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Sample records for adiponectin c-reactive protein

  1. C-reactive protein inhibits high-molecular-weight adiponectin expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanxin; Liu, Cuiping; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Su; Yang, Qichao; Jiang, Dan; Yuan, Guoyue

    2016-03-25

    Adiponectin, an adipose-specific protein hormone, is secreted from white adipose tissue and involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. It is assembled into low-molecular-weight trimer (LMW), middle-molecular-weight hexameric (MMW) and high-molecular-weight (HMW), among which HMW exhibits higher activity. In this study, we proved that C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, inhibited adiponectin expression, especially HMW in time-and dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, CRP decreased the HMW/total adiponectin ration and reduced adiponectin assembly by increasing ERp44, and decreasing Ero1-α and DsbA-L. CRP activated pAkt, the downstream of PI3K. Inhibition of PI3K or pAkt abolished the effect of CRP. Our study suggested that CRP decreased adiponectin expression and multimerization, while CRP-induced decline in adiponectin might be mediated through the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  2. Predictive role of adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein for prediction of cardiovascular event in an Iranian cohort Study: The Isfahan Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi-Saleh, Davoud; Koosha, Pooya; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Boshtam, Mansoureh; Oveis-Gharan, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Numerous studies have been conducted on the predictive effects of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) on cardiovascular events. Few studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of adiponectin for the prediction of the incident of cardiovascular events in the Middle East area. This study compared the predictive effect of hs-CRP and adiponectin on healthy volunteers for the prediction of cerebrovascular disease (CVD). METHODS This nested case-control in original Isfahan Cohort Study (ICS) was conducted from 2001 to 2011. Participants were selected from ICS. The case group included participants with CVD while the control group included participants without CVD. The level of hs-CRP and adiponectin was measured in the blood samples collected in the year 2007. Thereafter, the statistical analyses were performed to determine the predictive value of hs-CRP and adiponectin in CVD prediction. RESULTS The results showed that before the elimination of diabetes effect; there was a significant difference between the two groups, in terms of the mean of adiponectin (P = 0.019) and no significant difference was observed in hs-CRP levels (P = 0.673). However, after eliminating the factor of diabetes, there was no significant difference between the case and control groups in adiponectin and hs-CRP levels (P = 0.184, P = 0.946). The results showed that the odds ratio (OR) of the adiponectin level was 0.879 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.719-1.075, P = 0.210] while the OR of hs-CRP was 1.045 (95% CI: 0.922-1.185, P = 0.491). Furthermore, it was shown that after adjustment for age, sex, and diabetes; the OR of adiponectine was 0.875 (95% CI: 0.701-1.091, P = 0.235) and that of hs-CRP was 1.068 (95% CI: 0.935-1.219, P = 0.333). CONCLUSION The results show that adiponectin and hs-CRP cannot be predictors for cardiovascular events in a healthy population. Risk factors such as diabetes limit the use of adiponectin as a CVD predictor. PMID:27752270

  3. Associations of erythrocyte membrane fatty acids with the concentrations of C-reactive protein, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist and adiponectin in 1373 men.

    PubMed

    Takkunen, M J; de Mello, V D F; Schwab, U S; Ågren, J J; Kuusisto, J; Uusitupa, M I J

    2014-10-01

    Dietary and endogenous fatty acids could play a role in low-grade inflammation. In this cross-sectional study the proportions of erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (EMFA) and the concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and adiponectin were measured and their confounder-adjusted associations examined in 1373 randomly selected Finnish men aged 45-70 years participating in the population based Metsim study in Eastern Finland. The sum of n-6 EMFAs, without linoleic acid (LA), was positively associated with concentrations of CRP and IL-1Ra (r partial=0.139 and r partial=0.115, P<0.001). These associations were especially strong among lean men (waist circumference <94 cm; r partial=0.156 and r partial=0.189, P<0.001). Total n-3 EMFAs correlated inversely with concentrations of CRP (r partial=-0.098, P<0.001). Palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7) correlated positively with CRP (r partial=0.096, P<0.001). Cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7) was associated with high concentrations of adiponectin (r partial=0.139, P<0.001). In conclusion, n-6 EMFAs, except for LA, correlated positively with the inflammatory markers. Palmitoleic acid was associated with CRP, whereas, interestingly, its elongation product, cis-vaccenic acid, associated with anti-inflammatory adiponectin.

  4. Delivery Mode, Duration of Labor, and Cord Blood Adiponectin, Leptin, and C-Reactive Protein: Results of the Population-Based Ulm Birth Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Chad A.; Thiel, Larissa; Bornemann, Rebecca; Koenig, Wolfgang; Reister, Frank; Brenner, Hermann; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Genuneit, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have reported associations between delivery mode and health outcomes in infancy and later life. Previous smaller studies indicated a relationship between delivery mode and newborn inflammation potentially constituting a mediating factor. We aimed to determine the influence of delivery mode and duration of labor on cord blood concentrations of adiponectin, leptin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Methods In the Ulm SPATZ Health Study, 934 singleton newborns and their mothers were recruited during their hospital stay in the University Medical Center Ulm, Southern Germany, from 04/2012-05/2013. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by ELISAs (n = 836). Delivery mode was analyzed categorically (elective cesarean (reference), active labor delivery: emergency cesarean, assisted vaginal, and spontaneous vaginal); duration of labor continuously. Following log-transformation, linear regression was used to estimate geometric means ratios (GMR) adjusted for potential confounders for the effects of delivery mode and duration of labor on each biomarker separately. Independent replication was sought in the similarly conducted Ulm Birth Cohort Study recruited from 11/2000-11/2001. Results Individually, active labor delivery modes as well as increasing duration of labor were associated with higher leptin and hs-CRP concentrations. After mutual adjustment, the associations with delivery modes were attenuated but those for duration of labor remained statistically significant (GMR (95%CI) 1.10 (1.00; 1.21) and 1.15 (1.04; 1.27) for leptin and hs-CRP per hour of labor, respectively). No significant adjusted associations were observed between delivery modes and adiponectin concentrations. These findings were replicated in an independent birth cohort study. Conclusions Cord blood leptin and hs-CRP concentrations were associated with duration of labor rather than delivery mode. Further research is warranted to investigate these associations

  5. C-reactive protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. It is one of a group of proteins called "acute phase reactants" that go up in response to inflammation. This article discusses the blood test done to measure the amount of CRP in your blood.

  6. Association of Adiponectin with High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A 3.5-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Chun-Wu; Hsu, Yung-Chien; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adiponectin (ADPN), one of most abundant fat-derived biologically active substances, plays an important role in anti-atherosclerotic process. There are conflicting results about the impact of ADPN on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes and mortality, particularly in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). Moreover, the relationship between ADPN and inflammatory mediators has been seldom explored in this population. Therefore, we examined the relationship between ADPN and longitudinal high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) changes and investigated whether ADPN or hs-CRP levels could predict CV outcomes and mortality in prevalent PD patients after comprehensive adjustment of possible confounders. Methods In this prospective cohort study, 78 PD patients were enrolled and followed from February 2009 to August 2012. During follow-up, CV events and all-cause mortality were recorded. Results The mean baseline ADPN value was 29.46±18.01 μg/ml and duration of PD treatment was 37.76±36.96 months. In multiple linear regression analysis, plasma ADPN levels positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein and negatively associated with hs-CRP, body mass index, D4/D0 glucose, triglyceride, and duration of PD treatment. After stratified by genders, the inverse association between baseline ADPN and hs-CRP was more significant in the female group. The hs-CRP levels were followed up annually and remained significantly lower in the high ADPN group in the first 2 years. Patients were then stratified into two groups according to the median ADPN value (23.8 μg/ml). The results of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated less CV events and better survival in high ADPN group. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, only ADPN level (HR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.88–0.98, p = 0.02), age and history of CV diseases were independent risk factors for future CV events. Furthermore, hs-CRP (HR: 1.11, 95% CI:1.001–1.22, p = 0.04) was identified as independent predictor of

  7. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? C-Reactive Protein Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: CRP Formal name: C-Reactive Protein Related tests: ESR , Complement , Procalcitonin , ANA , Rheumatoid Factor ...

  8. Genetic determinants of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Danik, Jacqueline Suk; Ridker, Paul M

    2007-09-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are a complex phenotype with both genetic and environmental determinants. Recent work has highlighted the impact of genetic variants within the CRP gene as well as other candidate genes, often chosen for their role in the inflammatory pathway, on CRP levels. Emerging work shows the association of such genetic variants in CRP not only to CRP levels, but also to variation of CRP levels in the acute phase response. Work on the relation of genetic variants within CRP to cardiovascular disease has had varied results. Whole-genome association studies to investigate the genetic determinants of CRP levels in an unbiased manner are ongoing. PMID:18241613

  9. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866....5270 C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A C-reactive protein... the C-reactive protein in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of C-reactive protein aids...

  10. Effects of atorvastatin on human c reactive protein metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Statins are known to reduce plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. Our goals were to define the mechanisms by which CRP was reduced by maximal dose atorvastatin. Eight subjects with combined hyperlipidemia (5 men and 3 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled...

  11. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  12. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Michael

    2015-06-01

    C-reactive protein is a better indicator of inflammation than the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It is more sensitive and responds more quickly to changes in the clinical situation. False negative and false positive results are more common when measuring the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Renal disease, female sex and older age increase the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate has value in detecting low-grade bone infection, and in monitoring some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  13. C-Reactive Protein: Clinical and Epidemiological Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, María Sofía; Toledo, Alexandra; Añez, Roberto; Torres, Yaquelín; Apruzzese, Vanessa; Silva, Carlos; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    An important etiopathogenic component of cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis, with inflammation being an essential event in the pathophysiology of all clinical pictures it comprises. In recent years, several molecules implicated in this process have been studied in order to assess cardiovascular risk in both primary and secondary prevention. C-reactive protein is a plasmatic protein of the pentraxin family and an acute phase reactant, very useful as a general inflammation marker. Currently, it is one of the most profoundly researched molecules in the cardiovascular field, yet its clinical applicability regarding cardiovascular risk remains an object of discussion, considered by some as a simple marker and by others as a true risk factor. In this sense, numerous studies propose its utilization as a predictor of cardiovascular risk through the use of high-sensitivity quantification methods for the detection of values <1 mg/L, following strict international guidelines. Increasing interest in these clinical findings has led to the creation of modified score systems including C-reactive protein concentrations, in order to enhance risk scores commonly used in clinical practice and offer improved care to patients with cardiovascular disease, which remains the first cause of mortality at the worldwide, national, and regional scenarios. PMID:24653858

  14. Not only immunoglobulins, C-reactive protein too.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Alok

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this letter is to expand a discussion, published recently in Molecular Immunology, on the post-secretion gain of function by immunoglobulins. It was reported that some circulating IgG molecules in all healthy individuals acquire novel antigen-binding specificity after exposure to conditions that change protein conformation, such as acidic pH. Another protein, C-reactive protein, also acquires novel ligand-binding specificity post-secretion after a switch from its native pentameric conformation to non-native pentameric conformation. Thus, that the functions of a protein depend upon its alternate structural states, and therefore on the surrounding milieu, is a more general phenomenon for some ancient molecules of the immune system than previously thought.

  15. C-reactive protein in the diagnosis of melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Obrien, Matthew; Jacups, Susan P; Anstey, Nicholas M; Currie, Bart J

    2004-05-01

    Previous work suggested that C-reactive protein (CRP) may be a useful test in the diagnosis of melioidosis, the infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. We reviewed patients with culture-confirmed melioidosis to define the role of this inflammatory marker in the diagnosis of melioidosis. In 175 patients, we found that the admission CRP level may be normal or only mildly elevated, including patients with severe sepsis, fatal cases, and in relapsed melioidosis. In a multivariate analysis, sepsis and bacteremia were more strongly associated with mortality than CRP. Admission levels of CRP are not a sensitive marker for the presence of melioidosis and a normal level cannot be used to exclude acute, chronic, or relapsed melioidosis in febrile patients in or from endemic regions.

  16. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helal, Imed; Zerelli, Lilia; Krid, Madiha; ElYounsi, Fethi; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Zouari, Bechir; Adelmoula, Jaouida; Kheder, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS® INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L) and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L) levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001). Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94) and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027) and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028) remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%). Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03) and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009) and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001) were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries. PMID:22569431

  17. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Helal, Imed; Zerelli, Lilia; Krid, Madiha; ElYounsi, Fethi; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Zouari, Bechir; Adelmoula, Jaouida; Kheder, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD), as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS® INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L) and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L) levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001). Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94) and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027) and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028) remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%). Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03) and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009) and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001) were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries.

  18. Rat C-reactive protein activates the autologous complement system.

    PubMed

    Diaz Padilla, Niubel; Bleeker, Wim K; Lubbers, Yvonne; Rigter, Gemma M M; Van Mierlo, Gerard J; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik

    2003-08-01

    Activation of complement is a biological function of human C-reactive protein (hCRP), whereas rat CRP (rCRP) has been claimed to be unable to activate complement. As important biological functions of proteins are probably conserved among species, we re-evaluated, using various ligands, the capability of rCRP to activate complement. The activation of complement by hCRP and rCRP was investigated in solid- and fluid-phase systems. In the solid-phase system, purified CRP was fixed to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates and incubated with human or rat recalcified plasma. Dose-dependent binding of human and rat C3 and C4 was observed to human and rat CRP, respectively. In the fluid-phase system, recalcified rat plasma, which contains about 500 mg/l of CRP, or human plasma supplemented with hCRP, were incubated with lyso-phosphatidylcholine. A dose-dependent activation of complement was observed upon incubation with this ligand, as reflected by the generation of activated C4 as well as of CRP-complement complexes. This activation was, in both cases, inhibited by preincubation of plasma with p-aminophosphorylcholine, a specific inhibitor of the interaction of CRP with its ligands, or by chelation of calcium ions. We conclude that rat CRP, similarly to human CRP, can activate autologous complement. These results support the notion that opsonization of ligands with complement is an important biological function of CRP.

  19. Prospects and advancements in C-reactive protein detection

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Pranjal; Suman, Pankaj; Airon, Himangi; Mukherjee, Monalisa; Kumar, Prabhanshu

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the earliest proteins that appear in the blood circulation in most systemic inflammatory conditions and this is the reason for its significance, even after identification of many organ specific inflammatory markers which appear relatively late during the course of disease. Earlier methods of CRP detection were based on the classical methods of antigen-antibody interaction through precipitation and agglutination reactions. Later on, CRP based enzymatic assays came into the picture which were further modified by integration of an antigen-antibody detection system with surface plasma spectroscopy. Then came the time for the development of electrochemical biosensors where nanomaterials were used to make a highly sensitive and portable detection system based on silicon nanowire, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor/bipolar junction transistor, ZnS nanoparticle, aptamer, field emission transmitter, vertical flow immunoassay etc. This editorial attempts to summarize developments in the field of CRP detection, with a special emphasis on biosensor technology. This would help in translating the latest development in CRP detection in the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory conditions at an early onset of the diseases. PMID:25237625

  20. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  1. Effects of C-reactive protein on human lymphocyte responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Vetter, M L; Gewurz, H; Hansen, B; James, K; Baum, L L

    1983-05-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a trace serum protein that increases markedly in concentration during inflammatory reactions, was recently shown to bind to a subset of human IgG-FcR-bearing peripheral blood lymphocytes in the presence of a ligand such as pneumococcal C-polysaccharide (CPS). CRP has also been detected on a small percentage of PBL that are associated with NK activity. In the present study, we assessed the effects of CRP and CRP-CPS complexes on a variety of human lymphocyte functions in vitro. CRP and CRP complexes significantly enhanced (generally two to threefold) cell-mediated cytotoxicity, minimally enhanced the MLC reaction, and induced a small but regularly detectable blastogenic response in resting PBL. CRP or CRP-CPS complexes had no effect on mitogen-induced blastogenesis, PWM-induced generation of IgM plaque-forming cells, E-rosette formation, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, or NK activity. The basis for the preferential ability of CRP to enhance cytotoxicity responses in vitro is under further investigation.

  2. Prospects and advancements in C-reactive protein detection.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Pranjal; Suman, Pankaj; Airon, Himangi; Mukherjee, Monalisa; Kumar, Prabhanshu

    2014-03-26

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the earliest proteins that appear in the blood circulation in most systemic inflammatory conditions and this is the reason for its significance, even after identification of many organ specific inflammatory markers which appear relatively late during the course of disease. Earlier methods of CRP detection were based on the classical methods of antigen-antibody interaction through precipitation and agglutination reactions. Later on, CRP based enzymatic assays came into the picture which were further modified by integration of an antigen-antibody detection system with surface plasma spectroscopy. Then came the time for the development of electrochemical biosensors where nanomaterials were used to make a highly sensitive and portable detection system based on silicon nanowire, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor/bipolar junction transistor, ZnS nanoparticle, aptamer, field emission transmitter, vertical flow immunoassay etc. This editorial attempts to summarize developments in the field of CRP detection, with a special emphasis on biosensor technology. This would help in translating the latest development in CRP detection in the clinical diagnosis of inflammatory conditions at an early onset of the diseases. PMID:25237625

  3. C-reactive protein activates complement in infarcted human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Nijmeijer, Remco; Lagrand, Wim K; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Visser, Cees A; Meijer, Chris J L M; Niessen, Hans W M; Hack, C Erik

    2003-07-01

    Circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) constitute a cardiovascular risk marker. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed co-localization of CRP and activated complement in human infarcted myocardium suggesting CRP to enhance inflammation in ischemic myocardium by inducing local complement activation. The aim was to establish whether CRP activates complement in infarcted human myocardium and to assess the relationship between this activation and the duration of infarction. Myocardial tissue samples from 56 patients that had died from acute myocardial infarction were evaluated. Specimens were taken from infarcted as well as noninfarcted sites of the heart. CRP-mediated complement activation was assessed by immunohistochemistry and by measuring levels of complement, CRP, and CRP-complement complexes, specific markers for CRP-mediated activation, in homogenates of the heart. Infarctions of 12 hours to 5 days had significantly more extensive depositions of complement and CRP and contained significantly more CRP, activated complement, and CRP-complement complexes than infarctions that were less than 12 hours old. Levels of CRP complexes correlated significantly with CRP and complement concentrations in the infarctions, as well as with the extent of complement and CRP depositions as measured via immunohistochemistry. Specific activation products of CRP-mediated activation of complement are increased in infarcts of more than 12 hours in duration and correlate with the extent of complement depositions. Hence, CRP seems to enhance local inflammatory reactions ensuing in human myocardial infarcts of more than 12 hours duration.

  4. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in bank employees

    PubMed Central

    Cattafesta, Monica; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Salaroli, Luciane Bresciani

    2016-01-01

    Background The ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (us-CRP) is used for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, but it is not well described as a marker for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods An observational and transversal study of bank employees evaluated anthropometric, hemodynamic, and biochemical data. CRP values were determined using commercial kits from Roche Diagnostics Ltd, and MS criteria were analyzed according to National Cholesterol Education Program’s – Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III). Results A total of 88 individuals had MS, and 77.3% (n=68) of these showed alterations of us-CRP (P=0.0001, confidence interval [CI] 0.11–0.34). Individuals with MS had higher mean values of us-CRP in global measures (P=0.0001) and stratified by sex (P=0.004) than individuals without the syndrome. This marker exhibited significant differences with varying criteria for MS, such as waist circumference (P=0.0001), triglycerides (P=0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (P=0.007), and the highest levels of us-CRP were found in individuals with more MS criteria. Conclusion us-CRP was strongly associated with the presence of MS and MS criteria in this group of workers. us-CRP is a useful and effective marker for identifying the development of MS and may be used as a reference in routine care. PMID:27274294

  5. C-reactive protein in human atherogenesis: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Oliver; Li, Kefei; Zaczkiewicz, Myron; Graf, Matthias; Liu, Zhongmin; Torzewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in atherosclerosis is controversially discussed. Whereas initial experimental studies suggested a pathogenic role for CRP in atherogenesis, more recent genetic data from Mendelian randomization trials failed to provide evidence for a causative role of CRP in cardiovascular disease. Also, experimental results from laboratories all over the world were indeed contradictory, partly because of species differences in CRP biology and partly because data were not accurately evaluated. Here we summarize the published data from experimental work with mainly human material in order to avoid confusion based on species differences in CRP biology. Experimental work needs to be reevaluated after reconsideration of some traditional rules in research: (1) in order to understand a molecule's role in disease it may be helpful to be aware of its role in physiology; (2) it is necessary to define the disease entity that experimental CRP research deals with; (3) the scientific consensus is as follows: do not try to prove your hypothesis. Specific CRP inhibition followed by use of CRP inhibitors in controlled clinical trials may be the only way to prove or disprove a causative role for CRP in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24799767

  6. Physical activity and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Eric P; Grandjean, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the leading causes of death and disability in developed countries around the world despite the documented success of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions. This illustrates the multifactorial nature of atherosclerosis and the use of novel inflammatory markers as an adjunct to risk factor reduction strategies. As evidence continues to accumulate that inflammation is involved in all stages of the development and progression of atherosclerosis, markers of inflammation such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) may provide additional information regarding the biological status of the atherosclerotic lesion. Recent investigations suggest that physical activity reduces CRP levels. Higher levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are consistently associated with 6-35% lower CRP levels. Longitudinal training studies that have demonstrated reductions in CRP concentrations range from 16% to 41%, an effect that may be independent of baseline levels of CRP, body composition or weight loss. The average change in CRP associated with physical activity appears to be at least as good, if not better, than currently prescribed pharmacological interventions in similar populations. The primary purpose of this review will be to present evidence from both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations that physical activity lowers CRP levels in a dose-response manner. Finally, this review will examine factors such as body composition, sex, blood sample timing, diet and smoking, which may influence the CRP response to physical activity. PMID:16646631

  7. Impact of C-reactive protein (CRP) on surfactant function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Hales, C.A.; Thompson, B.T.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F. )

    1989-12-01

    Plasma levels of the acute-phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), increase up to one thousand-fold as a result of trauma or inflammation. CRP binds to phosphorylcholine (PC) in a calcium-ion dependent manner. The structural homology between PC and the major phospholipid component of surfactant, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), led to the present study in which we examined if CRP levels might be increased in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and subsequently interfere with surfactant function. Our results showed that CRP levels in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) was increased in patients with ARDS (97.8 +/- 84.2 micrograms/mg total protein vs. 4.04 +/- 2.2 micrograms/mg total protein in normals). Our results show that CRP binds to liposomes containing DPPC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). As a result of this interaction, CRP inhibits the surface activity of a PG-DPPC mixture when tested with a Wilhelmy surfactometer or with the Enhorning pulsating bubble apparatus. Furthermore, the surface activity of a clinically used surfactant replacement, Surfactant TA (2 mg/ml), was also severely impaired by CRP in a dose-dependent manner (doses used ranging from 24.5 to 1,175 micrograms/ml). In contrast, human serum albumin (HSA) at 500 and 900 micrograms/ml had no inhibitory effect on Surfactant TA surface activity. These results suggest that CRP, although not an initiating insult in ARDS, may contribute to the subsequent abnormalities of surfactant function and thus the pathogenesis of the pulmonary dysfunction seen in ARDS.

  8. Synchrotron X-Radiation Studies of C-Reactive Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Dean Aubrey Albert

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. C-reactive proteins (CRP) constitute a ubiquitous and highly conserved family of calcium binding, pentameric plasma proteins. Although the precise biological function of CRP is uncertain, known properties suggest a role in host defence. The structure determination aims to elucidate key structural aspects of the interaction of CRP with specific biological ligands, leading towards the ultimate determination of the biological function. The initial and often rate limiting step in biological crystallography is the reproducible growth of well ordered crystals. Human CRP has been crystallised in two tetragonal forms (P4_122 (form I) and P4 _222 (form II)) with closely similar unit cells, often twinned together. Heterogeneity due to dissociation of the oligomer is identified as a major factor limiting reproducible crystal growth. Other problems, of the large unit cell (>300A), weak diffraction and extreme sensitivity to X-rays, have been overcome using the intense Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at the S.E.R.C. Daresbury Laboratory. X-ray data sets to 3.1A and 3.75A resolution have been collected from the form I and form II crystals, respectively. Rotation function studies identify a pentamer in almost identical orientations in both crystal forms, and an artefactual 52 molecular pseudo-symmetry at low resolution. Despite extensive screening, structure determination has been delayed by the lack of suitable heavy atom derivatives. The analogous CRP from the invertebrate Limulus polyphemus has been crystallised in six polymorphic forms, two of which are suitable for structure analysis. Synchrotron X-ray data extending to 3.1A have been collected from small crystals (~0.1mm) of one form. Rotation function analyses corroborate the 222 molecular point group symmetry prescribe by the crystal packing.

  9. C-reactive protein levels in hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Hofman, Z L M; Relan, A; Hack, C E

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent episodes of angioedema attacks that can be painful, disfiguring and even life-threatening. The disorder results from a mutation in the gene that controls the synthesis of C1-inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH is a major regulator of activation of the contact system. It is often assumed that attacks results from uncontrolled local activation of the contact system with subsequent formation of bradykinin. To evaluate the involvement of inflammatory reactions in HAE, we analysed C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. For the current study we analysed CRP levels when patients were asymptomatic, during a clinical attack and in a follow-up period, and correlated these with the clinical manifestations of the attack. Data from 68 HAE patients were analysed and included CRP levels on 273 occasions. While asymptomatic, 20% of the patients analysed had increased CRP. At the onset of the attack (P = 0·049) and during the next 24 h CRP rose significantly (P = 0·002) in patients with an abdominal location, and post-attack levels were significantly higher in these patients than in patients with attacks at other locations (P = 0·034). In conclusion, CRP levels are elevated in a substantial proportion of asymptomatic HAE patients. Levels of CRP increase significantly during an abdominal attack. These data suggest low-grade systemic inflammatory reactions in HAE patients as well as a triggering event for attacks that starts prior to symptom onset. PMID:24588117

  10. C-reactive protein levels in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Z L M; Relan, A; Hack, C E

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients experience recurrent episodes of angioedema attacks that can be painful, disfiguring and even life-threatening. The disorder results from a mutation in the gene that controls the synthesis of C1-inhibitor (C1INH). C1INH is a major regulator of activation of the contact system. It is often assumed that attacks results from uncontrolled local activation of the contact system with subsequent formation of bradykinin. To evaluate the involvement of inflammatory reactions in HAE, we analysed C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. HAE patients included in a clinical database of recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) studies were evaluated. For the current study we analysed CRP levels when patients were asymptomatic, during a clinical attack and in a follow-up period, and correlated these with the clinical manifestations of the attack. Data from 68 HAE patients were analysed and included CRP levels on 273 occasions. While asymptomatic, 20% of the patients analysed had increased CRP. At the onset of the attack (P = 0·049) and during the next 24 h CRP rose significantly (P = 0·002) in patients with an abdominal location, and post-attack levels were significantly higher in these patients than in patients with attacks at other locations (P = 0·034). In conclusion, CRP levels are elevated in a substantial proportion of asymptomatic HAE patients. Levels of CRP increase significantly during an abdominal attack. These data suggest low-grade systemic inflammatory reactions in HAE patients as well as a triggering event for attacks that starts prior to symptom onset.

  11. C-Reactive Protein As a Marker of Melanoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shenying; Wang, Yuling; Sui, Dawen; Liu, Huey; Ross, Merrick I.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Cormier, Janice N.; Royal, Richard E.; Lucci, Anthony; Schacherer, Christopher W.; Gardner, Julie M.; Reveille, John D.; Bassett, Roland L.; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi; Amos, Christopher I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with melanoma and overall survival (OS), melanoma-specific survival (MSS), and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods Two independent sets of plasma samples from a total of 1,144 patients with melanoma (587 initial and 557 confirmatory) were available for CRP determination. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were used to evaluate the relationship between CRP and clinical outcome. Among 115 patients who underwent sequential blood draws, we evaluated the relationship between change in disease status and change in CRP using nonparametric tests. Results Elevated CRP level was associated with poorer OS and MSS in the initial, confirmatory, and combined data sets (combined data set: OS hazard ratio, 1.44 per unit increase of logarithmic CRP; 95% CI, 1.30 to 1.59; P < .001; MSS hazard ratio, 1.51 per unit increase of logarithmic CRP; 95% CI, 1.36 to 1.68; P < .001). These findings persisted after multivariable adjustment. As compared with CRP < 10 mg/L, CRP ≥ 10 mg/L conferred poorer OS in patients with any-stage, stage I/II, or stage III/IV disease and poorer disease-free survival in those with stage I/II disease. In patients who underwent sequential evaluation of CRP, an association was identified between an increase in CRP and melanoma disease progression. Conclusion CRP is an independent prognostic marker in patients with melanoma. CRP measurement should be considered for incorporation into prospective studies of outcome in patients with melanoma and clinical trials of systemic therapies for those with melanoma. PMID:25779565

  12. Atherosclerosis-related functions of C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Alok; Hammond, David J.; Singh, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is secreted by hepatocytes as a pentameric molecule made up of identical monomers, circulates in the plasma as pentamers, and localizes in atherosclerotic lesions. In some cases, localized CRP was detected by using monoclonal antibodies that did not react with native pentameric CRP but were specific for isolated monomeric CRP. It has been reported that, once CRP is bound to certain ligands, the pentameric structure of CRP is altered so that it can dissociate into monomers. Accordingly, the monomeric CRP found in atherosclerotic lesions may be a stationary, ligand-bound, by-product of a ligand-binding function of CRP. CRP binds to modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The binding of CRP to oxidized LDL requires acidic pH conditions; the binding at physiological pH is controversial. The binding of CRP to enzymatically-modified LDL occurs at physiological pH; however, the binding is enhanced at acidic pH. Using enzymatically-modified LDL, CRP has been shown to prevent the formation of enzymatically-modified LDL-loaded macrophage foam cells. CRP is neither pro-atherogenic nor atheroprotective in ApoE−/− and ApoB100/100Ldlr −/− murine models of atherosclerosis, except in one study where CRP was found to be slightly atheroprotective in ApoB100/100Ldlr −/− mice. The reasons for the ineffectiveness of human CRP in murine models of atherosclerosis are not defined. It is possible that an inflammatory environment, such as those characterized by acidic pH, is needed for efficient interaction between CRP and atherogenic LDL during the development of atherosclerosis and to observe the possible atheroprotective function of CRP in animal models. PMID:20932269

  13. Effects of C-reactive protein on adipokines genes expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Guoyue; Jia, Jue; Di, Liangliang; Zhou, Libin; Dong, Sijing; Ye, Jingjing; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ling; Wang, Jifang; Li, Lianxi; Yang, Ying; Mao, Chaoming; Chen, Mingdao

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP increases TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 genes expression in matured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP suppresses adiponectin, leptin and PPAR-{gamma} mRNA levels in matured 3T3-L1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wortmannin reverses effects of CRP on adiponectin, TNF-{alpha} and leptin mRNA levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP may regulate IR, obesity and metabolic syndrome by this mechanism. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue is now recognized to be an important endocrine organ, secreting a variety of adipokines that are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered as one of the most sensitive markers of inflammation. A number of studies have shown that elevation of CRP concentrations is an independent predictive parameter of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is also strongly associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of CRP on adipokines genes expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that CRP inhibited adiponectin, leptin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) genes expression and raised tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in matured 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose and time-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase by wortmannin partially reversed the effects of CRP on adiponectin, TNF-{alpha} and leptin genes expression. These results collectively suggest that CRP regulates adiponectin, TNF-{alpha}, leptin, IL-6 and PPAR-{gamma} genes expression, and that might represent a mechanism by which CRP regulates insulin resistance, obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  14. C reactive protein: an aid to assessment and monitoring of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, A D; McMahon, M J; Bowen, M; Cooper, E H

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation of C reactive protein as an indicator of the progress of acute pancreatitis has been made, and the data have been compared with the information given by the white cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and temperature and by two antiproteases--alpha 1 protease inhibitor and alpha 1 antichymotrypsin. The main value of C reactive protein is to provide a guide to the severity of the inflammation and to increase clinicians' awareness of the patient's enhanced risk of developing pancreatic collections when the C reactive protein concentration remains high (greater than 100 mg/l) at the end of the first week of the illness. In this respect C reactive protein concentrations are superior to white cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and temperature and the concentrations of antiproteases. PMID:6546392

  15. Birth Weight, Current Anthropometric Markers, and High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Brazilian School Children

    PubMed Central

    Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown associations of birth weight with increased concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein. This study assessed the relationship between birth weight, anthropometric and metabolic parameters during childhood, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. A total of 612 Brazilian school children aged 5–13 years were included in the study. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by particle-enhanced immunonephelometry. Nutritional status was assessed by body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds. Total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, and glucose were measured by enzymatic methods. Insulin sensitivity was determined by the homeostasis model assessment method. Statistical analysis included chi-square test, General Linear Model, and General Linear Model for Gamma Distribution. Body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds were directly associated with birth weight (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.015, resp.). Large for gestational age children showed higher high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (P < 0.001) than small for gestational age. High birth weight is associated with higher levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein, body mass index, waist circumference, and skinfolds. Large for gestational age altered high sensitivity C-reactive protein and promoted additional risk factor for atherosclerosis in these school children, independent of current nutritional status. PMID:25874126

  16. Effect of exercise training combined with phytoestrogens on adipokines and C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Riesco, Eléonor; Choquette, Stéphane; Audet, Mélisa; Lebon, Johann; Tessier, Daniel; Dionne, Isabelle J

    2012-02-01

    Phytoestrogens and training could be effective to reduce cardiovascular and type 2 diabetes mellitus risk factors in postmenopausal women. Nevertheless, the impact of their combination on adipokines and systemic inflammation was never investigated. The objective was to verify if 6 months of mixed training combined with phytoestrogens could have an additional effect on adipokine levels and systemic inflammation in obese postmenopausal women. Fifty-two obese women aged between 50 and 70 years were randomly assigned to (1) exercise with placebo (EX + PL; n = 25) or (2) exercise with phytoestrogens (EX + PHY; n = 27). Body weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and lean body mass (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) were assessed. Fasting plasma glucose and insulin, adiponectin, leptin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were obtained after a 12-hour overnight fast. Total energy intake was measured with a 3-day dietary record. All measurements were performed before and after the 6-month intervention. Although energy intake remained unchanged, body composition was improved in all women (all Ps < .02). Plasma CRP and leptin levels decreased in both groups similarly (all Ps < .03), whereas plasma adiponectin and insulin did not change with exercise combined with placebo or phytoestrogens. Correlation analyses showed that homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (r = -0.58, P = .02) and fasting insulin levels (r = -0.42, P = .02) at baseline were both correlated with changes in leptin levels. Baseline fasting glucose (r = -0.36, P = .03) and adiponectin (r = 0.45, P = .005) levels were associated with changes in CRP concentrations. Although mixed exercise program combined with phytoestrogens does not seem to provide any additional effect, mixed training improves systemic inflammation and leptin concentrations in obese postmenopausal women.

