and the transcriptional activity of CgTR promoter was repressed by unliganded CgTR protein. An atypical thyroid hormone response element (CgDR5) was found in the promoter of CgTR, which was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). These results indicated that some of the CgTR function is conserved. However, the EMSA assay showed that DNA binding specificity of CgTR was different from that of the vertebrate TR and experiments with two dual-luciferase reporter systems indicated that l-thyroxine, 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine, and triiodothyroacetic acid failed to activate the transcriptional activity of CgTR. This is the first study to functionally characterize TR in mollusks. The presence of THs and the functions of CgTR in mollusks

  10. Identification of Thyroid Hormones and Functional Characterization of Thyroid Hormone Receptor in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Provide Insight into Evolution of the Thyroid Hormone System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Xu, Fei; Qu, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Li, Li; Que, Huayong; Zhang, Guofan

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in development, metamorphosis, and metabolism in vertebrates. During the past century, TH functions were regarded as a synapomorphy of vertebrates. More recently, accumulating evidence has gradually convinced us that TH functions also occur in invertebrate chordates. To date, however, TH-related studies in non-chordate invertebrates have been limited. In this study, THs were qualitatively detected by two reliable methods (HPLC and LC/MS) in a well-studied molluscan species, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Quantitative measurement of THs during the development of C. gigas showed high TH contents during embryogenesis and that oyster embryos may synthesize THs endogenously. As a first step in elucidating the TH signaling cascade, an ortholog of vertebrate TH receptor (TR), the most critical gene mediating TH effects, was cloned in C. gigas. The sequence of CgTR has conserved DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains that normally characterize these receptors. Experimental results demonstrated that CgTR can repress gene expression through binding to promoters of target genes and can interact with oyster retinoid X receptor. Moreover, CgTR mRNA expression was activated by T4 and the transcriptional activity of CgTR promoter was repressed by unliganded CgTR protein. An atypical thyroid hormone response element (CgDR5) was found in the promoter of CgTR, which was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). These results indicated that some of the CgTR function is conserved. However, the EMSA assay showed that DNA binding specificity of CgTR was different from that of the vertebrate TR and experiments with two dual-luciferase reporter systems indicated that l-thyroxine, 3,3',5-triiodothyronine, and triiodothyroacetic acid failed to activate the transcriptional activity of CgTR. This is the first study to functionally characterize TR in mollusks. The presence of THs and the functions of CgTR in mollusks contribute

  11. A Hybrid Systems Approach to Hormonal Therapy of Prostate Cancer and its Nonlinear Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Gouhei; Suzuki, Taiji; Hirata, Yoshito

    2007-07-13

    This talk is to review our recent work on mathematical modeling of prostate cancer and its application to hormonal therapy of intermittent androgen suppression. First, we model the tumor growth of prostate cancer composed of a mixed dynamical assembly of androgen-dependent and androgen-independent cancer cells. Then, we introduce the intermittent androgen suppression to the model as feedback control with monitoring the serum prostate-specific antigen, where the controlled model is described as a hybrid system with continuous and discrete variables. Next, we analyze nonlinear dynamics and bifurcations of the hybrid system. Finally, we discuss a possibility to improve the hormonal therapy.

  12. Is immune system-related hypertension associated with ovarian hormone deficiency?

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Kathryn; Ji, Hong; Einstein, Gillian; Au, April; Hay, Meredith

    2016-03-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review summarizes recent data on the role of ovarian hormones and sex in inflammation-related hypertension. What advances does it highlight? The adaptive immune system has recently been implicated in the development of hypertension in males but not in females. The role of the immune system in the development of hypertension in women and its relationship to ovarian hormone production are highlighted. The immune system is known to contribute to the development of high blood pressure in males. However, the role of the immune system in the development of high blood pressure in females and the role of ovarian hormones has only recently begun to be studied. In animal studies, both the sex of the host and the T cell are critical biological determinants of susceptibility and resistance to hypertension induced by angiotensin II. In women, natural menopause is known to result in significant changes in the expression of genes regulating the immune system. Likewise, in animal models, ovariectomy results in hypertension and an upregulation in T-cell tumour necrosis factor-α-related genes. Oestrogen replacement results in decreases in inflammatory genes in the brain regions involved in blood pressure regulation. Together, these studies suggest that the response of the adaptive immune system to ovarian hormone deficiency is a significant contributor to hypertension in women. © 2015 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  13. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-07

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system.

  14. [Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy and the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Yildirir, Aylin

    2010-03-01

    Women suffer from cardiovascular diseases 10 years later than men, therefore female sex has been considered to be a 'protective factor'. However, the risk in women increases rapidly after menopause and the declining levels of endogenous estrogen is thought to be responsible. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) decreases the severity and intensity of menopausal symptoms and improves women's quality of life. Until the last 10 years, based on the results of observational studies, postmenopausal HRT was thought to protect women against cardiovascular events and decrease the risk of coronary artery disease by 35-50%. However, recent randomized primary and secondary prevention trials did not support the cardioprotective effect of HRT. The different results of observational and randomized controlled trials are discussed to be related to the differences in the study population. The study population in observational and prospective cohort studies included relatively young women at the earlier stages of menopause, whereas studies showing neutral or negative effects of HRT included women older than 50 years old at least 10 years in menopause. Furthermore, the effects of estrogen depend on the state of vascular pathology. In relatively healthy vessels with no or early signs of atherosclerosis, estrogen prevent the development or progression of atherosclerotic lesions, whereas in the presence of established atherosclerotic lesions, estrogen promotes atherosclerosis or may even trigger acute events. Therefore, it is critically important to predict which women can safely receive HRT and which are at increased risk from HRT. Under the light of current knowledge, HRT should not be used for prevention from cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women and the many other preventive strategies, (diet, exercise, blood pressure or cholesterol control) that are proven to be effective but underused, should be kept in mind.

  15. Systemic administration of anorexic gut peptide hormones impairs hedonic-driven sucrose consumption in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Erina; Yasoshima, Yasunobu; Shimura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-15

    A number of reports suggest that gut hormones such as cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and peptide YY(3-36) (PYY3-36), which are released postprandially, suppress homeostatic food intake and result in satiety and the termination of feeding. However, it remains unclear whether these peptide hormones also suppress non-homeostatic consumption of palatable foods or fluids. To examine whether gut hormones reduce hedonically motivated sugar consumption, we assessed the effects of intraperitoneal administration of these gut hormones on the consumption of a highly palatable sucrose solution, using a mouse model we previously established for binge-like sucrose overconsumption (Yasoshima and Shimura, 2015). To reduce homeostatic hunger, chow was available at nighttime prior to testing. After a limited-access training procedure for 10days, during which access to both sucrose and chow were controlled, on the test day, control mice injected with saline consumed significantly more sucrose than during the pre-training period. In contrast, sucrose consumption on the test day in the mice injected with CCK-8 (2 and 4μg/kg), GLP-1 (500 and 1000nmol/kg), or PYY3-36 (12.5 and 25nmol/kg) was significantly less than that in saline-injected mice. In a separate cohort of mice, the higher doses of CCK-8 and GLP-1 and a greater dose of PYY3-36 (50nmol/kg) did not produce conditioned taste aversion to saccharin, suggesting that the doses of exogenous hormones in the present study do not cause aversive visceral distress. The present findings suggest that the systemic administration of these three gut hormones suppresses hedonic-driven sugar consumption due to the anorexic, but not aversive-visceral, effects of these hormones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Establishment of transactivation assay systems using fish, amphibian, reptilian and human thyroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Oka, Tomohiro; Mitsui-Watanabe, Naoko; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Onishi, Yuta; Katsu, Yoshinao; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Ogino, Yukiko; Yatsu, Ryohei; Kohno, Satomi; Takase, Minoru; Kawashima, Yukio; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Aoki, Yasunobu; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2013-09-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the regulation of a wide range of biological processes associated with normal development and metabolism in vertebrates. For the screening of chemicals with a potential thyroid hormone and anti-thyroid hormone activities, we have established transient transactivation assay systems using thyroid hormone receptors (TRα and TRβ) from three frog species (Xenopus laevis, Silurana tropicalis and Rana rugosa), a fish (Oryzias latipes), an alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and a human (Homo sapiens). In all species examined, similar transcriptional activities were found for triiodothyronine (T3 : 10(-11) M in TRα and 10(-10) M in TRβ) and thyroxine (T4 : 10(-9) M in TRα and 10(-8) M in TRβ). Analogs of thyroid hormone (3,5,3',-triiodothyroacetic acid and 3,3',5,5'-tetraiodothyroacetic acid) exhibited weaker activity, requiring 10-fold higher concentrations for induction of activity when compared with T3 and T4 . These results provide support for the usefulness of in vitro screening assay systems as part of an approach to test chemicals for potential thyroid hormone receptor activity. In addition, we observed that T3 -stimulated transcriptional activity of the O. latipes TRα was inhibited by 10(-5) M tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). In contrast, TR antagonist activities on TRα were not encountered in other species, even with TBBPA concentrations at 10(-5) M. In vitro transactivation assay systems using TRs from various species can be used for the screening of chemicals with thyroid-receptor agonist and antagonist activities. They also can be used for studies that examine evolutionary differences among species in the potency of TR activation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1300 - Follicle-stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Follicle-stimulating hormone test system. 862.1300 Section 862.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1300 - Follicle-stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Follicle-stimulating hormone test system. 862.1300 Section 862.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1300 - Follicle-stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Follicle-stimulating hormone test system. 862.1300 Section 862.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1300 - Follicle-stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Follicle-stimulating hormone test system. 862.1300 Section 862.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1300 - Follicle-stimulating hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Follicle-stimulating hormone test system. 862.1300 Section 862.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  2. [Role of gastrointestinal hormones in pathogenesis of functional diseases of the digestive system in adolescent].

    PubMed

    Mosiienko, H P

    2008-01-01

    The author studied concentration of gastrin and holecistokinin in 68 adolescent with functional disease of the digestive system and vegetative dysfunctions. Considerable increase was established in the level of blood plasma gastrin in patients with gastroesophageal reflux and functional dyspepsia associated with increased motor function of the stomach. There is direct interrelation between the level of blood hormones and rate of vegetative dysfunctions and it testifies the role of the neuroendocrine system in the development of diseases of gastrointestinal system in adolescents.

  3. Environmental stressors influencing hormones and systems physiology in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stressors undoubtedly influence organismal biology, specifically the endocrine system that, in turn, impact cattle at the systems physiology level. Despite the significant advances in understanding the genetic determinants of the ideal dairy or beef cow, there is a grave lack of understanding of the systems physiology and effects of the environmental stressors that interfere with the endocrine system. This is a major problem because the lack of such knowledge is preventing advances in understanding gene-environment interactions and developing science-based solutions to these challenges. In this review, we synthesize the current knowledge on the nature of the major environmental stressors, such as climate (heat, cold, wind, and humidity), nutrition (feeds, feeding systems, and endocrine disruptors) and management (housing density and conditions, transportation, weaning practices). We summarize the impact of each one of these factors on cattle at the systems level, and provide solutions for the challenges. PMID:24996419

  4. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Fernández, Iván; Sánchez-Guzmán, María J; Jung, Sabine C; Pascual, Jose A; Pozo, María J

    2013-01-01

    Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defense response that is effective against a broad-spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defense signaling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms [induced systemic resistance (ISR)]. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR) is believed to involve a wider variety of signaling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defense-related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA), and the peptide prosystemin (PS) evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA, and ABA signaling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone-related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defense responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development.

  5. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Fernández, Iván; Sánchez-Guzmán, María J.; Jung, Sabine C.; Pascual, Jose A.; Pozo, María J.

    2013-01-01

    Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defense response that is effective against a broad-spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defense signaling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms [induced systemic resistance (ISR)]. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR) is believed to involve a wider variety of signaling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defense-related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA), and abscisic acid (ABA), and the peptide prosystemin (PS) evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA, and ABA signaling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone-related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defense responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development. PMID:23805146

  6. Modulating the function of the immune system by thyroid hormones and thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Jara, Evelyn L; Muñoz-Durango, Natalia; Llanos, Carolina; Fardella, Carlos; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Riedel, Claudia A

    2017-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a close bidirectional communication and regulation between the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Thyroid hormones (THs) can exert responses in various immune cells, e.g., monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells, and lymphocytes, affecting several inflammation-related processes (such as, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species generation, and cytokines production). The interactions between the endocrine and immune systems have been shown to contribute to pathophysiological conditions, including sepsis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and viral infections. Under these conditions, TH therapy could contribute to restoring normal physiological functions. Here we discuss the effects of THs and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on the immune system and the contribution to inflammation and pathogen clearance, as well as the consequences of thyroid pathologies over the function of the immune system.

  7. Is immune system-related hypertension associated with ovarian hormone deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Kathryn; Ji, Hong; Einstein, Gillian; Au, April; Hay, Meredith

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is known to contribute to the development of high blood pressure in males. However, the role of the immune system in the development of high blood pressure in females and the role of ovarian hormones has only recently begun to be studied. In animal studies, both the sex of the host and the T cell are critical biological determinants of susceptibility and resistance to hypertension induced by angiotensin II. In women, natural menopause is known to result in significant changes in the expression of genes regulating the immune system. Likewise, in animal models, ovariectomy results in hypertension and an upregulation in T-cell tumour necrosis factor-α-related genes. Oestrogen replacement results in decreases in inflammatory genes in the brain regions involved in blood pressure regulation. Together, these studies suggest that the response of the adaptive immune system to ovarian hormone deficiency is a significant contributor to hypertension in women. PMID:26419911

  8. Divergent roles for thyroid hormone receptor β isoforms in the endocrine axis and auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Abel, E. Dale; Boers, Mary-Ellen; Pazos-Moura, Carmen; Moura, Egberto; Kaulbach, Helen; Zakaria, Marjorie; Lowell, Bradford; Radovick, Sally; Liberman, M. Charles; Wondisford, Fredric

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) modulate various physiological functions in many organ systems. The TRα and TRβ isoforms are products of 2 distinct genes, and the β1 and β2 isoforms are splice variants of the same gene. Whereas TRα1 and TRβ1 are widely expressed, expression of the TRβ2 isoform is mainly limited to the pituitary, triiodothyronine-responsive TRH neurons, the developing inner ear, and the retina. Mice with targeted disruption of the entire TRβ locus (TRβ-null) exhibit elevated thyroid hormone levels as a result of abnormal central regulation of thyrotropin, and also develop profound hearing loss. To clarify the contribution of the TRβ2 isoform to the function of the endocrine and auditory systems in vivo, we have generated mice with targeted disruption of the TRβ2 isoform. TRβ2-null mice have preserved expression of the TRα and TRβ1 isoforms. They develop a similar degree of central resistance to thyroid hormone as TRβ-null mice, indicating the important role of TRβ2 in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Growth hormone gene expression is marginally reduced. In contrast, TRβ2-null mice exhibit no evidence of hearing impairment, indicating that TRβ1 and TRβ2 subserve divergent roles in the regulation of auditory function. PMID:10430610

  9. Interactions between immune, stress-related hormonal and cardiovascular systems following strenuous physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Danilo; Piarulli, Andrea; Mastorci, Francesca; Sebastiani, Laura; Laurino, Marco; Garbella, Erika; Castagnini, Cinzia; Pellegrini, Silvia; Lubrano, Valter; Bernardi, Giulio; Metelli, Maria; Bedini, Remo; L'abbate, Antonio; Pingitore, Alessandro; Gemignani, Angelo

    2013-09-01

    Physical exercise represents a eustress condition that promotes rapid coordinated adjustments in the immune, stress-related hormonal and cardiovascular systems, for maintaining homeostasis in response to increased metabolic demands. Compared to the tight multisystem coordination during exercise, evidence of between-systems cross talk in the early post exercise is still lacking. This study was aimed at identifying possible interactions between multiple systems following strenuous physical exercise (Ironman race) performed by twenty well-trained triathletes. Cardiac hemodynamics, left ventricle systolic and diastolic function and heart rate variability were measured along with plasma concentrations of immune messengers (cytokines and C-reactive protein) and stress-related hormones (catecholamines and cortisol) both 24h before and within 20 min after the race. Observed changes in antiinflammatory pathways, stress-related hormones and cardiovascular function were in line with previous findings; moreover, correlating parameters' changes (post versus pre-race) highlighted a dependence of cardiovascular function on the post-race biohumoral milieu: in particular, individual post-race variations of heart rate and diastolic function were strongly correlated with individual variations of anti-inflammatory cytokines, while individual baroreflex sensitivity changes were linked to IL-8 increase. Multiple correlations between anti-inflammatory cytokines and catecholamines were also found according with the autonomic regulation of immune function. Observed post-race cytokine and hormone levels were presumptively representative of the increases reached at the effort end while the cardiovascular parameters after the race were measured during the cardiovascular recovery; thus, results suggest that sustained strenuous exercise produced a stereotyped cardiovascular early recovery, whose speed could be conditioned by the immune and stress-related hormonal milieu.

  10. Nongenomic signaling pathways triggered by thyroid hormones and their metabolite 3-iodothyronamine on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Axelband, F; Dias, J; Ferrão, F M; Einicker-Lamas, M

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play a wide range of important physiological activities in almost all organism. As changes in these hormones levels-observed in hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism-promote serious derangements of the cardiovascular system, it is important to know their mechanisms of action. Although the classic genomic actions which are dependent on interaction with nuclear receptors to modulate cardiac myocytes genes expression, there is growing evidence about T(3) and T(4)-triggered nongenomic pathways, resulted from their binding to plasma membrane, cytoplasm, or mitocondrial receptors that leads to a rapidly regulation of cardiac functions. Interestingly both actions converge to amplify thyroid hormone effects on cardiovascular system. T(3) and T(4) nongenomic actions modify inotropic and chronotropic effects, cardiac action potential duration, cardiac growth, and myocyte shape by protein translation through protein kinases-dependent signaling cascades, which include PKA, PKC, PI3K, and MAPK, and changes on ion channels and pumps activity. In respect to the decreased systemic vascular resistance seen in hyperthyroidism, T(3) appears to activate NOS or ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. In addition, a novel biologically active T(4)-derived metabolite has been described, 3-iodothyronamine, T(1)AM, which also acts through membrane receptors to mediate nongenomic cardiac effects. This metabolite influences the physiological manifestations of thyroid hormone actions by inducing opposite effects from those stimulated by T(3) and T(4), such as negative inotropic and chronotropic effects. Therefore, beyond genomic and nongenomic effects of thyroid hormones, it is crucial for there to be an equilibrium between T(3) or T(4) and T(1)AM levels for maintaining cardiac homeostasis.

  11. Systemic application of growth hormone for enhancement of secondary and intramembranous fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Bail, Hermann J; Kolbeck, Stefan; Krummrey, Gert; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Haas, Norbert P; Raschke, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Hormones are known to influence bone metabolism and cellular mechanisms of fracture healing. Recent technologies in molecular biology offer recombinant production of hormones, which makes them applicable for pharmacological use. To investigate the effect of systemic growth hormone (GH) application experiments were performed in micropig animal models. Systemic daily subcutaneous injection of species-specific recombinant GH was investigated in Yucatan micropigs to evaluate the effect on secondary fracture healing in a standardized gap model (1 cm) and on intramembranous bone formation in distraction osteogenesis (DO). Quantitative computed tomography (qCT), biomechanical testing, measurement of systemic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels as well as histomorphometric analyses were performed to investigate differences in regenerate formation. Systemic GH administration significantly increased the torsional stability of the regenerate in comparison to the contralateral side in both experiments. qCT showed accelerated fracture bridging in the GH-treated animals in bone defect healing, while in DO histomorphometry elicited larger callus areas in the case of GH application. Systemic IGF-1 levels were significantly increased in both GH-treated groups. These experiments show that the systemic administration of recombinant GH accelerates fracture healing in standardized animal models. Clinical studies have now been initiated in order to prove the safety and the effectiveness of this therapeutical option.

  12. Evidence for the presence of thyroid stimulating hormone, thyroglobulin and their receptors in Eisenia fetida: a multilevel hormonal interface between the nervous system and the peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Márta; Koza, Anna; Engelmann, Péter; Németh, Péter; Csoknya, Mária

    2006-06-01

    The present study describes the localization and distribution of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TGB) and their receptors in Eisenia fetida (Annelida, Oligochaeta) as revealed by immunohistological methods. Immunopositive neuronal and non-neuronal cells are present in both the central nervous system and some peripheral organs (e.g. foregut and coelomocytes). TSH- and TGB-immunopositive neurons in the various ganglia of the central nervous system are differentially distributed. Most of the immunoreactive cells are found in the suboesophageal ganglion. The stained cells also differ in their shapes (round, oval, pear-shaped) and sizes (small, 12-25 microm; medium, 20-35 microm; large, 30-50 microm). In all ganglia of the central nervous system, TSH-positive neurons additionally show gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunopositivity. Non-neuronal cells also take part in hormone secretion and transport. Elongated TSH-positive cells have been detected in the capsule of the central ganglia and bear granules or vacuoles in areas lacking neurons. Many of capillaries show immunoreactivity for all four tested antibodies in the entire central nervous system and foregut. Among the coelomocytes, granulocytes and eleocytes stain for TSH and its receptor and for TGB but not for thyroid hormone receptor. Most of the granulocytes are large (25-50 microm) but a population of small cells (10-25 microm) are also immunoreactive. None of the coelomocytes stain for GABA. We therefore suggest that the members of this hormone system can modify both metabolism and immune functions in Eisenia. Coelomocytes might be able to secrete, transport and eliminate hormones in this system.

  13. Bifurcation analysis on a hybrid systems model of intermittent hormonal therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Gouhei; Tsumoto, Kunichika; Tsuji, Shigeki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    Hybrid systems are widely used to model dynamical phenomena that are characterized by interplay between continuous dynamics and discrete events. An example of biomedical application is modeling of disease progression of prostate cancer under intermittent hormonal therapy, where continuous tumor dynamics is switched by interruption and reinstitution of medication. In the present paper, we study a hybrid systems model representing intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Intermittent medication with switching between on-treatment and off-treatment periods is intended to possibly prevent a prostatic tumor from developing into a hormone-refractory state and is anticipated as a possible strategy for delaying or hopefully averting a cancer relapse which most patients undergo as a result of long-term hormonal suppression. Clinical efficacy of IAS therapy for prostate cancer is still under investigation but at least worth considering in terms of reduction of side effects and economic costs during off-treatment periods. In the model of IAS therapy, it depends on some clinically controllable parameters whether a relapse of prostate cancer occurs or not. Therefore, we examine nonlinear dynamics and bifurcation structure of the model by exploiting a numerical method to clarify bifurcation sets in the hybrid system. Our results suggest that adjustment of the normal androgen level in combination with appropriate medication scheduling could enhance the possibility of relapse prevention. Moreover, a two-dimensional piecewise-linear system reduced from the original model highlights the origin of nonlinear phenomena specific to the hybrid system.

  14. Building a scientific framework for studying hormonal effects on behavior and on the development of the sexually dimorphic nervous system

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been increasing concern that low-dose exposure to hormonally active chemicals disrupts sexual differentiation of the brain and peripheral nervous system. There also has been active drug development research on the therapeutic potential of hormone therapy on behaviors. T...

  15. Building a scientific framework for studying hormonal effects on behavior and on the development of the sexually dimorphic nervous system

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been increasing concern that low-dose exposure to hormonally active chemicals disrupts sexual differentiation of the brain and peripheral nervous system. There also has been active drug development research on the therapeutic potential of hormone therapy on behaviors. T...

  16. Evaluation of serum thyroid hormones in dogs with systemic inflammatory response syndrome or sepsis.

    PubMed

    Pashmakova, Medora B; Bishop, Micah A; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Barr, James W

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether dogs with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis have derangements in serum thyroid hormone concentrations and to evaluate whether such derangements relate to illness severity or outcome. Prospective observational study. Dogs hospitalized with SIRS or sepsis between May and December 2010 were included. Serum thyroid hormone concentrations were measured in all dogs. Data obtained on admission were used to calculate the Acute Patient Physiologic and Laboratory Evaluation (APPLE) scores. University teaching hospital. Twenty-two consecutive client-owned dogs hospitalized with SIRS or sepsis were enrolled; 18 dogs completed the study and 4 dogs were excluded for incomplete data. Forty-nine healthy dogs owned by volunteers were used as controls. None. Decreased total thyroxine (TT4) concentrations were documented in all septic and 7/9 dogs with SIRS. Free T4 concentrations were decreased, but were within the reference interval in 12/18 dogs with SIRS or sepsis compared to control dogs (P < 0.001). Dogs with increased APPLE(fast) scores were less likely to survive (P = 0.017). Dogs with SIRS or sepsis have derangements in measured serum thyroid hormones. No relationships were identified between thyroid hormone concentrations and survival. The APPLE(fast) score was the only variable predictive of poor outcome. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  17. Iodotyrosine deiodinase, a novel target of environmental halogenated chemicals for disruption of the thyroid hormone system in mammals.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Many synthetic chemicals have been identified as environmental contaminants with activity to disrupt normal function of the thyroid hormone system. Thyroid hormones play important roles in growth, development, differentiation, and basal metabolic homeostasis, as well as in brain development in human fetus and children, and thyroid dysfunction can have very serious consequences, including mental retardation. Environmental chemicals may affect thyroid hormone action in multiple ways, including reduced thyroid hormone synthesis owing to direct toxicity at the thyroid gland, interaction with thyroid hormone receptors and transporters such as transthyretin, and disturbance of thyroid hormone metabolism (e.g., glucuronidation, sulfation and deiodination). In addition, iodotyrosine deiodinase, which is involved in iodide salvage by catalyzing deiodination of iodinated by-products of thyroid hormone production, was recently identified as a possible new target for disruption of thyroid hormone homeostasis by environmental halogenated chemicals. This topic, after briefly summarizing findings on the thyroid hormone-disrupting action of environmental chemicals in mammals, focuses on the effects of environmental halogenated chemicals on iodotyrosine deiodinase activity.

  18. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  19. Integrated Systems View on Networking by Hormones in Arabidopsis Immunity Reveals Multiple Crosstalk for Cytokinin[W

    PubMed Central

    Naseem, Muhammad; Philippi, Nicole; Hussain, Anwar; Wangorsch, Gaby; Ahmed, Nazeer; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Phytohormones signal and combine to maintain the physiological equilibrium in the plant. Pathogens enhance host susceptibility by modulating the hormonal balance of the plant cell. Unlike other plant hormones, the detailed role of cytokinin in plant immunity remains to be fully elucidated. Here, extensive data mining, including of pathogenicity factors, host regulatory proteins, enzymes of hormone biosynthesis, and signaling components, established an integrated signaling network of 105 nodes and 163 edges. Dynamic modeling and system analysis identified multiple cytokinin-mediated regulatory interactions in plant disease networks. This includes specific synergism between cytokinin and salicylic acid pathways and previously undiscovered aspects of antagonism between cytokinin and auxin in plant immunity. Predicted interactions and hormonal effects on plant immunity are confirmed in subsequent experiments with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our dynamic simulation is instrumental in predicting system effects of individual components in complex hormone disease networks and synergism or antagonism between pathways. PMID:22643121

  20. Estrogenic activity and steroid hormones in swine wastewater through a lagoon constructed-wetland system.

    PubMed

    Shappell, Nancy W; Billey, Lloyd O; Forbes, Dean; Matheny, Terry A; Poach, Matthew E; Reddy, Gudigopuram B; Hunt, Patrick G

    2007-01-15

    Anaerobic lagoons and treatment wetlands are used worldwide to treat wastewater from dense livestock production facilities; however, there is very limited data on the hormonal activity of the wastewater effluent produced by these treatment systems. The objectives of this experiment were to measure (1) the hormonal activity of the initial effluent and (2) the effectiveness of a lagoon-constructed wetland treatment system for producing an effluent with a low hormonal activity. Wastewater samples were taken in April, July, and November 2004 and July 2005 from a lagoon-constructed wetland system at a swine farrowing facility. Estrogenic activity (in vitro E-screen assay), 17 beta-estradiol (E2), and testosterone concentrations (LC/MS-MS) were measured. A high correlation was found between estradiol equivalents determined by E-screen and LC/MS-MS (R2 = 0.82). Nutrient removal was measured to ensure that the wetlands were functioning in a manner similar to literature reports. Nutrient removals were typical for treatment wetlands: TKN 59-75% and orthophosphate 0-18%. Wetlands decreased estrogenic activity by 83-93%. Estrone was the most persistent estrogenic compound. Constructed wetlands produced effluents with estrogenic activity below the lowest equivalent E2 concentration known to have an effect on fish (10 ng/L or approximately 37 x 10(-12) M).

  1. The immune system in menopause: pros and cons of hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mimi; Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta; Wira, Charles R

    2014-07-01

    With aging, a general decline in immune function is observed leading to immune-senescence. Several of these changes are gender specific affecting postmenopausal women. Menopause is a normal part of a woman's lifecycle and consists of a series of body changes that can last from one to ten years. It is known that loss of sex hormones due to aging results in a reduction of immune functions. However, there remains a major gap in our understanding regarding the loss of immune functions particularly in the female reproductive tract (FRT) following menopause and the role of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) in protecting against immune senescence. The current review presents an overview of changes in the immune system due to aging, focusing on genital tract immunity in menopausal women and the risks and benefits of using MHT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Menopause'.

  2. [LED LIGHTING AS A FACTOR FOR THE STIMULATION OF THE HORMONE SYSTEM].

    PubMed

    Deynego, V N; Kaptsov, V A

    2015-01-01

    There are considered questions of non-visual effects of blue LED light sources on hormonal systems (cortisol, glucose, insulin) providing the high human performance. In modern conditions hygiene strategy for child and adolescent health strategy was shown to be replaced by a strategy of light stimulation of the hormonal profile. There was performed a systematic analysis of the axis "light stimulus-hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenals-cortisol-glucose-insulin". The elevation of the content of cortisol leads to the increase of the glucose level in the blood and the stimulation of the production of insulin, which can, like excessive consumption of food, give rise to irreversible decline in the number of insulin receptors on the cell surface, and thus--to a steady reduction in the ability of cells to utilize glucose, i.e. to type 2 diabetes or its aggravation.

  3. Thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone in Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation between secondary hypothyroidism and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Shahin, A A; Mostafa, H; Mahmoud, S

    2002-12-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the serum levels of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in addition to antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies and to investigate the correlation between these hormones and various disease manifestations among Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A group of 45 patients with SLE (43 women and 2 men with a mean age of 27.57 ± 9.89 years) underment assessment of their thyroid hormones. Antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies were assessed in 27 patients. Various disease manifestations were evaluated. A group of 20 normal female volunteers were involved as controls. The mean serum free triiodothyronine (FT3) levels in all patients were significantly lower than in controls (1.89 ± 1.14 vs. 3.15 ± 0.93 pg/ml; P < 0.05). Patients with a history of intravenous pulsed cyclophosphamide therapy showed significantly decreased levels of FT3 compared to those in other patients (1.17 ± 0.5 vs. 2.05 ± 0.95 pg/ml; P = 0.04). The mean serum free thyroxine (FT4) levels in all patients were significantly less than in the control group (1.24 ± 1.22 vs. 1.4 ± 0.3 mg/dl; P < 0.001). Of the 45 patients, 2 (4.4%) were considered to have primary hypothyroidism. Five of six patients (83.3%) with decreased FT4 levels developed fibromyalgia compared to 7 of 39 (17.9%) patients with normal T4 (P = 0.003). The mean serum TSH levels in all patients were significantly higher than in the controls (4.82 ± 22.2 vs. 2.65 ± 1.18 μIU/ml; P < 0.001). Six patients with decreased TSH levels were considered to have secondary hypothyroidism (13.3%); one of them showed decreased T3 and T4, two had decreased T4 only, and the other three were euthyroid. Comparing patients with and without secondary hypothyroidism, showed acute confusion in four (66.7%) in the former group versus four (10.3%) in the latter group (P = 0.006), anxiety in four (66.7%) in the former group versus six (15

  4. The endocrine and reproductive system: adverse effects of hormonally active substances?

    PubMed

    Greim, Helmut A

    2004-04-01

    Chemicals that have the intrinsic property to modulate or even disrupt the endocrine system are present in the human environment. Because it is the potency of such chemicals that determines the toxicologic relevance, assessment of the risk to human health must consider both the endocrine disrupting potential and the potency. Usually in vitro assays are applied to detect the potential of a hormone-like effect, and such data are considered useful to set priorities for additional testing and for mechanistic studies. However, such data allow only determination of relative potency of a chemical as compared with other xenobiotics, natural compounds, or endogenous hormones. Relevant information on the endocrine-disrupting potency can be taken only from in vivo assays, eg, the Hershberger (male reproductive organs) and uterotrophic (female reproductive organs) assays, the updated versions of the 28- and 90-day toxicity studies in rodents, and the 2-generation studies in rodents. With the use of this information and the concentration of these chemicals in humans, the potency of the effect as compared with endogenous hormone activity can be estimated. So far, the relative potencies of chemicals tested in in vitro systems as compared with estradiol are several orders of magnitude smaller, whereas potency of the phytoestrogen, eg, isoflavones such as genistein or daidzein, can even exceed that of estradiol, especially in infants who are fed soy-based formula as a sole source of nutrition. Although there are still open questions regarding in utero or early postnatal exposure, the low potencies and concentrations of manmade chemicals as compared with the endogenous hormones in humans make it unlikely that adverse effects occur at common exposure.

  5. Hormonal Control of Systems Associated with Egg Development in Phycitid Moths.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-12

    RD-Ai5i 688 HORMONAL CONTROL OF SYSTEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EGG i/i DEVELOPMENT IN PHYCITID MOTNS(IJ) OREGON STATE UNIV CORVALLIS DEPT OF ENTOMOLOGY V J...md Subtitlo) ,5. TVPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED 110 ,0",0. CO:’ :OL OF SY?,TEIi ASSO IATED WIH EGG f OR T D V !)EVE,0PNOF’fl’ IN Di YCITID NOTHS / 9...OF SYSTEMS ASSOCIATED WITH EGG DEVELOPMENT IN PHYCITID MOTHS FINAL REPORT VICTOR JACK BROOKES DECEMBER 12, 1984 U. S. ARMY RESEARCH OFFICE DAAG 27 -81

  6. In vivo absorption of steroidal hormones from smart polymer based delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sibao; Pederson, Daniel; Oak, Mayura; Singh, Jagdish

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop smart polymer based controlled delivery systems to deliver steroidal hormones after single subcutaneous (s.c.) injection at predetermined rates over extended period of time. In vivo absorption and pharmacokinetics of levonorgestrel (LNG) and testosterone (TSN) were investigated from the thermosensitive and phase sensitive polymeric controlled delivery systems. A selective, reliable, and rapid method for determination of serum LNG concentration was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandom mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface (HPLC-MS-MS with APCI), while TSN in serum samples was detected and quantified by a competitive immunoassay. The delivery systems controlled the absorption of LNG in rabbits up to 6 weeks from thermosensitive and approximately 4 weeks from phase sensitive polymeric delivery systems. In vivo study of TSN delivery systems in castrated rabbits controlled the release of TSN for at least 2 months from both thermosensitive and phase sensitive polymers. Thermosensitive and phase sensitive polymer formulations significantly (p < 0.05) increased relative bioavailability of steroidal hormones compared to control. In conclusion, thermosensitive and phase sensitive polymer based delivery systems controlled the release in vivo in rabbits for longer duration after single s.c. injection. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  7. Role of sleep in the regulation of the immune system and the pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Beatriz; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Esqueda-Leon, Enrique; Santana-Miranda, Rafael; Rojas-Zamorano, Jose Angel; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2012-07-01

    Sleep is characterized by a reduced response to external stimuli and a particular form of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Sleep is divided into two stages: REM sleep, characterized by muscle atonia, rapid eye movements, and EEG activity similar to wakefulness, and non-REM sleep, characterized by slow EEG activity. Around 80% of total sleep time is non-REM. Although it has been intensely studied for decades, the function (or functions) of sleep remains elusive. Sleep is a highly regulated state; some brain regions and several hormones and cytokines participate in sleep regulation. This mini-review focuses on how pituitary hormones and cytokines regulate or affect sleep and how sleep modifies the plasma concentration of hormones as well as cytokines. Also, we review the effects of hypophysectomy and some autoimmune diseases on sleep pattern. Finally, we propose that one of the functions of sleep is to maintain the integrity of the neuro-immune-endocrine system. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Sensitization of endocrine organs to anterior pituitary hormones by the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Engeland, William C

    2013-01-01

    Hormone secretion from endocrine glands constitutes a primary component of homeostatic control systems that defend whole body tissue viability and function. Endocrine organ secretion is controlled by efferent mechanisms that consist of both hormonal and neural elements. Anatomical evidence for dual control has led to increased understanding of how autonomic neural activity modulates functional sensitivity to hormonal input. The clinical relevance of autonomic-endocrine interactions is illustrated by examining functional control of the adrenal cortex and the ovary, two tissues that require tropic support from the anterior pituitary and receive sympathetic neural input. Extrapituitary mechanisms of adrenal cortical control including sympathetic neural activity have been implicated in controlling the amplitude of the cortisol awakening response (CAR), a diagnostic index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in humans. In addition, increases in sympathetic neural tone have been implicated in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a leading cause of female infertility. These examples offer strong evidence for the capability of autonomic neural activity to alter the functional sensitivity of endocrine glands. This interaction has significant clinical relevance and needs to be incorporated into our view in assessing endocrine organ function and dysfunction. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thyroid Hormones and Antioxidant Systems: Focus on Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Antonio; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Di Segni, Chantal; Persano, Mariasara; Gadotti, Giovanni; Silvestrini, Andrea; Festa, Roberto; Tiano, Luca; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Meucci, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    In previous works we demonstrated an inverse correlation between plasma Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and thyroid hormones; in fact, CoQ10 levels in hyperthyroid patients were found among the lowest detected in human diseases. On the contrary, CoQ10 is elevated in hypothyroid subjects, also in subclinical conditions, suggesting the usefulness of this index in assessing metabolic status in thyroid disorders. A Low-T3 syndrome is a condition observed in several chronic diseases: it is considered an adaptation mechanism, where there is a reduction in pro-hormone T4 conversion. Low T3-Syndrome is not usually considered to be corrected with replacement therapy. We review the role of thyroid hormones in regulation of antioxidant systems, also presenting data on total antioxidant capacity and Coenzyme Q10. Published studies suggest that oxidative stress could be involved in the clinical course of different heart diseases; our data could support the rationale of replacement therapy in low-T3 conditions. PMID:24351864

  10. Local and systemic hormonal responses in pepper leaves during compatible and incompatible pepper-tobamovirus interactions.

    PubMed

    Dziurka, Michał; Janeczko, Anna; Juhász, Csilla; Gullner, Gábor; Oklestková, Jana; Novák, Ondrej; Saja, Diana; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Tóbiás, István; Barna, Balázs

    2016-12-01

    Phytohormone levels and the expression of genes encoding key enzymes participating in hormone biosynthetic pathways were investigated in pepper leaves inoculated with two different tobamoviruses. Obuda pepper virus (ObPV) inoculation led to the development of hypersensitive reaction (incompatible interaction), while Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) inoculation resulted in a systemic, compatible interaction. ObPV-inoculation markedly increased not only the levels of salicylic acid (SA) (73-fold) and jasmonic acid (8-fold) but also those of abscisic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, cis-zeatin, cis-zeatin-9-riboside and trans-zeatin-9-riboside in the inoculated pepper leaves 3 days post inoculation. PMMoV infection increased only the contents of gibberellic acid and SA. Hormone contents did not change significantly after ObPV or PMMoV infection in non-infected upper leaves 20 days post inoculation. Concentrations of some brassinosteroids (BRs) and progesterone increased both in ObPV- and PMMoV inoculated leaves. ObPV inoculation markedly induced the expression of three phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) genes, while that of an isochorismate synthase (ICS) gene was not modified. PMMoV inoculation did not alter the expression of PAL and ICS genes but induced the transcript abundance of ACO although later than ObPV. Pre-treatment of pepper leaves with exogenous 24-epi-brassinolide (24-epi-BR) prior to ObPV-inoculation strongly mitigated the visible symptoms caused by ObPV. In addition, 24-epi-BR pre-treatment markedly altered the level of several hormones in pepper leaves following ObPV-inoculation. These data indicate that ObPV- and PMMoV-inoculations lead to intricate but well harmonized hormonal responses that are largely determined by the incompatible or compatible nature of plant-virus interactions.

  11. Acute Effect of Manganese on Hypothalamic Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Secretion in Adult Male Rats: Involvement of Specific Neurotransmitter Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prestifilippo, Juan Pablo; Fernández-Solari, Javier; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Mohn, Claudia Ester; de la Cal, Carolina; Reynoso, Roxana; Dees, W. Les; Rettori, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    Manganese chloride (MnCl2) is capable of stimulating luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats through the activation of the hypothalamic nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/protein kinase G pathway. The present study aimed to determine the involvement of specific neurotransmitters involved in this action. Our results indicate that dopamine, but not glutamic acid and prostaglandinds, mediates the MnCl2 stimulated secretion of LHRH from medial basal hypothalami in vitro, as well as increases the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, a biphasic response was observed in that gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) release was also increased, which acts to attenuate the MnCl2 action to stimulate LHRH secretion. Although it is clear that manganese (Mn+2) can acutely induce LHRH secretion in adult males, we suggest that the additional action of MnCl2 to release GABA, a LHRH inhibitor, may ultimately contribute to suppressed reproductive function observed in adult animals following exposure to high chromic levels of Mn+2. PMID:18603625

  12. [Reactivity of the adenylyl cyclase system in rat tissues to biogenic amines and peptide hormones under starvation condition].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Pertseva, M N

    2007-04-01

    Under starvation condition, sensitivity of the adenylyl cyclase system to regulatory action of biogenic amines and peptide hormones in rat tissues are changed. In the myocardium and skeletal muscles, after 2 and 4 days of starvation, the regulatory effects of isoproterenol and relaxin acting via G,-proteins on the adenylyl cyclase activity and the G-protein GTP-binding are significantly increased compared with control. At the same time, regulatory effects ofsomatostatin which are realized via Gi-proteins, on adenylyl cyclase system in the myocardium are decreased. Under prolonged starvation consisting of two consecutive 4-days periods, the effects of hormones acting via Gs-proteins on the adenylyl cyclase activity in muscle tissues are decreased to control value levels. The effects of hormones acting via Gi-proteins are largely reduced. In the brain, intensification of adenylyl cyclase stimulating hormonal effects was late and only observed after a 4-day starvation. Unlike muscle tissues, the increase of adenylyl cyclase stimulating effects in the brain is preserved after two-period starvation. The weakening of adenylyl cyclase inhibiting hormonal signals both in the brain and muscles is observed after a 2-day starvation and then the weakening is intensified. Possible role of glucose level and basal adenylyl cyclase activity in determination of the sensitivity of the adenylyl cyclase system to hormones under study is discussed. It is suggested that one of the key causes of physiological changes in animal organism under starvation involves alteration of hormonal signalling systems sensitivity, in particular that of the adenylyl cyclase system, to hormone regulatory action.

  13. Diversification and coevolution of the ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor system in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tine, Mbaye; Kuhl, Heiner; Teske, Peter R; Tschöp, Matthias H; Jastroch, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The gut hormone ghrelin is involved in numerous metabolic functions, such as the stimulation of growth hormone secretion, gastric motility, and food intake. Ghrelin is modified by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) or membrane-bound O-acyltransferase domain-containing 4 (MBOAT4) enabling action through the growth hormone secretagogue receptors (GHS-R). During the course of evolution, initially strong ligand/receptor specificities can be disrupted by genomic changes, potentially modifying physiological roles of the ligand/receptor system. Here, we investigated the coevolution of ghrelin, GOAT, and GHS-R in vertebrates. We combined similarity search, conserved synteny analyses, phylogenetic reconstructions, and protein structure comparisons to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the ghrelin system. Ghrelin remained a single-gene locus in all vertebrate species, and accordingly, a single GHS-R isoform was identified in all tetrapods. Similar patterns of the nonsynonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) ratio (dN/dS) in the vertebrate lineage strongly suggest coevolution of the ghrelin and GHS-R genes, supporting specific functional interactions and common physiological pathways. The selection profiles do not allow confirmation as to whether ghrelin binds specifically to GOAT, but the ghrelin dN/dS patterns are more similar to those of GOAT compared to MBOAT1 and MBOAT2 isoforms. Four GHS-R isoforms were identified in teleost genomes. This diversification of GHS-R resulted from successive rounds of duplications, some of which remained specific to the teleost lineage. Coevolution signals are lost in teleosts, presumably due to the diversification of GHS-R but not the ghrelin gene. The identification of the GHS-R diversity in teleosts provides a molecular basis for comparative studies on ghrelin's physiological roles and regulation, while the comparative sequence and structure analyses will assist translational medicine to determine structure-function relationships of the

  14. Sexual differentiation and the Kiss1 system: hormonal and developmental considerations.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Alexander S

    2009-01-01

    The nervous system (both central and peripheral) is anatomically and physiologically differentiated between the sexes, ranging from gender-based differences in the cerebral cortex to motoneuron number in the spinal cord. Although genetic factors may play a role in the development of some sexually differentiated traits, most identified sex differences in the brain and behavior are produced under the influence of perinatal sex steroid signaling. In many species, the ability to display an estrogen-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) surge is sexually differentiated, yet the specific neural population(s) that allows females but not males to display such estrogen-mediated "positive feedback" has remained elusive. Recently, the Kiss1/kisspeptin system has been implicated in generating the sexually dimorphic circuitry underlying the LH surge. Specifically, Kiss1 gene expression and kisspeptin protein levels in the anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus of the hypothalamus are sexually differentiated, with females displaying higher levels than males, even under identical hormonal conditions as adults. These findings, in conjunction with accumulating evidence implicating kisspeptins as potent secretagogues of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), suggest that the sex-specific display of the LH surge (positive feedback) reflects sexual differentiation of AVPV Kiss1 neurons. In addition, developmental kisspeptin signaling via its receptor GPR54 appears to be critical in males for the proper sexual differentiation of a variety of sexually dimorphic traits, ranging from complex social behavior to specific forebrain and spinal cord neuronal populations. This review discusses the recent data, and their implications, regarding the bi-directional relationship between the Kiss1 system and the process of sexual differentiation.

  15. Prolactin and growth hormone responses to hypoglycemia in patients with systemic sclerosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, Jozef; Raffayova, Helena; Imrich, Richard; Radikova, Zofia; Penesova, Adela; Macho, Ladislav; Lukac, Jozef; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Vigas, Milan

    2006-06-01

    This study compared prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) responses to hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) with those in matched healthy controls. No differences were found in glucose and GH responses to hypoglycemia in both groups of patients compared to controls. SSc patients had lower PRL response (P < 0.05) to hypoglycemia compared to controls. PRL response tended to be lower also in PsA patients, however the difference did not reach level of statistical significance (P = 0.11). The present study showed decreased PRL response to hypoglycemia in premenopausal females with SSc.

  16. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  17. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Carlos; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Lins Pessoa, Hugo de

    2010-05-01

    Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones.