  17. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein are associated with physical inactivity independent of obesity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, C P; Berntsen, A; Perstrup, L B; Eskildsen, P; Pedersen, B K

    2007-10-01

    It is recognized that the path from physical inactivity and obesity to lifestyle-related diseases involves low-grade inflammation, indicated by elevated plasma levels of inflammatory markers. Interestingly, contracting skeletal muscle is a major source of circulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) in response to acute exercise, but with a markedly lower response in trained subjects. As C-reactive protein (CRP) is induced by IL-6, we hypothesized that basal levels of IL-6 and CRP reflect the degree of regular physical activity when compared with other markers of inflammation associated with lifestyle-related morbidity. Fasting plasma/serum levels of IL-6, IL-18, CRP, tumur necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble TNF receptor II (sTNF-RII), and adiponectin were measured in healthy non-diabetic men and women (n=84). The amount of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) was assessed by interview. Obesity was associated with elevated insulin, C-peptide, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, IL-6, CRP, and adiponectin (all P<0.05). Importantly, physical inactivity was associated with elevated C-peptide (P=0.036), IL-6 (P=0.014), and CRP (P=0.007) independent of obesity, age, gender, and smoking. Furthermore, the LTPA score was inversely associated with IL-6 (P=0.017) and CRP (P=0.005), but with neither of the other markers. The results indicate that low levels of IL-6 and CRP - not IL-18, TNF-alpha, sTNF-RII, or adiponectin - reflect regular physical activity.

  18. C-reactive protein serum level in patients with psoriasis before and after treatment with narrow-band ultraviolet B*

    PubMed Central

    Farshchian, Mahmoud; Ansar, Akram; Sobhan, Mohammadreza; Hoseinpoor, Valiollah

    2016-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein is an inflammatory biomarker and its level increases in the serum of psoriatic patients. Its level is also associated with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the decrement of serum C-reactive protein level with narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) therapy. Methods C-reactive protein serum levels in psoriasis patients were measured before and after treatment with NB-UVB and the data were analyzed in relation to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score improvement. Results Baseline C-reactive protein levels among psoriatic patients were higher than normal. These levels decreased significantly after treatment (P<0.001). At the beginning of the study, patients with higher levels of C-reactive protein also had more extensive and severe skin involvement. The highest decrease in C-reactive protein was observed in patients who responded better to the treatment and achieved a higher Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 75%. There was an association between baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index scores and C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion Patients with moderate to severe plaque-type psoriasis had active systemic inflammation, which was demonstrated by increased levels of C-reactive protein. Furthermore, skin disease severity was correlated with C-reactive protein levels. Phototherapy healed the psoriatic skin lesions and reduced inflammation, while decreasing C-reactive protein levels.

  19. Blood leptin and C-reactive protein provide more sensitive assessment than blood lipids and other inflammatory biomarkers in overweight university students.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Reed, Debra B; Goli, Srikanth; Goswami, Debalina

    2011-08-01

    Overweight is an inflammatory disease, and today's overweight university students will be tomorrow's overweight employees and parents; however, few studies have focused on the link between overweight and inflammation in university students. We hypothesized that students at higher body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat (BF%) would have higher blood concentrations of lipids and inflammatory biomarkers. A cross-sectional study including 110 university students was conducted at Texas Tech University. Overweight was determined by BMI using measured height and weight, and BF% was determined using bioelectric impedance analysis. Serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were measured using enzymatic methods. Plasma concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor α were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that higher BMI was associated with increased blood concentrations of CRP, leptin, and triglyceride (only in male subjects) and decreased blood adiponectin concentrations in university students. In addition, BF% was significantly correlated with blood concentrations of leptin and CRP. Female students had significantly higher blood concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, and CRP than did male students. In conclusion, blood inflammatory biomarkers, especially leptin and CRP, provide a more sensitive and accurate assessment than blood cholesterol and triglyceride for overweight individuals in this population. Leptin, adiponectin, and CRP are sex-dependent inflammatory biomarkers. PMID:21925343

  20. Inflammation and C-reactive protein in atrial fibrillation: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Galea, Roberto; Cardillo, Maria Teresa; Caroli, Annalisa; Marini, Maria Giulia; Sonnino, Chiara; Narducci, Maria L; Biasucci, Luigi M

    2014-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality rates. The incompletely understood pathogenesis of this cardiac dysrhythmia makes it difficult to improve approaches to primary and secondary prevention. Evidence has accumulated in regard to a relationship between inflammation and atrial fibrillation. Investigators have correlated the dysrhythmia with myocarditis, pericardiotomy, and C-reactive protein levels, suggesting that inflammation causes atrial fibrillation or participates in its onset and continuation. Conversely, other investigators suggest that atrial fibrillation induces an inflammatory response. In this review, we summarize and critically discuss the nature and clinical role of inflammation and C-reactive protein in atrial fibrillation. PMID:25425976

  1. LIFESTYLE DETERMINANTS OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN MIDDLE-AGED, URBAN CHINESE MEN

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Raquel; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Cai, Hui; Elasy, Tom; Cai, Qiuyin; Zhang, Xianglan; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae; Li, Honglan; Xu, Wang Hong; Yang, Gong; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), common in aging populations, are associated with higher risk for chronic diseases, including diabetes and coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between lifestyle factors and high CRP among middleaged men living in Shanghai, China. PMID:21111583

  2. C-reactive protein and genetic variants and cognitive decline in old age: The PROSPER Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, have been associated with cognitive impairment in old age. However, it is unknown whether CRP is causally linked to cognitive decline. Within the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) tri...

  3. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in players on a major league baseball team.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, John D

    2003-08-15

    We performed a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein test in major league baseball players. This test was of limited usefulness on preseason physical examination of 50 major league baseball players. The test is more likely to be of greater value performed on those whose 10-year risk of coronary heart disease is in the 10% to 20% range.

  4. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866.5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866.5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866.5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5270 - C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false C-reactive protein immuno-logical test system. 866.5270 Section 866.5270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  8. Magnesium Status and Its Relationship with C-Reactive Protein in Obese Women.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ana Raquel Soares; Cruz, Kyria Jayanne Clímaco; Morais, Jennifer Beatriz Silva; Severo, Juliana Soares; de Freitas, Taynáh Emannuelle Coelho; Veras, Antonio Lobão; da Rocha Romero, Amanda Batista; Colli, Célia; do Nascimento Nogueira, Nadir; Torres-Leal, Francisco Leonardo; do Nascimento Marreiro, Dilina

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the relationship between magnesium status and C-reactive protein concentration in obese and nonobese women. This cross-sectional study included 131 women, aged between 20 and 50 years, who were divided into two groups: obese (n=65) and control (n=66) groups. Magnesium intake was monitored using 3-day food records and NutWin software version 1.5. The plasma, erythrocyte, and urinary magnesium concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. C-reactive protein concentration in serum was measured by immunoturbidimetric assay. The mean values of the magnesium content in the diet were lower than those recommended, though there was no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). The mean concentrations of plasma and erythrocyte magnesium were within the normal range, with no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). Urinary excretion of this mineral was less than the reference values in both groups, with no significant difference (p>0.05). The mean concentration of serum C-reactive protein was within the normal range in both groups, with no significant difference (p>0.05). There was a positive correlation between urinary magnesium and serum C-reactive protein (p=0.015). Obese patients ingest low dietary magnesium content, which seems to induce hypomagnesuria as a compensatory mechanism to keep plasma concentrations of the mineral at adequate levels. The study shows a positive correlation between urinary magnesium concentrations and serum C-reactive protein, suggesting the influence of hypomagnesuria on this inflammatory protein in obese women.

  9. Low Plasma Hdl Cholesterol and Elevated C Reactive Protein further Increase Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Latinos with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calle, Mariana C; Vega-López, Sonia; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Volek, Jeff S; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether low plasma HDL and high C reactive protein (CRP) concentrations would further increase cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in Latinos with poorly controlled type-2 diabetes, already at high risk for CVD. Subjects (n = 68) were grouped into High-HDL (≥ or 1.03 or 1.3 mmol/L) or Low-HDL (<1.03 or 1.3 mmol/L) for men and women, respectively. Following classification, risk factors for CVD including apolipoproteins, lipoprotein size and subfraction distribution were assesed. Similarly, participants were divided according to their CRP levels (≥ or < 3mg/L) and key inflammatory markers as well as leptin and adiponectin were analyzed. The Low-HDL group had higher concentrations of the atherogenic particles, large and medium VLDL and the smaller LDL subfractions compared to the High-HDL group (p<0.001). Consistently, VLDL diameter was larger and LDL diameter smaller in the Low HDL group (p<0.001). The High-CRP group had larger waist circumference (p<0.001) and body mass index (p<0.001) than the Low-CRP group. Leptin was also higher in the High- CRP group (p< 0.01). These data suggest that Latinos with type-2 diabetes having either Low-HDL or High-CRP concentrations are at a higher risk for atherosclerosis and CVD than their counterparts who have High-HDL or Low-CRP. PMID:22407331

  10. [Tuftsin-like peptides from a C-reactive protein molecule as regulators of lymphocyte proliferation].

    PubMed

    Polevshchikov, A V; Nazarov, P G

    1994-01-01

    Influence of synthetic peptides from human C-reactive protein (CRP) on proliferation of intact and mitogen stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes was studied. Effect of the tetra-peptides from CRP was similar to that of tuftsin Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg. All the peptides studied did not increase the 3H-thymidine incorporation into the resting lymphocytes but accelerated it after mitogen stimulation. The peptides efficiency depended on T- or B-specificity of mitogens. PMID:8122411

  11. Vitamin D and C-Reactive Protein: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Liefaard, Marte C.; Ligthart, Symen; Vitezova, Anna; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Franco, Oscar H.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Dehghan, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent and has been associated with many diseases. It has been suggested that vitamin D has effects on the immune system and inhibits inflammation. The aim of our study was to investigate whether vitamin D has an inhibitory effect on systemic inflammation by assessing the association between serum levels of vitamin D and C-reactive protein. We studied the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and C-reactive protein through linear regression in 9,649 participants of the Rotterdam Study, an observational, prospective population-based cohort study. We used genetic variants related to vitamin D and CRP to compute a genetic risk score and perform bi-directional Mendelian randomization analysis. In linear regression adjusted for age, sex, cohort and other confounders, natural log-transformed CRP decreased with 0.06 (95% CI: -0.08, -0.03) unit per standard deviation increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Bi-directional Mendelian randomization analyses showed no association between the vitamin D genetic risk score and lnCRP (Beta per SD = -0.018; p = 0.082) or the CRP genetic risk score and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (Beta per SD = 0.001; p = 0.998). In conclusion, higher levels of Vitamin D are associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein. In this study we did not find evidence for this to be the result of a causal relationship. PMID:26147588

  12. The Acute-Phase Proteins Serum Amyloid A and C Reactive Protein in Transudates and Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Alessandra M.; Bürger, Cristiani; Cardoso, Jefferson R.; Lavado, Edson L.; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Campa, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between exudates and transudates is very important in the patient management. Here we evaluate whether the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA), in comparison with C reactive protein (CRP) and total protein (TP), can be useful in this discrimination. CRP, SAA, and TP were determined in 36 exudate samples (27 pleural and 9 ascitic) and in 12 transudates (9 pleural and 3 ascitic). CRP, SAA, and TP were measured. SAA present in the exudate corresponded to 10% of the amount found in serum, that is, the exudate/serum ratio (E/S) was 0.10 ± 0.13. For comparison, the exudate/serum ratio for CRP and TP was 0.39 ± 0.37 and 0.68 ± 0.15, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between serum and exudate SAA concentration (r = 0.764;p < 0.0001). The concentration of SAA in transudates was low and did not overlap with that found in exudates (0.02-0.21 versus 0.8–360.5 g/mL). SAA in pleural and ascitic exudates results mainly from leakage of the serum protein via the inflamed membrane. A comparison of the E/S ratio of SAA and CRP points SAA as a very good marker in discriminating between exudates and transudates. PMID:16864904

  13. Localisation of C reactive protein in infarcted tissue sites of multiple organs during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Baidoshvili, A; Nijmeijer, R; Lagrand, W K; Hack, C E; Niessen, H W M

    2002-02-01

    This report hypothesises an active role for the acute phase protein, C reactive protein (CRP), in local inflammatory reactions. This was studied in infarction sites from liver and kidney in a patient who died as a result of multiple complications after cholecystectomy. In this patient, a general acute phase protein reaction was induced, with an increase in plasma CRP. In infarction sites of kidney and liver, colocalisation of CRP and activated complement were found, whereas non-infarct sites were negative for CRP and complement. These results suggest that CRP directly participates in local inflammatory processes, possibly via complement activation, after binding of a suitable ligand.

  14. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  15. C-reactive protein promotes acute kidney injury via Smad3-dependent inhibition of CDK2/cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Lai, Weiyan; Tang, Ying; Huang, Xiao R; Ming-Kuen Tang, Patrick; Xu, Anping; Szalai, Alexander J; Lou, Tan-Qi; Lan, Hui Y

    2016-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is exacerbated in C-reactive protein transgenic mice but alleviated in Smad3 knockout mice. Here we used C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 wild-type and C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 knockout mice to investigate the signaling mechanisms by which C-reactive protein promotes AKI. Serum creatinine was elevated, and the extent of tubular epithelial cell necrosis following ischemia/reperfusion-induced AKI was greater in C-reactive protein transgenics but was blunted when Smad3 was deleted. Exacerbation of AKI in C-reactive protein transgenics was associated with increased TGF-β/Smad3 signaling and expression of the cyclin kinase inhibitor p27, but decreased phosphorylated CDK2 and expression of cyclin E. Concomitantly, tubular epithelial cell proliferation was arrested at the G1 phase in C-reactive protein transgenics with fewer cells entering the S-phase cell cycle as evidenced by fewer bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells. In contrast, the protection from AKI in C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 knockout mice was associated with decreased expression of p27 and promotion of CDK2/cyclin E-dependent G1/S transition of tubular epithelial cells. In vitro studies using tubular epithelial cells showed that C-reactive protein activates Smad3 via both TGF-β-dependent and ERK/MAPK cross talk mechanisms, Smad3 bound directly to p27, and blockade of Smad3 or the Fc receptor CD32 prevented C-reactive protein-induced p27-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. In vivo, treatment of C-reactive protein transgenics with a Smad3 inhibitor largely improved AKI outcomes. Thus, C-reactive protein may promote AKI by impairing tubular epithelial cell regeneration via the CD32-Smad3-p27-driven inhibition of the CDK2/cyclin E complex. Targeting Smad3 may offer a new treatment approach for AKI. PMID:27470679

  16. Biomarkers of Adiponectin: Plasma Protein Variation and Genomic DNA Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Harvest F.

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin is secreted by white adipose tissue and exists as the most abundant adipokine in the human plasma. Recent research has indicated that plasma adiponectin levels are inversely correlated with body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance. Reduction of plasma adiponectin levels is commonly observed in the patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and/or in those who are obese in comparison with healthy control individuals. The adiponectin (AdipoQ) gene has a moderate linkage disequilibrium (LD), but two small LD blocks are observed, respectively, in the promoter region and the boundary of exon 2-intron 2. Genetic association studies have demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) +45G15G(T/G) in exon 2 and +276G/T in intron 2 of the AdipoQ gene confer the risk susceptibility to the development of T2D, obesity and diabetic nephropathy (DN). The SNPs in the promoter region, including −11426A/G, −11377C/G and −11391G/A, are found to be associated with T2D and DN. Recent research has indicated that the promoter polymorphisms interfere with the AdipoQ promoter activity. The haplotypes constructed by the promoter polymorphisms and SNP +276G/T in intron 2 are associated with circulating adiponectin levels. This review summarises genetic and pathophysiological relevancies of adiponectin and discusses about the biomarkers of adiponectin plasma protein variation and genomic DNA polymorphisms. PMID:20029651

  17. A fluorescent immunoassay for the determination of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Bolzoni, L.; Giannetti, A.; Porro, G.; Senesi, F.; Trono, C.

    2009-05-01

    The discrimination of viral and bacterial sepsis is an important issue in intensive care patients. For this purpose, the simultaneous measurements of different analytes such as C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), myeloperoxidase, interleukines and neopterin, are necessary. A novel optical platform was designed and realised for the implementation of fluorescence-based immunoassays. The core of the optical platform is a plastic biochip, formed by a series of microchannels each of them devoted to the determination of a single analyte. Sandwich assays for CRP and PCT spiked in serum were performed in order to demonstrate the reliability of a multi-array device.

  18. Radiometric ligand binding assay for C-reactive protein. Complexed C-reactive protein is not detectable in acute phase serum.

    PubMed

    De Beer, F C; Shine, B; Pepys, M B

    1982-10-01

    A radiometric ligand binding assay for human C-reactive protein (CRP) was established using pneumococcal C polysaccharide (CPS) coupled to magnetizable cellulose particles as the solid phase ligand. Competition for binding to the solid phase between 125I-CRP and unlabelled CRP permitted detection of 30 micrograms/l of CRP and the precise assay of concentrations up to 3000 micrograms/l. Identical results were obtained when the assay was used to quantitate isolated pure CRP and pure CRP added to normal human serum. However in vitro addition of known ligands for CRP to acute phase serum resulted in lowering of the apparent CRP concentration in this assay and addition of as little as 1 microgram/l of free CPS or 1 mg/l of lecithin was demonstrable in this way. A combination of the ligand binding assay and the standard electroimmunoassay for CRP was therefore used to test acute phase sera for the presence of CRP complexed in vitro. No evidence of complexed CRP was detected among sera containing between 1-319 mg/l of CRP from patients with Hodgkin's disease (10), rheumatoid arthritis (10), Crohn's disease (19) and various microbial infections (11), including six with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Since it is likely that CRP does form complexes with its ligands in the plasma these results suggest that complexed CRP is rapidly cleared from the circulation.

  19. Early detection of infected ureteral obstruction after SWL employing C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J M; Boeckmann, W; Mattelaer, P; Krämer, U; Jakse, G

    1996-12-01

    Infection of the obstructed upper urinary tract is a severe complication of stone disease. Early detection and therapy is crucial to prevent septicemia. The authors investigated prospectively whether C-reactive protein (CRP) might act as a marker for the early detection of infected upper urinary tract obstruction. The serum concentration of CRP was compared with the classic markers of inflammation--white blood cell (WBC) count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and temperature--in the follow-up of 85 patients undergoing 173 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) treatments. Post-SWL, 69% of the patients showed dilation of the upper tract on ultrasonography and 16.5% became symptomatic and required intervention. In this group, the mean CRP value was increased 18-fold, whereas the WBC count, ESR, and temperature were not markedly raised. In contrast, patients with no need for additional treatment showed no more than a 2-fold increase in CRP. C-Reactive protein seems to be a useful indicator for the early detection of infected upper urinary tract obstruction.

  20. Complement activation in patients with sepsis is in part mediated by C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Wolbink, G J; Bossink, A W; Groeneveld, A B; de Groot, M C; Thijs, L G; Hack, C E

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the activation of complement in patients with sepsis was investigated. In 104 patients with infections of varying severity, circulating levels of CRP-complement complexes, which are specific indicators for CRP-mediated complement activation, were assessed. Complement-CRP complexes were increased in almost all patients and correlated significantly with levels of C3a (r = .59; P < .001) and C-reactive protein (r = .76; P < .001). In addition, they correlated with levels of secretory phospholipase A2 (r = .59; P < .001). Levels of complement-CRP complexes in patients with a pneumococcal type of infection were similar to those in patients with other types of infections. Complement-CRP complexes were significantly higher in patients with shock (P = .01) and in patients who died (P = .03). These results demonstrate that part of the complement activation in patients with sepsis is independent from a direct interaction with microorganisms but rather results from an endogenous mechanism involving CRP.

  1. Consumption of a healthy dietary pattern results in significant reductions in C-reactive protein levels in adults: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Neale, E P; Batterham, M J; Tapsell, L C

    2016-05-01

    Consumption of healthy dietary patterns has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Dietary intervention targets disease prevention, so studies increasingly use biomarkers of underlying inflammation and metabolic syndrome progression to examine the diet-health relationship. The extent to which these biomarkers contribute to the body of evidence on healthy dietary patterns is unknown. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of healthy dietary patterns on biomarkers associated with adiposity, insulin resistance, and inflammation in adults. A systematic search of Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (all years to April 2015) was conducted. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials; effects of dietary patterns assessed on C-reactive protein (CRP), total adiponectin, high-molecular-weight adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α, adiponectin:leptin, resistin, or retinol binding protein 4. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to assess the weighted mean differences in change or final mean values for each outcome. Seventeen studies were included in the review. These reflected research on dietary patterns associated with the Mediterranean diet, Nordic diet, Tibetan diet, and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. Consumption of a healthy dietary pattern was associated with significant reductions in CRP (weighted mean difference, -0.75 [-1.16, -0.35]; P = .0003). Non-significant changes were found for all other biomarkers. This analysis found evidence for favorable effects of healthy dietary patterns on CRP, with limited evidence for other biomarkers. Future research should include additional randomized controlled trials incorporating a greater range of dietary patterns and biomarkers. PMID:27101757

  2. Identification of Acidic pH-dependent Ligands of Pentameric C-reactive Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, David J.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Thompson, James A.; Beeler, Bradley W.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Agrawal, Alok

    2010-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a phylogenetically conserved protein; in humans, it is present in the plasma and at sites of inflammation. At physiological pH, native pentameric CRP exhibits calcium-dependent binding specificity for phosphocholine. In this study, we determined the binding specificities of CRP at acidic pH, a characteristic of inflammatory sites. We investigated the binding of fluid-phase CRP to six immobilized proteins: complement factor H, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, complement C3b, IgG, amyloid β, and BSA immobilized on microtiter plates. At pH 7.0, CRP did not bind to any of these proteins, but, at pH ranging from 5.2 to 4.6, CRP bound to all six proteins. Acidic pH did not monomerize CRP but modified the pentameric structure, as determined by gel filtration, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid-binding fluorescence, and phosphocholine-binding assays. Some modifications in CRP were reversible at pH 7.0, for example, the phosphocholine-binding activity of CRP, which was reduced at acidic pH, was restored after pH neutralization. For efficient binding of acidic pH-treated CRP to immobilized proteins, it was necessary that the immobilized proteins, except factor H, were also exposed to acidic pH. Because immobilization of proteins on microtiter plates and exposure of immobilized proteins to acidic pH alter the conformation of immobilized proteins, our findings suggest that conformationally altered proteins form a CRP-ligand in acidic environment, regardless of the identity of the protein. This ligand binding specificity of CRP in its acidic pH-induced pentameric state has implications for toxic conditions involving protein misfolding in acidic environments and favors the conservation of CRP throughout evolution. PMID:20843812

  3. Management of patients with respiratory infections in primary care: procalcitonin, C-reactive protein or both?

    PubMed

    Meili, Marc; Müller, Beat; Kulkarni, Prasad; Schütz, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    Use of inflammatory biomarkers to guide antibiotic decisions has shown promising results in the risk-adapted management of respiratory tract infections, mainly in the inpatient setting. Several observational and interventional trials have investigated the benefits of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) testing in primary care. Both markers have shown promising results, although CRP is an inflammatory biomarker while PCT is more specific for bacterial infections. For CRP, point-of-care testing is widely established. Recently, sensitive point-of-care testing for PCT has also become available. A high-quality trial comparing these two markers for the management of patients in primary care is currently lacking. The aim of this paper is to review the existing literature investigating the use of PCT and CRP in primary care. The authors compare their performance for guiding antibiotic stewardship and analyze the cut-off values and endpoints to put these parameters into context in a low-acuity environment.

  4. Mollusc C-reactive protein crosses species barrier and reverses hepatotoxicity of lead in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandip; Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Sarkar, Shuvasree; Agarwal, Soumik; Kundu, Rakesh; Maitra, Sudipta; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2013-08-01

    Achatina fulica C-reactive protein (ACRP) reversed the toxic effects of lead nitrate both in vivo in mice and in vitro in rat hepatocytes restoring the basal level of cell viability, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and superoxides. Cytotoxicity was also significantly ameliorated in rat hepatocytes by in vitro pre-treatments with individual subunits (60, 62, 90 and 110 kDa) of ACRP. Annexin V-Cy3/CFDA dual staining showed significant reduction in the number of apoptotic hepatocytes pre-treated with ACRP. ACRP induced restoration of mitochondrial membrane potential was remarkable. ACRP pre-treatment prevented Pb-induced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. The antagonistic effect of ACRP may be due to scavenging of reactive oxygen species which maintained the homeostasis of cellular redox potential as well as reduced glutathione status. The results suggest that ACRP crosses the species barrier and it may be utilized as a viable exogenous agent of cytoprotection against heavy metal related toxicity.

  5. C-reactive Protein: Repeated Measurements will Improve Dialysis Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Gabriela; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a common feature in the uremic phenotype and associates with poor outcomes. The awareness regarding the importance of inflammation assessment in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has risen in recent years, and despite the development of novel biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP) is still the most measured inflammatory parameter. Notwithstanding, the possible weak points of CRP determination, this biomarker has demonstrated being useful both for guidance in clinical practice and for risk estimation. In addition, regular determination of CRP among dialysis patients has been associated with better outcomes in different dialysis facilities. Because persistent inflammation may be a silent reflection of various pathophysiologic alterations in CKD, it is crucial that inflammatory markers are regularly monitored and therapeutic attempts be made to target this inflammation.

  6. Relationship of C-reactive protein and bone mineral density in community-dwelling elderly females.

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Kalpana; Teklehaimanot, Senait; Tran, The-Huy; Asuncion, Merlyn; Norris, Keith

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inflammatory cytokines have been shown to play an important role in bone remodeling. We hypothesized that higher levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly females. DESIGN: Secondary data analysis of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PARTICIPANTS: 2,807 females 65 years and older. RESULTS: CRP was associated with BMD in the bivariate sis (p<0.001) but not in the multivariate analysis (p=0.23) Age, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and immobility were independently associated with BMD. CONCLUSIONS: CRP may be useful in screening for osteoporosis among community-dwelling elderly females. However, CRP appears to act as a surrogate for other factorsdirectly associated with osteoporosis. Further studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:15779496

  7. Relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tie, Y X; Fu, Y Y; Xu, Z; Peng, Y

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between C-reactive protein levels and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We recruited 30 OSAS patients into the observation group (OSAS group), and subdivided them into mild, moderate and severe groups according to the apnea hypopnea index. In addition, 20 normal individuals were included in the control group. Plasma CRP levels of two groups were measured. As compared with the control group, the CRP levels in the OSAS group were significantly increased (P < 0.05). ANOVA showed that CRP levels in the three subgroups differ; statistically significant differences between the mild and severe OSA patients were observed (P < 0.05). It was hypothesized that OSAS patients show elevated serum CRP levels, and that serum CRP levels are associated with OSAS severity. PMID:27323094

  8. Neuropathic pain, depressive symptoms, and C-reactive protein in sciatica patients.

    PubMed

    Uher, Tomas; Bob, Petr

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that neuropathic pain component in low back pain (LBP) patients is associated with higher ratings of comorbidities such as depression and anxiety disorders. In line with current findings, the purpose of this clinical study is to examine a hypothesis regarding a relationship of neuropathic pain component, depression, and other psychopathological symptoms in a specific group of LBP patients with sciatica pain. With respect to findings that depression is related to inflammatory changes, and inflammatory mediators may play a role in neuropathic pain generation, we have assessed also serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Results of the present study show that increased neuropathic pain component in sciatica patients is associated with elevated levels of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and serum CRP levels. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that CRP levels in sciatica patients are closely associated with neuropathic pain.

  9. On-chip determination of C-reactive protein using magnetic particles in continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Phurimsak, Chayakom; Tarn, Mark D; Peyman, Sally A; Greenman, John; Pamme, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate the application of a multilaminar flow platform, in which functionalized magnetic particles are deflected through alternating laminar flow streams of reagents and washing solutions via an external magnet, for the rapid detection of the inflammatory biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP). The two-step sandwich immunoassay was accomplished in less than 60 s, a vast improvement on the 80-300 min time frame required for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and the 50 min necessary for off-chip magnetic particle-based assays. The combination of continuous flow and a stationary magnet enables a degree of autonomy in the system, while a detection limit of 0.87 μg mL(-1) makes it suitable for the determination of CRP concentrations in clinical diagnostics. Its applicability was further proven by assaying real human serum samples and comparing those results to values obtained using standard ELISA tests.

  10. Serum levels of hypersensitive-C-reactive protein in moderate and severe acne

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, M. R.; Parhizkar, A. R.; Jowkar, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP) has been reported to occur in psoriasis, urticaria, acne, rosacea and many other dermatological and nondermatological conditions. Chronic systemic inflammation has been implicated in the development of neuropsychiatric/degenerative disorders, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus and even carcinogenesis. The present study is designed to determine whether the level of inflammation created by acne vulgaris could be high enough to raise the serum levels of high-sensitive CRP. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with moderate and severe acne vulgaris were enrolled, along with 44 age and sex matched healthy blood donors as controls. Hypersensitive-CRP (Hs-CRP) was measured in both groups. Results: Hypersensitive-C-reactive protein levels in the case group varied between 0 and 28.1 μg/ml with an average of 2.24 ± 4.87 μg/ml (mean ± standard deviation) and a median of 0.6 μg/ml (interquartile range [IQR] =0.3, 1.4 μg/ml). Hs-CRP levels of the control group varied between 0 and 14 μg/ml with an average of 3.12 ± 3.67 μg/ml and a median of 1.5 μg/ml (IQR = 0.55, 5.0 μg/ml). No significant difference of Hs-CRP level between the two groups was seen (t = –0.961, 95% confidence interval: Lower = –2.6942, upper = 0.9377; P = 0.339). Additionally, no significant difference in the level of Hs-CRP was noted between the moderate and severe acne groups (95% confidence interval: Lower = –5.2495, upper = 1.6711; P = 0.165). Conclusion: Acne vulgaris, even in its severe grades (excluding acne fulminans and acne conglobata), does not induce significant inflammation at the systemic level. PMID:26225329

  11. C-reactive protein by pregnancy and lactational status among Filipino young adult women

    PubMed Central

    Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Adair, Linda S.; Borja, Judith; McDade, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Pregnancy and lactation involve adaptations in immune regulation, but little is known about cross-cultural variation in inflammatory changes during pregnancy or lactation. Here we report concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in a large cross-sectional sample of healthy Filipino women who vary in parity, gestational and lactational status, and who come from a population previously described as having low CRP. Methods Fasting plasma CRP was measured among female participants (ages 20.8-22.4 years) in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (n=822). Results Median CRP was 0.2 mg/L in nulliparous women and peaked at 2.0 mg/L in women in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. Parous but post-partum women had higher CRP compared to nulliparous women, which was largely explained by body composition differences as reflected in waist circumference and skinfold measures. Among post-partum women with infants, CRP was similar in women who were currently breastfeeding compared to those who were not. Conclusions At Cebu, women late in gestation have 10-fold higher C-reactive protein compared to nulliparous women, with no evidence that lactation is inflammatory. These population-based findings are similar with findings from prior clinic-based studies and are consistent with the maternal immunological adaptations initiated during pregnancy. The tendency of human females to spend more time than females of other great apes in gestation rather than lactation suggests that the human life history strategy involved increased time spent by reproductively aged females in a pro-inflammatory state. PMID:23180717

  12. [Usefulness of C-reactive protein for the diagnosis of bacterial infections in children. A review].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Patricio; Duffau, Gaston

    2005-05-01

    Although C-Reactive protein (CRP) was described more than 70 years ago and it still is commonly used in practice, studies exploring its usefulness persist while some propose its replacement by other inflammatory acute-phase-mediators. The aim of this clinical review is to answer the question if CRP measurement warrant clinical decisions for febrile children because it discriminates between bacterial from non bacterial etiologies. We made a systematic search by means of MEDLINE, SciELO and LILACS with the following MESH terms: "C-reactive protein", "bacterial", "infection", "children", "diagnosis" or "detection", besides the Haynes selector for articles on diagnosis, between 1950 and 2004. Selection data extraction and critical appraisal were independently made by the two authors, following standard criteria. We selected 7 primary articles, 3 clinical reviews and two randomized clinical trials. There was no disagreement between reviewers. Only one of the clinical reviews followed standard guidelines; two reviews concluded that no isolated CRP values would warrant to make decisions on starting or withholding antimicrobial therapy in febrile children. All primary articles showed methodological flaws in basic validity criteria. Both randomized clinical trials showed that CRP results did not change either doctor's decisions about antimicrobial prescriptions nor the studied patients' prognosis. We did not find evidences that could warrant the use of CRP for the defined problem in Pediatrics. Main problems affecting validity of studies on CRP as diagnostic resource are the lack of laboratory methods uniformity--including the gold standard make up--the heterogeneity of cut off points, clinical spectrum inappropriateness of study groups as well as the resulting diversity of the fixed indexes values. Moreover, no validation of this test in children population has been made so far.

  13. C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN DIABETIC PATIENTS BEFORE GASTRIC BYPASS AS A POSSIBLE MARKER FOR POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    LINS, Daniel C.; CAMPOS, Josemberg M.; de PAULA, Patrícia S.; GALVÃO-NETO, Manoel; PACHU, Eduardo; CAVALCANTI, Ney; FERRAZ, Álvaro A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background : Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated to inflammatory state, which can be set off by the adipose tissue, once it is a metabolically active organ that can cause a chronic mild inflammatory state. Aim : To evaluate the correlation between preoperative C-reactive protein and postoperative complications risk in obese patients (grades II and III) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods : Between 2008 and 2013 were analysed 209 patients (107 with diabetes), presenting body mass index >40 kg/m2or >35 kg/m2with comorbidities. During the postoperative period, two groups were evaluated: with and without complications. Preoperative ultra-sensitive C-reactive protein was measured by immunonephelometry method. Results : Complications occurred in seven patients (pulmonary thromboembolism, fistula, two cases of suture leak, pancreatitis, evisceration and upper digestive hemorrhage). No statistical significance was found regarding lipid profile and C-reactive protein between patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus. When compared to each other, both groups (with and without complications) presented with statistical significance regarding C-reactive protein level (7,2 mg/dl vs 3,7 mg/dl, p=0,016) and had similar weight loss percentage after 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Conclusions : Preoperative C-reactive protein serum level was higher in the group which presented complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass when compared to the group without postoperative complications. PMID:26537265

  14. Sensitive detection of C-reactive protein in serum by immunoprecipitation-microchip capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Ela; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Wenz, Christian; Rüfer, Andreas; Redl, Heinz; Bahrami, Soheyl; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-06-01

    Sepsis represents a significant cause of mortality in intensive care units. Early diagnosis of sepsis is essential to increase the survival rate of patients. Among others, C-reactive protein (CRP) is commonly used as a sepsis marker. In this work we introduce immune precipitation combined with microchip capillary gel electrophoresis (IP-MCGE) for the detection and quantification of CRP in serum samples. First high-abundance proteins (HSA, IgG) are removed from serum samples using affinity spin cartridges, and then the remaining proteins are labeled with a fluorescence dye and incubated with an anti-CRP antibody, and the antigen/antibody complex is precipitated with protein G-coated magnetic beads. After precipitation the complex is eluted from the beads and loaded onto the MCGE system. CRP could be reliably detected and quantified, with a detection limit of 25 ng/μl in serum samples and 126 pg/μl in matrix-free samples. The overall sensitivity (LOQ = 75 ng/μl, R(2) = 0.9668) of the method is lower than that of some specially developed methods (e.g., immune radiometric assay) but is comparable to those of clinically accepted ELISA methods. The straightforward sample preparation (not prone to mistakes), reduced sample and reagent volumes (including the antibodies), and high throughput (10 samples/3 h) are advantages and therefore IP-MCGE bears potential for point-of-care diagnosis. PMID:25778394

  15. Sensitive detection of C-reactive protein in serum by immunoprecipitation-microchip capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Ela; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Wenz, Christian; Rüfer, Andreas; Redl, Heinz; Bahrami, Soheyl; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-06-01

    Sepsis represents a significant cause of mortality in intensive care units. Early diagnosis of sepsis is essential to increase the survival rate of patients. Among others, C-reactive protein (CRP) is commonly used as a sepsis marker. In this work we introduce immune precipitation combined with microchip capillary gel electrophoresis (IP-MCGE) for the detection and quantification of CRP in serum samples. First high-abundance proteins (HSA, IgG) are removed from serum samples using affinity spin cartridges, and then the remaining proteins are labeled with a fluorescence dye and incubated with an anti-CRP antibody, and the antigen/antibody complex is precipitated with protein G-coated magnetic beads. After precipitation the complex is eluted from the beads and loaded onto the MCGE system. CRP could be reliably detected and quantified, with a detection limit of 25 ng/μl in serum samples and 126 pg/μl in matrix-free samples. The overall sensitivity (LOQ = 75 ng/μl, R(2) = 0.9668) of the method is lower than that of some specially developed methods (e.g., immune radiometric assay) but is comparable to those of clinically accepted ELISA methods. The straightforward sample preparation (not prone to mistakes), reduced sample and reagent volumes (including the antibodies), and high throughput (10 samples/3 h) are advantages and therefore IP-MCGE bears potential for point-of-care diagnosis.

  16. Culture and the Immune System: Cultural Consonance in Social Support and C-reactive Protein in Urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ribeiro, Rosane P; Dos Santos, José Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we examine the distribution of a marker of immune system stimulation-C-reactive protein-in urban Brazil. Social relationships are associated with immunostimulation, and we argue that cultural dimensions of social support, assessed by cultural consonance, are important in this process. Cultural consonance is the degree to which individuals, in their own beliefs and behaviors, approximate shared cultural models. A measure of cultural consonance in social support, based on a cultural consensus analysis regarding sources and patterns of social support in Brazil, was developed. In a survey of 258 persons, the association of cultural consonance in social support and C-reactive protein was examined, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, depressive symptoms, and a social network index. Lower cultural consonance in social support was associated with higher C-reactive protein. Implications of these results for future research are discussed.

  17. C-reactive protein collaborates with plasma lectins to boost immune response against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ng, Patricia M L; Le Saux, Agnès; Lee, Chia M; Tan, Nguan S; Lu, Jinhua; Thiel, Steffen; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak L

    2007-07-25

    Although human C-reactive protein (CRP) becomes upregulated during septicemia, its role remains unclear, since purified CRP showed no binding to many common pathogens. Contrary to previous findings, we show that purified human CRP (hCRP) binds to Salmonella enterica, and that binding is enhanced in the presence of plasma factors. In the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, CRP is a major hemolymph protein. Incubation of hemolymph with a range of bacteria resulted in CRP binding to all the bacteria tested. Lipopolysaccharide-affinity chromatography of the hemolymph co-purified CRP, galactose-binding protein (GBP) and carcinolectin-5 (CL5). Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays suggested that these pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) form pathogen recognition complexes. We show the conservation of PRR crosstalk in humans, whereby hCRP interacts with ficolin (CL5 homologue). This interaction stabilizes CRP binding to bacteria and activates the lectin-mediated complement pathway. We propose that CRP does not act alone but collaborates with other plasma PRRs to form stable pathogen recognition complexes when targeting a wide range of bacteria for destruction. PMID:17581635

  18. [Effect of acetylcholine and C-reactive protein on regulation of anaphylactic shock in guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Nezhinskaia, G I; Losev, N A; Nazarov, P G; Sapronov, N S

    2005-01-01

    The investigation of acetylcholine-dependent regulation of the model anaphylaxic shock in guinea pigs showed that an increase in the concentration of endogenous acetylcholine in sensitized animals leads to an increase in the agonal shock period (by 15 +/- 1 min in the test and 3 +/- 1 min in the control) and abolishes shock in the pathochemical phase: anaphylactic index 0.4 +/- 0.02 in the test against 4 +/- 0.02 in the control). The injection of purified blood plasma proteins-IgG or C-reactive protein (CRP) preparations--decreased the anaphylactic reaction. The activation of cholinergic tone prior to shock induction is an effective means of preventing shock development. The acquired resistance decreased the response to repeated injections of horse serum. Animals protected from the shock (methacin 40 min and neostigmine 15 min prior to shock, or methacine plus IgG 40 min prior to shock) showed nearly normal PFCs. The effect of methacin was significantly influenced by simultaneously injected plasma proteins: IgG potentiated the broncholytic effect of methacin, while CRP abrogated it. The effective antishock therapy led to normalization of the antibody production activity of B-lymphocytes, while unprotected animals exhibited increased level of antibody production. PMID:16193659

  19. A review of C-reactive protein: A diagnostic indicator in periodontal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Renuka Devi; Nallasamy, Vijaykumar; Reddy, Raghavendra; Esther, Nalini; Maruthappan, Yuvaraja

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a local inflammatory process mediating the destruction of periodontal tissues, triggered by bacterial insult. Recent evidence suggests the presence of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease may significantly affect systemic health conditions such as coronary heart disease, stroke, or adverse pregnancy outcome. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein which reflects a measure of the acute phase response. CRP is used as one of the markers of choice in monitoring the acute phase response because it increases to a relatively high concentration compared to basal concentration. CRP has been shown to predict cardiovascular (CV) mortality in recent studies, and elevated CRP levels have been observed in middle-aged patients with periodontitis. Combination of chronic infections like periodontitis with elevated CRP is associated with higher chronic heart diseases. The recognition of the relationship between periodontal diseases and atherosclerotic events is relatively recent and mostly based on the inflammatory hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Periodontal disease is one of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and possibly one of its causes. Hence, even associations of modest magnitude have a large impact. The cost to the society directly attributable to atherosclerotic sequelae is very large. Periodontitis is treatable; moreover, it is preventable. Experimental conformation of this shows that another widely prevalent and preventable contributor to the burden of cardiovascular disease would be added to the options available of the clinicians and public health practitioners for the control of the epidemic of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23066303

  20. C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 are elevated in onchocerciasis patients after ivermectin treatment.

    PubMed

    Njoo, F L; Hack, C E; Oosting, J; Luyendijk, L; Stilma, J S; Kijlstra, A

    1994-09-01

    Ivermectin treatment of onchocerciasis can induce adverse reactions. Mechanisms underlying these reactions are poorly understood but may include activation of neutrophils. This study investigated the acute-phase response in onchocerciasis patients during 2 days after ivermectin treatment. The acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) and cytokines that mediate the acute-phase response (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF alpha] and interleukin-6 [IL-6]) were measured in 144 skin snip-positive onchocerciasis patients and 12 skin snip-negative controls who received one dose of ivermectin (150 micrograms/kg). No elevated TNF alpha levels were found, but IL-6 and CRP were elevated in 25.7% and 50.7% of the patients, respectively, after ivermectin treatment. Most patients (89.2%) with raised IL-6 also had raised CRP. Such increases were not observed in controls and in patients were correlated with adverse reactions and microfilarial densities. These findings suggest a possible role of the acute-phase response in microfilarial destruction following ivermectin treatment.

  1. C-reactive protein and the acute phase reaction in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Thomas; Triebel, Jakob; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Christ, Michael; Sieber, Cornel; Fassbender, Klaus; Heppner, Hans Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The C-reactive protein (CRP), first described as a serum component capable of precipitating the C-polysaccharide of pneumococci, is one of the most important proteins because the serum concentration rises in the acute phase reaction. The acute phase reaction is the nonspecific reaction of the body to noxious stimuli of the most varied kinds, such as infections, burns, neoplasms and tissue trauma. The CRP is synthesized in liver parenchymal cells by cytokines which are derived from stimulated leucocytes and released into the circulation. Because of its molecular structure and in synergy with the complement system, it is able to precipitate and/or lyse microorganisms, thereby rendering them harmless. Measurement of the serum CRP concentration can provide important information with respect to the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Due to immunosenescence in geriatric patients the synthesis of CRP appears to be limited to inflammatory stimuli; however, this phenomenon does not appear to be of major clinical relevance. Despite the introduction of new parameters of the acute phase reaction, sometimes with better performance, such as interleukin-6, procalcitonin and the soluble endotoxin receptor sCD14, measurement of CRP for diagnosis and treatment monitoring is still justified even in geriatric patients as testing is rapid, economic and nearly ubiquitously available round the clock. Biochemical markers of the acute phase reaction should always be interpreted together with the clinical picture and their specific limitations.

  2. C-Reactive Protein: An In-Depth Look into Structure, Function, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Núñez, Victoria; Añez, Roberto; Torres, Yaquelin; Toledo, Alexandra; Chacín, Maricarmen; Silva, Carlos; Pacheco, Enrique; Rojas, Joselyn; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the adult population worldwide, with atherosclerosis being its key pathophysiologic component. Atherosclerosis possesses a fundamental chronic inflammatory aspect, and the involvement of numerous inflammatory molecules has been studied in this scenario, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a plasma protein with strong phylogenetic conservation and high resistance to proteolysis, predominantly synthesized in the liver in response to proinflammatory cytokines, especially IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF. CRP may intervene in atherosclerosis by directly activating the complement system and inducing apoptosis, vascular cell activation, monocyte recruitment, lipid accumulation, and thrombosis, among other actions. Moreover, CRP can dissociate in peripheral tissue—including atheromatous plaques—from its native pentameric form into a monomeric form, which may also be synthesized de novo in extrahepatic sites. Each form exhibits distinct affinities for ligands and receptors, and exerts different effects in the progression of atherosclerosis. In view of epidemiologic evidence associating high CRP levels with cardiovascular risk—reflecting the biologic impact it bears on atherosclerosis—measurement of serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP has been proposed as a tool for assessment of cardiovascular risk. PMID:27433484

  3. Monomeric C-reactive protein and inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chirco, Kathleen R; Whitmore, S Scott; Wang, Kai; Potempa, Lawrence A; Halder, Jennifer A; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2016-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a devastating disease characterized by central vision loss in elderly individuals. Previous studies have suggested a link between elevated levels of total C-reactive protein (CRP) in the choroid, CFH genotype, and AMD status; however, the structural form of CRP present in the choroid, its relationship to CFH genotype, and its functional consequences have not been assessed. In this report, we studied genotyped human donor eyes (n = 60) and found that eyes homozygous for the high-risk CFH (Y402H) allele had elevated monomeric CRP (mCRP) within the choriocapillaris and Bruch's membrane, compared to those with the low-risk genotype. Treatment of choroidal endothelial cells in vitro with mCRP increased migration rate and monolayer permeability compared to treatment with pentameric CRP (pCRP) or medium alone. Organ cultures treated with mCRP exhibited dramatically altered expression of inflammatory genes as assessed by RNA sequencing, including ICAM-1 and CA4, both of which were confirmed at the protein level. Our data indicate that mCRP is the more abundant form of CRP in human choroid, and that mCRP levels are elevated in individuals with the high-risk CFH genotype. Moreover, pro-inflammatory mCRP significantly affects endothelial cell phenotypes in vitro and ex vivo, suggesting a role for mCRP in choroidal vascular dysfunction in AMD. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Suppression of interleukin-6-induced C-reactive protein expression by FXR agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Songwen Liu Qiangyuan; Wang Juan; Harnish, Douglas C.

    2009-02-06

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a human acute-phase protein, is a risk factor for future cardiovascular events and exerts direct pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic properties. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, plays an essential role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we report that two synthetic FXR agonists, WAY-362450 and GW4064, suppressed interleukin-6-induced CRP expression in human Hep3B hepatoma cells. Knockdown of FXR by short interfering RNA attenuated the inhibitory effect of the FXR agonists and also increased the ability of interleukin-6 to induce CRP production. Furthermore, treatment of wild type C57BL/6 mice with the FXR agonist, WAY-362450, attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced serum amyloid P component and serum amyloid A3 mRNA levels in the liver, whereas no effect was observed in FXR knockout mice. These data provide new evidence for direct anti-inflammatory properties of FXR.

  5. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bao, Yan; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Huiqi; Liu, Chang; Han, Huanxing

    2015-01-01

    Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs) enable on-site “yes” or “no” determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs)-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP). CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test. PMID:26491289

  6. The evaluation of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein levels and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Ali Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sarbolouki, Shokooh

    2013-03-16

    Malnutrition and inflammation are the most important causes of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein (CRP) level and nutritional markers in contrast to previous routine method. 18 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 53±16 years were randomly selected in this before-and-after clinical trial. The patients under a standard hemodialysis of 3 times/4 h per week were converted to 4 times/4 h for a period of 6 weeks. The CRP, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL serum levels, anthropometric indices and 24-h diet recall intake was assessed before and after of the period. The data were analyzed using paired t-test, and P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. All patients completed the study. Mean weight, body mass index and serum albumin increased while serum CRP level decreased significantly after the intervention (P<0.03). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, as well as energy, protein and fat intake had no significant change before and after the study. Increase in dialysis frequency decreased systemic inflammation and improved the nutritional state of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, it may decrease the risk of cardiovascular events in these patients.

  7. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bao, Yan; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Huiqi; Liu, Chang; Han, Huanxing

    2015-01-01

    Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs) enable on-site "yes" or "no" determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs)-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP). CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test.

  8. Exposing a Hidden Functional Site of C-reactive Protein by Site-directed Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Hammond, David J.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Mishra, Vinod K.; Johnson, David A.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a cyclic pentameric protein whose major binding specificity, at physiological pH, is for substances bearing exposed phosphocholine moieties. Another pentameric form of CRP, which exists at acidic pH, displays binding activity for oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). The ox-LDL-binding site in CRP, which is hidden at physiological pH, is exposed by acidic pH-induced structural changes in pentameric CRP. The aim of this study was to expose the hidden ox-LDL-binding site of CRP by site-directed mutagenesis and to generate a CRP mutant that can bind to ox-LDL without the requirement of acidic pH. Mutation of Glu42, an amino acid that participates in intersubunit interactions in the CRP pentamer and is buried, to Gln resulted in a CRP mutant (E42Q) that showed significant binding activity for ox-LDL at physiological pH. For maximal binding to ox-LDL, E42Q CRP required a pH much less acidic than that required by wild-type CRP. At any given pH, E42Q CRP was more efficient than wild-type CRP in binding to ox-LDL. Like wild-type CRP, E42Q CRP remained pentameric at acidic pH. Also, E42Q CRP was more efficient than wild-type CRP in binding to several other deposited, conformationally altered proteins. The E42Q CRP mutant provides a tool to investigate the functions of CRP in defined animal models of inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis because wild-type CRP requires acidic pH to bind to deposited, conformationally altered proteins, including ox-LDL, and available animal models may not have sufficient acidosis or other possible modifiers of the pentameric structure of CRP at the sites of inflammation. PMID:22158621

  9. Parental education is related to C-reactive protein among female middle-aged community volunteers.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennifer E; Marsland, Anna L; Flory, Janine D; Muldoon, Matthew F; Cohen, Sheldon; Manuck, Stephen B

    2009-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that socioeconomic attributes of both childhood and adulthood confer risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this study, we examine the association of both parental and individual educational attainment with C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory mediator relevant to cardiovascular pathophysiology, in a mid-life community sample. Subjects were 811 men and women (394 men/417 women; 87% European-American/13% African-American), 30-54 years of age. Plasma concentrations of CRP were determined from blood samples obtained at a single session following an overnight fast. Regression analyses adjusting for age and race showed both parental education and individual education to be associated inversely with CRP in women, but not men. The relationship of parental education with CRP in women persisted on multivariable adjustment for both lifestyle risk factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep, exercise, body mass index) and individual SES. Independent of reported personal educational attainment, mid-life adult women whose parents achieved fewer years of educational attainment exhibit higher levels of circulating CRP than women with higher parental education. This association may help explain the increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality conferred by low childhood socioeconomic status.

  10. C-reactive protein levels are influenced by common IL-1 gene variations.

    PubMed

    Berger, Peter; McConnell, Joseph P; Nunn, Martha; Kornman, Kenneth S; Sorrell, Julian; Stephenson, Katherine; Duff, Gordon W

    2002-02-21

    Elevated markers of systemic inflammation are associated with the development of acute coronary syndromes, but there is no current explanation for increased inflammation in overtly healthy individuals. The influence of genetic control of the inflammatory response on the observed variability is unknown. We studied the frequency of four polymorphisms in interleukin (IL) 1 genes, known to modulate inflammation, in 454 individuals undergoing coronary angiography and analysed their influence on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen levels. Females and smokers had higher levels of CRP than males (Pi = 0.001) and non-smokers (Pi = 0.001). Patients with genotype 2.2 for the IL-1B(+3954) polymorphism had twice the median CRP levels of patients who were genotype 1.1 (4.33 vs 2.01 mg/l; P = 0.001). Patients with genotype 1.2 or 2.2 at the IL-1A(+4845) polymorphism also had higher median CRP (2.92 vs 2.05 mg/l, Pi = 0.023). In multivariate analyses, CRP levels remained significantly associated with IL-1 polymorphisms after adjustment for smoking, gender and age. Fibrinogen levels had similar associations with the IL-1 genotypes. These data indicate that IL-1 gene polymorphisms known to affect the inflammatory response are highly related to plasma levels of CRP and fibrinogen in patients referred for coronary angiography.

  11. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) & cardiovascular disease: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Deepak Y; Xavier, Denis; Sigamani, Alben; Pais, Prem

    2015-09-01

    The role of low grade systemic inflammation as evidenced by elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease has been intensely investigated through observational studies and clinical trials in the past two decades. On the basis of evidence that has accrued, hsCRP measurement has been integrated into the Reynolds risk scoring system to predict cardiovascular risk. The JUPITER trial proved the benefit of statins in cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with low grades of systemic inflammation and 'normal' cholesterol levels. However, substantial evidence has been generated from western studies. We, therefore, conducted a scoping review for studies done in India with a view to identify gaps in evidence and make further recommendations. Most Indian studies had small sample sizes and short term follow ups. There were no large population based prospective studies where patients were followed up for long periods of time for major cardiovascular end points. An analysis of the hsCRP level from the control arms of case-control studies derived a mean hsCRP value of 1.88 mg/l, which is higher than the western population where values < 1 mg/l are classified as low cardiovascular risk. Further large prospective cohort studies with longer term follow ups are essential before we can make further recommendations to integrate hsCRP into risk prediction models for cardiovascular disease prevention.

  12. [The significance of high sensitive C reactive protein as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Meguro, Shu; Ishibashi, Midori; Takei, Izumi

    2012-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Several prospective studies have indicated that an elevated high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level is a risk factor for CVD. These results were also confirmed by prospective studies in Japan both for primary and secondary prevention. A randomized control study using statins also revealed that lower levels of both LDL cholesterol and hs-CRP were independently related to the incidence of CVD. Recent meta-analysis revealed that hs-CRP was a risk factor not only for CVD but for other diseases including cancers. It revealed that the absolute value of hs-CRP varied among the study populations. The mechanism of how hs-CRP is associated with the pathogenesis of CVD is not fully understood. Generally, inflammation in the vascular wall and the release of inflammatory cytokines from macrophages was considered to the main mechanism, but infection with such as chlamydia or Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal disease have been postulated as the causes of systemic inflammation. Recently, visceral fat accumulation and its cross-interaction with inflammatory cells have been proposed as the cause of systemic inflammation as "innate inflammation". Our original cross sectional studies also showed the correlations of hs-CRP with BMI and triglyceride. Although there is no specific therapy for the reduction of hs-CRP, we have to consider hs-CRP as a risk factor for CVD which complements other classical risk factors. PMID:22686046

  13. Serum C-Reactive Protein and Procalcitonin Kinetics in Patients Undergoing Elective Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Battistelli, Sandra; Fortina, Mattia; Carta, Serafino; Guerranti, Roberto; Nobile, Francesco; Ferrata, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The sensitivity and the specificity of different methods to detect periprosthetic infection have been questioned. The current study aimed to investigate the kinetics of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) in patients undergoing uncomplicated elective total hip arthroplasty (THA), to provide a better interpretation of their levels in noninfectious inflammatory reaction. Methods. A total of 51 patients were included. Serum CRP and PCT concentrations were obtained before surgery, on the 1st, 3rd, and 7th postoperative days and after discharge on the 14th and 30th days and at 2 years. Results. Both markers were confirmed to increase after surgery. The serum CRP showed a marked increase on the 3rd postoperative day while the peak of serum PCT was earlier, even if much lower, on the first day. Then, they declined slowly approaching the baseline values by the second postoperative week. PCT mean values never exceed concentrations typically related to bacterial infections. Conclusions. CRP is very sensitive to inflammation. It could be the routine screening test in the follow-up of THA orthopaedic patients, but it should be complemented by PCT when there is the clinical suspicion of periprosthetic infection. PMID:24877114

  14. Evaluation of point-of-care testing of C-reactive protein in forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Mikiko; Koda, Yoshiro

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the technical performance and robustness of the point-of-care test for C-reactive protein (CRP) NycoCard CRP for use in forensic autopsy cases. The results of 17 of 39 cadaver blood samples that had CRP in the range effectively measured by the NycoCard (5-120mg/l) correlated well (r=0.99) with those of quantitative latex agglutination immunoassay (turbidimetry), and the out-of-range NycoCard results were fully consistent with those obtained by turbidimetry. For the ten sera whose CRP >120mg/l according to NycoCard, a significant correlation (r=0.98) was observed between values multiplied by the dilution ratio and those of turbidimetry. No significant differences were observed after a freeze-thaw procedure. In addition, CRP results using recombinant human CRP spiked with hemoglobin up to 80g/l were not significantly different from the unspiked results in PBS. The test allows reliable and cost-effective on-site measurement of CRP from a small volume of serum (5μl) with simple equipment. This semi-quantification method of CRP should be useful for diagnosis during autopsy.

  15. Socioeconomic position, health behaviors, and C-reactive protein: A moderated-mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Mezuk, Briana; Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Rafferty, Jane A.; Jackson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to understand the link between low SEP and cardiovascular disease (CVD) by examining the association between SEP, health-related coping behaviors, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker and independent risk factor for CVD in a US sample of adults. Design We used a multiple mediation model to evaluate how these behaviors work in concert to influence CRP levels and whether these relationships were moderated by gender and race/ethnicity. Main outcome measures CRP levels were divided into two categories: elevated CRP (3.1–10.0 mg/L) and normal CRP (≤ 3.0 mg/L). Results Both poverty and low educational attainment were associated with elevated CRP, and these associations were primarily explained through higher levels of smoking and lower levels of exercise. In the education model, poor diet also emerged as a significant mediator. These behaviors accounted for 87.9% of the total effect of education on CRP and 55.8% the total effect of poverty on CRP. We also found significant moderation of these mediated effects by gender and race/ethnicity. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the influence of socioeconomically-patterned environmental constraints on individual-level health behaviors. Specifically, reducing socioeconomic inequalities may have positive effects on CVD disparities through reducing cigarette smoking and increasing vigorous exercise. PMID:20496985

  16. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP.

  17. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Tobar, Iván Darío; Nello-Pérez, Carlota; Fernández, Alí; Mogollón, Nora; Pérez, Mary Carmen; Verde, Juan; Concepción, Juan Luis; Rodriguez-Bonfante, Claudina; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease.

  18. Circadian rhythm of C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Herold, M; Günther, R

    1987-01-01

    Ten men with classic rheumatoid arthritis were studied for 23 days in Badgastein, Austria, in August, 1980. One man (patient 07) showed a marked increase of disease activity after a few days. C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations increased from 8.7 mg/dl on day 2 to 13.0 mg/dl on day 16. CRP values expressed as percent mean of a day showed a significant circadian rhythm with the acrophase at -30 degrees. For the same patient we also found significant circadian rhythms in grip strength and pearl stringing with acrophases in the evening and a circadian rhythm in walking time with the acrophase in the early morning. Seven of the ten men in the study had elevated CRP concentrations during the 3 weeks of observation. Population-mean cosinor results of CRP, grip strength, pearl stringing, and walking time revealed acrophases similar to the single cosinor results of patient 07. Our results suggest that inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis is a circadian rhythmic process with lowest disease activity in the evening.

  19. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in differantiating to contamination from bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Oksuz, Lutfiye; Somer, Ayper; Salman, Nuran; Erk, Osman; Gurler, Nezahat

    2014-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are important biological markers used in the diagnosis of severe infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consistency of blood culture with PCT and CRP in differentiating contamination and non-bacteremia from true bacteremia. In this study blood samples were obtained from 809 febrile patients and analyzed using BACTEC 9120 system. All of positive blood cultures were performed Gram staining. The microorganisms were identified with conventional methods and automated systems. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were made by disc diffusion. PCT levels were analyzed by mini VIDAS device and PCT kit. PCT and CRP levels were analyzed with blood cultures in same times. Kruskal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, Spearman’s rho test and ROC curve were used for statistical analyses. The bacteremia group was found to be significantly different from non-bacteremia group and contamination group in terms of both PCT and CRP (p<0.0001). The p values of PCT and CRP in differentiating bacteremia from non-bacteremia were p<0.001 for PCT, p=0.002 for CRP and in differentiating bacteremia from contamination were p<0.001 for PCT, p<0.001 for CRP. PCT is a more useful marker than CRP in the differentiating of true bacteremia from contamination according to the results of this study. PMID:25763049

  20. Reference intervals for procalcitonin and C-reactive protein after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, M; Hole, A; Johnsen, H; Asberg, A; Rydning, A; Myrvold, H E; Bjerve, K S

    2002-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT). a new marker proposed as a diagnostic tool for bacterial infections, triggers a systemic-inflammatory reaction in the body (sepsis, septic shock) and has potential use in a wide range of patient settings. To interpret the results from PCT measurements, we depend on reference intervals established from relevant populations. PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations were analysed in 47 patients with a normal postoperative course after major abdominal surgery. The mean concentration of PCT declines from the first day and reaches half its initial values on the second day after the operation. whereas the mean concentration of CRP increases in the first 48 h and reaches half its maximum value on the fifth day after the operation. We present a continuous reference interval for plasma PCT and CRP concentrations in the first week following major abdominal surgery. For PCT we also present a graphic display of expected mean and expected upper reference limits predicted from the value measured on the first postoperative day.

  1. C-reactive protein directly suppresses T helper 1 cell differentiation and alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Shan-Hui; Wright, Tyler T.; Shen, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Hai-Yun; Zhu, Wei; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Ji, Shang-Rong; Szalai, Alexander J.; Wu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum soluble pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that serves as a marker of inflammation and directly contributes to innate immunity. Herein we show that human CRP also directly contributes to adaptive immunity, i.e. native CRP binds specifically to human Jurkat T cells and to mouse naïve CD4+ T cells and modulates their T helper (Th) 1 and Th2 responses. In vitro both exogenously added (purified) and endogenously expressed (via transfection) human CRP inhibited Th1 differentiation and augmented Th2 differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells. In vivo for human CRP transgenic (CRPtg) compared to wild type mice, a lesser proportion of the T cells recovered from the spleens of healthy animals were Th1 cells. Moreover in both CRPtg mice and in wild type mice treated with human CRP, during myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis both the Th1 cell response and disease severity were inhibited. These pattern recognition-independent actions of CRP directly on T cells highlights the potential for this soluble PRR to act as a tonic regulator of immunity, shaping global adaptive immune responses during both homeostasis and disease. PMID:25917100

  2. Sensitive detection of C-reactive protein using optical fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, S; Vasu, K S; Asokan, S; Sood, A K

    2015-03-15

    An accurate and highly sensitive sensor platform has been demonstrated for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) using optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The CRP detection has been carried out by monitoring the shift in Bragg wavelength (ΔλB) of an etched FBG (eFBG) coated with an anti-CRP antibody (aCRP)-graphene oxide (GO) complex. The complex is characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A limit of detection of 0.01mg/L has been achieved with a linear range of detection from 0.01mg/L to 100mg/L which includes clinical range of CRP. The eFBG sensor coated with only aCRP (without GO) show much less sensitivity than that of aCRP-GO complex coated eFBG. The eFBG sensors show high specificity to CRP even in the presence of other interfering factors such as urea, creatinine and glucose. The affinity constant of ∼1.1×10(10)M(-1) has been extracted from the data of normalized shift (ΔλB/λB) as a function of CRP concentration. PMID:25461166

  3. Blood count and C-reactive protein evolution in gastric cancer patients with total gastrectomy surgery

    PubMed Central

    CSENDES J., Attila; MUÑOZ Ch., Andrea; BURGOS L., Ana María

    2014-01-01

    Background The complete blood count (CBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are useful inflammatory parameters for ruling out acute postoperative inflammatory complications. Aim To determine their changes in gastric cancer patients submitted to total gastrectomy. Methods This is a prospective study, with 36 patients with gastric cancer who were submitted to elective total gastrectomy. On the first, third and fifth postoperative day (POD), blood count and CRP changes were assessed. Patients with postoperative complications were excluded. Results Twenty-one (58%) were men and 15 (42%) women. The mean age was 65 years. The leukocytes peaked on the 1st POD with a mean of 13,826 u/mm³, and decreased to 8,266 u/mm³ by the 5th POD. The bacilliforms peaked on the 1st POD with a maximum value of 1.48%. CRP reached its maximum level on the 3rd POD with a mean of 144.64 mg/l±44.84. Preoperative hematocrit (HCT) was 35% and 33.67% by the 5th POD. Hemoglobin, showed similar values. Conclusions Leukocytes increased during the 1st POD but reached normal values by the 5th POD. CRP peaked on the 3rd POD but did not reach normal values by the 5th POD. PMID:25626929

  4. Association between use of specialty dietary supplements and C-reactive protein concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Elizabeth D; Lampe, Johanna W; Vaughan, Thomas L; Peters, Ulrike; Rehm, Colin D; White, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Laboratory evidence suggests that certain specialty dietary supplements have antiinflammatory properties, though evidence in humans remains limited. Data on a nationally representative sample of 9,947 adults from the 1999-2004 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used to assess the associations between specialty supplement use and inflammation, as measured by serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration. Using survey-weighted multivariate linear regression, significant reductions in hs-CRP concentrations were associated with regular use of glucosamine (17%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 7, 26), chondroitin (22%, 95% CI: 8, 33), and fish oil (16%, 95% CI: 0.3, 29). No associations were observed between hs-CRP concentration and regular use of supplements containing methylsulfonylmethane, garlic, ginkgo biloba, saw palmetto, or pycnogenol. These results suggest that glucosamine and chondroitin supplements are associated with reduced inflammation in humans and provide further evidence to support an inverse association between use of fish oil supplements and inflammation. It is important to further investigate the potential antiinflammatory role of these supplements, as there is a need to identify safe and effective ways to reduce inflammation and the burden of inflammation-related diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  5. Interactions between C-reactive protein genotypes with markers of nutritional status in relation to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R; Towers, G Wayne

    2014-11-11

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state.

  6. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    PubMed Central

    BRAVO-TOBAR, Iván Darío; NELLO-PÉREZ, Carlota; FERNÁNDEZ, Alí; MOGOLLÓN, Nora; PÉREZ, Mary Carmen; VERDE, Juan; CONCEPCIÓN, Juan Luis; RODRIGUEZ-BONFANTE, Claudina; BONFANTE-CABARCAS, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  7. Evaluation of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid C-reactive protein in patients with peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Kumaresan; Padmanabhan, Giri; Vijayaraghavan, Bhooma

    2016-05-01

    Severe peritonitis causing death is one of the most devastating complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since the predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in PD fluid has not been assessed, the objective of the present study is to evaluate its predictive value and clinical correlation in patients on PD with peritonitis. One hundred and twenty patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) were enrolled and their serum and fluid CRP (Fl. CRP) were evaluated at the start of CAPD. All patients who developed peritonitis were further evaluated for serum and fluid CRP. The patients were categorized into four groups, namely: normal patients (control group), patients with peritonitis, patients with peritonitis leading to catheter removal, and death due to peritonitis. Sixty-five patients developed peritonitis of whom, catheter removal was performed in eight patients. Five patients died due to peritonitis-related complications. Fl. CRP showed a significant difference among the three groups, unlike S. CRP. Estimation of CRP in the peritoneal fluid may be a useful marker to monitor the onset of peritonitis. PMID:27215236

  8. Validity of C-reactive protein (CRP) for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hisamuddin, Effat; Hisam, Aliya; Wahid, Sughra; Raza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the validity of C-reactive protein levels for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Methods: A cross sectional (Validation) study was conducted at Neonatology unit in KRL general hospital (emergency/OPD) of 7 months duration from February 2012 to August 2012. By using purposive sampling technique, 147, sample size was calculated by using WHO sample size calculator taking sensitivity 75%, specificity 95%, expected prevalence 50%, desired precision 10% and confidence level 95%. Results: Mean age of the neonates was 5.72 days + 3.86. Male patients were 81(55.1%) while 66(44.9%) were female. Neonatal sepsis was observed in 43(29.25%) and were confirmed through blood culture while 104(70.75%) were not confirmed on blood culture as neonatal sepsis. The sensitivity and specificity of CRP in diagnosis of acute neonatal sepsis was 76.92% and 53.49% respectively while it had a positive predictive value of 80% and negative predictive value of 48.94%. Over all the diagnostic accuracy of CRP in diagnosis of neonatal sepsis was 70.07%. Conclusion: CRP estimation does have a role in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis but the test is not specific enough to be relied upon as the only indicator. PMID:26150837

  9. Cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and C-reactive protein levels in nonsmoking individuals with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and pulmonary function and the relationship with metabolic variables and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Nineteen men with diabetes and 19 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. All individuals were given incremental cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function tests. In the exercise test, maximal workload (158.3±22.3 vs 135.1±25.2, P=0.005), peak heart rate (HRpeak: 149±12 vs 139±10, P=0.009), peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak: 24.2±3.2 vs 18.9±2.8, P<0.001), and anaerobic threshold (VO2VT: 14.1±3.4 vs 12.2±2.2, P=0.04) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than in control subjects. Pulmonary function test parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol), and CRP plasma levels were not different in control subjects and individuals with DM. No correlations were observed between hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), CRP and pulmonary function test and cardiopulmonary exercise test performance. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that nonsmoking individuals with DM have decreased cardiorespiratory fitness that is not correlated with resting pulmonary function parameters, HbA1c, and CRP plasma levels. PMID:24760118

  10. Interactions between C-Reactive Protein Genotypes with Markers of Nutritional Status in Relation to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C.; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R.; Towers, G. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state. PMID:25393688

  11. Interactions between C-reactive protein genotypes with markers of nutritional status in relation to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Swanepoel, Bianca; Dolman, Robin C; Pieters, Marlien; Conradie, Karin R; Towers, G Wayne

    2014-11-01

    Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP), is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state. PMID:25393688

  12. Label-free detection of C-reactive protein using a carbon nanofiber based biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rakesh K.; Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    We report the sensitive detection of C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker for cardiac disease, using a carbon nanofiber based biosensor platform. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers were grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition to fabricate nanoelectrode arrays in a 3 X 3 configuration. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for the CRP detection. The CV responses show a 25 % reduction in redox current upon the immobilization of anti-CRP on the electrode where as a 30% increase in charge transfer resistance is seen from EIS. Further reduction in redox current and increase in charge transfer resistance result from binding of CRP on anti-CRP immobilized surface, proportional to the concentration of the CRP target. The detection limit of the sensor is found to be ~90 pM or ~11 ng/ml, which is in the clinically relevant range. Control tests using non-specific myoglobin antigen confirmed the specificity of the present approach. PMID:24709327

  13. Elevated C-reactive protein and self-reported disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Eudy, A M; Vines, A I; Dooley, M A; Cooper, G S; Parks, C G

    2014-12-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation, has been associated with increased disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. However, the association in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains unclear. We examined the association of CRP with self-reported disease activity in the Carolina Lupus Study and described differences by sociodemographic characteristics. The study included baseline and three-year follow-up data on 107 African-American and 69 Caucasian SLE patients enrolled at a median 13 months since diagnosis. Models estimated prevalence differences in the association of baseline CRP with self-reported flares, adjusting for age, sex, race and education. Active disease or flare was reported by 59% at baseline and 58% at follow-up. Higher CRP (>10 µg/ml vs. <3 µg/ml) was associated with a 17% (95% confidence interval (CI): -20, 53%) higher prevalence of flare at baseline and a 26% (95% CI: -9, 62%) higher prevalence of flare at follow-up. These CRP-flare associations were notably stronger in patients with lower education at baseline and in African-Americans at follow-up. These findings suggest that CRP may be a useful marker in studies of SLE health disparities.