  18. The Role of the Growth Hormone/Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Visceral Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Lewitt, Moira S

    2017-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is involved in the pathophysiology of obesity. Both GH and IGF-I have direct effects on adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, and this system is involved in the cross-talk between adipose tissue, liver, and pituitary. Transgenic animal models have been of importance in identifying mechanisms underlying these interactions. It emerges that this system has key roles in visceral adiposity, and there is a rationale for targeting this system in the treatment of visceral obesity associated with GH deficiency, metabolic syndrome, and lipodystrophies. This evidence is reviewed, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, and recommendations are made for future research. PMID:28469442

  19. Identification of a Lipokine, a Lipid Hormone Linking Adipose Tissue to Systemic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Haiming; Gerhold, Kristin; Mayers, Jared R.; Wiest, Michelle M.; Watkins, Steve M.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of lipid metabolism in individual tissues can lead to systemic disruption of insulin action and glucose metabolism. Utilizing a comprehensive lipidomic platform and mice deficient in adipose tissue lipid chaperones aP2 and mal1, we explored how metabolic alterations in adipose tissue are linked to whole-body metabolism through lipid signals. A robust increase in de novo lipogenesis rendered the adipose tissue of these mice resistant to the deleterious systemic effects of dietary lipid exposure. Systemic lipid profiling also led to identification of C16:1n7-palmitoleate as an adipose tissue-derived lipid hormone that strongly stimulates muscle insulin action and suppresses hepatosteatosis. Our data reveal a novel, lipid-mediated endocrine network and demonstrate that adipose tissue uses lipokines such as C16:1n7-palmitoleate to communicate with distant organs and regulate systemic metabolic homeostasis. PMID:18805087

  20. Effects of hormonal contraception on systemic metabolism: cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Würtz, Peter; Auro, Kirsi; Morin-Papunen, Laure; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Tiainen, Mika; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Joensuu, Anni; Havulinna, Aki S; Aalto, Kristiina; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Salomaa, Veikko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Perola, Markus; Raitakari, Olli T; Lawlor, Debbie A; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hormonal contraception is commonly used worldwide, but its systemic effects across lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acids, circulating metabolites and cytokines remain poorly understood. Methods: A comprehensive molecular profile (75 metabolic measures and 37 cytokines) was measured for up to 5841 women (age range 24–49 years) from three population-based cohorts. Women using combined oral contraceptive pills (COCPs) or progestin-only contraceptives (POCs) were compared with those who did not use hormonal contraception. Metabolomics profiles were reassessed for 869 women after 6 years to uncover the metabolic effects of starting, stopping and persistently using hormonal contraception. Results: The comprehensive molecular profiling allowed multiple new findings on the metabolic associations with the use of COCPs. They were positively associated with lipoprotein subclasses, including all high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses. The associations with fatty acids and amino acids were strong and variable in direction. COCP use was negatively associated with albumin and positively associated with creatinine and inflammatory markers, including glycoprotein acetyls and several growth factors and interleukins. Our findings also confirmed previous results e.g. for increased circulating triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. Starting COCPs caused similar metabolic changes to those observed cross-sectionally: the changes were maintained in consistent users and normalized in those who stopped using. In contrast, POCs were only weakly associated with metabolic and inflammatory markers. Results were consistent across all cohorts and for different COCP preparations and different types of POC delivery. Conclusions: Use of COCPs causes widespread metabolic and inflammatory effects. However, persistent use does not appear to accumulate the effects over time and the metabolic perturbations are reversed upon discontinuation. POCs have little effect on systemic metabolism and

  1. Imbalance in the blood antioxidant system in growth hormone-deficient children before and after 1 year of recombinant growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Pankratova, Maria S; Baizhumanov, Adil A; Yusipovich, Alexander I; Faassen, Maria; Shiryaeva, Tatyana Yu; Peterkova, Valentina A; Kovalenko, Svetlana S; Kazakova, Tatiana A; Maksimov, Georgy V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the effects of 12-month therapy with recombinant growth hormone (rGH) on the blood antioxidant system in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of plasma was measured by FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power or ferric reducing ability of plasma); activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in erythrocytes were assessed; non-protein thiols (NT) and ceruloplasmin (CP) levels were also measured. These parameters were determined before and after 12 month of rGH treatment. Eleven treatment-naive prepubertal children with growth hormone deficiency were included in the study. Another 11 prepubertal children comprised a control group. Before rGH treatment, TAC of plasma and NT level in the control group were significantly lower (726 ± 196 vs. 525 ± 166 µmol/L, P = 0.0182 and 0.92 ± 0.18 vs. 0.70 ± 0.22 µmol/ml, P = 0.0319, before and after the therapy, respectively). The only parameter that significantly (19.6 ± 4.7 vs. 14.5 ± 3.4 Units/g Hb, P = 0.0396) exceeded the same in the control group after rGH therapy was SOD activity. However, none of the measured parameters of antioxidant system in GHD children, except for TAC (525 ± 166 vs. 658 ± 115 µmol/L, P = 0.0205), exhibited significant improvement toward the end of the 12-month treatment period, although non-significant changes in CAT activity and CP level were also observed. This work has demonstrated that some parameters of the blood antioxidant system are out of balance and even impaired in GHD children. A 12-month treatment with rGH resulted in a partial improvement of the antioxidant system.

  2. Extracellular production of an intact and biologically active human growth hormone by the Bacillus brevis system.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Saito, Y; Asami, O; Yamada, Y; Hirai, M; Udata, S

    1997-10-01

    The characteristic features of the Bacillus brevis system are very high productivity of heterologous proteins and very low extracellular protease activity. However, degradation of some heterologous proteins, especially mammalian proteins, can be observed and resulted in a lowering of protein productivity. By using a mutant expressing low levels of proteases and the addition of EDTA to the medium, intact human growth hormone (hGH) was successfully produced with the B. brevis system. Signal peptide modification with higher basicity in the amino terminal region and higher hydrophobicity in the middle region brought about a twelve-fold increase in hGH production. The hGH yield was further elevated to 240 mg L-1 by optimization of culture conditions. Thus, biologically active and mature hGH can be efficiently produced directly in the medium with the B. brevis system.

  3. Identification of a lipokine, a lipid hormone linking adipose tissue to systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiming; Gerhold, Kristin; Mayers, Jared R; Wiest, Michelle M; Watkins, Steven M; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2008-09-19

    Dysregulation of lipid metabolism in individual tissues leads to systemic disruption of insulin action and glucose metabolism. Utilizing quantitative lipidomic analyses and mice deficient in adipose tissue lipid chaperones aP2 and mal1, we explored how metabolic alterations in adipose tissue are linked to whole-body metabolism through lipid signals. A robust increase in de novo lipogenesis rendered the adipose tissue of these mice resistant to the deleterious effects of dietary lipid exposure. Systemic lipid profiling also led to identification of C16:1n7-palmitoleate as an adipose tissue-derived lipid hormone that strongly stimulates muscle insulin action and suppresses hepatosteatosis. Our data reveal a lipid-mediated endocrine network and demonstrate that adipose tissue uses lipokines such as C16:1n7-palmitoleate to communicate with distant organs and regulate systemic metabolic homeostasis.

  4. [The Integration and Regulation of Hormone-Sensitive Lipase in Reproductive System].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-yi; Xu, Guo-Heng

    2015-02-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) has long been considered as a classical rate-limiting enzyme during lipolysis since it was first described in 1960s. HSL is regulated mainly by catecholamine, including adrenalin. Studies in recent years indicated that the substrates for HSL are not only triglycerides, but also diacylglycerol with the catalytic activity is ten times that of triglycerides, glycerol esters and cholesterol esters, which overthrow the opinion that HSL is specific to triglyceride. The scientists have generated HSL gene knockout mice and confirmed HSL is widely located in the reproductive system, which indicates that HSL may play an important role in the regulation of physiological and pathophysiological process in the reproductive system. Here, we will focus on the features of the HSL gene, mRNA and its protein, and summarize the HSL functions in the reproductive system.

  5. Regulation of synaptic functions in central nervous system by endocrine hormones and the maintenance of energy homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhiping P; Han, Weiping

    2012-10-01

    Energy homoeostasis, a co-ordinated balance of food intake and energy expenditure, is regulated by the CNS (central nervous system). The past decade has witnessed significant advances in our understanding of metabolic processes and brain circuitry which responds to a broad range of neural, nutrient and hormonal signals. Accumulating evidence demonstrates altered synaptic plasticity in the CNS in response to hormone signals. Moreover, emerging observations suggest that synaptic plasticity underlies all brain functions, including the physiological regulation of energy homoeostasis, and that impaired synaptic constellation and plasticity may lead to pathological development and conditions. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of postsynaptic receptors such as AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid), NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) and GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) receptors, and the presynaptic components by hormone signals. A detailed understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms by which hormones regulate energy homoeostasis may lead to novel strategies in treating metabolic disorders.

  6. Hormone treatment of depression

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    There is a well-established relationship between alterations of various hormonal systems and psychiatric disorders, both in endocrine and psychiatric patients. This has led to clinical and research studies examining the efficacy of the different hormones for treatment of depression. These data will be reviewed with particular regard to the thyroid, gonadal, pineal, and adrenal cortex hormones. The data generally provide limited, but varying evidence for the antidepressant efficacy of these hormones. PMID:21485752

  7. Hypothalamic neural systems controlling the female reproductive life cycle: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, glutamate, and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Maffucci, Jacqueline A.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis undergoes a number of changes throughout the reproductive life cycle that are responsible for the development, puberty, adulthood, and senescence of reproductive systems. This natural progression is dictated by the neural network controlling the hypothalamus including the cells that synthesize and release gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and their regulatory neurotransmitters. Glutamate and GABA are the primary excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, and as such contribute a great deal to modulating this axis throughout the lifetime via their actions on receptors in the hypothalamus, both directly on GnRH neurons as well as indirectly though other hypothalamic neural networks. Interactions among GnRH neurons, glutamate, and GABA, including the regulation of GnRH gene and protein expression, hormone release, and modulation by estrogen, are critical to age-appropriate changes in reproductive function. Here, we present evidence for the modulation of GnRH neurosecretory cells by the balance of glutamate and GABA in the hypothalamus, and the functional consequences of these interactions on reproductive physiology across the life cycle. PMID:19349036

  8. Effect of different culture systems and 3, 5, 3'-triiodothyronine/follicle-stimulating hormone on preantral follicle development in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Zhengpin; Niu, Wanbao; Zhu, Baochang; Xia, Guoliang

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical method to isolate preantral follicle has been reported for many years. However, the culture systems in vitro are still unstable. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the culture system of mice preantral follicles on the follicular development in vitro. The results showed that the 96-well plate system was the most effective method for mice follicle development in vitro (volume change: 51.71%; survival rate: 89%, at day 4). Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and Thyroid hormone (TH) are important for normal follicular development and dysregulation of hormones are related with impaired follicular development. To determine the effect of hormone on preantral follicular development, we cultured follicle with hormones in the 96-well plate culture system and found that FSH significantly increased preantral follicular growth on day 4. The FSH-induced growth action was markedly enhanced by T₃ although T₃ was ineffective alone. We also demonstrated by QRT-PCR that T₃ significantly enhanced FSH-induced up-regulation of Xiap mRNA level. Meanwhile, Bad, cell death inducer, was markedly down-regulated by the combination of hormones. Moreover, QRT-PCR results were also consistent with protein regulation which detected by Western Blotting analysis. Taken together, the findings of the present study demonstrate that 96-well plate system is an effective method for preantral follicle development in vitro. Moreover, these results provide insights on the role of thyroid hormone in increasing FSH-induced preantral follicular development, which mediated by up-regulating Xiap and down-regulating Bad.

  9. Olanzapine-induced changes in glucose metabolism are independent of the melanin-concentrating hormone system.

    PubMed

    Girault, Elodie M; Toonen, Pim W; Eggels, Leslie; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2013-11-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as Olanzapine (Ola) induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these undesired side-effects are currently unknown. Chagnon et al. showed that the common allele rs7973796 of the prepro-melanin-concentrating hormone (PMCH) gene is associated with a greater body mass index in Ola-treated schizophrenic patients. As PMCH encodes for the orexigenic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), it was hypothesized that MCH is involved in Ola-induced metabolic changes. We have recently reported that the intragastric infusion of Ola results in hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance in male rats. In order to test in vivo the possible involvement of the PMCH gene in the pathogenesis of Ola side-effects, we administered Ola intragastrically in wild-type (WT) and PMCH knock-out (KO) rats. Our results show that glucose and corticosterone levels, as well as endogenous glucose production, are elevated by the infusion of Ola in both WT and KO animals. Thus, the lack of MCH does not seem to affect the acute effects of Ola on glucose metabolism. On the other hand, these effects might be obliterated by compensatory changes in other hypothalamic systems. In addition, possible modulatory effects of the MCH KO on the long term effects of Ola, i.e. increased adiposity, body weight gain, have not been investigated yet.

  10. Protective actions of melatonin and growth hormone on the aged cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Sergio D; Forman, Katherine A; García, Cruz; Vara, Elena; Escames, Germaine; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that certain aspects of lifestyle and genetics act as risk factors for a variety of cardiovascular disorders, including coronary disease, hypertension, heart failure and stroke. Aging, however, appears to be the major contributor for morbidity and mortality of the impaired cardiovascular system. Growth hormone (GH) and melatonin seem to prevent cardiac aging, as they contribute to the recovery of several physiological parameters affected by age. These hormones exhibit antioxidant properties and decrease oxidative stress and apoptosis. This paper summarizes a set of studies related to the potential role that therapy with GH and melatonin may play in the protection of the altered cardiac function due to aging, with a focus on experiments performed in our laboratory using the senescence-accelerated mouse as an aging model. In general, we observed significantly increased inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis markers in hearts from senescence-accelerated prone 10-month-old animals compared to 2-month-old controls, while anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic markers as well as endothelial nitric oxide synthase were decreased. Senescence-accelerated resistant animals showed no significant changes with age. GH or melatonin treatment prevented the age-dependent cardiac alterations observed in the senescence-accelerated prone group. Combined administration of GH plus melatonin reduced the age-related changes in senescence-accelerated prone hearts in an additive fashion that was different to that displayed when administered alone. GH and melatonin may be potential agents for counteracting oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation in the aging heart.

  11. Absence of systemic hormonal effects in an oestradiol diether topically active on the vaginal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J P; Cachelou, R; Guéritée, N

    1982-12-01

    The women in this study were either post-menopausal or ovariectomised for at least 1 yr prior to the study. They had also been treated for cancer of the cervix (27 women), endometrium (5), ovaries (5) or breast (1). All women presented with sexual troubles, mainly genital discomfort (dyspareunia or vaginism). In a double-blind fashion, gynaecological capsules containing either an oestradiol diether (ICD: promestriene) or only the excipient were administered for 40 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, the FSH, LH, oestrone (E1) and oestradiol (E2) plasma levels were not found to be significantly different from the pre-therapeutic values. These results suggest that promestriene acts on the vaginal mucosa, therefore not being converted back into the hormone from which it was derived. Also, in its dietheroxide form, promestriene is incapable of crossing the malpighian (vaginal or epidermal) epithelium and of reaching the general blood circulation. This discrepancy between the local anti-atrophic effects and the inability to exert systemic oestrogen activities singles out promestriene and justifies its therapeutic use when hormonally active oestrogens are contra-indicated, as in patients who have an oestrogen-sensitive cancer in their medical history.

  12. Building a scientific framework for studying hormonal effects on behavior and on the development of the sexually dimorphic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Li, Abby A; Baum, Michael J; McIntosh, Laura J; Day, Mark; Liu, Feng; Gray, L Earl

    2008-05-01

    There has been increasing concern that low-dose exposure to hormonally active chemicals disrupts sexual differentiation of the brain and peripheral nervous system. There also has been active drug development research on the therapeutic potential of hormone therapy on behaviors. These different research goals have in common the need to develop reliable animal models to study the effect of hormones on brain function and behaviors that are predictive of effects in humans. This paper summarizes presentations given at the June 2007 11th International Neurotoxicology Association (INA-11) meeting, which addressed these issues. Using a few examples from the bisphenol A neurobehavioral literature for illustrative purposes, Dr. Abby Li discussed some of the methodological issues that should be considered in designing developmental neurobehavioral animal studies so they can be useful for human health risk assessment. Dr. Earl Gray provided an overview of research on the role of androgens and estrogens in the development of the brain and peripheral nervous system and behavior. Based on this scientific foundation, Dr. Gray proposed a rational framework for the study of the effects of developmental exposures to chemicals on the organization of the sexually dimorphic nervous system, including specific recommendations for experimental design and statistical analyses that can increase the utility of the research for regulatory decision-making. Dr. Michael Baum and by Dr. Feng Liu presented basic research on the hormonal mechanisms underlying sexual preference and estrogenic effects of cognition, respectively. These behaviors are among those studied in adult animals following in utero exposure to hormonally active chemicals, to evaluate their potential effects on sexual differentiation of the brain. Understanding of the hormonal mechanisms of these behaviors, and of relevance to humans, is needed to develop biologically plausible hypotheses regarding the potential effects of

  13. Identification of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor orthologue in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vadakkadath Meethal, Sivan; Gallego, Miguel J; Haasl, Ryan J; Petras, Stephen J; Sgro, Jean-Yves; Atwood, Craig S

    2006-01-01

    Background The Caenorhabditis elegans genome is known to code for at least 1149 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but the GPCR(s) critical to the regulation of reproduction in this nematode are not yet known. This study examined whether GPCRs orthologous to human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) exist in C. elegans. Results Our sequence analyses indicated the presence of two proteins in C. elegans, one of 401 amino acids [GenBank: NP_491453; WormBase: F54D7.3] and another of 379 amino acids [GenBank: NP_506566; WormBase: C15H11.2] with 46.9% and 44.7% nucleotide similarity to human GnRHR1 and GnRHR2, respectively. Like human GnRHR1, structural analysis of the C. elegans GnRHR1 orthologue (Ce-GnRHR) predicted a rhodopsin family member with 7 transmembrane domains, G protein coupling sites and phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C. Of the functionally important amino acids in human GnRHR1, 56% were conserved in the C. elegans orthologue. Ce-GnRHR was actively transcribed in adult worms and immunoanalyses using antibodies generated against both human and C. elegans GnRHR indicated the presence of a 46-kDa protein, the calculated molecular mass of the immature Ce-GnRHR. Ce-GnRHR staining was specifically localized to the germline, intestine and pharynx. In the germline and intestine, Ce-GnRHR was localized specifically to nuclei as revealed by colocalization with a DNA nuclear stain. However in the pharynx, Ce-GnRHR was localized to the myofilament lattice of the pharyngeal musculature, suggesting a functional role for Ce-GnRHR signaling in the coupling of food intake with reproduction. Phylogenetic analyses support an early evolutionary origin of GnRH-like receptors, as evidenced by the hypothesized grouping of Ce-GnRHR, vertebrate GnRHRs, a molluscan GnRHR, and the adipokinetic hormone receptors (AKHRs) and corazonin receptors of arthropods. Conclusion This is the first report of a GnRHR orthologue in C. elegans, which shares significant

  14. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the amphibian brain and its relationship with the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) system: An overview.

    PubMed

    Jadhao, Arun G; Pinelli, Claudia; D'Aniello, Biagio; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that the hypothalamic neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays an important role as a primary factor regulating gonadotropin secretion in reproductive processes in vertebrates. The discovery of the presence of a gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the brains of birds has further contributed to our understanding of the reproduction control by the brain. GnIH plays a key role in inhibition of reproduction and acts on the pituitary gland and GnRH neurons via a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPR147). GnIH decreases gonadotropin synthesis and release, thus inhibiting gonadal development and maintenance. The GnRH and GnIH neuronal peptidergic systems are well reported in mammals and birds, but limited information is available regarding their presence and localization in the brains of other vertebrate species, such as reptiles, amphibians and fishes. The aim of this review is to compile and update information on the localization of GnRH and GnIH neuronal systems, with a particular focus on amphibians, summarizing the neuroanatomical distribution of GnIH and GnRH and emphasizing the discovery of GnIH based on RFamide peptides and GnIH orthologous peptides found in other vertebrates and their functional significance.

  15. Growth hormone production and role in the reproductive system of female chicken.

    PubMed

    Hrabia, Anna

    2015-09-01

    The expression and role of growth hormone (GH) in the reproductive system of mammals is rather well established. In birds the limited information thus far available suggests that GH is an endocrine or paracrine/autocrine regulator of ovarian and oviductal functions too. GH and its receptors are expressed in all compartments of the ovary and oviduct and change accordingly to physiological state. The intra-ovarian role of GH likely includes the regulation of steroidogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis, the modulation of LH action and the synthesis of IGFs (insulin-like growth factors). In the oviduct, GH is also involved in the regulation of oviduct-specific protein expression. The present study provides a review of current knowledge on the presence and action of GH in the female reproduction, in which it is likely that act in endocrine, autocrine or paracrine mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inspection of multidimensional phase spaces with an application to the dynamics of hormonal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosa, U.; Harms, H.-M.; Prank, K.; Hesch, R.-D.

    1991-03-01

    We look directly into multidimensional phase spaces. This is useful if little is known about suitable observables and underlying laws. The dynamical system we examine is the human body, in particular the secretion of the parathyroid hormone (PTH). Time series of PTH concentrations are transformed to multidimensional data sets. From their representations in phase space we derive a suitable observable: the average lifetime of a PTH fluctuation. It provides a clear-cut discrimination between health and two metabolic bone diseases, viz. osteoporosis and hyperparathyroidism. The derivation is done step by step: First we consider multidimensional displays and observe that it is certain correlation function which plays an important role. Then a single number is taken from that correlation function, and a threshold value is suggested.

  17. Neural systems and hormones mediating attraction to infant and child faces

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lizhu; Ma, Xiaole; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Zhao, Weihua; Xu, Lei; Becker, Benjamin; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    We find infant faces highly attractive as a result of specific features which Konrad Lorenz termed “Kindchenschema” or “baby schema,” and this is considered to be an important adaptive trait for promoting protective and caregiving behaviors in adults, thereby increasing the chances of infant survival. This review first examines the behavioral support for this effect and physical and behavioral factors which can influence it. It then provides details of the increasing number of neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies investigating the neural circuitry underlying this baby schema effect in parents and non-parents of both sexes. Next it considers potential hormonal contributions to the baby schema effect in both sexes and the neural effects associated with reduced responses to infant cues in post-partum depression, anxiety and drug taking. Overall the findings reviewed reveal a very extensive neural circuitry involved in our perception of cuteness in infant faces, with enhanced activation compared to adult faces being found in brain regions involved in face perception, attention, emotion, empathy, memory, reward and attachment, theory of mind and also control of motor responses. Both mothers and fathers also show evidence for enhanced responses in these same neural systems when viewing their own as opposed to another child. Furthermore, responses to infant cues in many of these neural systems are reduced in mothers with post-partum depression or anxiety or have taken addictive drugs throughout pregnancy. In general reproductively active women tend to rate infant faces as cuter than men, which may reflect both heightened attention to relevant cues and a stronger activation in their brain reward circuitry. Perception of infant cuteness may also be influenced by reproductive hormones with the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin being most strongly associated to date with increased attention and attraction to infant cues in both sexes. PMID:26236256

  18. Neural systems and hormones mediating attraction to infant and child faces.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lizhu; Ma, Xiaole; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Zhao, Weihua; Xu, Lei; Becker, Benjamin; Kendrick, Keith M

    2015-01-01

    We find infant faces highly attractive as a result of specific features which Konrad Lorenz termed "Kindchenschema" or "baby schema," and this is considered to be an important adaptive trait for promoting protective and caregiving behaviors in adults, thereby increasing the chances of infant survival. This review first examines the behavioral support for this effect and physical and behavioral factors which can influence it. It then provides details of the increasing number of neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies investigating the neural circuitry underlying this baby schema effect in parents and non-parents of both sexes. Next it considers potential hormonal contributions to the baby schema effect in both sexes and the neural effects associated with reduced responses to infant cues in post-partum depression, anxiety and drug taking. Overall the findings reviewed reveal a very extensive neural circuitry involved in our perception of cuteness in infant faces, with enhanced activation compared to adult faces being found in brain regions involved in face perception, attention, emotion, empathy, memory, reward and attachment, theory of mind and also control of motor responses. Both mothers and fathers also show evidence for enhanced responses in these same neural systems when viewing their own as opposed to another child. Furthermore, responses to infant cues in many of these neural systems are reduced in mothers with post-partum depression or anxiety or have taken addictive drugs throughout pregnancy. In general reproductively active women tend to rate infant faces as cuter than men, which may reflect both heightened attention to relevant cues and a stronger activation in their brain reward circuitry. Perception of infant cuteness may also be influenced by reproductive hormones with the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin being most strongly associated to date with increased attention and attraction to infant cues in both sexes.

  19. The crosstalk between thyroid hormones and the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    PubMed

    Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Carrillo-Sepúlveda, Maria Alícia; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela S; Gomes, Dayane A; Diniz, Gabriela P

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) exert multiple effects on the heart and vascular system. As a consequence, altered cardiovascular function observed in the thyroid diseases corresponds to one of the most important and clinically relevant aspects found in both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Besides THs' direct effects on the heart and vascular system, in the last three decades several studies have implicated the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) in some of the cardiovascular effects of THs, with this interaction suggesting that RAS may be an important mediator of THs actions. In the present review, we discuss the alterations in the circulating RAS, as well as modifications in cardiac and vascular RAS which are involved in the cardiovascular alterations found during the modulation of TH levels. In addition, considering the important role that both systems present during fetal and neonatal periods, we also review the interaction between THs and the RAS in the development of cardiovascular system. A greater understanding of the role of the RAS in hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, during early or adult life will presumably facilitate the evolution of newer, targeted therapies. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Invertebrate Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Related Peptides and Their Receptors: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Tsubasa; Shiraishi, Akira; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Matsubara, Shin; Aoyama, Masato; Satake, Honoo

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) play pivotal roles in reproductive functions via the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonad axis, namely, HPG axis in vertebrates. GnRHs and their receptors (GnRHRs) are likely to be conserved in invertebrate deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans. All vertebrate and urochordate GnRHs are composed of 10 amino acids, whereas protostome, echinoderm, and amphioxus GnRH-like peptides are 11- or 12-residue peptide containing two amino acids after an N-terminal pyro-Glu. In urochordates, Halocynthia roretzi GnRH gene encodes two GnRH peptide sequences, whereas two GnRH genes encode three different GnRH peptides in Ciona intestinalis. These findings indicate the species-specific diversification of GnRHs. Intriguingly, the major signaling pathway for GnRHRs is intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in chordates, echinoderms, and protostomes, whereas Ciona GnRHRs (Ci-GnRHRs) are endowed with multiple GnRHergic cAMP production pathways in a ligand-selective manner. Moreover, the ligand-specific modulation of signal transduction via heterodimerization among Ci-GnRHR paralogs suggests the species-specific development of fine-tuning of gonadal functions in ascidians. Echinoderm GnRH-like peptides show high sequence differences compared to those of protostome counterparts, leading to the difficulty in classification of peptides and receptors. These findings also show both the diversity and conservation of GnRH signaling systems in invertebrates. The lack of the HPG axis in invertebrates indicates that biological functions of GnRHs are not release of gonadotropins in current invertebrates and common ancestors of vertebrates and invertebrates. To date, authentic or putative GnRHRs have been characterized from various echinoderms and protostomes as well as chordates and the mRNAs have been found to be distributed not only reproductive organs but also other tissues. Collectively, these findings further support the notion that invertebrate GnRHs have

  1. Cloning of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone and evidence for molt-inhibiting hormone within the central nervous system of the blue crab Portunus pelagicus.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael J; Stewart, Praphaporn; Sroyraya, Morakot; Soonklang, Nantawan; Cummins, Scott F; Hanna, Peter J; Duan, Wei; Sobhon, Prasert

    2013-02-01

    The crustacean X-organ-sinus gland (XO-SG) complex controls molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) production, although extra expression sites for MIH have been postulated. Therefore, to explore the expression of MIH and distinguish between the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) superfamily, and MIH immunoreactive sites (ir) in the central nervous system (CNS), we cloned a CHH gene sequence for the crab Portunus pelagicus (Ppel-CHH), and compared it with crab CHH-type I and II peptides. Employing multiple sequence alignments and phylogenic analysis, the mature Ppel-CHH peptide exhibited residues common to both CHH-type I and II peptides, and a high degree of identity to the type-I group, but little homology between Ppel-CHH and Ppel-MIH (a type II peptide). This sequence identification then allowed for the use of MIH antisera to further confirm the identity and existence of a MIH-ir 9kDa protein in all neural organs tested by Western blotting, and through immunohistochemistry, MIH-ir in the XO, optic nerve, neuronal cluster 17 of the supraesophageal ganglion, the ventral nerve cord, and cell cluster 22 of the thoracic ganglion. The presence of MIH protein within such a diversity of sites in the CNS, and external to the XO-SG, raises new questions concerning the established mode of MIH action.

  2. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  3. Hormone profile in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus with previous or current amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Silva, Clovis A; Deen, Maria E J; Febrônio, Marilia V; Oliveira, Sheila K; Terreri, Maria T; Sacchetti, Silvana B; Sztajnbok, Flavio R; Marini, Roberto; Quintero, Maria V; Bica, Blanca E; Pereira, Rosa M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Ferriani, Virginia P; Robazzi, Teresa C; Magalhães, Claudia S; Hilário, Maria O

    2011-08-01

    To identify the underlying mechanism of amenorrhea in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) patients, thirty-five (11.7%) JSLE patients with current or previous amenorrhea were consecutively selected among the 298 post-menarche patients followed in 12 Brazilian pediatric rheumatology centers. Pituitary gonadotrophins [follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH)] and estradiol were evaluated in 32/35 patients, and prolactin and total testosterone in 29/35 patients. Patient's medical records were carefully reviewed according to demographic, clinical and therapeutic findings. The mean duration of amenorrhea was 7.2 ± 3.6 months. Low FSH or LH was observed in 7/32 (22%) JSLE patients and normal FSH or LH in 25 (78%). Remarkably, low levels of FSH or LH were associated with higher frequency of current amenorrhea (57% vs. 0%, P = 0.001), higher median disease activity (SLEDAI) and damage (SLICC/ACR-DI) (18 vs. 4, P = 0.011; 2 vs. 0, P = 0.037, respectively) and higher median current dose of prednisone (60 vs. 10 mg/day, P = 0.0001) compared to normal FSH or LH JSLE patients. None of them had decreased ovarian reserve and premature ovarian failure. Six of 29 (21%) patients had high levels of prolactin, and none had current amenorrhea. No correlations were observed between levels of prolactin and SLEDAI, and levels of prolactin and SLICC/ACR-DI scores (Spearman's coefficient). We have identified that amenorrhea in JSLE is associated with high dose of corticosteroids indicated for active disease due to hypothalamic-pituitary-ovary axis suppression.

  4. Changes in the ghrelin hormone pathway maybe part of an unusual gastric system in monotremes.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Myers, Mark A; Forbes, Briony E; Grützner, Frank

    2013-09-15

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone (GH)-releasing and appetite-regulating peptide predominately released from the stomach. Ghrelin is evolutionarily highly conserved and known to have a wide range of functions including the regulation of metabolism by maintaining an insulin-glucose balance. The peptide is produced as a single proprotein, which is later proteolytically cleaved. Ghrelin exerts its biological function after O-n-octanoylation at residue serine 3, which is catalyzed by ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) and allows binding to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R 1a). Genes involved in the ghrelin pathway have been identified in a broad range of vertebrate species, however, little is known about this pathway in the basal mammalian lineage of monotremes (platypus and echidna). Monotremes are particularly interesting in this context, as they have undergone massive changes in stomach anatomy and physiology, accompanied by a striking loss of genes involved in gastric function. In this study, we investigated genes in the ghrelin pathway in monotremes. Using degenerate PCR, database searches and synteny analysis we found that genes encoding ghrelin and GOAT are missing in the platypus genome, whilst, as has been reported in other species, the GHSR is present and expressed in brain, pancreas, kidney, intestine, heart and stomach. This is the first report suggesting the loss of ghrelin in a mammal. The loss of this gene may be related to changes to the platypus digestive system and raises questions about the control of blood glucose levels and insulin response in monotreme mammals. In addition, the conservation of the ghrelin receptor gene in platypus indicates that another ligand(s) maybe acting via this receptor in monotremes.

  5. Role of systemic chemotherapy in metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Niraj; Kohli, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC) have traditionally been treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Recently, there has been a demonstration of a survival benefit with the addition of docetaxel to ADT from three large randomized controlled trials. This review summarizes these trials, draws comparisons between the trials, and attempts to provide critical evidence-based recommendation on the role of docetaxel in mHSPC. Methods: Of the two published (GETUG-AFU, Chemo-Hormonal therapy vs. Androgen Ablation Randomized Trial for Extensive Disease in prostate cancer [CHAARTED]) and one presented trial (STAMPEDE) an analysis of the study design, patient characteristics, outcomes, variables, and a critical comparison between the trials was performed for making practice recommendations. Results: All the three trials demonstrated statistically significant progression free survival with the addition of docetaxel to ADT in mHSPC. However, while CHAARTED trial demonstrated a significant survival benefit with addition of docetaxel to ADT in patients with high volume mHSPC, GETUG-AFU failed to demonstrate statistically significant survival benefit although there was an absolute difference in survival between the two arms, with lower sample size and statistical power compared to CHAARTED. The largest study, STAMPEDE, reported a 22 month survival benefit in patients with M1 disease with statistical significance; with subgroup analysis of high volume and low volume disease patients yet to be reported. Conclusion: After a careful comparison between the trials, we conclude that systemic docetaxel chemotherapy within 4 months of initiating ADT for metastatic, high-volume HSPC should be considered the standard of care for patients with good performance status. PMID:27843206

  6. Hormone replacement therapy and incidence of central nervous system tumours in the Million Women Study.

    PubMed

    Benson, Victoria S; Pirie, Kirstin; Green, Jane; Bull, Diana; Casabonne, Delphine; Reeves, Gillian K; Beral, Valerie

    2010-10-01

    We examined the relation between the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) tumours in a large prospective study of 1,147,894 postmenopausal women. Women were aged 56.6 years on average at entry, and HRT use was recorded at recruitment and updated, where possible, about 3 years later. During a mean follow-up of 5.3 years per woman, 1,266 CNS tumours were diagnosed, including 557 gliomas, 311 meningiomas and 117 acoustic neuromas. Compared with never users of HRT, the relative risks (RRs) for all incident CNS tumours, gliomas, meningiomas and acoustic neuromas in current users of HRT were 1.20 (95% CI: 1.05-1.36), 1.09 (95% CI: 0.89-1.32), 1.34 (95% CI: 1.03-1.75) and 1.58 (95% CI: 1.02-2.45), respectively, and there was no significant difference in the relative risks by tumour type (heterogeneity p = 0.2). In past users of HRT the relative risk was 1.07 (95% CI: 0.93-1.24) for all CNS tumours. Among current users of HRT, there was significant heterogeneity by the type of HRT with the users of oestrogen-only HRT at higher risk of all CNS tumours than users of oestrogen-progestagen HRT (RR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.21-1.67 versus RR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.82-1.16) (heterogeneity p < 0.001). Among current users of oestrogen-only and oestrogen-progestagen HRT, there was no significant heterogeneity by duration of use, hormonal constituent or mode of administration of HRT.

  7. Effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing central nervous system: possible involvement of thyroid hormone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajdel-Sulkowska, E. M.; Li, G. H.; Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Sulkowski, G. M.; Koibuchi, N.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of hypergravity exposure on the developing brain and specifically explored the possibility that these effects are mediated by altered thyroid status. Thirty-four timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to continuous centrifugation at 1.5 G (HG) from gestational Day 11 until one of three key developmental points: postnatal Day (P) 6, P15, or P21 (10 pups/dam: 5 males/5 females). During the 32-day centrifugation, stationary controls (SC, n = 25 dams) were housed in the same room as HG animals. Neonatal body, forebrain, and cerebellum mass and neonatal and maternal thyroid status were assessed at each time point. The body mass of centrifuged neonates was comparatively lower at each time point. The mass of the forebrain and the mass of the cerebellum were maximally reduced in hypergravity-exposed neonates at P6 by 15.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Analysis of neonatal plasma suggested a transient hypothyroid status, as indicated by increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level (38.6%) at P6, while maternal plasma TSH levels were maximally elevated at P15 (38.9%). Neither neonatal nor maternal plasma TH levels were altered, suggesting a moderate hypothyroid condition. Thus, continuous exposure of the developing rats to hypergravity during the embryonic and neonatal periods has a highly significant effect on the developing forebrain and cerebellum and neonatal thyroid status (P < 0.05, Bonferroni corrected). These data are consistent with the hypothesized role of the thyroid hormone in mediating the effect of hypergravity in the developing central nervous system and begin to define the role of TH in the overall response of the developing organism to altered gravity.

  8. Systemic above- and belowground cross talk: hormone-based responses triggered by Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivores in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Egger, Barbara; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Hofmann, Julia; Schausberger, Peter; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Above- and belowground plant parts are simultaneously attacked by different pests and pathogens. The host mediates these interactions and physiologically reacts, e.g. with local and systemic alterations of endogenous hormone levels coupled with coordinated transcriptional changes. This in turn affects attractiveness and susceptibility of the plant to subsequent attackers. Here, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is used to study stress hormone-based systemic responses triggered by simultaneous root parasitism by the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii and shoot herbivory by the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis and the spider mite Tetranychus urticae. First, HPLC/MS and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR are used to show that nematode parasitism strongly affects stress hormone levels and expression of hormone marker genes in shoots. Previous nematode infection is then demonstrated to affect the behavioural and life history performance of both arthropods. While thrips explicitly avoid nematode-infected plants, spider mites prefer them. In addition, the life history performance of T. urticae is significantly enhanced by nematode infection. Finally, systemic changes triggered by shoot-feeding F. occidentalis but not T. urticae are shown to make the roots more attractive for H. schachtii. This work emphasises the importance of above- and belowground signalling and contributes to a better understanding of plant systemic defence mechanisms against plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:26324462

  9. High Molecular Weight Isoforms of Growth Hormone In Cells of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Weigent, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial body of research exists to support the idea that cells of the immune system produce growth hormone (GH). However, the structure and mechanism of action of lymphocyte-derived GH continues to remain largely unknown. Here we present the results of Western analysis of whole cell extracts showing that different molecular weight isoforms of GH of approximately 100 kDa, 65 kDa, and 48 kDa can be detected in primary mouse cells of the immune system and in the mouse EL4 cell line. The identity of the 65 kDa and 48 kDa isoforms of GH were confirmed by mass spectrometry. The various isoforms were detected in both enriched T and B spleen cell populations. The large molecular weight isoform appears to reside primarily in the cytoplasm whereas the lower molecular weight 65 kDa and 48 kDa isoforms were detected primarily in the nucleus. These results also suggest that GH isoforms are induced by oxidative stress. In EL4 cells overexpressing GH, the expression of luciferase controlled by a promoter containing the antioxidant response element is increased almost three-fold above control. The data suggest that the induction of isoforms of the GH molecule in cells of the immune system may be an important mechanism of adaptation and/or protection of lymphoid cells under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:21741628

  10. Twin arginine translocation system in secretory expression of recombinant human growth hormone

    PubMed Central

    Bagherinejad, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir-Mohammad; Abedi, Daryoush; Chou, C. Perry; Moazen, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in E. coli has several advantages over other expression systems. Misfolding, inclusion body formation, and lack of eukaryotic post translational modification are the most disadvantages of this system. Exporting of correctly folded proteins to the outside of reductive cytoplasmic environment through twin-arginine system could help to pass these limiting steps. Two signal sequences, TorA and SufI are used at N-terminal of human growth hormone (hGH) bearing DsbA gene sequence at C-terminal to enhance folding. The synthetic cassettes including the signal sequence, hGH and DsbA were transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) to study the effect of signal sequence and DsbA chaperone on translocation and folding of the protein. The results confirmed using signal sequence at N-terminal of targeted protein and coexpression with DsbA could transport proteins to the periplasmic space and culture media compared to control groups. Although there is no protein band of somatropin in SDS-Page of culture media samples when using SufI as signaling sequence, the study demonstrated TorA signal sequence could transport the target protein to the culture media. However, there was a considerable amount of hGH in periplasmic space when using SufI compared to control. PMID:28003839

  11. Melanin-concentrating hormone: unique peptide neuronal systems in the rat brain and pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Zamir, N.; Skofitsch, G.; Bannon, M.J.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    A unique neuronal system was detected in the rat central nervous system by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay with antibodies to salmon melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). MCH-like immunoreactive (MCH-LI) cell bodies were confined to the hypothalamus. MCH-LI fibers were found throughout the brain but were most prevalent in hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and pons-medulla regions. High concentrations of MCH-LI were measured in the hypothalamic medial forebrain bundle (MFB), posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the diagonal band. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of MFB extracts from rat brain indicate that MCH-like peptide from the rat has a different retention time than that of the salmon MCH. An osmotic stimuls (2% NaCl as drinking water for 120 hr) caused a marked increase in MCH-LI concentrations in the lateral hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe. The present studies establish the presence of MCH-like peptide in the rat brain. The MCH-LI neuronal system is well situated to coordinate complex functions such as regulation of water intake.

  12. Hormonal Modulation of Dendritic Cells Differentiation, Maturation and Function: Implications for the Initiation and Progress of Systemic Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan Pablo; Jara, Evelyn L; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-04-01

    Hormonal homeostasis is crucial for keeping a competent and healthy immune function. Several hormones can modulate the function of various immune cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) by influencing the initiation of the immune response and the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to self-antigens. Hormones, such as estrogens, prolactin, progesterone and glucocorticoids may profoundly affect DCs differentiation, maturation and function leading to either a pro-inflammatory or an anti-inflammatory (or tolerogenic) phenotype. If not properly regulated, these processes can contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. An unbalanced hormonal status may affect the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the expression of activating/inhibitory receptors and co-stimulatory molecules on conventional and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), conferring susceptibility to develop autoimmunity. Estrogen receptor (ER)-α signaling in conventional DCs can promote IFN-α and IL-6 production and induce the expression of CD40, CD86 and MHCII molecules. Furthermore, estrogen modulates the pDCs response to Toll-like receptor ligands enhancing T cell priming. During lupus pathogenesis, ER-α deficiency decreased the expression of MHC II on pDCs from the spleen. In contrast, estradiol administration to lupus-prone female mice increased the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, enhanced the immunogenicity and produced large amounts of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α by bone marrow-derived DCs. These data suggest that estradiol/ER signaling may play an active role during lupus pathology. Similarly, understanding hormonal modulation of DCs may favor the design of new therapeutic strategies based on autologous tolerogenic DCs transfer, especially in sex-biased systemic autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss recent data relative to the role of different hormones (estrogen, prolactin, progesterone and glucocorticoids) in DC function during systemic autoimmune pathogenesis.

  13. A system biology approach highlights a hormonal enhancer effect on regulation of genes in a nitrate responsive "biomodule"

    PubMed Central

    Nero, Damion; Krouk, Gabriel; Tranchina, Daniel; Coruzzi, Gloria M

    2009-01-01

    Background Nitrate-induced reprogramming of the transcriptome has recently been shown to be highly context dependent. Herein, a systems biology approach was developed to identify the components and role of cross-talk between nitrate and hormone signals, likely to be involved in the conditional response of NO3- signaling. Results Biclustering was used to identify a set of genes that are N-responsive across a range of Nitrogen (N)-treatment backgrounds (i.e. nitrogen treatments under different growth conditions) using a meta-dataset of 76 Affymetrix ATH1 chips from 5 different laboratories. Twenty-one biclusters were found to be N-responsive across subsets of this meta-dataset. N-bicluster 9 (126 genes) was selected for further analysis, as it was shown to be reproducibly responsive to NO3- as a signal, across a wide-variety of background conditions and datasets. N-bicluster 9 genes were then used as "seed" to identify putative cross-talk mechanisms between nitrate and hormone signaling. For this, the 126 nitrate-regulated genes in N-bicluster 9 were biclustered over a meta-dataset of 278 ATH1 chips spanning a variety of hormone treatments. This analysis divided the bicluster 9 genes into two classes: i) genes controlled by NO3- only vs. ii) genes controlled by both NO3- and hormones. The genes in the latter group showed a NO3- response that is significantly enhanced, compared to the former. In silico analysis identified two Cis-Regulatory Elements candidates (CRE) (E2F, HSE) potentially involved the interplay between NO3- and hormonal signals. Conclusion This systems analysis enabled us to derive a hypothesis in which hormone signals are proposed to enhance the nitrate response, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for the link between nitrate signaling and the control of plant development. PMID:19500399

  14. The response of the hepatic insulin-like growth factor system to growth hormone and dexamethasone in calves.

    PubMed

    Hammon, H M; Zbinden, Y; Sauerwein, H; Breier, B H; Blum, J W; Donkin, S S

    2003-12-01

    Glucocorticoids inhibit postnatal growth and yet can stimulate the somatotropic axis around birth. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dexamethasone on the somatotropic axis and on the responses of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system to growth hormone treatment in calves. Calves (n=24) were randomly divided into four groups. Group DX was injected with dexamethasone (30 micro g/kg body weight per day), group GH was injected with 500 mg slow-release bovine growth hormone at 14-day intervals, group GHDX was injected with dexamethasone and bovine growth hormone, and group CNTRL (serving as control) was injected with saline from day 3 to day 42 of life. Blood samples were taken on day 3 and blood and liver samples were obtained on days 7, 14, 28 and 42. Body weight increased in the CNTRL and GH groups up to the end of the study and in the DX and GHDX groups up to the fourth week. Dexamethasone treatment decreased (P<0.05) plasma IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-1 on days 7 and 14, but increased (P<0.05) plasma IGFBP-1, decreased (P<0.05) plasma IGF-I and IGFBP-3, and decreased hepatic mRNA for growth hormone receptor (GHR) and IGF-I on day 42. Growth hormone treatment increased (P<0.05) plasma growth hormone concentrations on days 7 and 14, tended to increase (P<0.1) plasma IGF-I concentrations on day 42, and increased (P<0.05) hepatic mRNA levels of GHR on day 14 and IGF-I mRNA levels on days 7 and 14. The combined dexamethasone and growth hormone treatment increased plasma growth hormone concentrations on day 7 and resulted in the highest plasma concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 (day 7 to day 28) as well as the greatest abundance of hepatic GHR (day 14) and IGF-I (days 7 and 14) mRNA. Plasma IGFBP-1 concentrations in the GHDX group behaved in a similar manner as in the DX group. In conclusion, the response of the somatotropic axis to growth hormone treatment could be greatly enhanced by dexamethasone treatment during the neonatal and

  15. Combination of a long-acting delivery system for luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist with Novantrone chemotherapy: increased efficacy in the rat prostate cancer model.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Kook, A I; Monje, E; Redding, T W; Paz-Bouza, J I

    1986-01-01

    The combination of hormonal treatment based on a long-acting delivery system for the agonist [6-D-tryptophan]luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ([D-Trp6]-LH-RH) with the chemotherapeutic agent Novantrone (mitoxantrone dihydrochloride) was studied in the Dunning R3327H rat prostate cancer model. Microcapsules of [D-Trp6]-LH-RH formulated from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calculated to release a controlled dose of 25 micrograms/day were injected intramuscularly once a month. Novantrone (0.25 mg/kg) was injected intravenously once every 3 weeks. Three separate experiments were carried out. When the therapy was started 45 days after transplantation and continued for 70 days, tumor volume in the presence of the microcapsules (966 +/- 219 mm3) or Novantrone (3606 +/- 785 mm3) given alone was significantly decreased compared to controls (14,476 +/- 3045 mm3). However, the combination of microcapsules and Novantrone caused a greater inhibition of tumor growth (189 +/- 31 mm3) than the single agents. Similar effects were seen when the percent increase in tumor volume was examined. Tumor volume increased 10,527 +/- 1803% for the control group. The inhibition of growth caused by the [D-Trp6]LH-RH microcapsules alone (672 +/- 153% increase in volume) was again greater than that caused by Novantrone alone (2722 +/- 421% increase). The combination of the two agents was again the most effective, resulting in an increase in tumor volume of only 105 +/- 29%. Control tumors weighed 30.0 +/- 6.5 g. Tumor weights were much less in the groups treated with either microcapsules (3.28 +/- 0.69 g) or Novantrone (19.53 +/- 3.3 g) alone. The lowest tumor weights after 70 days of treatment were obtained in the group that received the combination of [D-Trp6]LH-RH microcapsules and Novantrone (1.02 +/- 0.2 g). Testes and ventral prostate weights were significantly diminished by the administration of microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH alone or in combination with Novantrone. In both of these

  16. Impact of resistance to thyroid hormone on the cardiovascular system in adults.

    PubMed

    Pulcrano, Melania; Palmieri, Emiliano Antonio; Mannavola, Deborah; Ciulla, Michele; Campi, Irene; Covelli, Danila; Lombardi, Gaetano; Biondi, Bernadette; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    The clinical manifestations of resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) are highly variable, and the impact of RTH on the cardiovascular system has been poorly investigated. The objective of the study was to evaluate the cardiovascular characteristics of 16 untreated and asymptomatic patients with RTH compared with 16 euthyroid healthy controls to define the cardiovascular involvement in RTH syndrome. Sixteen untreated and asymptomatic RTH patients (eight males; aged 33 +/- 12 yr, range 21-45 yr) and 16 controls (nine males; aged 33 +/- 5 yr, range 24-42 yr) were enrolled. Clinical data, thyroid status, and echocardiographic results were recorded. Heart rate was comparable with that of controls, whereas arterial pressure was higher than controls. Mean interventricular septum diastolic thickness and mean left ventricular (LV) posterior wall diastolic thickness were significantly lower in RTH patients than controls with a consequent significant decrease of the mean LV mass and LV mass indexed by body surface area. Patients also had abnormalities of myocardial relaxation as indicated by a significant increase of peak A and consequent reduction of the early to late ratio. Finally, systemic vascular resistance was significantly higher in RTH patients than controls. Our results suggest the presence of cardiovascular alterations in asymptomatic and untreated RTH patients similar to those reported in hypothyroid patients. Our strict selection likely created a bias in the inclusion of a particular type of RTH patients, who could represent a minority of patients with RTH. However, no correlation was found between the type of mutation and cardiovascular characteristics of RTH patients.

  17. Periplasmic production via the pET expression system of soluble, bioactive human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Szoka, Francis C

    2013-02-01

    A pET based expression system for the production of recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) directed to the Escherichia coli periplasmic space was developed. The pET22b plasmid was used as a template for creating vectors that encode hGH fused to either a pelB or ompA secretion signal under control of the strong bacteriophage T7 promoter. The pelB- and ompA-hGH constructs expressed in BL21 (λDE3)-RIPL E. coli are secreted into the periplasm which facilitates isolation of soluble hGH by selective disruption of the outer membrane. A carboxy-terminal poly-histidine tag enabled purification by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography with an average yield of 1.4 mg/L culture of purified hGH, independent of secretion signal. Purified pelB- and ompA-hGH are monomeric based on size exclusion chromatography with an intact mass corresponding to mature hGH indicating proper cleavage of the signal peptide and folding in the periplasm. Both pelB- and ompA-hGH bind the hGH receptor with high affinity and potently stimulate Nb2 cell growth. These results demonstrate that the pET expression system is suitable for the rapid and simple isolation of bioactive, soluble hGH from E. coli.