  14. Absence of diurnal variation of C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier-Ewert, H. K.; Ridker, P. M.; Rifai, N.; Price, N.; Dinges, D. F.; Mullington, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) in otherwise healthy subjects has been shown to predict future risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. CRP is synthesized by the liver in response to interleukin-6, the serum concentration of which is subject to diurnal variation. METHODS: To examine the existence of a time-of-day effect for baseline CRP values, we determined CRP concentrations in hourly blood samples drawn from healthy subjects (10 males, 3 females; age range, 21-35 years) during a baseline day in a controlled environment (8 h of nighttime sleep). RESULTS: Overall CRP concentrations were low, with only three subjects having CRP concentrations >2 mg/L. Comparison of raw data showed stability of CRP concentrations throughout the 24 h studied. When compared with cutoff values of CRP quintile derived from population-based studies, misclassification of greater than one quintile did not occur as a result of diurnal variation in any of the subjects studied. Nonparametric ANOVA comparing different time points showed no significant differences for both raw and z-transformed data. Analysis for rhythmic diurnal variation using a method fitting a cosine curve to the group data was negative. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that baseline CRP concentrations are not subject to time-of-day variation and thus help to explain why CRP concentrations are a better predictor of vascular risk than interleukin-6. Determination of CRP for cardiovascular risk prediction may be performed without concern for diurnal variation.

  15. Effect of particulate matter air pollution on C-reactive protein: a review of epidemiologic studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanli; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; L.Scheider, William; Mu, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory response is implicated as a biologic mechanism that links particulate matter (PM) air pollution with health effects. C-reactive protein (CRP), an important acute-phase reactant with profound proinflammatory properties, is used clinically as an indicator of the presence and intensity of inflammation. In vitro and in vivo animal studies suggest that CRP levels increase in response to PM exposure, but there was no consistency in epidemiologic studies. Herein, a systematic review was conducted to examine the association between PM exposure and serum CRP levels in humans. Elevated CRP levels were consistently found among children, and CRP elevations were also observed among healthy adults, albeit requiring higher peak levels of PM exposure. PM-induced CRP responses were not consistently found in adults with chronic inflammatory conditions, perhaps because of the use of anti-inflammatory medications in this population. Of the eight examined randomized trials, only one trial with a longer intervention period supported the effect of PM exposure on CRP concentrations. To provide conclusive evidence, further epidemiologic studies are needed to better quantify the magnitude of CRP level changes in response to PM with well-defined study populations and better control of various confounding factors. PMID:23023922

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cardiovascular disease: The influence of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Bouloukaki, Izolde; Mermigkis, Charalampos; Kallergis, Eleftherios M; Moniaki, Violeta; Mauroudi, Eleni; Schiza, Sophia E

    2015-05-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common medical condition, associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of this association have not been completely understood and may be multifactorial in origin. A number of studies suggest that inflammatory processes have emerged critical in the pathogenesis of CVD in OSAS. A range of circulating inflammatory molecules has been identified and measured, with a view to assess inflammation and predict vascular damage risk, such as plasma cytokines, adhesion molecules, and C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a relevant marker worthy of further study, because not only is elevated in patients with OSAS, but also is rapidly becoming a risk factor for cardiac disease. Furthermore, in selected OSAS patients, aggressive treatment of the disorder may lead to retarding or even improvement of CVD progression. However, still there is a debate on the true correlation between CRP and OSAS, as well as the clinical effect of any reduction after OSAS treatment. Further research is required to define those OSAS patients who will have a considerable reduction with treatment, as well as to understand the significance of the interaction between cardiovascular risk factor and CRP reduction in patients with OSAS. PMID:25992322

  17. Binding of C-reactive protein to human lymphocytes. I. Requirement for a binding specificity.

    PubMed

    James, K; Hansen, B; Gewurz, H

    1981-12-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that C-reactive protein (CRP) binds selectively to T lymphocytes and inhibits certain of their reactivities in vitro. However, these findings could not be repeated using more highly purified CRP preparations even under a variety of experimental conditions. Purified CRP alone did not bind to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL); however, in the presence of a ligand such as pneumococcal C-polysaccharide (CPS), CRP binding was readily detectable both by immunofluorescence and by a radioassay established for this purpose. The optimal concentration of CRP, ratio of CRP:CPS, and time and temperature for reactivity were determined using both assays. A markedly enhanced rate of binding was observed after pre-equilibration of CRP with calcium. A small percentage (mean 3.0%; range 0.5 to 8.0%) of PBL bound complexed CRP, and saturation was reached with 200 microgram CRP/ml. Reactivity of CRP with a multimeric form of phosphocholine (PC) (KLH-PC44) led to binding comparable to that observed with CPS, whereas monomeric PC inhibited the binding. Thus, in the presence of a multimeric binding specificity, CRP binds to a small fraction of peripheral blood lymphocytes, which are characterized in the accompanying paper.

  18. Nonobese, exercising children diagnosed with dyslipidemia have normal C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Miguel Arturo Salazar; Vázquez, Beatriz Yadira Salazar; Intaglietta, M; Cabrales, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Nonobese children age 10.4 ± 1.1 years diagnosed with dyslipidemia (n = 51) were compared to normal children age 10.8 ± 1.1 years (n = 38). Affected individuals had increased total cholesterol: 223 ± 23 vs 152 ± 17 mg/dl, p < 0.001; and decreased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol: 41.9 ± 4.1 vs 57.6 ± 5.7 mg/dl, p < 0.001 and triglycerides: 90.8 ± 40.5 vs 65.7 ± 25.0 mg/dl, p < 0.002. Fasting glucose was also significantly elevated (p < 0.02). All other parameters, including blood pressure, were not statistically different between groups. The concentration of C-reactive protein was not statistically different between groups. Analysis of medical records showed that this anomaly may be related to this group (as well as the control group) performing regular, daily exercise. This activity was quantified via a self administered questionnaire, and found to be statistically identical in controls and dyslipidemic individuals. Exercise is associated with the release of antiinflammatory cytokines, therefore our results support the contention that it is a significant factor in promoting health conditions from an early stage in life. PMID:19436676

  19. Predicting Outcome of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis With a Single Measurement of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Heikki; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, shows high serum levels in invasive bacterial infections. We investigated the potential of a single CRP measurement at different phases of acute childhood bacterial meningitis to predict outcomes. Methods: Using whole-blood finger-prick samples with no centrifugation, CRP was measured quantitatively on arrival and on day 3 or 4 in children participating in 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind treatment studies conducted in Latin America or Angola. The results were compared with patient outcomes. Results: Although initial CRP values from 669 children gave useful prognostic information, the 3rd or 4th day measurements taken from 275 children associated significantly with seizures, slow recovery and low scores on the Glasgow Outcome Scale, with odds ratios for CRP values above the median (62 mg/L) ranging from 2 to 6, 2 to 5, and 3 to 5 (Latin America–Angola), respectively. Hearing impairment, although not full deafness, was 3 to 7 times more likely if CRP was above the median soon after hospitalization. Conclusions: Especially in resource-poor settings, clinicians have few simple-enough tools to identify the child with meningitis who requires maximum attention. CRP is a worthy addition. PMID:26986770

  20. Effects of Different Doses of Physical Activity on C-Reactive Protein Among Women

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Laura K.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Blair, Steven N.; Church, Timothy S.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Physical activity has been inversely associated with CRP. However, the clinical trials examining the effect of exercise training have produced conflicting results. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the influence an exercise training program on CRP in postmenopausal women. Methods Sedentary, overweight/obese, postmenopausal women with elevated systolic blood pressure (120.0 to 159.9 mm Hg) (N= 464) were randomized into 1 of 4 groups: a non-exercise control or 1 of 3 aerobic exercise groups; exercise energy expenditure of 4, 8, or 12 kcal/kg/week (KKW), for 6 months at a training intensity of 50% of peak VO2. Results Complete data was available of 421 participants and mean baseline CRP was 5.7 (5.5) mg/L with no significant differences across groups. While VO2 increased in a dose response manner, there were no significant changes in CRP in any of the exercise intervention groups compared to the control group. Change in fitness was not associated with change in CRP, whereas change in weight was significantly associated with change in CRP. Conclusion Despite increasing fitness, six months of aerobic exercise training did not improve CRP. However, improvements in CRP were associated with reductions in weight. PMID:19952829

  1. Out-of-hours antibiotic prescription after screening with C reactive protein: a randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Rebnord, Ingrid Keilegavlen; Sandvik, Hogne; Batman Mjelle, Anders; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of preconsultation C reactive protein (CRP) screening on antibiotic prescribing and referral to hospital in Norwegian primary care settings with low prevalence of serious infections. Design Randomised controlled observational study at out-of-hours services in Norway. Setting Primary care. Participants 401 children (0–6 years) with fever and/or respiratory symptoms were recruited from 5 different out-of-hours services (including 1 paediatric emergency clinic) in 2013–2015. Intervention Data were collected from questionnaires and clinical examination results. Every third child was randomised to a CRP test before the consultation; for the rest, the doctor ordered a CRP test if considered necessary. Outcome measures Main outcome variables were prescription of antibiotics and referral to hospital. Results In the group pretested with CRP, the antibiotic prescription rate was 26%, compared with 22% in the control group. In the group pretested with CRP, 5% were admitted to hospital, compared with 9% in the control group. These differences were not statistically significant. The main predictors for ordering a CRP test were parents' assessment of seriousness of the illness and the child's temperature. Paediatricians ordered CRP tests less frequently than did other doctors (9% vs 56%, p<0.001). Conclusions Preconsultation screening with CRP of children presenting to out-of-hours services with fever and/or respiratory symptoms does not significantly affect the prescription of antibiotics or referral to hospital. Trial registration number NCT02496559; Results. PMID:27173814

  2. Study of Serum Levels of Leptin, C-Reactive Protein and Nutritional Status in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Karajibani, Mansour; Hassanpour, Zahra; Pourmofatteh, Mahla

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and decreases appetite. However, the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of hemodialysis (HD)-related malnutrition has not been fully evaluated. Objectives: The aim of study was to investigate the association between the serum leptin levels, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and nutritional status in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: This analytical descriptive study included 45 hemodialysis patients and 40 healthy subjects. Biochemical parameters and serum leptin levels were measured. The nutritional status was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the calculation of the body mass index (BMI). Results: Serum leptin (P < 0.05) and albumin (P < 0.0001) levels and BMI (P < 0.001) of HD patients were significantly lower, while CRP levels were significantly higher than those of controls (P < 0.0001). HD patients consumed the lower daily servings of the food groups compared to the control subjects (P < 0.0001). A significant positive correlation between serum levels of leptin and albumin and BMI was demonstrated. No significant correlations were identified between leptin level, CRP level, and other variables. Conclusions: The findings suggest that low levels of leptin may be a contributory factor for malnutrition in HD patients. Further studies are required to ascertain the significance of leptin levels in relation to nutritional factors in hemodialysis patients. PMID:26430525

  3. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Cardiovascular Disease Across Countries and Ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein; Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Despite substantial differences in ethnicities, habits, cultures, the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and affordable therapies, atherosclerosis remains the major cause of death in developing and developed countries. However, irrespective of these differences, inflammation is currently recognized as the common pathway for the major complications of atherosclerosis, stroke, and ischemic heart disease. A PubMed search was conducted for "high-sensitivity C-reactive protein" (hs-CRP) in combination with the terms race, ethnicity, gender, prevalence, geographic, epidemiology, cardiovascular, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and mortality. This review includes the articles that pertained to the topic and additional articles identified from the reference lists of relevant publications. This review describes the marked differences in cardiovascular mortality across countries and ethnicities, which may be attributed to inequalities in the prevalence of the classic risk factors and the stage of cardiovascular epidemiological transition. However, hs-CRP appears to contribute to the prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk and mortality even after multiple adjustments. Considering the perception of cardiovascular disease as an inflammatory disease, the more widespread use of hs-CRP appears to represent a valid tool to identify people at risk, independent of their ancestry or geographic region. In conclusion, this review reports that the complications associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are triggered by the major mechanisms of dyslipidemia and inflammation; whereas both mechanisms are influenced by classic risk factors, hs-CRP contributes additional information regarding cardiovascular events and mortality. PMID:27166776

  4. Evaluation of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluid C-reactive protein in patients with peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Kumaresan; Padmanabhan, Giri; Vijayaraghavan, Bhooma

    2016-05-01

    Severe peritonitis causing death is one of the most devastating complications of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Since the predictive value of C-reactive protein (CRP) in PD fluid has not been assessed, the objective of the present study is to evaluate its predictive value and clinical correlation in patients on PD with peritonitis. One hundred and twenty patients on continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) were enrolled and their serum and fluid CRP (Fl. CRP) were evaluated at the start of CAPD. All patients who developed peritonitis were further evaluated for serum and fluid CRP. The patients were categorized into four groups, namely: normal patients (control group), patients with peritonitis, patients with peritonitis leading to catheter removal, and death due to peritonitis. Sixty-five patients developed peritonitis of whom, catheter removal was performed in eight patients. Five patients died due to peritonitis-related complications. Fl. CRP showed a significant difference among the three groups, unlike S. CRP. Estimation of CRP in the peritoneal fluid may be a useful marker to monitor the onset of peritonitis.

  5. Possible mechanisms of C-reactive protein mediated acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Fordjour, Patrick Asare; Wang, Yadong; Shi, Yang; Agyemang, Kojo; Akinyi, Mary; Zhang, Qiang; Fan, Guanwei

    2015-08-01

    Myocardial infarction is a relevant cardiovascular event worldwide for morbidity and mortality. It has been theorized that acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) and other acute coronary events that are precipitated by atherosclerosis are due to arterial blockage from fat deposits. It is now known, however, that atherosclerosis involves more than just lipids. Inflammation has also been studied extensively to play a substantial role in myocardial infarction. There have been debates and conflicting reports over the past few years about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of cardiovascular events. Several studies have shown that CRP is not only an inflammatory marker, but also involved in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction. Studies have linked atherogenesis and rupture of atherosclerotic lesion to endothelial dysfunction. CRP directly inhibits endothelial cell nitric oxide (NO) production via destabilizing endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Decreased NO release causes CRP mediated inhibition of angiogenesis, stimulating endothelial cell apoptosis. CRP can also activate the complement system through the classical pathway. Complement activation plays an important role in mediating monocyte and neutrophil recruitment in an injured myocardium and may therefore lead to increase in infarct size. This article discusses the possible roles of CRP in complement activation, endothelial dysfunction and its impact on the development of myocardial infarction. We also reviewed the possible therapeutic approaches to myocardial infarction.

  6. Associations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia and comparison groups.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jamie; Depp, Colin; Martin, Averria Sirkin; Daly, Rebecca E; Glorioso, Danielle K; Palmer, Barton W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by physical (mainly metabolic and cardiovascular) comorbidity and shortened lifespan. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), an inflammatory marker of hepatic origin linked to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and mortality in the general population, has been reported to be elevated in people with schizophrenia. However, the relationship of hs-CRP to psychiatric and medical risk factors, after controlling for potentially confounding variables such as smoking, is not well established in schizophrenia. We assessed hs-CRP levels along with various demographic, psychiatric, and metabolic measures in 88 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 71 age epoch-matched comparison subjects with no history of a major psychiatric illness. hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in individuals with schizophrenia than in comparison subjects. Higher hs-CRP levels in the schizophrenia group were associated with female gender, more severe negative symptoms, greater medical comorbidity, and worse metabolic risk factors including BMI, fasting glucose, and hemoglobin A1c levels. hs-CRP was not related to age, race, education, smoking status, antipsychotic dosage, or cognitive impairment. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the relationship between hs-CRP and long-term health outcomes including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and mortality in schizophrenia. PMID:26341579

  7. Dual-Quantum-Dots-Labeled Lateral Flow Strip Rapidly Quantifies Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, XiaoPing; Huang, YunYe; Lin, ZhongShi; Xu, Liang; Yu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    In the article, a dual-quantum-dots-labeled (dual-QDs-labeled) lateral flow strip (LFS) method was developed for the simultaneous and rapid quantitative detection of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. Two QD-antibody conjugates with different fluorescence emission spectra were produced and sprayed on the LFS to capture PCT and CRP in the blood. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich method for PCT and, meanwhile, a competitive inhibition method for CRP were employed in the LFS. For PCT and CRP in serum assayed by the dual-QDs-labeled LFS, their detection sensitivities reached 0.1 and 1 ng/mL, respectively, and their linear quantitative detection ranges were from 0.3 to 200 ng/mL and from 50 to 250 μg/mL, respectively. There was little evidence that the PCT and CRP assays would be interfered with each other. The correlations for testing CRP and PCT in clinical samples were 99.75 and 97.02 %, respectively, between the dual-QDs-labeled LFS we developed and commercial methods. The rapid quantification of PCT and CRP on dual-QDs-labeled LFS is of great clinical value to distinguish inflammation, bacterial infection, or viral infection and to provide guidance for the use of antibiotics or other medicines.

  8. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP. PMID:26907682

  9. Ratio of C-Reactive Protein to Albumin Predicts Muscle Mass in Adult Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Tong; Wu, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Hsu, Yung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the ratio of C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP–Alb ratio) is associated with clinical outcomes in patients with disease. We examined the predictive value of this ratio in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In this cross-sectional study, 91 eligible adult HD patients were analyzed, and the correlation between the CRP–Alb ratio and skeletal muscle mass normalized for body weight (SMM/wt; estimated using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer) was investigated. The mean age of the study participants was 54.9 ± 6.6 years (ranging from 27 to 64 years); 43 (47.2%) were men. The mean values for the SMM/wt were 39.1% ± 5.4%. The CRP–Alb ratio was found to be negatively correlated with SMM/wt (r = −0.33, P = 0.002) and creatinine (r = −0.20, P = 0.056). All the univariate significant and nonsignificant relevant covariates were selected for multivariable stepwise regression analysis. We determined that the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance and CRP–Alb ratio were independent risk determinants for SMM/wt (βHOMA-IR = −0.18 and βCRP–Alb ratio = −3.84, adjusted R2 = 0.32). This study indicated that the CRP–Alb ratio may help clinicians in predicting muscle mass in adult patients undergoing HD. PMID:27768746

  10. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) & cardiovascular disease: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Deepak Y.; Xavier, Denis; Sigamani, Alben; Pais, Prem

    2015-01-01

    The role of low grade systemic inflammation as evidenced by elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease has been intensely investigated through observational studies and clinical trials in the past two decades. On the basis of evidence that has accrued, hsCRP measurement has been integrated into the Reynolds risk scoring system to predict cardiovascular risk. The JUPITER trial proved the benefit of statins in cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with low grades of systemic inflammation and ‘normal’ cholesterol levels. However, substantial evidence has been generated from western studies. We, therefore, conducted a scoping review for studies done in India with a view to identify gaps in evidence and make further recommendations. Most Indian studies had small sample sizes and short term follow ups. There were no large population based prospective studies where patients were followed up for long periods of time for major cardiovascular end points. An analysis of the hsCRP level from the control arms of case-control studies derived a mean hsCRP value of 1.88 mg/l, which is higher than the western population where values < 1 mg/l are classified as low cardiovascular risk. Further large prospective cohort studies with longer term follow ups are essential before we can make further recommendations to integrate hsCRP into risk prediction models for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:26458341

  11. Effects of Different Exercise Intensities with Isoenergetic Expenditures on C-Reactive Protein and Blood Lipid Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Te Hung; Yang, Chang Bin; Hsu, Chin Hsing

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of different exercise intensities on C-reactive protein (CRP), and whether changes in CRP levels correlated with blood lipid levels. Ten men exercised at 25%, 65%, and 85% of their maximum oxygen consumption rates. Participants' blood was analyzed for CRP and blood lipid levels before and after the exercise sessions.…

  12. The Complementary Role of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in the Diagnosis and Severity Assessment of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khakzad, Mohammad Reza; Javanbakht, Maryam; Shayegan, Mohammad Reza; Kianoush, Sina; Omid, Fatemeh; Hojati, Maryam; Meshkat, Mojtaba

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a beneficial diagnostic test for the evaluation of inflammatory response. Extremely low levels of CRP can be detected using high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test. A considerable body of evidence has demonstrated that inflammatory response has an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. In this study, we evaluated…

  13. A role for secretory phospholipase A2 and C-reactive protein in the removal of injured cells.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Wolbink, G J; Schalkwijk, C; Speijer, H; Hermens, W T; van den Bosch, H

    1997-03-01

    The acute phase response is initiated in response to infection or physical trauma and is characterized by an increase in the levels of some plasma proteins. Here, Erik Hack and colleagues suggest that the combined actions of two of these acute phase proteins, secretory phospholipase A2 and C-reactive protein, may serve to promote phagocytosis of injured cells and tissue debris, thereby enhancing inflammation and tissue damage.

  14. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (-42 to -57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (-63 to -74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (-59 to -66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism.

  15. Air Pollution and Inflammation (Interleukin-6, C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen) in Myocardial Infarction Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Rückerl, Regina; Greven, Sonja; Ljungman, Petter; Aalto, Pasi; Antoniades, Charalambos; Bellander, Tom; Berglind, Niklas; Chrysohoou, Christina; Forastiere, Francesco; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; von Klot, Stephanie; Koenig, Wolfgang; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Lanki, Timo; Pekkanen, Juha; Perucci, Carlo A.; Schneider, Alexandra; Sunyer, Jordi; Peters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have found that ambient air pollution has been associated with cardiovascular disease exacerbation. Objectives Given previous findings, we hypothesized that particulate air pollution might induce systemic inflammation in myocardial infarction (MI) survivors, contributing to an increased vulnerability to elevated concentrations of ambient particles. Methods A prospective longitudinal study of 1,003 MI survivors was performed in six European cities between May 2003 and July 2004. We compared repeated measurements of interleukin 6 (IL-6), fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) with concurrent levels of air pollution. We collected hourly data on particle number concentrations (PNC), mass concentrations of particulate matter (PM) < 10 μm (PM10) and < 2.5 μm (PM2.5), gaseous pollutants, and meteorologic data at central monitoring sites in each city. City-specific confounder models were built for each blood marker separately, adjusting for meteorology and time-varying and time-invariant covariates. Data were analyzed with mixed-effects models. Results Pooled results show an increase in IL-6 when concentrations of PNC were elevated 12–17 hr before blood withdrawal [percent change of geometric mean, 2.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0–4.6]. Five day cumulative exposure to PM10 was associated with increased fibrinogen concentrations (percent change of arithmetic mean, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.1–1.1). Results remained stable for smokers, diabetics, and patients with heart failure. No consistent associations were found for CRP. Conclusions Results indicate an immediate response to PNC on the IL-6 level, possibly leading to the production of acute-phase proteins, as seen in increased fibrinogen levels. This might provide a link between air pollution and adverse cardiac events. PMID:17637925

  16. Targeting C-reactive protein for the treatment of cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepys, Mark B.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Ruth Gallimore, J.; Kahan, Melvyn C.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Hawkins, Philip N.; Myers, Rebecca M.; Smith, Martin D.; Polara, Alessandra; Cobb, Alexander J. A.; Ley, Steven V.; Andrew Aquilina, J.; Robinson, Carol V.; Sharif, Isam; Gray, Gillian A.; Sabin, Caroline A.; Jenvey, Michelle C.; Kolstoe, Simon E.; Thompson, Darren; Wood, Stephen P.

    2006-04-01

    Complement-mediated inflammation exacerbates the tissue injury of ischaemic necrosis in heart attacks and strokes, the most common causes of death in developed countries. Large infarct size increases immediate morbidity and mortality and, in survivors of the acute event, larger non-functional scars adversely affect long-term prognosis. There is thus an important unmet medical need for new cardioprotective and neuroprotective treatments. We have previously shown that human C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein that binds to ligands exposed in damaged tissue and then activates complement, increases myocardial and cerebral infarct size in rats subjected to coronary or cerebral artery ligation, respectively. Rat CRP does not activate rat complement, whereas human CRP activates both rat and human complement. Administration of human CRP to rats is thus an excellent model for the actions of endogenous human CRP. Here we report the design, synthesis and efficacy of 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane as a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CRP. Five molecules of this palindromic compound are bound by two pentameric CRP molecules, crosslinking and occluding the ligand-binding B-face of CRP and blocking its functions. Administration of 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane to rats undergoing acute myocardial infarction abrogated the increase in infarct size and cardiac dysfunction produced by injection of human CRP. Therapeutic inhibition of CRP is thus a promising new approach to cardioprotection in acute myocardial infarction, and may also provide neuroprotection in stroke. Potential wider applications include other inflammatory, infective and tissue-damaging conditions characterized by increased CRP production, in which binding of CRP to exposed ligands in damaged cells may lead to complement-mediated exacerbation of tissue injury.

  17. Lectin specificity and binding characteristics of human C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Köttgen, E; Hell, B; Kage, A; Tauber, R

    1992-07-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is thought to play an important role in immunomodulation. The exact biologic function of this pentraxin protein is, however, still unclear. Here we report experiments designed to further characterize the binding properties of CRP. Using purified human CRP it could be shown that CRP immobilized onto polystyrene surfaces or onto latex beads binds distinct plasma glycoproteins including IgG, asialofetuin, asialo-beta 2-glycoprotein I and, likewise, synthetic glycoproteins as a lectin, exhibiting binding specificity for terminal galactosyl residues of the glycoprotein glycans. Binding of CRP to IgA, IgM, IgG, asialofetuin, asialo-beta 2-glycoprotein I and to synthetic glycoproteins requires immobilization onto surfaces of both CRP and the ligand. Fibronectin and fibrinogen are bound by surface-immobilized CRP also in soluble phase. Comparing various mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as competitive inhibitors of the lectin binding activity of CRP, only beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-D-GalNAc, beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-D-GalNAc, and beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-D-GlcNAc had significant inhibitory power at a concentration of 8 mmol/liter. Binding activity of CRP was pH-dependent with an optimum at pH 5 to 6 and was reduced by 90% when pH was shifted from 6 to the physiologic pH value of 7.4. CRP exhibited lectin-like properties with binding specificity for galactosyl residues also when bound to K-562 erythroleukemia cells. It is therefore suggested that CRP immobilized onto surfaces exhibits lectin activity toward galactosyl groups preferentially in a mildly acidic environment as present at sites of inflammation.

  18. Dietary patterns and risk of elevated C-reactive protein concentrations 12 years later.

    PubMed

    Julia, Chantal; Meunier, Nathalie; Touvier, Mathilde; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Sapin, Vincent; Papet, Isabelle; Cano, Noël; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation mediates several chronic diseases. Micronutrients can act on inflammation, either through modulating cytokine production or by scavenging by-products of activated white cells. Identifying dietary patterns (DP) reflecting these mechanisms and relating them to inflammation is of interest. The objective of the study was to identify DP specifically associated with intakes of nutrients potentially involved in inflammatory processes in a middle-aged population and investigate long-term associations between these DP and C-reactive protein (CRP) status assessed several years later. Subjects included in the Supplementation in Vitamins and Mineral Antioxidants 2 cohort study, having available data on dietary assessment carried out in 1994-5 and CRP measurement in 2007-9, were included in the analysis. DP were extracted with reduced rank regression (RRR), using antioxidant micronutrients and PUFA as response variables. Associations between CRP measurements >3 mg/l and extracted DP were then examined with logistic regression models providing OR and 95% CI. A total of 2031 subjects (53·2% women, mean follow-up duration: 12·5 years) were included in the analyses. Of the four extracted DP, a DP with high loading values of vegetables and vegetable oils, leading to high intakes of antioxidant micronutrients and essential fatty acids, was significantly and negatively associated with risk of elevated CRP (OR 0·88; 95% CI 0·78, 0·98). Conversely, a DP reflecting a high n-6:n-3 fatty acid intake ratio was positively and significantly associated with elevated CRP (adjusted OR 1·15; 95% CI 1·00, 1·32). DP extracted with RRR provide support for further exploration of relationships between dietary behaviour and inflammation.

  19. Effect of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms and C-reactive protein in migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Tayebeh; Askari, Gholamreza; Khorvash, Fariborz; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migarine is the most common headache around the world including Iran. In recent years, Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to a global health problem. A few studies have been determined inverse association between serum levels of Vitamin D with a headache. So, in this study, we investigated the effect of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms and C-reactive protein (CRP) among patients with migraine. Materials and Methods: This study was randomized, double-blind, and controlled-placebo clinical trial. Sixty-five migraine patients aged 10-61 years were included for analysis. Vitamin D was administrated for 10 weeks with 50,000 IU dosage of Vitamin D per week. Multivariate analysis of covariate and univariate analysis of covariate were done to determine the effects of Vitamin D supplementation on symptoms, including severity, duration, frequency of headache, and the headache diary result (HDR). Results: Mean headache frequency and HDR had significant difference among two groups (5.9 ± 7.0 vs. 7.0 ± 6.0, P = 0.06 and 85.0 ± 134.2 vs. 132.1 ± 147.1, P = 0.04). But, a mean difference of headache frequency was marginally significant (P = 0.06). These values were lower among the intervention group compared to placebo group. The association was not observed between CRP with migraine disease. Conclusion: In this study, we shown Vitamin D supplementation may be useful in decreasing frequency of headache attacks and HDR among patients with migraine. PMID:26487877

  20. The Diagnostic Value of the Pleural Fluid C-Reactive Protein in Parapneumonic Effusions.

    PubMed

    Izhakian, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G; Fox, Benjamin D; Vainshelboim, Baruch; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of pleural C-reactive protein (CRP) biomarker levels in identifying parapneumonic effusions. Methods. A single-center, retrospective review of 244 patients diagnosed with pleural effusions was initiated among patients at the Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel, between January 2011 and December 2013. The patients were categorized into 4 groups according to their type of pleural effusion as follows: heart failure, malignant, post-lung transplantation, and parapneumonic effusion. Results. The pleural CRP levels significantly differentiated the four groups (p < 0.001) with the following means: parapneumonic effusion, 5.38 ± 4.85 mg/dL; lung transplant, 2.77 ± 2.66 mg/dL; malignancy, 1.19 ± 1.51 mg/dL; and heart failure, 0.57 ± 0.81 mg/dL. The pleural fluid CRP cut-off value for differentiating among parapneumonic effusions and the other 3 groups was 1.38 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 84.2%, 71.5%, 37%, and 95%, respectively. A backward logistic regression model selected CRP as the single predictor of parapneumonic effusion (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.37-1.89). Conclusions. Pleural fluid CRP levels can be used to distinguish between parapneumonic effusions and other types of exudative effusions. CRP levels < 0.64 mg/dL are likely to indicate a pleural effusion from congestive heart failure, whereas levels ≥ 1.38 mg/dL are suggestive of an infectious etiology.

  1. The Diagnostic Value of the Pleural Fluid C-Reactive Protein in Parapneumonic Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Izhakian, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G.; Fox, Benjamin D.; Vainshelboim, Baruch; Kramer, Mordechai R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of pleural C-reactive protein (CRP) biomarker levels in identifying parapneumonic effusions. Methods. A single-center, retrospective review of 244 patients diagnosed with pleural effusions was initiated among patients at the Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel, between January 2011 and December 2013. The patients were categorized into 4 groups according to their type of pleural effusion as follows: heart failure, malignant, post-lung transplantation, and parapneumonic effusion. Results. The pleural CRP levels significantly differentiated the four groups (p < 0.001) with the following means: parapneumonic effusion, 5.38 ± 4.85 mg/dL; lung transplant, 2.77 ± 2.66 mg/dL; malignancy, 1.19 ± 1.51 mg/dL; and heart failure, 0.57 ± 0.81 mg/dL. The pleural fluid CRP cut-off value for differentiating among parapneumonic effusions and the other 3 groups was 1.38 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 84.2%, 71.5%, 37%, and 95%, respectively. A backward logistic regression model selected CRP as the single predictor of parapneumonic effusion (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.37–1.89). Conclusions. Pleural fluid CRP levels can be used to distinguish between parapneumonic effusions and other types of exudative effusions. CRP levels < 0.64 mg/dL are likely to indicate a pleural effusion from congestive heart failure, whereas levels ≥ 1.38 mg/dL are suggestive of an infectious etiology. PMID:27194820

  2. Cumulative Depression Episodes Predicts Later C-Reactive Protein Levels: A Prospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E. Jane

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is associated with elevated levels of the inflammation marker C -reactive protein (CRP), yet the direction of this association remains unclear. This study tested bi-directional longitudinal associations between CRP and depression in a sample of adolescent and young adults. The study compared the effects of current depression to the cumulative episodes of depression over time. Methods Nine waves of data from the prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (N = 1,420) were used, covering children in the community aged 9–16, 19, and 21 years old. Structured interviews were used to assess depressive symptoms, depression diagnosis, and cumulative depressive episodes. Bloodspots were collected at each observation and assayed for CRP levels. Results CRP levels were not associated with later depression status. In contrast, all depression-related variables displayed evidence of association with later CRP levels. The associations with depressive symptoms and diagnostic status were attenuated after controlling for covariates particularly body mass index, smoking, and medication use. The effect of cumulative depressive episodes, however, continued to be significant after accounting for a range of covariates. Body mass index, smoking behavior and recent infections may mediate a portion of the effect of cumulative episodes on later CRP, but cumulative depressive episodes continued to predict CRP levels independently. Conclusions The occurrence of multiple depressive episodes exerted the greatest effect on later CRP levels. This suggests that risk for the diseases of middle age - cardiovascular and metabolic disease – may begin in childhood and depend, in part, upon long-term emotional functioning. PMID:22047718

  3. CRP (C-reactive protein) in Early Pregnancy Predictor for Development of GDM.

    PubMed

    Fatema, N; Deeba, F; Akter, S; Sultana, N; Nasrin, B; Ali, L; Begum, S A

    2016-04-01

    This case-control study was done to find out whether elevated serum CRP in early pregnancy is a predictor of GDM and conducted under joined supervision of Obstetrics & Gynecology Department, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) Hospital and Biomedical Research Group (BMRG), BIRDEM, from August 2005 to November 2007. Pregnant mothers at their first 16 weeks of gestation without any medical disorder of pregnancy were included in the study. For the purpose of this study blood samples were again collected for OGTT at their 16weeks, 24-28 weeks and 32 weeks of pregnancy to detect GDM. After confirmation of GDM, C-reactive protein and C-peptide were done from the preserved fasting serum sample at the end of this study to compare GDM with control group. A total of 297 patients were included in this study. Among them 145(48%) patients completed follow up, 59(20%) lost from follow-up and 11(4%) patients had abortion; 82(28%) are due for follow up 31(10%) pregnant patients developed GDM subsequently. Finally 28 GDM patients were taken as cases and 71 were control matched for their gestational age and parity. At earlier weeks of gestation, hsCRP could predict (PPV) development of GDM in 59% with NPV 84%, sensitivity 61% and specificity 83%. C-peptide in the 50th percentile could predict (PPV) development of GDM in 58% with NPV 96%, sensitivity 72% and specificity 93%. The present data indicates that hsCRP and C-peptide both is sensitive markers in predicting GDM. PMID:27277359

  4. Association between dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jennifer A.; Ma, Yunsheng; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Olendzki, Barbara; Chiriboga, David; Stanek, Edward J.; Merriam, Philip; Ockene, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study examined the relationship between quality of dietary carbohydrate intake, as measured by glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), and high sensitivity serum C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. Method During a one-year observational study, data were collected at baseline and at each quarter thereafter. GI and GL were calculated from multiple 24-hour dietary recalls (24HRs), three randomly selected 24HRs at every quarter, with up to fifteen 24HRs per participant. Hs-CRP was measured in blood samples collected at baseline and each of the four quarterly measurement points. Multivariable linear mixed models were used to examine both the cross-sectional and the longitudinal association of GI, GL, and hs-CRP. Results Among 582 adult men and women with at least two measures of both diet and hs-CRP, average daily GI score (white bread=100) was 85 and average GL was 198, Average hs-CRP was 1.84 mg/l. Overall, there was no association between either GI or GL and hs-CRP. Subgroup analyses revealed an inverse association between GL and hs-CRP, among obese individuals (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2). Conclusions Quality of dietary carbohydrates does not appear to be associated with serum hs-CRP levels. Among obese individuals higher dietary GL appears to be related to lower hs-CRP levels. Due to the limited number of studies on this topic and their conflicting results, further investigation is warranted. PMID:18402914

  5. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidoroff, Marianne; Karikoski, Riitta; Raivio, Taneli; Savilahti, Erkki; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) measurement can aid the assessment of disease activity and glucocorticoid treatment in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: CRP levels were measured in 39 children with IBD undergoing colonoscopy [median age 12.8 years, Crohn’s disease (CD) n = 20], in 22 other children with IBD followed for acute response to glucocorticoids, and in 33 paediatric non-IBD patients. When standard CRP level was below detection limit (< 5 mg/L), hs-CRP was analyzed. RESULTS: Sixty-four percent (25/39) of the children with IBD undergoing colonoscopy displayed undetectable (< 5 mg/L) standard CRP levels. Of these, the hs-CRP measurement could not differentiate between active (median, 0.2 mg/L, range, 0.007-1.37, n = 17) or quiescent (0.1 mg/L, 0.01-1.89, n = 8, P = NS) disease. Patients with ileocolonic CD had higher CRP levels (14 mg/L, 0.06-45, n = 13) than patients with no ileal involvement (0.18 mg/L, 0.01-9, n = 7, P < 0.01) or ulcerative colitis (UC) (0.13 mg/L, 0.007-23, P < 0.05). In children with active IBD treated with systemic glucocorticoids, the standard CRP was undetectable in 59% of the patients. The hs-CRP levels did not differ between patients that responded to steroid therapy and in non-responders. CONCLUSION: The measurement of hs-CRP did not prove useful in the assessment of disease activity or glucocorticoid treatment in paediatric IBD patients that had undetectable standard CRP. PMID:20556836

  6. Differential diagnosis of elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels: a rheumatology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bitik, Berivan; Mercan, Rıdvan; Tufan, Abdurrahman; Tezcan, Engin; Küçük, Hamit; İlhan, Mustafa; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Haznedaroğlu, Seminur; Göker, Berna

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the case of high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, the diagnosis of the underlying disease can be challenging especially in serologically unrevealing patients who have nonspecific clinical findings. We aimed to investigate the final distribution of definitive diagnoses in patients who initially presented with nonspecific clinical findings and sustained elevations in serum ESR/CRP levels. Material and Methods The medical records of patients hospitalized in a rheumatology clinic between January 2010 and January 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were classified into two main groups: those with previously diagnosed underlying rheumatic disease (RD) and those without. The groups were analyzed for the final distribution of definitive diagnoses. Results Out of 112 patients in the general study population, 47 had a previous RD and 65 had no previous history of RD. In these 65 patients, the most common etiology of nonspecific elevations in ESR/CRP levels was new onset RD (52.3%). Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) was the most common new onset RD (38% of all new onset RD) followed by seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. The incidences of infections and malignancies were 24.6% and 9.2%, respectively. CRP levels were significantly higher in infections when compared with new onset RD or malignancies (p<0.05). In patients with previous RD, the flare of the underlying disease was the most common etiology of nonspecific elevations in ESR/CRP levels (n=39, 83%, 20 female/19 male). Conclusion Extraordinarily high levels of serum CRP in a patient with nonspecific clinical findings should raise suspicion for non-rheumatic diagnoses, such as infection and malignancy, even in the presence of a previously diagnosed RD. Advanced radiological investigation is justified in these cases to rule out malignancy.

  7. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Predicts Mortality and Technique Failure in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Li, Yi-Jung; Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Lin, Chan-Yu; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Hsu, Hsiang-Hao; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An elevated level of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is widely considered an indicator of an underlying inflammatory disease and a long-term prognostic predictor for dialysis patients. This cross-sectional cohort study was designed to assess the correlation between the level of high-sensitivity CRP (HS-CRP) and the outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Methods A total of 402 patients were stratified into 3 tertiles (lower, middle, upper) according to serum HS-CRP level and and followed up from October 2009 to September 2011. During follow-up, cardiovascular events, infection episodes, technique failure, and mortality rate were recorded. Results During the 24-month follow-up, 119 of 402 patients (29.6%) dropped out from PD, including 28 patients (7.0%) who died, 81 patients (20.1%) who switched to hemodialysis, and 10 patients (2.5%) who underwent kidney transplantation. The results of Kaplan–Meier analysis and log-rank test demonstrated a significant difference in the cumulative patient survival rate across the 3 tertiles (the lowest rate in upper tertile). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, only higher HS-CRP level, older age, the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), lower serum albumin level, and the occurrence of cardiovascular events during follow-up were identified as independent predictors of mortality. Every 1 mg/L increase in HS-CRP level was independently predictive of a 1.4% increase in mortality. Multivariate Cox regression analysis also showed that higher HS-CRP level, the presence of DM, lower hemoglobin level, lower serum albumin level, higher dialysate/plasma creatinine ratio, and the occurrence of infective episodes and cardiovascular events during follow-up were independent predictors of technique failure. Conclusions The present study shows the importance of HS-CRP in the prediction of 2-year mortality and technique survival in PD patients independent of age, diabetes, hypoalbuminemia, and the occurrence of

  8. Determinants of C-reactive protein in chronic hemodialysis patients: relevance of dialysis catheter utilization.

    PubMed

    Hung, Adriana; Pupim, Lara; Yu, Chang; Shintani, Ayumi; Siew, Edward; Ayus, Carlos; Hakim, Raymond M; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2008-04-01

    Biomarkers of inflammation, especially C-reactive protein (CRP), have been consistently shown to predict poor outcomes in chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients. However, the determinants of CRP and the value of its monitoring in CHD patients have not been well defined. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate possible determinants of the inflammatory response in CHD patients with a focus on dialysis catheter utilization. Monthly CRP were measured in 128 prevalent CHD patients (mean age 56.6 years [range 19-90], 68% African Americans, 39% diabetics [DM]) over a mean follow-up of 12 months (range 2-26 months). There were a total of 2405 CRP measurements (median 5.7 mg/L; interquartile range [IQR] 2.4-16.6 mg/L). The presence of a dialysis catheter (p<0.002), cardiovascular disease (p=0.01), male gender (p=0.005), higher white blood cell count (p<0.0001), elevated phosphorus (p=0.03), and lower cholesterol (p=0.02) and albumin (p<0.0001) concentrations were independent predictors of elevated CRP in the multivariate analysis. Additionally, CRP levels were significantly associated with the presence of a catheter, when comparing the levels before and after catheter insertion (p=0.002) as well as before and after catheter removal (p=0.009). Our results indicate that the presence of a hemodialysis catheter is an independent determinant of an exaggerated inflammatory response in CHD patients representing a potentially modifiable risk factor. PMID:18394058

  9. Pleiotropy among Common Genetic Loci Identified for Cardiometabolic Disorders and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ligthart, Symen; de Vries, Paul S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Dehghan, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotropic genetic variants have independent effects on different phenotypes. C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with several cardiometabolic phenotypes. Shared genetic backgrounds may partially underlie these associations. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify the shared genetic background of inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes using published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We also evaluated whether the pleiotropic effects of such loci were biological or mediated in nature. First, we examined whether 283 common variants identified for 10 cardiometabolic phenotypes in GWAS are associated with CRP level. Second, we tested whether 18 variants identified for serum CRP are associated with 10 cardiometabolic phenotypes. We used a Bonferroni corrected p-value of 1.1×10-04 (0.05/463) as a threshold of significance. We evaluated the independent pleiotropic effect on both phenotypes using individual level data from the Women Genome Health Study. Evaluating the genetic overlap between inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes, we found 13 pleiotropic regions. Additional analyses showed that 6 regions (APOC1, HNF1A, IL6R, PPP1R3B, HNF4A and IL1F10) appeared to have a pleiotropic effect on CRP independent of the effects on the cardiometabolic phenotypes. These included loci where individuals carrying the risk allele for CRP encounter higher lipid levels and risk of type 2 diabetes. In addition, 5 regions (GCKR, PABPC4, BCL7B, FTO and TMEM18) had an effect on CRP largely mediated through the cardiometabolic phenotypes. In conclusion, our results show genetic pleiotropy among inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes. In addition to reverse causation, our data suggests that pleiotropic genetic variants partially underlie the association between CRP and cardiometabolic phenotypes. PMID:25768928

  10. Role of Doppler Ultrasonography and C-Reactive Protein in Patients with Acute Scrotum.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Abdulwahid G; Elkhader, Bahaaedin A; Saade, Charbel; Fagiri, Maram A; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z

    2016-01-01

    This research was designate with an intention to find the role of Doppler ultrasonography (DUS) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with acute scrotum. A sum of 80 (mean age 23±2.1 years) consequential patients were recruited for a period of six months between July 2015 and January 2016 in this prospective study. Collected data confined age, medical history, and clinical symptoms. DUS was performed with a linear array transducer (10-15 MHz) connected to HI vision Avius ultrasound unit; Hitachi. CRP was measured using turbidimetric analysis through the Cobas Integra analyzer system (Test CRPL2, 0-293); Roche Diagnostics. Statistical analysis was accomplished using the standard Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 for Windows; Microsoft. Fitted achievement values for DUS in the diagnosis of testicular torsion, epididymo-orchitis, and varicocele were respectively 100%, 91% and 88% for sensitivity, 92%, 71%, and 90% for specificity, and 94%, 83%, and 89% for accuracy. An increased in the serum CRP level (63.2±40.2 mg/L) was seen in an inflammatory cause of the acute scrotum. In contrast, there was no increase in CRP level (8±3.1 mg/L) in the non-inflammatory cases (P < 0.0001). Scrotal DUS is a highly precise preoperative diagnostic instrument, thereby confirm its course application in the incipient triage of patients with acute scrotum. Serum level of CRP can afford useful advice for differentiation between inflammatory and other reasons of the acute scrotum. PMID:27530575

  11. H-Type Hypertension and C Reactive Protein in Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Qiu, De-Xing; Fu, Rong-Li; Xu, Tian-Fen; Jing, Meng-Juan; Zhang, Hui-Shan; Geng, He-Hong; Zheng, Long-Chao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension with high homocysteine (HHcy) (H-type hypertension) and C reactive protein (CRP) can increase the incidence of ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear whether recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS) is related to H-type hypertension and CRP. The present study investigated the correlation of H-type hypertension and CRP level with RIS. Totally, 987 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were recruited in a teaching hospital in Henan province, China during March 2014 to March 2015. The demographic and clinical characteristics and blood biochemical parameters of patients were analyzed. Elevated levels of CRP and homocysteine (Hcy) were defined as >8.2 mg/L and 10 μmol/L, respectively. Among the 987 patients, 234 were RIS. Thirty-eight percent of RIS patients had elevated CRP level and 91.5% of RIS patients had HHcy. In multivariate analysis, adjusted odds ratio (OR) of RIS in patients aged ≥60 years was 1.576 (95% CI: 1.125-2.207), in male patients 1.935 (95% CI: 1.385-2.704), in patients with diabetes 1.463 (95% CI: 1.037-2.064), CRP levels 1.013 (95% CI: 1.006-1.019), simple hypertension 3.370 (95% CI: 1.15-10.183), and H-type hypertension 2.990 (95% CI: 1.176-7.600). RIS was associated with older age, male, diabetes, H-type hypertension and CRP. Controlling H-type hypertension and CRP level may reduce the risk of RIS. PMID:27164124

  12. Serum leptin, C-reactive protein, and cancer mortality in the NHANES III.

    PubMed

    Wulaningsih, Wahyu; Holmberg, Lars; Ng, Tony; Rohrmann, Sabine; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Adipokines, such as leptin, may affect cancer through its link with inflammation and obesity. We investigated the association between leptin, C-reactive protein, and risk of cancer death while accounting general and abdominal obesity. From the Third National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES III), we selected 5957 adult men and women with baseline measurements of serum leptin and CRP. Multivariable Cox regression was used to assess leptin and CRP levels (low, moderate, high) in relation to risk of cancer death. Stratification analyses were performed for obesity as defined by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Fine and Gray regression was performed to account for death from cardiovascular disease and other causes as competing events. A total of 385 participants died of cancer during a mean follow-up of 18 years. After adjusting for BMI and waist circumference, an inverse association with log-transformed leptin was found for women, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.51-1.30) and 0.40 (95% CI: 0.24-0.68) for moderate and high compared to low levels of leptin, respectively; P(trend) = 0.0007). No association for leptin was observed in men, but higher CRP corresponded to increased risk of dying from cancer (HR: 2.98; 95% CI: 1.57-5.64 for the highest vs. lowest categories of CRP). Similar associations were observed with competing risk analysis also adjusted for BMI and waist circumference. Contrasting associations of serum leptin and CRP with cancer mortality may indicate sex-specific biological or environmental pathways linking obesity and cancer in men and women which warrant mechanistic investigations.

  13. Binding site of C-reactive protein on M-ficolin.

    PubMed

    Tanio, Michikazu; Wakamatsu, Kaori; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2009-12-01

    The binding abilities of human C-reactive protein (CRP) with the C-terminal fibrinogen-like (FBG) domain and the full-length form of human M-ficolin were investigated by pull-down and zonal affinity chromatography analyses. Pull-down assays using an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc)-agarose column demonstrated that CRP binds to the trimeric FBG domains, and that the GlcNAc-binding ability of the FBG domain is unaffected by CRP binding. Interestingly, the full-length M-ficolin, comprising the N-terminal collagen-like (COL) and C-terminal FBG domains, displayed lower affinity for CRP, and the monomeric FBG domain showed virtually no binding to CRP, as qualitatively judged by zonal affinity chromatography using a GlcNAc column. These results indicated that CRP binding requires the trimeric form of the FBG domain, and that the presence of the COL domain reduces the interaction between CRP and M-ficolin. In addition, pull-down assays using a histidine-tag affinity column demonstrated that neither the full-length M-ficolin nor the trimeric FBG domains, immobilized through their C-terminal histidine tags, showed any affinity for CRP, indicating that the CRP binding site is located near Ala326 at the C-terminus of M-ficolin, spatially close to a neck region (around Pro115) between the FBG and COL domains. From these findings, we concluded that CRP binding is enhanced by conformational bending at the neck region of M-ficolin, to avoid steric hindrance by the COL domain. Such a situation may be generated by oligomeric M-ficolin binding to surfaces with widely distributed ligands, such as pathogens. PMID:19853918

  14. Baseline C-Reactive Protein Levels and Life Prognosis in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Hideyuki; Oeda, Tomoko; Umemura, Atsushi; Tomita, Satoshi; Kohsaka, Masayuki; Park, Kwiyoung; Yamamoto, Kenji; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of inflammation, and high levels of CRP correlate with vascular death. Chronic inflammation is considered to be involved in neurodegeneration, although there is no evidence linking it with the process of neurodegenerative diseases. Objective To determine the role of baseline CRP levels in the prognosis of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods A cohort of 313 patients with a mean age of 69.1 and mean PD duration of 7.9 years was retrospectively followed for a mean observation time of 1,753 days. CRP was measured when patients were not diagnosed with any infections, and levels were repetitively measured to investigate a tendency of “regression to mean.” The primary outcome measure was a survival time from study enrollment to death. Results During the observation period 56 patients died. Baseline CRP was log-linearly associated with a risk of death in PD. Mean survival time was 3,149 (95% confidence interval; 3,009-3,289) days in patients with CRP ≤ 0.8mg/L (lower two thirds) and 2,620 (2,343-2,897) days in those with CRP > 0.8 mg/L (top third, p < 0.001, log-rank test). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per two-fold higher CRP concentration for all deaths was 1.29 (1.10-1.52), and after excluding PD-unrelated deaths, such as cancer or stroke, HR was 1.23 (1.01-1.49) (adjusted for age, sex, PD duration, modified Hohen-Yahr stages, MMSE scores, and serum albumin). Conclusions Baseline CRP concentrations were associated with the risk of death and predicted life prognosis of patients with PD. The associations were independent from PD duration, PD severity, cognitive function, ages, and nutritional conditions, suggesting the possibility that subclinical chronic inflammation is associated with a neurodegenerative process in PD. PMID:26218286

  15. C-reactive protein and long-term ischemic stroke prognosis.

    PubMed

    VanGilder, Reyna L; Davidov, Danielle M; Stinehart, Kyle R; Huber, Jason D; Turner, Ryan C; Wilson, Karen S; Haney, Eric; Davis, Stephen M; Chantler, Paul D; Theeke, Laurie; Rosen, Charles L; Crocco, Todd J; Gutmann, Laurie; Barr, Taura L

    2014-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory biomarker of inflammation and may reflect progression of vascular disease. Conflicting evidence suggests CRP may be a prognostic biomarker of ischemic stroke outcome. Most studies that have examined the relationship between CRP and ischemic stroke outcome have used mortality or subsequent vascular event as the primary outcome measure. Given that nearly half of stroke patients experience moderate to severe functional impairments, using a biomarker like CRP to predict functional recovery rather than mortality may have clinical utility for guiding acute stroke treatments. The primary aim of this study was to systematically and critically review the relationship between CRP and long-term functional outcome in ischemic stroke patients to evaluate the current state of the literature. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were searched for original studies which assessed the relationship between acute CRP levels measured within 24 hours of symptom onset and long-term functional outcome. The search yielded articles published between 1989 and 2012. Included studies used neuroimaging to confirm ischemic stroke diagnosis, high-sensitivity CRP assay, and a functional outcome scale to assess prognosis beyond 30 days after stroke. Study quality was assessed using the REMARK recommendations. Five studies met all inclusion criteria. Results indicate a significant association between elevated baseline high sensitivity CRP and unfavorable long-term functional outcome. Our results emphasize the need for additional research to characterize the relationship between acute inflammatory markers and long-term functional outcome using well-defined diagnostic criteria. Additional studies are warranted to prospectively examine the relationship between high sensitivity CRP measures and long-term outcome.

  16. Metabolic syndrome: prevalence, associated factors, and C-reactive protein: the MADRIC (MADrid RIesgo Cardiovascular) Study.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Maria A; Puig, Juan G; Mora, Marta; Aragón, Rosa; O'Dogherty, Pascual; Antón, José L; Sánchez-Villares, Teresa; Rubio, José M; Rosado, Javier; Torres, Rosa; Marcos, Joaquín; Pallardo, Luis F; Banegas, José R

    2008-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is defined by the clustering of a number of cardiovascular risk factors. The aims of the present study were to estimate the prevalence of MS in Madrid (Spain) by 2 definitions and to investigate its relationship with several sociodemographic factors and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. This was a cross-sectional population study, and participants were 1344 subjects aged 31 to 70 years. Clinical evaluation included data on sociodemographic and cardiovascular background, physical examination, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The CRP levels were determined in a subgroup of 843 subjects. The diagnosis of MS was made according to the 2005 Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of MS was 24.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.3%-26.9%) using the ATP III definition and 30.9% (95% CI, 28.4%-33.3%) using the International Diabetes Federation definition. The overall agreement rate was 91.5% (kappa = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.76-0.83). Prevalence figures by both definitions were higher in men than in women and increased with age. Male sex, older age, low educational level, and physical inactivity were all determinants of ATP III-defined MS. The presence of MS or any of its components was associated with high CRP levels. In a logistic regression analysis, low educational level and waist circumference were the best predictors for high CRP level. The prevalence of MS in the Madrid region is one of the highest in Europe and confirms the strong Spanish regional variability in this syndrome frequency. Some sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, particularly educational level, are predictors for MS and high CRP levels.

  17. Exploratory Cohort Study of Associations between Serum C - Reactive Protein and Fatigue after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Simiao; Duncan, Fiona; Anderson, Niall H.; Kuppuswamy, Annapoorna; Macloed, Malcolm R.; Mead, Gillian E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Post-stroke fatigue is a common and distressing problem but little is known about its biological mechanisms. This cohort study was to investigate associations between C-reactive protein (CRP) and fatigue after stroke. Methods Patients were assessed at one, six and 12 months after their stroke onset, with the Fatigue Assessment Scale, a case definition of post-stroke fatigue, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and daily step counts. Blood samples were collected at each assessment and the CRP level was determined by a standard CRP immunoassay. Cross-sectional associations between CRP and fatigue at each time point were determined by Pearson correlation coefficient and independent-samples t-test. Whether CRP levels at one month predict fatigue scores at six and 12 months was explored by multiple linear regression, with anxiety, depression, and daily step counts as covariates. Results Sixty-five patients (mean age 67 years, 65% men) were included: 61 at one month, 49 at six months, and 41 at 12 months. CRP levels and fatigue scores were not associated at one month (p = 0.88) or 12 months (p = 0.56), but weakly associated at six months (r = 0.27, p = 0.04); however, this association was no longer significant (p = 0.14) after controlling for the effects of covariates. The CRP level was not associated with the fulfilment of case definition of post-stroke fatigue at any time points (all p > 0.05). The CRP level at one month was not a significant predictor for fatigue levels at either six months (p = 0.93) or 12 months (p = 0.78). Conclusions There is insufficient evidence for the association between CRP and PSF in stroke patients. Future studies with larger sample sizes and controlling for potential confounders are needed to investigate whether this association exists. PMID:26599129

  18. C-reactive protein and fibrin clot strength measured by thrombelastography after coronary stenting.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Owens, Janelle; Breall, Jeffrey A; Lu, Deshun; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Bolad, Islam; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A

    2013-04-01

    Inflammation is implicated in the progression of coronary artery disease and the molecular processes of inflammation and thrombosis are closely intertwined. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with an elevated risk of adverse ischaemic events after coronary stenting and hypercoagulability. Heightened whole blood clot strength measured by thrombelastography (TEG) has been associated with adverse ischaemic events after stenting. We intended to examine the relationship of CRP to plasma fibrin clot strength in patients after coronary stenting. Plasma fibrin clot strength was measured by TEG in 54 patients 16-24 h after undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Coagulation was induced in citrated plasma by addition of kaolin and CaCl2. Plasma levels of CRP and fibrinogen were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Increasing quartiles of CRP were associated with increasing levels of maximal plasma fibrin clot strength measured by TEG (P < 0.001) and increasing BMI (P = 0.04). Patients in the highest quartile of CRP had significantly higher maximal fibrin clot strength (G) than the patients in the lowest quartile (G: 3438 ± 623 vs. 2184 ± 576 dyn/cm, P < 0.0001). Fibrinogen concentration was not significantly different across quartiles of CRP (P = 0.97). Patients with established coronary artery disease undergoing coronary stenting who have elevated CRP after PCI exhibit heightened maximal plasma fibrin clot strength as compared with those with low CRP. Thrombotic risk associated with elevated CRP may be linked to procoagulant changes and high tensile fibrin clot strength independent of fibrinogen concentration.

  19. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Clinical Outcomes after Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Ago, Tetsuro; Hata, Jun; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junya; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Kamouchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is elevated in response to inflammation caused by brain infarction, the association of CRP with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke remains uncertain. This study examined whether plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) levels at onset were associated with clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors and acute infections after stroke. Methods We prospectively included 3653 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent and were hospitalized within 24 h of onset. Plasma hsCRP levels were measured on admission and categorized into quartiles. The association between hsCRP levels and clinical outcomes, including neurological improvement, neurological deterioration, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≥3 at 3 months), were investigated using a logistic regression analysis. Results Higher hsCRP levels were significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke subtype, conventional risk factors, intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapy, and acute infections during hospitalization (multivariate-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the highest quartile versus the lowest quartile as a reference: 0.80 [0.65–0.97] for neurological improvement, 1.72 [1.26–2.34] for neurological deterioration, and 2.03 [1.55–2.67] for a poor functional outcome). These associations were unchanged after excluding patients with infectious diseases occurring during hospitalization, or those with stroke recurrence or death. These trends were similar irrespective of stroke subtypes or baseline stroke severity, but more marked in patients aged <70 years (Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Conclusions High plasma hsCRP is independently associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27258004

  20. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein using quantum dots and immunochromatographic test strips

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xianglin; Pu, Xu; Jun, Pen; Zhu, XiaoBo; Zhu, Di; Chen, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapid immunochromatographic tests can detect disease markers in 10–15 minutes, which facilitates clinical diagnosis and treatment programs. However, most immunochromatographic tests employ gold nanoparticles as reporters, and these have only moderate sensitivity and act as qualitative methods for analyzing high biomarker concentrations. Methods In this study, we introduce quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes and immunochromatographic strips to develop quantitative fluorescence point-of-care tests (QF-POCT) to analyze C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Goat anti-rabbit IgG and rabbit IgG were used as control antibodies, and mouse monoclonal CRP antibody pairs were used for disease marker detection. One monoclonal CRP antibody was conjugated with QDs and served as a signal antibody, and the other monoclonal CRP antibody was dispensed onto the nitrocellulose membrane and served as a capturing antibody. In the presence of CRP, the fluorescence intensity of the monoclonal antibody-CRP-monoclonal antibody sandwich complex captured on the nitrocellulose membrane was determined using the fluorescence strip reader. Results QF-POCT assays could quantitatively analyze the concentration of CRP in 15 minutes had a detection limit of 0.25 mg/L, and had a wide detection linearity range (0.5–300 mg/L). The intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation were 8.95% and 9.86% at 0.5 mg/L, 6.47% and 8.66% at 10 mg/L, and 6.81% and 9.10% at 60 mg/L, respectively. In a comparison between clinical samples, the results of this QD-based assay of CRP levels were significantly correlated with those of an Immulite 2000 assay (R=0.993, P<0.001). Conclusion Our results demonstrated that the QD-based immunochromatographic test is a rapid, sensitive, accurate, and quantitative method for the detection of disease biomarkers. PMID:25506215

  1. C-Reactive Protein, Lipid-soluble Micronutrients, and Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Robert V.; Chai, Weiwen; Franke, Adrian A.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Marchand, Loic Le

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of biomarkers associated with survival in cancer patients is important for elucidating the underlying mechanisms of cancer progression and identifying possible interventions to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality. Methods Using stored patient plasma samples from a multiethnic population-based case-control study of invasive colorectal cancer, we measured post-treatment blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipid-soluble micronutrients. Patients (n=368) were followed after phlebotomy (mean of 8 years), during which time 47% died (25% colorectal cancer-specific). Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression with adjustment for stage, age at diagnosis, ethnicity, sex, smoking status, and month of blood draw. Results A positive association with overall risk of death was observed for CRP (HR for highest vs. lowest quintile: 1.80; 95% CI: 1.07-3.04; Ptrend=0.01) whereas, inverse associations were generally observed for retinol and carotenoids (HRs for overall risk of death for the highest quintile ranging from 0.5-0.8); these associations were significant for retinol (Ptrend=0.0002), α-carotene (Ptrend=0.02), and total carotenoids (Ptrend=0.02) and were generally consistent across subgroups (sex, ethnicity, cancer anatomical subtype, and stage). Hazard ratios for retinol and carotenoids were attenuated somewhat after adjustment for CRP. Similar trends for CRP were observed for colorectal cancer-specific deaths (HR for highest vs. lowest tertile: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.18-3.61; Ptrend=0.01) as for deaths from all other causes (Pheterogeneity=0.78). Conclusion These observations are consistent with a direct relationship between circulating CRP and overall survival among colorectal cancer patients. Impact These results, if reproduced, suggest that reduction of inflammation should be explored as a potential complementary treatment strategy. PMID:23677577

  2. C-Reactive Protein Levels in African Americans: A Diet and Lifestyle Randomized Community Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, James R.; Wirth, Michael; Davis, Lisa; Davis, Briana; Harmon, Brook E.; Hurley, Thomas G.; Drayton, Ruby; Murphy, E. Angela; Shivappa, Nitin; Wilcox, Sara; Adams, Swann A.; Brandt, Heather M.; Blake, Christine E.; Armstead, Cheryl A.; Steck, Susan E.; Blair, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Inflammation is linked to poor lifestyle behaviors and a variety of chronic diseases that are prevalent among African Americans, especially in the southeastern U.S. Purpose The goal of the study was to test the effect of a community-based diet, physical activity, and stress reduction intervention conducted in 2009–2012 on reducing serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in overweight and obese African-American adults. Methods An RCT intervention was designed jointly by members of African-American churches and academic researchers. In late 2012, regression (i.e., mixed) models were fit that included both intention-to-treat and post hoc analyses conducted to identify important predictors of intervention success. Outcomes were assessed at 3 months and 1 year. Results At baseline, the 159 individuals who were recruited in 13 churches and had evaluable outcome data were, on average, obese (BMI=33.1 [±7.1]) and had a mean CRP level of 3.7 (±3.9) mg/L. Reductions were observed in waist-to-hip ratio at 3 months (2%, p=0.03) and 1 year (5%, p<0.01). In female participants attending ≥60% of intervention classes, there was a significant decrease in CRP at 3 months of 0.8 mg/L (p=0.05), but no change after 1 year. No differences were noted in BMI or interleukin-6. Conclusions In overweight/obese, but otherwise “healthy,” African-American church members with very high baseline CRP levels, this intervention produced significant reductions in CRP at 3 and 12 months, and in waist-to-hip ratio, which is an important anthropometric predictor of overall risk of inflammation and downstream health effects. Trial registration This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01760902. PMID:24050419

  3. Association Between Dietary Pattern and Serum C-Reactive Protein in Japanese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Nanri, Hinako; Nakamura, Kazuyo; Hara, Megumi; Higaki, Yasuki; Imaizumi, Takeshi; Taguchi, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Horita, Mikako; Shinchi, Koichi; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2011-01-01

    Background Dietary pattern may influence the risks of cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome through its effects on inflammation. We evaluated the association between dietary pattern and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in a Japanese population. Methods In this cross-sectional analysis, we used baseline data from 3905 men and 5640 women (age 40–69 years) who participated in a population-based cohort study between November 2005 and December 2007. Participants with possible inflammation-related diseases, current analgesic use, high hs-CRP levels (≥3000 ng/mL) or extreme dietary energy intake were excluded. We used 46 items from a validated short food frequency questionnaire and examined major dietary patterns by factor analysis. Results We identified 5 dietary patterns: healthy (high in vegetables and fruit), Western (high in meat and fried foods), seafood (high in shellfish, squid, fish, etc.), bread (high in bread and low in rice), and dessert (high in confections and fruit). After adjustment for age, alcohol use, smoking, physical activity, and body mass index, hs-CRP levels in men were inversely associated with the healthy, bread, and dessert patterns (P-trend: 0.01, 0.06, and <0.01, respectively) and positively associated with the seafood pattern (P-trend = 0.02). In women, hs-CRP levels were inversely associated with the healthy pattern (P-trend = 0.06) and positively associated with the Western pattern (P-trend = 0.06). Conclusions The healthy dietary pattern may be associated with suppressed inflammation in Japanese men and women, independently of body mass index and other factors. The sex-specific associations of hs-CRP with other dietary patterns (eg, the seafood pattern) require further study. PMID:21325731

  4. Genetic contribution to C-reactive protein levels in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Geneviève; Guénard, Frédéric; Bouchard, Luigi; Garneau, Véronique; Turcot, Valérie; Houde, Alain; Tchernof, André; Bergeron, Jean; Deshaies, Yves; Hould, Frédéric-Simon; Lebel, Stéfane; Marceau, Picard; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2012-03-01

    Obese individuals are characterized by a chronic, low-grade inflammatory state. Increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, have been observed in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. We have previously reported that genes encoding proteins involved in the anti-inflammatory and immune response are differentially expressed in visceral adipose tissue of obese men with or without the metabolic syndrome. Among these genes, the interferon-gamma-inducible protein 30 (IFI30), CD163 molecule (CD163), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 9 (CXCL9) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), were selected for further genetic analyses. The aim of the study was to verify whether IFI30, CD163, CXCL9 and TSLP gene polymorphisms contribute to explain the inter-individual variability of the inflammatory profile of obesity assessed by plasma high-sensitivity CRP concentrations. A total of 1185 severely obese individuals were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering most of the sequence-derived genetic variability at the IFI30, CD163, CXCL9 and TSLP gene loci (total of 27 SNPs). Following measurement of plasma CRP levels, subjects were divided into two groups, low vs. high using the median value of plasma CRP levels (8.31 mg/L) as a cutoff point. Genotype frequencies were compared between groups. Associations between genotypes and plasma CRP levels (continuous variable) were also tested after adjustments for age, sex, smoking and BMI. The rs11554159 and rs7125 IFI30 SNPs showed a significant difference in genotype frequencies (p<0.05) between subgroups of low vs. high plasma CRP levels (wild type homozygotes: rs11554159=47% vs. 55%, rs7125=31% vs. 24%, for low vs. high CRP groups, respectively). The association between rs11554159 and CRP levels as a continuous variable remained significant (p=0.004). Both carriers of the GA and AA genotypes demonstrated, on average, a 13% lower CRP levels in comparison with GG homozygotes. No association was

  5. Arsenite activates NFκB through induction of C-reactive protein

    SciTech Connect

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Sollome, James J.; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Camenisch, Todd D.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2012-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein in humans. Elevated levels of CRP are produced in response to inflammatory cytokines and are associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a common environmental toxicant, also produces cardiovascular disorders, namely atherosclerosis and is associated with insulin-resistance. Inorganic arsenic has been shown to contribute to cardiac toxicities through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result in the activation of NFκB. In this study we show that exposure of the hepatic cell line, HepG2, to environmentally relevant levels of arsenite (0.13 to 2 μM) results in elevated CRP expression and secretion. ROS analysis of the samples showed that a minimal amount of ROS are produced by HepG2 cells in response to these concentrations of arsenic. In addition, treatment of FvB mice with 100 ppb sodium arsenite in the drinking water for 6 months starting at weaning age resulted in dramatically higher levels of CRP in both the liver and inner medullary region of the kidney. Further, mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct cells (mIMCD-4), a mouse kidney cell line, were stimulated with 10 ng/ml CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. Pretreatment with 10 nM Y27632, a known Rho-kinase inhibitor, prior to CRP exposure attenuated NFκB activation. These data suggest that arsenic causes the expression and secretion of CRP and that CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway, thereby providing a novel pathway by which arsenic can contribute to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to arsenic can induce the expression and secretion of CRP. ► Mice treated with NaAsO{sub 2} showed higher levels of CRP in both the liver and kidney. ► mIMCD-3 were stimulated with CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. ► CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway. ► Data