  18. Fibromyalgia, autism, and opioid addiction as natural and induced disorders of the endogenous opioid hormonal system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian; Ulberg, Scott; Shivale, Swati; Donaldson, Jeffrey; Milczarski, Ben; Faraone, Stephen V

    2014-10-01

    Because of their circulation through the blood, the multiplicity of receptor sites, and the diversity of functions, opioids may most accurately be designated as a hormone. Opioids modulate the intensity of pain. In mammals, the opioid system has been modified to modulate social interactions as well (Panksepp and Watt, 2011). Over 10,000 patient encounters were observed on a neuropsychoanalytic addiction medicine service. Cold pressor times (CPT) were recorded before and after stimulation of the opioid system with low-dose naltrexone (LDN) for patients after opioid detoxification and for fibromyalgia patients. Patients maintained on opioids relate autistically. The cold, unrelated nature of their human interactions was reversed by detoxification from opioids. Fibromyalgia patients have difficulty participating in human relationships, as if they lack an ability to respond interpersonally, as do post-detoxification patients. LDN improved pain tolerance as shown by a significant increase on CPT for post detoxification patients from 16 seconds to 55 seconds and in fibromyalgia patients from 21 seconds to 42 seconds, and improved relatedness. The correlation of opioid prescribing increasing over time and autism prevalence increasing over time is highly significant. 1. Opioid-maintained patients relate autistically. 2. Autism is a hyperopioidergic disorder. 3. Fibromylagia is a hypoopioidergic disorder. 4. Low opioid tone caused by opioid maintenance or fibromyalgia can usually be reversed with low-dose naltrexone. 5. The increase in the incidence of autism may have been caused by the increase in use of opioids for analgesia during childbirth.

  19. Chitosan nanoparticles as carrier systems for the plant growth hormone gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Anderson Espirito Santo; Silva, Paula Mayara; Oliveira, Jhones Luis; Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2017-02-01

    This work concerns the development of nanocarriers composed of alginate/chitosan (ALG/CS) and chitosan/tripolyphosphate (CS/TPP) for the plant growth regulator gibberellic acid (GA3). ALG/CS nanoparticles with and without GA3 presented mean size of 450±10nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.3, zeta potential of -29±0.5mV, concentrations of 1.52×10(11) and 1.92×10(11) nanoparticles mL(-1), respectively, and 100% encapsulation efficiency. CS/TPP nanoparticles with and without GA3 presented mean size of 195±1nm, PDI of 0.3, zeta potential of +27±3mV, concentrations of 1.92×10(12) and 3.54×10(12) nanoparticles mL(-1), respectively, and 90% encapsulation efficiency. The nanoparticles were stable during 60days and the two systems differed in terms of the release mechanism, with the release depending on factors such as pH and temperature. Bioactivity assays using Phaseolus vulgaris showed that the ALG/CS-GA3 nanoparticles were most effective in increasing leaf area and the levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. The systems developed showed good potential, providing greater stability and efficiency of this plant hormone in agricultural applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [A new conceptual approach for searching for molecular causes of diabetes mellitus, based on the study of functioning of hormonal signaling systems].

    PubMed

    Pertseva, M N; Kuznetsova, L A; Shpakov, A O

    2013-01-01

    The review deals with analysis and generalization of the data obtained by authors on abnormalities in hormonal signal systems in diabetes mellitus (DM)--in rats with experimental models of DM of the types 1 and 2, in patients with DM, and in invertebrates (mollucs) with experimental diabetes-like state. Changes of functional state of hormonal signal systems regulated by different hormones, including biogenic amines and peptides of the insulin group, in a wide spectrum of tissues are discussed. The conclusion is made that disturbances in hormonal signal systems are the key molecular causes of physiological and metabolic abnormalities occurring in the types 1 and 2 DM. A concept on polyhormonal genesis of DM and the systemic nature of disturbances in the hormone-regulated signaling cascades under conditions of DM is formulated.

  1. Asp327Asn polymorphism of sex hormone-binding globulin gene is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus incidence.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Piotr; Gasik, Robert; Lianeri, Margarita; Cieślak, Dorota; Wudarski, Mariusz; Hrycaj, Paweł; Łacki, Jan K; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous sex hormones have been observed to have a role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) predisposition. Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) regulates the bioavailability of sex hormones to target tissues. Therefore, we examined the distribution of the SHBG functional polymorphism Asp327Asn (rs6259) in SLE patients (n = 150) and controls (n = 150) in a Polish population. We found a contribution of the SHBG327Asn variant to the development of SLE. Women with the Asp/Asn and Asn/Asn genotypes displayed a 2.630-fold increased risk of SLE (95% CI = 1.561-4.433, P = 0.0003). SHBG has a much higher affinity for testosterone than estradiol, and the SHBG327Asn variant displays a reduction of estradiol clearance. Therefore we suggest that the opposing effects of estrogens and testosterone on the immune system and imbalance in the levels of these hormones in SLE patients can be enhanced by the SHBG327Asn protein variant.

  2. Distinct expression patterns of glycoprotein hormone subunits in the lophotrochozoan Aplysia: implications for the evolution of neuroendocrine systems in animals.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Andreas; Plachetzki, David; Donelly, Evonne; Gunaratne, Dinuka; Bobkova, Yelena; Jacobson, John; Kohn, Andrea B; Moroz, Leonid L

    2012-11-01

    Glycoprotein hormones (GPHs) comprise a group of signaling molecules critical for major metabolic and reproductive functions. In vertebrates they include chorionic gonadotropin, LH, FSH, and TSH. The active hormones are characterized by heterodimerization between a common α and hormone-specific β subunit, which activate leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein coupled receptors. To date, genes referred to as GPHα2 and GPHβ5 have been the only glycoprotein hormone subunits identified in invertebrates, suggesting that other GPHα and GPHβ subunits diversified during vertebrate evolution. Still the functions of GPHα2 and GPHβ5 remain largely unknown for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To further understand the evolution and putative function of these subunits, we cloned and analyzed phylogenetically two glycoprotein subunits, AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ, from the sea hare Aplysia californica. Model based three-dimensional predictions of AcaGPHβ confirm the presence of a complete cysteine knot, two hairpin loops, and a long loop. As in the human GPHβ5 subunit the seatbelt structure is absent in AcaGPHβ. We also found that AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ subunits are expressed in larval stages of Aplysia, and we present a detailed expression map of the subunits in the adult central nervous system using in situ hybridizations. Both subunits are expressed in subpopulations of pleural and buccal mechanosensory neurons, suggesting a neuronal modulatory function of these subunits in Aplysia. Furthermore it supports the model of a relatively diffuse neuroendocrine-like system in molluscs, where specific primary sensory neurons release peptides extrasynaptically (paracrine secretion). This is in contrast to vertebrates and insects, in which releasing and stimulating factor from centralized sensory regions of the central nervous system ultimately regulate hormone release in peripheral glands.

  3. Distinct Expression Patterns of Glycoprotein Hormone Subunits in the Lophotrochozoan Aplysia: Implications for the Evolution of Neuroendocrine Systems in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Plachetzki, David; Donelly, Evonne; Gunaratne, Dinuka; Bobkova, Yelena; Jacobson, John; Kohn, Andrea B.; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2012-01-01

    Glycoprotein hormones (GPHs) comprise a group of signaling molecules critical for major metabolic and reproductive functions. In vertebrates they include chorionic gonadotropin, LH, FSH, and TSH. The active hormones are characterized by heterodimerization between a common α and hormone-specific β subunit, which activate leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein coupled receptors. To date, genes referred to as GPHα2 and GPHβ5 have been the only glycoprotein hormone subunits identified in invertebrates, suggesting that other GPHα and GPHβ subunits diversified during vertebrate evolution. Still the functions of GPHα2 and GPHβ5 remain largely unknown for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To further understand the evolution and putative function of these subunits, we cloned and analyzed phylogenetically two glycoprotein subunits, AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ, from the sea hare Aplysia californica. Model based three-dimensional predictions of AcaGPHβ confirm the presence of a complete cysteine knot, two hairpin loops, and a long loop. As in the human GPHβ5 subunit the seatbelt structure is absent in AcaGPHβ. We also found that AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ subunits are expressed in larval stages of Aplysia, and we present a detailed expression map of the subunits in the adult central nervous system using in situ hybridizations. Both subunits are expressed in subpopulations of pleural and buccal mechanosensory neurons, suggesting a neuronal modulatory function of these subunits in Aplysia. Furthermore it supports the model of a relatively diffuse neuroendocrine-like system in molluscs, where specific primary sensory neurons release peptides extrasynaptically (paracrine secretion). This is in contrast to vertebrates and insects, in which releasing and stimulating factor from centralized sensory regions of the central nervous system ultimately regulate hormone release in peripheral glands. PMID:22977258

  4. Thyroid hormone and cardiovascular system: from basic concepts to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Iervasi, Giorgio; Nicolini, Giuseppina

    2013-04-01

    Experimental and clinical findings strongly support the concept that thyroid hormone (TH) plays a fundamental role in the cardiovascular (CV) homeostasis. CV diseases represent a major public health care and economic problem being one of the principal causes of morbidity, mortality and hospitalization. In particular, chronic heart failure (HF) is one of the most common reasons for general practitioners consultations in people >65-70 years old. TH derangement may have a key role in the evolution process of HF. In HF, the main and earlier alteration of the thyroid function is referred to as "low-T3" syndrome characterized by the reduction in serum total T3 and free T3 with normal levels of thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin (TSH). This syndrome may affect till one-third of advanced HF patients. The main goal of this mini-review is to examine the main pathophysiological and clinical links between an altered thyroid metabolism and CV diseases, namely HF during progression of disease from organ specific to systemic disorder.

  5. Histamine inhibits the melanin-concentrating hormone system: implications for sleep and arousal

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Gregory S; Olivas, Nicholas D; Ikrar, Taruna; Sanathara, Nayna M; Wang, Lien; Wang, Zhiwei; Civelli, Olivier; Xu, Xiangmin

    2014-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-producing neurons are known to regulate a wide variety of physiological functions such as feeding, metabolism, anxiety and depression, and reward. Recent studies have revealed that MCH neurons receive projections from several wake-promoting brain regions and are integral to the regulation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Here, we provide evidence in both rats and mice that MCH neurons express histamine-3 receptors (H3R), but not histamine-1 (H1R) or histamine-2 (H2R) receptors. Electrophysiological recordings in brain slices from a novel line of transgenic mice that specifically express the reporter ZsGreen in MCH neurons show that histamine strongly inhibits MCH neurons, an effect which is TTX insensitive, and blocked by the intracellular presence of GDP-β-S. A specific H3R agonist, α-methylhistamine, mimicks the inhibitory effects of histamine, and a specific neutral H3R antagonist, VUF 5681, blocks this effect. Tertiapin Q (TPQ), a G protein-dependent inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel inhibitor, abolishes histaminergic inhibition of MCH neurons. These results indicate that histamine directly inhibits MCH neurons through H3R by activating GIRK channels and suggest that that inhibition of the MCH system by wake-active histaminergic neurons may be responsible for silencing MCH neurons during wakefulness and thus may be directly involved in the regulation of sleep and arousal. PMID:24639485

  6. Autoradiographic localization of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Manaker, S.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the rat and human central nervous system (CNS). The binding of (/sup 3/H)-3-methyl-histidine/sup 2/-TRH ((/sup 3/H)-MeTRH) to TRH receptors was saturable, of a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5 nM), and specific for TRH analogs. Studies with neurotoxins ibotenic acid and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) suggest that TRH receptors within the amygdala are predominantly located on cell bodies, and not nerve terminals. Finally, an examination was made of the concentrations of TRH receptors in spinal cords of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a degenerative disease of the motor neurons located in Lamina IX. Large decreases in TRH receptors were noted in ALS spinal cords, when compared to non-neurological controls, probably reflecting the loss of motor neurons. In addition, decreases in the TRH receptor concentration of Lamina II were observed. This finding may reflect the sensitivity of neurons throughout the CNS to the pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuronal degeneration which cause ALS.

  7. Reduction of thyrotropin-releasing hormone concentrations in central nervous system of African lungfish during estivation.

    PubMed

    Kreider, M S; Winokur, A; Pack, A I; Fishman, A P

    1990-03-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) has been implicated as an important modulator of arousal state in mammals. Changes in the content of TRH in several brain regions accompany hibernation in the ground squirrel. In the present study, the involvement of TRH in the regulation of arousal was further investigated in the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens, which contain high concentrations of TRH throughout its central nervous system and enter a hibernation-like state, estivation. Lungfish were divided into three groups. Group 1 was fed normally, group 2 was starved while aquatic, and group 3 was allowed to enter into a state of estivation. After 3 months, the lungfish were sacrificed and the concentrations of TRH, norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin were determined in the telencephalon, diencephalon, medulla, and spinal cord. In estivation, there was a significant decline in the concentration of TRH in the diencephalon, with no alteration in other regions. Starvation had no effect on regional TRH concentrations. The concentration of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin did not change in estivation; however, a significant elevation of norepinephrine in the diencephalon and dopamine in the telencephalon was observed in starvation. Starvation and estivation were associated with significant declines in the protein content of the diencephalon and medulla. The estivation-linked decline in TRH in the diencephalon of the lungfish is similar to the decrease in TRH content in the hypothalamus in hibernating ground squirrels. These findings lend further support to the importance of TRH in the regulation of arousal state.

  8. [The crisis of the hormonal system: the health-effects of endocrine disruptors].

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2017-09-01

    The endocrine disruptors are natural or arteficial molecules wich are present in the animal (human) environment and entering into the organism. They are bound by hormone receptors, simulating or inhibiting the normal hormonal message. This way they are able to stimulate or hinder the function of the given cell, as well as the synthesis and transport of hormones or receptors. They can cause faulty hormonal imprinting in critical periods of development with lifelong consequences, as alteration of hormone-influenced cell functions, inclination to or manifestation of diseases, so they have medical importance. The number of endocrine disruptors as well as their amount are large and continously growing. Numerous, in adult age manifested disease (e.g. malignant tumors) can be deduced to perinatal harms. Their long-lasting effect can cause the alteration of basal human developmental characteristics (e.g. start of menarche). Vitamins A and D are hormones (exohormones) and could be endocrine disruptors. Perinatal imprinting caused by endocrine disruptors is transmitted to the progenies epigenetically, which also can influence the drug-sensitivity of offspring' receptors. If the epigenetic change is continuously transmitted to the progeny generations, this could have human-evolutionary importance. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(37): 1443-1451.

  9. Regulation of synaptic functions in central nervous system by endocrine hormones and the maintenance of energy homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Zhiping P.; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Energy homoeostasis, a co-ordinated balance of food intake and energy expenditure, is regulated by the CNS (central nervous system). The past decade has witnessed significant advances in our understanding of metabolic processes and brain circuitry which responds to a broad range of neural, nutrient and hormonal signals. Accumulating evidence demonstrates altered synaptic plasticity in the CNS in response to hormone signals. Moreover, emerging observations suggest that synaptic plasticity underlies all brain functions, including the physiological regulation of energy homoeostasis, and that impaired synaptic constellation and plasticity may lead to pathological development and conditions. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of postsynaptic receptors such as AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid), NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) and GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) receptors, and the presynaptic components by hormone signals. A detailed understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms by which hormones regulate energy homoeostasis may lead to novel strategies in treating metabolic disorders. PMID:22582733

  10. Hormones and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blackstein, Martin Elliot

    1984-01-01

    Hormonal therapy is the first systemic therapy to have been used successfully in the treatment of cancer. Developments in steroid hormone receptor assays in the last decade have resulted in the first predictable assays for cancer therapy. The role of hormones, in both the development and treatment of breast, prostate and uterine cancer, is reviewed. Because hormonal therapy is generally a less toxic palliative treatment than other treatments (e.g., chemotherapy and radiation), it has been used for malignancies such as malignant melanoma, hypernephroma, and carcinoid. PMID:21278945

  11. The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system in an animal model of depression-like behavior.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M J; Parks, G S; Clinton, S M; Watson, S J; Akil, H; Civelli, O

    2012-08-01

    Selective breeding for divergence in locomotion in a novel environment (bHR, bred High-Responder; bLR, bred Low-Responder) correlates with stress-reactivity, spontaneous anxiety-like behaviors and predicts vulnerability in a rodent model of depression. Identifying genetic factors that may account for such vulnerability are key determinants not only for the illness outcome but also for the development of better-tailored treatment options. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuropeptide that exhibits some of the hallmarks of a regulator of affective states. The aim of this study was to ascertain the role of the MCH system in depression-like behaviors in bHR vs. bLR rats. bLR rats showed a 44% increase in hypothalamic pMCH mRNA and a 14% decrease in hippocampal CA1 MCH1R mRNA when compared to bHR rats. Interestingly, the amount of time that rats spent immobile in the FST (depressive-like behavior) correlated positively with the amount of hypothalamic pMCH mRNA and negatively with that of hippocampal CA1 MCH1R. The results indicate that the bLR-bHR is a useful rat model to investigate individual basal genetic differences that participate in the monitoring of emotional responsiveness (i.e., depression- and anxiety-like behaviors). They also point to the MCH system (i.e., chronically higher pMCH expression and consequently receptor down-regulation) as a candidate biomarker for the severity of depressive-like behavior. The data indicate that MCH1R participates in the modulation of depression-like behavior through a process that involves the CA1 region of the hippocampus, supporting the possible use of MCH1R antagonists in the treatment of depression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Steroid hormones, prostanoids, and angiogenic systems during rescue of the corpus luteum in pigs.

    PubMed

    Przygrodzka, E; Kaczmarek, M M; Kaczynski, P; Ziecik, A J

    2016-02-01

    In order to characterize the transition of the corpora lutea (CL) from acquisition of luteolytic sensitivity to rescue of luteal function: i) the expression of 38 factors associated with steroids, prostanoids, and angiogenic systems and ii) concentrations of the main hormones responsible for maintenance of CL function in cyclic and pregnant pigs were examined. Additionally, the effect of prostaglandin (PG) E2 and F2 α on luteal function during the estrous cycle and pregnancy was evaluated in vitro. Significantly up-regulated gene expression was revealed in CL collected on day 14 of the estrous cycle (CYP19A1, ESR2, PTGS2, HIF1A, and EDN1) and on days 12-14 of pregnancy (SCARB1, PGRMC1, STAR, HSD3B1, NR5A1, PTGFR, PTGER4, and VEGFA). Elevated concentrations of estradiol-17β and PGE2 occurred in CL on days 12 and 14 of pregnancy respectively, while an increased intraluteal PGF2 α content was noted on day 14 of the estrous cycle. Both PGs increased the synthesis of progesterone by cultured luteal slices obtained on day 14 of pregnancy, in contrast to the action of PGF2 α on the corresponding day of the estrous cycle. PGE2 stimulated cAMP production via PTGER2 and PTGER4, while PGF2 α elevated the content of CREB in cultured luteal slices from CL of pregnant pigs. In silico analysis showed that infiltration of lymphocytes and apoptosis of microvascular endothelium were activated in CL on day 12 of the estrous cycle vs pregnancy. Summarizing, an abundance of E2 and PGE2 during pregnancy regulates specific pathways responsible for steroidogenesis, the prostanoid signaling system and angiogenesis during rescue from luteolysis in porcine CL.

  13. The effects of hypokalaemia on the hormone exocytosis in adenohypophysis and prolactinoma cell culture model systems.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Z; Pálföldi, R; László, A; Radács, M; László, M; Hausinger, P; Tiszlavicz, L; Rázga, Z; Valkusz, Z; Gálfi, M

    2014-11-01

    The extracellular ion milieu determines the exocytosis mechanism that is coupled to spontaneous electrical activity. The K(+) ion plays crucial role in this mechanism: as the potassium current is associated with membrane hyperpolarization and hormone release through protein cascade activation. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the response mechanisms of normal adenohypophysis and adenohypophyseal prolactinoma cell populations at different extracellular K(+) levels with an otherwise isoionic milieu of all other essential ions. We focused on prolactin (PRL) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) release.In our experimental study, female Wistar rats (n=20) were treated with estrone-acetate (150 μg/kg b.w./week) for 6 months to induce prolactinomas in the adenohypophysis. Primary, monolayer cell cultures were prepared by enzymatic and mechanical digestion. PRL and ACTH hormone presence was measured by radioimmunoassay or immuno-chemiluminescence assay. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess the apoptotic cells.Differences between the effects of hypokalaemia on normal adenohypophysis cultures and prolactinoma cell populations were investigated. Significant alteration (p<0.001, n=10) in hormone exocytosis was detected in K(+) treated adenohypophyseal and prolactinoma cell cultures compared to untreated groups. Immunocyto-chemistry showed that Bcl-2 expression was reduced under hypokalaemic conditions.The decrease in hormone exocytosis was tightly correlated to the extracellular K(+) in both cell types, leading to the conclusion that external K(+) may be the major factor for the inhibition of hormone release. The significant increase in hormone content in supernatant media suggests that hypokalaemia may play important role in apoptosis.

  14. The potential environmental risks of pharmaceuticals in Vietnamese aquatic systems: case study of antibiotics and synthetic hormones.

    PubMed

    Thanh Thuy, Hoang Thi; Nguyen, Tuan Dinh

    2013-11-01

    Presently, many pharmaceuticals are listed as emerging contaminants since they are considered to be great potential threats to environmental ecosystems. These contaminants, thus, present significant research interest due to their extensive use and their physicochemical and toxicological properties. This review discusses a whole range of findings that address various aspects of the usage, occurrence, and potentially environmental risks of pharmaceuticals released from various anthropogenic sources, with emphasis on the aquatic systems in Vietnam. The published information and collected data on the usage and occurrence of antibiotics and synthetic hormone in effluents and aquatic systems of Vietnam is reported. This is followed by a potential ecological risk assessment of these pollutants. The extensive use of antibiotics and synthetic hormones in Vietnam could cause the discharge and accumulation of these contaminants in the aquatic systems and potentially poses serious risks for ecosystems. Vietnam is known to have extensively used antibiotics and synthetic hormones, so these contaminants are inevitably detected in aquatic systems. Thus, an appropriate monitoring program of these contaminants is urgently needed in order to mitigate their negative effects and protect the ecosystems.

  15. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of estrogen , a hormone that helps control the menstrual cycle . Changing estrogen levels can bring on symptoms such ... of two hormones—estrogen and progesterone —control your menstrual cycle. These hormones are made by the ovaries . Estrogen ...

  16. Is the vascular system a main target for thyroid hormones? From molecular and biochemical findings to clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Laura; Colantuoni, Antonio; Iervasi, Giorgio

    2005-04-01

    The cardiovascular system is an important target for thyroid hormones (THs). Until recently, our understanding of the biological role of THs has been largely based on a catalog of effects observed in excess or deficiency of THs. In the last decades, however, some important progress has been done in defining the molecular and biochemical basis of thyroid hormone action at the cellular and nuclear level. Most of the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the effects of THs on the heart have been clarified, whereas few data are available about the mechanisms of action of THs on the vasculature. Data reported so far describe the thyroid hormone effects on the vascular system as indirect consequences of thermogenic or hemodynamic derangements. The aim of this review is to focus on the direct role of THs in the vascular system, to analyze the main factors involved in this regulatory process, to evaluate the causes of imbalance, their relationships to some pathophysiological conditions, and, finally, to hypothesize effective therapeutic approaches. Our review considers data on the molecular and biochemical properties of iodothyronine deiodinases, with particular attention to D2, the enzyme for the local conversion of the precursor thyroxine (T4) into the biologically active triiodothyronine (T3). We summarize data on the deiodinase tissue distribution, subcellular localization, topology and structure-activity relationships. We also discuss the physiological role of deiodinases and their involvement in the TH-mediated regulation of vascular function.

  17. HUMAN INTERVENTIONS TO CHARACTERIZE NOVEL RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN-ALDOSTERONE SYSTEM AND PARATHYROID HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jenifer M.; Williams, Jonathan S.; Luther, James M.; Garg, Rajesh; Garza, Amanda E.; Pojoga, Luminita H.; Ruan, Daniel T.; Williams, Gordon H.; Adler, Gail K.; Vaidya, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Observational studies in primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) suggest a positive relationship between aldosterone and parathyroid hormone (PTH); however, interventions to better characterize the physiologic relationship between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and PTH are needed. We evaluated the effect of individual RAAS components on PTH using 4 interventions in humans without PA. PTH was measured before and after: Study 1) low-dose angiotensin II [AngII] infusion (1 ng/kg/min) and captopril administration (25 mg × 1); Study 2) high-dose AngII infusion (3 ng/kg/min); Study 3) blinded crossover randomization to aldosterone infusion (0.7 µg/kg/hr) and vehicle; and Study 4) blinded randomization to spironolactone (50mg/daily) or placebo for 6 weeks. Infusion of AngII at 1 ng/kg/min acutely increased aldosterone (+148%) and PTH (+10.3%), while AngII at 3 ng/kg/min induced larger incremental changes in aldosterone (+241%) and PTH (+36%) (P<0.01). Captopril acutely decreased aldosterone (−12%) and PTH (−9.7%) (P<0.01). In contrast, aldosterone infusion robustly raised serum aldosterone (+892%) without modifying PTH. However, spironolactone therapy over 6 weeks modestly lowered PTH when compared to placebo (P<0.05). In vitro studies revealed the presence of AngII type I and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein expression in normal and adenomatous human parathyroid tissues. We observed novel pleiotropic relationships between RAAS components and the regulation of PTH in individuals without PA: the acute modulation of PTH by the RAAS appears to be mediated by AngII, whereas the long-term influence of the RAAS on PTH may involve aldosterone. Future studies to evaluate the impact of RAAS inhibitors in treating PTH-mediated disorders are warranted. PMID:24191286

  18. Optimal systemic therapy for premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jankowitz, Rachel C; McGuire, Kandace P; Davidson, Nancy E

    2013-08-01

    Although systemic therapy is one of the cornerstones of therapy for premenopausal women with early stage breast cancer, there remain many unknowns regarding its optimal use. By accident of clinical trial design, much clinical investigation in premenopausal women has focused on chemotherapy. More recently the value of endocrine therapy (tamoxifen and ovarian suppression/ablation via surgery, LHRH agonists, or chemotherapy-induced menopause) has become apparent, and some form of endocrine therapy is viewed as standard for virtually all premenopausal women with early stage invasive breast cancer that expresses estrogen and/or progesterone receptor. Critical open questions include type and duration of endocrine therapy and the development of prognostic/predictive markers to help identify patients who are likely to benefit from chemotherapy in addition to endocrine therapy. For some years, five years of tamoxifen has been viewed as the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal hormone-responsive breast cancer, although the ATLAS trial suggests that an additional five years of tamoxifen can be considered. The MA17 trial also suggests that an additional five years of an aromatase inhibitor can be considered for women who become postmenopausal during tamoxifen therapy. Information about the value of ovarian suppression continues to emerge, most recently with the demonstration of excellent outcome with goserelin plus tamoxifen in the ABCSG12 trial. The SOFT and TEXT trials, whose accrual is now complete, should help to define optimal endocrine therapy. In addition, use of the 21-gene recurrence score assay may help to delineate the additional value of chemotherapy for patients with node-negative breast cancer, and its utility in the setting of women with 1-3 positive lymph nodes is under study in the RxPONDER trial. Nonetheless, the need for other predictive biomarkers to select appropriate therapy remains real. Finally, attention to long term benefits and side effects

  19. Effect of growth hormone on renal and systemic acid-base homeostasis in humans.

    PubMed

    Sicuro, A; Mahlbacher, K; Hulter, H N; Krapf, R

    1998-04-01

    The effects of recombinant human growth hormone (GH, 0.1 U.kg body wt-1.12 h-1) on systemic and renal acid-base homeostasis were investigated in six normal subjects with preexisting sustained chronic metabolic acidosis, induced by NH4Cl administration (4.2 mmol.kg body wt-1.day-1). GH administration increased and maintained plasma bicarbonate concentration from 14.1 +/- 1.4 to 18.6 +/- 1.1 mmol/l (P < 0.001). The GH-induced increase in plasma bicarbonate concentration was the consequence of a significant increase in net acid excretion that was accounted for largely by an increase in renal NH+4 excretion sufficient in magnitude to override a decrease in urinary titratable acid excretion. During GH administration, urinary pH increased and correlated directly and significantly with urinary NH4+ concentration. Urinary net acid excretion rates were not different during the steady-state periods of acidosis and acidosis with GH administration. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid activities increased significantly in response to acidosis and were suppressed (glucocorticoid) or decreased to control levels (mineralocorticoid) by GH. The partial correction of metabolic acidosis occurred despite GH-induced renal sodium retention (180 mmol; gain in weight of 1.8 +/- 0.2 kg, P < 0.005) and decreased glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid activities. Thus GH (and/or insulin-like growth factor I) increased plasma bicarbonate concentration and partially corrected metabolic acidosis. This effect was generated in large part by and maintained fully by a renal mechanism (i.e., increased renal NH3 production and NH+4/net acid excretion).

  20. Assessment of anti-Müllerian hormone levels in premenopausal patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gasparin, A A; Souza, L; Siebert, M; Xavier, R M; Chakr, R M S; Palominos, P E; Brenol, J C T; Monticielo, O A

    2016-03-01

    The ovarian reserve of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may be affected by disease activity and medication use. Studies have found that patients with SLE have similar fertility rates as healthy women of the same age. The goal of the present study was to investigate the ovarian reserve of patients with SLE by measuring anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, and compare it to that of healthy controls. This was a case-control study performed on 80 premenopausal women, of whom 40 fulfilled the 1997 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for SLE and 40 healthy controls paired by oral contraceptive use. Serum concentrations of AMH in peripheral venous blood were measured using a human AMH ELISA kit (CUSABIO, Wuhan, China). AMH serum levels did not differ between patients with SLE and controls (22.79 ± 17.32 ng/ml versus 21.41 ± 16.22 ng/ml, respectively, p = 0.7), even after adjusting for age (21.03 ± 2.074 ng/ml versus 23.97 ± 2.71 ng/ml; p = 0.5). AHM levels were not significantly correlated with disease duration (r = 0.2; p = 0.3), body mass index (r = 0.2; p = 0.2) and disease activity (SLEDAI (r = 0.1; p = 0.7)) and damage indices (SLICC (r = 0.1; p = 0.7)). No associations were found between AMH and ethnicity, current smoking, as well as current or prior use of cyclophosphamide and other immunosuppressants. In this cross-sectional study, women with SLE demonstrated similar AMH levels as healthy controls, suggesting preserved ovarian reserve in this population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Activin/follistatin system in grass carp pituitary cells: - Regulation by local release of growth hormone and luteinizing hormone and its functional role in growth hormone synthesis and secretion

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Roger S. K.; Bai, Jin; Yuen, Karen W. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotrophin regulation by activin/follistatin system is well-documented, but the corresponding effect on growth hormone (GH) has not been fully characterized and with little information available in lower vertebrates, especially in fish models. In grass carp, local interactions of GH and luteinizing hormone (LH) can induce GH release and gene expression at pituitary level via autocrine/paracrine mechanisms. To shed light on the role of activin/follistatin system in GH regulation by local actions of GH and LH, grass carp activin βA and βB were cloned, shown to be single-copy genes expressed in the pituitary, and confirmed to encode activin proteins capable of transactivating promoter with activin-responsive elements. In grass carp pituitary cells, activin A and B were effective in reducing GH secretion and GH cell content with concurrent drop in GH mRNA level whereas the opposite was true for follistatin, the activin-binding protein known to neutralize the effects of endogenous activin. Treatment with activin A and B not only could suppress basal but also inhibit GH mRNA expression induced by GH and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a functional analogue of LH in fish model. Apparently, down-regulation of GH mRNA by activin was mediated by reducing GH transcript stability with concurrent inhibition on GH promoter activity via the SMAD pathway. In reciprocal experiments, GH treatment was found to up-regulate activin βA, activin βB and follistatin mRNA levels in carp pituitary cells but the opposite was noted by removing endogenous GH with GH antiserum. Interestingly, parallel treatment with hCG could also inhibit basal as well as GH-induced activin βA, activin βB and follistatin gene expression. These results, as a whole, indicate that the pituitary activin/follistatin system can serve as a regulatory target for local interactions of GH and LH and contribute to GH regulation by autocrine/paracrine mechanisms in the carp pituitary. PMID:28662143

  2. Interactions of the human cardiopulmonary, hormonal and body fluid systems in parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Limper, U; Gauger, P; Beck, P; Krainski, F; May, F; Beck, L E J

    2014-06-01

    Commercial parabolic flights accessible to customers with a wide range of health states will become more prevalent in the near future because of a growing private space flight sector. However, parabolic flights present the passengers' cardiovascular system with a combination of stressors, including a moderately hypobaric hypoxic ambient environment (HH) and repeated gravity transitions (GT). Thus, the aim of this study was to identify unique and combined effects of HH and GT on the human cardiovascular, pulmonary and fluid regulation systems. Cardiac index was determined by inert gas rebreathing (CI(rb)), and continuous non-invasive finger blood pressure (FBP) was repeatedly measured in 18 healthy subjects in the standing position while they were in parabolic flight at 0 and 1.8 G(z). Plasma volume (PV) and fluid regulating blood hormones were determined five times over the flight day. Eleven out of the 18 subjects were subjected to an identical test protocol in a hypobaric chamber in ambient conditions comparable to parabolic flight. CI(rb) in 0 G(z) decreased significantly during flight (early, 5.139 ± 1.326 L/min; late, 4.150 ± 1.082 L/min) because of a significant decrease in heart rate (HR) (early, 92 ± 15 min(-1); late, 78 ± 12 min(-1)), even though the stroke volume (SV) remained the same. HH produced a small decrease in the PV, both in the hypobaric chamber and in parabolic flight, indicating a dominating HH effect without a significant effect of GT on PV (-52 ± 34 and -115 ± 32 ml, respectively). Pulmonary tissue volume decreased in the HH conditions because of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (0.694 ± 0.185 and 0.560 ± 0.207 ml) but increased at 0 and 1.8 G(z) in parabolic flight (0.593 ± 0.181 and 0.885 ± 0.458 ml, respectively), indicating that cardiac output and arterial blood pressure rather than HH are the main factors affecting pulmonary vascular regulation in parabolic flight. HH and GT each lead to specific responses of the

  3. Prediction of Scylla olivacea (Crustacea; Brachyura) peptide hormones using publicly accessible transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA) sequences.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    The aquaculture of crabs from the genus Scylla is of increasing economic importance for many Southeast Asian countries. Expansion of Scylla farming has led to increased efforts to understand the physiology and behavior of these crabs, and as such, there are growing molecular resources for them. Here, publicly accessible Scylla olivacea transcriptomic data were mined for putative peptide-encoding transcripts; the proteins deduced from the identified sequences were then used to predict the structures of mature peptide hormones. Forty-nine pre/preprohormone-encoding transcripts were identified, allowing for the prediction of 187 distinct mature peptides. The identified peptides included isoforms of adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-like peptide, allatostatin A, allatostatin B, allatostatin C, bursicon β, CCHamide, corazonin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone/molt-inhibiting hormone, diuretic hormone 31, eclosion hormone, FMRFamide-like peptide, HIGSLYRamide, insulin-like peptide, intocin, leucokinin, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide F, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone, pyrokinin, red pigment concentrating hormone, RYamide, short neuropeptide F, SIFamide and tachykinin-related peptide, all well-known neuropeptide families. Surprisingly, the tissue used to generate the transcriptome mined here is reported to be testis. Whether or not the testis samples had neural contamination is unknown. However, if the peptides are truly produced by this reproductive organ, it could have far reaching consequences for the study of crustacean endocrinology, particularly in the area of reproductive control. Regardless, this peptidome is the largest thus far predicted for any brachyuran (true crab) species, and will serve as a foundation for future studies of peptidergic control in members of the commercially important genus Scylla.

  4. Adaptations of the autonomous nervous system controlling heart rate are impaired by a mutant thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Jens; Davis, Benjamin; Vujovic, Milica; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2010-05-01

    Thyroid hormone has profound direct effects on cardiac function, but the hormonal interactions with the autonomic control of heart rate are unclear. Because thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-alpha1 has been implicated in the autonomic control of brown adipose energy metabolism, it might also play an important role in the central autonomic control of heart rate. Thus, we aimed to analyze the role of TRalpha1 signaling in the autonomic control of heart rate using an implantable radio telemetry system. We identified that mice expressing the mutant TRalpha1R384C (TRalpha1+m mice) displayed a mild bradycardia, which becomes more pronounced during night activity or on stress and is accompanied by a reduced expression of nucleotide-gated potassium channel 2 mRNA in the heart. Pharmacological blockage with scopolamine and the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist timolol revealed that the autonomic control of cardiac activity was similar to that in wild-type mice at room temperature. However, at thermoneutrality, in which the regulation of heart rate switches from sympathetic to parasympathetic in wild-type mice, TRalpha1+m mice maintained sympathetic stimulation and failed to activate parasympathetic signaling. Our findings demonstrate a novel role for TRalpha1 in the adaptation of cardiac activity by the autonomic nervous system and suggest that human patients with a similar mutation in TRalpha1 might exhibit a deficit in cardiac adaptation to stress or physical activity and an increased sensitivity to beta-blockers.

  5. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) immunoreactive hypophysial neurosecretory system in the teleost Poecilia latipinna: light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Batten, T F; Baker, B I

    1988-05-01

    Neurons containing immunoreactivity for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were located in the brain of the teleost Poecilia latipinna by light microscopic (peroxidase antiperoxidase) and electron microscopic (immunogold) methods. Neuronal cell bodies were found in the tuberal hypothalamus, mostly within the nucleus lateralis tuberis, pars lateralis, containing MCH-immunoreactive granules up to 150 nm in diameter. From here bundles of immunoreactive fibers could be traced through the preoptic area as far forward as the olfactory bulb, and through the posterior hypothalamus up into the pretectal thalamus and midbrain. The main projection was, however, to the neurohypophysis, where MCH fibers were observed to form contacts with pituicytes, basement membranes around blood vessels, and the endocrine cells of the pars intermedia. Occasionally MCH-immunoreactive terminals were also seen near the corticotrophs of the rostral pars distalis. These results support the hypothesis that MCH may act as a systemic hormone, a central neurotransmitter, and a modulator of pituitary function.

  6. Protein Hormones and Immunity‡

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Keith W.; Weigent, Douglas A.; Kooijman, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A number of observations and discoveries over the past 20 years support the concept of important physiological interactions between the endocrine and immune systems. The best known pathway for transmission of information from the immune system to the neuroendocrine system is humoral in the form of cytokines, although neural transmission via the afferent vagus is well documented also. In the other direction, efferent signals from the nervous system to the immune system are conveyed by both the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous systems. Communication is possible because the nervous and immune systems share a common biochemical language involving shared ligands and receptors, including neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, growth factors, neuroendocrine hormones and cytokines. This means that the brain functions as an immune-regulating organ participating in immune responses. A great deal of evidence has accumulated and confirmed that hormones secreted by the neuroendocrine system play an important role in communication and regulation of the cells of the immune system. Among protein hormones, this has been most clearly documented for prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), but significant influences on immunity by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) have also been demonstrated. Here we review evidence obtained during the past 20 years to clearly demonstrate that neuroendocrine protein hormones influence immunity and that immune processes affect the neuroendocrine system. New findings highlight a previously undiscovered route of communication between the immune and endocrine systems that is now known to occur at the cellular level. This communication system is activated when inflammatory processes induced by proinflammatory cytokines antagonize the function of a variety of hormones, which then causes endocrine resistance in both the periphery and brain. Homeostasis during inflammation is achieved by a balance between cytokines and

  7. Hormonal Interference with Pheromone Systems in Parasitic Acarines, Especially Ixodid Ticks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    spermatogenesis , vitellogenesis and oviposition in the adults. However, proof of the existence of this elusive hormone and its actions remains to be... Spermatogenesis and Spermiogenesis The processes and developmental timing of spermatogenesis and spermio- genesis in ticks and parasitic mites continues to be...determining mechanism is XX: XO. The reptile feeding species A. dissimile (larvae feed on inanmals also) has chromosal configurations indicating

  8. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor system: modulatory role in aging and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyun; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Soo-Sung; Zhou, Yu; Silver, Nathan; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Receptors for hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are expressed throughout the brain. Age-related decline in gonadal reproductive hormones cause imbalances of this axis and many hormones in this axis have been functionally linked to neurodegenerative pathophysiology. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a vital role in both central and peripheral reproductive regulation. GnRH has historically been known as a pituitary hormone; however, in the past few years, interest has been raised in GnRH actions at non-pituitary peripheral targets. GnRH ligands and receptors are found throughout the brain where they may act to control multiple higher functions such as learning and memory function and feeding behavior. The actions of GnRH in mammals are mediated by the activation of a unique rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that does not possess a cytoplasmic carboxyl terminal sequence. Activation of this receptor appears to mediate a wide variety of signaling mechanisms that show diversity in different tissues. Epidemiological support for a role of GnRH in central functions is evidenced by a reduction in neurodegenerative disease after GnRH agonist therapy. It has previously been considered that these effects were not via direct GnRH action in the brain, however recent data has pointed to a direct central action of these ligands outside the pituitary. We have therefore summarized the evidence supporting a central direct role of GnRH ligands and receptors in controlling central nervous physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:20632963

  9. Verification of epigenetic inheritance in a unicellular model system: multigenerational effects of hormonal imprinting.

    PubMed

    Kőhidai, László; Lajkó, Eszter; Pállinger, Eva; Csaba, György

    2012-10-01

    The unicellular Tetrahymena has receptors for hormones of higher vertebrates, produces these hormones, and their signal pathways are similar. The first encounter with a hormone in higher dose provokes the phenomenon of hormonal imprinting, by which the reaction of the cell is quantitatively modified. This modification is transmitted to the progeny generations. The duration of the single imprinter effect of two representative signal molecules, insulin and 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine), in two concentrations (10(-6) and 10(-15) M) were studied. The effects of imprinting were followed in 5 physiological indices: (i) insulin binding, (ii) 5-HT synthesis, (iii) swimming behaviour, (iv) cell growth and (v) chemotaxis in progeny generations 500 and 1000. The result of each index was different from the non-imprinted control functions, growth rate, swimming behaviour and chemotactic activity to insulin being enhanced, while others, e.g. synthesis and chemotactic responsiveness of 5-HT and the binding of insulin were reduced. This means that a function-specific heritable epigenetic change during imprinting occurs, and generally a single encounter with a femtomolar hormone concentration is enough for provoking durable and heritable imprinting in Tetrahymena. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of epigenetic effects at a unicellular level and call attention to the possibility that the character of unicellular organisms has changed through to the present day due to an enormous amount of non-physiological imprinter substances in their environment. The results - together with results obtained earlier in mammals - point to the validity of epigenetic imprinting effects throughout the animal world.

  10. Homologies between the amino acid sequences of some vertebrate peptide hormones and peptides isolated from invertebrate sources.

    PubMed

    De Loof, A; Schoofs, L

    1990-01-01

    1. The 4K-prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) or bombyxin and the melanization-reddish coloration hormone of the silkworm Bombyx mori resemble insulin and insulin-like growth factors. 2. The family of adipokinetic/red pigment concentrating hormones has some similarity with glucagon. 3. Members of the FMRFamide family are found in vertebrates as well as in invertebrates. 4. In Locusta, a molecule immunologically and biologically related to amphibian melanophore stimulating hormone has been partially characterized. 5. Enkephalins and enkephalin-related peptides occur in insects and other invertebrates. 6. Peptides belonging to the tachykinin family have been isolated from molluscan (Octopus) salivary glands and from insect nervous tissue (Locusta migratoria). 7. Invertebrate arginine-vasotocin homologs have been isolated from an insect (Locusta migratoria) and from a mollusc (Conus). 8. In Leucophaea, Locusta and Drosophila, peptides resembling those of the vertebrate gastrin/cholecystokinin family have been identified. 9. As the number of different neuro-/gut peptides with possible function(s) as hormone, neurotransmitter or neuromodulator is now estimated to be of the order of a few hundred, more similarities will probably show up in the near future.

  11. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells combined with parathyroid hormone therapy synergistically regenerates multiple rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Cohn Yakubovich, Doron; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Bez, Maxim; Schary, Yeshai; Yalon, Eran; Sirhan, Afeef; Amira, May; Yaya, Alin; De Mel, Sandra; Da, Xiaoyu; Ben-David, Shiran; Tawackoli, Wafa; Ley, Eric J; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma; Pelled, Gadi

    2017-03-09

    A devastating condition that leads to trauma-related morbidity, multiple rib fractures, remain a serious unmet clinical need. Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to regenerate various tissues. We hypothesized that parathyroid hormone (PTH) therapy would enhance MSC homing and differentiation, ultimately leading to bone formation that would bridge rib fractures. The combination of human MSCs (hMSCs) and a clinically relevant PTH dose was studied using immunosuppressed rats. Segmental defects were created in animals' fifth and sixth ribs. The rats were divided into four groups: a negative control group, in which animals received vehicle alone; the PTH-only group, in which animals received daily subcutaneous injections of 4 μg/kg teriparatide, a pharmaceutical derivative of PTH; the hMSC-only group, in which each animal received five injections of 2 × 10(6) hMSCs; and the hMSC + PTH group, in which animals received both treatments. Longitudinal in vivo monitoring of bone formation was performed biweekly using micro-computed tomography (μCT), followed by histological analysis. Fluorescently-dyed hMSCs were counted using confocal microscopy imaging of histological samples harvested 8 weeks after surgery. PTH significantly augmented the number of hMSCs that homed to the fracture site. Immunofluorescence of osteogenic markers, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein, showed that PTH induced cell differentiation in both exogenously administered cells and resident cells. μCT scans revealed a significant increase in bone volume only in the hMSC + PTH group, beginning by the 4(th) week after surgery. Eight weeks after surgery, 35% of ribs in the hMSC + PTH group had complete bone bridging, whereas there was complete bridging in only 6.25% of ribs (one rib) in the PTH-only group and in none of the ribs in the other groups. Based on the μCT scans, biomechanical analysis using the micro-finite element method demonstrated that

  12. Bursicon Functions within the Drosophila Central Nervous System to Modulate Wing Expansion Behavior, Hormone Secretion, and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Peabody, Nathan C.; Diao, Fengqiu; Luan, Haojiang; Wang, Howard; Dewey, Elizabeth M.; Honegger, Hans-Willi; White, Benjamin H.

    2009-01-01

    Hormones are often responsible for synchronizing somatic physiological changes with changes in behavior. Ecdysis (i.e. the shedding of the exoskeleton) in insects has served as a useful model for elucidating the molecular and cellular mechanisms of this synchronization, and has provided numerous insights into the hormonal coordination of body and behavior. An example in which the mechanisms have remained enigmatic is the neurohormone bursicon, which after the final molt, coordinates the plasticization and tanning of the initially folded wings with behaviors that drive wing expansion. The somatic effects of the hormone are governed by bursicon that is released into the blood from neurons in the abdominal ganglion (the BAG), which die after wing expansion. How bursicon induces the behavioral programs required for wing expansion, however, has remained unknown. Here we show by targeted suppression of excitability that a pair of bursicon-immunoreactive neurons distinct from the BAG and located within the subesophageal ganglion in Drosophila (the BSEG) is involved in controlling wing expansion behaviors. Unlike the BAG, the BSEG arborize widely in the nervous system, including within the abdominal neuromeres, suggesting that, in addition to governing behavior, they also may modulate the BAG. Indeed, we show that animals lacking bursicon receptor function have deficits both in the humoral release of bursicon and in post-eclosion apoptosis of the BAG. Our results reveal novel neuromodulatory functions for bursicon and support the hypothesis that the BSEG are essential for orchestrating both the behavioral and somatic processes underlying wing expansion. PMID:19118171

  13. Octopus gonadotrophin-releasing hormone: a multifunctional peptide in the endocrine and nervous systems of the cephalopod.

    PubMed

    Minakata, H; Shigeno, S; Kano, N; Haraguchi, S; Osugi, T; Tsutsui, K

    2009-03-01

    The optic gland, which is analogous to the anterior pituitary in the context of gonadal maturation, is found on the upper posterior edge of the optic tract of the octopus Octopus vulgaris. In mature octopus, the optic glands enlarge and secrete a gonadotrophic hormone. A peptide with structural features similar to that of vertebrate gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was isolated from the brain of octopus and was named oct-GnRH. Oct-GnRH showed luteinising hormone-releasing activity in the anterior pituitary cells of the Japanese quail Coturnix coturnix. Oct-GnRH immunoreactive signals were observed in the glandular cells of the mature optic gland. Oct-GnRH stimulated the synthesis and release of sex steroids from the ovary and testis, and elicited contractions of the oviduct. Oct-GnRH receptor was expressed in the gonads and accessory organs, such as the oviduct and oviducal gland. These results suggest that oct-GnRH induces the gonadal maturation and oviposition by regulating sex steroidogenesis and a series of egg-laying behaviours via the oct-GnRH receptor. The distribution and expression of oct-GnRH in the central and peripheral nervous systems suggest that oct-GnRH acts as a multifunctional modulatory factor in feeding, memory processing, sensory, movement and autonomic functions.