  6. Plasma protein thiols, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein and red blood cell acetylcholinesterase in patients undergoing intrauterine insemination

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Krishnananda; Kumar, Pratap; Adiga, Satish Kumar; Rao, Anjali; Lanka, Anupama; Singh, Jaipal

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate acetylcholinesterase (AChE), protein thiols (PT), ceruloplasmin (CP) and C-reactive proteins (CRPs) to assess any change in their levels following intrauterine insemination (IUI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-two patients aged 31 ± 4.65 years (mean ± SD) with primary infertility selected for IUI. All of them had induced ovulation with clomiphene citrate 50 mg from day 2 to day 6. After taking the consent, 2 ml of blood was withdrawn before and after 24 h of IUI for biochemical estimations. RESULTS: We observed a significant decrease in plasma CP, PT and RBC AChE (P < 0.001) following IUI compared with the respective pre-procedure levels. Highly sensitive CRP showed a marginal increase after IUI. CONCLUSION: Fluctuations in levels of the above parameters point to their role in the female reproductive system and in the outcome of the IUI. PMID:19562071

  7. Parental support buffers the association of depressive symptoms with cortisol and C-reactive protein during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shu-Sha Angie; Bower, Julienne E; Almeida, David M; Cole, Steven W; Dahl, Ronald E; Irwin, Michael R; Seeman, Teresa E; McDade, Thomas; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2016-10-01

    Social experiences can affect the relationship between depression and physical health. The current study examined how social support from parents and friends may moderate the association of depressive symptoms with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and C-reactive protein among adolescents (N=316, Mage=16.40, SD=.74; 57% female) from diverse ethnic backgrounds (23.1% Asian, 29.1% European, 41.8% Latino, and 6.0% other backgrounds). Results indicated that parent support, but not friend support, moderated the link between depressive symptoms and both total daily cortisol output (a measure HPA activity) and C-reactive protein (a marker of inflammation). These patterns did not differ by ethnicity. Overall, the study highlights the continued, and perhaps accumulated, importance of parents during adolescence despite increasing needs for autonomy from and exploration outside of the family unit. PMID:26995316

  8. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein as cardiovascular risk marker in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pfützner, Andreas; Forst, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a liver-derived pattern recognition molecule that is increased in inflammatory states. It rapidly increases within hours after tissue injury, and it is suggested that it is part of the innate immune system and contributes to host defense. Since cardiovascular disease is at least in part an inflammatory process, CRP has been investigated in the context of arteriosclerosis and subsequent vascular disorders. Based on multiple epidemiological and intervention studies, minor CRP elevation [high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP)] has been shown to be associated with future major cardiovascular risk (hsCRP:<1 mg/L=low risk; 1-3 mg/L=intermediate risk; 3-10 mg/L=high risk; >10 mg/L=unspecific elevation). It is recommended by the American Heart Association that patients at intermediate or high risk of coronary heart disease may benefit from measurement of hsCRP with regard to their individual risk prediction. Elevation of hsCRP is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes development in patients with all levels of metabolic syndrome. In type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin A1c significantly correlates with hsCRP levels and future cardiovascular risk. Also, hsCRP levels increase with the stage of beta-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. Non-diabetes drugs that have been shown to reduce hsCRP concentrations include aspirin, statins, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and fibrates. Recent intervention studies have also demonstrated the distinct efficacy of different anti-diabetes treatments on a variety of cardiovascular risk markers. Intensive insulin therapy may reduce inflammation, but this effect may be influenced by the degree of weight gain. Treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma has lead to substantial reduction of hsCRP and other cardiovascular risk markers in several comparator studies. Since this effect was shown to be independent of the degree of glycemic improvement, it can be regarded as a classspecific

  9. Inverse Correlation between Vitamin D and C-Reactive Protein in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui-Xue; Zhou, Qi-Fan; Xu, Zhi-Wei; Hao, Jia-Hu; Huang, Kun; Mou, Zhe; Jiang, Xiao-Min; Tao, Fang-Biao; Zhu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Some studies suggested that adequate vitamin D might reduce inflammation in adults. However, little is known about this association in early life. We aimed to determine the relationship between cord blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in neonates. Cord blood levels of 25(OH)D and CRP were measured in 1491 neonates in Hefei, China. Potential confounders including maternal sociodemographic characteristics, perinatal health status, lifestyle, and birth outcomes were prospectively collected. The average values of cord blood 25(OH)D and CRP were 39.43 nmol/L (SD = 20.35) and 6.71 mg/L (SD = 3.07), respectively. Stratified by 25(OH)D levels, per 10 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D, CRP decreased by 1.42 mg/L (95% CI: 0.90, 1.95) among neonates with 25(OH)D <25.0 nmol/L, and decreased by 0.49 mg/L (95% CI: 0.17, 0.80) among neonates with 25(OH)D between 25.0 nmol/L and 49.9 nmol/L, after adjusting for potential confounders. However, no significant association between 25(OH)D and CRP was observed among neonates with 25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L. Cord blood 25(OH)D and CRP levels showed a significant seasonal trend with lower 25(OH)D and higher CRP during winter-spring than summer-autumn. Stratified by season, a significant linear association of 25(OH)D with CRP was observed in neonates born in winter-spring (adjusted β = −0.11, 95% CI: −0.13, −0.10), but not summer-autumn. Among neonates born in winter-spring, neonates with 25(OH)D <25 nmol/L had higher risk of CRP ≥10 mg/L (adjusted OR = 3.06, 95% CI: 2.00, 4.69), compared to neonates with 25(OH)D ≥25 nmol/L. Neonates with vitamin D deficiency had higher risk of exposure to elevated inflammation at birth. PMID:26569292

  10. Impact of clinical and procedural factors upon C reactive protein dynamics following transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ruparelia, Neil; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Frame, Angela; Ariff, Ben; Sutaria, Nilesh; Fertleman, Michael; Cousins, Jonathan; Anderson, Jon; Bicknell, Colin; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Sen, Sayan; Malik, Iqbal S; Colombo, Antonio; Mikhail, Ghada W

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of procedural and clinical factors upon C reactive protein (CRP) dynamics following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS: Two hundred and eight consecutive patients that underwent transfemoral TAVI at two hospitals (Imperial, College Healthcare NHS Trust, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom and San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy) were included. Daily venous plasma CRP levels were measured for up to 7 d following the procedure (or up to discharge). Procedural factors and 30-d safety outcomes according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition were collected. RESULTS: Following TAVI, CRP significantly increased reaching a peak on day 3 of 87.6 ± 5.5 mg/dL, P < 0.001. Patients who developed clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis had significantly increased levels of CRP (P < 0.001). The presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with a significantly higher peak CRP level at day 3 (78.4 ± 3.2 vs 92.2 ± 4.4, P < 0.001). There was no difference in peak CRP release following balloon-expandable or self-expandable TAVI implantation (94.8 ± 9.1 vs 81.9 ± 6.9, P = 0.34) or if post-dilatation was required (86.9 ± 6.3 vs 96.6 ± 5.3, P = 0.42), however, when pre-TAVI balloon aortic valvuloplasty was performed this resulted in a significant increase in the peak CRP (110.1 ± 8.9 vs 51.6 ± 3.7, P < 0.001). The development of a major vascular complication did result in a significantly increased maximal CRP release (153.7 ± 11.9 vs 83.3 ± 7.4, P = 0.02) and there was a trend toward a higher peak CRP following major/life-threatening bleeding (113.2 ± 9.3 vs 82.7 ± 7.5, P = 0.12) although this did not reach statistical significance. CRP was not found to be a predictor of 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Careful attention should be paid to baseline clinical characteristics and procedural factors when interpreting CRP following TAVI to determine their future management. PMID

  11. The role of C-reactive protein in innate and acquired inflammation: new perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Trial, JoAnn; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Entman, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    The participation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in host defense against microorganisms has been well described. More controversial has been its role in chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Our recent publications explain the reasons for some of the confusion concerning CRP as a risk factor for disease and whether it is pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. We found that two isoforms of CRP, pentameric (pCRP) and monomeric (mCRP), on microparticles (MPs), were not measureable by standard clinical assays. When we investigated MPs by imaging cytometry in plasma from controls versus patients with peripheral artery disease, we found that MPs from endothelial cells bearing mCRP were elevated. This elevation did not correlate with the soluble pCRP measured by high-sensitivity CRP assays. The data suggest that detection of mCRP on MPs may be a more specific marker in diagnosis, measurement of progression, and risk sensitivity in chronic disease. In an in vitro model of vascular inflammation, pCRP was anti-inflammatory and mCRP was pro-inflammatory for macrophage and T cell polarization. When we further investigated pCRP under defined conditions, we found that pCRP in the absence of a phosphocholine ligand had no inflammatory consequences. When combined with phosphocholine ligands, pCRP signaled through two Fcγ receptors (FcγRI and FcγRII) via phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase (pSYK) to activate monocytes. Phosphocholine itself, when bound to pCRP, induced a congruent M2 macrophage and Th2 response. Phosphocholine is also the head group on the lipid phosphatidylcholine, which can become oxidized. Liposomes bearing oxidized phosphatidylcholine without pCRP promoted a uniform M1 macrophage and Th1 pro-inflammatory response. When oxidized liposomes were bound to pCRP, there was a disjunction in the macrophage and T cell response: monocytes matured into M2 macrophages, but the T cells polarized into a Th1 phenotype. The CRP-bound liposomes signaled

  12. Relationship between C - Reactive Protein and Stroke: A Large Prospective Community Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Chunxue; Wu, Jianwei; Zhou, Yong; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Anxin; Wu, Shouling; Zhao, Xingquan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have suggested that C-reactive protein (CRP) was associated with risk of stroke. There were few studies in Asian population, or on stroke subtypes other than ischemic stroke. We thus investigated the relationship between CRP and the risks of all stroke and its subtypes in a Chinese adult population. Methods In the current study, we included 90,517 Chinese adults free of stroke and myocardial infarction at baseline (June 2006 to October 2007) in analyses. Strokes were classified as ischemic stroke (IS), intracranial heamorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid heamorrhage (SAH). High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) were categorized into three groups: <1 mg/L, 1 to 3 mg/L, and >3 mg/L. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the association between hs-CRP concentrations and all stroke, as well as its subtypes. Results During a median follow-up time of 49 months, we documented 1,472 incident stroke cases. Of which 1,049 (71.3%) were IS, 383 (26.0%) were ICH, and 40 (2.7%) were SAH. After multivariate adjustment, hs-CRP concentrations ≥1 mg/L were associated with increased risks of all stroke (hs-CRP 1–3 mg/L: hazard ratio (HR) 1.17, 95% confidential interval (CI) 1.03–1.33; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07–1.46) and IS (hs-CRP 1–3 mg/L: HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01–1.36; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.11–1.60), but not with ICH and SAH. Subgroup analyses showed that higher hs-CRP concentration was more prone to be a risk factor for all stroke and IS in non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive participants. Conclusion We found that higher hs-CRP concentrations were associated with a higher risk of IS, particularly for non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive subjects. In contrast, we did not observe significant associations between hs-CRP and ICH/SAH. PMID:25191699

  13. Elevated C-reactive protein levels and metabolic syndrome in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Zuliani, Giovanni; Volpato, Stefano; Galvani, Matteo; Blè, Alessandro; Bandinelli, Stefania; Corsi, Anna Maria; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Guralnik, Jack M.; Fellin, Renato; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) and “low grade” systemic inflammation (LGSI) are very common findings in the older population. Although MS and LGSI have been associated in adults, it is not known what is the real contribution of MS, and its single components, to LGSI in older persons, due to the potential confounding effect of comorbidity and aging. We investigated the relationship between increased C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels, a marker of LGSI, and MS in 1044 older (≥65 years) community dwelling Italian individuals enrolled the InChianti study. Metabolic syndrome was defined by the NCEP-ATP III-AHA/NHLBI criteria. High sensitivity CRP (hs.CRP) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and defined as high when >3 mg/L. The overall prevalence of MS was 31%. The prevalence of high hs.CRP was 54.5% in subjects with, and 41.3% in those without MS (p < 0.001). MS was associated with high hs.CRP levels after adjustment for age, gender, and comorbidity (OR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.46-2.55). Compared to subjects with MS and no LGSI, individuals with MS and LGSI were characterized by higher waist circumference, BMI, and HOMA score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed the association between waist circumference and high hs.CRP levels in subjects with MS (waist circumference III vs. I tertile OR: 2.60, 95% CI: 1.79-3.77) independent of age, gender, and important confounding variables including comorbidity. Additional analyses, conducted with and without dichotomization of hs.CRP levels, confirmed the central role of waist circumference in the LGSI phenomenon, independent of gender and diagnosis of MS. We conclude that in older individuals, MS is associated with LGSI, but the association is mainly supported by a strong independent correlation between waist circumference and high hs.CRP levels. In the absence of this specific MS component, it seems that the contribution of MS to LGSI would be modest at best. PMID:18845301

  14. Inverse Correlation between Vitamin D and C-Reactive Protein in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Tao, Rui-Xue; Zhou, Qi-Fan; Xu, Zhi-Wei; Hao, Jia-Hu; Huang, Kun; Mou, Zhe; Jiang, Xiao-Min; Tao, Fang-Biao; Zhu, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Some studies suggested that adequate vitamin D might reduce inflammation in adults. However, little is known about this association in early life. We aimed to determine the relationship between cord blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in neonates. Cord blood levels of 25(OH)D and CRP were measured in 1491 neonates in Hefei, China. Potential confounders including maternal sociodemographic characteristics, perinatal health status, lifestyle, and birth outcomes were prospectively collected. The average values of cord blood 25(OH)D and CRP were 39.43 nmol/L (SD = 20.35) and 6.71 mg/L (SD = 3.07), respectively. Stratified by 25(OH)D levels, per 10 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D, CRP decreased by 1.42 mg/L (95% CI: 0.90, 1.95) among neonates with 25(OH)D <25.0 nmol/L, and decreased by 0.49 mg/L (95% CI: 0.17, 0.80) among neonates with 25(OH)D between 25.0 nmol/L and 49.9 nmol/L, after adjusting for potential confounders. However, no significant association between 25(OH)D and CRP was observed among neonates with 25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L. Cord blood 25(OH)D and CRP levels showed a significant seasonal trend with lower 25(OH)D and higher CRP during winter-spring than summer-autumn. Stratified by season, a significant linear association of 25(OH)D with CRP was observed in neonates born in winter-spring (adjusted β = -0.11, 95% CI: -0.13, -0.10), but not summer-autumn. Among neonates born in winter-spring, neonates with 25(OH)D <25 nmol/L had higher risk of CRP ≥10 mg/L (adjusted OR = 3.06, 95% CI: 2.00, 4.69), compared to neonates with 25(OH)D ≥25 nmol/L. Neonates with vitamin D deficiency had higher risk of exposure to elevated inflammation at birth. PMID:26569292

  15. Baseline Plasma C-Reactive Protein Concentrations and Motor Prognosis in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Atsushi; Oeda, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Tomita, Satoshi; Kohsaka, Masayuki; Park, Kwiyoung; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), a blood inflammatory biomarker, is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease. In animal models of Parkinson disease (PD), systemic inflammatory stimuli can promote neuroinflammation and accelerate dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, the association between long-term systemic inflammations and neurodegeneration has not been assessed in PD patients. Objective To investigate the longitudinal effects of baseline CRP concentrations on motor prognosis in PD. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective analysis of 375 patients (mean age, 69.3 years; mean PD duration, 6.6 years). Plasma concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP were measured in the absence of infections, and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-III) scores were measured at five follow-up intervals (Days 1–90, 91–270, 271–450, 451–630, and 631–900). Main Outcome Measure Change of UPDRS-III scores from baseline to each of the five follow-up periods. Results Change in UPDRS-III scores was significantly greater in PD patients with CRP concentrations ≥0.7 mg/L than in those with CRP concentrations <0.7 mg/L, as determined by a generalized estimation equation model (P = 0.021) for the entire follow-up period and by a generalized regression model (P = 0.030) for the last follow-up interval (Days 631–900). The regression coefficients of baseline CRP for the two periods were 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21–2.61) and 2.62 (95% CI 0.25–4.98), respectively, after adjusting for sex, age, baseline UPDRS-III score, dementia, and incremental L-dopa equivalent dose. Conclusion Baseline plasma CRP levels were associated with motor deterioration and predicted motor prognosis in patients with PD. These associations were independent of sex, age, PD severity, dementia, and anti-Parkinsonian agents, suggesting that subclinical systemic inflammations could accelerate neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:26308525

  16. Determinants of C-reactive protein concentrations in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gutaj, Paweł; Krzyżanowska, Patrycja; Brązert, Jacek; Wender-Ożegowska, Ewa

    2016-04-13

    INTRODUCTION    Increased C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations during pregnancy are associated with several perinatal complications. OBJECTIVES    The aim of the study was to assess serum CRP concentrations and identify its determinants in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. PATIENTS AND METHODS    CRP concentrations were determined using a high-sensitivity assay (hs-CRP) in the first trimester (I, week <12 of gestation), in mid-pregnancy (II, weeks 20 to 24 of gestation), and in the late third trimester (III, weeks 34 to 39 of gestation) in a group of 73 patients with type 1 diabetes. RESULTS    There was a significant increase in CRP concentrations between the first trimester and mid‑pregnancy (median [interquartile range], 2.5 mg/l [1.3-4.5 mg/l] and 5.6 mg/l [2.5-11.6 mg/l]; P = 0.0001), which then stabilized with no further change between mid-pregnancy and the late third trimester (5.7 mg/l [2.5-9.6 mg/l]). CRP concentrations in all 3 trimesters were positively correlated with the waist‑to-hip ratio (I, P <0.0001; II, P = 0.0004; III, P = 0.0369) and body mass index (I, P = 0.015; II, P = 0.0025; III, P = 0.0048), measured in the first trimester. CRP concentrations during pregnancy were positively correlated with a measure of insulin resistance, namely, the estimated glucose disposal rate, assessed in the first trimester (I, P = 0.01; II, P = 0.0165; III, P = 0.0062). There was a positive correlation between the levels of hs-CRP and total cholesterol (P = 0.001), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.013), and triglycerides (P = 0.0014) in the first trimester. There was no significant correlation between CRP and hemoglobin A1c, daily insulin requirement/kg, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, maternal age, and diabetes duration. CONCLUSIONS    Adiposity, abnormal body fat distribution, and insulin resistance are the major determinants of CRP concentrations in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. Our results confirm the

  17. Association of exome sequences with plasma C-reactive protein levels in >9000 participants

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Ursula M.; Auer, Paul L.; Bis, Joshua C.; Lin, Honghuang; Wei, Peng; Pankratz, Nathan; Lange, Leslie A.; Brody, Jennifer; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kim, Daniel S.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Fornage, Myriam; Haessler, Jeffery; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Leal, Suzanne M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tracy, Russell; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Willer, Cristen; Loos, Ruth; Melander, Olle; Mcpherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Kees; Reilly, Muredach; Watkins, Hugh; Girelli, Domenico; Fontanillas, Pierre; Chasman, Daniel I.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Gibbs, Richard; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Peters, Ulrike; Dupuis, Josée; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Gross, Myron D.; Reiner, Alex P.

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration is a heritable systemic marker of inflammation that is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Genome-wide association studies have identified CRP-associated common variants associated in ∼25 genes. Our aims were to apply exome sequencing to (1) assess whether the candidate loci contain rare coding variants associated with CRP levels and (2) perform an exome-wide search for rare variants in novel genes associated with CRP levels. We exome-sequenced 6050 European-Americans (EAs) and 3109 African-Americans (AAs) from the NHLBI-ESP and the CHARGE consortia, and performed association tests of sequence data with measured CRP levels. In single-variant tests across candidate loci, a novel rare (minor allele frequency = 0.16%) CRP-coding variant (rs77832441-A; p.Thr59Met) was associated with 53% lower mean CRP levels (P = 2.9 × 10−6). We replicated the association of rs77832441 in an exome array analysis of 11 414 EAs (P = 3.0 × 10−15). Despite a strong effect on CRP levels, rs77832441 was not associated with inflammation-related phenotypes including coronary heart disease. We also found evidence for an AA-specific association of APOE-ε2 rs7214 with higher CRP levels. At the exome-wide significance level (P < 5.0 × 10−8), we confirmed associations for reported common variants of HNF1A, CRP, IL6R and TOMM40-APOE. In gene-based tests, a burden of rare/lower frequency variation in CRP in EAs (P ≤ 6.8 × 10−4) and in retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α (RORA) in AAs (P = 1.7 × 10−3) were associated with CRP levels at the candidate gene level (P < 2.0 × 10−3). This inquiry did not elucidate novel genes, but instead demonstrated that variants distributed across the allele frequency spectrum within candidate genes contribute to CRP levels. PMID:25187575

  18. C-reactive protein in patients on chronic hemodialysis with different techniques and different membranes.

    PubMed

    Panichi, V; Rizza, G Manca; Taccola, D; Paoletti, S; Mantuano, E; Migliori, M; Frangioni, S; Filippi, C; Carpi, A

    2006-01-01

    In hemodialysis patients, C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute-phase reactant, is a sensitive and independent marker of malnutrition, anemia, and cardiovascular mortality. The aim of the present study was to evaluate CRP levels in plasma samples from long-term hemodialysis patients on different extracorporeal modalities and dialyzed with different membranes, at baseline and after 6 months. Two hundred and forty-seven patients were recruited in eight hospital-based centers. All patients had been on their dialytic modality for at least 3 months and were prospectively followed in their initial dialytic modality for 6 months. Patients were treated with conventional bicarbonate dialysis (N = 127) or hemodiafiltration (N = 120). Patients treated with conventional bicarbonate dialysis were dialyzed with different membranes: Cuprophane (N = 51), low-flux cellulose modified membrane (N = 37) and synthetic membranes (N = 39). Hemodiafiltration was performed in post-dilution mode with polysulfone (N = 66) and polyacrylonitrile (N = 54) membranes. Analysis of baseline CRP values in the clinically stable patients showed that an unexpectedly high proportion (47%) of the patients had CRP values higher than 5 mg/l (upper limit in normal subjects). The mean +/- S.D. CRP values were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in hemodiafiltration with infusion volumes < 10 l per session (14.6+/-3.1 mg/l) than in standard hemodialysis (5.1 +/- 2.1 mg/l) and hemodiafiltration with infusion volumes > 20 l per session (4.9 +/- 2.1 mg/l). These values did not significantly change after 6 months of follow-up. Concerning the membranes, the highest levels of CRP were observed in patients dialyzed with Cuprophane with a significant increase from 15.1 +/- 3.6 to 21.2 +/- 3.1 mg/l after 6 months (P < 0.05); a significant reduction of CRP levels was observed in patients dialyzed with polysulfone in the same follow-up period (from 13.5 +/- 2.9 to 8.1 +/- 2.4 mg/l; P < 0.05). The CRP increase following low

  19. Association of C-Reactive Protein and Metabolic Disorder in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxia; Zhang, Liying; Chen, Shanying; Liu, Xinyu; Shao, Xiaofei; Zou, Hequn

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels and explore the risk factors for an elevated hs-CRP level. We also provide the clinical utility of CRP to identify subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey in China. Subjects were divided into three subgroups: hs-CRP ≤ 1 mg/L, 1 mg/L < hs-CRP ≤ 3 mg/L and hs-CRP > 3 mg/L. Multiple linear regressions and logistic regression models were used. Results: In the Chinese population, 50.43% subjects had a low hs-CRP level, 30.21% subjects had an intermediate hs-CRP level and 19.36% subjects had an elevated hs-CRP level. Age, physical inactivity, abdominal obesity, a low LDL level, an elevated fasting glucose level, uric acid and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) were correlated with log-CRP. In multivariate analysis, relative risks of an elevated CRP level were 2.40 (95% CI 1.44–3.99, p = 0.001), 3.63 (95% CI 2.20–5.98, p < 0.001), 4.23 (95% CI 2.51–7.11, p < 0.001) and 6.23 (95% CI 3.45–11.26, p < 0.001) for subjects with 1, 2, 3, or more than 3 MetS components, respectively. The accurate estimates of the area under the receiver operating characteristic of hs-CRP for MetS was 0.6954 (95% CI, 0.67–0.72). Conclusion: Age, physical inactivity, abdominal obesity, a low LDL level, an elevated fasting glucose level, uric acid and ACR are correlated with log-CRP. The number of MetS components is a significant determinant of elevated CRP levels after adjusted for other potential confounders. PMID:26193292

  20. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    PubMed

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP level<10 mg/L. To determine if diagnosis of septic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRP<10 mg/L (K. kingae, n=5/63 ; S. aureus, n=4/26). Initial temperature and fibrinogen were significantly lower in the CRP<10 mg/L group than in the other (37.3°C vs. 37.9°C, P=0.039 and 4.19 vs. 5.72 g/L, P=0.003, respectively). Age, symptom duration before diagnosis, as well as leukocyte and platelet counts were similar in both groups. Two children (2/89=2.2%) with S. aureus septic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRP<10 mg/L needed a second surgical drainage because of relapse of arthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP<10 mg/L experienced complications, while six of those with initial CRP≥10 mg/L needed a second surgical act

  1. Serum C-Reactive Protein Levels in Normal-Weight Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Young; Lee, Ji-Ah; Oh, Jee-Young; Sung, Yeon-Ah; Chung, Hyewon

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Serum levels of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a vascular inflammatory marker, may predict the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes and CVD. The aim of this study was to compare hsCRP levels between normal weight women with PCOS and controls with a normal menstrual cycle and to determine the factors associated with serum hsCRP levels. Methods Thirty-nine lean PCOS patients and 24 healthy, regular cycling women were enrolled in this study. We performed anthropometric measurements, fat computed tomography (CT), and blood sampling to determine blood chemistry and levels of hsCRP, gonadotropins, testosterone, and sex-hormone binding globulin. We also conducted 75-g oral glucose-tolerance test and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp to assess insulin sensitivity. Results Serum hsCRP concentrations were higher in women with PCOS than in women with regular mensturation. However, this difference was no longer significant after adjusting for body mass index (BMI). hsCRP levels were correlated with waist circumference (r=0.46, p<0.01), BMI (r=0.46, p<0.01), visceral fat area (r=0.45, p<0.01), and systolic (r=0.42, p<0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (r=0.39, p<0.05). hsCRP also tended to be negatively associated with insulin-mediated glucose uptake (IMGU) (r=-0.31, p=0.07). A multiple regression analysis revealed that BMI (β=0.29, p<0.05), systolic blood pressure (β=0.39, p<0.01), and IMGU (β=-0.31, p<0.05) predicted serum hsCRP levels in women with PCOS. Conclusions PCOS by itself does not seem to be associated with increased hsCRP levels, whereas known CVD risk factors affect serum hsCRP levels in PCOS. PMID:19949734

  2. Efect of periodontal disease and non surgical periodontal treatment on C-reactive protein. Evaluation of type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Llambés, Fernando; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Guiha, Rami; Bautista, Daniel; Caffesse, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze how anti-infectious periodontal treatment affects C reactive protein (CRP) values in patients with type 1 diabetes, and correlate baseline CRP levels with periodontal disease severity. Study Design: A cohort of fifty three subjects with type 1 diabetes and moderate to severe periodontitis were recruited. Periodontal parameters were measured, and blood samples were obtained to evaluate high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Group 1 was treated with scaling, root planning, and systemic administration of doxycycline. Group 2 received only scaling and root planning. Results: Hs-CRP was reduced after periodontal treatment in group 1 (-0.22 mg/l) and 2 (-0.21 mg/l ) but this reduction was not statistically significant, even in the patients with the best response to periodontal treatment. However, significant correlation appeared between hs-CRP and mean probing pocket depth (PPD) (p=0, 01) and mean clinical attachment level (CAL) (p=0,03). Conclusions: Non-surgical periodontal treatment couldn’t reduce hs-CRP values, however, it was found an association between advanced periodontitis and elevated blood hs-CRP levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. It can be speculated that periodontal disease increases production of pro-inflammatory mediators in patients with type 1 diabetes, but other producing sources of these pro-inflammatory substances may exist. Key words:Periodontal disease, periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 1, periodontal therapy, C reactive protein. PMID:22322513

  3. Insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein during olanzapine administration: effects of the antidiabetic metformin.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Sandia, Ignacio; Lacruz, Anny; Rangel, Nairy; de Mendoza, Soaira; Beaulieu, Serge; Contreras, Quilianio; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Vargas, Doritza

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the Authors assessed some insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein after olanzapine administration, and the effect of metformin on these variables, 37 patients with chronic schizophrenia were given olanzapine (10 mg/day for 14 weeks). Nineteen patients received metformin (850-2550 mg/day) and 18 received placebo in a randomized, double-blind protocol. The following variables were quantified before and after olanzapine: cortisol, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, glucagon, growth hormone, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. Results were correlated with the changes in body weight and the insulin resistance index. We have reported elsewhere that metformin did not prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain, and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased after metformin and placebo; Baptista T, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2006; 51: 192-196. Cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and fibrinogen levels significantly decreased in both groups. Glucagon significantly increased after metformin (P=0.03). Leptin tended to increase after placebo (P=0.1) and displayed a small nonsignificant reduction after metformin. The C-reactive protein did not change significantly in any group. Contrarily to most published studies, olanzapine was associated with decreased insulin resistance. Decrements in cortisol, fibrinogen and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels point to an improvement in the metabolic profile. The trend for leptin to increase after placebo, but not after metformin in spite of similar weight gain suggests a beneficial effect of this antidiabetic agent. PMID:17293706

  4. A common site within factor H SCR 7 responsible for binding heparin, C-reactive protein and streptococcal M protein.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Eleni; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Male, Dean A; Ranganathan, Shoba; Ormsby, Rebecca J; Fischetti, Vince A; Mold, Carolyn; Gordon, David L

    2003-04-01

    The complement inhibitor factor H (fH) interacts via its seventh short consensus repeat (SCR) domain with multiple ligands including heparin, streptococcal M protein and C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of this study was to localize the residues in SCR 7 required for these interactions. We initially built a homology model of fH SCR 6-7 using the averaged NMR structures of fH SCR 15-16 and vaccinia control protein SCR 3-4 as templates. Electrostatic potentials of the model's surface demonstrated a co-localization of three clusters of positively charged residues on SCR 7, labeled site A (R369 and K370), site B (R386 and K387) and site C (K392). These residues, localized to the linker region preceding SCR 7 and to the end of a "hypervariable loop" in SCR 7, were systematically replaced with uncharged alanine residues in an fH construct containing SCR 1-7. The resulting proteins were expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. By ELISA analysis we demonstrated: first, that substituting site A inhibited heparin and CRP binding; secondly, that substituting site B inhibited binding to heparin, CRP and M protein; and thirdly, that substituting site C clearly inhibited only heparin binding.

  5. Role of Serum Interleukin 6, Albumin and C-Reactive Protein in COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Emami Ardestani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a non-specific inflammation, which involves the airways, lung parenchyma and pulmonary vessels. The inflammation causes the activation of inflammatory cells and the release of various inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-6 and tumor necoris factor alpha (TNF-a). The purpose of the present study was to measure serum IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP) (as a positive phase reactant) and albumin level (as a negative phase reactant) in COPD patients (only due to cigarette smoking not bio-mass), non COPD smokers and healthy subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); we compared the differences in inflammatory factors among groups. Materials and Methods: A total of 180 males were enrolled in this study and divided into three equal groups. The first group was 60 smokers who had COPD. The second group included 60 smokers without COPD and the third group consisted of people who were not smokers and did not have COPD; 5 mL of venous blood was taken from all participants and it was collected in a test tube containing anticoagulant and then centrifuged at 3000 rpm for 10 minutes. Serum was separated and used to measure the amount of IL-6, CRP and albumin. Spirometry was performed according to the criteria set by the American Thoracic Society. Results: The mean serum level of IL-6 was 83.2±7.5 pg/mL in group I, 54.9±24.3 pg/mL in group II and 46.9±10.4 pg/mL in group III. There was a significant difference among the three groups (P<0.001). The mean serum level of CRP was 28.9±14.9 mg/dL in the first group, 19.9±8.5 mg/dL in the second group and 4.2±2.3 mg/dL in the third group (P=0.02). But by controlling the confounding effects of age, this difference was not significant (P=0.49). The mean serum level of albumin was I 4.1±0.57 mg/dL in group I, 4.3±0.56 mg/dL in group II and 4.1±0.53 mg/dL in group III. There was no significant difference among the three groups in this regard (P=0

  6. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease--a perspective.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard

    2010-12-09

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with "intermediate risk" as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals with

  7. Genetic Loci Influencing C-reactive Protein Levels and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul; Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Peden, John F.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Braund, Peter; Engert, James C.; Bennett, Derrick; Coin, Lachlan; Ashby, Deborah; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Brown, Ian J.; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; McCarthy, Mark I.; Peltonen, Leena; Freimer, Nelson B.; Farrall, Martin; Ruokonen, Aimo; Hamsten, Anders; Lim, Noha; Froguel, Philippe; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Scott, James; Hall, Alistair S.; Schunkert, Heribert; Anand, Sonia S.; Collins, Rory; Samani, Nilesh J.; Watkins, Hugh; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are independently associated with risk of coronary heart disease, but whether CRP is causally associated with coronary heart disease or merely a marker of underlying atherosclerosis is uncertain. Objective: To investigate association of genetic loci with CRP levels and risk of coronary heart disease. Design, setting and participants: We first carried out a genome-wide association (n=17,967) and replication study (n=14,747) to identify genetic loci associated with plasma CRP concentrations. Data collection took place between 1989 and 2008 and genotyping between 2003 and 2008. We carried out a Mendelian randomisation study of the most closely associated SNP in the CRP locus and published data on other CRP variants involving a total of 28,112 cases and 100,823 controls, to investigate the association of CRP variants with coronary heart disease. We compared our finding with that predicted from meta-analysis of observational studies of CRP levels and risk of coronary heart disease. For the other loci associated with CRP levels, we selected the most closely associated SNP for testing against coronary heart disease among 14,365 cases and 32,069 controls. Main outcome measure: Risk of coronary heart disease. Results: Polymorphisms in five genetic loci were strongly associated with CRP levels (% difference per minor allele): SNP rs6700896 in LEPR (−14.7% [95% Confidence Interval {CI}], −17.5 – −11.9, P=1.6×10−21), rs4537545 in IL6R (−10.8% [95% CI, −13.8 – −7.7], P=5.1×10−11), rs7553007 in CRP locus (−20.7% [95% CI, −23.5 – −17.9], P=3.3×10−38), rs1183910 in HNF1A (−13.6% [95% CI, −16.4 – −10.6], P=1.2×10−17) and rs4420638 in APOE-CI-CII (−21.8% [95% CI, −25.4 – −18.1], P=2.1×10−25). Association of SNP rs7553007 in the CRP locus with coronary heart disease gave odds ratio (OR) 0.98 (95% CI, 0.94 – 1.01) per 20% lower CRP. Our Mendelian randomisation study of variants

  8. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease – a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with “intermediate risk” as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals

  9. Post-effort chances in C-reactive protein level among soccer players at the end of the training season.

    PubMed

    Kostrzewa-Nowak, Dorota; Nowak, Robert; Chamera, Tomasz; Buryta, Rafał; Moska, Waldemar; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Numerous literature data point out the differences in immunological parameters as a result of physical effort and the relation of those changes to the subject's fitness level. This study was aimed at the assessment of soccer players' condition and adaptation to physical effort based on the changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) blood level. C-reactive protein, total protein, and albumin plasma levels before and after 60-minute-long outdoor running were determined among 16 (8 men and 8 women) soccer players. Statistically significant increase in total blood protein level was observed in both studied groups. However, there were no statistically significant changes in albumin level in soccer players' blood. Determination of CRP showed that the exercise test caused changes in its level among both women and men; yet, statistically significant increase in CRP level was found only in women's blood. The different influence of effort on CRP plasma level may be explained by the involvement of various mechanisms in regulation of acute-phase responses in different conditions. It was found in our study that CRP level could be a valuable tool to assess the metabolic response to aerobic exercise.

  10. Comparison of serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein as diagnostic markers of systemic inflammation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Michelle B.; Langhorn, Rebecca; Goddard, Amelia; Andreasen, Eva B.; Moldal, Elena; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Jakobsen, Sabrina; Persson, Frida; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic performance of canine serum amyloid A (SAA) was compared with that of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the detection of systemic inflammation in dogs. Sera from 500 dogs were retrospectively included in the study. C-reactive protein and SAA were measured using validated automated assays. The overlap performance, clinical decision limits, overall diagnostic performance, correlations, and agreement in the clinical classification between these 2 diagnostic markers were compared. Significantly higher concentrations of both proteins were detected in dogs with systemic inflammation (SAA range: 48.75 to > 2700 mg/L; CRP range: 0.4 to 907.4 mg/L) compared to dogs without systemic inflammation (SAA range: 1.06 to 56.4 mg/L; CRP range: 0.07 to 24.7 mg/L). Both proteins were shown to be sensitive and specific markers of systemic inflammation in dogs. Significant correlations and excellent diagnostic agreement were observed between the 2 markers. However, SAA showed a wider range of concentrations and a significantly superior overall diagnostic performance compared with CRP. PMID:24489396

  11. Interleukin-1 Blockade With Canakinumab to Improve Exercise Capacity in Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Elevated High Sensitivity C-reactive Protein (Hs-CRP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Prior Acute Myocardial Infarction; Evidence of Systemic Inflammation (C Reactive Protein Plasma >2 mg/l); Reduced Left Ventricle Ejection Fraction (<50%); Symptoms of Heart Failure (NYHA Class II-III)

  12. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Cardiovascular Disease Across Countries and Ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein; de Oliveira Izar, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Despite substantial differences in ethnicities, habits, cultures, the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and affordable therapies, atherosclerosis remains the major cause of death in developing and developed countries. However, irrespective of these differences, inflammation is currently recognized as the common pathway for the major complications of atherosclerosis, stroke, and ischemic heart disease. A PubMed search was conducted for “high-sensitivity C-reactive protein” (hs-CRP) in combination with the terms race, ethnicity, gender, prevalence, geographic, epidemiology, cardiovascular, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and mortality. This review includes the articles that pertained to the topic and additional articles identified from the reference lists of relevant publications. This review describes the marked differences in cardiovascular mortality across countries and ethnicities, which may be attributed to inequalities in the prevalence of the classic risk factors and the stage of cardiovascular epidemiological transition. However, hs-CRP appears to contribute to the prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk and mortality even after multiple adjustments. Considering the perception of cardiovascular disease as an inflammatory disease, the more widespread use of hs-CRP appears to represent a valid tool to identify people at risk, independent of their ancestry or geographic region. In conclusion, this review reports that the complications associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are triggered by the major mechanisms of dyslipidemia and inflammation; whereas both mechanisms are influenced by classic risk factors, hs-CRP contributes additional information regarding cardiovascular events and mortality. PMID:27166776

  13. Evidence that complement protein C1q interacts with C-reactive protein through its globular head region.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Fabian D G; Brouwer, Mieke C; Arlaud, Gérard J; Daha, Mohamed R; Hack, C Erik; Roos, Anja

    2006-03-01

    C1q acts as the recognition unit of the first complement component, C1, and binds to immunoglobulins IgG and IgM, as well as to non-Ig ligands, such as C-reactive protein (CRP). IgG and IgM are recognized via the globular head regions of C1q (C1qGR), whereas CRP has been postulated to interact with the collagen-like region (C1qCLR). In the present study, we used a series of nine mAbs to C1q, five directed against C1qGR and four against C1qCLR, to inhibit the interaction of C1q with CRP. The F(ab')(2) of each of the five mAbs directed against C1qGR inhibited binding of C1q to polymerized IgG. These five mAbs also successfully inhibited the interaction of C1q with CRP. Moreover, these five mAbs inhibited C1 activation by CRP as well as by polymerized IgG in vitro. In contrast, none of the four mAbs against C1qCLR inhibited C1q interaction with CRP or IgG, or could reduce activation of complement by CRP or polymerized IgG. These results provide the first evidence that the interaction of C1q with CRP or IgG involves sites located in the C1qGR, whereas sites in the CLR do not seem to be involved in the physiological interaction of C1q with CRP.

  14. Acrolein stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in thrombosis model mice and cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Ryotaro; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ikuo, Yukiko; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Itsuko; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Chiba, Kan; Toida, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro), IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were useful for identifying silent brain infarction with high sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to determine whether acrolein causes increased production of IL-6 and CRP in thrombosis model mice and cultured cells. In mice with photochemically induced thrombosis, acrolein produced at the locus of infarction increased the level of IL-6 and then CRP in plasma. This was confirmed in cell culture systems - acrolein stimulated the production of IL-6 in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells, mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and IL-6 in turn stimulated the production of CRP in human hepatocarcinoma cells. The level of IL-6 mRNA was increased by acrolein through an increase in phosphorylation of the transcription factors, c-Jun, and NF-κB p65. Furthermore, CRP stimulated IL-6 production in mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and HUVEC. IL-6 functioned as a protective factor against acrolein toxicity in Neuro-2a cells and HUVEC. These results show that acrolein stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 and CRP, which function as protecting factors against acrolein toxicity, and that the combined measurement of PC-Acro, IL-6, and CRP is effective for identification of silent brain infarction. The combined measurements of protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro), IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were useful for identifying silent brain infarction. The aim of this study was to determine whether acrolein causes increased production of IL-6 and CRP, and indeed acrolein increased IL-6 synthesis and IL-6 in turn increased CRP synthesis. Furthermore, IL-6 decreased acrolein toxicity in several cell lines.

  15. Cardiac troponin and C-reactive protein for predicting all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Jie; Chen, Xu-Miao; Nie, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Cheng, Yun-Jiu; Lin, Xiao-Xiong; Wu, Su-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of cardiac troponin and C-reactive protein are associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease. However, the relationship between these two biomarker levels and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to quantify the association of cardiac troponin and C-reactive protein levels with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Relevant studies were identified by searching the MEDLINE database through November 2013. Studies were included in the meta-analysis if they reported the long-term all-cause or cardiovascular mortality of chronic kidney disease patients with abnormally elevated serum levels of cardiac troponin or C-reactive protein. Summary estimates of association were obtained using a random-effects model. Thirty-two studies met our inclusion criteria. From the pooled analysis, cardiac troponin and C-reactive protein were significantly associated with all-cause (HR 2.93, 95% CI 1.97-4.33 and HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.14-1.29, respectively) and cardiovascular (HR 3.27, 95% CI 1.67-6.41 and HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.10-1.28, respectively) mortality. In the subgroup analysis of cardiac troponin and C-reactive protein, significant heterogeneities were found among the subgroups of population for renal replacement therapy and for the proportion of smokers and the C-reactive protein analysis method. Elevated serum levels of cardiac troponin and C-reactive protein are significant associated with higher risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Further studies are warranted to explore the risk stratification in chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:26017799

  16. The Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Plasma Adiponectin Level and Adiponectin-related Protein Expression in Myocardial Tissue of ApoE(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Li-Hui; Li, Jiang-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Numerous reports have confirmed the effect of ApoE knockout in the induction of cardiovascular diseases and the protective effect of adiponectin against the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to reveal the roles of adiponectin signaling in the progression of cardiovascular diseases induced by ApoE knockout and to analyze the healthy effects of aerobic exercise on ApoE knockout mice (ApoE(-/-) mice) through observing the changes of adiponectin signaling caused by ApoE knockout and aerobic exercise. A twelve-week aerobic exercise program was carried out on the male ApoE(-/-) mice and the C57BL / 6J mice (C57 mice) of the same strain. Results show that the body weights, blood lipid level, plasma adiponectin level and adiponectin-related proteins in myocardial tissue were all significantly changed by ApoE knockout. A twelve-week aerobic exercise program exerted only minimal effects on the body weights, blood lipid levels, and plasma adiponectin levels of ApoE(-/-) mice, but increased the expressions of four adiponectin-related proteins, AdipoR1, PPARα, AMPK and P-AMPK, in the myocardial tissue of the ApoE(-/-) mice. In summary, adiponectin signaling may play an import role in the progression of cardiovascular diseases induced by ApoE knockout, and the beneficial health effects of aerobic exercise on ApoE(-/-) mice may be mainly from the increased adiponectin-related protein expression in myocardial tissue. Key pointsA twelve-week aerobic exercise program exerted only limited effects on the body weights and the plasma adiponectin levels of both the normal mice and the ApoE(-/-) mice but did effectively regulate the blood lipid levels of the normal mice (but not the ApoE(-/-) mice).After 12 weeks of aerobic exercise, expression of the adiponectin-related proteins in the myocardial tissue of the ApoE(-/-) and normal mice was increased, but the increased amplitudes of these proteins in the ApoE(-/-) mice were much larger in the Apo

  17. Secretion of the Adipocyte-Specific Secretory Protein Adiponectin Critically Depends on Thiol-Mediated Protein Retention▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Schraw, Todd D.; Kim, Ja-Young; Khan, Tayeba; Rajala, Michael W.; Follenzi, Antonia; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2007-01-01

    Adiponectin is a secretory protein abundantly secreted from adipocytes. It assembles into a number of different higher-order complexes. Adipocytes maintain tight control over circulating plasma levels, suggesting the existence of a complex, highly regulated biosynthetic pathway. However, the critical mediators of adiponectin maturation within the secretory pathway have not been elucidated. Previously, we found that a significant portion of de novo-synthesized adiponectin is not secreted and retained in adipocytes. Here, we show that there is an abundant pool of properly folded adiponectin in the secretory pathway that is retained through thiol-mediated retention, as judged by the release of adiponectin in response to treatment of adipocytes with reducing agents. Adiponectin is covalently bound to the ER chaperone ERp44. An adiponectin mutant lacking cysteine 39 fails to stably interact with ERp44, demonstrating that this residue is the primary site mediating the covalent interaction. Another ER chaperone, Ero1-Lα, plays a critical role in the release of adiponectin from ERp44. Levels of both of these proteins are highly regulated in adipocytes and are influenced by the metabolic state of the cell. While less critical for the secretion of trimers, these chaperones play a major role in the assembly of higher-order adiponectin complexes. Our data highlight the importance of posttranslational events controlling adiponectin levels and the release of adiponectin from adipocytes. One mechanism for increasing circulating levels of specific adiponectin complexes by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists may be selective upregulation of rate-limiting chaperones. PMID:17353260

  18. The three-dimensional structure of calcium-depleted human C-reactive protein from perfectly twinned crystals.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mohamed A M; Shrive, Annette K; Holden, David; Myles, Dean A A; Volanakis, John E; DeLucas, Larry J; Greenhough, Trevor J

    2002-06-01

    C-reactive protein is a member of the pentraxin family of oligomeric serum proteins which has been conserved through evolution, homologues having been found in every species in which they have been sought. Human C-reactive protein (hCRP) is the classical acute-phase reactant produced in large amounts in response to tissue damage and inflammation and is used almost universally as a clinical indicator of infection and inflammation. The role of hCRP in host defence and the calcium-dependent ligand-binding specificity of hCRP for phosphocholine moieties have long been recognized. In order to clarify the structural rearrangements associated with calcium binding, the reported affinity of calcium-depleted hCRP for polycations and other ligands, and the role of calcium in protection against denaturation and proteolysis, the structure of calcium-depleted hCRP has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Crystals of calcium-depleted hCRP are invariably twinned and those suitable for analysis are merohedral type II twins of point group 4 single crystals. The structure has been solved by molecular replacement using the calcium-bound hCRP structure [Shrive et al. (1996), Nature Struct. Biol. 3, 346-354]. It reveals two independent pentamers which form a face-to-face decamer across a dyad near-parallel to the twinning twofold axis. Cycles of intensity deconvolution, density modification (tenfold NCS) and model building, eventually including refinement, give a final R factor of 0.19 (R(free) = 0.20). Despite poor definition in some areas arising from the limited resolution of the data and from the twinning and disorder, the structure reveals the probable mode of twinning and the conformational changes, localized in one of the calcium-binding loops, which accompany calcium binding. PMID:12037301

  19. Elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, Iraj; Vahdat, Katayoun; Jafari, Seyed Mojtaba; Beigi, Saeideh; Assadi, Majid; Azizi, Fatemeh; Sanjdideh, Zahra

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that low-grade systemic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, limited information is available about the relationship of diabetes mellitus and inflammation in Asia. We examined the association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and diabetes in a general Iranian population. In an ancillary study to the Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study, a cohort study of men and women aged > or = 25 years, a random sample of 1754 (49.2 percent males, 50.8 percent females) subjects were evaluated. High sensitivity C-reactive protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Elevated serum CRP was defined as more than 3.0 mg/l. The diabetes classification was based on the criteria of the American Diabetes Association. A total of 8.6 percent of the subjects (8.0 percent of males & 9.1 percent of females; p>0.05) had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Geometric mean of CRP was 1.94 mg/l (3.80 SD) in the studied population. The subjects with diabetes had a higher geometric mean of CRP levels than the subjects with no diabetes [3.67 (SD 3.71) versus 1.85 (3.83) respectively; p<0.0001)]. In multiple logistic regression analysis, diabetes showed a significant age-adjusted association with elevated CRP levels [Odds Ratio = 2.03, Confidence Interval (1.38-2.98); p<0.0001] after adjusting for sex, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol blood pressure, smoking and body mass index. In conclusion, beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors, elevated CRP is significantly correlated with diabetes in general population of the northern Persian Gulf. Further insight into the specific effects of proinflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins will be essential for the development of new preventive strategies for diabetes mellitus. PMID:18493107

  20. Association of the IL6-174(G/C) polymorphism with C-reactive protein concentration after weight loss in obese men.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Carita; Nenonen, Arja; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Borg, Patrik; Fogelholm, Mikael; Laine, Seppo; Huhtala, Heini; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hurme, Mikko

    2006-06-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of C-reactive protein has emerged as an important predictor of future cardiovascular diseases and metabolic abnormalities in apparently healthy individuals. Obese individuals tend to have elevated C-reactive protein concentrations. Weight loss induces a change in this protein, and single nucleotide polymorphisms in regulating genes might affect this change, since C-reactive protein concentration is known to be approximately 40-50% heritable. Our aim was to study the association between the IL6 -174(G/C), IL1B +3,954(C/T) and CRP +1,059(G/C) single nucleotide polymorphisms, and CRP concentrations in obese men during a weight reduction program. We genotyped 72 obese men who had participated in a weight reduction program. Their C-reactive protein concentrations, interleukin-6 levels and fat mass were determined at two time points: at baseline and after weight reduction (after 2 months). After weight reduction, the mean weight loss was 14.3 kg. Median C-reactive protein concentrations decreased, after weight reduction, from 1.72 to 1.22 mg/l (p < 0.02). The baseline C-reactive protein concentration did not differ between the IL6-174(G/C) genotypes, but after weight loss, concentrations differed (p = 0.03 Kruskal-Wallis test); the highest concentration was found in the CC genotype (CC 1.01 versus GG 1.93 mg/l, p = 0.007 ANOVA post-hoc test). This change in concentration was associated with the IL6-174(G/C) genotype (p = 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis test), being least in the CC genotype. The other single nucleotide polymorphisms studied were not associated with CRP concentrations. Our results show that, at baseline, there is no difference in C-reactive protein concentrations among the different IL6-174(G/C) genotypes, but after weight loss the CC genotype is associated with highest C-reactive protein concentrations, resulting from the fact that C-reactive protein seems not to decrease with weight loss in this genotype.

  1. Magnetic permeability based diagnostic test for the determination of the canine C-reactive protein concentration in undiluted whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibraimi, Filiz; Kriz, Kirstin; Merin, Henrik; Kriz, Dario

    2009-05-01

    We describe an one-step 11-min magnetic permeability based two-site immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) utilizing polyclonal anti-canine CRP antibody conjugated dextran iron oxide nanoparticles (79 nm) as superparamagnetic labels and polyclonal anti-canine CRP conjugated silica microparticles (15 to 40 μm) as carriers. An inductance based magnetic permeability reader was used to detect the target analyte, CRP, in 10 μL whole blood samples, by measuring the magnetic permeability increase of the silica microparticle sediment due to immuno complex superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Measurements on standards showed a linear response between 0 and 17.5 mg/L CRP. Measurements performed on 16 whole blood samples from mixed breeds showed good correlation with a commercially available ELISA assay.

  2. C reactive protein may not be reliable as a marker of severe bacterial infection in patients receiving tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Bari, Syed Farhan; Khan, Afsha; Lawson, Tom

    2013-01-01

    This is a case of a 65-year-old man with seropositive erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), well controlled on methotrexate, sulfasalazine, low-dose prednisolone and monthly infusions of tocilizumab. He presented with a 3-week history of pain and swelling in his left knee, gradually increasing in severity with an inability to bear weight. He was systemically well with normal vital signs. Examination confirmed an effusion and aspiration was turbid in appearance. C reactive protein (CRP) was normal. He was treated empirically with antibiotics. Synovial fluid and blood cultures confirmed Staphylococcus aureus infection. He completed a 6 weeks course of antibiotics with complete resolution of symptoms. Throughout the treatment his CRP remained normal which is likely to have been the result of prior treatment with tocilizumab. PMID:24177456

  3. Risk Stratification for Primary Prevention of Coronary Artery Disease: Roles of C-Reactive Protein and Coronary Artery Calcium.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Waqas T; Rana, Jamal S; Yeboah, Joseph; Bin Nasir, Usama; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H

    2015-12-01

    Risk stratification of individuals at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) plays an important role in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In addition to risk scores derived from conventional cardiovascular risk factors, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) have emerged as two of the widely accepted non traditional risk factors for atherosclerotic disease that have shown incremental prognostic value in predicting cardiovascular events. This review systematically assesses the role of hs-CRP and CAC in various studies and demonstrates meta-analyses of the incremental prognostic value of hs-CRP and CAC in identifying patients at risk of future CVD events. Compared with this, CAC showed better incremental prognostic value and might be a better indicator of ASCVD risk in asymptomatic adults.

  4. Comparative evaluation of levels of C-reactive protein and PMN in periodontitis patients related to cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, G.; Nagaraj, M.; Jayashree, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous cross-sectional studies have suggested that chronic periodontitis is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence that periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases are linked by inflammatory factors including C-reactive protein. The purpose of the study was to investigate the levels of CRP and PNM cells as a marker of inflammatory host response in the serum of chronic periodontitis patients and in patients with CVD. Materials and Methods: Study population included 75 patients; both male and female above 35 years were included for the study. The patients were divided into three groups of 25 each – Group I: Chronic periodontitis patients with CVD, Group II: Chronic periodontitis patients without CVD and Group III: Control subjects (without chronic periodontitis and CVD). Patients with chronic periodontitis had ≥8 teeth involved with probing depth (PD) ≥5 mm involved. The control group had PD ≤ 3 mm and no CVD. Venous blood was collected from the patients and C-reactive protein levels were analyzed by immunoturbidimetry. PMN was recorded by differential count method. Results: On comparison, OHI-S Index, GI, mean PD, CRP and PMN values showed significant difference from Group I to III. CRP level was highly significant in Group I when compared with Group II and Group III. PMN level was highly significant in Group I when compared with Group III PMN level which was not significant. Conclusion: This study indicated that periodontitis may add the inflammation burden of the individual and may result in increased levels of CVD based on serum CRP levels. Thus, controlled prospective trials with large sample size should be carried out to know the true nature of the relationship if indeed one exists. PMID:24049333

  5. Correlates of Serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP) - No Association With Sleep Duration or Sleep Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Shahrad; Austin, Diane; Lin, Ling; Nieto, F. Javier; Young, Terry; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Increasing evidence suggests that alterations in sleep duration are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Additionally, sleep disordered breathing (SDB), which is associated with disturbed nighttime sleep and hypoxemia, may be an independent risk factor for CVD. The inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein (CRP), is an important predictor of CVD. We investigated potential associations between circulating CRP, sleep duration, and SDB. Design: Cross-sectional Study. Population: Participants were 907 adults from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study (WSCS). Measurements and Results: CRP was measured after overnight polysomnography. The relationships between CRP and sleep parameters were evaluated using multiple linear regression with and without controlling for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) and other potential confounders. CRP was found to be higher for women and had a strong positive correlation with age and BMI. CRP showed a significant positive association with current smoking, waist-hip ratio (WHR), LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin, and insulin, independent of age, sex, and BMI. Significant independent negative associations for CRP were observed with HDL-cholesterol (HDL), insulin sensitivity (quantitative insulin sensitivity check index [QUICKI]), and hours of exercise. There was a significant positive association between CRP levels and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, the measure of SDB), but these relationships were not significant after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI. No significant association between CRP levels and measures of sleep duration (polysomnographic and self-reported) were found. Conclusion: There was no significant association between CRP levels and sleep duration. The lack of an independent association between CRP levels and SDB suggests that the reported relationship between these 2 variables may be primarily driven by their association with obesity. Citation: Taheri S; Austin D; Lin L; Nieto FJ

  6. Nicotinic Acid Increases Adiponectin Secretion from Differentiated Bovine Preadipocytes through G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Christina; Hosseini, Afshin; Singh, Shiva P.; Regenhard, Petra; Khalilvandi-Behroozyar, Hamed; Sauerwein, Helga; Mielenz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    The transition period in dairy cows (3 weeks prepartum until 3 weeks postpartum) is associated with substantial mobilization of energy stores, which is often associated with metabolic diseases. Nicotinic acid (NA) is an antilipolytic and lipid-lowering compound used to treat dyslipidaemia in humans, and it also reduces non-esterified fatty acids in cattle. In mice the G-protein coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A) ligand NA positively affects the secretion of adiponectin, an important modulator of glucose and fat metabolism. In cattle, the corresponding data linking NA to adiponectin are missing. Our objective was to examine the effects of NA on adiponectin and AMPK protein abundance and the expression of mRNAs of related genes such as chemerin, an adipokine that enhances adiponectin secretion in vitro. Differentiated bovine adipocytes were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX) to verify the involvement of GPR signaling, and treated with 10 or 15 µM NA for 12 or 24 h. NA increased adiponectin concentrations (p ≤ 0.001) and the mRNA abundances of GPR109A (p ≤ 0.05) and chemerin (p ≤ 0.01). Pre-incubation with PTX reduced the adiponectin response to NA (p ≤ 0.001). The NA-stimulated secretion of adiponectin and the mRNA expression of chemerin in the bovine adipocytes were suggestive of GPR signaling-dependent improved insulin sensitivity and/or adipocyte metabolism in dairy cows. PMID:25411802

  7. APOE Polymorphism Is Associated with C-reactive Protein Levels but Not with White Blood Cell Count: Dong-gu Study and Namwon Study.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yong-Woon; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Choi, Jin-Su; Rhee, Jung-Ae; Lee, Young-Hoon; Nam, Hae-Sung; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Park, Kyeong-Soo; Ryu, So-Yeon; Choi, Seong-Woo; Kim, Hee Nam; Cauley, Jane A; Shin, Min-Ho

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the association of the APOE polymorphism with serum C-reactive protein levels and white blood cell count in two large population-based studies in Korean. The datasets included the Dong-gu study (n = 8,893) and the Namwon Study (n = 10,032). APOE genotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Multivariable linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship of APOE genotypes with C-reactive protein levels and white blood cell count with adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, and serum lipids. In the multivariate model, carriers of E3E4 or E4E4 genotype had significantly lower C-reactive protein levels compared with carriers of E3E3 genotype group (0.50 mg/L vs. 0.67 mg/L; 0.37 mg/L vs. 0.67 mg/L, respectively, for the Dong-gu Study and 0.47 mg/L vs. 0.66 mg/L; 0.45 mg/L vs. 0.66 mg/L, respectively, for the Namwon Study). However, there was no difference in white blood cell count among APOE genotypes. We found that the APOE E4 allele is associated with lower C-reactive protein levels, but not white blood cell count. Our results suggest that APOE genotype may influence C-reactive protein levels through non-inflammatory pathway.

  8. Direct detection of C-reactive proteins in human serum using nanoparticle-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.-Y.; Tsang, K. Y.; Hu, W. P.; Hsu, H.-Y.; Chiou, A.; Chang, G.-L.; Chen, S.-J.

    2006-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) produced by the liver is one of the most characteristic acute-phase proteins. It has been suggested that the level of CRP in human serum may be a significant tool of detecting risks of developing cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Here we propose an advanced plasmonic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bioassay with Au nanoparticles embedded in the dielectric film that demonstrates a 10X improvement in resolution compared to the conventional SPR biosensor. The co-sputtered film was modified with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane to sequentially immobilize protein G, monoclonal anti-CRP antibody (C8), and human serum albumins (HSA). After blocked by ethanolamine, the sensor was used to detect CRP. Using this extremely sensitive biochip, the lowest reliable concentration of CRP without any exterior labeling is simplified to human physiological level. The novel assay has the latent capability of not only eliminating the disturbances coming from serum proteins resulting in false signals, but is also able to be applied in rapid and label-free clinical detections of CRP with large improved sensitivity.

  9. Evaluation of the role of maternal serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in predicting early pregnancy failure.

    PubMed

    Jauniaux, Eric; Gulbis, Béatrice; Jamil, Amna; Jurkovic, Davor

    2015-03-01

    Maternal serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP) was evaluated in predicting spontaneous abortion in spontaneous pregnancies presenting with threatened spontaneous abortion. Seventy-one cases of threatened spontaneous abortion (group A) and 71 asymptomatic controls (group B), matched for gestational and maternal age, body mass index and smoking status, were included. Maternal serum samples were evaluated for HCG, progesterone, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and HSCRP using standard bio-assays. No difference was observed in ultrasound measurements, and median progesterone maternal serum level was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in group A compared with group B. In group A, the median of all ultrasound and maternal serum parameters was significantly lower (P < 0.01) compared with group B. The median gestational sac diameter, volume and median HSCRP and PAPP-A levels were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in group A, with a normal outcome compared with group B, probably owing to the inflammatory reaction associated with intrauterine bleeding. In group A patients destined to abortion, the gestational sac development and corresponding protein synthesis fell before the fetal heart activity stopped; in spontaneous pregnancies, maternal serum HSCRP did not provide additional information for the management of threatened spontaneous abortion but warrants further research in assisted reproduction pregnancies. PMID:25596909

  10. Surfactant protein D, Club cell protein 16, Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine, C-reactive protein, and Fibrinogen biomarker variation in chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Lock-Johansson, Sofie; Vestbo, Jørgen; Sorensen, Grith Lykke

    2014-11-25

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multifaceted condition that cannot be fully described by the severity of airway obstruction. The limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted researchers to investigate a multitude of surrogate biomarkers of disease for the assessment of patients, prediction of risk, and guidance of treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of observations for a selection of recently investigated pulmonary inflammatory biomarkers (Surfactant protein D (SP-D), Club cell protein 16 (CC-16), and Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC/CCL-18)) and systemic inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen) with COPD. The relevance of these biomarkers for COPD is discussed in terms of their biological plausibility, their independent association to disease and hard clinical outcomes, their modification by interventions, and whether changes in clinical outcomes are reflected by changes in the biomarker.

  11. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and homocysteine was estimated at 500 m altitude, 3650 m altitude, 3 day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m), and 1 month after coming back to the 500 m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m). P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction.

  12. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and homocysteine was estimated at 500m altitude, 3650m altitude, 3day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400m), and 1 month after coming back to the 500m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400m). P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26731740

  13. [Relationship of food groups intake and C-reactive protein in healthy adults from Mexicali, Baja California, México].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Esparza, Josefina; Robinson-Navarro, Octavio; Ortega-Vélez, María Isabel; Diaz-Molina, Raúl; Carrillo-Cedillo, Eugenia Gabriela; Soria-Rodriguez, Carmen G

    2013-09-01

    The high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an important biomarker in inflammatory processes. The objective was to analyze the relationship between the concentrations of hs-CRP in adults from a northern Mexico region with their typical food intake patterns. A sample of 72 university professors underwent clinical and anthropometric assessments and their hs-CRP levels were quantified with an immunoenzymometric assay. Additionally, they filled out a food intake frequency questionnaire, from which the servings of different food groups were obtained with the ESHA software. The average age of participants was 49.75 +/- 10.05 years and the average hs-CRP concentration was 1.66 (0.97, 3.52) mg/L. The value of the association between fruit consumption and hs-CRP level was protective, according to the logistic regression analysis, being the Odds Ratio (OR) 0.23 (95% CI: 0.05, 1.03); while for vegetables the OR was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.12, 3.68). Furthermore, high protein content foods, dairy products, oils and fats were associated with elevated levels of hs-CRP. In conclusion, in our study, the intake of some food groups like fruits and vegetables, and to a lesser extent cereals, were associated with low values of hs-PCR. PMID:24354239

  14. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of two new C-reactive protein genes from common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Falco, Alberto; Cartwright, Jamie R; Wiegertjes, Geert F; Hoole, David

    2012-05-01

    C-Reactive protein (CRP) plays an important role in the acute phase response. Transcripts encoding two new CRP-like molecules (ccCRP1 and ccCRP2) from European common carp have been characterized which has enabled seven CRP-like genes to be identified in zebrafish. 79.3% (ccCRP1) and 74.5% (ccCRP2) identity to CRP from East-Asian common carp occurs and fish CRP genes form a distinct clade. ccCRP2 gene organization comprises four exons and three introns, in contrast to the two exons/one intron organization of mammalian CRP genes. Gene expression assays showed both ccCRP-like molecules are constitutively expressed in liver, skin, gill, gut, muscle, kidney, spleen and blood. Protein levels of ccCRP in serum and spleen were significantly different from other organs analyzed, and levels were greatest in the liver. It is proposed that the two carp CRP genes defined differ in their expression profiles which may suggest differences in their biological activities.

  15. Effect of whey supplementation on circulating C-reactive protein: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling-Mei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Rao, Chun-Ping; Han, Shufen; Wan, Zhongxiao; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2015-02-09

    Whey supplementation is beneficial for human health, possibly by reducing the circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) level, a sensitive marker of inflammation. Thus, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate their relationship. A systematic literature search was conducted in July, 2014, to identify eligible studies. Either a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model was used to calculate pooled effects. The meta-analysis results of nine trials showed a slight, but no significant, reduction of 0.42 mg/L (95% CI -0.96, 0.13) in CRP level with the supplementation of whey protein and its derivates. Relatively high heterogeneity across studies was observed. Subgroup analyses showed that whey significantly lowered CRP by 0.72 mg/L (95% CI -0.97, -0.47) among trials with a daily whey dose≥20 g/day and by 0.67 mg/L (95% CI -1.21, -0.14) among trials with baseline CRP≥3 mg/L. Meta-regression analysis revealed that the baseline CRP level was a potential effect modifier of whey supplementation in reducing CRP. In conclusion, our meta-analysis did not find sufficient evidence that whey and its derivates elicited a beneficial effect in reducing circulating CRP. However, they may significantly reduce CRP among participants with highly supplemental doses or increased baseline CRP levels.

  16. Platelet-Monocyte Aggregates and C-Reactive Protein are Associated with VTE in Older Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Shih, Lauren; Kaplan, David; Kraiss, Larry W; Casper, T Charles; Pendleton, Robert C; Peters, Christopher L; Supiano, Mark A; Zimmerman, Guy A; Weyrich, Andrew S; Rondina, Matthew T

    2016-06-07

    Emerging evidence implicates platelets as key mediators of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Nevertheless, the pathways by which platelets and circulating procoagulant proteins synergistically orchestrate VTE remain incompletely understood. We prospectively determined whether activated platelets and systemic procoagulant factors were associated with VTE in 32 older orthopedic surgery patients. Circulating platelet-monocyte aggregates (PMAs), p-selectin expression (P-SEL), and integrin αIIbβ3 activation (PAC-1 binding) were assessed pre-operatively and 24 hours post-operatively. The proinflammatory and procoagulant molecule C-reactive protein (CRP), which induces PMA formation in vitro, along with plasma d-dimer and fibrinogen levels were also measured. The primary outcome was VTE occurring within 30 days post-operatively. Overall, 40.6% of patients developed VTE. Patients with VTE had a significant increase in circulating PMAs and CRP post-operatively, compared to those without VTE. Changes in PMA and CRP in VTE patients were significantly correlated (r(2) = 0.536, p = 0.004). In contrast, P-SEL expression and PAC-1 binding, fibrinogen levels, and d-dimers were not associated with VTE. This is the first study to identify that increased circulating PMAs and CRP levels are early markers associated with post-surgical VTE. Our findings also provide new clinical evidence supporting the interplay between PMAs and CRP in patients with VTE.

  17. Aptamer-conjugated live human immune cell based biosensors for the accurate detection of C-reactive protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pentameric protein that is present in the bloodstream during inflammatory events, e.g., liver failure, leukemia, and/or bacterial infection. The level of CRP indicates the progress and prognosis of certain diseases; it is therefore necessary to measure CRP levels in the blood accurately. The normal concentration of CRP is reported to be 1–3 mg/L. Inflammatory events increase the level of CRP by up to 500 times; accordingly, CRP is a biomarker of acute inflammatory disease. In this study, we demonstrated the preparation of DNA aptamer-conjugated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (Apt-PBMCs) that specifically capture human CRP. Live PBMCs functionalized with aptamers could detect different levels of human CRP by producing immune complexes with reporter antibody. The binding behavior of Apt-PBMCs toward highly concentrated CRP sites was also investigated. The immune responses of Apt-PBMCs were evaluated by measuring TNF-alpha secretion after stimulating the PBMCs with lipopolysaccharides. In summary, engineered Apt-PBMCs have potential applications as live cell based biosensors and for in vitro tracing of CRP secretion sites.