  14. Effects of complexation with in vivo enhancing monoclonal antibodies on activity of growth hormone in two responsive cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Beattie, J; Borromeo, V; Bramani, S; Secchi, C; Baumbach, W R; Mockridge, J

    1999-12-01

    We describe the properties of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to ovine GH, two of which have previously been shown to enhance, in vivo, the biological activity of bovine and ovine growth hormone. We have examined the effects of these MAbs on GH activity in two appropriate GH-responsive cell culture systems, investigating both acute signalling effects (Janus-activated kinase (Jak)-2 tyrosine phosphorylation -5 min) and longer-term (MTT-formazan production -24 h) effects of hormone-antibody complexes. In the 3T3-F442A pre-adipocyte cell line (which has been demonstrated to be GH responsive), we show that complexation of recombinant bovine (rb) GH with either of the two enhancing anti-ovine GH MAbs (OA11 and OA15) and the non-enhancing MAb, OA14, attenuates the ability of GH to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak-2 at a 5-min time point. Using the mouse myeloid cell line, FDC-P1, stably transfected with the full-length ovine GH receptor (oGHR), we demonstrate that rbGH causes a dose-dependent increase in MTT-formazan production by these cells. Further, we demonstrate that OA11 and OA14, but not OA15, cause a decrease in this stimulatory activity of rbGH over a hormone concentration range of 5-50 ng/ml at both 24 and 48 h. We conclude that the different in vitro activities of the two in vivo enhancing MAbs are most probably related to the time-courses over which these two assays are performed, and also to the relative affinities between antibody, hormone and receptor. In addition, the in vitro inhibitory activity of the enhancing MAb OA11 in both short- and long-term bioassay lends further support to an exclusively in vivo model for MAb-mediated enhancement of GH action.

  15. Hormones and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ... Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of Hormones Brainy Hormones What Do Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs ...

  16. A system for culture of human trabecular bone and hormone response profiles of derived cells.

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, A. J.; McGuire-Goldring, M. B.; Goldring, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Specimens of human trabecular bone from II patients were processed for tissue culture. In 10 out of 11 samples both cellular and matrix outgrowths were noted at the surfaces of explanted fragments after the first week in culture. During the second week adherent cells extended beyond the margins of the bone fragments and appeared to replicate. Plates achieved confluence in 30-36 days and cells were subcultured. In passaged cells doubling times were 5-7 days. Six cell cultures were examined for the presence of alkaline and acid phosphatase activity employing histochemical techniques. All six cultures contained cells which stained positively for alkaline phosphatase (10-80%). A small number of cells in one culture demonstrated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity. Responses to hormones known to regulate the biological activities of skeletal tissues were also tested. Intracellular cyclic AMP was significantly increased by parathyroid hormone in three cultures, by salmon calcitonin in three cultures and by prostaglandin E2 in all 10 cultures. All three hormones increased the cyclic AMP content of cells cultured from human periosteum. It is concluded that cells cultured by this method demonstrate biochemical and morphological characteristics consistent with a skeletal tissue origin. Furthermore, such an approach may permit isolation and further characterization of individual subpopulations of bone cells of human origin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6093841

  17. Hormonal Regulation of Response to Oxidative Stress in Insects-An Update.

    PubMed

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-10-27

    Insects, like other organisms, must deal with a wide variety of potentially challenging environmental factors during the course of their life. An important example of such a challenge is the phenomenon of oxidative stress. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKH) as principal stress responsive hormones in insects involved in activation of anti-oxidative stress response pathways. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of oxidative stress experimentally induced by various stressors and monitored by suitable biomarkers, and on detailed characterization of AKH's role in the anti-stress reactions. These reactions are characterized by a significant increase of AKH levels in the insect body, and by effective reversal of the markers-disturbed by the stressors-after co-application of the stressor with AKH. A plausible mechanism of AKH action in the anti-oxidative stress response is discussed as well: this probably involves simultaneous employment of both protein kinase C and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathways in the presence of extra and intra-cellular Ca(2+) stores, with the possible involvement of the FoxO transcription factors. The role of other insect hormones in the anti-oxidative defense reactions is also discussed.

  18. Hormonal Regulation of Response to Oxidative Stress in Insects—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Bednářová, Andrea; Zemanová, Milada; Krishnan, Natraj

    2015-01-01

    Insects, like other organisms, must deal with a wide variety of potentially challenging environmental factors during the course of their life. An important example of such a challenge is the phenomenon of oxidative stress. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of adipokinetic hormones (AKH) as principal stress responsive hormones in insects involved in activation of anti-oxidative stress response pathways. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of oxidative stress experimentally induced by various stressors and monitored by suitable biomarkers, and on detailed characterization of AKH’s role in the anti-stress reactions. These reactions are characterized by a significant increase of AKH levels in the insect body, and by effective reversal of the markers—disturbed by the stressors—after co-application of the stressor with AKH. A plausible mechanism of AKH action in the anti-oxidative stress response is discussed as well: this probably involves simultaneous employment of both protein kinase C and cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate pathways in the presence of extra and intra-cellular Ca2+ stores, with the possible involvement of the FoxO transcription factors. The role of other insect hormones in the anti-oxidative defense reactions is also discussed. PMID:26516847

  19. Adrenocorticotropic hormone in serial cerebrospinal fluid in man - Subject to acute regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system?

    PubMed

    Kellner, Michael; Wortmann, Viola; Salzwedel, Cornelie; Kober, Daniel; Petzoldt, Martin; Urbanowicz, Tatiana; Pulic, Mersija; Boelmans, Kai; Yassouridis, Alexander; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2016-05-30

    Acute regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system has not been investigated in man. In a pilot study in healthy male volunteers we measured ACTH every twenty minutes in serial CSF for three hours after an intravenous placebo, hydrocortisone (100mg) or insulin (2mg/kg) injection. No acute inhibitory or stimulatory effects of these interventions were discovered. Our results corroborate previous findings in rhesus monkeys. The regulation of CSF ACTH and its potential relevance for behavioral alterations in health and disease (e.g. major depression or anorexia nervosa) in humans need further study.

  20. [Anti-Müllerian hormone levels as a predictor of ovarian reserve in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: a review].

    PubMed

    Gasparin, Andrese Aline; Chakr, Rafael Mendonça da Silva; Brenol, Claiton Viegas; Palominos, Penélope Ester; Xavier, Ricardo Machado; Souza, Lucian; Brenol, João Carlos Tavares; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2015-01-01

    The anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is secreted from granulosa cells of growing ovarian follicles and appears to be the best endocrine marker capable of estimating ovarian reserve. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women of reproductive age and may negatively affect their fertility due to disease activity and the treatments used. Recently, several studies assessed AMH levels to understand the real impact of SLE and its treatment on fertility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Partial ablation of uropygial gland effects on growth hormone concentration and digestive system histometrical aspect of akar putra chicken.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Hasan S A; Lokman, I H; Zuki, A B Z; Kassim, A B

    2016-04-01

    Partial ablation of the uropygial gland is being used in the poultry industry as a new way to enhance body performance of chickens. However, limited data are available estimating the efficacy of partial uropygialectomy (PU) to improve body organ activity. The present study evaluated the effect of partial ablation of the uropygial gland on the serum growth hormone concentration level and digestive system histology of 120 Akar Putra chickens in 5 trials with 3 replicates per trial. The experimental treatments consisted of a control treatment T1; partial ablation of the uropygial gland was applied in the T2, T3, T4, and T5 treatments at 3, 4, 5, and 6 wk of age, respectively. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. All treatment groups were provided the same diet. Venous blood samples were collected on wk 7, 10, and 12 to assay the levels of growth hormone concentration. On the last d of the experiment, 4 birds per replicate were randomly isolated and euthanized to perform the necropsy. Digestive system organs' cross sections were measured by a computerized image analyzer after being stained with haematoxylin and eosin. In comparison with the control group, surgical removal of the uropygial gland, especially at wk 3, had a greater (P<0.01) effect on the total duodenum, jejunum, and ilium wall thickness. In addition, effects (P<0.05) were observed on the wall thickness of males' cecum and colon. Moreover, the wall layers of the esophagus, proventriculus, gizzard, and rectum were not affected by the treatment. However, removing the uropygial gland showed significant impact (P<0.05) in males' growth hormone concentration level at wk 7 and (P<0.01) effects at wk 12 in both sexes. This study provides a novel and economic alternative to enhance the body performance of poultry in general and Akar Putra chickens particularly.

  2. Neither load nor systemic hormones determine resistance training-mediated hypertrophy or strength gains in resistance-trained young men.

    PubMed

    Morton, Robert W; Oikawa, Sara Y; Wavell, Christopher G; Mazara, Nicole; McGlory, Chris; Quadrilatero, Joe; Baechler, Brittany L; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2016-07-01

    We reported, using a unilateral resistance training (RT) model, that training with high or low loads (mass per repetition) resulted in similar muscle hypertrophy and strength improvements in RT-naïve subjects. Here we aimed to determine whether the same was true in men with previous RT experience using a whole-body RT program and whether postexercise systemic hormone concentrations were related to changes in hypertrophy and strength. Forty-nine resistance-trained men (23 ± 1 yr, mean ± SE) performed 12 wk of whole-body RT. Subjects were randomly allocated into a higher-repetition (HR) group who lifted loads of ∼30-50% of their maximal strength (1RM) for 20-25 repetitions/set (n = 24) or a lower-repetition (LR) group (∼75-90% 1RM, 8-12 repetitions/set, n = 25), with all sets being performed to volitional failure. Skeletal muscle biopsies, strength testing, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans, and acute changes in systemic hormone concentrations were examined pretraining and posttraining. In response to RT, 1RM strength increased for all exercises in both groups (P < 0.01), with only the change in bench press being significantly different between groups (HR, 9 ± 1, vs. LR, 14 ± 1 kg, P = 0.012). Fat- and bone-free (lean) body mass and type I and type II muscle fiber cross-sectional area increased following training (P < 0.01) with no significant differences between groups. No significant correlations between the acute postexercise rise in any purported anabolic hormone and the change in strength or hypertrophy were found. In congruence with our previous work, acute postexercise systemic hormonal rises are not related to or in any way indicative of RT-mediated gains in muscle mass or strength. Our data show that in resistance-trained individuals, load, when exercises are performed to volitional failure, does not dictate hypertrophy or, for the most part, strength gains. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Neither load nor systemic hormones determine resistance training-mediated hypertrophy or strength gains in resistance-trained young men

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Robert W.; Oikawa, Sara Y.; Wavell, Christopher G.; Mazara, Nicole; McGlory, Chris; Quadrilatero, Joe; Baechler, Brittany L.; Baker, Steven K.

    2016-01-01

    We reported, using a unilateral resistance training (RT) model, that training with high or low loads (mass per repetition) resulted in similar muscle hypertrophy and strength improvements in RT-naïve subjects. Here we aimed to determine whether the same was true in men with previous RT experience using a whole-body RT program and whether postexercise systemic hormone concentrations were related to changes in hypertrophy and strength. Forty-nine resistance-trained men (23 ± 1 yr, mean ± SE) performed 12 wk of whole-body RT. Subjects were randomly allocated into a higher-repetition (HR) group who lifted loads of ∼30-50% of their maximal strength (1RM) for 20–25 repetitions/set (n = 24) or a lower-repetition (LR) group (∼75–90% 1RM, 8–12 repetitions/set, n = 25), with all sets being performed to volitional failure. Skeletal muscle biopsies, strength testing, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans, and acute changes in systemic hormone concentrations were examined pretraining and posttraining. In response to RT, 1RM strength increased for all exercises in both groups (P < 0.01), with only the change in bench press being significantly different between groups (HR, 9 ± 1, vs. LR, 14 ± 1 kg, P = 0.012). Fat- and bone-free (lean) body mass and type I and type II muscle fiber cross-sectional area increased following training (P < 0.01) with no significant differences between groups. No significant correlations between the acute postexercise rise in any purported anabolic hormone and the change in strength or hypertrophy were found. In congruence with our previous work, acute postexercise systemic hormonal rises are not related to or in any way indicative of RT-mediated gains in muscle mass or strength. Our data show that in resistance-trained individuals, load, when exercises are performed to volitional failure, does not dictate hypertrophy or, for the most part, strength gains. PMID:27174923

  4. Long-acting delivery systems for peptides: inhibition of rat prostate tumors by controlled release of [D-Trp6]luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone from injectable microcapsules.

    PubMed Central

    Redding, T W; Schally, A V; Tice, T R; Meyers, W E

    1984-01-01

    Intramuscular injection of [6-D-tryptophan]-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone [( D-Trp6]LH-RH) in microcapsules of poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide), designed to release a controlled dose of the peptide over a 30-day period, decreased the weights of androgen-dependent Dunning prostate tumors in rats and suppressed serum testosterone levels more effectively than daily subcutaneous administration of equivalent or double doses of unencapsulated [D-Trp6]LH-RH. The microcapsules or daily injections of [D-Trp6]LH-RH also significantly decreased tumor volumes. Microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH or related analogs that can be injected once a month should make the treatment of patients with prostate carcinoma and other neoplasms or disorders more convenient and efficacious. Images PMID:6237365

  5. Targeting brain angiotensin and corticotrophin-releasing hormone systems interaction for the treatment of mood and alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Wolfgang H; Saavedra, Juan M

    2008-06-01

    The brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) participates importantly in the regulation of endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral response to stress. Recent data indicate that central action of AT(1) receptor antagonists can reduce anxiety symptoms in experimental animals. Furthermore, central inhibition of RAS activity decreases ethanol intake in an animal model of alcoholism. Pathological anxiety responses and the development of substance dependence are both critically mediated through corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) systems, and the RAS is positioned to interact both with hypothalamic as well as extrahypothalamic CRH systems. The thesis of this paper is that the RAS is part of the neurochemical dysregulation underlying negative affective states, anxiety disorders, and ethanol dependence and that medications targeting the RAS should be considered to augment the treatment of these disorders.

  6. Acute and chronic effects of hormone replacement therapy on the cardiovascular system in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Lori D; MacLusky, Neil J; Shapiro, Heather M; Abramson, Beth L; Thomas, Scott G; Goodman, Jack M

    2004-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that conjugated estrogens and continuous medroxyprogesterone increases heart disease risk in healthy women. Little is known about the effects of the natural ovarian hormones estradiol and progesterone on cardiovascular function at rest and exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the short- and longer-term effects of a cyclic format of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) (1 mg estradiol daily with cyclic micronized progesterone, 200 mg for 10 d/month) on cardiovascular function at rest and during exercise in healthy, postmenopausal women. A double-blind, cross-over study was conducted in 31 patients. Peak oxygen uptake and ventilatory threshold in addition to submaximal cardiac output were determined. Peripheral measures of resting and peak ischemic blood flows were also determined. Measurements were made at baseline, after 4 h of estrogen/placebo exposure, and subsequently after 1, 2, and 3 months. The sequence of data collection was repeated after 6-wk washout. Oral estradiol with cyclic micronized progesterone increases peak ischemic peripheral blood flow chronically but fails to improve exercise tolerance and peak oxygen uptake. Similarly, submaximal central cardiovascular function is unaffected by HRT. This suggests that estradiol has a beneficial effect on peripheral blood flow, but this benefit offers little advantage in terms of peak exercise performance after 3 months of HRT.

  7. Stress hormones predict a host superspreader phenotype in the West Nile virus system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gervasi, Stephanie; Burgan, Sarah; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Martin, Lynn B.

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT), have profound effects on the behaviour and physiology of organisms, and thus have the potential to alter host competence and the contributions of individuals to population- and community-level pathogen dynamics. For example, CORT could alter the rate of contacts among hosts, pathogens and vectors through its widespread effects on host metabolism and activity levels. CORT could also affect the intensity and duration of pathogen shedding and risk of host mortality during infection. We experimentally manipulated songbird CORT, asking how CORT affected behavioural and physiological responses to a standardized West Nile virus (WNV) challenge. Although all birds became infected after exposure to the virus, only birds with elevated CORT had viral loads at or above the infectious threshold. Moreover, though the rate of mortality was faster in birds with elevated CORT compared with controls, most hosts with elevated CORT survived past the day of peak infectiousness. CORT concentrations just prior to inoculation with WNV and anti-inflammatory cytokine concentrations following viral exposure were predictive of individual duration of infectiousness and the ability to maintain physical performance during infection (i.e. tolerance), revealing putative biomarkers of competence. Collectively, our results suggest that glucocorticoid stress hormones could directly and indirectly mediate the spread of pathogens.

  8. Influences of the environment on the endocrine and paracrine fish growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I system.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, M

    2010-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a key component of the complex system that regulates differentiation, development, growth and reproduction of fishes. The IGF-I gene is mainly expressed in the liver that represents the principal source of endocrine IGF-I but also in numerous other organs where the hormone most probably acts in an autocrine-paracrine manner. The primary stimulus for synthesis and release of IGF-I is growth hormone (GH) from the anterior pituitary. Thus, in analogy to mammals, it is usual to speak of a fish 'GH-IGF-I axis'. The GH-IGF-I system is affected by changes in the environment and probably represents a target of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) that impair many physiological processes in fishes. Thus, the review deals with the influences of changes in different environmental factors, such as food availability, temperature, photoperiod, season, salinity and EDCs, on GH gene expression in pituitary, IGF-I gene expression in liver and extrahepatic sites and the physiological effects resulting from the evoked alterations in endocrine and local IGF-I. Environmental influences certainly interact with each other but for convenience of the reader they will be dealt with in separate sections. Current trends in GH-IGF-I research are analysed and future focuses are suggested at the end of the sections.

  9. [Vitamin D hormone system and diabetes mellitus: lessons from selective activators of vitamin D receptor and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Jódar-Gimeno, Esteban; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    The vitamin D hormone system has significant skeletal and extra-skeletal effects. Vitamin D receptor occurs in different tissues, and several cells other than renal cells are able to locally produce active vitamin D, which is responsible for transcriptional control of hundreds of genes related to its pleiotropic effects. There is increasing evidence relating vitamin D to development and course of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Specifically, influence of vitamin D on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, inflammatory response, and urinary albumin excretion could explain the relevant impact of vitamin D status on diabetic nephropathy. Selective vitamin D receptor activators are molecules able to reproduce agonistic or antagonistic effects of active vitamin D depending on the tissue or even on the cell type. Specifically, paricalcitol has a beneficial profile because of its potency to reduce parathyroid hormone, with lower effects on serum calcium or phosphate levels. Moreover, in patients with diabetes and renal disease, paricalcitol decreases microalbuminuria, hospitalization rates, and cardiovascular mortality. Therefore, these molecules represent an attractive new option to improve prognosis of renal disease in patients with diabetes.

  10. Growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor system in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tönshoff, Burkhard; Kiepe, Daniela; Ciarmatori, Sonia

    2005-03-01

    Disturbances of the somatotropic hormone axis play an important pathogenic role in growth retardation and catabolism in children with chronic renal failure (CRF). The apparent discrepancy between normal or elevated growth hormone (GH) levels and diminished longitudinal growth in CRF has led to the concept of GH insensitivity, which is caused by multiple alterations in the distal components of the somatotropic hormone axis. Serum levels of IGF-I and IGF-II are normal in preterminal CRF, while in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) IGF-I levels are slightly decreased and IGF-II levels slightly increased. In view of the prevailing elevated GH levels in ESRD, these serum IGF-I levels appear inadequately low. Indeed, there is both clinical and experimental evidence for decreased hepatic production of IGF-I in CRF. This hepatic insensitivity to the action of GH may be partly the consequence of reduced GH receptor expression in liver tissue and partly a consequence of disturbed GH receptor signaling. The actions and metabolism of IGFs are modulated by specific high-affinity IGFBPs. CRF serum has an IGF-binding capacity that is increased by seven- to tenfold, leading to decreased IGF bioactivity of CRF serum despite normal total IGF levels. Serum levels of intact IGFBP-1, -2, -4, -6 and low molecular weight fragments of IGFBP-3 are elevated in CRF serum in relation to the degree of renal dysfunction, whereas serum levels of intact IGFBP-3 are normal. Levels of immunoreactive IGFBP-5 are not altered in CRF serum, but the majority of IGFBP-5 is fragmented. Decreased renal filtration and increased hepatic production of IGFBP-1 and -2 both contribute to high levels of serum IGFBP. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that these excessive high-affinity IGFBPs in CRF serum inhibit IGF action in growth plate chondrocytes by competition with the type 1 IGF receptor for IGF binding. These data indicate that growth failure in CRF is mainly due to functional IGF deficiency

  11. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause Fact Sheet Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause January, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol ... take HT for symptom relief.) What are bioidentical hormones? Bioidentical hormones are identical to the hormones that ...

  12. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help diagnose and monitor the treatment of acromegaly and gigantism . Growth hormone is essential for normal ... signs and symptoms of GH excess ( gigantism and acromegaly ). Suppression testing may be done when a pituitary ...

  13. Systems analysis of shoot apical meristem growth and development: integrating hormonal and mechanical signaling.

    PubMed

    Murray, James A H; Jones, Angharad; Godin, Christophe; Traas, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is a small population of stem cells that continuously generates organs and tissues. This review covers our current understanding of organ initiation by the SAM in Arabidopsis thaliana. Meristem function and maintenance involves two major hormones, cytokinins and auxins. Cytokinins appear to play a major role in meristem maintenance and in controlling meristematic properties, such as cell proliferation. Self-organizing transport processes, which are still only partially understood, lead to the patterned accumulation of auxin at particular positions, where organs will grow out. A major downstream target of auxin-mediated growth regulation is the cell wall, which is a determinant for both growth rates and growth distribution, but feedbacks with metabolism and the synthetic capacity of the cytoplasm are crucial as well. Recent work has also pointed at a potential role of mechanical signals in growth coordination, but the precise mechanisms at work remain to be elucidated.

  14. [Effect of fetal adrenal hormones on the reactivity of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenocortical system in the adult rat].

    PubMed

    Dygalo, N N; Naumenko, E V

    1984-01-01

    It was found in the experiments on adult males, descendants of the intact or adrenalectomized (prior to mating) female rats which were injected during the pregnancy with adrenaline, hydrocortisone or saline solution, that the reaction of their hypophysial-adrenocortical system to emotional stress or injection of noradrenaline into brain were inversely proportional to the content of corticosteroids, rather than of adrenaline, in the blood of their mothers during the pregnancy. On the other hand, the coupled changes of the levels of corticosteroids and adrenaline in the blood of pregnant mothers only was accompanied by the marked decrease in the sensitivity of brain cholinergic mechanisms in descendants. Hence, the changes of the levels of both adrenaline and corticosterids in the blood of pregnant females modify the reactivity of hypophysial-adrenocortical system of adult descendants, apparently, via the development of brain neurochemical mechanisms in the foetuses. But the role of these hormones is different.

  15. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  16. Follicle-stimulating hormone polypeptide modified nanoparticle drug delivery system in the treatment of lymphatic metastasis during ovarian carcinoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lingling; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yingtao; Xu, Congjian

    2014-10-01

    Traditional chemotherapy drugs have an obvious drawback of nonspecific biodistribution in treating ovarian cancer. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), a G-protein coupled receptor which is mainly expressed in reproductive system, is an important drug target in developing novel therapeutics. Using a polypeptide of follicle-stimulating hormone (named as FSHP), a conjugated nanoparticle, FSHP-NP was developed to target FSHR in lymphatic metastasis of ovarian cancer. FSHP-NP was tested for recognition specificity and uptake efficiency on FSHR-expressing cells. A paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded FSHP-NP (FSHP-NP-PTX) was further developed and its anti-tumor effect was determined in vivo and in vitro. Taking NuTu-19 cells as an example, FSHP-NP-PTX displayed significantly stronger anti-cell proliferative and anti-tumor effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner when compared with free PTX or naked PTX-loaded nanoparticles (NP-PTX) in vitro. In vivo examinations showed that the size and weight of the lymph nodes were reduced in the FSHP-NP-PTX group. FSHR as a novel therapeutic target in ovarian cancer and delivery of PTX via conjugated nanoparticle (FSHP-NP) might represent a new therapeutic approach in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential effects of adrenergic and corticosteroid hormonal systems on human short- and long-term declarative memory for emotionally arousing material.

    PubMed

    Maheu, Francoise S; Joober, Ridha; Beaulieu, Serge; Lupien, Soriia J

    2004-04-01

    The effects of adrenergic and corticosteroid hormonal systems on emotional memory were measured in 64 young men. Placebo, propranolol (40 or 80 mg; beta blocker), or metyiapone (corticosteroid synthesis inhibitor) was administered before the viewing of a story composed of emotional and neutral segments. Short- and long-term declarative memory for the story was assessed. Propranolol 40 mg had no effects on declarative memory. Propranolol 80 mg impaired short- and long-term declarative memory for emotionally arousing material. Metyrapone did not impair short-term declarative memory but impaired long-term declarative memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material. Results demonstrate that adrenergic and corticosteroid hormonal systems differentially affect declarative memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material, and suggest that interactions between adrenal hormonal systems modulate emotionally arousing declarative memory in humans.

  18. Systemic uptake of diethyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, and butyl paraben following whole-body topical application and reproductive and thyroid hormone levels in humans.

    PubMed

    Janjua, Nadeem Rezaq; Mortensen, Gerda Krogh; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Kongshoj, Brian; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2007-08-01

    In vitro and animal studies have reported endocrine-disrupting activity of chemicals used commonly as additives in cosmetics and skin care products. We investigated whether diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), and butyl paraben (BP) were systemically absorbed and influenced endogenous reproductive and thyroid hormone levels in humans after topical application. In a two-week single-blinded study, 26 healthy young male volunteers were assigned to daily whole-body topical application of 2 mg/cm2 basic cream formulation each without (week one) and with (week two) the three 2% (w/w) compounds. The concentrations of BP and the main phthalate metabolites monoethyl (MEP) and monobutyl phthalate (MBP) were measured in serum together with the following reproductive hormones: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), lutenising hormone (LH), testosterone, estradiol, and inhibin B and thyroid hormones (thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), total triiodothyroxine (T3), and total thyroxine (T4)). MEP, MBP, and BP peaked in serum a few hours after application, reaching mean +/- SEM levels of 1001 +/- 81 microg/L, 51 +/- 6 microg/ L, and 135 +/- 11 microg/L, respectively. Only MEP was detectable in serum before treatment. Minor differences in inhibin B, LH, estradiol, T4, FT4, and TSH were observed between the two weeks, but these were not related to exposure. We demonstrated for the first time that DEP, DBP, and BP could be systemically absorbed in man after topical application. The systemic absorption of these compounds did not seem to have any short-term influence on the levels of reproductive and thyroid hormones in the examined young men.

  19. Using Digital Images of the Zebra Finch Song System as a Tool to Teach Organizational Effects of Steroid Hormones: A Free Downloadable Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grisham, William; Schottler, Natalie A.; Beck McCauley, Lisa M.; Pham, Anh P.; Ruiz, Maureen L.; Fong, Michelle C.; Cui, Xinran

    2011-01-01

    Zebra finch song behavior is sexually dimorphic: males sing and females do not. The neural system underlying this behavior is sexually dimorphic, and this sex difference is easy to quantify. During development, the zebra finch song system can be altered by steroid hormones, specifically estradiol, which actually masculinizes it. Because of the…

  20. Using Digital Images of the Zebra Finch Song System as a Tool to Teach Organizational Effects of Steroid Hormones: A Free Downloadable Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grisham, William; Schottler, Natalie A.; Beck McCauley, Lisa M.; Pham, Anh P.; Ruiz, Maureen L.; Fong, Michelle C.; Cui, Xinran

    2011-01-01

    Zebra finch song behavior is sexually dimorphic: males sing and females do not. The neural system underlying this behavior is sexually dimorphic, and this sex difference is easy to quantify. During development, the zebra finch song system can be altered by steroid hormones, specifically estradiol, which actually masculinizes it. Because of the…

  1. Action of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: involvement of novel arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, G D; Capdevila, J; Chacos, N; Manna, S; Falck, J R

    1983-01-01

    Anterior pituitary cells were incubated in the presence of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and one of three inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism:indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase system; nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an antioxidant that inhibits lipoxygenase; and icosatetraynoic acid, an acetylenic analogue of arachidonic acid that blocks all known pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. Indomethacin was ineffective in blocking luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was only marginally capable of inhibiting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Icosatetraynoic acid at 10 microM completely inhibited stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Addition of several epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites to cells in vitro resulted in secretion of luteinizing hormone equal to or greater than that induced by 10 nM luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. The half-maximal effective dose for these compounds was approximately 50 nM. The 5,6-epoxyicosatrienoic acid was the most potent of the compounds tested. These studies suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone release is closely coupled with the production of oxidized arachidonic acid metabolites. Moreover, one or more of the epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites might be a component of the cascade of reactions initiated by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone that ultimately results in secretion of luteinizing hormone. PMID:6344087

  2. Variation in steroid hormone levels among Caribbean Anolis lizards: endocrine system convergence?

    PubMed

    Husak, Jerry F; Lovern, Matthew B

    2014-04-01

    Variation in aggression among species can be due to a number of proximate and ultimate factors, leading to patterns of divergent and convergent evolution of behavior among even closely related species. Caribbean Anolis lizards are well known for their convergence in microhabitat use and morphology, but they also display marked convergence in social behavior and patterns of aggression. We studied 18 Anolis species across six ecomorphs on four different Caribbean islands to test four main hypotheses. We hypothesized that species differences in aggression would be due to species differences in circulating testosterone (T), a steroid hormone implicated in numerous studies across vertebrate taxa as a primary determinant of social behavior; more aggressive species were expected to have higher baseline concentrations of T and corticosterone. We further hypothesized that low-T species would increase T and corticosterone levels during a social challenge. Within three of the four island assemblages studied we found differences in T levels among species within an island that differ in aggression, but in the opposite pattern than predicted: more aggressive species had lower baseline T than the least aggressive species. The fourth island, Puerto Rico, showed the pattern of baseline T levels among species we predicted. There were no patterns of corticosterone levels among species or ecomorphs. One of the two species tested increased T in response to a social challenge, but neither species elevated corticosterone. Our results suggest that it is possible for similarities in aggression among closely related species to evolve via different proximate mechanisms.

  3. Combination Treatment with Progesterone and Vitamin D Hormone May Be More Effective than Monotherapy for Nervous System Injury and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cekic, Milos; Sayeed, Iqbal; Stein, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    More than two decades of pre-clinical research and two recent clinical trials have shown that progesterone (PROG) and its metabolites exert beneficial effects after traumatic brain injury (TBI) through a number of metabolic and physiological pathways that can reduce damage in many different tissues and organ systems. Emerging data on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VDH), itself a steroid hormone, have begun to provide evidence that, like PROG, it too is neuroprotective, although some of its actions may involve different pathways. Both agents have high safety profiles, act on many different injury and pathological mechanisms, and are clinically relevant, easy to administer, and inexpensive. Furthermore, vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in a large segment of the population, especially the elderly and institutionalized, and can significantly affect recovery after CNS injury. The combination of PROG and VDH in pre-clinical and clinical studies is a novel and compelling approach to TBI treatment. PMID:19394357

  4. Uniconazole-induced tolerance of soybean to water deficit stress in relation to changes in photosynthesis, hormones and antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingcai; Duan, Liusheng; Tian, Xiaoli; He, Zhongpei; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Baomin; Li, Zhaohu

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated whether uniconazole confers drought tolerance to soybean and if such tolerance is correlated with changes in photosynthesis, hormones and antioxidant system of leaves. Soybean plants were foliar treated with uniconazole at 50 mg L-1 at the beginning of bloom and then exposed to water deficit stress at pod initiation for 7 d. Uniconazole promoted biomass accumulation and seed yield under both water conditions. Plants treated with uniconazole showed higher leaf water potential only in water-stressed condition. Water stress decreased the chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate, but those of uniconazole-treated plants were higher than the stressed control. Uniconazole increased the maximum quantum yield of photosystemand ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity of water-stressed plants. Water stress decreased partitioning of assimilated 14C from labeled leaf to the other parts of the plant. In contrast, uniconazole enhanced translocation of assimilated 14C from labeled leaves to the other parts, except stems, regardless of water treatment. Uniconazole-treated plants contained less GA3, GA4 and ABA under well-watered condition than untreated plants, while the IAA and zeatin levels were increased substantially under both water conditions, and ABA concentration was also increased under water stressed condition. Under water-stressed conditions, uniconazole increased the content of proline and soluble sugars, and the activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in soybean leaves but not the malondialdehyde content or electrical conductivity. These results suggest that uniconazole-induced tolerance to water deficit stress in soybean was related to the changes of photosynthesis, hormones and antioxidant system of leaves.

  5. The stem cell factor (SCF)/c-KIT system in carcinogenesis of reproductive tissues: What does the hormonal regulation tell us?

    PubMed

    Figueira, Marília I; Cardoso, Henrique J; Correia, Sara; Maia, Cláudio J; Socorro, Sílvia

    2017-10-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor c-KIT and its ligand, the stem cell factor (SCF) are expressed in several tissues of male and female reproductive tract, playing an important role in the regulation of basic biological processes. The activation of c-KIT by SCF controls, cell survival and death, cell differentiation and migration. Also, the SCF/c-KIT system has been implicated in carcinogenesis of reproductive tissues due to its altered expression pattern or overactivation in consequence of gain-of-functions mutations. Over the years, it has also been shown that hormones, the primary regulators of reproductive function and causative agents in the case of hormone-dependent cancers, are also able to control the SCF/c-KIT tissue levels. Therefore, it is liable to suppose that disturbed SCF/c-KIT expression driven by (de)regulated hormone actions can be a relevant step towards carcinogenesis. The present review describes the SCF and c-KIT expression in cancers of reproductive tissues, discussing the implications of the hormonal regulation of the SCF/c-KIT system in cancer development. Understanding the relationship between hormonal imbalance and the SCF/c-KIT expression and activity would be relevant in the context of novel therapeutic approaches in reproductive cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Systemic intermittent parathyroid hormone treatment improves osseointegration of press-fit inserted implants in cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) has an anabolic effect on bone, as confirmed in human osteoporosis studies, distraction osteogenesis, and fracture healing. PTH in rat models leads to improved fixation of implants in low-density bone or screw insertion transcortically. Material and methods We examined the effect of human PTH (1–34) on the cancellous osseointegration of unloaded implants inserted press-fit in intact bone of higher animal species. 20 dogs were randomized to treatment with human PTH (1–34), 5 μg/kg/day subcutaneously, or placebo for 4 weeks starting on the day after insertion of a cylindrical porous coated plasma-sprayed titanium alloy implant in the proximal metaphyseal cancellous bone of tibia. Osseointegration was evaluated by histomorphometry and fixation by push-out test to failure. Results Surface fraction of woven bone at the implant interface was statistically significantly higher in the PTH group by 1.4 fold with (median (interquartile range) 15% (13–18)) in the PTH group and 11% (7–13) in control. The fraction of lamellar bone was unaltered. No significant difference in bone or fibrous tissue was observed in the circumferential regions of 0–500, 500–1,000, and 1,000–2,000 μm around the implant. Mechanically, the implants treated with PTH showed no significant differences in total energy absorption, maximum shear stiffness, or maximum shear strength. Interpretation Intermittent treatment with PTH (1–34) improved xhistological osseointegration of a prosthesis inserted press-fit at surgery in cancellous bone, with no additional improvement of the initial mechanical fixation at this time point. PMID:22880714

  7. Mollusc gonadotropin-releasing hormone directly regulates gonadal functions: a primitive endocrine system controlling reproduction.

    PubMed

    Treen, Nicholas; Itoh, Naoki; Miura, Hanae; Kikuchi, Ippei; Ueda, Takenori; Takahashi, Keisuke G; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Sharp, Peter J; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Osada, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is central to the control of vertebrate reproductive cycles and since GnRH orthologs are also present in invertebrates, it is likely that the common ancestor of bilateral animals possessed a GnRH-like peptide. In order to understand the evolutionary and comparative biology of GnRH peptides we cloned the cDNA transcripts of prepro GnRH-like peptides from two species of bivalve molluscs, the Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis and the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. We compared their deduced uncleaved and mature amino acid sequences with those from other invertebrates and vertebrates, and determined their sites of expression and biological activity. The two molluscan GnRH sequences increased the number of known protostome GnRHs to six different forms, indicating the current classification of protostome GnRHs requires further revision. In both molluscs, RT-PCR analysis showed that the genes were highly expressed in nervous tissue with lower levels present in peripheral tissues including the gonads, while immunocytochemistry, using anti-octopus GnRH-like peptide, demonstrated the presence of GnRH-like peptide in neural tissue. Putative scallop GnRH-like peptide stimulated spermatogonial cell division in cultured scallop testis, but the scallop GnRH-like peptide did not stimulate LH release from cultured quail pituitary cells. This is the first report of the cloning of bivalve GnRH-like peptide genes and of molluscan GnRH-like peptides that are biologically active in molluscs, but not in a vertebrate.

  8. Adrenocorticotropic hormone gel in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: A retrospective study of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Golubovsky, Josh; Hui-Yuen, Joyce; Shah, Ummara; Olech, Ewa; Lomeo, Rosalia; Singh, Vijay; Busch, Howard; Strandberg, Mary Jane; Strandberg, Kayla; Horowitz, Leslie; Askanase, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Acthar Gel is a long-acting formulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) with anti-inflammatory effects thought to be mediated in part through melanocortin receptor activation. This study was initiated to understand the role of Acthar Gel in SLE treatment in rheumatology practices. Methods: This is a retrospective case series of nine adult female patients treated with Acthar Gel for at least six months at five academic centers. Treating physicians completed a one-page questionnaire on lupus medications, disease activity, and outcomes. Clinical response was defined using SLEDAI 2K and improvement in the clinical manifestation(s) being treated. Results: The most common clinical SLE manifestations/indications requiring therapy with Acthar Gel were arthritis, rash, and inability to taper corticosteroids. The mean SLEDAI 2K score at baseline was 5.8 ± 5.0 (range 0-16). Six patients were concomitantly treated with corticosteroids (mean dose 18.3mg/day). All patients were on background SLE medications including immunosuppressives. Seven of nine patients had an overall improvement, with a decrease in SLEDAI 2K from 5.8 ± 5.0 at baseline to 3.5 ± 2.7 (range 0-8); four of five patients had improvement or resolution in arthritis, and one of two patients had resolution of inflammatory rash. Four patients discontinued corticosteroids and one patient tapered below 50% of the initial dose by 3 months of treatment with Acthar Gel. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: This study suggests a role for Acthar Gel as an alternative to corticosteroids in the treatment of SLE. Acthar Gel appears to be safe and well-tolerated after 6 months of treatment, with a significant reduction in disease activity. PMID:27158444

  9. Adrenocorticotropic hormone gel in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: A retrospective study of patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Golubovsky, Josh; Hui-Yuen, Joyce; Shah, Ummara; Olech, Ewa; Lomeo, Rosalia; Singh, Vijay; Busch, Howard; Strandberg, Mary Jane; Strandberg, Kayla; Horowitz, Leslie; Askanase, Anca

    2015-01-01

    Acthar Gel is a long-acting formulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) with anti-inflammatory effects thought to be mediated in part through melanocortin receptor activation. This study was initiated to understand the role of Acthar Gel in SLE treatment in rheumatology practices. This is a retrospective case series of nine adult female patients treated with Acthar Gel for at least six months at five academic centers. Treating physicians completed a one-page questionnaire on lupus medications, disease activity, and outcomes. Clinical response was defined using SLEDAI 2K and improvement in the clinical manifestation(s) being treated. The most common clinical SLE manifestations/indications requiring therapy with Acthar Gel were arthritis, rash, and inability to taper corticosteroids. The mean SLEDAI 2K score at baseline was 5.8 ± 5.0 (range 0-16). Six patients were concomitantly treated with corticosteroids (mean dose 18.3mg/day). All patients were on background SLE medications including immunosuppressives. Seven of nine patients had an overall improvement, with a decrease in SLEDAI 2K from 5.8 ± 5.0 at baseline to 3.5 ± 2.7 (range 0-8); four of five patients had improvement or resolution in arthritis, and one of two patients had resolution of inflammatory rash. Four patients discontinued corticosteroids and one patient tapered below 50% of the initial dose by 3 months of treatment with Acthar Gel. No adverse events were reported. This study suggests a role for Acthar Gel as an alternative to corticosteroids in the treatment of SLE. Acthar Gel appears to be safe and well-tolerated after 6 months of treatment, with a significant reduction in disease activity.

  10. Systemic intermittent parathyroid hormone treatment improves osseointegration of press-fit inserted implants in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Daugaard, Henrik; Elmengaard, Brian; Andreassen, Troels Torp; Lamberg, Anders; Bechtold, Joan Elisabeth; Soballe, Kjeld

    2012-08-01

    Intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) has an anabolic effect on bone, as confirmed in human osteoporosis studies, distraction osteogenesis, and fracture healing. PTH in rat models leads to improved fixation of implants in low-density bone or screw insertion transcortically. We examined the effect of human PTH (1-34) on the cancellous osseointegration of unloaded implants inserted press-fit in intact bone of higher animal species. 20 dogs were randomized to treatment with human PTH (1-34), 5 μg/kg/day subcutaneously, or placebo for 4 weeks starting on the day after insertion of a cylindrical porous coated plasma-sprayed titanium alloy implant in the proximal metaphyseal cancellous bone of tibia. Osseointegration was evaluated by histomorphometry and fixation by push-out test to failure. Surface fraction of woven bone at the implant interface was statistically significantly higher in the PTH group by 1.4 fold with (median (interquartile range) 15% (13-18)) in the PTH group and 11% (7-13) in control. The fraction of lamellar bone was unaltered. No significant difference in bone or fibrous tissue was observed in the circumferential regions of 0-500, 500-1,000, and 1,000-2,000 μm around the implant. Mechanically, the implants treated with PTH showed no significant differences in total energy absorption, maximum shear stiffness, or maximum shear strength. Intermittent treatment with PTH (1-34) improved histological osseointegration of a prosthesis inserted press-fit at surgery in cancellous bone, with no additional improvement of the initial mechanical fixation at this time point.

  11. [Hormonal perturbations in fibromyalgia].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, J L; Perrin, A E; Grunenberger, F; Goichot, B

    2001-12-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain and fatigue without biological detectable disturbances. The mechanisms of this disease are unknown. It has been postulated that it can be the consequence of a chronic stress mediated mainly through the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system. These fields have been extensively studied. Results were scattered and non convincing. A reduction of growth hormone and IGF-1 levels described in a third of patients has led to a double blind random clinical trial with biogenetic growth hormone. Results were equivocal . Other hormonal systems are grossly normals and circadian rhythms are unaltered. Despite some arguments in favour of a CRH neurons hyperactivity, these results are not able to consolide a particular physiopathological mechanism and to argument for a new therapeutic approach. Many of the abnormalities may be the consequence of psychological disturbances.

  12. The Effects of Local and Systemic Growth Hormone Treatment on Germ Cell Population and Fertility in an Experimental Unilateral Testicular Torsion and Orchiectomy Model.

    PubMed

    Ates, Ufuk; Gollu, Gulnur; Bingol-Kologlu, Meltem; Billur, Deniz; Kucuk, Gonul; Oruklu, Nihan; Bagrıacik, Umit; Hasırcı, Nesrin; Dindar, Hüseyin

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of local and systemic growth hormone on the germ cell population of the contralateral testes of pubertal rats subjected to unilateral testicular torsion and orchiectomy 24 hours later. A total of 40 male Wistar-Albino rats at age 3 weeks were divided into 5 groups. In the sham operated group the right testis was sutured and orchiectomy was performed 24 hours later. In groups 2 to 5 orchiectomy was performed 24 hours later following testicular torsion. In groups 3 and 4 unloaded and growth hormone loaded gelatin films, respectively, were sutured on the contralateral testes. In group 5 systemic growth hormone was administered for 7 days. Five weeks later each rat was cohabited with 2 female rats and the left testes were removed for evaluation. Mean seminiferous tubular diameter, mean testicular biopsy score and the mean haploid cell percentage were calculated. Mating studies were performed and fertility parameters were assayed. Mean seminiferous tubular diameter, mean testicular biopsy score and the mean haploid cell percentage of the contralateral testes were significantly decreased in the control and gelatin groups compared with the other groups. There was no difference between the local and systemic growth hormone groups regarding the haploid cell percentage. There were no differences between the groups in mean fetus numbers, mating or fertility and fecundity indexes except in the gelatin group, in which the mean fetus number was significantly lower. Fertility is not affected in rats after 24 hours of testicular torsion and orchiectomy, although there is germ cell injury and a decrease in the percent of haploid cells. Growth hormone administration resulted in the restoration of germ cell histology and an increase in the haploid cell percentage of the contralateral testes. Growth hormone may improve fertility after unilateral testicular torsion and orchiectomy. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  13. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  14. Growth hormone alters the glutathione S-transferase and mitochondrial thioredoxin systems in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2014-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH's actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance.

  15. Growth Hormone Alters the Glutathione S-Transferase and Mitochondrial Thioredoxin Systems in Long-Living Ames Dwarf Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH’s actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance. PMID:24285747

  16. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-01-01

    central nervous system. In this way, hormonal signals from the gut may be translated into the subjective sensation of satiety. Moreover, the importance of the brain–gut axis in the control of food intake is reflected in the dual role exhibited by many gut peptides as both hormones and neurotransmitters. Peptides such as CCK and GLP-1 are expressed in neurons projecting both into and out of areas of the central nervous system critical to energy balance. The global increase in the incidence of obesity and the associated burden of morbidity has imparted greater urgency to understanding the processes of appetite control. Appetite regulation offers an integrated model of a brain–gut axis comprising both endocrine and neurological systems. As physiological mediators of satiety, gut hormones offer an attractive therapeutic target in the treatment of obesity. PMID:16815798

  17. Juvenile hormone-dopamine systems for the promotion of flight activity in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Ken; Nagao, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    The reproductive roles of dopamine and dopamine regulation systems are known in social hymenopterans, but the knowledge on the regulation systems in solitary species is still needed. To test the possibility that juvenile hormone (JH) and brain dopamine interact to trigger territorial flight behavior in males of a solitary bee species, the effects on biogenic amines of JH analog treatments and behavioral assays with dopamine injections in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata were quantified. Brain dopamine levels were significantly higher in methoprene-treated males than in control males 4 days after treatment, but were not significantly different after 7 days. Brain octopamine and serotonin levels did not differ between methoprene-treated and control males at 4 and 7 days after treatment. Injection of dopamine caused significantly higher locomotor activities and a shorter duration for flight initiation in experimental versus control males. These results suggest that brain dopamine can be regulated by JH and enhances flight activities in males. The JH-dopamine system in males of this solitary bee species is similar to that of males of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera.

  18. Juvenile hormone-dopamine systems for the promotion of flight activity in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken; Nagao, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    The reproductive roles of dopamine and dopamine regulation systems are known in social hymenopterans, but the knowledge on the regulation systems in solitary species is still needed. To test the possibility that juvenile hormone (JH) and brain dopamine interact to trigger territorial flight behavior in males of a solitary bee species, the effects on biogenic amines of JH analog treatments and behavioral assays with dopamine injections in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata were quantified. Brain dopamine levels were significantly higher in methoprene-treated males than in control males 4 days after treatment, but were not significantly different after 7 days. Brain octopamine and serotonin levels did not differ between methoprene-treated and control males at 4 and 7 days after treatment. Injection of dopamine caused significantly higher locomotor activities and a shorter duration for flight initiation in experimental versus control males. These results suggest that brain dopamine can be regulated by JH and enhances flight activities in males. The JH-dopamine system in males of this solitary bee species is similar to that of males of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera.

  19. Microcystin-LR retards gonadal maturation through disrupting the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factors system in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Su, Yujing; Lin, Wang; Guo, Honghui; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Gu, Zemao; Li, Li

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have documented that microcystins (MCs) have potential toxic effects on growth and reproduction in fish. However, no systematic data exist on whether MCs cause gonadal development retardation through disrupting the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factors (GH/IGFs) system. To this end, zebrafish hatchlings (5 d post-fertilization) were exposed to 0, 0.3, 3 and 30µg/L microcystin-LR (MC-LR) for 90 d until they reached sexual maturity. Life-cycle exposure to MC-LR caused delayed ovarian maturation and sperm development along with ultrapathological lesions in the brain and liver. Moreover, the retarded gonadal development was accompanied by an inhibition of the GH/IGFs system, which was characterized by significant decreases in the transcriptional levels of brain gh (males only), hepatic igf2a and igf2b as well as gonadal igf1 (males only), igf3 and igf2r. These findings for the first time point to the influence of MC-LR on fish gonadal development via the GH/IGFs system. Also, sex-differential impairments suggested that gonadal development of males is more vulnerable than that of female to MC-LR. Our results provide evidence that MC-LR at environmentally relevant concentrations is able to induce impairments on fish gonadal development.

  20. Hormonal Responses to Synthetic Luteinizing Hormone and Follicle Stimulating Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Man

    PubMed Central

    Besser, G. M.; McNeilly, A. S.; Anderson, D. C.; Marshall, J. C.; Harsoulis, P.; Hall, R.; Ormston, B. J.; Alexander, L.; Collins, W. P.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, synthetic decapeptide luteinizing hormone/follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone (LH/FSH-RH), have been studied in 18 normal men and five women in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. Rapid and dose-dependent (25 to 100 μg) increases in serum immunoreactive LH were seen, which reached a peak 20 to 30 minutes after a rapid intravenous injection. Similar but much smaller increases in serum immunoreactive FSH were seen. These conclusions have been validated by using two different immunoassay systems for each hormone. The LH/FSH-RH therefore causes both LH and FSH release in man as in animals but does not affect growth hormone, thyrotrophin, or ACTH. The gonadotrophin responses were the same in the women as in the men but were insufficient in the men to cause statistically significant changes in the serum levels of the gonadal steroid hormones, testosterone or oestradiol, or in their precursors 17 α-hydroxyprogesterone or progesterone. In the women, however, there was a rise in oestradiol after the 100-μg doses. The use of LH/FSH-RH will provide an important test to define the level of the lesion in hypogonadal patients and also should be valuable in the treatment of some types of male and female infertility. A simple and clinically useful LH/FSH-RH test of pituitary function is described (100 μg given intravenously), and the provisional normal responses of LH and FSH at 20 and 60 minutes are given. PMID:4339974

  1. Types of hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of hormone therapy; Hormone replacement therapy - types; Menopause - types of hormone therapy; HT - types; Menopausal hormone ... Menopause symptoms include: Hot flashes Night sweats Sleep problems Vaginal dryness Anxiety Moodiness Less interest in sex ...

  2. Individualised growth response optimisation (iGRO) tool: an accessible and easy-to-use growth prediction system to enable treatment optimisation for children treated with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Jane; Lindberg, Anders; Aydin, Ferah; Gomez, Roy; Maghnie, Mohamad; Rooman, Raoul; Steinkamp, Heinz; Doerr, Helmuth; Ranke, Michael; Camacho-Hubner, Cecilia

    2017-10-26

    Growth prediction models (GPMs) exist to support clinical management of children treated with growth hormone (GH) for growth hormone deficiency (GHD), Turner syndrome (TS) and for short children born small for gestational age (SGA). Currently, no prediction system has been widely adopted. The objective was to develop a stand-alone web-based system to enable the widespread use of an 'individualised growth response optimisation' (iGRO) tool across European endocrinology clinics. A modern platform was developed to ensure compatibility with IT systems and web browsers. Seventeen GPMs derived from the KIGS database were included and tested for accuracy. The iGRO system demonstrated prediction accuracy and IT compatibility. The observed discrepancies between actual and predicted height may support clinicians in investigating the reasons for deviations around the expected growth and optimise treatment. This system has the potential for wide access in endocrinology clinics to support the clinical management of children treated with GH for these three indications.

  3. Abundance and fate of antibiotics and hormones in a vegetative treatment system receiving cattle feedlot runoff

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vegetative treatment systems (VTS) have been developed and built as an alternative to conventional holding pond systems for managing run-off from animal feeding operations. Initially developed to manage runoff nutrients via uptake by grasses, their effectiveness at removing other runoff contaminant...

  4. Seasonal Changes in Plasma Levels of Sex Hormones in the Greater Rhea (Rhea americana), a South American Ratite with a Complex Mating System

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Diego J.; Vera Cortez, Marilina; Della Costa, Natalia S.; Lèche, Alvina; Hansen, Cristian; Navarro, Joaquín L.; Martella, Mónica B.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal rhythm in sex hormones has been extensively studied in birds, as well as its relationship with the type of mating system. The Greater Rhea (Rhea americana), a South American ratite species, reproduces seasonally and has a complex mating system: female-defense polygyny and sequential polyandry. The present study aimed at analyzing the endocrine basis of reproduction in this species and its relationship with its mating system. We used HPLC and electrochemiluminescence techniques to identify and measure plasma testosterone and estradiol levels. Annual oscillations in sex hormones, testosterone and estradiol, in adult males and females were observed. Lower levels of these hormones were exhibited during the non reproductive season (February to July), whereas their maximum values were reached in September for males and November-December for females. These fluctuations reflect the seasonal changes in gonadal function. By contrast, no significant sex hormones oscillations were observed in juvenile males and females (negative control of seasonal changes). Greater rheas maintain high testosterone and estradiol levels throughout the reproductive period. The high testosterone levels during incubation and chick rearing did not inhibit parental behavior in males, which appears not to conform to the “Challenge Hypothesis”. In females, the high estradiol levels throughout the reproductive season would be needed to sustain their long egg-laying period. PMID:24837464

  5. Seasonal changes in plasma levels of sex hormones in the greater Rhea (Rhea americana), a South American Ratite with a complex mating system.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Diego J; Vera Cortez, Marilina; Della Costa, Natalia S; Lèche, Alvina; Hansen, Cristian; Navarro, Joaquín L; Martella, Mónica B

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal rhythm in sex hormones has been extensively studied in birds, as well as its relationship with the type of mating system. The Greater Rhea (Rhea americana), a South American ratite species, reproduces seasonally and has a complex mating system: female-defense polygyny and sequential polyandry. The present study aimed at analyzing the endocrine basis of reproduction in this species and its relationship with its mating system. We used HPLC and electrochemiluminescence techniques to identify and measure plasma testosterone and estradiol levels. Annual oscillations in sex hormones, testosterone and estradiol, in adult males and females were observed. Lower levels of these hormones were exhibited during the non reproductive season (February to July), whereas their maximum values were reached in September for males and November-December for females. These fluctuations reflect the seasonal changes in gonadal function. By contrast, no significant sex hormones oscillations were observed in juvenile males and females (negative control of seasonal changes). Greater rheas maintain high testosterone and estradiol levels throughout the reproductive period. The high testosterone levels during incubation and chick rearing did not inhibit parental behavior in males, which appears not to conform to the "Challenge Hypothesis". In females, the high estradiol levels throughout the reproductive season would be needed to sustain their long egg-laying period.

  6. [Dynamic changes in the reactivity of the hormonal system regulation with the impact by LBNP sessions in long-term space mission].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, A I; Noskov, V B; Poliakov, V V; Vorob'ev, D V; Nichiporuk, I A; Hinghofer-Szalkay, G; Rossler, A; Kvetnianski, R; Macho, L

    1998-01-01

    Experiment INTERSTITIUM was performed on days 3, 170, 287, and 430 of the long-term MIR mission of the Russian cosmonaut-physician in order to evaluate reactivity of the system of hormonal regulation of homeostasis during LBNP sessions. Data of the experiment displayed different types of reaction of the volume controls to LBNP at the onset (F-3), in the course of and soon after recovery (R-4) from the extended mission which are signs of specific phases of adaptive shifts in the organism of cosmonaut. Exaggerated reactivity of the hormonal systems during LBNP in flight suggests more significant consequences of the test for the cardiovascular system of human in microgravity. The most expressed hormonal reaction to LBNP was documented at the very beginning of the postflight period. Plasma cGMP was materially reduced in the process of the mission and remained quite low on R-4; return of nucleotides to the norm was observed no earlier than on R-90. Complete recovery from the space mission took three months when the hormonal reaction to LBNP was same as prior to launch.

  7. Functional Characterization of Hypertrehalosemic Hormone Receptor in Relation to Hemolymph Trehalose and to Oxidative Stress in the Cockroach Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia-Hsin; Bellés, Xavier; Lee, How-Jing

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrehalosemic hormone (HTH) is a peptide hormone that belongs to the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family, which exerts pleiotropic actions related to catabolic reaction and stress response. AKH peptides have been demonstrated to participate in stress response including oxidative stress in several insects. In order to study the signaling pathway of HTH involved in anti-oxidative stress, we have characterized a HIH receptor cDNA in Blattella germanica (Blage-HTHR) in structural and in functional terms using RNA interference (RNAi). Blage-HTHR is expressed in various female adult tissues (brain-CC-CA, ventral nerve cord, midgut, fat body, oviduct), but maximal expression is observed in the fat body. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Blage-HTHR expression results in a significantly lower level of hemolymph trehalose, even though HTH is exogenously administered. Paraquat elicits lethal oxidative stress in B. germanica, and co-injection of paraquat and HTH reduces this detrimental effect and extends the median survival time. Interestingly, the "rescue" effect of HTH on mortality caused by paraquat is diminished in specimens with depleted expression of Blage-HTH and Blage-HTHR. Finally, lipid peroxidation in the hemolymph increases 4 h after paraquat treatment, in comparison with control specimens or with HTH-treated specimens. However, lipid peroxidation induced by paraquat was not "rescued" by HTH in Blage-HTH and Blage-HTHR knockdown specimens. Our results demonstrate that HTH acts as a stress hormone mediating anti-oxidative protection in B. germanica, and that its receptor, Blage-HTHR, is essential for this action.

  8. Thyroid hormone transporter defects.

    PubMed

    Grüters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    In in vitro experiments, active transport of thyroid hormones had been repeatedly demonstrated. The membrane transporters for thyroid hormones which have been identified include the organic anion transporting polypeptide, heterodimeric amino acid transporters and the monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) which are the focus of this chapter. The gene encoding MCT8 which was identified as a specific thyroid hormone transporter is located on chromosome Xq13.2. The expression pattern of MCT8 indicates that MCT8 plays an important role in the development of the central nervous system by transporting thyroid hormone into neurons as its main target cells. Mutational analysis of the MCT8 gene revealed mutations or deletions in the MCT8 gene in unrelated male patients with severe psychomotor retardation and biochemical findings consistent with thyroid hormone resistance. Indeed, thyroid function tests in patients with MCT8 mutations demonstrated marked elevations of serum T3 (in the thyrotoxic range), a significant decrease in serum T4 or fT4 and normal to elevated TSH levels.

  9. Regulation of skeletal muscle growth in fish by the growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2013-10-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is the key promoter of growth in vertebrates; however, how this system modulates muscle mass in fish is just recently becoming elucidated. In fish, the GH induces muscle growth by modulating the expression of several genes belonging to the myostatin (MSTN), atrophy, GH, and IGF systems as well as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). The GH controls the expression of igf1 via Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of the transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling pathway, but it seems that it is not the major regulator. These mild effects of the GH on igf1 expression in fish muscle seem to be related with the presence of higher contents of truncated GH receptor1 (tGHR1) than full length GHR (flGHR1). IGFs in fish stimulate myogenic cell proliferation, differentiation, and protein synthesis through the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/TOR signaling pathways, concomitant with abolishing protein degradation and atrophy via the PI3K/AKT/FOXO signaling pathway. Besides these signaling pathways control the expression of several genes belonging to the atrophy and IGF systems. Particularly, IGFs and amino acid control the expression of igf1, thus, suggesting other of alternative signaling pathways regulating the transcription of this growth factor. The possible role of IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and the contribution of muscle-derived versus hepatic-produced IGF1 on fish muscle growth is also addressed. Thus, a comprehensive overview on the GH-IGF system regulating fish skeletal muscle growth is presented, as well as perspectives for future research in this field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of REM Sleep, Melanin Concentrating Hormone and Orexin/Hypocretin Systems in the Sleep Deprivation Pre-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Marta; Adamantidis, Antoine; Facchin, Laura; Bassetti, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Study Objectives Sleep reduction after stroke is linked to poor recovery in patients. Conversely, a neuroprotective effect is observed in animals subjected to acute sleep deprivation (SD) before ischemia. This neuroprotection is associated with an increase of the sleep, melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin/hypocretin (OX) systems. This study aims to 1) assess the relationship between sleep and recovery; 2) test the association between MCH and OX systems with the pathological mechanisms of stroke. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four experimental groups: (i) SD_IS: SD performed before ischemia; (ii) IS: ischemia; (iii) SD_Sham: SD performed before sham surgery; (iv) Sham: sham surgery. EEG and EMG were recorded. The time-course of the MCH and OX gene expression was measured at 4, 12, 24 hours and 3, 4, 7 days following ischemic surgery by qRT-PCR. Results A reduction of infarct volume was observed in the SD_IS group, which correlated with an increase of REM sleep observed during the acute phase of stroke. Conversely, the IS group showed a reduction of REM sleep. Furthermore, ischemia induces an increase of MCH and OX systems during the acute phase of stroke, although, both systems were still increased for a long period of time only in the SD_IS group. Conclusions Our data indicates that REM sleep may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of SD pre-ischemia, and that both MCH and OX systems were increased during the acute phase of stroke. Future studies should assess the role of REM sleep as a prognostic marker, and test MCH and OXA agonists as new treatment options in the acute phase of stroke. PMID:28061506

  11. Peripheral corticotropin-releasing hormone is produced in the immune and reproductive systems: actions, potential roles and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kalantaridou, Sophia; Makrigiannakis, Antonis; Zoumakis, Emmanouil; Chrousos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the principal regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, has been identified in various organ systems, including the immune and the female and male reproductive systems. CRH-like immunoreactivity has been reported in peripheral inflammatory sites and in a number of reproductive organs, including the ovaries, endometrial glands, decidualized endometrial stroma, placenta, decidua, and the testes. Therefore, "immune" and "reproductive" CRH are forms of "tissue" CRH; i.e., CRH found in peripheral tissues. Immune CRH plays a direct immunomodulatory role as an autocrine/paracrine mediator of inflammation. Immune CRH participates in several experimental inflammations and, in humans, in inflamed tissues from patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. One of the early effects of immune CRH is the degranulation of mast cells and the release of histamine and several inflammatory cytokines. Reproductive CRH is regulating reproductive functions with an inflammatory component, such as ovulation, luteolysis, decidualization, implantation, and early maternal tolerance. Placental CRH participates in the physiology of pregnancy and the onset of labor. Circulating placental CRH is responsible for the physiologic hypercortisolism of the latter half of pregnancy. Postpartum, this hypercortisolism is followed by a transient adrenal suppression, which may explain the blues/depression and increased autoimmune phenomena observed during this period.

  12. [Effect of anabolic preparation fenobolin on blood, reproductive system and hormone levels in blood serum of fractionally irradiated male rats].

    PubMed

    Vereshchako, G G; Gorokh, G A; Fedosenko, O L; Gun'kova, N V; Iakushev, D L; Konoplia, E F

    2011-01-01

    Influence of anabolic drug (phenobolin) injection at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg on some indexes of blood, reproductive system, the level of thyroid hormones, corticosterone and testosterone in blood serum of the male rats exposed to a fractional irradiation at the total dose of 2.0 Gy have been studied. A significant decrease in the quantity of leucocytes and lymphocytes after a fractional irradiation without and with phenobolin introduction was determined. Introduction of anabolic drug resulted in a significant drop of relative mass of testes and, particularly, epididymes, and also in a sharp decrease of the number of mature germ cells isolated from epididymes. A combined action of phenobolin and fractional irradiation (2.0 Gy) led to a significant reduction (3-5 times) in the quantity of mature germ cells in an epididymis. In some cases phenobolin influenced the level of testosterone in blood serum of the intact and irradiated animals. The anabolic steroid drug affects negatively the state of reproductive system of male rats.

  13. Phosphate Availability Alters Architecture and Causes Changes in Hormone Sensitivity in the Arabidopsis Root System1

    PubMed Central

    López-Bucio, José; Hernández-Abreu, Esmeralda; Sánchez-Calderón, Lenin; Nieto-Jacobo, María Fernanda; Simpson, June; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2002-01-01

    The postembryonic developmental program of the plant root system is plastic and allows changes in root architecture to adapt to environmental conditions such as water and nutrient availability. Among essential nutrients, phosphorus (P) often limits plant productivity because of its low mobility in soil. Therefore, the architecture of the root system may determine the capacity of the plant to acquire this nutrient. We studied the effect of P availability on the development of the root system in Arabidopsis. We found that at P-limiting conditions (<50 μm), the Arabidopsis root system undergoes major architectural changes in terms of lateral root number, lateral root density, and primary root length. Treatment with auxins and auxin antagonists indicate that these changes are related to an increase in auxin sensitivity in the roots of P-deprived Arabidopsis seedlings. It was also found that the axr1-3, axr2-1, and axr4-1 Arabidopsis mutants have normal responses to low P availability conditions, whereas the iaa28-1 mutant shows resistance to the stimulatory effects of low P on root hair and lateral root formation. Analysis of ethylene signaling mutants and treatments with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid showed that ethylene does not promote lateral root formation under P deprivation. These results suggest that in Arabidopsis, auxin sensitivity may play a fundamental role in the modifications of root architecture by P availability. PMID:12011355

  14. Epidermal homeostasis: the role of the growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor systems.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Stephanie R; Thumiger, Susan P; Werther, George A; Wraight, Christopher J

    2003-12-01

    GH and IGF-I and -II were first identified by their endocrine activity. Specifically, IGF-I was found to mediate the linear growth-promoting actions of GH. It is now evident that these two growth factor systems also exert widespread activity throughout the body and that their actions are not always interconnected. The literature highlights the importance of the GH and IGF systems in normal skin homeostasis, including dermal/epidermal cross-talk. GH activity, sometimes mediated via IGF-I, is primarily evident in the dermis, particularly affecting collagen synthesis. In contrast, IGF action is an important feature of the dermal and epidermal compartments, predominantly enhancing cell proliferation, survival, and migration. The locally expressed IGF binding proteins play significant and complex roles, primarily via modulation of IGF actions. Disturbances in GH and IGF signaling pathways are implicated in the pathophysiology of several skin perturbations, particularly those exhibiting epidermal hyperplasia (e.g., psoriasis, carcinomas). Additionally, many studies emphasize the potential use of both growth factors in the treatment of skin wounds; for example, burn patients. This overview concerns the role and mechanisms of action of the GH and IGF systems in skin and maintenance of epidermal integrity in both health and disease.

  15. Anti-Müllerian Hormone Is Required for Chicken Embryonic Urogenital System Growth but Not Sexual Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Luke S; Ayers, Katie; Cutting, Andrew D; Doran, Timothy J; Sinclair, Andrew H; Smith, Craig A

    2015-12-01

    In mammals, the primary role of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) during development is the regression of Müllerian ducts in males. These structures otherwise develop into fallopian tubes, oviducts, and upper vagina, as in females. This highly conserved function is retained in birds and is supported by the high levels of AMH expression in developing testes. In mammals, AMH expression is controlled partly by the transcription factor, SOX9. However, in the chicken, AMH mRNA expression precedes that of SOX9 , leading to the view that AMH may lie upstream of SOX9 and play a more central role in avian testicular development. To help define the role of AMH in chicken gonad development, we suppressed AMH expression in chicken embryos using RNA interference. In males, AMH knockdown did not affect the expression of key testis pathway genes, and testis cords developed normally. However, a reduction in the size of the mesonephros and gonads was observed, a phenotype that was evident in both sexes. This growth defect occurred as a result of the reduced proliferative capacity of the cells of these tissues, and male gonads also had a significant reduction in germ cell numbers. These data suggest that although AMH does not directly contribute to testicular or ovarian differentiation, it is required in a sex-independent manner for proper cell proliferation and urogenital system growth.

  16. Human Growth Hormone Delivery with a Microneedle Transdermal System: Preclinical Formulation, Stability, Delivery and PK of Therapeutically Relevant Doses.

    PubMed

    Ameri, Mahmoud; Kadkhodayan, Miryam; Nguyen, Joe; Bravo, Joseph A; Su, Rebeca; Chan, Kenneth; Samiee, Ahmad; Daddona, Peter E

    2014-05-15

    This study evaluated the feasibility of coating formulated recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on a titanium microneedle transdermal delivery system, Zosano Pharma (ZP)-hGH, and assessed preclinical patch delivery performance. Formulation rheology and surface activity were assessed by viscometry and contact angle measurement. rhGH liquid formulation was coated onto titanium microneedles by dip-coating and drying. The stability of coated rhGH was determined by size exclusion chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC). Preclinical delivery and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in female hairless guinea pigs (HGP) using rhGH coated microneedle patches at 0.5 and 1 mg doses and compared to Norditropin® a commercially approved rhGH subcutaneous injection. Studies demonstrated successful rhGH formulation development and coating on microneedle arrays. The ZP-hGH patches remained stable at 40 °C for six months with no significant change in % aggregates. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the rhGH-coated microneedle patches, delivered with high efficiency and the doses delivered indicated linearity with average Tmax of 30 min. The absolute bioavailability of the microneedle rhGH patches was similar to subcutaneous Norditropin® injections. These results suggest that ZP-transdermal microneedle patch delivery of rhGH is feasible and may offer an effective and patient-friendly alternative to currently marketed rhGH injectables.

  17. Human Growth Hormone Delivery with a Microneedle Transdermal System: Preclinical Formulation, Stability, Delivery and PK of Therapeutically Relevant Doses

    PubMed Central

    Ameri, Mahmoud; Kadkhodayan, Miryam; Nguyen, Joe; Bravo, Joseph A.; Su, Rebeca; Chan, Kenneth; Samiee, Ahmad; Daddona, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of coating formulated recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on a titanium microneedle transdermal delivery system, Zosano Pharma (ZP)-hGH, and assessed preclinical patch delivery performance. Formulation rheology and surface activity were assessed by viscometry and contact angle measurement. rhGH liquid formulation was coated onto titanium microneedles by dip-coating and drying. The stability of coated rhGH was determined by size exclusion chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography (SEC-HPLC). Preclinical delivery and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in female hairless guinea pigs (HGP) using rhGH coated microneedle patches at 0.5 and 1 mg doses and compared to Norditropin® a commercially approved rhGH subcutaneous injection. Studies demonstrated successful rhGH formulation development and coating on microneedle arrays. The ZP-hGH patches remained stable at 40 °C for six months with no significant change in % aggregates. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the rhGH-coated microneedle patches, delivered with high efficiency and the doses delivered indicated linearity with average Tmax of 30 min. The absolute bioavailability of the microneedle rhGH patches was similar to subcutaneous Norditropin® injections. These results suggest that ZP-transdermal microneedle patch delivery of rhGH is feasible and may offer an effective and patient-friendly alternative to currently marketed rhGH injectables. PMID:24838219

  18. Heterogeneity in the growth hormone pituitary gland system of rats and humans: Implications to microgravity based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Hayes, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Cleveland, C.; Todd, P.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    The cell separation techniques of velocity sedimentation, flow cytometry and continuous flow electrophoresis were used to obtain enriched populations of growth hormone (GH) cells. The goal was to isolate a GH cell subpopulation which releases GH molecules which are very high in biological activity, it was important to use a method which was effective in processing large numbers of cells over a short time span. The techniques based on sedimentation are limited by cell density overlaps and streaming. While flow cytometry is useful in the analytical mode for objectively establishing cell purity, the numbers of cells which can be processed in the sort mode are so small as to make this approach ineffective in terms of the long term goals. It was shown that continuous flow electrophoresis systems (CFES) can separate GH cells from other cell types on the basis of differences in surface charge. The bioreactive producers appear to be more electrophoretically mobile than the low producers. Current ground based CFES efforts are hampered by cell clumping in low ionic strength buffers and poor cell recoveries from the CFES device.

  19. Integration of in silico methods and computational systems biology to explore endocrine-disrupting chemical binding with nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, P; Sack, A; Wampole, M; Bobst, S; Vracko, M

    2017-07-01

    Thousands of potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals present difficult regulatory challenges. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals can interfere with several nuclear hormone receptors associated with a variety of adverse health effects. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has released its reviews of Tier 1 screening assay results for a set of pesticides in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP), and recently, the Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project (CERAPP) data. In this study, the predictive ability of QSAR and docking approaches is evaluated using these data sets. This study also presents a computational systems biology approach using carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) as a case study. For estrogen receptor and androgen receptor binding predictions, two commercial and two open source QSAR tools were used, as was the publicly available docking tool Endocrine Disruptome. For estrogen receptor binding predictions, the ADMET Predictor, VEGA, and OCHEM models (specificity: 0.88, 0.88, and 0.86, and accuracy: 0.81, 0.84, and 0.88, respectively) were each more reliable than the MetaDrug™ model (specificity 0.81 and accuracy 0.77). For androgen receptor binding predictions, the Endocrine Disruptome and ADMET Predictor models (specificity: 0.94 and 0.8, and accuracy: 0.78 and 0.71, respectively) were more reliable than the MetaDrug™ model (specificity 0.33 and accuracy 0.4). A consensus approach is proposed that reaches general agreement among the models (specificity 0.94 and accuracy 0.89). This study integrates QSAR, docking, and systems biology approaches as a virtual screening tool for use in risk assessment. As such, this systems biology pathways and network analysis approach provides a means to more critically assess the potential effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Detecting the Hormonal Pathways in Oilseed Rape behind Induced Systemic Resistance by Trichoderma harzianum TH12 to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Alkooranee, Jawadayn Talib; Aledan, Tamarah Raad; Ali, Ali Kadhim; Lu, Guangyuan; Zhang, Xuekun; Wu, Jiangsheng; Fu, Chunhua; Li, Maoteng

    2017-01-01

    Plants have the ability to resist pathogen attack after infection or treatment with biotic and abiotic elicitors. In oilseed rape plant Brassica napus AACC and in the artificially synthesized Raphanus alboglabra RRCC, the root-colonizing Trichoderma harzianum TH12 fungus triggers induced systemic resistance (ISR), and its culture filtrate (CF) triggers a systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response against infection by the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET) are plant hormone signals that play important roles in the regulation of ISR and SAR. In this study, at six different time points (1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days post-infection [dpi]), six resistance genes were used as markers of signaling pathways: JA/ET signaling used AOC3, PDF1.2 and ERF2 genes, while PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 genes were used as markers of SA signaling. The results of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that AOC3, PDF1.2 and ERF2 expression levels in infected leaves of AACC and RRCC increase at 1 and 2 dpi with S. sclerotiorum or inoculation with TH12. PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 expression levels increased at 8 and 10 dpi in infected leaves. PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 expression levels increased early in plants treated with CF in both of the healthy genotypes. Furthermore, induction of SA- and JA/ET-dependent defense decreased disease symptoms in infected leaves at different times. The results suggest that the RRCC genotype exhibits resistance to disease and that the ability of TH12 and its CF to induce systemic resistance in susceptible and resistant oilseed rape genotypes exists. In addition, the results indicate for the first time that in RRCC the SA signaling pathway is involved in resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  1. Sexual differentiation of the copulatory neuromuscular system in green anoles (Anolis carolinensis): normal ontogeny and manipulation of steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Melissa M; Wade, Juli

    2005-09-05

    The copulatory neuromuscular system of green anoles is sexually dimorphic and differentiates during embryonic development, although details of the process were unknown. In Experiment 1, we determined the time course of normal ontogeny. Both male and female embryos possessed bilateral copulatory organs (hemipenes) and associated muscles until incubation day 13; the structures completely regressed in female embryos by incubation day 19 (total incubation 34 days). In Experiment 2, we treated eggs with testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, or vehicle on both incubation days 10 and 13 to determine whether these steroid hormones mediate sexual differentiation. These time points fall between gonadal differentiation, which was determined in Experiment 1 to complete before day 10, and regression of the peripheral copulatory system in females. Tissue was collected on the day of hatching. Gonads were classified as testes or ovaries; presence versus absence of hemipenes and muscles, and the number and size of copulatory motoneurons were determined. Copulatory system morphology of vehicle-treated animals matched their gonadal sex. Hemipenes and muscles were absent in estradiol-treated animals, and androgens rescued the hemipenes and muscles in most females. Both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone treatment also caused hypertrophy of the hemipenes, which were everted in animals treated with these steroids. Copulatory motoneurons, assessed on the day of hatching in both experiments, were not dimorphic in size or number. Steroid treatment significantly increased motoneuron size and number overall, but no significant differences were detected in pairwise comparisons. These data demonstrate that differentiation of peripheral copulatory neuromuscular structures occurs during embryonic development and is influenced by gonadal steroids (regression by estradiol and enhancement by androgens), but associated motoneurons do not differentiate until later in life.

  2. Parathyroid hormone 1 receptor is essential to induce FGF23 production and maintain systemic mineral ion homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yi; Bi, Ruiye; Densmore, Michael J.; Sato, Tadatoshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Yuan, Quan; Zhou, Xuedong; Erben, Reinhold G.; Lanske, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid-hormone–type 1 receptor (PTH1R) is extensively expressed in key regulatory organs for systemic mineral ion homeostasis, including kidney and bone. We investigated the bone-specific functions of PTH1R in modulating mineral ion homeostasis by generating a novel mouse model in which PTH1R is ablated in the limb mesenchyme using Prx1Cre transgenic mice. Such ablation decreased FGF23 protein and serum levels by 50%, despite normal Fgf23 mRNA levels in long bones. Circulating calcium and PTH levels were unchanged, but inorganic phosphate and 1,25(OH)2D3 levels were significantly decreased and accompanied by elevated urinary calcium and phosphate wasting. Key renal genes for balancing mineral ion homeostasis, calbindinD28k, Klotho, and Napi2a were suppressed by 30–40%. Intermittent hPTH(1–34) injections increased Fgf23 mRNA (7.3-fold), Nurr1 mRNA (3.1-fold), and serum intact-FGF23 (1.6-fold) in controls, but failed to induce Fgf23, Nurr1 mRNA, or intact FGF23 production in mutants. Moreover, a significant elevation in serum C-terminal-FGF23 levels (4-fold) was detected in both genotypes. PTH markedly downregulated Galnt3 expression (2.7-fold) in controls but not in mutants. These results demonstrate the pivotal role of PTH1R in long bones to regulate systemic mineral ion homeostasis and the direct induction of FGF23 by PTH1R signaling.—Fan, Y., Bi, R., Densmore, M. J., Sato, T., Kobayashi, T., Yuan, Q., Zhou, X., Erben, R. G., Lanske, B. Parathyroid hormone 1 receptor is essential to induce FGF23 production and maintain systemic mineral ion homeostasis. PMID:26428657

  3. Stress Hormone Epinephrine Enhances Adipogenesis in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells by Up-Regulating the Neuropeptide Y System

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruijun; Kitlinska, Joanna B.; Munday, William R.; Gallicano, G. Ian; Zukowska, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal stress, psychologically and metabolically, increases the risk of obesity and diabetes in the progeny. However, the mechanisms of the pathogenesis remain unknown. In adult mice, stress activates NPY and its Y2R in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner in the abdominal fat. This increased adipogenesis and angiogenesis, leading to abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome which were inhibited by intra-fat Y2R inactivation. To determine whether stress elevates NPY system and accelerates adipogenic potential of embryo, here we “stressed" murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) in vitro with epinephrine (EPI) during their adipogenic differentiation. EPI was added during the commitment stage together with insulin, and followed by dexamethasone in the standard adipogenic differentiation medium. Undifferentiated embryonic bodies (EBs) showed no detectable expression of NPY. EPI markedly up-regulated the expression NPY and the Y1R at the commitment stage, followed by increased Y2R mRNA at the late of the commitment stage and the differentiation stage. EPI significantly increased EB cells proliferation and expression of the preadipocyte marker Pref-1 at the commitment stage. EPI also accelerated and amplified adipogenic differentiation detected by increasing the adipocyte markers FABP4 and PPARγ mRNAs and Oil-red O-staining at the end of the differentiation stage. EPI-induced adipogenesis was completely prevented by antagonists of the NPY receptors (Y1R+Y2R+Y5R), indicating that it was mediated by the NPY system in mESC's. Taken together, these data suggest that stress may play an important role in programing ESCs for accelerated adipogenesis by altering the stress induced hormonal regulation of the NPY system. PMID:22570731

  4. Detecting the Hormonal Pathways in Oilseed Rape behind Induced Systemic Resistance by Trichoderma harzianum TH12 to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Alkooranee, Jawadayn Talib; Aledan, Tamarah Raad; Ali, Ali Kadhim; Lu, Guangyuan; Zhang, Xuekun; Wu, Jiangsheng; Fu, Chunhua

    2017-01-01

    Plants have the ability to resist pathogen attack after infection or treatment with biotic and abiotic elicitors. In oilseed rape plant Brassica napus AACC and in the artificially synthesized Raphanus alboglabra RRCC, the root-colonizing Trichoderma harzianum TH12 fungus triggers induced systemic resistance (ISR), and its culture filtrate (CF) triggers a systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response against infection by the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET) are plant hormone signals that play important roles in the regulation of ISR and SAR. In this study, at six different time points (1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days post-infection [dpi]), six resistance genes were used as markers of signaling pathways: JA/ET signaling used AOC3, PDF1.2 and ERF2 genes, while PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 genes were used as markers of SA signaling. The results of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that AOC3, PDF1.2 and ERF2 expression levels in infected leaves of AACC and RRCC increase at 1 and 2 dpi with S. sclerotiorum or inoculation with TH12. PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 expression levels increased at 8 and 10 dpi in infected leaves. PR-1, TGA5 and TGA6 expression levels increased early in plants treated with CF in both of the healthy genotypes. Furthermore, induction of SA- and JA/ET-dependent defense decreased disease symptoms in infected leaves at different times. The results suggest that the RRCC genotype exhibits resistance to disease and that the ability of TH12 and its CF to induce systemic resistance in susceptible and resistant oilseed rape genotypes exists. In addition, the results indicate for the first time that in RRCC the SA signaling pathway is involved in resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:28045929

  5. Osteocalcin induces growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 system by promoting testosterone synthesis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Li, K

    2014-10-01

    Osteocalcin has been shown to enhance testosterone production in men. In the present study, we investigated the effects of osteocalcin on testosterone and on induction of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis. Osteocalcin injection stimulated growth, which could be inhibited by castration. In addition, osteocalcin induced testosterone secretion in testes both in vivo and in vitro. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, we showed that growth hormone expression was significantly increased in the pituitary after osteocalcin injection (p<0.05). Growth hormone expression in CLU401 mouse pituitary cells was also significantly stimulated (p<0.05) by osteocalcin-induced MA-10 cells. Osteocalcin injection also promoted hepatic expression of growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 (p<0.05), as demonstrated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Similarly, osteocalcin-induced MA-10 cells promoted growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 expression in NCTC1469 cells. These results suggest that the growth-stimulating activities of osteocalcin are mediated by testicular testosterone secretion, and thus provide valuable information regarding the regulatory effects of osteocalcin expression on the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis via reproductive activities.

  6. Cell culture approaches to understanding the actions of steroid hormones on the insect nervous system.

    PubMed

    Levine, R B; Weeks, J C

    1996-01-01

    During metamorphosis of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, ecdysteroids regulate the dendritic remodeling and programmed death of identified motoneurons. These changes contribute to the dramatic reorganization of behavior that accompanies metamorphosis. As a step toward elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms by which ecdysteroids affect neuronal phenotype, we have investigated the responses of Manduca motoneurons to ecdysteroids in vitro. Following dendritic regression at the end of larval life, thoracic leg motoneurons placed in culture respond to ecdysteroids by an increase in branching complexity, similar to events in vivo. Growth cone structure is affected markedly by ecdysteroids. At pupation, a rise in ecdysteroids triggers the segment-specific death of proleg motoneurons: the same segmental pattern of death is observed when motoneurons from different segments are removed from the nervous system and exposed to ecdysteroids in vitro. These studies provide strong evidence that Manduca motoneurons are direct targets of steroid action and set the stage for further studies of the specific mechanisms involved.

  7. Hemodynamic and hormonal changes to dual renin-angiotensin system inhibition in experimental hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moniwa, Norihito; Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; VonCannon, Jessica L; Simington, Stephen W; Wang, Hao; Groban, Leanne; Brosnihan, K Bridget; Nagata, Sayaka; Kato, Johji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Gomez, R Ariel; Lopez, Maria L Sequeira; Ferrario, Carlos M

    2013-02-01

    We examined the antihypertensive effects of valsartan, aliskiren, or both drugs combined on circulating, cardiac, and renal components of the renin-angiotensin system in congenic mRen2.Lewis hypertensive rats assigned to: vehicle (n=9), valsartan (via drinking water, 30 mg/kg per day; n=10), aliskiren (SC by osmotic mini-pumps, 50 mg/kg per day; n=10), or valsartan (30 mg/kg per day) combined with aliskiren (50 mg/kg per day; n=10). Arterial pressure and heart rate were measured by telemetry before and during 2 weeks of treatment; trunk blood, heart, urine, and kidneys were collected for measures of renin-angiotensin system components. Arterial pressure and left-ventricular weight/tibia length ratio were reduced by monotherapy of valsartan, aliskiren, and further reduced by the combination therapy. Urinary protein excretion was reduced by valsartan and further reduced by the combination. The increases in plasma angiotensin (Ang) II induced by valsartan were reversed by the treatment of aliskiren and partially suppressed by the combination. The decreases in plasma Ang-(1-7) induced by aliskiren recovered in the combination group. Kidney Ang-(1-12) was increased by the combination therapy whereas the increases in urinary creatinine mediated by valsartan were reversed by addition of aliskiren. The antihypertensive and antiproteinuric actions of the combined therapy were associated with marked worsening of renal parenchymal disease and increased peritubular fibrosis. The data show that despite improvements in the surrogate end points of blood pressure, ventricular mass, and proteinuria, dual blockade of Ang II receptors and renin activity is accompanied by worsening of renal parenchymal disease reflecting a renal homeostatic stress response attributable to loss of tubuloglomerular feedback by Ang II.

  8. Thyroid hormone and the heart.

    PubMed

    Moolman, J A

    2002-01-01

    Thyroid hormone has important cardiovascular effects, and abnormalities of its production cause cardiovascular morbidity. The role of both excessive and insufficient thyroid hormone production in the pathogenesis of clinical cardiac diseases can be deduced from thyroid hormone-induced molecular changes. Thyroid hormone regulates the expression of myocardial genes regulating the handling of calcium, which affects both systolic and diastolic myocardial function. Thyroid hormone also has indirect and direct effects on peripheral vascular smooth muscle tone, and alters the coupling of the left ventricle and arterial system. Excessive production of thyroid hormone results in an increased cardiac output as well as increased cardiac work efficiency, but reduced cardiac reserve. Amiodarone therapy for cardiac rhythm can cause both hyper- and hypothyroidism. Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) can be due to either excessive thyroid hormone production (type I AIT) or thyroid hormone release due to an inflammatory condition (type II AIT). Classification of AIT is helpful in guiding therapy. Amiodarone causes changes in the thyroid function tests of euthyroid patients on therapy--it inhibits the conversion of T(4) and T(3), which results in decreased T(3) and slightly increased T(4) serum levels in euthyroid patients. Baseline thyroid functions should therefore be determined before starting amiodarone therapy, and at 6-monthly intervals thereafter.

  9. Hormonal Programming Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tobet, Stuart A; Lara, Hernan E; Lucion, Aldo B; Wilson, Melinda E; Recabarren, Sergio E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2013-01-01

    Hormones influence countless biological processes across the lifespan, and during developmental sensitive periods hormones have the potential to cause permanent tissue-specific alterations in anatomy and physiology. There are numerous critical periods in development wherein different targets are affected. This review outlines the proceedings of the Hormonal Programming in Development session at the US-South American Workshop in Neuroendocrinology in August 2011. Here we discuss how gonadal hormones impact various biological processes within the brain and gonads during early development and describe the changes that take place in the aging female ovary. At the cellular level, hormonal targets in the brain include neurons, glia, or vasculature. On a genomic/epigenomic level, transcription factor signaling and epigenetic changes alter the expression of hormone receptor genes across development and following ischemic brain insult. In addition, organizational hormone exposure alters epigenetic processes in specific brain nuclei and may be a mediator of sexual differentiation of the neonatal brain. During development of the ovary, exposure to excess gonadal hormones leads to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Exposure to excess androgens during fetal development also has a profound effect on the development of the male reproductive system. In addition, increased sympathetic nerve activity and stress during early life have been linked to PCOS symptomology in adulthood. Finally, we describe how age-related decreases in fertility are linked to high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), which enhances sympathetic nerve activity and alters ovarian function. PMID:22700441

  10. Effects of feeding system on growth performance, plasma biochemical components and hormones, and carcass characteristics in Hanwoo steers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chan Sung; Cho, Woong Ki; Jang, In Seok; Lee, Sung Sill; Moon, Yea Hwang

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare growth performance, blood components and carcass traits by two feeding systems (concentrate with roughage separately [CON] vs total mixed ration [TMR]) in Hanwoo steers, and to learn the relationship between blood components during fattening or finishing phases and carcass traits in Hanwoo steers. Sixty steers aged 8 months were allotted to two feeding systems and fed similar amounts of average dry matter and total digestible nutrient throughout whole experimental period according to each feeding program. Steers were weighed monthly, taken blood at the end of growing, fattening and finishing periods, and slaughtered at 30 month of age. Growing performance was higher (p<0.05) in the CON group compared to the TMR group during fattening and finishing periods. The CON group was lower (p<0.05) in blood aspartic acid transaminase, blood urea nitrogen and retinol levels during growing period, but higher in triglyceride and cholesterol levels during fattening and finishing periods compared to the TMR group. The CON group was greater (p<0.05) in rib-eye area, and lighter (p<0.05) red in meat color compared to the TMR group. In the correlation coefficients between blood components of steers and carcass traits, retinol had a negative (p<0.05) correlation with marbling score and rib-eye area. Leptin had a positive (p<0.05) correlation with back fat thickness. Blood cholesterol and triglyceride were positively (p<0.05) correlated with carcass weight and rib-eye area. Growth performance, carcass ribeye area and meat color showed a more desirable result in the CON compared to the TMR in Hanwoo steers. Assessing the accumulated data of carcass traits with blood components including hormones-particularly retinol, cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin-during the fattening or finishing phases, it may be possible to find a biomarker for determining beef quality in living animals.

  11. Environmental estrogens inhibit growth of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by modulating the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor system.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrea M; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Martin, Lincoln E; Sheridan, Mark A

    2014-01-15

    Although environmental estrogens (EE) have been found to disrupt a wide variety of developmental and reproductive processes in vertebrates, there is a paucity of information concerning their effects on organismal growth, particularly postembryonic growth. In this study, we exposed juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 17β-estradiol (E2) β-sitosterol (βS), or 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) to assess the effects of EE on overall organismal growth and on the growth hormone-insulin-like-growth factor (GH-IGF) system. EE treatment significantly reduced food conversion, body condition, and body growth. EE-inhibited growth resulted from alterations in peripheral elements of the GH-IGF system, which includes multiple GH receptors (GHRs), IGFs, and IGF receptors (IGFRs). In general, E2, βS, and NP reduced the expression of GHRs, IGFs, and IGFRs; however, the effects varied in an EE-, tissue-, element type-specific manner. For example, in liver, E2 was more efficacious than either βS, and NP in reducing GHR expression, and the effect of E2 was greater on GHR 1 than GHR2 mRNA. By contrast, in gill, all EEs affected GHR expression in a similar manner and there was no difference in the effect on GHR1 and GHR 2 mRNA. With regard to IGF expression, all EEs reduced hepatic IGF1 and IGF2 mRNA levels, whereas as in gill, only E2 and NP significantly reduced IGF1 and IGF2 expression. Lastly, E2 and NP reduced the expression of IGFR1A and IGFR1B mRNA expression similarly in gill and red and white muscle, whereas βS had no effect on expression of IGFR mRNAs. These findings indicate that EEs disrupt post-embryonic growth by reducing GH sensitivity, IGF production, and IGF sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of a Hormone-Releasing Intrauterine System on the Vaginal Microbiome: A Prospective Baboon Model

    PubMed Central

    Hashway, Sara A.; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Bassis, Christine M.; Uchihashi, Mayu; Schmidt, Kelsey C.; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.; Patton, Dorothy L.; Bell, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in humans may alter vaginal microbial populations and susceptibility to pathogens. This study evaluated the time-dependent effects of an LNG-IUS on the vaginal microbiome of the baboon, a useful animal model for reproductive studies. Methods LNG-IUS were inserted into three reproductively mature, female baboons. The animals were evaluated for six months by physical examination and Gram-stained cytology. The vaginal microbiota was characterized at each timepoint by culture-independent analysis of the16S rRNA-encoding gene. Results Each baboon harbored a diverse vaginal microbiome. Inter-individual variation exceeded intra-individual variation. Diversity declined over time in one baboon and showed mild fluctuations in the other two. There were no significant community differences from early to late post LNG-IUS placement. Conclusions The baboon vaginal microbiome is unique to each individual and is polymicrobial. In this pilot study, the vaginal microbiome remained stable from early to late post LNG-IUS placement. PMID:24266633

  13. Nosema ceranae alters a highly conserved hormonal stress pathway in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Mayack, C; Natsopoulou, M E; McMahon, D P

    2015-12-01

    Nosema ceranae, an emerging pathogen of the western honeybee (Apis mellifera), is implicated in recent pollinator losses and causes severe energetic stress. However, whether precocious foraging and accelerated behavioural maturation in infected bees are caused by the infection itself or via indirect energetic stress remains unknown. Using a combination of nutritional and infection treatments, we investigated how starvation and infection alters the regulation of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and octopamine, two highly conserved physiological pathways that respond to energetic stress by mobilizing fat stores and increasing search activity for food. Although there was no response from AKH when bees were experimentally infected with N. ceranae or starved, supporting the notion that honeybees have lost this pathway, there were significant regulatory changes in the octopamine pathway. Significantly, we found no evidence of acute energetic stress being the only cause of symptoms associated with N. ceranae infection. Therefore, the parasite itself appears to alter regulatory components along a highly conserved physiological pathway in an infection-specific manner. This indicates that pathogen-induced behavioural alteration of chronically infected bees should not just be viewed as a coincidental short-term by-product of pathogenesis (acute energetic stress) and may be a result of a generalist manipulation strategy to obtain energy for reproduction.

  14. Hormonal enhancement of insecticide efficacy in Tribolium castaneum: oxidative stress and metabolic aspects.

    PubMed

    Plavšin, Ivana; Stašková, Tereza; Šerý, Michal; Smýkal, Vlastimil; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Kodrík, Dalibor

    2015-04-01

    Insect anti-stress responses, including those induced by insecticides, are controlled by adipokinetic hormones (AKHs). We examined the physiological consequences of Pyrap-AKH application on Tribolium castaneum adults (AKH-normal and AKH-deficient prepared by the RNAi technique) treated by two insecticides, pirimiphos-methyl and deltamethrin. Co-application of pirimiphos-methyl and/or deltamethrin with AKH significantly increased beetle mortality compared with application of the insecticides alone. This co-treatment was accompanied by substantial stimulation of general metabolism, as monitored by carbon dioxide production. Further, the insecticide treatment alone affected some basic markers of oxidative stress: it lowered total antioxidative capacity as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase in the beetle body; in addition, it enhanced the activity of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase. However, these discrepancies in oxidative stress markers were eliminated/reduced by co-application with Pyrap-AKH. We suggest that the elevation of metabolism, which is probably accompanied with faster turnover of toxins, might be responsible for the higher mortality that results after AKH and insecticide co-application. Changes in oxidative stress markers are probably not included in the mechanisms responsible for increased mortality.

  15. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of male mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2003-06-20

    Local renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) have been postulated in brain, pituitary and adrenal glands. These local RAS have been implicated, respectively, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system and body water balance, the secretion of pituitary hormones and the secretion of aldosterone by adrenal glands. By other hand, it is known that the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is involved in blood pressure regulation, and is affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of testosterone on RAS-regulating aminopeptidase A, B and M activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis, measuring these activities in their soluble and membrane-bound forms in the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands of orchidectomized males and orchidectomized males treated subcutaneously with several doses of testosterone. The present data suggest that in male mice, testosterone influences the RAS- and vasopressin-degrading activities at all levels of the HPA axis.

  16. [Incretin hormones].

    PubMed

    Cáp, J

    2011-04-01

    Incretin hormones are peptides that are secreted from endocrine cell of gastrointestinal tract after nutrient ingestion and stimulate insulin secretion. Glucosodependent Insulinotropic Peptide--GIP is released from K-cells of duodenum and proximal jejunum, recently GIP synthesis has been proved in pancreatic alpha cells. Besides the incretin effect causes GIP increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis in fat tissue, increased bone formation and decreased resorption and has protective and proliferative effect on CNS neurons. Both GIP agonists (to treat diabetes) and antagonist (to treat obesity) are being studied. Another incretin hormone is derived in intestinal I-cells by posttranslational processing of proglucagon--glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). GLP-1 stimulates insuline production and inhibits glucagon secretion, exerts proliferative and antiapoptotic effect on beta-cells. Via receptors on vagal nerve and central mechanisms decreases food intake and decreases body weight. By deceleration of gastric emptying it attenuates increases in meal-associated blood glucose levels. It exerts cardioprotective effects. GLP-1 receptors have been proved in liver recently but decreased liver glucose production and increased glucose uptake by liver and muscle are mediated indirectly by altering insulin and glucagons levels. GLP-2 stimulates enterocytes proliferation, up-regulates intestinal nutrient transport, improves intestinal barrier function, and inhibits gastric and intestinal motility. GLP-2 also reduces bone resorption.

  17. Ovarian hormones and obesity.

    PubMed

    Leeners, Brigitte; Geary, Nori; Tobler, Philippe N; Asarian, Lori

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake, i.e. eating and energy expenditure (EE). Severe obesity is more prevalent in women than men worldwide, and obesity pathophysiology and the resultant obesity-related disease risks differ in women and men. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Pre-clinical and clinical research indicate that ovarian hormones may play a major role. We systematically reviewed the clinical and pre-clinical literature on the effects of ovarian hormones on the physiology of adipose tissue (AT) and the regulation of AT mass by energy intake and EE. Articles in English indexed in PubMed through January 2016 were searched using keywords related to: (i) reproductive hormones, (ii) weight regulation and (iii) central nervous system. We sought to identify emerging research foci with clinical translational potential rather than to provide a comprehensive review. We find that estrogens play a leading role in the causes and consequences of female obesity. With respect to adiposity, estrogens synergize with AT genes to increase gluteofemoral subcutaneous AT mass and decrease central AT mass in reproductive-age women, which leads to protective cardiometabolic effects. Loss of estrogens after menopause, independent of aging, increases total AT mass and decreases lean body mass, so that there is little net effect on body weight. Menopause also partially reverses women's protective AT distribution. These effects can be counteracted by estrogen treatment. With respect to eating, increasing estrogen levels progressively decrease eating during the follicular and peri-ovulatory phases of the menstrual cycle. Progestin levels are associated with eating during the luteal phase, but there does not appear to be a causal relationship. Progestins may increase binge eating and eating stimulated by negative emotional states during the luteal phase. Pre-clinical research indicates that one mechanism for the pre-ovulatory decrease in eating is a

  18. Testicular expression of the Lin28/let-7 system: Hormonal regulation and changes during postnatal maturation and after manipulations of puberty.

    PubMed

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, S; Manfredi-Lozano, M; Ruiz-Pino, F; León, S; Morales, C; Cordido, F; Gaytán, F; Pinilla, L; Tena-Sempere, M

    2015-10-23

    The Lin28/let-7 system, which includes the RNA-binding proteins, Lin28a/Lin28b, and let-7 miRNAs, has emerged as putative regulator of puberty and male gametogenesis; yet, its expression pattern and regulation in postnatal testis remain ill defined. We report herein expression profiles of Lin28 and let-7 members, and related mir-145 and mir-132, in rat testis during postnatal maturation and in models of altered puberty and hormonal deregulation. Neonatal expression of Lin28a and Lin28b was low and rose markedly during the infantile period; yet, expression patterns diverged thereafter, with persistently elevated levels only for Lin28b, which peaked at puberty. Let-7a, let-7b, mir-132 and mir-145 showed profiles opposite to Lin28b. In fact, let-7b and mir-145 were abundant in pachytene spermatocytes, but absent in elongating spermatids, where high expression of Lin28b was previously reported. Perturbation of puberty by neonatal estrogenization reverted the Lin28/let-7 expression ratio; expression changes were also detected in other models of delayed puberty, due to early photoperiod or nutritional manipulations. In addition, hypophysectomy or growth hormone (GH) deficiency revealed regulation of this system by gonadotropins and GH. Our data document the expression profiles of the Lin28/let-7 system in rat testis along postnatal/pubertal maturation, and their perturbation in models of pubertal and hormonal manipulation.

  19. [The changes in hormonal status of the cardiovascular and the thyroid systems in rats with 18-month type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Derkach, K V; Ignatieva, P A; Bogush, I V; Balluzek, M F; Shpakov, A O

    2016-01-01

    Among the most common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are disorders of the cardiovascular and the thyroid systems. The functions of these systems may be weakened with increasing age. However, the mechanisms of these disorders, including the role of alterations in the adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS), are not fully elucidated. Objective was to study thyroid status and ACSS activity of the myocardium and the thyroid gland (TG) of rats with 8- and 18-month DM2 (DM-8 and DM-18) as compared to control animals of the same age (C-8 and C-18). In the myocardium of rats with DM2 an imbalance of β-adrenergic regulation of ACSS was detected, and these disturbances were amplified with increasing age. In the myocardium of rats of the C-18 group the disturbances of ACSS hormonal regulation were also identified, but they were less pronounced. In diabetic rats, the levels of free thyroxine and total triiodothyronine decreased, the level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) increased, and the stimulatory effect of TSH on the ACSS in TG was attenuated, which indicates the hypothyroid state in long-term DM2. In the C-18 group, these changes were absent. Thus, in the myocardium and TG of rats with 18-month DM2 the hormonal regulation of ACSS was violated, which may be one of the causes of cardiovascular pathology and hypothyroid states in long-term DM2.

  20. Testicular expression of the Lin28/let-7 system: Hormonal regulation and changes during postnatal maturation and after manipulations of puberty

    PubMed Central

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, S.; Manfredi-Lozano, M.; Ruiz-Pino, F.; León, S.; Morales, C.; Cordido, F.; Gaytán, F.; Pinilla, L.; Tena-Sempere, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lin28/let-7 system, which includes the RNA-binding proteins, Lin28a/Lin28b, and let-7 miRNAs, has emerged as putative regulator of puberty and male gametogenesis; yet, its expression pattern and regulation in postnatal testis remain ill defined. We report herein expression profiles of Lin28 and let-7 members, and related mir-145 and mir-132, in rat testis during postnatal maturation and in models of altered puberty and hormonal deregulation. Neonatal expression of Lin28a and Lin28b was low and rose markedly during the infantile period; yet, expression patterns diverged thereafter, with persistently elevated levels only for Lin28b, which peaked at puberty. Let-7a, let-7b, mir-132 and mir-145 showed profiles opposite to Lin28b. In fact, let-7b and mir-145 were abundant in pachytene spermatocytes, but absent in elongating spermatids, where high expression of Lin28b was previously reported. Perturbation of puberty by neonatal estrogenization reverted the Lin28/let-7 expression ratio; expression changes were also detected in other models of delayed puberty, due to early photoperiod or nutritional manipulations. In addition, hypophysectomy or growth hormone (GH) deficiency revealed regulation of this system by gonadotropins and GH. Our data document the expression profiles of the Lin28/let-7 system in rat testis along postnatal/pubertal maturation, and their perturbation in models of pubertal and hormonal manipulation. PMID:26494358

  1. The peptide hormone pQDLDHVFLRFamide (crustacean myosuppressin) modulates the Homarus americanus cardiac neuromuscular system at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J S; Cashman, C R; Smith, C M; Beale, K M; Towle, D W; Christie, A E; Dickinson, P S

    2009-12-01

    pQDLDHVFLRFamide is a highly conserved crustacean neuropeptide with a structure that places it within the myosuppressin subfamily of the FMRFamide-like peptides. Despite its apparent ubiquitous conservation in decapod crustaceans, the paracrine and/or endocrine roles played by pQDLDHVFLRFamide remain largely unknown. We have examined the actions of this peptide on the cardiac neuromuscular system of the American lobster Homarus americanus using four preparations: the intact animal, the heart in vitro, the isolated cardiac ganglion (CG), and a stimulated heart muscle preparation. In the intact animal, injection of myosuppressin caused a decrease in heartbeat frequency. Perfusion of the in vitro heart with pQDLDHVFLRFamide elicited a decrease in the frequency and an increase in the amplitude of heart contractions. In the isolated CG, myosuppressin induced a hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential of cardiac motor neurons and a decrease in the cycle frequency of their bursting. In the stimulated heart muscle preparation, pQDLDHVFLRFamide increased the amplitude of the induced contractions, suggesting that myosuppressin modulates not only the CG, but also peripheral sites. For at least the in vitro heart and the isolated CG, the effects of myosuppressin were dose-dependent (10(-9) to 10(-6) mol l(-1) tested), with threshold concentrations (10(-8)-10(-7) mol l(-1)) consistent with the peptide serving as a circulating hormone. Although cycle frequency, a parameter directly determined by the CG, consistently decreased when pQDLDHVFLRFamide was applied to all preparation types, the magnitudes of this decrease differed, suggesting the possibility that, because myosuppressin modulates the CG and the periphery, it also alters peripheral feedback to the CG.

  2. The peptide hormone pQDLDHVFLRFamide (crustacean myosuppressin) modulates the Homarus americanus cardiac neuromuscular system at multiple sites

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, J. S.; Cashman, C. R.; Smith, C. M.; Beale, K. M.; Towle, D. W.; Christie, A. E.; Dickinson, P. S.

    2009-01-01

    pQDLDHVFLRFamide is a highly conserved crustacean neuropeptide with a structure that places it within the myosuppressin subfamily of the FMRFamide-like peptides. Despite its apparent ubiquitous conservation in decapod crustaceans, the paracrine and/or endocrine roles played by pQDLDHVFLRFamide remain largely unknown. We have examined the actions of this peptide on the cardiac neuromuscular system of the American lobster Homarus americanus using four preparations: the intact animal, the heart in vitro, the isolated cardiac ganglion (CG), and a stimulated heart muscle preparation. In the intact animal, injection of myosuppressin caused a decrease in heartbeat frequency. Perfusion of the in vitro heart with pQDLDHVFLRFamide elicited a decrease in the frequency and an increase in the amplitude of heart contractions. In the isolated CG, myosuppressin induced a hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential of cardiac motor neurons and a decrease in the cycle frequency of their bursting. In the stimulated heart muscle preparation, pQDLDHVFLRFamide increased the amplitude of the induced contractions, suggesting that myosuppressin modulates not only the CG, but also peripheral sites. For at least the in vitro heart and the isolated CG, the effects of myosuppressin were dose-dependent (10−9 to 10−6 mol l−1 tested), with threshold concentrations (10−8−10−7 mol l−1) consistent with the peptide serving as a circulating hormone. Although cycle frequency, a parameter directly determined by the CG, consistently decreased when pQDLDHVFLRFamide was applied to all preparation types, the magnitudes of this decrease differed, suggesting the possibility that, because myosuppressin modulates the CG and the periphery, it also alters peripheral feedback to the CG. PMID:19946074

  3. Sex hormones and the genesis of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Lindsay S

    2006-03-01

    The sexually dimorphic prevalence of autoimmune disease remains one of the most intriguing clinical observations among this group of disorders. While sex hormones have long been recognized for their roles in reproductive functions, within the past 2 decades scientists have found that sex hormones are integral signaling modulators of the mammalian immune system. Sex hormones have definitive roles in lymphocyte maturation, activation, and synthesis of antibodies and cytokines. Sex hormone expression is altered among patients with autoimmune disease, and this variation of expression contributes to immune dysregulation. English-language literature from the last 10 years was reviewed to examine the relationship between sex hormones and the function of the mammalian immune system. Approximately 50 publications were included in this review, and the majority were controlled trials with investigator blinding that compared both male and female diseased and normal subjects. The review provided basic knowledge regarding the broad impact of sex hormones on the immune system and how abnormal sex hormone expression contributes to the development and maintenance of autoimmune phenomena, with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus, as models of "lupus-prone" mice are readily available. Sex hormones affect the function of the mammalian immune system, and sex hormone expression is different in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus than in healthy subjects. Sex hormones play a role in the genesis of autoimmunity. Future research may provide a therapeutic approach that is capable of altering disease pathogenesis, rather than targeting disease sequelae.

  4. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  5. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    Growth hormone deficiency means the pituitary gland does not make enough growth hormone. ... The pituitary gland is located at the base of the brain. This gland controls the body's balance of hormones. It ...

  6. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  7. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... use hormone therapy to prevent memory loss or Alzheimer’s disease? No, do not use hormone therapy to prevent memory loss or Alzheimer’s disease. Do hormones protect against aging and wrinkles ...

  8. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions. PMID:3466175

  9. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  10. The effects of stress hormones on immune function may be vital for the adaptive reconfiguration of the immune system during fight-or-flight behavior.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Shelley A

    2014-09-01

    Intense, short-term stress (i.e., robust activation of the fight-or-flight response) typically produces a transient decline in resistance to disease in animals across phyla. Chemical mediators of the stress response (e.g., stress hormones) help induce this decline, suggesting that this transient immunosuppression is an evolved response. However, determining the function of stress hormones on immune function is difficult because of their complexity. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that stress hormones help maintain maximal resistance to disease during the physiological changes needed to optimize the body for intense physical activity. Work on insects demonstrates that stress hormones both shunt resources away from the immune system during fight-or-flight responses as well as reconfigure the immune system. Reconfiguring the immune system minimizes the impact of the loss of these resources and reduces the increased costs of some immune functions due to the physiological changes demanded by the fight-or-flight response. For example, during the stress response of the cricket Gryllus texensis, some molecular resources are shunted away from the immune system and toward lipid transport, resulting in a reduction in resistance to disease. However, insects' immune cells (hemocytes) have receptors for octopamine (the insect stress neurohormone). Octopamine increases many hemocyte functions, such as phagocytosis, and these changes would tend to mitigate the decline in immunity due to the loss of molecular resources. Moreover, because the stress response generates oxidative stress, some immune responses are probably more costly when activated during a stress response (e.g., those that produce reactive molecules). Some of these immune responses are depressed during stress in crickets, while others, whose costs are probably not increased during a stress response, are enhanced. Some effects of stress hormones on immune systems may be better understood as examples of reconfiguration

  11. Deciding about hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    HRT - deciding; Estrogen replacement therapy - deciding; ERT- deciding; Hormone replacement therapy - deciding; Menopause - deciding; HT - deciding; Menopausal hormone therapy - deciding; MHT - deciding

  12. Small and remarkable: The Micro-Tom model system as a tool to discover novel hormonal functions and interactions.

    PubMed

    Campos, Marcelo Lattarulo; Carvalho, Rogério Falleiros; Benedito, Vagner Augusto; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira

    2010-03-01

    Hormones are molecules involved in virtually every step of plant development and studies in this field have been shaping plant physiology for more than a century. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, long used as a tool to study plant hormones, lacks significant important developmental traits, such as fleshy climacteric fruit, compound leaf and multicellular trichomes, suggesting the necessity for alternative plant models. An attractive option often used is tomato, a species also of major economic importance, being ideal to bring together basic and applied plant sciences. The tomato Micro-Tom (MT) cultivar makes it possible to combine the direct benefits of studying a crop species with the fast life cycle and small size required for a suitable biological model. However, few obscure questions are constantly addressed to MT, creating a process herein called "MT mystification". In this work we present evidence clarifying these questions and show the potential of MT, aiming to demystify it. To corroborate our ideas we showed that, by making use of MT, our laboratory demonstrated straightforwardly new hormonal functions and also characterized a novel antagonistic hormonal interaction between jasmonates and brassinosteroids in the formation of anti-herbivory traits in tomato.

  13. Thyroid hormones and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Avais; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pearce, Simon H S; Zaman, Azfar; Iervasi, Giorgio; Razvi, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial and vascular endothelial tissues have receptors for thyroid hormones and are sensitive to changes in the concentrations of circulating thyroid hormones. The importance of thyroid hormones in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis can be deduced from clinical and experimental data showing that even subtle changes in thyroid hormone concentrations - such as those observed in subclinical hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, and low triiodothyronine syndrome - adversely influence the cardiovascular system. Some potential mechanisms linking the two conditions are dyslipidaemia, endothelial dysfunction, blood pressure changes, and direct effects of thyroid hormones on the myocardium. Several interventional trials showed that treatment of subclinical thyroid diseases improves cardiovascular risk factors, which implies potential benefits for reducing cardiovascular events. Over the past 2 decades, accumulating evidence supports the association between abnormal thyroid function at the time of an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, experimental studies showed that thyroid hormones can have an important therapeutic role in reducing infarct size and improving myocardial function after acute MI. In this Review, we summarize the literature on thyroid function in cardiovascular diseases, both as a risk factor as well as in the setting of cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure or acute MI, and outline the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  14. [Women, immunity and sexual hormones].

    PubMed

    Denenberg, R

    1995-01-01

    How a weakened immune system affects the female's reproductive system is explained. The female's endocrine system controls the menstrual and reproductive systems, and the immune system attacks harmful substances and organisms. The hypothalamus stimulates the pituitary gland to produce the hormones FSH and LH, which in turn signal the ovaries to produce estrogen and progesterone. These hormones cause a mature egg to be released. If fertilized, the egg remains within the uterus; if not, menstruation occurs. HIV-positive females often complain of menstrual cycle changes, such as irregular periods, depression, or pain. The virus, other complications, or medications, such as AZT, may cause these symptoms. Estrogen therapy may help those with suppressed immune systems who have premature menopause. Oral contraceptives offer protection against pregnancy, but not HIV. It is not known if the pill reacts adversely with AIDS treatment drugs. Lists are provided showing the pros and cons of oral contraceptives and hormone therapy.

  15. Hormonal and Local Regulation of Bone Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canalis, Ernesto

    1985-01-01

    Reviews effects of hormones, systemic factors, and local regulators on bone formation. Identifies and explains the impact on bone growth of several hormones as well as the components of systemic and local systems. Concentrates on bone collagen and DNA synthesis. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  16. Hormonal and Local Regulation of Bone Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canalis, Ernesto

    1985-01-01

    Reviews effects of hormones, systemic factors, and local regulators on bone formation. Identifies and explains the impact on bone growth of several hormones as well as the components of systemic and local systems. Concentrates on bone collagen and DNA synthesis. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  17. [Hormones and hair growth in man].

    PubMed

    Moretti, G; Rampini, E; Rebora, A

    1977-12-01

    A literature review tries to diminish the ambiguity between hormones and hairs. Therefore the hormonal action in general (regulation of the protein synthesis indirectly by enzymatical regulation of the AMP-system or directly by hormones as active metabolites) and the methods to explore hormones-hair-interaction are discussed. Hormones pertaining to the pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis are regarded as the paramount hormones; therefore the results of research in testosterone, 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone, estrogens, progesterone, glucocorticoids, the hypophysis and its tropins are recapitulated. The main disorders of hair-growth, pattern baldness and "idiopathic" hirsutism, which would be dependent on a similar disturbance of androgen metabolism, are discussed. Pathology in hair-growth may arise in any point of the cascade of hormone action.

  18. [Hormonal dysnatremia].

    PubMed

    Karaca, P; Desailloud, R

    2013-10-01

    Because of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) disorder on production or function we can observe dysnatremia. In the absence of production by posterior pituitary, central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurs with hypernatremia. There are hereditary autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X- linked forms. When ADH is secreted but there is an alteration on his receptor AVPR2, it is a nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in acquired or hereditary form. We can make difference on AVP levels and/or on desmopressine response which is negative in nephrogenic forms. Hyponatremia occurs when there is an excess of ADH production: it is a euvolemic hypoosmolar hyponatremia. The most frequent etiology is SIADH (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH), a diagnostic of exclusion which is made after eliminating corticotropin deficiency and hypothyroidism. In case of brain injury the differential diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting (CSW) syndrome has to be discussed, because its treatment is perfusion of isotonic saline whereas in SIADH, the treatment consists in administration of hypertonic saline if hyponatremia is acute and/or severe. If not, fluid restriction demeclocycline or vaptans (antagonists of V2 receptors) can be used in some European countries. Four types of SIADH exist; 10 % of cases represent not SIADH but SIAD (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis) due to a constitutive activation of vasopressin receptor that produces water excess. c 2013 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Postoperative levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system versus oral contraceptives after gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment for preventing endometrioma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sihyun; Jung, Ji Ann; Lee, Yousun; Kim, Hye Yeon; Seo, Seok Kyo; Choi, Young Sik; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Byung Seok

    2014-01-01

    Although the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) is effective in reducing the recurrence of endometriosis-associated pain, its efficacy in preventing endometrioma recurrence is questionable. We compared the efficacy of postoperative use of LNG-IUS with oral contraceptives (OC) for preventing endometrioma recurrence. A retrospective cohort study. Medical university hospital. Ninety-nine women with endometriomas. A chart review was performed of women of reproductive age who had undergone laparoscopic surgery for endometrioma followed by three cycles of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (leuprolide acetate) treatment. Women were categorized into two groups: a group that had postoperative LNG-IUS placement (n = 42) and a group that received postoperative, cyclic, low-dose, monophasic, OCs (n = 57). Main outcome measures. Endometrioma recurrence was analyzed according to several clinical variables and postoperative treatment modalities. During the follow-up period (median 17 months), recurrent endometriomas were detected in eight women (8.1%). Patients with LNG-IUS had a recurrence rate of 4.8% (2/42), whereas women receiving OC had a recurrence rate of 10.5% (6/57). Cumulative recurrence-free survival assessment revealed that mean disease-free survival times for both groups were similar, but that for LNG-IUS was slightly longer than that for OC, with statistical significance (34.4 ± 1.0 months, 95% confidence interval 32.3–36.5, vs. 33.4 ± 1.3 months, 95% confidence interval 30.8–36.0, p = 0.045). Univariate analysis revealed a hazard ratio of 0.178 (95% confidence interval 0.029–1.075) (p = 0.060) for postoperative LNG-IUS use and endometrioma recurrence. However, for the multivariate regression analysis, only postoperative serum CA 125 levels were significantly associated with endometrioma recurrence (hazard ratio 1.012, p = 0.010). Postoperative LNG-IUS use seemed to be comparable to the use of cyclic OC in preventing endometrioma

  20. Stress and reproductive hormones reflect inter-specific social and nutritional conditions mediated by resource availability in a bear-salmon system.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Heather M; Darimont, Chris T; Paquet, Paul C; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Smits, Judit E G

    2014-01-01

    Food availability can influence the nutritional and social dynamics within and among species. Our investigation focused on grizzly and black bears in coastal British Columbia, Canada, where recent and dramatic declines in their primary prey (salmon) raise concerns about potentially negative effects on bear physiology. We examined how salmon availability relates to stress and reproductive hormones in coastal grizzly (n = 69) and black bears (n = 68) using cortisol and testosterone. In hair samples from genotyped individuals, we quantified salmon consumption using stable isotope analysis and hormone levels by enzyme immunoassay. To estimate the salmon biomass available to each bear, we developed a spatially explicit approach based on typical bear home-range sizes. Next, we compared the relative importance of salmon consumption and salmon availability on hormone levels in male bears using an information theoretical approach. Cortisol in grizzly bears was higher in individuals that consumed less salmon, possibly reflecting nutritional stress. In black bears, cortisol was better predicted by salmon availability than salmon consumption; specifically, individuals in areas and years with low salmon availability showed higher cortisol levels. This indicates that cortisol in black bears is more strongly influenced by the socially competitive environment mediated by salmon availability than by nutritional requirements. In both species, testosterone generally decreased with increasing salmon availability, possibly reflecting a less competitive environment when salmon were abundant. Differences between species could relate to different nutritional requirements, social densities and competitive behaviour and/or habitat use. We present a conceptual model to inform further investigations in this and other systems. Our approach, which combines data on multiple hormones with dietary and spatial information corresponding to the year of hair growth, provides a promising tool

  1. Stress and reproductive hormones reflect inter-specific social and nutritional conditions mediated by resource availability in a bear–salmon system

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Heather M.; Darimont, Chris T.; Paquet, Paul C.; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E.; Smits, Judit E. G.

    2014-01-01

    Food availability can influence the nutritional and social dynamics within and among species. Our investigation focused on grizzly and black bears in coastal British Columbia, Canada, where recent and dramatic declines in their primary prey (salmon) raise concerns about potentially negative effects on bear physiology. We examined how salmon availability relates to stress and reproductive hormones in coastal grizzly (n = 69) and black bears (n = 68) using cortisol and testosterone. In hair samples from genotyped individuals, we quantified salmon consumption using stable isotope analysis and hormone levels by enzyme immunoassay. To estimate the salmon biomass available to each bear, we developed a spatially explicit approach based on typical bear home-range sizes. Next, we compared the relative importance of salmon consumption and salmon availability on hormone levels in male bears using an information theoretical approach. Cortisol in grizzly bears was higher in individuals that consumed less salmon, possibly reflecting nutritional stress. In black bears, cortisol was better predicted by salmon availability than salmon consumption; specifically, individuals in areas and years with low salmon availability showed higher cortisol levels. This indicates that cortisol in black bears is more strongly influenced by the socially competitive environment mediated by salmon availability than by nutritional requirements. In both species, testosterone generally decreased with increasing salmon availability, possibly reflecting a less competitive environment when salmon were abundant. Differences between species could relate to different nutritional requirements, social densities and competitive behaviour and/or habitat use. We present a conceptual model to inform further investigations in this and other systems. Our approach, which combines data on multiple hormones with dietary and spatial information corresponding to the year of hair growth, provides a promising tool

  2. Preparation of Single-cohort Colonies and Hormone Treatment of Worker Honeybees to Analyze Physiology Associated with Role and/or Endocrine System.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takayuki; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Kubo, Takeo

    2016-09-06

    Honeybee workers are engaged in various tasks related to maintaining colony activity. The tasks of the workers change according to their age (age-related division of labor). Young workers are engaged in nursing the brood (nurse bees), while older workers are engaged in foraging for nectar and pollen (foragers). The physiology of the workers changes in association with this role shift. For example, the main function of the hypopharyngeal glands (HPGs) changes from the secretion of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) to the secretion of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes. Because worker tasks change as the workers age in typical colonies, it is difficult to discriminate the physiological changes that occur with aging from those that occur with the role shift. To study the physiological changes in worker tissues, including the HPGs, in association with the role shift, it would be useful to manipulate the honeybee colony population by preparing single-cohort colonies in which workers of almost the same age perform different tasks. Here we describe a detailed protocol for preparing single-cohort colonies for this analysis. Six to eight days after single-cohort colony preparation, precocious foragers that perform foraging tasks earlier than usual appear in the colony. Representative results indicated role-associated changes in HPG gene expression, suggesting role-associated HPG function. In addition to manipulating the colony population, analysis of the endocrine system is important for investigating role-associated physiology. Here, we also describe a detailed protocol for treating workers with 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), an active form of ecdysone, and methoprene, a juvenile hormone analogue. The survival rate of treated bees was sufficient to examine gene expression in the HPGs. Gene expression changes were observed in response to 20E- and/or methoprene-treatment, suggesting that hormone treatments induce physiological changes of the HPGs. The protocol for hormone

  3. The breast cancer hormone receptor retesting controversy in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada: lessons for the health system.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Deborah M; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients with hormonal treatment is determined by the presence of estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status in breast cancer. In Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), 425 of 1088 (39.1%) patients who had original "negative" receptor tests conducted between 1997 and 2005, had positive results upon retesting in a specialized laboratory. This commentary addresses (1) the diagnostic utility of estrogen and progesterone testing for breast cancer in general, (2) specific testing problems that occurred in NL, (3) scientific problems associated with retesting, and (4) the impact on public trust and the resulting legal and political responses that occurred as a result of the adverse events associated with false-negative hormone receptor tests. Finally, the lessons learned will be discussed including known high false-negative rates associated with the tests and the bias associated with retesting, the need for quality assurance and national standards, public education, and appropriate communication with patients and the public.

  4. Norditropin SimpleXx: a liquid human growth hormone formulation, a pen system and an auto-insertion device.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Skakkebaek, N E; Jacobsen, B B; Keller, E; Heinrich, U; Hartmann, K; Hokken-Koelega, A C; Delemarre van de Waal, H A

    1999-01-01

    Patient compliance is of vital importance for the outcome of any medical therapy. Compliance is especially a problem in long-term treatment of non-life threatening diseases, such as growth retardation in children. Until recently, all human growth hormone (hGH) products required a reconstitution process. Norditropin((R)) SimpleXx(TM) is a liquid formulation of the biosynthetic hGH product Norditropin((R)), and, together with an improved NovoPen((R)) 1.5, NordiPen(TM), and an auto-insertion device, PenMate(TM)/NordiPenMate(TM), it has been developed in order to ease the injection process for patients. A randomized, open, multicentre, crossover trial compared Norditropin((R)) SimpleXx(TM)/improved NovoPen((R)) 1.5 with freeze-dried Norditropin((R)) PenSet((R))/Nordiject((R)). A total of 67 children with GH deficiency, aged 5-18 years, were treated with either Norditropin((R)) SimpleXx(TM) for 6 weeks followed by Norditropin((R)) for 6 weeks or the opposite (sequences I and II, respectively). Acceptability/convenience and pain perception were evaluated by questionnaire after each period. The function and handling of the PenMate(TM) were evaluated in a Dutch trial by 27 GH-treated children with intrauterine growth retardation, aged 4-16 years, and their parents. All children were accustomed to using the Nordiject((R)) pen. The evaluation of the PenMate(TM) was based on a questionnaire. A similar trial was conducted in England, in which the NordiPen(TM) and the NordiPenMate(TM) were evaluated by 25 GH-treated children and their parents. Norditropin((R)) SimpleXx(TM) was found to be easier to inject by 64% of the children, and 98% of the children found the system easier to use overall. There was no difference in pain perception between the two administration systems, as judged by questionnaires and visual analogue scale score. Three out of four patients preferred to continue treatment with Norditropin((R)) SimpleXx(TM). The safety profiles of the two systems were similar

  5. Abnormalities of Thyroid Hormone Metabolism during Systemic Illness: The Low T3 Syndrome in Different Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone abnormalities are common in critically ill patients. For over three decades, a mild form of these abnormalities has been described in patients with several diseases under outpatient care. These alterations in thyroid hormone economy are a part of the nonthyroidal illness and keep an important relationship with prognosis in most cases. The main feature of this syndrome is a fall in free triiodothyronine (T3) levels with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Free thyroxin (T4) and reverse T3 levels vary according to the underlying disease. The importance of recognizing this condition in such patients is evident to physicians practicing in a variety of specialties, especially general medicine, to avoid misdiagnosing the much more common primary thyroid dysfunctions and indicating treatments that are often not beneficial. This review focuses on the most common chronic diseases already known to present with alterations in serum thyroid hormone levels. A short review of the common pathophysiology of the nonthyroidal illness is followed by the clinical and laboratorial presentation in each condition. Finally, a clinical case vignette and a brief summary on the evidence about treatment of the nonthyroidal illness and on the future research topics to be addressed are presented. PMID:27803712

  6. Hormonal status of male reproductive system: androgens and estrogens in the testis and epididymis. In vivo and in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    Bilińska, Barbara; Wiszniewska, Barbara; Kosiniak-Kamysz, Kazimierz; Kotula-Balak, Małgorzata; Gancarczyk, Monika; Hejmej, Anna; Sadowska, Jolanta; Marchlewicz, Mariola; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Wenda-Rózewicka, Lidia

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to summarize our results on the role of androgens and estrogens in human, rodent and equine testes and epididymides, in both, physiological and patological conditions, obtained in the space of the Solicited Project (084/PO6/2002) financially supported by the State Committee for Scientific Research during the last three years. Testosterone produced by Leydig cells of the testes is clearly the major androgen in the circulation of men and adult males of most mammalian species. However, androgen metabolites make up a significant fraction of total circulating steroids. Moreover, androgen metabolism may proceed to amplify the action of testosterone through its conversion to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or its aromatization to estradiol. The distribution of androgen and estrogen receptors (ARs and ERs) within male reproductive tissues is important because of their crucial role in mediating androgen and/or estrogen action. Attempts were undertaken to discuss not only the role of aromatase and ERs in mediating the action of estrogens in the male, but also the importance of DHT in hormonal regulation of the epididymis. In the latter, alterations caused by finasteride treatment and lead-induced oxidative stress are described. Male reproductive function of the testis and epididymis reflected by the alterations in enzymatic activity, distribution of steroid hormone receptors, differences in steroid hormone levels and altered gene expression of antioxidant enzymes are also discussed.

  7. Hormone therapy in acne.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2013-01-01

    Underlying hormone imbalances may render acne unresponsive to conventional therapy. Relevant investigations followed by initiation of hormonal therapy in combination with regular anti-acne therapy may be necessary if signs of hyperandrogenism are present. In addition to other factors, androgen-stimulated sebum production plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acne in women. Sebum production is also regulated by other hormones, including estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, glucocorticoids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins. Hormonal therapy may also be beneficial in female acne patients with normal serum androgen levels. An understanding of the sebaceous gland and the hormonal influences in the pathogenesis of acne would be essential for optimizing hormonal therapy. Sebocytes form the sebaceous gland. Human sebocytes express a multitude of receptors, including receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters and the receptors for steroid and thyroid hormones. Various hormones and mediators acting through the sebocyte receptors play a role in the orchestration of pathogenetic lesions of acne. Thus, the goal of hormonal treatment is a reduction in sebum production. This review shall focus on hormonal influences in the elicitation of acne via the sebocyte receptors, pathways of cutaneous androgen metabolism, various clinical scenarios and syndromes associated with acne, and the available therapeutic armamentarium of hormones and drugs having hormone-like actions in the treatment of acne.

  8. Evaluating the function of putative hormone transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Burkhard; Murphy, Angus S

    2009-01-01

    Hormones typically serve as long distance signaling molecules. To reach their site of action, hormones need to be transported from the sites of synthesis. Many plant hormones are mobile, thus requiring specific transport systems for the export from their source cells as well as subsequent import into target cells. Hormone transport in general is still poorly understood. Auxin is probably the most intensively studied plant hormone concerning transport in the moment. To advance our understanding of hormone transport we need two principal data sets: information on the properties of the transport systems including substrate specificity and kinetics, and we need to identify candidate genes for the respective transporters. Physiological transport data can provide an important basis for identifying and characterizing candidate transporters and to define their in vivo role. A recent publication in Plant Physiology highlights how kinetic and specificity studies may help to identify cytokinin transporters.1 PMID:19649195

  9. Evaluating the function of putative hormone transporters.

    PubMed

    Frommer, Wolf B; Schulz, Burkhard; Murphy, Angus S

    2009-02-01

    Hormones typically serve as long distance signaling molecules. To reach their site of action, hormones need to be transported from the sites of synthesis. Many plant hormones are mobile, thus requiring specific transport systems for the export from their source cells as well as subsequent import into target cells. Hormone transport in general is still poorly understood. Auxin is probably the most intensively studied plant hormone concerning transport in the moment. To advance our understanding of hormone transport we need two principal data sets: information on the properties of the transport systems including substrate specificity and kinetics, and we need to identify candidate genes for the respective transporters. Physiological transport data can provide an important basis for identifying and characterizing candidate transporters and to define their in vivo role. A recent publication in Plant Physiology highlights how kinetic and specificity studies may help to identify cytokinin transporters.

  10. Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis and Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion Associated with Lamotrigine-induced Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozisik, Lale; Tanriover, Mine Durusu; Saka, Esen

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a severe drug hypersensitivity reaction characterized by rash, fever and multi-organ failure. Limbic encephalitis (LE) is a rare disorder characterized by cognitive dysfunction with memory disturbance, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. We herein present an unusual case of DRESS syndrome due to lamotrigine with reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus, which developed autoimmune LE and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Discontinuation of lamotrigine, administration of methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin led to improvement. The LE in this case might have been caused by an autoimmune inflammatory mechanism associated with DRESS syndrome.

  11. Thyroid hormone transporters in the brain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takehiro; Abe, Takaaki

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in proper mammalian development of the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Lack of sufficient thyroid hormone results in abnormal development of virtually all organ systems, a syndrome termed cretinism. In particular, hypothyroidism in the neonatal period causes serious damage to neural cells and leads to mental retardation. Although thyroxine is the major product secreted by the thyroid follicular cells, the action of thyroid hormone is mediated mainly through the deiodination of T(4) to the biologically active form 3,3', 5-triiodo-L-thyronine, followed by the binding of T(3) to a specific nuclear receptor. Before reaching the intracellular targets, thyroid hormone must cross the plasma membrane. Because of the lipophilic nature of thyroid hormone, it was thought that they traversed the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. However, in the past decade, a membrane transport system for thyroid hormone has been postulated to exist in various tissues. Several classes of transporters, organic anion transporter polypeptide (oatp) family, Na(+)/Taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (ntcp) and amino acid transporters have been reported to transport thyroid hormones. Monocarboxylate transporter8 (MCT8) has recently been identified as an active and specific thyroid hormone transporter. Mutations in MCT8 are associated with severe X-linked psycomotor retardation and strongly elevated serum T3 levels in young male patients. Several other molecules should be contributed to exert the role of thyroid hormone in the central nervous system.

  12. Characterisation and pharmacological analysis of a crustacean G protein-coupled receptor: the red pigment-concentrating hormone receptor of Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Marco, Heather G; Verlinden, Heleen; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Gäde, Gerd

    2017-07-31

    This is the first pharmacological characterisation of a neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in a crustacean. We cloned the ORF of the red pigment-concentrating hormone from a German strain of Daphnia pulex (Dappu-RPCH), as well as that of the cognate receptor (Dappu-RPCHR). Dappu-RPCHR has the hallmarks of the rhodopsin superfamily of GPCRs, and is more similar to insect adipokinetic hormone (AKH) receptor sequences than to receptor sequences for AKH/corazonin-like peptide or corazonin. We provide experimental evidence that Dappu-RPCH specifically activates the receptor (EC50 value of 65 pM) in a mammalian cell-based bioluminescence assay. We further characterised the properties of the ligands for the Dappu-RPCHR by investigating the activities of a variety of naturally-occurring peptides (insect AKH and crustacean RPCH peptides). The insect AKHs had lower EC50 values than the crustacean RPCHs. In addition, we tested a series of Dappu-RPCH analogues, where one residue at a time is systematically replaced by an alanine to learn about the relative importance of the termini and side chains for activation. Mainly amino acids in positions 1 to 4 and 8 of Dappu-RPCH appear responsible for effective activation of Dappu-RPCHR. The substitution of Phe4 in Dappu-RPCH had the most damaging effect on its agonistic activity.

  13. RNA interference unveils functions of the hypertrehalosemic hormone on cyclic fluctuation of hemolymph trehalose and oviposition in the virgin female Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia-Hsin; Lee, How-Jing

    2011-07-01

    Hypertrehalosemic hormone (HTH) is a neuropeptide within the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family that induces a release of trehalose from fat body into hemolymph in a number of insects. In this study, we first showed that female adult German cockroach, Blattella germanica, displayed a cyclic fluctuation of hemolymph trehalose levels correlated to the maturation of oocytes in the reproductive cycle. After cloning the HTH cDNA from the German cockroach (Blage-HTH), expression studies indicated that Blage-HTH mRNA showed the cyclic changes during the first reproductive cycle, where peak values occurred in 8-day-old virgin female cockroaches, which were going to produce oothecae. The functions of Blage-HTH were studied using RNA interference (RNAi) to knockdown its expression. Adult virgin females of B. germanica injected with Blage-HTH dsRNA increased hemolymph trehalose levels in the late period of vitellogenesis more slowly than control. Furthermore, RNAi of Blage-HTH delayed oviposition time and some (10%) individuals did not produce the first ootheca until 15 days after eclosion, whereas the control group produced ootheca before 9 days in all cases.

  14. Lack of sensorial innervation in the newborn female rats affects the activity of hypothalamic monoaminergic system and steroid hormone secretion during puberty.

    PubMed

    Quiróz, Ubaldo; Morales-Ledesma, Leticia; Morán, Carolina; Trujillo, Angélica; Domínguez, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    There is evidence that sensory innervation plays a role regulating ovarian functions, including fertility.Since sensory denervation by means of capsaicin in newborn female rats results in a lower response togonadotropins, the present study analyzed the effects that sensory denervation by means of capsaicin in neonatal rats has on the concentration of monoamines in the anterior(AH) and medium (MH) hypothalamus, and on steroid hormone levels in serum. Groups of newborn female rats were injected subcutaneously with capsaicin and killed at 10, 20, and 30 days of age and on the first vaginal estrous.The concentrations of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin(5-HT), and their metabolites in the AH and MH were measured using HPLC, and the levels of estradiol (E),progesterone (P), testosterone (T), FSH, and luteinizing hormone using radioimmunoanalysis. The results show thatat 20 days of age, capsaicin-treated rats have lowernoradrenergic and serotonergic activities in the AH, and that the dopaminergic activity was lower in the MH. These results suggest that the sensorial system connections within the monoaminergic systems of the AH and MH are different.Capsaicin-treated animals had lower T, E, and P levels than in the control group, suggesting that the lower activity in the AH monoaminergic system and lower hormonesecretion could be explained by the blockade of information mediated by the sensory innervation (probably substance P), mainly between the ovary and the AH.

  15. Hormone symphony during root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; De La Paz Sánchez, María; García-Ponce, Berenice; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2012-12-01

    Hormones regulate plant growth and development in response to external environmental stimuli via complex signal transduction pathways, which in turn form complex networks of interaction. Several classes of hormones have been reported, and their activity depends on their biosynthesis, transport, conjugation, accumulation in the vacuole, and degradation. However, the activity of a given hormone is also dependent on its interaction with other hormones. Indeed, there is a complex crosstalk between hormones that regulates their biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling functionality, although some hormones have overlapping or opposite functions. The plant root is a particularly useful system in which to study the complex role of plant hormones in the plastic control of plant development. Physiological, cellular, and molecular genetic approaches have been used to study the role of plant hormones in root meristem homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the synthesis, signaling, transport of hormones and role during root development and examine the role of hormone crosstalk in maintaining homeostasis in the apical root meristem. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Enhancing effect of human thyroid stimulating hormone (hTSH) monoclonal antibody in the hTSH immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) system.

    PubMed

    Mirapurkar, Shubhangi; Samuel, G; Borkute, S D; Sivaprasad, N

    2012-01-01

    Different monoclonal antibodies, both commercial and indigenously produced, were evaluated in various combinations to optimize an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) system for human thyroid stimulating hormone (hTSH). During these studies, it was observed that mixing one of the indigenously produced hTSH monoclonal antibody (2B11) in the hTSH IRMA system using Immunotech (Beckman Coulter, Czech Republic) kit reagents, led to an overall increase in the assay binding and sensitivity (from 0.025 mIU/L to 0.015mIU/L) of this IRMA system. This is not a general property of all monoclonal antibodies against hTSH. The mechanism for this enhancement can be attributed to the formation of a multicomponent complex.

  17. Parathyroid hormone-related protein and its receptors: nuclear functions and roles in the renal and cardiovascular systems, the placental trophoblasts and the pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Thomas L; Cormier, Sarah; Eichinger, Anne; Endlich, Karlhans; Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie; Fischer, Evelyne; Friedman, Peter A; Karaplis, Andrew C; Massfelder, Thierry; Rossert, Jérôme; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Silve, Caroline; Stewart, Andrew F; Takane, Karen; Helwig, Jean-Jacques

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of the so-called ‘parathyroid hormone-related protein' (PTHrP) in 1987 was the result of a long quest for the factor which, by mimicking the actions of PTH in bone and kidney, is responsible for the hypercalcemic paraneoplastic syndrome, humoral calcemia of malignancy. PTHrP is distinct from PTH in a number of ways. First, PTHrP is the product of a separate gene. Second, with the exception of a short N-terminal region, the structure of PTHrP is not closely related to that of PTH. Third, in contrast to PTH, PTHrP is a paracrine factor expressed throughout the body. Finally, most of the functions of PTHrP have nothing in common with those of PTH. PTHrP is a poly-hormone which comprises a family of distinct peptide hormones arising from post-translational endoproteolytic cleavage of the initial PTHrP translation products. Mature N-terminal, mid-region and C-terminal secretory forms of PTHrP are thus generated, each of them having their own physiologic functions and probably their own receptors. The type 1 PTHrP receptor, binding both PTH(1-34) and PTHrP(1-36), is the only cloned receptor so far. PTHrP is a PTH-like calciotropic hormone, a myorelaxant, a growth factor and a developmental regulatory molecule. The present review reports recent aspects of PTHrP pharmacology and physiology, including: (a) the identification of new peptides and receptors of the PTH/PTHrP system; (b) the recently discovered nuclear functions of PTHrP and the role of PTHrP as an intracrine regulator of cell growth and cell death; (c) the physiological and developmental actions of PTHrP in the cardiovascular and the renal glomerulo-vascular systems; (d) the role of PTHrP as a regulator of pancreatic beta cell growth and functions, and, (e) the interactions of PTHrP and calcium-sensing receptors for the control of the growth of placental trophoblasts. These new advances have contributed to a better understanding of the pathophysiological role of PTHrP, and will help to identify

  18. Rhizosphere bacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase increase yield of plants grown in drying soil via both local and systemic hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Belimov, Andrey A; Dodd, Ian C; Hontzeas, Nikos; Theobald, Julian C; Safronova, Vera I; Davies, William J

    2009-01-01

    Decreased soil water availability can stimulate production of the plant hormone ethylene and inhibit plant growth. Strategies aimed at decreasing stress ethylene evolution might attenuate its negative effects. An environmentally benign (nonchemical) method of modifying crop ethylene relations - soil inoculation with a natural root-associated bacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 (containing the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase that degrades the ethylene precursor ACC), was assessed with pea (Pisum sativum) plants grown in drying soil. Inoculation with V. paradoxus 5C-2, but not with a transposome mutant with massively decreased ACC deaminase activity, improved growth, yield and water-use efficiency of droughted peas. Systemic effects of V. paradoxus 5C-2 included an amplified soil drying-induced increase of xylem abscisic acid (ABA) concentration, but an attenuated soil drying-induced increase of xylem ACC concentration. A local bacterial effect was increased nodulation by symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, which prevented a drought-induced decrease in nodulation and seed nitrogen content. Successfully deploying a single bacterial gene in the rhizosphere increased yield and nutritive value of plants grown in drying soil, via both local and systemic hormone signalling. Such bacteria may provide an easily realized, economic means of sustaining crop yields and using irrigation water more efficiently in dryland agriculture.

  19. Gastrointestinal hormone research - with a Scandinavian annotation.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from neuroendocrine cells in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gut, which makes it the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasible to conceive the hormones under five headings: The structural homology groups a majority of the hormones into nine families, each of which is assumed to originate from one ancestral gene. The individual hormone gene often has multiple phenotypes due to alternative splicing, tandem organization or differentiated posttranslational maturation of the prohormone. By a combination of these mechanisms, more than 100 different hormonally active peptides are released from the gut. Gut hormone genes are also widely expressed outside the gut, some only in extraintestinal endocrine cells and cerebral or peripheral neurons but others also in other cell types. The extraintestinal cells may release different bioactive fragments of the same prohormone due to cell-specific processing pathways. Moreover, endocrine cells, neurons, cancer cells and, for instance, spermatozoa secrete gut peptides in different ways, so the same peptide may act as a blood-borne hormone, a neurotransmitter, a local growth factor or a fertility factor. The targets of gastrointestinal hormones are specific G-protein-coupled receptors that are expressed in the cell membranes also outside the digestive tract. Thus, gut hormones not only regulate digestive functions, but also constitute regulatory systems operating in the whole organism. This overview of gut hormone biology is supplemented with an annotation on some Scandinavian contributions to gastrointestinal hormone research.

  20. Endocrine disruptors and thyroid hormone physiology.

    PubMed

    Jugan, Mary-Line; Levi, Yves; Blondeau, Jean-Paul

    2010-04-01

    Endocrine disruptors are man-made chemicals that can disrupt the synthesis, circulating levels, and peripheral action of hormones. The disruption of sex hormones was subject of intensive research, but thyroid hormone synthesis and signaling are now also recognized as important targets of endocrine disruptors. The neurological development of mammals is largely dependent on normal thyroid hormone homeostasis, and it is likely to be particularly sensitive to disruption of the thyroid axis. Here, we survey the main thyroid-disrupting chemicals, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, perchlorates, and brominated flame-retardants, that are characteristic disruptors of thyroid hormone homeostasis, and look at their suspected relationships to impaired development of the human central nervous system. The review then focuses on disrupting mechanisms known to be directly or indirectly related to the transcriptional activity of the thyroid hormone receptors.

  1. Gut hormones and obesity: physiology and therapies.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rebecca; Tan, Tricia; Bloom, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, it has been established that hormones produced by the gut, pancreas, and adipose tissue are key players in the control of body weight. These hormones act through a complex neuroendocrine system, including the hypothalamus, to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. In obesity, this homeostatic balance is disrupted, either through alterations in the levels of these hormones or through resistance to their actions. Alterations in gut hormone secretion following gastric bypass surgery are likely to underlie the dramatic and persistent loss of weight following this procedure, as well as the observed amelioration in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Medications based on the gut hormone GLP-1 are currently in clinical use to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus and have been shown to produce weight loss. Further therapies for obesity based on other gut hormones are currently in development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. TH1/TH2 cytokine profile, metalloprotease-9 activity and hormonal status in pregnant rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ-VALLE, J F; VÁZQUEZ-DEL MERCADO, M; GARCÍA-IGLESIAS, T; OROZCO-BAROCIO, G; BERNARD-MEDINA, G; MARTÍNEZ-BONILLA, G; BASTIDAS-RAMÍREZ, B E; NAVARRO, A D; BUENO, M; MARTÍNEZ-LÓPEZ, E; BEST-AGUILERA, C R; KAMACHI, M; ARMENDÁRIZ-BORUNDA, J

    2003-01-01

    During the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), several immune and neuroendocrine changes associated with pregnancy may exert positive (amelioration) or negative (exacerbation) effects on the clinical outcome. In order to shed light on the mechanisms underlying these responses, we performed a prospective longitudinal study in RA and SLE pregnant women, including healthy pregnant women as a control group. Cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression assessed by quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), cytokine levels and lymphocyte proliferation responses (LPR) following phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of PBMC, plasma metalloprotease-9 activity (MMP-9) and hormonal status during pregnancy were determined. TNFa was the most abundant cytokine mRNA expressed in PBMC in all groups studied (healthy pregnant women, RA and SLE pregnant patients). However, a general TH2 response reflected by high IL-10 levels was found in RA, as well as SLE, patients. A significant change in IFN-γ was observed in RA patients but only during the first trimester of pregnancy. This compared with a major TH1 response in healthy pregnant women. Interestingly, our study showed a homogeneous hormonal pattern in RA and SLE patients. Although decreased cortisol levels were observed in all patients studied, this is possibly related to the remission of disease activity status brought about by steroid treatment before and during pregnancy. In summary, we suggest that complex immune and hormonal networks are involved in pregnancy and that rheumatic diseases are very dynamic immune processes that cannot be described with a clear-cut cytokine profile. Furthermore, the observations in this study may reflect treatment-related immune effects more than those associated with disease. PMID:12562402

  3. The influence of ovarian factors on the somatostatin-growth hormone system during the postnatal growth and sexual development in lambs.

    PubMed

    Wańkowska, Marta; Polkowska, Jolanta; Misztal, Tomasz; Romanowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the effects of ovarian hormones on somatostatin in the hypothalamic neurons and growth hormone (GH) secretion during the postnatal growth and development of sheep. The study was performed on 9-week-old (infantile) lambs that were ovary-intact (OVI) or ovariectomized (OVX) at 39 days of age, and on 16-week-old (juvenile) lambs that were OVI or OVX at 88 days of age. Hormones in neurons and somatotropic cells were assayed with immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay. Following ovariectomy, immunoreactive somatostatin was more abundant (p<0.05) in the hypothalamus of infantile lambs, whereas in juvenile lambs it was more abundant (p<0.05) in the periventricular nucleus but reduced (p<0.01) in the median eminence. In contrast to somatostatin in the hypothalamus, the content of immunoreactive GH in the hypophysis was less in OVX infantile lambs, but greater in OVX juvenile lambs (p<0.05). Basal blood serum concentrations of GH were greater (p<0.05) in OVX infantile lambs, whereas in OVX juvenile lambs, mean and basal concentrations of GH and amplitude of GH pulses were less than in OVI lambs (p<0.05). The postnatal increase in body weight was greatest in middle-late infancy (p<0.01). The body weight did not differ (p>0.05) between OVI and OVX lambs. In conclusion, ovarian factors may inhibit the GH secretion in infantile lambs but enhance the GH secretion in juvenile lambs. Transition to puberty, as related to the growth rate, appears to be due mainly to change in gonadal influence on the somatostatin neurosecretion. A stimulation of somatostatin output in the median eminence by gonadal factors in infancy is followed by a stimulation of somatostatin accumulation after infancy. Thus, ovarian factors modulate mechanisms within the somatotropic system of lambs to synchronize the somatic growth with sexual development.

  4. Modulation of xenobiotic biotransformation system and hormonal responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) after exposure to tributyltin (TBT).

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Anne Skjetne; Arukwe, Augustine

    2007-04-01

    Multiple biological effects of tributyltin (TBT) on juvenile salmon have been investigated. Fish were exposed for 7 days to waterborne TBT at nominal concentrations of 50 and 250 microg/L dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Hepatic samples were analyzed for gene expression patterns in the hormonal and xenobiotic biotransformation pathways using validated real-time PCR method. Immunochemical and several cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated enzyme activity (ethoxyresorufin: EROD, benzyloxyresorufin: BROD, methoxyresorufin: MROD and pentoxyresorufin: PROD) assays were analyzed. Our data show that TBT produced concentration-specific decrease of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), vitellogenin (Vtg), zona radiata protein (Zr-protein) and increase of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) and androgen receptor-beta (ARbeta) in the hormonal pathway. In the xenobiotic biotransformation pathway, TBT produced apparent increase and decrease at respective low and high concentration, on aryl hydrocarbon receptor-alpha (AhRalpha), AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and AhR repressor (AhRR) mRNA. The expression of CYP1A1 and GST showed a TBT concentration-dependent decrease. The AhRbeta, CYP3A and uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (UGT) mRNA expressions were significantly induced after exposure to TBT. Immunochemical analysis of CYP3A and CYP1A1 protein levels confirmed the TBT effects observed at the transcriptional levels. The effect of TBT on the biotransformation enzyme gene expressions partially co-related but did not directly parallel enzyme activity levels for EROD, BROD, MROD and PROD. In general, these findings confirm previous reports on the endocrine effects of TBT, in addition to effects on hepatic CYP1A isoenzyme at the transcriptional level that transcends to protein and enzymatic levels. The induced expression patterns of CYP3A and UGT mRNA after TBT exposure, suggest the involvement of CYP3A and UGT in TBT metabolism in fish. The effect of TBT on CYP3A is proposed to

  5. LH (Luteinizing Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... for luteinizing hormone (LH), a hormone associated with reproduction and the stimulation of the release of an ... LH and FSH with the development of secondary sexual characteristics at an unusually young age are an ...

  6. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3D Patient Education mobile app The Hormone Health Network helps you and your health care provider have ... Copyright Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. Terms & Policies Network Partners The Hormone Health Network partners with other ...

  7. Hormonal effects in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001911.htm Hormonal effects in newborns To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hormonal effects in newborns occur because in the womb, babies ...

  8. [Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan

    2011-04-01

    Thyroid hormone resistance syndromes are a group of genetic conditions characterized by decreased tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormones. Three syndromes, in which resistance to hormone action is respectively due to mutations in the gene encoding for thyroid hormone receptor TRβ, impaired T4 and T3 transport, and impaired conversion of T4 to T3 mediated by deiodinases. An updated review of each of these forms of resistance is provided, and their pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical approaches are discussed.

  9. The Hormonal Control of Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Anthony P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Numerous circulating peptides and steroids produced in the body influence appetite through their actions on the hypothalamus, the brain stem, and the autonomic nervous system. These hormones come from three major sites—fat cells, the gastrointestinal tract, and the pancreas. In this Review we provide a synthesis of recent evidence concerning the actions of these hormones on food intake. PMID:17448988

  10. Informing Women on Menopause and Hormone Therapy: Know the Menopause a Multidisciplinary Project Involving Local Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Serena; Satolli, Roberto; Colombo, Cinzia; Senatore, Sabrina; Cotichini, Rodolfo; Da Cas, Roberto; Spila Alegiani, Stefania; Mosconi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy (HT) in the menopause is still a tricky question among healthcare providers, women and mass media. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy was a Consensus Conference (CC) organized in 2008: the project Know the Menopause has been launched to shift out the results to women and healthcare providers and to assess the impact of the cc’s statement. Methods And Findings: The project, aimed at women aged 45-60 years, was developed in four Italian Regions: Lombardy, Tuscany, Lazio, Sicily, each with one Local Health Unit (LHU) as “intervention” and one as “control”. Activities performed were: survey on the press; training courses for health professionals; educational materials for target populations; survey aimed at women, general practitioners (GPs), and gynaecologists; data analysis on HT drugs’ prescription. Local activities were: training courses; public meetings; dissemination on mass media. About 3,700 health professionals were contacted and 1,800 participated in the project. About 146,500 printed leaflets on menopause were distributed to facilitate the dialogue among women and health care professionals. Training courses and educational cascade-process activities: participation ranged 25- 72% of GPs, 17-71% of gynaecologists, 14-78% of pharmacists, 34-85% of midwives. Survey: 1,281 women interviewed. More than 90% believed menopause was a normal phase in life. More than half did not receive information about menopause and therapies. HT prescription analysis: prevalence fell from 6% to 4% in five years. No differences in time trends before-after the intervention. Major limitations are: organizational difficulties met by LHU, too short time for some local activities. Conclusions A huge amount of information was spread through health professionals and women. The issue of menopause was also used to discuss women’s wellbeing. This project offered an opportunity to launch a multidisciplinary, multimodal approach to

  11. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  12. Vasopressin release from the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system: effects of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), its analogues and melatonin.

    PubMed

    Boczek-Leszczyk, E; Stempniak, B; Juszczak, M

    2010-08-01

    The influence of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its analogues (i.e., agonist and antagonist) on vasopressin (VP) release from the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophysial (H-N) system was studied both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, it was determined whether the possible response of vasopressinergic neurones to these peptides could be modified by melatonin through a cAMP-dependent mechanism. In this study we demonstrate, for the first time, that the highly selective GnRH agonist (i.e., [Des-Gly(10),D-His(Bzl)(6),Pro-NHEt(9)]-LHRH; histrelin) stimulates the release of VP from the rat H-N system, while native GnRH and its antagonist remain inactive in modifying this process in vitro. Melatonin significantly inhibited basal and histrelin-induced release of VP in vitro, but displayed no significant influence on VP secretion when GnRH or its antagonist were present in a medium. Melatonin fully suppressed forskolin-stimulated VP release from the rat H-N system. On the other hand, addition of forskolin to a medium containing both histrelin and melatonin did not further alter the inhibitory influence of melatonin on the histrelin-dependent release of VP in vitro. After intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of native GnRH or its agonist, blood plasma VP concentration was significantly higher than in control animals, which was accompanied by decreased content of the hormone in the neurohypophysis. Intravenous (i.v.) injection of melatonin did not change, in any subgroup, blood plasma VP concentration, when compared to the vehicle-injected rats. However, the neurohypophysial levels of the hormone were significantly higher after melatonin injection in control, GnRH- and histrelin-infused animals. Our present results suggest that activation of the GnRH receptor in the hypothalamus is involved in stimulation of VP secretion from the rat H-N system. We have also shown that melatonin, at a concentration close to its physiological level in the blood, significantly

  13. [Cell composition and ultrastructure of the thymus in offspring during changes in the hormonal background in the mother-fetus functional system].

    PubMed

    Torbek, V E

    1988-10-01

    Micro- and ultrastructure has been studied in newborn rats, developed under conditions of an altered hormonal background in the functional system mother--fetus (FSMF), when hydrocortisone acetate is injected on the 17th-18th days of pregnancy, and at bilateral adrenalectomy of pregnant females. A number of similar changes in the offspring thymus are revealed under both procedure: the portion of mitotically dividing and blast forms of cells decreases, there is a certain tendency to increasing destructively altered cells and intensity of the processes in differentiation of cellular elements and subcellular structures, that is, evidently, depended on increasing contents of corticosteroids in the developing organism. When hydrocortisone acetate is injected to the pregnant rats, some amount of the drug can penetrate across the placenta and a superfluous concentration of glucocorticoids is created in the fetus blood. When adrenalectomy is performed in the pregnant rats, the main cause of elevated secretion of corticosteroids in the fetuses is, evidently, stimulation of the adrenals with their own ACTH, that is produced as a response to a decreased concentration of corticosteroids in FSMF. Nevertheless, in the fetal thymus reaction to the effects mentioned there are some differences. In the experiments with adrenalectomy in the pregnant rats, in the offspring thymus signs of degradation of lymphocytes and reticuloepitheliocytes are manifested more distinctly; that can be connected with a high concentration of endogenic corticosteroids in the fetus blood and with a qualitative composition of the hormones.

  14. Distribution and sequence of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and its potential role as a molecular link between feeding and reproductive systems in the Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica).

    PubMed

    Fraley, G S; Coombs, E; Gerometta, E; Colton, S; Sharp, P J; Li, Q; Clarke, I J

    2013-04-01

    The reproductive status of adult Pekin drakes is very sensitive to nutritional status. Thus, the purpose of this study was to increase our understanding of the neurobiology underlying the depressive effect of fasting on the secretion of reproductive hormones. It was hypothesized that this effect was mediated by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). Networks of GnIH fibers were present throughout the diencephalon, and cell bodies were present primarily, in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The duck GnIH gene was cloned and sequenced and found to encode GnIH and two GnIH-related peptides (GnIH-RP1, GnIH-RP2) which have a similar identity to those found in other avian species. Intracerebroventricular injection of GnIH, but not of GnIH-RP1, depressed plasma LH and stimulated feeding. Fasting for 48h depressed plasma LH and induced fos expression in about half the population of GnIH-ir neurons. These data suggest that GnIH neurons are mediators between feeding and reproductive systems in Pekin drakes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Thyroid hormone signaling in energy homeostasis and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    McAninch, Elizabeth A.; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid hormone plays a significant role in diverse processes related to growth, development, differentiation, and metabolism. Thyroid hormone signaling modulates energy expenditure through both central and peripheral pathways. At the cellular level, the thyroid hormone exerts its effects after concerted mechanisms facilitate binding to the thyroid hormone receptor. In the hypothalamus, signals from a range of metabolic pathways, including appetite, temperature, afferent stimuli via the autonomic nervous system, availability of energy substrates, hormones, and other biologically active molecules, converge to maintain plasma thyroid hormone at the appropriate level to preserve energy homeostasis. At the tissue level, thyroid hormone actions on metabolism are controlled by transmembrane transporters, deiodinases, and thyroid hormone receptors. In the modern environment, humans are susceptible to an energy surplus, which has resulted in an obesity epidemic and thus understanding the contribution of the thyroid hormone to cellular and organism metabolism is increasingly relevant. PMID:24697152

  16. Seasonal plasticity in the peptide neuronal systems: potential roles of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone, neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide in the regulation of the reproductive axis in subtropical Indian weaver birds.

    PubMed

    Surbhi; Rastogi, A; Rani, S; Kumar, V

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments examined the expression of gonadotrophin-releasing and inhibiting hormones (GnRH-I, GnRH-II and GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in subtropical Indian weaver birds, which demonstrate relative photorefractoriness. Experiment 1 measured peptide expression levels in the form of immunoreactive (-IR) cells, percentage cell area and cell optical density in the preoptic area (GnRH-I), midbrain (GnRH-II), paraventricular nucleus (GnIH), mediobasal hypothalamus [dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), infundibular complex (INc), NPY and VIP] and lateral septal organ (VIP) during the progressive, breeding, regressive and nonbreeding phases of the annual reproductive cycle. GnRH-I was decreased in the nonbreeding and VIP was increased in INc in the breeding and regressive states. GnRH-II and NPY levels did not differ between the testicular phases. Double-labelled immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed a close association between the GnRH/GnIH, GnRH/NPY, GnRH/VIP and GnIH/NPY peptide systems, implicating them interacting and playing roles in the reproductive regulation in weaver birds. Experiment 2 further measured these peptide levels in the middle of day and night in weaver birds that were maintained under short days (8 : 16 h light /dark cycle; photosensitive), exposed to ten long days (16 : 8 h light /dark cycle; photostimulated) or maintained for approximately 2 years on a 16 : 8 h light /dark cycle (photorefractory). Reproductively immature testes in these groups precluded the possible effect of an enhanced gonadal feedback on the hypothalamic peptide expression. There were group differences in the GnRH-I (not GnRH-II), GnIH, NPY and VIP immunoreactivity, albeit with variations in immunoreactivity measures in the present study. These results, which are consistent with those reported in birds with relative photorefractoriness, show the distribution and possibly a complex interaction of key neuropeptides in the regulation of the

  17. Review of hormonal treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdulkareem, I H; Zurmi, I B

    2012-01-01

    This critical review focuses on the role of steroid hormones and their receptors in the development and treatment of breast cancer, with special reference to estrogen receptors, as well as mechanisms of receptor-ligand interactions, response or resistance to hormonal therapy against breast cancer, in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. Tamoxifen is used in hormonal treatment of breast cancer for up to five years, depending on the presentation. However, there have been recent developments in hormonal therapy of breast cancer in the last ten years, with the introduction of many different alternative therapies for this condition. A critical review of published articles in Pubmed/Medline, Athens, AJOL, NHS Evidence, Science Direct and Google, relating to hormonal treatment of breast cancer, was undertaken, in order to evaluate the mechanisms of estrogen receptor-ligand interactions, their involvement in the etio-pathogenesis of breast cancer, resistance of breast cancer cells to anti-hormonal agents, as well as ways of treating breast cancer using anti-hormone drugs like tamoxifen. Although tamoxifen is the established drug for hormonal treatment of breast cancer, cases of hormone resistance breast cancer have been described recently in the literature. This can happen from the beginning, or during treatment. Therefore, we aim to examine the causes of resistance to hormonal treatment with a view to understand the options of tackling this problem, and suggest other novel alternative hormonal therapies that can be tried, which may overtake tamoxifen in the future. We also seek to emphasize that hormonal therapy has a definite place in the treatment of breast cancer along with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as the disease is often considered to be multi-systemic even from the beginning.

  18. Thyroid Hormone Acts Locally to Increase Neurogenesis, Neuronal Differentiation, and Dendritic Arbor Elaboration in the Tadpole Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher K.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) regulates many cellular events underlying perinatal brain development in vertebrates. Whether and how TH regulates brain development when neural circuits are first forming is less clear. Furthermore, although the molecular mechanisms that impose spatiotemporal constraints on TH action in the brain have been described, the effects of local TH signaling are poorly understood. We determined the effects of manipulating TH signaling on development of the optic tectum in stage 46–49 Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Global TH treatment caused large-scale morphological effects in tadpoles, including changes in brain morphology and increased tectal cell proliferation. Either increasing or decreasing endogenous TH signaling in tectum, by combining targeted DIO3 knockdown and methimazole, led to corresponding changes in tectal cell proliferation. Local increases in TH, accomplished by injecting suspensions of tri-iodothyronine (T3) in coconut oil into the midbrain ventricle or into the eye, selectively increased tectal or retinal cell proliferation, respectively. In vivo time-lapse imaging demonstrated that local TH first increased tectal progenitor cell proliferation, expanding the progenitor pool, and subsequently increased neuronal differentiation. Local T3 also dramatically increased dendritic arbor growth in neurons that had already reached a growth plateau. The time-lapse data indicate that the same cells are differentially sensitive to T3 at different time points. Finally, TH increased expression of genes pertaining to proliferation and neuronal differentiation. These experiments indicate that endogenous TH locally regulates neurogenesis at developmental stages relevant to circuit assembly by affecting cell proliferation and differentiation and by acting on neurons to increase dendritic arbor elaboration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Thyroid hormone (TH) is a critical regulator of perinatal brain development in vertebrates. Abnormal TH signaling in early

  19. [Hormonal contraception].

    PubMed

    Prilepskaia, V N

    1991-12-01

    Effective contraceptives contribute to the regulation of births, protect the health of women, reduce maternal and perinatal mortality and gynecological diseases, and prevent abortion-related complications. Complications after abortion average 30%, and among primigravidas the rate reaches 45%. Abortion can result in sterility and in the inability to carry out the pregnancy. Oral contraceptives (OCs) are used by 150 million globally. In new preparations ethinyl estradiol (EE) and levonorgestrel (LNG) are the most common components. In the 2-phase and 3-phase preparations Sequilar, Anteovin, and lipid profile safe Triquilar the gestagen component was reduced 40%. Continuin and Famulen are minipills, and Postinor is a postcoital contraceptive. Absolute contraindications of OCs include thromboembolytic diseases, severe cardiovascular system diseases, liver disorders, cirrhosis, cerebral vascular diseases, grave diabetes, jaundice, and malignant tumors of the mammae and sexual organs. Rigevidon, Triquilar, and Trisiston have high steroid content with minimal side effects. The protective effect of OCs are: 2-3 times lower risk of inflammation of the small pelvis, lower risk of malignant and benign ovarian tumors that lasts even after discontinuation, uterine cancer prevention (antiproliferation effect on the endometrium and inhibition of mitotic activity of the myometrium), and reduced risk of benign breast neoplasms. The finding that estrogen-induced risk of breast cancer increases with longterm contraceptive use in young nulliparas has not been persuasively proven. The optimal duration of uninterrupted OC use is 1-1.5 years. Monophasic estrogen-gestagen preparations include Bisecurin, Non-Ovlon, Ovidon, Rigevidon, Minisiston, and Demulen with low dosages of EE, LNG, norethisterone acetate, and diacetate ethonodiol. Norplant is a subdermal silastic capsule with effectiveness for up to 5 years.

  20. Neuronal systems immunoreactive with antiserum to lamprey gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the brain of Petromyzon marinus.

    PubMed

    King, J C; Sower, S A; Anthony, E L

    1988-07-01

    The role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in mammalian reproduction has been studied extensively; however, the role of a structurally different, but related, decapeptide is not well characterized in the most primitive class of vertebrates, Agnatha. Utilizing an antiserum directed to the recently characterized lamprey GnRH, we examined immunoreactive neuronal perikarya and nerve fibers in sections from the brain of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, using the unlabeled peroxidase-antiperoxidase method. Neuronal perikarya and fibers were immunopositive with antisera generated to lamprey GnRH and also to certain antisera generated to mammalian GnRH. Immunopositive neuronal perikarya were detected in an arc-shaped population extending from ventral to dorsal preoptic areas. Fibers from these cells projected to the neurohypophysis via the preoptico-hypophyseal tract, but in addition also protruded into the third ventricle. Additionally, some fibers coursed along the external surface of the brain, and may also release GnRH into meningeal compartments. The presence of fully processed, mature decapeptide is indicated within neuronal perikarya, as well as in projecting nerve fibers and terminals. No reaction product was detected in sections incubated with an antiserum to the interior amino acid sequences of mammalian LHRH. This finding supports the structure reported for lamprey GnRH by Sherwood et al. (1986).

  1. The ecdysis triggering hormone system is essential for successful moulting of a major hemimetabolous pest insect, Schistocerca gregaria

    PubMed Central

    Lenaerts, Cynthia; Cools, Dorien; Verdonck, Rik; Verbakel, Lina; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Marchal, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insects are enclosed in a rigid exoskeleton, providing protection from desiccation and mechanical injury. To allow growth, this armour needs to be replaced regularly in a process called moulting. Moulting entails the production of a new exoskeleton and shedding of the old one and is induced by a pulse in ecdysteroids, which activates a peptide-mediated signalling cascade. In Holometabola, ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) is the key factor in this cascade. Very little functional information is available in Hemimetabola, which display a different kind of development characterized by gradual changes. This paper reports on the identification of the ETH precursor and the pharmacological and functional characterisation of the ETH receptor in a hemimetabolous pest species, the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. Activation of SchgrETHR by SchgrETH results in an increase of both Ca2+ and cyclic AMP, suggesting that SchgrETHR displays dual coupling properties in an in vitro cell-based assay. Using qRT-PCR, an in-depth profiling study of SchgrETH and SchgrETHR transcripts was performed. Silencing of SchgrETH and SchgrETHR resulted in lethality at the expected time of ecdysis, thereby showing their crucial role in moulting. PMID:28417966

  2. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of female mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; De la Chica, Susana; Cortés, Pedro; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2008-07-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) participates in the maintenance of cardiovascular functions and in the control of blood pressure. By other hand, it is known that blood pressure regulation and HPA activity are affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of estradiol and progesterone on renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-regulating aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B and aminopeptidase N activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis of ovariectomized mice and ovariectomized mice treated subscutaneously with different doses of estradiol and progesterone. Our data suggest that in female mice, estradiol and progesterone influence RAS-regulating and vasopressin-degrading activities at different levels of the HPA axis.

  3. [Influence of replacement growth hormone therapy (hGH) on pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-adrenal systems in prepubertal children with GH deficiency].

    PubMed

    Vyshnevs'ka, O A; Bol'shova, O V

    2013-06-01

    Today, the most pathogenic therapy of GH deficiency is hGH replacement therapy. Replacement hGH therapy a highly effective method of growth correction in children with GH deficiency, but further investigations are necessary for timely detection of disturbances of other organs and systems. The authors reported that hGH therapy supressed thyroid and adrenal functions. Besides, most patients with GH deficiency have multiple defficiency of pituitary hormones (both TSH and ACTH), so hGH therapy can enhances hypothyroidism and hypoadrenalism. In the Department of Pediatric Endocrinology of the Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism a great experience was accumulated in the treatment of GH deficiency children and in the study of the efficacy and safety of this treatment.

  4. Receptors for parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide: from molecular cloning to definition of diseases.

    PubMed

    Jüppner, H; Schipani, E

    1996-07-01

    The parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor belongs to a distinct family of G protein-coupled receptors, the members of which usually signal through at least two second messenger systems, adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C. The parathyroid hormone/ parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor is most abundantly expressed in bone, kidney and growth-plate chondrocytes, and, at lower levels, in a variety of fetal and adult tissues. To search for human diseases that are caused by parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor defects, genomic DNA of patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib and of patients with Jansen's metaphyseal chondrodysplasia was screened for mutations in all coding exons of the receptor gene. Inactivating parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor mutations were excluded in patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib. However, a receptor mutation that causes agonist-independent, constitutive cAMP accumulation was identified in a patient with Jansen's metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, a rare form of short-limbed dwarfism associated with hypercalcemia despite normal or low concentrations of parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide. These findings allow the conclusion to be drawn that parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptors mediate the endocrine actions of parathyroid hormone, which are required for the control of calcium homeostasis and the autocrine-paracrine actions of parathyroid hormone-related peptide, which are required for normal growth-plate development.

  5. Ubiquitin, hormones and biotic stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Kate; Callis, Judy

    2007-05-01

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to a substrate protein changes its fate. Notably, proteins typically tagged with a lysine48-linked polyubiquitin chain become substrates for degradation by the 26S proteasome. In recent years many experiments have been performed to characterize the proteins involved in the ubiquitylation process and to identify their substrates, in order to understand better the mechanisms that link specific protein degradation events to regulation of plant growth and development. This review focuses on the role that ubiquitin plays in hormone synthesis, hormonal signalling cascades and plant defence mechanisms. Several examples are given of how targeted degradation of proteins affects downstream transcriptional regulation of hormone-responsive genes in the auxin, gibberellin, abscisic acid, ethylene and jasmonate signalling pathways. Additional experiments suggest that ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis may also act upstream of the hormonal signalling cascades by regulating hormone biosynthesis, transport and perception. Moreover, several experiments demonstrate that hormonal cross-talk can occur at the level of proteolysis. The more recently established role of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in defence against biotic threats is also reviewed. The UPS has been implicated in the regulation of almost every developmental process in plants, from embryogenesis to floral organ production probably through its central role in many hormone pathways. More recent evidence provides molecular mechanisms for hormonal cross-talk and links the UPS system to biotic defence responses.

  6. Ubiquitin, Hormones and Biotic Stress in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dreher, Kate; Callis, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Background The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to a substrate protein changes its fate. Notably, proteins typically tagged with a lysine48-linked polyubiquitin chain become substrates for degradation by the 26S proteasome. In recent years many experiments have been performed to characterize the proteins involved in the ubiquitylation process and to identify their substrates, in order to understand better the mechanisms that link specific protein degradation events to regulation of plant growth and development. Scope This review focuses on the role that ubiquitin plays in hormone synthesis, hormonal signalling cascades and plant defence mechanisms. Several examples are given of how targeted degradation of proteins affects downstream transcriptional regulation of hormone-responsive genes in the auxin, gibberellin, abscisic acid, ethylene and jasmonate signalling pathways. Additional experiments suggest that ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis may also act upstream of the hormonal signalling cascades by regulating hormone biosynthesis, transport and perception. Moreover, several experiments demonstrate that hormonal cross-talk can occur at the level of proteolysis. The more recently established role of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in defence against biotic threats is also reviewed. Conclusions The UPS has been implicated in the regulation of almost every developmental process in plants, from embryogenesis to floral organ production probably through its central role in many hormone pathways. More recent evidence provides molecular mechanisms for hormonal cross-talk and links the UPS system to biotic defence responses. PMID:17220175

  7. High Initiation of Adjuvant Hormonal Therapy Among Uninsured Stages I-III Breast Cancer Patients Treated in a Safety-Net Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Caitlin C; Tiro, Jasmin A; Jean, Gary W; Balasubramian, Bijal A; Alvarez, Carlos A

    2017-06-01

    Despite benefits of adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT), many eligible breast cancer patients do not complete therapy as recommended. Patterns of AHT use have not been well studied among uninsured breast cancer patients who fall into coverage gaps or are ineligible for public insurance programs. We identified 291 patients newly diagnosed with stages I-III hormone receptor-positive breast cancer from January 2008 to December 2012. All patients were treated at a safety-net healthcare system and enrolled in an income-based medical assistance program that fills AHT prescriptions at low cost. We extracted and linked cancer registry, pharmacy claims, and medical record data to assess AHT initiation (defined as a new AHT prescription ≤18 months since diagnosis) and sociodemographic and healthcare utilization variables. Log-binomial regression was used to identify correlates of initiation. Overall, 239 (82%) patients initiated AHT. Tamoxifen (42%) and anastrozole (55%) were most commonly prescribed. The mean copay was $4.90 for tamoxifen and $6.00 for anastrozole. Although crude analyses revealed small, statistically significant prevalence ratios for race/ethnicity (Hispanic vs. white, other vs. white), year of diagnosis (2008 vs. 2012), primary care visit before diagnosis (any vs. none), and smoking status (current vs. never), there were no significant correlates of initiation in the adjusted model. Safety-net healthcare systems providing access to AHT (i.e., through reduced copays) could improve the number of eligible patients initiating therapy. Continuity and integration of care in these settings may reduce disparities frequently observed in uninsured, low-income breast cancer populations.

  8. Identification of a calcitonin-like diuretic hormone that functions as an intrinsic modulator of the American lobster, Homarus americanus, cardiac neuromuscular system

    PubMed Central

    Christie, A. E.; Stevens, J. S.; Bowers, M. R.; Chapline, M. C.; Jensen, D. A.; Schegg, K. M.; Goldwaser, J.; Kwiatkowski, M. A.; Pleasant, T. K.; Shoenfeld, L.; Tempest, L. K.; Williams, C. R.; Wiwatpanit, T.; Smith, C. M.; Beale, K. M.; Towle, D. W.; Schooley, D. A.; Dickinson, P. S.

    2010-01-01

    In insects, a family of peptides with sequence homology to the vertebrate calcitonins has been implicated in the control of diuresis, a process that includes mixing of the hemolymph. Here, we show that a member of the insect calcitonin-like diuretic hormone (CLDH) family is present in the American lobster, Homarus americanus, serving, at least in part, as a powerful modulator of cardiac output. Specifically, during an ongoing EST project, a transcript encoding a putative H. americanus CLDH precursor was identified; a full-length cDNA was subsequently cloned. In silico analyses of the deduced prepro-hormone predicted the mature structure of the encoded CLDH to be GLDLGLGRGFSGSQAAKHLMGLAAANFAGGPamide (Homam-CLDH), which is identical to a known Tribolium castaneum peptide. RT-PCR tissue profiling suggests that Homam-CLDH is broadly distributed within the lobster nervous system, including the cardiac ganglion (CG), which controls the movement of the neurogenic heart. RT-PCR analysis conducted on pacemaker neuron- and motor neuron-specific cDNAs suggests that the motor neurons are the source of the CLDH message in the CG. Perfusion of Homam-CLDH through the isolated lobster heart produced dose-dependent increases in both contraction frequency and amplitude and a dose-dependent decrease in contraction duration, with threshold concentrations for all parameters in the range 10–11 to 10–10 mol l–1 or less, among the lowest for any peptide on this system. This report is the first documentation of a decapod CLDH, the first demonstration of CLDH bioactivity outside the Insecta, and the first detection of an intrinsic neuropeptide transcript in the crustacean CG. PMID:20008368

  9. Daily patterns and adaptation of the ghrelin, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 system under daytime food synchronisation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arellanes-Licea, E del C; Báez-Ruiz, A; Carranza, M E; Arámburo, C; Luna, M; Díaz-Muñoz, M

    2014-05-01

    Daytime restricted feeding promotes the re-alignment of the food entrained oscillator (FEO). Endocrine cues which secretion is regulated by the transition of fasting and feeding cycles converge in the FEO. The present study aimed to investigate the ghrelin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 system because their release depends on rhythmic and nutritional factors, and the output from the system influences feeding and biochemical status. In a daily sampling approach, rats that were fed ad lib. were compared with rats on a reversed (daytime) and restricted feeding schedule by 3 weeks (dRF; food access for 2 h), also assessing the effect of acute fasting and refeeding. We undertook measurements of clock protein BMAL1 and performed somatometry of peripheral organs and determined the concentration of total, acylated and unacylated ghrelin, GH and IGF-1 in both serum and in its main synthesising organs. During dRF, BMAL1 expression was synchronised to mealtime in hypophysis and liver; rats exhibited acute hyperphagia, stomach distension with a slow emptying, a phase shift in liver mass towards the dark period and decrease in mass perigonadal white adipose tissue. Total ghrelin secretion during the 24-h period increased in the dRF group as a result of elevation of the unacylated form. By contrast, GH and IGF-1 serum concentration fell, with a modification of GH daily pattern after mealtime. In the dRF group, ghrelin content in the stomach and pituitary GH content decreased, whereas hepatic IGF-1 remained equal. The daily patterns and synthesis of these hormones had a rheostatic adaptation. The endocrine adaptive response elicited suggests that it may be associated with the regulation of metabolic, behavioural and physiological processes during the paradigm of daytime restricted feeding and associated FEO activity.

  10. Developmental changes and day-night expression of the gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone system in the European sea bass: Effects of rearing temperature.

    PubMed

    Paullada-Salmerón, José A; Loentgen, Guillaume Henri; Cowan, Mairi; Aliaga-Guerrero, María; Rendón-Unceta, María Del Carmen; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2017-04-01

    The role of rearing temperature on fish development, sex differentiation and puberty has been largely addressed, but the impact of water temperature on the ontogeny of the main neuroendocrine systems controlling reproduction has received little attention. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) has been shown to act on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and on the pituitary to inhibit gonadotropin release and synthesis in vertebrates, including sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax. In the present study we investigated the effects of rearing temperature during the thermosensitive period (5-60days post-fertilization, dpf) on the expression of the GnIH gene (gnih) and its receptor (gnihr). Animals were maintained under two different conditions, low temperature (LT, 15°C) or high temperature (HT, 21°C), throughout the thermosensitive period and sampled from 5 to 360dpf at mid-light (ML) and mid-dark (MD). Our results showed significant effects of temperature on gnih and gnihr expression during the thermosensitive period, with higher transcript levels under LT condition. Some differences were also evident after the completion of the sex differentiation process. Moreover, we revealed daily variations in the developmental expression of gnih and gnihr, with higher diurnal mRNA levels at early stages (until 25dpf), and a shift to higher nocturnal expression levels at 300-360dpf, which corresponded with the beginning of the winter (reproductive season). To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first study reporting the effects of rearing temperature on the transcription of gnih system genes, as well as its daily variations during the development of a fish species.

  11. Identification of a calcitonin-like diuretic hormone that functions as an intrinsic modulator of the American lobster, Homarus americanus, cardiac neuromuscular system.

    PubMed

    Christie, A E; Stevens, J S; Bowers, M R; Chapline, M C; Jensen, D A; Schegg, K M; Goldwaser, J; Kwiatkowski, M A; Pleasant, T K; Shoenfeld, L; Tempest, L K; Williams, C R; Wiwatpanit, T; Smith, C M; Beale, K M; Towle, D W; Schooley, D A; Dickinson, P S

    2010-01-01

    In insects, a family of peptides with sequence homology to the vertebrate calcitonins has been implicated in the control of diuresis, a process that includes mixing of the hemolymph. Here, we show that a member of the insect calcitonin-like diuretic hormone (CLDH) family is present in the American lobster, Homarus americanus, serving, at least in part, as a powerful modulator of cardiac output. Specifically, during an ongoing EST project, a transcript encoding a putative H. americanus CLDH precursor was identified; a full-length cDNA was subsequently cloned. In silico analyses of the deduced prepro-hormone predicted the mature structure of the encoded CLDH to be GLDLGLGRGFSGSQAAKHLMGLAAANFAGGPamide (Homam-CLDH), which is identical to a known Tribolium castaneum peptide. RT-PCR tissue profiling suggests that Homam-CLDH is broadly distributed within the lobster nervous system, including the cardiac ganglion (CG), which controls the movement of the neurogenic heart. RT-PCR analysis conducted on pacemaker neuron- and motor neuron-specific cDNAs suggests that the motor neurons are the source of the CLDH message in the CG. Perfusion of Homam-CLDH through the isolated lobster heart produced dose-dependent increases in both contraction frequency and amplitude and a dose-dependent decrease in contraction duration, with threshold concentrations for all parameters in the range 10(-11) to 10(-10) mol l(-1) or less, among the lowest for any peptide on this system. This report is the first documentation of a decapod CLDH, the first demonstration of CLDH bioactivity outside the Insecta, and the first detection of an intrinsic neuropeptide transcript in the crustacean CG.

  12. The mechanism of regulation of ovarian maturation by red pigment concentrating hormone in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Bao, Chenchang; Huang, Huiyang; Ye, Haihui; Li, Shaojing

    2016-01-01

    In this study a full-length cDNA (Sp-RPCH) was cloned from the eyestalk ganglia of the mud crab Scylla paramamosain. Sp-RPCH is 660 base pairs in length and its open reading frame encodes a precursor that is predicted to be processed into a 25-residue signal peptide, a mature red pigment concentrating hormone (RPCH, an octapeptide), and a 75-residue precursor-related peptide. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that it clusters with other crustacean RPCHs and belongs to the adipokinetic hormone/RPCH peptide superfamily. Sp-RPCH gene expression was detected, using an end-point polymerase chain reaction (PCR), not only in the eyestalk ganglia but also in the brain and thoracic ganglia. Quantified using a real-time PCR, Sp-RPCH gene expression levels in the three tissues fluctuated along a cycle of ovarian maturation, with the levels progressively increased from stages I to IV, after which the expression levels decreased (although they remained significantly higher than stage I levels) when the ovary reached the mature stage (stage V). It was demonstrated using a patch clamp analysis that synthetic RPCH was able to evoke a Ca(2+) current in dissociated brain neurons and synthetic RPCH significantly increased the mean oocyte diameter of the ovarian tissues co-cultured with the eyestalk ganglia, brain, or thoracic ganglia; the stimulatory effect of RPCH was absent when the nervous tissues were not included in the ovarian incubation. Animals administrated with RPCH had significantly higher levels of gonad-somatic index, hepatopancreas-somatic index, and vitellogenin gene expression, when compared to control animals receiving a saline injection. The combined results clearly show that RPCH is involved in ovarian maturation in the mud crab; the stimulatory effects of RPCH are likely mediated by its actions on the release from the nervous tissues of factor(s) that directly regulate vitellogenesis in the ovary and hepatopancreas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Systemic and local anti-Mullerian hormone reflects differences in the reproduction potential of Zebu and European type cattle.

    PubMed

    Stojsin-Carter, Anja; Mahboubi, Kiana; Costa, Nathalia N; Gillis, Daniel J; Carter, Timothy F; Neal, Michael S; Miranda, Moyses S; Ohashi, Otavio M; Favetta, Laura A; King, W Allan

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate plasma anti-Mullerian hormone (Pl AMH), follicular fluid AMH (FF AMH) and granulosa cell AMH transcript (GC AMH) levels and their relationships with reproductive parameters in two cattle subspecies, Bos taurus indicus (Zebu), and Bos taurus taurus (European type cattle). Two-dimensional ultrasound examination and serum collection were performed on Zebu, European type and crossbreed cows to determine antral follicle count (AFC), ovary diameter (OD) and Pl AMH concentration. Slaughterhouse ovaries for Zebu and European type cattle were collected to determine FF AMH concentrations, GC AMH RNA levels, AFC, oocyte number, cleavage and blastocyst rate. Additionally GC AMH receptor 2 (AMHR2) RNA level was measured for European type cattle. Relationship between AMH and reproductive parameters was found to be significantly greater in Zebu compared to European cattle. Average Pl AMH mean ± SE for Zebu and European cattle was 0.77 ± 0.09 and 0.33 ± 0.24 ng/ml respectively (p = 0.01), whereas average antral FF AMH mean ± SE for Zebu and European cattle was 4934.3 ± 568.5 and 2977.9 ± 214.1 ng/ml respectively (p < 0.05). This is the first published report of FF and GC AMH in Zebu cattle. Levels of GC AMHR2 RNA in European cattle were correlated to oocyte number (p = 0.01). Crossbred animals were found more similar to their maternal Zebu counterparts with respect to their Pl AMH to AFC and OD relationships. These results demonstrate that AMH reflects differences between reproduction potential of the two cattle subspecies therefore can potentially be used as a reproductive marker. Furthermore these results reinforce the importance of separately considering the genetic backgrounds of animals when collecting or interpreting bovine AMH data for reproductive performance.

  14. Prenatal exposure to vinclozolin disrupts selective aspects of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neuronal system of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Wadas, B C; Hartshorn, C A; Aurand, E R; Palmer, J S; Roselli, C E; Noel, M L; Gore, A C; Veeramachaneni, D N R; Tobet, S A

    2010-06-01

    Developmental exposure to the agricultural fungicide vinclozolin can impair reproductive function in male rabbits and was previously found to decrease the number of immunoreactive-gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones in the region of the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and rostral preoptic area by postnatal week (PNW) 6. In the present study, in an aim to further examine the disruption of GnRH neurones by foetal vinclozolin exposure, pregnant rabbits were dosed orally with vinclozolin, flutamide or carrot paste vehicle for the last 2 weeks of gestation. Offspring were euthanised at birth (males and females), PNW 6 (females), PNW 26 (adult males) or PNW 30 (adult females) of age. At birth and in adults, brains were sectioned and processed for immunoreactive GnRH. The numbers of immunoreactive GnRH neuronal perikarya were significantly decreased in vinclozolin-treated rabbits at birth and in adult littermates. By contrast, there was an increase in GnRH immunoreactivity in the terminals in the region of the median eminence. Analysis of PNW 6 female brains by radioimmunoassay revealed a two-fold increase in GnRH peptide content in the mediobasal hypothalamus in vinclozolin-treated rabbits. This finding was complemented by immunofluorescence analyses, which revealed a 2.8-fold increase in GnRH immunoreactivity in the median eminence of vinclozolin compared to vehicle-treated females at PNW 30. However, there was no difference between treatment groups in the measures of reproduction that were evaluated: ejaculation latency, conception rates or litter size. These results indicate that sub-acute, prenatal vinclozolin treatment is sufficient to create perdurable alterations in the GnRH neuronal network that forms an important input into the reproductive axis. Finally, the effect of vinclozolin on the GnRH neuronal network was not comparable to that of flutamide, suggesting that vinclozolin was not acting through anti-androgenic mechanisms.

  15. Prenatal exposure to vinclozolin disrupts selective aspects of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal system of the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Wadas, B.C.; Hartshorn, C.A.; Aurand, E.R.; Palmer, J.S.; Roselli, C.E.; Noel, M.L.; Gore, A.C.; Veeramachaneni, D.N.R.; Tobet, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Developmental exposure to the agricultural fungicide vinclozolin can impair reproductive function in male rabbits and was previously found to decrease the number of immunoreactive-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (ir-GnRH) neurons in the region of the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT) and rostral preoptic area (rPOA) by postnatal week (PNW) 6. To further examine the disruption of GnRH neurons by fetal vinclozolin exposure, in the current study, pregnant rabbits were dosed orally with vinclozolin, flutamide, or carrot paste vehicle for the last two weeks of gestation. Offspring were euthanized at birth (males and females), PNW6 (females), PNW26 (adult males), or PNW30 (adult females) of age. At birth and in adults, brains were sectioned and processed for immunoreactive GnRH. The numbers of immunoreactive GnRH neuronal perikarya were significantly decreased in vinclozolin-treated rabbits at birth and in adult littermates. By contrast, there was an increase in GnRH immunoreactivity in the terminals in the region of the median eminence. Analysis of PNW6 female brains by radioimmunoassay (RIA) revealed a two-fold increase in GnRH peptide content in the mediobasal hypothalamus in vinclozolin-treated rabbits. This finding was complemented by immunofluorescence analyses that showed a 2.8-fold increase in GnRH immunoreactivity in the median eminence of vinclozolin compared to vehicle-treated females at PNW30. However, there was no difference between treatment groups in the measures of reproduction that were evaluated: ejaculation latency, conception rates or litter size. These results indicate that subacute, prenatal vinclozolin treatment is sufficient to create perdurable alterations in the GnRH neuronal network that forms an important input into the reproductive axis. Finally, the effect of vinclozolin on the GnRH neuronal network was not comparable to that of flutamide, suggesting that vinclozolin was not acting through anti-androgenic mechanisms. PMID

  16. Effects of gonadal hormones on the peripheral cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) system under a myositis condition in rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Katelyn Y; Zhang, Youping; Ro, Jin Y

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we assessed the effects of peripherally administered cannabinoids in an orofacial myositis model, and the role of sex hormones in cannabinoid receptor (CBR) expression in trigeminal ganglia (TG). Peripherally administered arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), a specific CB1R agonist, significantly attenuated complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in the masseter muscle in male rats. The ACPA effect was blocked by a local administration of AM251, a specific CB1R antagonist, but not by AM630, a specific CB2R antagonist. In female rats, a 30-fold higher dose of ACPA was required to produce a moderate reduction in mechanical hypersensitivity. CFA injected in masseter muscle significantly upregulated CB1R mRNA expression in TG in male, but not in female, rats. There was a close correlation between the CB1R mRNA levels in TG and the antihyperalgesic effect of ACPA. Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, which are elevated in the muscle tissue following CFA treatment, induced a significant upregulation of CB1R mRNA expression in TG from male rats. The upregulation of CB1R was prevented in TG cultures from orchidectomized male rats, which was restored by the application of testosterone. The cytokines did not alter the CB1R mRNA level in TG from intact as well as ovariectomized female rats. Neither estradiol supplement nor estrogen receptor blockade had any effects on CB1R expression. These data indicate that testosterone, but not estradiol, is required for the regulation of CB1Rs in TG under inflammatory conditions, which provide explanations for the sex differences in the antihyperalgesic effects of peripherally administered cannabinoids. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Can the usage of human growth hormones affect facial appearance and the accuracy of face recognition systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Jake; Martin, Michael; Bourlai, Thirimachos

    2014-06-01

    In law enforcement and security applications, the acquisition of face images is critical in producing key trace evidence for the successful identification of potential threats. The goal of the study is to demonstrate that steroid usage significantly affects human facial appearance and hence, the performance of commercial and academic face recognition (FR) algorithms. In this work, we evaluate the performance of state-of-the-art FR algorithms on two unique face image datasets of subjects before (gallery set) and after (probe set) steroid (or human growth hormone) usage. For the purpose of this study, datasets of 73 subjects were created from multiple sources found on the Internet, containing images of men and women before and after steroid usage. Next, we geometrically pre-processed all images of both face datasets. Then, we applied image restoration techniques on the same face datasets, and finally, we applied FR algorithms in order to match the pre-processed face images of our probe datasets against the face images of the gallery set. Experimental results demonstrate that only a specific set of FR algorithms obtain the most accurate results (in terms of the rank-1 identification rate). This is because there are several factors that influence the efficiency of face matchers including (i) the time lapse between the before and after image pre-processing and restoration face photos, (ii) the usage of different drugs (e.g. Dianabol, Winstrol, and Decabolan), (iii) the usage of different cameras to capture face images, and finally, (iv) the variability of standoff distance, illumination and other noise factors (e.g. motion noise). All of the previously mentioned complicated scenarios make clear that cross-scenario matching is a very challenging problem and, thus, further investigation is required.

  18. Thyroid hormone and the growth plate.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yvonne Y; Wang, Lai; Ballock, R Tracy

    2006-12-01

    Thyroid hormone was first identified as a potent regulator of skeletal maturation at the growth plate more than forty years ago. Since that time, many in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that thyroid hormone regulates the critical transition between cell proliferation and terminal differentiation in the growth plate, specifically the maturation of growth plate chondrocytes into hypertrophic cells. However these studies have neither identified the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal maturation by thyroid hormone, nor demonstrated how the systemic actions of thyroid hormone interface with the local regulatory milieu of the growth plate. This article will review our current understanding of the role of thyroid hormone in regulating the process of endochondral ossification at the growth plate, as well as what is currently known about the molecular mechanisms involved in this regulation.

  19. Hormonal regulation of longevity in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Borg, Holly M.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple biological and environmental factors impact the life span of an organism. The endocrine system is a highly integrated physiological system in mammals that regulates metabolism, growth, reproduction, and response to stress, among other functions. As such, this pervasive entity has a major influence on aging and longevity. The growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin pathways have been at the forefront of hormonal control of aging research in the last few years. Other hormones, including those from the thyroid and reproductive system have also been studied in terms of life span regulation. The relevance of these hormones to human longevity remains to be established, however the evidence from other species including yeast, nematodes, and flies suggest that evolutionarily well-conserved mechanisms are at play and the endocrine system is a key determinant. PMID:17360245

  20. Standardization of hormone determinations.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2013-12-01

    Standardization of hormone determinations is important because it simplifies interpretation of results and facilitates the use of common reference values for different assays. Progress in standardization has been achieved through the introduction of more homogeneous hormone standards for peptide and protein hormones. However, many automated methods for determinations of steroid hormones do not provide satisfactory result. Isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (ID-MS) has been used to establish reference methods for steroid hormone determinations and is now increasingly used for routine determinations of steroids and other low molecular weight compounds. Reference methods for protein hormones based on MS are being developed and these promise to improve standardization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of hormones in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    ROMAN, IULIA IOANA; CONSTANTIN, ANNE-MARIE; MARINA, MIHAELA ELENA; ORASAN, REMUS IOAN

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic, common skin disease, which affects the patient’s quality of life to the highest degree. Several exogenous factors and endogenous hormonal changes may act as triggers for psoriasis. The skin possesses a true endocrine system, which is very important in multiple systemic diseases. A number of conditions are associated with psoriasis, and its severity can also be influenced by hormones. Even though the sex hormones and prolactin have a major role in psoriasis pathogenicity, there are a lot of other hormones which can influence the psoriasis clinical manifestations: glucocorticoids, epinephrine, thyroid hormones, and insulin. PMID:27004020

  2. Effects of Traditional and Pyramidal Resistance Training Systems on Muscular Strength, Muscle Mass, and Hormonal Responses in Older Women: A Randomized Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alex S; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Fleck, Steven J; Pina, Fábio L C; Nascimento, Matheus A; Cyrino, Edilson S

    2017-07-01

    Ribeiro, AS, Schoenfeld, BJ, Fleck, SJ, Pina, FLC, Nascimento, MA, and Cyrino, ES. Effects of traditional and pyramidal resistance training systems on muscular strength, muscle mass, and hormonal responses in older women: a randomized crossover trial. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1888-1896, 2017-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resistance training (RT) performed in a pyramid (PR) versus a traditional (TD) system on muscular strength, muscle mass, and hormonal responses in older women. Twenty-five older women (67.6 ± 5.1 years, 65.9 ± 11.1 kg, 154.7 ± 5.8 cm, and 27.5 ± 4.5 kg·m) performed both a TD and PR system RT program in a balanced crossover design. The TD program consisted of 3 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum (RM) with a constant load for the 3 sets, whereas the PR system consisted of 3 sets of 12/10/8-RM with incrementally higher loads for each set. Training was performed in 2 phases of 8 weeks each, with a 12-week washout between the 8-week phases. One repetition maximum (1RM) tests were used as measures of muscular strength. Dual X-ray absorptiometry was used to estimate skeletal muscle mass. Testosterone and IGF-1 concentrations were determined preintervention and postintervention after 12 hours fasting. Significant (p ≤ 0.05) increases were observed in both groups for muscular strength in the 1RM chest press (TD = 12.4% and effect size [ES] = 0.86 vs. PR = 11.5% and ES = 0.74), knee extension (TD = 12.5% and ES = 0.61 vs. PR = 11.8% and ES = 0.62), preacher curl (TD = 10.9% and ES = 0.63 vs. PR = 8.6% and ES = 0.54), and for skeletal muscle mass (TD = 3.6% and ES = 0.32 vs. PR = 2.4% and ES = 0.24) with no differences between groups. There were no significant (p > 0.05) main effects for IGF-1 and testosterone. The results suggest that the PR and TD systems performed are similarly effective for promoting positive adaptations in muscular strength and hypertrophy in older women.

  3. Early-life adversity programs emotional functions and the neuroendocrine stress system: the contribution of nutrition, metabolic hormones and epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yam, Kit-Yi; Naninck, Eva F G; Schmidt, Mathias V; Lucassen, Paul J; Korosi, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies have shown that early-life adversities, such as abuse or neglect, can increase the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. Remarkably, the lasting consequences of stress during this sensitive period on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and emotional function closely resemble the long-term effects of early malnutrition and suggest a possible common pathway mediating these effects. During early-life, brain development is affected by both exogenous factors, like nutrition and maternal care as well as by endogenous modulators including stress hormones. These elements, while mostly considered for their independent actions, clearly do not act alone but rather in a synergistic manner. In order to better understand how the programming by early-life stress takes place, it is important to gain further insight into the exact interplay of these key elements, the possible common pathways as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate their effects. We here review evidence that exposure to both early-life stress and early-life under-/malnutrition similarly lead to life-long alterations on the neuroendocrine stress system and modify emotional functions. We further discuss how the different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and next suggest a possible role for the early-life adversity induced alterations in metabolic hormones and nutrient availability in shaping later stress responses and emotional function throughout life, possibly via epigenetic mechanisms. Such knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies, which gives the advantage of viewing the synergistic action of a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity.

  4. Consequences of elevated luteinizing hormone on diverse physiological systems: use of the LHbetaCTP transgenic mouse as a model of ovarian hyperstimulation-induced pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Mann, Rachel J; Keri, Ruth A; Nilson, John H

    2003-01-01

    Chronically elevated luteinizing hormone (LH) induces significant pathology in the LHbetaCTP transgenic mouse model, which uses the bovine gonadotropin alpha (alpha)-subunit promoter to direct transgene expression specifically to gonadotropes in the anterior pituitary. Previously, it was shown that female LHbetaCTP mice are infertile due to anovulation, develop granulosa cell tumors, and undergo precocious puberty from elevated LH and steroid hormones that fail to completely repress the alpha-subunit promoter. This chapter will discuss recent studies that further elucidate the impact of chronically elevated LH on diverse physiological systems. Granulosa cell tumors induced by elevated LH are strain dependent and prevented when transgenics are treated with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) surges. A granulosa cell tumor-associated transcriptome is generated, revealing several possible gene candidates for ovarian granulosa cell tumorigenesis. Primordial follicles in LHbetaCTP transgenics become depleted and oocytes exhibit increased rates of meiotic segregation defects, although meiotic competency is acquired normally. Anovulation can be rescued in transgenics by superovulation, though pregnancy fails at midgestation due to maternal factors. Uterine receptivity defects prevent implantation of normal embryos following induction of pseuodpregnancy. Transgenics develop Cushing-like adrenocortical hyperfunction with increased corticosterone production following induction of adrenal LH receptor expression. Elevated LH acts as a tumor promoter in the gonads and the adrenal gland, when expressed in conjunction with the inhibin-alpha SV40 transgene. Finally, chronic elevated LH promotes mammary tumorigenesis. The understanding of multiple clinical pathologies--including ovarian cancer, perimenopausal reproductive aging, premature ovarian failure, polycystic ovarian syndrome, Cushing's syndrome, and breast cancer--may be enhanced through further study of this useful

  5. Melanocyte-stimulating hormone plasma levels and environmental illumination in the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis: a role for the neurosecretory system of the vena cava in cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Christopher S; Metz, Juriaan R; Flik, Gert; Williamson, Roddy

    2002-02-15

    A melanotropin-like peptide (alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-MSH) is suggested to be released into the circulatory system of cephalopods via the neurosecretory system of the vena cava or NSV, where neurosecretory vesicles contained within the axons of the NSV-neuropil on the inner surface of the vena cava lie in close contact with the venous circulation. Radioimmunoassay of blood plasma samples taken from the cephalic vein of anaesthetised cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis showed that immunoreactive alpha-MSH (ir alpha-MSH) was detectable within the cuttlefish circulatory system. The validity of the assay for determination of cuttlefish ir alpha-MSH was determined by parallelism of the alpha-MSH standard curve against serially diluted cuttlefish plasma samples. Plasma samples taken during a natural day-night-day illumination cycle showed a significant elevation in ir alpha-MSH concentration to 1.44 +/- 0.26 ng ml(-1) during the middle of the dark phase compared to concentrations of 0.48 +/- 0.13 and 0.35 +/- 0.10 ng ml(-1) in the middle of the light phases of the illumination cycle. So far, indirect evidence suggests Sepia officinalis may modulate chromatophore activity, body patterning, and behaviour via neuroendocrine release and circulating titres of this proopiomelanocortin-derived peptide. (C)2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  6. Effect of noise stress on cardiovascular system in adult male albino rat: implication of stress hormones, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Said, Mona A; El-Gohary, Ola A

    2016-07-01

    Noise pollution has been realized as an environmental stressor associated with modern life style that affects our health without being consciously aware of it. The present study investigated the effect of acute, chronic intermittent and chronic continuous exposure to noise of intensity 80-100 dB on heart rate and mean systemic arterial blood pressure in rats and the possible underlying mechanisms. Noise stress causes significant increase in heart rate, mean systemic arterial blood pressure as well as significant increase in plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline, endothelin-1, nitric oxide and malondialdehyde with significant decrease in superoxide dismutase and these values are significantly more worse in chronic continuous exposure to noise than acute or chronic intermittent exposure. These findings suggest that noise stress has many adverse effects on cardiovascular system via increasing plasma levels of stress hormones, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. These findings have major implication in the management of adverse cardiovascular reactions of people subjected to daily noise stress.

  7. Neuronal control of breathing: sex and stress hormones.

    PubMed

    Behan, Mary; Kinkead, Richard

    2011-10-01

    There is a growing public awareness that hormones can have a significant impact on most biological systems, including the control of breathing. This review will focus on the actions of two broad classes of hormones on the neuronal control of breathing: sex hormones and stress hormones. The majority of these hormones are steroids; a striking feature is that both groups are derived from cholesterol. Stress hormones also include many peptides which are produced primarily within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and secreted into the brain or into the circulatory system. In this article we will first review and discuss the role of sex hormones in respiratory control throughout life, emphasizing how natural fluctuations in hormones are reflected in ventilatory metrics and how disruption of their endogenous cycle can predispose to respiratory disease. These effects may be mediated directly by sex hormone receptors or indirectly by neurotransmitter systems. Next, we will discuss the origins of hypothalamic stress hormones and their relationship with the respiratory control system. This relationship is 2-fold: (i) via direct anatomical connections to brainstem respiratory control centers, and (ii) via steroid hormones released from the adrenal gland in response to signals from the pituitary gland. Finally, the impact of stress on the development of neural circuits involved in breathing is evaluated in animal models, and the consequences of early stress on respiratory health and disease is discussed.

  8. Usability and Tolerability of the Norditropin NordiFlex® Injection Device in Children Never Previously Treated With Growth Hormone

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-23

    Growth Hormone Disorder; Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children; Genetic Disorder; Turner Syndrome; Foetal Growth Problem; Small for Gestational Age; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Insufficiency; Delivery Systems

  9. Juvenile hormone regulation of Drosophila aging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile hormone (JH) has been demonstrated to control adult lifespan in a number of non-model insects where surgical removal of the corpora allata eliminates the hormone’s source. In contrast, little is known about how juvenile hormone affects adult Drosophila melanogaster. Previous work suggests that insulin signaling may modulate Drosophila aging in part through its impact on juvenile hormone titer, but no data yet address whether reduction of juvenile hormone is sufficient to control Drosophila life span. Here we adapt a genetic approach to knock out the corpora allata in adult Drosophila melanogaster and characterize adult life history phenotypes produced by reduction of juvenile hormone. With this system we test potential explanations for how juvenile hormone modulates aging. Results A tissue specific driver inducing an inhibitor of a protein phosphatase was used to ablate the corpora allata while permitting normal development of adult flies. Corpora allata knockout adults had greatly reduced fecundity, inhibited oogenesis, impaired adult fat body development and extended lifespan. Treating these adults with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene restored all traits toward wildtype. Knockout females remained relatively long-lived even when crossed into a genotype that blocked all egg production. Dietary restriction further extended the lifespan of knockout females. In an analysis of expression profiles of knockout females in fertile and sterile backgrounds, about 100 genes changed in response to loss of juvenile hormone independent of reproductive state. Conclusions Reduced juvenile hormone alone is sufficient to extend the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. Reduced juvenile hormone limits reproduction by inhibiting the production of yolked eggs, and this may arise because juvenile hormone is required for the post-eclosion development of the vitellogenin-producing adult fat body. Our data do not support a mechanism for juvenile hormone control

  10. Parathyroid Hormone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body does not produce enough parathyroid hormone [PTH; a natural substance needed to control the amount ... Parathyroid hormone injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: tingling, tickling, or ...

  11. Concentrations of hormones, pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants in groundwater affected by septic systems in New England and New York.

    PubMed

    Phillips, P J; Schubert, C; Argue, D; Fisher, I; Furlong, E T; Foreman, W; Gray, J; Chalmers, A

    2015-04-15

    Septic-system discharges can be an important source of micropollutants (including pharmaceuticals and endocrine active compounds) to adjacent groundwater and surface water systems. Groundwater samples were collected from well networks tapping glacial till in New England (NE) and sandy surficial aquifer New York (NY) during one sampling round in 2011. The NE network assesses the effect of a single large septic system that receives discharge from an extended health care facility for the elderly. The NY network assesses the effect of many small septic systems used seasonally on a densely populated portion of Fire Island. The data collected from these two networks indicate that hydrogeologic and demographic factors affect micropollutant concentrations in these systems. The highest micropollutant concentrations from the NE network were present in samples collected from below the leach beds and in a well downgradient of the leach beds. Total concentrations for personal care/domestic use compounds, pharmaceutical compounds and plasticizer compounds generally ranged from 1 to over 20 μg/L in the NE network samples. High tris(2-butoxyethyl phosphate) plasticizer concentrations in wells beneath and downgradient of the leach beds (>20 μg/L) may reflect the presence of this compound in cleaning agents at the extended health-care facility. The highest micropollutant concentrations for the NY network were present in the shoreline wells and reflect groundwater that is most affected by septic system discharges. One of the shoreline wells had personal care/domestic use, pharmaceutical, and plasticizer concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 5.7 μg/L. Estradiol equivalency quotient concentrations were also highest in a shoreline well sample (3.1 ng/L). Most micropollutant concentrations increase with increasing specific conductance and total nitrogen concentrations for shoreline well samples. These findings suggest that septic systems serving institutional settings and densely

  12. Dual ionic interaction system based on polyelectrolyte complex and ionic, injectable, and thermosensitive hydrogel for sustained release of human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Ran; Seo, Bo-Bae; Song, Soo-Chang

    2013-01-01

    A dual ionic interaction system composed of a positively charged polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) containing human growth hormone (hGH) and anionic thermosensitive hydrogel has been suggested for sustained delivery of bioactive hGH. The PEC was prepared by ionic interaction between negatively charged hGH and positively charged protamine sulfate (PS) to suppress diffusion of hGH. Moreover, we loaded the positively charged PEC into an anionic, injectable, and thermosensitive poly(organophosphazene) hydrogel to enhance sustained release of hGH by dual ionic interactions. PS formed a spherical complex with hGH, and their ionic interaction grew stronger with increasing amounts of PS. From a weight ratio of 0.5, the PS/hGH complex had a size and zeta-potential that were constantly maintained around 500 nm and +8 mV, respectively, in 0.9% NaCl. The PEC-loaded hydrogels suppressed the initial burst release of hGH and extended the release period in vitro and in vivo. In a pharmacokinetic study in rats, the PEC-loaded anionic hydrogel extended half-life 13-fold with similar area under the curve (AUC) compared to hGH solution. Furthermore, single injection of PEC-loaded anionic hydrogel showed a more increased growth rate than daily injection of hGH solution for 7 days in hypophysectomized rats, demonstrating its potential as an injectable, sustained delivery system that can release bioactive hGH.

  13. Postoperative Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System Insertion After Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Treatment for Preventing Endometriotic Cyst Recurrence: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Chon, Seung Joo; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Bo Hyon; Cho, SiHyun; Choi, Young Sik; Lee, Byung Seok; Seo, Seok Kyo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of postoperative levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) insertion after gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) treatment for preventing endometriotic cyst recurrence. The LNG-IUS was applied to 28 women who had undergone surgery for endometriosis followed by 6 cycles of GnRH-a treatment. Clinical characteristics, endometriosis recurrence, and adverse effects were analyzed. Student t test was performed for analysis. Before surgery, 20 (71.4%) patients had dysmenorrhea, and the mean pain score (visual analog scale [VAS]) was 4.26. The numbers of women diagnosed with stage III endometriosis and stage IV endometriosis were 15 (53.6%) and 13 (46.4%), respectively, according to the revised American Fertility Society scoring system. The mean cancer antigen 125 levels and VAS scores were significantly lower after treatment than before treatment (11.61 vs 75.66 U/mL, P < .0001 and 0.50 vs 4.26 U/mL, P < .0001, respectively). Of the 28 patients, 13 (46.4%) simultaneously had adenomyosis, and 2 (7.1%) underwent LNG-IUS removal because of unresolved vaginal bleeding and dysmenorrhea. Recurrence was noted in 2 (7.1%) women. Postoperative LNG-IUS insertion after GnRH-a treatment is an effective approach for preventing endometriotic cyst recurrence, especially in women who do not desire to conceive.

  14. Molecular characterisation and expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein in the caudal neurosecretory system of the euryhaline flounder, Platichthys flesus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiqun; Jin, Yingying; Xu, Jinling; Greenwood, Michael P; Balment, Richard J

    2017-02-27

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a hypercalcemic factor in fish, but the source of circulating PTHrP remains unclear. In this study investigation of the caudal neurosecretory system (CNSS), considered one of major sources of PTHrP in fish, provided valuable insights into this regulatory system. We report pthrpa and pthrpb gene cloning, characterization, expression, and responses to low salinity and hypocalcemia challenge in flounder. The pthrpa and pthrpb precursors, isolated from a European flounder CNSS library, consist of 166 and 192 amino acid residues, respectively, with an overall homology of approximately 59.2%. Both precursors contain a signal peptide and a mature peptide with cleavage and amidation sites. The flounder PTHrPA and PTHrPB peptides share only 41% sequence identity with human PTHrPA. Quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that the bone and bladder, are respectively major sites of pthrpa and pthrpb expression in flounder. Urophysectomy confirmed the CNSS as a likely contributor to circulating PTHrP peptides. There were no significant differences in CNSS pthrpa and pthrpb mRNA expression or plasma PTHrP levels between seawater (SW) and freshwater (FW)-adapted fish, though plasma total calcium concentrations were higher in FW animals. The intraperitonial administration of EGTA rapidly induced hypocalcemia and concomitant elevation in plasma PTHrP accompanied by increases in both pthrpa and pthrpb expression in the CNSS. Together, these findings support an evolutionary conserved role for PTHrP in the endocrine regulation of calcium.

  15. Hormonal component of tumor photodynamic therapy response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones in the response of the treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) comes from the induction of acute phase response by this modality. This adrenal gland activity is orchestrated through the engagement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal axis incited by stress signals emanating from the PDT-treated tumor. Glucocorticoid hormone activity engendered within the context of PDT-induced acute phase response performs multiple important functions; among other involvements they beget acute phase reactant production, systemic neutrophil mobilization, and control the production of inflammation-modulating and immunoregulatory proteins.

  16. Thyroid Hormones and Growth in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21750631

  17. Thyroid hormones and growth in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Tarım, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate growth by several mechanisms. In addition to their negative feedback effect on the stimulatory hormones thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid hormones also regulate their receptors in various physiological and pathological conditions. Up-regulation and down-regulation of the thyroid receptors fine-tune the biological effects exerted by the thyroid hormones. Interestingly, the deiodinase enzyme system is another intrinsic regulator of thyroid physiology that adjusts the availability of thyroid hormones to the tissues, which is essential for normal growth and development. Almost all chronic diseases of childhood impair growth and development. Every disease may have a unique mechanism to halt linear growth, but reduced serum concentration or diminished local availability of thyroid hormones seems to be a common pathway. Therefore, the effects of systemic diseases on thyroid physiology must be taken into consideration in the evaluation of growth retardation in affected children.

  18. Is homosexuality hormonally determined?

    PubMed

    Birke, L I

    1981-01-01

    This paper suggest there is insufficient evidence to conclude that homosexuality has endocrine bases. The search for hormonal correlates occurs within a model that views homosexuality as a medical problem requiring biological explanations and a program of treatment or prevention. This search is heavily rooted in popular conceptions of gender-appropriate behavior, as well as in naive concepts of the significance of hormonal changes. Two kinds of hormonal study are considered here. Researchers may either (a) investigate hormone levels in adult populations or (b) investigate hypotheses of behavioral determination by prenatal hormones. Much of the latter information derives from animal studies, commonly on the laboratory rat. This paper questions the validity of assumptions underlying these studies--assumptions about the behavior of the laboratory rat itself and, more importantly, about the legitimacy of this animal as a model for human behavior. It is suggested that, although such hypotheses are naive, their current popularity arises from their potential role in "controlling" homosexuality.

  19. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. Testosterone is one ...

  20. Anti-Müllerian Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Anti-Müllerian Hormone Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: AMH; AMH Hormone Test; Müllerian-inhibiting Hormone; MIH; Müllerian Inhibiting Factor; ...

  1. Cortistatin vaccination--a solution to growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moaeen-ud-Din, M; Malik, Nosheen; Guo, Yang Li; Ali, Ahmad; Babar, Masroor Ellahi

    2009-12-01

    Cortistatin and somatostatin are neuropeptides which have inhibitory effects on growth hormone through common five receptors. Although, both have inhibitory effects but, only cortistatin has direct inhibitory effects on growth hormone secretagogue and is more potent inhibitor of growth hormone than somatostatin. This control of growth hormone can be manipulated through immunoneutralization of cortistatin through cortistatin DNA vaccine rather than antibodies application. A DNA vaccine of cortistatin can be produced using recombinant DNA technology in a eukaryotic expression system and will serve as a tool not to only alleviate the growth hormone deficiency problems in human but, can also be used to improve growth rate in farm animals.

  2. The behavior of renal-regulating hormones during hypogravic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of fluid and electrolyte behavior during space flight is believed to be under control, in large part, of a group of hormones which have their major effects on renal excretion. The hormones studied include renin-angitensin, aldosterone, and antidiuretic hormone (ADH). The regulatory systems of these renal-regulating hormones as they act individually and in concert with each other are analyzed. The analysis is based on simulations of the mathematical model of Guyton. A generalized theory is described which accounts for both short-term and long-term behavior of this set of hormones.

  3. Weight loss and low body cell mass in males with lung cancer: relationship with systemic inflammation, acute-phase response, resting energy expenditure, and catabolic and anabolic hormones.

    PubMed

    Simons, J P; Schols, A M; Buurman, W A; Wouters, E F

    1999-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate, in human lung cancer, the relationship between weight loss and the existence of a low body cell mass (BCM) on the one hand, and the putative presence of systemic inflammation, an increased acute-phase response, anorexia, hypermetabolism and changes in circulating levels of several anabolic and catabolic hormones on the other. In 20 male lung cancer patients, pre-stratified by weight loss of >/=10% (n=10) or of <10% (n=10), the following measurements were performed: BCM (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry/bromide dilution), circulating levels of sTNF-R55 and sTNF-R75 (soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors of molecular masses 55 and 75 kDa respectively), interleukin-6, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, albumin, appetite (scale of 0-10), resting energy expenditure (by indirect calorimetry) and circulating levels of catabolic (cortisol) and anabolic [testosterone, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)] hormones. Compared with the patients with a weight loss of <10%, those with a weight loss of >/=10% were characterized by higher levels of sTNF-R55 (trend towards significance; P=0.06), and lower levels of albumin (27.4 compared with 34.4 mmol/l; P=0.02), testosterone (13.2 compared with 21.5 nmol/l; P=0.01) and IGF-I (119 compared with 184 ng/ml; P=0.004). In the patient group as a whole, the percentage weight loss was significantly correlated with sTNF-R55 (r=0.59, P=0.02), albumin (r=-0.63, P=0.006) and IGF-I (r=-0.50, P=0.02) levels. Height-adjusted BCM was significantly correlated with sTNF-R55 (r=-0.57, P=0.03), sTNF-R75 (r=-0.50, P=0. 04), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (r=-0.50, P=0.04), albumin (r=0.56, P=0.02) and resting energy expenditure/BCM (r=-0.54, P=0. 03), and there was a trend towards a correlation with IGF-I concentration (r=0.44, P=0.06). We conclude that, in human lung cancer, weight loss and the presence of a low BCM are associated with systemic inflammation, an increased acute

  4. Weightlifting Training and Hormonal Responses in Adolescent Males: Implications for Program Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Andrew C.; Schilling, Brian K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses monitoring of the training tolerance of junior- aged weightlifters, focusing on: whether the hormonal system can be used to monitor training status; puberty and the hormonal environment; whether training stresses can be monitored by the hormonal environment; adolescent weightlifters' hormonal response during a lifting session; whether…

  5. Concentrations of hormones, pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants in groundwater affected by septic systems in New England and New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Schubert, Christopher E.; Argue, Denise M.; Fisher, Irene J.; Furlong, Edward T.; Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; Chalmers, Ann T.

    2015-01-01

    The highest micropollutant concentrations for the NY network were present in the shoreline wells and reflect groundwater that is most affected by septic system discharges. One of the shoreline wells had personal care/domestic use, pharmaceutical, and plasticizer concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 5.7 μg/L. Estradiol equivalency quotient concentrations were also highest in a shoreline well sample (3.1 ng/L). Most micropollutant concentrations increase with increasing specific conductance and total nitrogen concentrations for shoreline well samples. These findings suggest that septic systems serving institutional settings and densely populated areas in coastal settings may be locally important sources of micropollutants to adjacent aquifer and marine systems.

  6. Endocrine interactions between plants and animals: Implications of exogenous hormone sources for the evolution of hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ashley E M; Heyland, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Hormones are central to animal physiology, metabolism and development. Details on signal transduction systems and regulation of hormone synthesis, activation and release have only been studied for a small number of animal groups, notably arthropods and chordates. However, a significant body of literature suggests that hormonal signaling systems are not restricted to these phyla. For example, work on several echinoderm species shows that exogenous thyroid hormones (THs) affect larval development and metamorphosis and our new data provide strong evidence for endogenous synthesis of THs in sea urchin larvae. In addition to these endogenous sources, these larvae obtain THs when they consume phytoplankton. Another example of an exogenously acquired hormone or their precursors is in insect and arthropod signaling. Sterols from plants are essential for the synthesis of ecdysteroids, a crucial group of insect morphogenic steroids. The availability of a hormone or hormone precursor from food has implications for understanding hormone function and the evolution of hormonal signaling in animals. For hormone function, it creates an important link between the environment and the regulation of internal homeostatic systems. For the evolution of hormonal signaling it helps us to better understand how complex endocrine mechanisms may have evolved.

  7. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor activation stimulates oxytocin release from the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system while melatonin inhibits this process.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Marlena; Boczek-Leszczyk, Emilia

    2010-01-15

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its agonist and antagonist on oxytocin (OT) release from the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophysial (H-N) system. An additional aim was to determine whether the possible response of oxytocinergic neurons to these peptides could be modified by melatonin through a cAMP-dependent mechanism. The results show that the highly selective GnRH agonist (i.e., [Des-Gly(10),d-His(Bzl)(6),Pro-NHEt(9)]-LHRH; Histrelin) stimulates the secretion of OT from an isolated rat H-N system. Melatonin significantly inhibited basal and histrelin-induced release of OT in vitro, and displayed no significant influence on OT release in the presence of GnRH or its antagonist. Addition of melatonin to a medium containing forskolin resulted in significant reduction of OT secretion from the H-N system. On the other hand, addition of forskolin to a medium containing both histrelin and melatonin did not further alter the inhibitory influence of melatonin on the histrelin-dependent secretion of OT in vitro. Intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion (experiment in vivo) of a GnRH antagonist resulted in substantial inhibition of OT release, thus revealing the stimulatory action of endogenous GnRH. In melatonin-treated animals, blood plasma OT levels were not changed in comparison to the vehicle. Our present data strongly suggests that activation of the GnRH receptor in the hypothalamus is involved in stimulation of OT secretion from the rat H-N system. It has also been shown, under experimental in vitro conditions, that melatonin fully suppresses the response of oxytocinergic neurons to the GnRH agonist - histrelin. The effect of melatonin on OT release is mediated by the cAMP-dependent mechanism, although other mechanisms of action are also possible.

  8. Peripheral activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Granata, R

    2016-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates GH synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition to its endocrine role, GHRH exerts a wide range of extrapituitary effects which include stimulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation, and inhibition of apoptosis. Accordingly, expression of GHRH, as well as the receptor GHRH-R and its splice variants, has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types. Among the direct peripheral activities, GHRH regulates pancreatic islet and β-cell survival and function and endometrial cell proliferation, promotes cardioprotection and wound healing, influences the immune and reproductive systems, reduces inflammation, indirectly increases lifespan and adiposity and acts on skeletal muscle cells to inhibit cell death and atrophy. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly clear that GHRH exerts important extrapituitary functions, suggesting potential therapeutic use of the peptide and its analogs in a wide range of medical settings.

  9. Vitamins as hormones.

    PubMed

    Reichrath, J; Lehmann, B; Carlberg, C; Varani, J; Zouboulis, C C

    2007-02-01

    Vitamins A and D are the first group of substances that have been reported to exhibit properties of skin hormones, such as organized metabolism, activation, inactivation, and elimination in specialized cells of the tissue, exertion of biological activity, and release in the circulation. Vitamin A and its two important metabolites, retinaldehyde and retinoic acids, are fat-soluble unsaturated isoprenoids necessary for growth, differentiation and maintenance of epithelial tissues, and also for reproduction. In a reversible process, vitamin A is oxidized IN VIVO to give retinaldehyde, which is important for vision. The dramatic effects of vitamin A analogues on embryogenesis have been studied by animal experiments; the clinical malformation pattern in humans is known. Retinoic acids are major oxidative metabolites of vitamin A and can substitute for it in vitamin A-deficient animals in growth promotion and epithelial differentiation. Natural vitamin A metabolites are vitamins, because vitamin A is not synthesized in the body and must be derived from carotenoids in the diet. On the other hand, retinoids are also hormones - with intracrine activity - because retinol is transformed in the cells into molecules that bind to and activate specific nuclear receptors, exhibit their function, and are subsequently inactivated. The mechanisms of action of natural vitamin A metabolites on human skin are based on the time- and dose-dependent influence of morphogenesis, epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation, epithelial and mesenchymal synthetic performance, immune modulation, stimulation of angiogenesis and inhibition of carcinogenesis. As drugs, vitamin A and its natural metabolites have been approved for the topical and systemic treatment of mild to moderate and severe, recalcitrant acne, photoaging and biologic skin aging, acute promyelocytic leukaemia and Kaposi's sarcoma. On the other hand, the critical importance of the skin for the human body's vitamin D endocrine

  10. Hormone (ACTH, T3) content of immunophenotyped lymphocyte subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Pállinger, Éva; Kiss, Gergely Attila; Csaba, György

    2016-12-01

    Cells of the immune system synthesize, store, and secrete polypeptide and amino acid type hormones, which also influence their functions, having receptors for different hormones. In the present experiment immunophenotyped immune cells isolated from bone marrow, thymus, and peritoneal fluid of mice were used for demonstrating the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and triiodothyronine (T3) hormone production of differentiating immune cells. Both hormones were found in each cell type, and in each maturation state, which means that all cells are participating in the hormonal function of the immune system. The lineage-independent presence of ACTH and T3 in differentiating hematopoietic cells denotes that their expression ubiquitous during lymphocyte development. Higher ACTH and T3 content of B cells shows that these cells are the most hormonally active and suggests that the hormones may have an autocrine regulatory role in B cell development. Developing T cells showed heterogeneous hormone production which was associated with their maturation state. Differences in the hormone contents of immune cells isolated from different organs indicate that their hormone production is defined by their differentiation or maturation state, however, possibly also by the local microenvironment.

  11. Involvement of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic systems in thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced rat cerebellar cGMP formation.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Hashimoto, T; Nagai, Y

    1996-12-05

    The increase in cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) caused by subcutaneous injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) tartrate was observed in a region-specific manner in the rat cerebellum. TRH tartrate (TRH-T) (2.8, 7.0 and 17 mg/kg as free TRH, s.c.) produced dose-dependent increases in cGMP levels markedly in the cerebellar superior and inferior vermis, and a smaller but still significant increase in the cerebellar hemispheres and brainstem but no significant increases in other brain regions. The TRH-induced increase in the cGMP level in the cerebellum was suppressed by pretreatment with muscimol, THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one) or MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and partially suppressed by atropine but was not suppressed by chlordiazepoxide, oxazepam, phentolamine, propranolol, cyproheptadine, haloperidol, baclofen or DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), suggesting the possible involvement of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(A)-ergic, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamatergic and cholinergic systems. These results suggest that excitatory amino acids may be involved in the cGMP formation caused by TRH in the cerebellar areas, and that cGMP formation is inhibited by enhancement of GABAA receptor function.

  12. The role of nutrition in the regulation of luteinizing hormone secretion by the opioidergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic systems in female Mediterranean goats.

    PubMed

    Zarazaga, Luis A; Celi, Irma; Guzmán, José Luis; Malpaux, Benoît

    2011-03-01

    This study examined which neural mechanism (opioid, dopaminergic, or serotonergic system) is involved in the regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, with and without nutritional modulation, at different times of the photoperiodic cycle. Goats were randomly distributed into two experimental groups that received either 1.1 (high group; n = 18) or 0.7 (low group; n = 18) times the nutritional maintenance requirements. The goats were exposed to alternations of 3 mo of long days and 3 mo of short days. Plasma LH concentrations were measured twice a week. The effects of intravenous injections of naloxone (endogenous opioid receptor antagonist), pimozide (dopaminergic(2) receptor antagonist), and cyproheptadine (serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine(2) receptor antagonist) on LH secretion were assessed during challenges in three different photoperiodic situations: the onset of LH stimulation by short days (OnsetSD), the onset of LH inhibition by long days (OnsetLD), and during the LH inhibition by long days (LateLD). The role of the different neural systems was clearly modified by the level of nutrition. In the low-nutrition group, only naloxone increased LH concentrations during onsetLD (P < 0.05). However, in the high-nutrition group, naloxone increased the concentration and pulsatility of LH (P < 0.05) in onsetSD and onsetLD. Pimozide increased LH concentration and pulsatility (P < 0.05) in onsetLD and LH concentration in lateLD (P < 0.001). Finally, cyproheptadine significantly increased LH concentration at all three times (P < 0.001). These results provide evidence that all three systems are involved in the inhibition of LH release in onsetLD, and that the opioid and serotonin mechanisms are involved during the onsetSD that were enhanced by a high plane of nutrition.

  13. Changes in hormonal balance and meristematic activity in primary root tips on the slowly rotating clinostat and their effect on the development of the rapeseed root system.

    PubMed

    Aarrouf, J; Schoevaert, D; Maldiney, R; Perbal, G

    1999-04-01

    The morphometry of the root system, the meristematic activity and the level of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA) and zeatin in the primary root tips of rapeseed seedlings were analyzed as functions of time on a slowly rotating clinostat (1 rpm) or in the vertical controls (1 rpm). The fresh weight of the root system was 30% higher throughout the growth period (25 days) in clinorotated seedlings. Morphometric analysis showed that the increase in biomass on the clinostat was due to greater primary root growth, earlier initiation and greater elongation of the secondary roots, which could be observed even in 5-day-old seedlings. However, after 15 days, the growth of the primary root slowed on the clinostat, whereas secondary roots still grew faster in clinorotated plants than in the controls. At this time, the secondary roots began to be initiated closer to the root tip on the clinostat than in the control. Analysis of the meristematic activity and determination of the levels in IAA, ABA and zeatin in the primary root tips demonstrated that after 5 days on the clinostat, the increased length of the primary root could be the consequence of higher meristematic activity and coincided with an increase in both IAA and ABA concentrations. After 15 days on the clinostat, a marked increase in IAA, ABA and zeatin, which probably reached supraoptimal levels, seems to cause a progressive disturbance of the meristematic cells, during a decrease of primary root growth between 15 and 25 days. These modifications in the hormonal balance and the perturbation of the meristematic activity on the clinostat were followed by a loss of apical dominance, which was responsible for the early initiation of secondary roots, the greater elongation of the root system and the emergence of the lateral roots near the tip of the primary root.

  14. Thyroid hormone disorders and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Yu, Zhui; Li, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality, which results from severe infection and can lead to secondary organ dysfunction. It is one of the most common cause of death in intensive care unit. Clinical reports have shown that sepsis was often accompanied by thyroid dysfunction, which is called "low triiodothyronine (T3)" syndrome and characterized by decreased blood total T3 and free T3, and by normal or decreased thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This syndrome may greatly affect the prognosis of patients with sepsis. The main purpose of this review is to illustrate the role of thyroid hormone disorder in the development and prognosis of sepsis.

  15. Thyroid hormone and the central control of homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Warner, Amy; Mittag, Jens

    2012-08-01

    It has long been known that thyroid hormone has profound direct effects on metabolism and cardiovascular function. More recently, it was shown that the hormone also modulates these systems by actions on the central autonomic control. Recent studies that either manipulated thyroid hormone signalling in anatomical areas of the brain or analysed seasonal models with an endogenous fluctuation in hypothalamic thyroid hormone levels revealed that the hormone controls energy turnover. However, most of these studies did not progress beyond the level of anatomical nuclei; thus, the neuronal substrates as well as the molecular mechanisms remain largely enigmatic. This review summarises the evidence for a role of thyroid hormone in the central autonomic control of peripheral homeostasis and advocates novel strategies to address thyroid hormone action in the brain on a cellular level.

  16. Effects of feeding system on growth performance, plasma biochemical components and hormones, and carcass characteristics in Hanwoo steers

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chan Sung; Cho, Woong Ki; Jang, In Seok; Lee, Sung Sill; Moon, Yea Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to compare growth performance, blood components and carcass traits by two feeding systems (concentrate with roughage separately [CON] vs total mixed ration [TMR]) in Hanwoo steers, and to learn the relationship between blood components during fattening or finishing phases and carcass traits in Hanwoo steers. Methods Sixty steers aged 8 months were allotted to two feeding systems and fed similar amounts of average dry matter and total digestible nutrient throughout whole experimental period according to each feeding program. Steers were weighed monthly, taken blood at the end of growing, fattening and finishing periods, and slaughtered at 30 month of age. Results Growing performance was higher (p<0.05) in the CON group compared to the TMR group during fattening and finishing periods. The CON group was lower (p<0.05) in blood aspartic acid transaminase, blood urea nitrogen and retinol levels during growing period, but higher in triglyceride and cholesterol levels during fattening and finishing periods compared to the TMR group. The CON group was greater (p<0.05) in rib-eye area, and lighter (p<0.05) red in meat color compared to the TMR group. In the correlation coefficients between blood components of steers and carcass traits, retinol had a negative (p<0.05) correlation with marbling score and rib-eye area. Leptin had a positive (p<0.05) correlation with back fat thickness. Blood cholesterol and triglyceride were positively (p<0.05) correlated with carcass weight and rib-eye area. Conclusion Growth performance, carcass ribeye area and meat color showed a more desirable result in the CON compared to the TMR in Hanwoo steers. Assessing the accumulated data of carcass traits with blood components including hormones—particularly retinol, cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin—during the fattening or finishing phases, it may be possible to find a biomarker for determining beef quality in living animals. PMID:28669143

  17. Two emerging concepts for elite athletes: the short-term effects of testosterone and cortisol on the neuromuscular system and the dose-response training role of these endogenous hormones.

    PubMed

    Crewther, Blair T; Cook, Christian; Cardinale, Marco; Weatherby, Robert P; Lowe, Tim

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this review is to highlight two emerging concepts for the elite athlete using the resistance-training model: (i) the short-term effects of testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) on the neuromuscular system; and (ii) the dose-response training role of these endogenous hormones. Exogenous evidence confirms that T and C can regulate long-term changes in muscle growth and performance, especially with resistance training. This evidence also confirms that changes in T or C concentrations can moderate or support neuromuscular performance through various short-term mechanisms (e.g. second messengers, lipid/protein pathways, neuronal activity, behaviour, cognition, motor-system function, muscle properties and energy metabolism). The possibility of dual T and C effects on the neuromuscular system offers a new paradigm for understanding resistance-training performance and adaptations. Endogenous evidence supports the short-term T and C effects on human performance. Several factors (e.g. workout design, nutrition, genetics, training status and type) can acutely modify T and/or C concentrations and thereby potentially influence resistance-training performance and the adaptive outcomes. This novel short-term pathway appears to be more prominent in athletes (vs non-athletes), possibly due to the training of the neuromuscular and endocrine systems. However, the exact contribution of these endogenous hormones to the training process is still unclear. Research also confirms a dose-response training role for basal changes in endogenous T and C, again, especially for elite athletes. Although full proof within the physiological range is lacking, this athlete model reconciles a proposed permissive role for endogenous hormones in untrained individuals. It is also clear that the steroid receptors (cell bound) mediate target tissue effects by adapting to exercise and training, but the response patterns of the membrane-bound receptors remain highly speculative. This information

  18. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormone for the body’s needs. This is called Hypothyroidism and may be caused by a non-functioning ... or by a non-functioning pituitary gland (see Hypothyroidism Brochure ). Hypothyroidism, is the most common reason for ...

  19. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a doctor’s instructions). ... that bioidentical hormones, whether prepared by a compounding pharmacy or pharmaceutical company, are safer to use than ...

  20. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called acromegaly . In children it is called gigantism . Too little growth hormone can cause a slow ... growth due to excess GH during childhood, called gigantism. (A special test is done to confirm this ...

  1. [Dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA(S)]: anabolic hormone?].

    PubMed

    Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Maggio, Marcello

    2010-09-01

    The role of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphated form (DHEAS) as anabolic hormones is still debated in the literature. In this review we describe the fundamental steps of DHEA physiological secretion and its peripheral metabolism. Moreover we will list all the observational and intervention studies conducted in humans. Many observational studies have tested the relationship between low DHEA levels and age-related changes in skeletal muscle and bone, while intervention studies underline the positive and significant effects of DHEA treatment on several parameters of body composition. Surprisingly, observational studies are not consistent with different effects in men and women. There is recent evidence of a significant role of DHEA in frailty syndrome and as predictor of mortality. However a more complete approach of the problem suggests the opportunity to not focus only on one single hormonal derangement but to analyze the parallel dysregulation of anabolic hormones including sex steroids, GH-IGF-1 system and other catabolic hormones.

  2. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  3. Molecular characterization and expression of urotensin II and its receptor in the flounder (Platichthys flesus): a hormone system supporting body fluid homeostasis in euryhaline fish.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiqun; Greenwood, Michael; Dow, Louise; Yuill, Janette; Worthington, Jonathan; Brierley, Matthew J; McCrohan, Catherine R; Riccardi, Daniela; Balment, Richard J

    2006-08-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a potent vasoconstrictor in mammals, but the source of circulating UII remains unclear. Investigations of the caudal neurosecretory system (CNSS), considered the major source of UII in fish, alongside target tissue expression of UII receptor (UT), can provide valuable insights into this highly conserved regulatory system. We report UII gene characterization, expression of the first fish UT, and responses to salinity challenge in flounder. The 12-aa UII peptide shares 73% sequence identity with pig and human UII. Flounder UT receptor shares 56.7% identity with rat. Although the CNSS is the major site of UII expression, RT-PCR revealed expression of UII and UT in all tissues tested. Around 30-40% of large CNSS Dahlgren cells expressed UII, alone or in combination with urotensin I and/or corticotrophin releasing hormone. Immunolocalization of UT in osmoregulatory tissues (gill, kidney) was associated with vascular elements. There were no consistent differences in CNSS UII expression or plasma UII between seawater (SW)- and freshwater (FW)-adapted fish, although gill and kidney UT expression was lower in FW animals. After acute transfer from SW to FW, plasma UII and kidney and gill UT expression were reduced, whereas UT expression in kidney was increased after reverse transfer. UII appears to be more important to combat dehydration and salt-loading in SW than the hemodilution faced in FW. Potentially, altered target tissue sensitivity through changes in UT expression, is an important physiological controlling mechanism, not only relevant for migratory fish but also likely conserved in mammals.

  4. Daily rhythms of urotensin I and II gene expression and hormone secretion in the caudal neurosecretory system of the euryhaline flounder (Platichthys flesus).

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiqun; Zhang, Ying; Xiong, Jianghong; Balment, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The caudal neurosecretory system (CNSS) is a unique neuroendocrine structure for environmental adaptation in fish, and is the major site of expression and secretion of urotensin I (UI) and II (UII). This study examined daily changes in mRNA expression and the secretion profile of UI and UII in the CNSS. Daily rhythms were observed in mRNA level of CNSS UI, urophysis UI, plasma UII, glucose, potassium and sodium. No statistically significant (Cosinor, P>0.05) diel rhythmicity in mRNA level of CNSS UII, urophysis UII, cortisol, lactate, osmolality and chloride were detected. The calculated acrophase of sodium, cortisol, plasma UII, urophysis UII, urophysis UI and mRNA level of CNSS UI rhythms were recorded at 13:04 h, 13:39 h, 14:45 h, 15:27 h, 14:41 h and 14:39 h, respectively and a positive relationship was evident among them. The acrophase of glucose and potassium rhythms were recorded at 18:57 h and 22:35 h, respectively. The glucose levels increased progressively at the onset of the UII surge at 15:00 h and reached peak values at dusk. The results support the hypothesis that the CNSS may play a role in the control of co-ordinated daily changes in energy mobilization, nutritional behavior and osmoregulatory systems in euryhaline flounder. Our findings described for the first time the existence of daily rhythms of CNSS hormone expression and secretion in Platichthys flesus. These results reveal the importance of taking into account the time of day when assessing stress responses and evaluating UI and UII as physiological indicators of stress in this species.

  5. Postmenopausal hormone therapy-also use of estradiol plus levonorgestrel-intrauterine system is associated with an increased risk of primary fallopian tube carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koskela-Niska, Virpi; Pukkala, Eero; Lyytinen, Heli; Ylikorkala, Olavi; Dyba, Tadeusz

    2015-10-15

    Data on the possible impact of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on the incidence of rare primary fallopian tube carcinoma (PFTC) are scarce. Therefore, we conducted a nationwide case-control study analyzing the association between the use of different HTs and PFTC. All women aged 50 years or older with an incident PFTC (n = 360) during 1995-2007 were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry. For each case of PFTC, ten age- and place of residence-matched controls were selected from the Finnish National Population Register, which also provided information on parity. Data on HT purchases were received from the Prescription Register, and data on hysterectomies and sterilizations from the National Care Register. Controls with a salpingectomy before the PFTC diagnosis of the respective case were excluded. The PFTC risk in relation to different HTs was estimated with a conditional logistic regression model, adjusted for parity, age at last delivery, hysterectomy and sterilization. The use for five years or more of estradiol combined with levonorgestrel-releasing-intrauterine system (odds ratio 2.84, 95% confidence interval 1.10-7.38) and sequential estradiol-progestin therapy (EPT; 3.37; 2.23-5.08) were both linked with increases in the risk of PFTC, while the risk with use of estradiol-only therapy or continuous EPT was not statistically significantly increased. The OR for the use of tibolone for one year or more was 1.56 (0.55-4.41). The use of HT is related to an increased risk of PFTC, particularly when a progestin component is intrauterine or systemic progestin is given in sequential manner. © 2015 UICC.

  6. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases. PMID:28117293

  7. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Murat

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  8. Non-contraceptive uses of levonorgestrel-releasing hormone system (LNG-IUS)--a systematic enquiry and overview.

    PubMed

    Varma, Rajesh; Sinha, Deepali; Gupta, Janesh K

    2006-03-01

    Levonorgestrel releasing-intrauterine systems (LNG-IUS) were originally developed as a method of contraception in the mid 1970s. The only LNG-IUS approved for general public use is the Mirena LNG-IUS, which releases 20 mcg of levonorgestrel per day directly in to the uterine cavity. However, new lower dose (10 and 14 mcg per day) and smaller sized LNG-IUS (MLS, FibroPlant-LNG) are currently under clinical development and investigation. Research into the non-contraceptive uses of LNG-IUS is rapidly expanding. In the UK, LNG-IUS is licensed for use in menorrhagia and to provide endometrial protection to perimenopausal and postmenopausal women on estrogen replacement therapy. There is limited evidence to suggest that LNG-IUS may also be beneficial in women with endometriosis, adenomyosis, fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia and early stage endometrial cancer (where the patient is deemed unfit for primary surgical therapy). This systematic enquiry and overview evaluates the quality of evidence relating to the non-contraceptive therapeutic uses of LNG-IUS in gynaecology.

  9. Application of yeast-two hybrid assay to chemical genomic screens: a high-throughput system to identify novel molecules modulating plant hormone receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Chini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Phytohormones are endogenous signalling molecules that regulate plant development, adaptation to the environment, and survival. Upon internal or external stimuli, hormones are quickly accumulated and perceived, which in turn activates specific signalling cascades regulating the appropriate physiological responses. In the last decade, great advances in understanding plant hormone perception mechanisms have been achieved. Among different methodological approaches, yeast-two hybrid (Y2H) assays played a pivotal role in the identification and analysis of plant hormone perception complexes. The Y2H assay is a rapid and straightforward technique that can be easily employed to identify small molecules directly modulating plant hormone perception complexes in a high-throughput manner. However, an Y2H chemical screen tends to isolate false positive molecules, and therefore a secondary in planta screen is required to confirm the genuine bioactivity of putative positive hits. This two-step screening approach can substantially save time and manual labor. This chapter focuses on the prospects of Y2H-based chemical genomic high-throughput screens applied to plant hormone perception complexes. Specifically, the method employed to carry out a chemical genomic screen to identify agonist and antagonist molecules of the phytohormone jasmonic acid in its conjugated form jasmonic acid-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is described. An easy in planta confirmation assay is also illustrated. However, this methodology can be easily extended to detect novel chemical compounds perturbing additional plant hormone receptor complexes. Finally, the high-throughput approach described here can also be implemented for the identification of molecules interfering with protein-protein interaction of plant complexes other than hormone receptors.

  10. Thyroid hormone, neural tissue and mood modulation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Whybrow, P C

    2001-04-01

    The successful treatment of affective disorders with thyroid hormone exemplifies the suggested inter-relationship between endocrine and neuronal systems in these disorders. Thyroid hormones have a profound influence on behaviour and appear to be capable of modulating the phenotypic expression of major affective illness. Specifically, there is good evidence that triiodothyronine (T3) may accelerate the antidepressant response to tricylic antidepressants, and some studies suggest that T3 may augment the therapeutic response to antidepressants in refractory depressed patients. Open studies have also indicated that adjunctive supraphysiological doses of thyroxine (T4) can ameliorate depressive symptomatology and help stabilize the long-term course of illness in bipolar and unipolar patients, especially women refractory to standard medications. Despite acceptance of the essential role of thyroid hormone on brain maturation and differentiation, and the clinical and therapeutic observations in association with mood disorders, the molecular action that may underlie the mood-modulating properties of thyroid hormone in the adult brain has only recently become the focus of research. The identification of nuclear T3 receptors, the region-specific expression of deiodinase isoenzymes and the molecular analyses of thyroid-responsive genes in the adult brain have provided the biological bases for a better understanding of thyroid hormone action in mature neurons. Also the influence of thyroid hormones on the putative neurotransmitter systems that regulate mood and behaviour, serotonin and norepinephrine, may be helpful in explaining their mood-modulating effects.

  11. Steroid hormones and BDNF.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, N; Russo, M; Santoro, A N; Litta, P; Cela,