  18. Aptamer-conjugated live human immune cell based biosensors for the accurate detection of C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jangsun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pentameric protein that is present in the bloodstream during inflammatory events, e.g., liver failure, leukemia, and/or bacterial infection. The level of CRP indicates the progress and prognosis of certain diseases; it is therefore necessary to measure CRP levels in the blood accurately. The normal concentration of CRP is reported to be 1–3 mg/L. Inflammatory events increase the level of CRP by up to 500 times; accordingly, CRP is a biomarker of acute inflammatory disease. In this study, we demonstrated the preparation of DNA aptamer-conjugated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (Apt-PBMCs) that specifically capture human CRP. Live PBMCs functionalized with aptamers could detect different levels of human CRP by producing immune complexes with reporter antibody. The binding behavior of Apt-PBMCs toward highly concentrated CRP sites was also investigated. The immune responses of Apt-PBMCs were evaluated by measuring TNF-alpha secretion after stimulating the PBMCs with lipopolysaccharides. In summary, engineered Apt-PBMCs have potential applications as live cell based biosensors and for in vitro tracing of CRP secretion sites. PMID:27708384

  19. Flexible modeling improves assessment of prognostic value of C-reactive protein in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, B; Abrahamowicz, M; Xiao, Y; Beauchamp, M-E; MacDonald, N; Kasymjanova, G; Kreisman, H; Small, D

    2010-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is gaining credibility as a prognostic factor in different cancers. Cox's proportional hazard (PH) model is usually used to assess prognostic factors. However, this model imposes a priori assumptions, which are rarely tested, that (1) the hazard ratio associated with each prognostic factor remains constant across the follow-up (PH assumption) and (2) the relationship between a continuous predictor and the logarithm of the mortality hazard is linear (linearity assumption). Methods: We tested these two assumptions of the Cox's PH model for CRP, using a flexible statistical model, while adjusting for other known prognostic factors, in a cohort of 269 patients newly diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results: In the Cox's PH model, high CRP increased the risk of death (HR=1.11 per each doubling of CRP value, 95% CI: 1.03–1.20, P=0.008). However, both the PH assumption (P=0.033) and the linearity assumption (P=0.015) were rejected for CRP, measured at the initiation of chemotherapy, which kept its prognostic value for approximately 18 months. Conclusion: Our analysis shows that flexible modeling provides new insights regarding the value of CRP as a prognostic factor in NSCLC and that Cox's PH model underestimates early risks associated with high CRP. PMID:20234363

  20. Can we use C-reactive protein levels to predict severe infection or sepsis in severely burned patients?

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Marc G; Finnerty, Celeste C; Kulp, Gabriela A; Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    This is a large cohort analysis in severely burned pediatric children to determine whether C-reactive protein (CRP) can be used as a predictor for severe infection or sepsis. Nine-hundred eighteen pediatric burn patients were enrolled in this study. CRP values were measured throughout acute hospitalization and for up to 6 months postburn. Demographic data, incidence of infection, surgical interventions and other relevant clinical information was compiled from medical records. We performed an extensive literature search to identify models that other groups have developed to determine the effects of CRP levels postburn to assess the value of these parameters as predictors of sepsis or severe infection. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and regression analysis where appropriate. Three-hundred fifteen female and 603 male pediatric patients were enrolled in this study. Average total body surface area (TBSA) burn was 45±23%, with full thickness burn over 32±27% TBSA, and patients were 7±6 years old. CRP values significantly correlated with burn size, survival and gender. Significantly higher levels of CRP were found in large burns, in non-survivors, and in females, p<0.05. Using various described models to determine whether CRP levels change before and after an event can predict sepsis or severe infection, we found that CRP cannot predict severe infection or sepsis. Although CRP is a marker of the inflammatory response postburn, CRP fails to predict infection or sepsis in severely burn patients.

  1. Can we use C-reactive protein levels to predict severe infection or sepsis in severely burned patients?

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G; Finnerty, Celeste C; Kulp, Gabriela A; Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    This is a large cohort analysis in severely burned pediatric children to determine whether C-reactive protein (CRP) can be used as a predictor for severe infection or sepsis. Nine-hundred eighteen pediatric burn patients were enrolled in this study. CRP values were measured throughout acute hospitalization and for up to 6 months postburn. Demographic data, incidence of infection, surgical interventions and other relevant clinical information was compiled from medical records. We performed an extensive literature search to identify models that other groups have developed to determine the effects of CRP levels postburn to assess the value of these parameters as predictors of sepsis or severe infection. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and regression analysis where appropriate. Three-hundred fifteen female and 603 male pediatric patients were enrolled in this study. Average total body surface area (TBSA) burn was 45±23%, with full thickness burn over 32±27% TBSA, and patients were 7±6 years old. CRP values significantly correlated with burn size, survival and gender. Significantly higher levels of CRP were found in large burns, in non-survivors, and in females, p<0.05. Using various described models to determine whether CRP levels change before and after an event can predict sepsis or severe infection, we found that CRP cannot predict severe infection or sepsis. Although CRP is a marker of the inflammatory response postburn, CRP fails to predict infection or sepsis in severely burn patients. PMID:23875119

  2. Traffic Exposure in a Population with High Prevalence Type 2 Diabetes - Do Medications Influence Concentrations of C-Reactive Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Rioux, Christine L.; Tucker, Katherine L.; Brugge, Doug; Gute, David M.; Mwamburi, Mkaya

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and particulate air pollution are associated with inflammatory dysregulation. We assessed the modifying effects of diabetes medications on the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and traffic exposure in adults with T2D (n=379). CRP concentrations were significantly positively associated with residence ≤100 m of a roadway, >100m and ≤200m of a roadway and increased traffic density for individuals using insulin. For individuals using oral hypoglycemic medications (OHAs), CRP was significantly negatively associated with residence >100 m - ≤200 m of a roadway and multiple roadway exposure in an interaction model. Among people with diabetes, individuals on insulin appear to be most vulnerable to the effects of traffic exposure. Disease severity among insulin users may promote the pro-inflammatory response to traffic exposure, though diabetes medications may also modify the response. Possible anti-inflammatory effects of OHAs with traffic exposure merit further evaluation. PMID:21292365

  3. Measurements of C-reactive protein in serum and lactate dehydrogenase in serum and synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hurter, K; Spreng, D; Rytz, U; Schawalder, P; Ott-Knüsel, F; Schmökel, H

    2005-03-01

    Diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) is based upon the clinical orthopaedic examination and the radiographic assessment, both of which can be non-specific and insensitive in early joint disease. The aim of our study was to investigate if there is an increase in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in degenerative joint disease (DJD) and if CRP could be used to help diagnose OA. We also wished to investigate whether it was possible to distinguish a joint with clinically and radiographically confirmed OA from a healthy joint by comparing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels within the synovial fluid and the serum. We have shown a difference in synovial LDH levels between diseased and healthy joints (P<0.0001). There was also a significant difference between LDH in arthritic synovial fluid and serum, with no correlation between the values. Despite the fact that the values of our clinical patients tended to be higher than the values of our control group (P=0.05) all measured values were within the normal limits of previous publications. From these data, we conclude that single measurements of serum CRP do not permit detection of OA in clinical patients and that serum LDH is not a reliable marker for osteoarthritis. LDH levels in the synovial fluid could be of diagnostic value for identifying osteoarthritis. PMID:15727922

  4. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive Protein (CRP) as severe systemic infection markers in febrile neutropenic adults

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, Karin SR; Costa, Silvia F; Leone, Claudio; Chamone, Dalton AF

    2007-01-01

    Background Procalcitonin (PCT) is an inflammatory marker that has been used as indicator of severe bacterial infection. We evaluated the concentrations of PCT as a marker for systemic infection compared to C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients neutropenic febrile. Methods 52 adult patients were enrolled in the study. Blood sample was collected in order to determine the serum concentrations of PCT, CRP and other hematological parameters at the onset of fever. The patients were divided into 2 groups, one with severe infection (n = 26) and the other in which the patients did not present such an infection (n = 26). Then PCT and CRP concentrations at the fever onset were compared between groups using non parametric statistical tests, ROC curve, sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio, and Spearman's correlation coefficient. Results The mean of PCT was significantly higher in the group with severe infection (6.7 ng/mL versus 0.6 ng/mL – p = 0.0075) comparing with CRP. Serum concentrations of 0.245 ng/mL of PCT displayed 100% de sensitivity and 69.2% specificity. PCT concentrations of 2,145 ng/mL presented a likelihood ratio of 13, which was not observed for any concentration of CRP. Conclusion PCT seems to be an useful marker for the diagnosis of systemic infection in febrile neutropenic patients, probably better than CRP. PMID:18034890

  5. C-Reactive Protein Levels and Radiation-Induced Mucositis in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels or the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the grade of acute radiation-induced mucositis in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was performed in 40 patients who received intensity-modulated radiation therapy as a radical treatment of primary laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Serum CRP level and ESR were initially checked on the day of radiotherapy simulation and were measured every week during the irradiation schedule and two times biweekly after radiotherapy. Mucosal reactions were evaluated by radiation oncologists on days of blood sampling. Results: The distribution of the most severe mucositis was Grade I mucositis in 10% of the patients, Grade II in 60% of the patients and Grade III in 30% of the patients. Statistical analysis indicated a significant rise in the CRP level (p < 0.001) according to radiation fraction number and grade of mucositis. A change of the mean CRP level was correlated with progression of mean grade of mucositis according to fraction number. The ESR did not show any statistically significant relationship with radiotherapy fraction number and grade of acute mucositis. Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between the presence of acute mucositis and CRP level in this study. The CRP level could be conveniently determined along with evaluation of mucosal reactions during or after radiotherapy to provide further information on radiation-induced mucositis.

  6. Elevated Maternal C-Reactive Protein is Associated with Increased Risk of Schizophrenia in a National Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Canetta, Sarah; Sourander, Andre; Surcel, Helja-Marja; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Leiviskä, Jaana; Kellendonk, Christoph; McKeague, Ian W.; Brown, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The goal of the present study was to investigate an association between early gestational C-reactive protein (CRP), an established inflammatory biomarker, prospectively assayed in maternal sera, and schizophrenia in a large national birth cohort with an extensive serum biobank. Methods This study utilized a nested case-control design from the Finnish Prenatal Study of Schizophrenia cohort. 777 schizophrenia cases (630 with schizophrenia, 147 with schizoaffective disorder) that had maternal sera available for CRP testing were identified and matched to 777 controls in the analysis. Maternal CRP levels were assessed using a latex immunoassay from archived maternal serum specimens. Results Increasing maternal CRP levels, classified as a continuous variable, were significantly associated with schizophrenia in offspring (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.10-1.56, p=0.003). This finding remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders including maternal and parental history of psychiatric disorders, twin/singleton birth, urbanicity, province of birth, and maternal socioeconomic status. Conclusion This finding provides the most robust evidence to date that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in schizophrenia, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24969261

  7. Effect of Nutritional Status and Dietary Patterns on Human Serum C-Reactive Protein and Interleukin-6 Concentrations12

    PubMed Central

    Smidowicz, Angelika; Regula, Julita

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are widely tested inflammatory markers involved in the development of these diseases. Several studies indicate a relation between nutritional status and the concentrations of human high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Similarly, the role of diet in reducing inflammation and thereby modulating the risk of non-communicable diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review focuses on the effects of the selected nutrition models in humans on the concentrations of CRP and IL-6. It seems that the Mediterranean diet model is most effective in inhibiting inflammation. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension model and the plant nutrition model also have proven to be beneficial. The data on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets are inconclusive. Comprehensive studies are necessary, taking into account the cumulative effect of dietary and other factors on the inflammatory process. PMID:26567198

  8. Novel Pretreatment Scoring Incorporating C-reactive Protein to Predict Overall Survival in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Sorafenib Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Yasui, Yutaka; Higuchi, Mayu; Yoshida, Tsubasa; Komiyama, Yasuyuki; Takaura, Kenta; Hayashi, Tsuguru; Kuwabara, Konomi; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Takada, Hitomi; Ueda, Masako; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Suzuki, Shoko; Itakura, Jun; Takahashi, Yuka; Izumi, Namiki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to build a prediction score of prognosis for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after sorafenib treatment. Methods A total of 165 patients with advanced HCC who were treated with sorafenib were analyzed. Readily available baseline factors were used to establish a scoring system for the prediction of survival. Results The median survival time (MST) was 14.2 months. The independent prognostic factors were C-reactive protein (CRP) <1.0 mg/dL [hazard ratio (HR) =0.51], albumin >3.5 g/dL (HR =0.55), alpha-fetoprotein <200 ng/mL (HR =0.45), and a lack of major vascular invasion (HR =0.39). Each of these factors had a score of 1, and after classifying the patients into five groups, the total scores ranged from 0 to 4. Higher scores were linked to significantly longer survival (p<0.0001). Twenty-nine patients (17.6%) with a score of 4 had a MST as long as 36.5 months, whereas MST was as short as 2.4 and 3.7 months for seven (4.2%) and 22 (13.3%) patients with scores of 0 and 1, respectively. Conclusions A novel prognostic scoring system, which includes the CRP level, has the ability to stratify the prognosis of patients with advanced stage HCC after treatment with sorafenib. PMID:27781198

  9. Investigating interactions of the pentraxins serum amyloid P component and C-reactive protein by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, J Andrew; Robinson, Carol V

    2003-10-15

    The oligomeric state of human SAP (serum amyloid P component) in the absence and presence of known ligands has been investigated using nanoelectrospray ionization MS. At pH 8.0, in the absence of Ca2+, SAP has been shown to consist of pentameric and decameric forms. In the presence of physiological levels of Ca2+, SAP was observed to exist primarily as a pentamer, reflecting its in vivo state. dAMP was shown not only to promote decamerization, but also to lead to decamer stacking involving up to 30 monomers. A mechanism for this finding is proposed. CRP (C-reactive protein), a pentraxin closely related to SAP, exists as a pentamer in the presence or absence of Ca2+. Pentamers of CRP and SAP were shown to form mixed decamers in Ca2+-free buffer; however, in the presence of Ca2+, this interaction was not observed. Furthermore, no exchange of monomeric subunits was observed between the SAP and CRP oligomers, suggesting a remarkable stability of the individual pentameric complexes. PMID:12892563

  10. Detection of the Inflammation Biomarker C-Reactive Protein in Serum Samples: Towards an Optimal Biosensor Formula

    PubMed Central

    Fakanya, Wellington M.; Tothill, Ibtisam E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), is reported in this work. CRP has been used to assess inflammation and is also used in a multi-biomarker system as a predictive biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk. A gold-based working electrode sensor was developed, and the types of electrode printing inks and ink curing techniques were then optimized. The electrodes with the best performance parameters were then employed for the construction of an immunosensor for CRP by immobilizing anti-human CRP antibody on the working electrode surface. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was then constructed after sample addition by using anti-human CRP antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The signal was generated by the addition of a mediator/substrate system comprised of 3,3,5',5'-Tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Measurements were conducted using chronoamperometry at −200 mV against an integrated Ag/AgCl reference electrode. A CRP limit of detection (LOD) of 2.2 ng·mL−1 was achieved in spiked serum samples, and performance agreement was obtained with reference to a commercial ELISA kit. The developed CRP immunosensor was able to detect a diagnostically relevant range of the biomarker in serum without the need for signal amplification using nanoparticles, paving the way for future development on a cardiac panel electrochemical point-of-care diagnostic device. PMID:25587427

  11. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms.

  12. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein-based decision tree model for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections.

    PubMed

    Kraszewska-Głomba, Barbara; Szymańska-Toczek, Zofia; Szenborn, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    As no specific laboratory test has been identified, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis) remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We searched for a practical use of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in distinguishing PFAPA attacks from acute bacterial and viral infections. Levels of PCT and CRP were measured in 38 patients with PFAPA and 81 children diagnosed with an acute bacterial (n=42) or viral (n=39) infection. Statistical analysis with the use of the C4.5 algorithm resulted in the following decision tree: viral infection if CRP≤19.1 mg/L; otherwise for cases with CRP>19.1 mg/L: bacterial infection if PCT>0.65ng/mL, PFAPA if PCT≤0.65 ng/mL. The model was tested using a 10-fold cross validation and in an independent test cohort (n=30), the rule's overall accuracy was 76.4% and 90% respectively. Although limited by a small sample size, the obtained decision tree might present a potential diagnostic tool for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections when interpreted cautiously and with reference to the clinical context. PMID:27131024

  13. High sensitivity C-reactive protein distribution in the elderly: the Bambuí Cohort Study, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, L.G.S.; Eloi-Santos, S.M.; Peixoto, S.V.; Lima-Costa, M.F.; Vidigal, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the serum concentration of the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) provides a useful marker in clinical practice. However, the distribution of CRP is not available for all age and population groups. This study assessed the distribution of high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) by gender and age in 1470 elderly individuals from a Brazilian community that participates in the Bambuí Cohort Study. Blood samples were collected after 12 h of fasting and serum samples were stored at -70°C. Measurements were made with a commercial hs-CRP immunonephelometric instrument. More than 50% of the results were above 3.0 mg/L for both genders. Mean hs-CRP was higher in women (3.62 ± 2.58 mg/L) than in men (3.03 ± 2.50 mg/L). This difference was observed for all ages, except for the over-80 age group. This is the first population-based study to describe hs-CRP values in Latin American elderly subjects. Our results indicate that significant gender differences exist in the distribution of hs-CRP, and suggest that gender-specific cut-off points for hs-CRP would be necessary for the prediction of cardiovascular risks. PMID:23011406

  14. Commutability of the CRM 470 C-reactive protein value in the Dade Behring N High Sensitivity CRP assay.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A Myron; Ledue, Thomas B; Collins, Marilyn F

    2003-02-01

    Certified Reference Material 470 (CRM 470) demonstrates commutability with both the manufacturer's calibrator and with dilutions of serum pools in the Dade Behring N High Sensitivity assay for C-reactive protein (CRP). Both regression and back calibration show similar nonlinearity for all materials, largely due to the method of calibration curve fitting used in this assay. Significant differences in values among the currently available commercial assays can be largely overcome by using appropriate calibration curve fitting and the recommended value transfer protocol, which includes a minimum of two assay runs on each of at least 3 separate days, with weight correction of all reconstitutions and dilutions. An initial weight-corrected dilution should be made each day because of the relatively high level of CRP in CRM 470. In our opinion, the degree of nonlinearity, imprecision, and differences in values in currently available assays renders the use of fixed clinical decision cut-points questionable for high-sensitivity CRP. An alternative approach is suggested.

  15. Effect of nutritional status and dietary patterns on human serum C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Smidowicz, Angelika; Regula, Julita

    2015-11-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are widely tested inflammatory markers involved in the development of these diseases. Several studies indicate a relation between nutritional status and the concentrations of human high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Similarly, the role of diet in reducing inflammation and thereby modulating the risk of non-communicable diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review focuses on the effects of the selected nutrition models in humans on the concentrations of CRP and IL-6. It seems that the Mediterranean diet model is most effective in inhibiting inflammation. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension model and the plant nutrition model also have proven to be beneficial. The data on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets are inconclusive. Comprehensive studies are necessary, taking into account the cumulative effect of dietary and other factors on the inflammatory process.

  16. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  17. Binding of C-reactive protein to human lymphocytes. II. Interaction with a subset of cells bearing the Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    James, K; Hansen, B; Gewurz, H

    1981-12-01

    In the preceding paper we reported that C-reactive protein (CRP) in the presence of a multimeric binding specificity such as C-polysaccharide (CPS) binds to a small percentage of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). In the present paper additional methods for demonstrating this binding were developed and utilized to help characterize the CRP-binding cell. Heat-modified CRP and E-CPS-CRP each were found to bind to a similar percentage of PBL by microscopic visualization, and an identical degree of binding was observed by cytofluorimetric analysis. Multiple marker studies indicated that CRP-binding cells are found in the T cell, B cell, and null cell categories in a ratio of 2:1:1, respectively. Preferential overlap was seen with IgG FcR-bearing cells, which accounted for 70% of the CRP-binding cells; however, only 12% of the FcR cells bound CRP. These studies indicate that CRP-binding cells predominantly represent a subset of cells bearing FcR, and these cells have the morphologic characteristics of large granular lymphocytes. CRP in the presence of CPS bound to cells of multiple human and murine cultured lines shown to have IgG FcR reactivity, but showed lesser or no binding to cell lines negative for FcR. The precise morphologic and functional characterization of the CRP-binding cells and the nature of the binding site are yet to be established.

  18. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein-based decision tree model for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections

    PubMed Central

    Kraszewska-Głomba, Barbara; Szymańska-Toczek, Zofia; Szenborn, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    As no specific laboratory test has been identified, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis) remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We searched for a practical use of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in distinguishing PFAPA attacks from acute bacterial and viral infections. Levels of PCT and CRP were measured in 38 patients with PFAPA and 81 children diagnosed with an acute bacterial (n=42) or viral (n=39) infection. Statistical analysis with the use of the C4.5 algorithm resulted in the following decision tree: viral infection if CRP≤19.1 mg/L; otherwise for cases with CRP>19.1 mg/L: bacterial infection if PCT>0.65ng/mL, PFAPA if PCT≤0.65 ng/mL. The model was tested using a 10-fold cross validation and in an independent test cohort (n=30), the rule’s overall accuracy was 76.4% and 90% respectively. Although limited by a small sample size, the obtained decision tree might present a potential diagnostic tool for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections when interpreted cautiously and with reference to the clinical context. PMID:27131024

  19. Elevated salivary C-reactive protein levels are associated with active and passive smoking in healthy youth: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We examined salivary C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the context of tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) in healthy youth. We hypothesized that there would be a dose-response relationship between TSE status and salivary CRP levels. Methods This work is a pilot study (N = 45) for a larger investigation in which we aim to validate salivary CRP against serum CRP, the gold standard measurement of low-grade inflammation. Participants were healthy youth with no self-reported periodontal disease, no objectively measured obesity/adiposity, and no clinical depression, based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). We assessed tobacco smoking and confirmed smoking status (non-smoking, passive smoking, and active smoking) with salivary cotinine measurement. We measured salivary CRP by the ELISA method. We controlled for several potential confounders. Results We found evidence for the existence of a dose-response relationship between the TSE status and salivary CRP levels. Conclusions Our preliminary findings indicate that salivary CRP seems to have a similar relation to TSE as its widely used serum (systemic inflammatory) biomarker counterpart. PMID:22152006

  20. The Effect of Quercetin on Plasma Oxidative Status, C-Reactive Protein and Blood Pressure in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Fatemeh; Eghtesadi, Shahryar; Ahmadzadeh, Arman; Aryaeian, Naheed; Zabihiyeganeh, Mozhdeh; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Jazayeri, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the increased production of free radicals and inflammatory factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the effects of bioflavonoid quercetin on reducing oxidative stress, inflammation and blood pressure, the present study examined the effects of bioflavonoid quercetin on total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of plasma, lipid peroxidation and blood pressure in women with RA. Methods: The current study was a randomized double-blind clinical trial in which 51 women with RA aged 19-70 years, were participated. Patients were assigned into quercetin (500 mg/day) or placebo groups for 8 weeks. Dietary intake was recorded using 24-h dietary recall questionnaire and the physical activity was assessed through an international short questionnaire of physical activity at the beginning and end of the study. Plasma TAC and malondialdehyde (MDA) using colorimetric method, oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and also blood pressure were measured at the beginning and end of intervention. Results: After 8 weeks there were no significant differences in TAC of plasma, ox-LDL, MDA, hs-CRP, systolic and diastolic blood pressure between quercetin and placebo groups and in each group comparing before and after. Conclusions: In this study, quercetin had no effect on oxidative and inflammatory status of plasma and blood pressure in patients with RA. Further studies are needed to ensure the effect of quercetin on oxidative stress and inflammation in human. PMID:24829713

  1. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Agustín; Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82-0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  2. MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode of the gated lateral bipolar junction transistor for C-reactive protein detection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heng; Kwon, Hyurk-Choon; Yeom, Se-Hyuk; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2011-10-15

    In this study, we propose a novel biosensor based on a gated lateral bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for biomaterial detection. The gated lateral BJT can function as both a BJT and a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with both the emitter and source, and the collector and drain, coupled. C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an important disease marker in clinical examinations, can be detected using the proposed device. In the MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode, the sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility of the gated lateral BJT for biosensors were evaluated in this study. According to the results, in the MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode, the gated lateral BJT shows good selectivity and reproducibility. Changes in the emitter (source) current of the device for CRP antigen detection were approximately 0.65, 0.72, and 0.80 μA/decade at base currents of -50, -30, and -10 μA, respectively. The proposed device has significant application in the detection of certain biomaterials that require a dilution process using a common biosensor, such as a MOSFET-based biosensor. PMID:21835604

  3. Calcium-dependent binding of rabbit C-reactive protein to supported lipid monolayers containing exposed phosphorylcholine group.

    PubMed Central

    Sui, S F; Sun, Y T; Mi, L Z

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of rabbit C-reactive protein (rCRP) with a supported monolayer containing a phosphorylcholine moiety was studied. Three types of phospholipids were synthesized, each containing a insertion spacer of eight, six, or three atoms between the phosphorylcholine group and hydrophobic tail. By varying the length of the insertion spacer, we can vary the extension of the phosphorylcholine group from the membrane surface. By varying the monolayer composition, we can control the lateral distance between the exposed phosphorylcholine groups. Using the surface plasmon resonance technique (SPR), we demonstrated that the calcium-dependent binding of rCRP to the model membrane is governed not only by the ability of the ligand to access the binding pocket fully (spacer length), but also by lateral hindrance within the two-dimensional plane of the membrane. The value of the apparent binding constant was estimated by theoretical analysis, which is obviously dependent on the composition of the lipid mixture, and a maximum of (9.9 +/- 1.5) x 10(6) M-1 was obtained. PMID:9876145

  4. Neurokinin 3 receptor and phosphocholine transferase: missing factors for pathogenesis of C-reactive protein in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Parchim, Nicholas F.; Wang, Wei; Iriyama, Takayuki; Ashimi, Olaide A.; Siddiqui, Athar H.; Blackwell, Sean; Sibai, Baha; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), an innate immune mediator, is elevated in the circulation prior to symptoms in patients with preeclampsia (PE), a severe hypertensive pregnancy disorder with high mortality and morbidity. However, the specific sources underlying increased CRP and the role of elevated CRP in PE are undefined. Here, we report that circulating CRP levels are significantly increased in a large cohort of normotensive pregnant individuals compared to nulligravid women and is further increased in PE patients. These findings led us to further discover that placental syncytiotrophoblasts are previously unrecognized cellular sources of CRP and underlie elevated CRP in normotensive pregnant women and the additional increase in PE patients. Next, we demonstrated that injection of CRP induces PE features including hypertension (157.08 mmHg CRP treated vs. 118.99 mmHg control), proteinuria (35.0 mg/μg CRP treated vs. 14.1 mg/μg control), kidney and placental damage and increased levels of sFlt-1 in pregnant mice but not nonpregnant mice. We hypothesize that phosphocholine transferase, a placental specific enzyme posttranslationally modifying neurokinin B (NKB), is essential for the pathogenic role of CRP in PE through activation of the neurokinin 3 receptor. Overall, our studies have provided significant new insight regarding the pathogenic role of CRP in PE and highlighted innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:25452470

  5. Intraplaque Expression of C-Reactive Protein Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Severe Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mach, François; Roth, Aline; Burger, Fabienne; Bertolotto, Maria; Spinella, Giovanni; Pane, Bianca; Palombo, Domenico; Dallegri, Franco; Vuilleumier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Serum c-reactive protein (CRP) was suggested for the assessment of intermediate cardiovascular (CV) risk. Here, systemic or intraplaque CRP levels were investigated as predictors of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in patients with severe carotid stenosis. CRP levels were assessed in the serum and within different portions (upstream and downstream) of carotid plaques of 217 patients undergoing endarterectomy. The association between CRP and intraplaque lipids, collagen, neutrophils, smooth muscle cells (SMC), and macrophage subsets was determined. No correlation between serum CRP and intraplaque biomarkers was observed. In upstream portions, CRP content was directly correlated with intraplaque neutrophils, total macrophages, and M1 macrophages and inversely correlated with SMC content. In downstream portions, intraplaque CRP correlated with M1 and M2 macrophages. According to the cut-off point (CRP > 2.9%) identified by ROC analysis in upstream portions, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with high CRP levels had a greater rate of MACEs. This risk of MACEs increased independently of age, male gender, serum CRP, and statin use. In conclusion, in patients with severe carotid artery stenosis, high CRP levels within upstream portions of carotid plaques directly and positively correlate with intraplaque inflammatory cells and predict MACEs at an 18-month follow-up period. PMID:27738391

  6. Depressive Symptoms, Race, and Circulating C-Reactive Protein: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sheldon; DiLillo, Vicki G.; Lewis, Cora E.; Kiefe, Catarina; Whooley, Mary; Matthews, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the prospective association of depressive symptoms with circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and determine the direction of that association. Methods Using data from 2544 healthy participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study (ages 33–45, 55% female, 42% black), we examined the prospective association of depressive symptoms, as measured by the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), with circulating CRP five years later. Results Depressive symptoms at CARDIA Year 15 predicted CRP at Year 20, independent of demographic characteristics, biological and medical risk factors, health behaviors, and Year 15 CRP. This association, however, was conditional upon race such that the increase in CRP with increasing depressive symptoms was present in blacks but not whites. In neither blacks nor whites did Year 15 CRP predict Year 20 depressive symptoms. Among black participants, when examined in separate analyses, higher scores on the depressed affect and somatic symptoms subscales of the CES-D, and lower scores on the positive affect subscale were associated with greater Year 20 CRP. The interpersonal problems subscale was unrelated to CRP. When all four subscale scores were entered simultaneously in the same model, black participants' scores on the positive affect and somatic symptoms subscales emerged as independent predictors of Year 20 CRP whereas the depressed affect and interpersonal problems subscales did not. Conclusions Depressive symptoms may be more closely linked to inflammation in blacks than in whites. PMID:20668285

  7. Label-free RNA aptamer-based capacitive biosensor for the detection of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Anjum; Gurbuz, Yasar; Kallempudi, Saravan; Niazi, Javed H

    2010-08-28

    In this study, we report a novel aptamer-based capacitive label-free biosensor for monitoring transducing aptamer-protein recognition events, based on charge distribution under the applied frequency by non-Faradaic impedance spectroscopy (NFIS). This approach to capacitive biosensors is reported for the first time in this study, is reagent-less in processing and is developed using gold interdigitated (GID) capacitor arrays functionalized with synthetic RNA aptamers. The RNA atpamers served as biorecognition elements for C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk (CVR). The signal is generated as a result of the change in relative capacitance occurring as a result of the formation of an RNA-CRP complex on GID capacitors with the applied AC electrical frequency (50-350 MHz). The dispersion peak of the capacitance curve was dependent on the CRP concentration and tends to shift toward lower frequencies, accompanied by the increase in relaxation time due to the increased size of the aptamer-CRP complex. The dissociation constant (K(d)) calculated from the non-linear regression analysis of the relative capacitance change with the applied frequency showed that strong binding of CRP occurred at 208 MHz (K(d) = 1.6 microM) followed by 150 MHz (K(d) = 4.2 microM) and 306 MHz (K(d) = 3.4 microM) frequencies. The dynamic detection range for CRP is determined to be within 100-500 pg ml(-1). Our results demonstrates the behavior of an RNA-protein complex on GID capacitors under an applied electric field, which can be extended to other pairs of affinity biomolecules as well as for the development of electrical biosensor systems for different applications, including the early diagnosis of diseases.

  8. Monomeric C-reactive protein and Notch-3 co-operatively increase angiogenesis through PI3K signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Boras, Emhamed; Slevin, Mark; Alexander, M Yvonne; Aljohi, Ali; Gilmore, William; Ashworth, Jason; Krupinski, Jerzy; Potempa, Lawrence A; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Elobeid, Adila; Matou-Nasri, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the most acute-phase reactant serum protein of inflammation and a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease. Its expression is associated with atherosclerotic plaque instability and the formation of immature micro-vessels. We have previously shown that CRP upregulates endothelial-derived Notch-3, a key receptor involved in vascular development, remodelling and maturation. In this study, we investigated the links between the bioactive monomeric CRP (mCRP) and Notch-3 signalling in angiogenesis. We used in vitro (cell counting, wound-healing and tubulogenesis assays) and in vivo (chorioallantoic membrane) angiogenic assays and Western blotting to study the angiogenic signalling pathways induced by mCRP and Notch-3 activator chimera protein (Notch-3/Fc). Our results showed an additive effect on angiogenesis of mCRP stimulatory effect combined with Notch-3/Fc promoting bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) proliferation, migration, tube formation in Matrigel(TM) with up-regulation of phospho-Akt expression. The pharmacological blockade of PI3K/Akt survival pathway by LY294002 fully inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis induced by mCRP/Notch-3/Fc combination while blocking Notch signalling by gamma-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) partially inhibited mCRP/Notch-3/Fc-induced angiogenesis. Using a BAEC vascular smooth muscle cell co-culture sprouting angiogenesis assay and transmission electron microscopy, we showed that activation of both mCRP and Notch-3 signalling induced the formation of thicker sprouts which were shown later by Western blotting to be associated with an up-regulation of N-cadherin expression and a down-regulation of VE-cadherin expression. Thus, mCRP combined with Notch-3 activator promote angiogenesis through the PI3K/Akt pathway and their therapeutic combination has potential to promote and stabilize vessel formation whilst reducing the risk of haemorrhage from unstable plaques. PMID:24972386

  9. A 1-year lifestyle intervention for weight loss in individuals with type 2 diabetes reduces high C-reactive protein levels and identifies metabolic predictors of change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: We examined whether a 1-year intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss reduced elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in obese individuals with diabetes and identified metabolic and fitness predictors of hs-CRP change. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Look A...

  10. Do preoperative C-reactive protein and mean platelet volume levels predict development of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting?

    PubMed Central

    Düzyol, Çağrı; Aksoy, Rezan; Özcan, Kazım Serhan; Güngör, Barış; İdiz, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) operation is associated with increased risk of prolonged hospitalisation, health expenses and adverse clinical outcomes. Aim To investigate the relationship of atrial fibrillation after an isolated coronary artery bypass operation with levels of mean platelet volume and C-reactive protein. Material and methods Among 1240 patients who underwent operations for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass between January 2007 and May 2014, 1138 (91.8%) patients with preoperative normal sinusal rhythm were enrolled in the study. Patients were assigned to group 1 (n = 294) comprising patients who developed atrial fibrillation in the first 72 postoperative hours or group 2 (n = 844) comprising patients who remained in normal sinusal rhythm in the postoperative period. Results The incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation was 25.8%. The preoperative mean platelet volume (fl) and C-reactive protein (mg/dl) values in group 1 were 9.1 ±0.5 and 1.1 ±0.9 respectively, while these values were 8.3 ±0.6 and 0.5 ±0.3 respectively in group 2, which was statistically significant (p = 0.0001). Length of stay in the hospital (p = 0.0001) was higher in group 1. The values of mean platelet volume (fl) and mean C-reactive protein (mg/dl) were 9.9 ±0.9 and 30.9 ±3.4 respectively in group 1, while the values of mean platelet volume (fl) and mean C-reactive protein (mg/dl) were 8.8 ±0.6 and 24.9 ±4.8 respectively in group 2 (p = 0.0001 for mean platelet volume, p = 0.0001 for C-reactive protein). The difference between the groups was statistically significant in terms of postoperative neurologic events (p = 0.0001) and hospital mortality (p = 0.001). Increased C-reactive protein and mean platelet volume levels were found to be independent predictors of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Conclusions In our study, elevated preoperative mean platelet volume and C-reactive

  11. Succination of thiol groups in adipose tissue proteins in diabetes: succination inhibits polymerization and secretion of adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Norma; Rajesh, Mathur; Jepson, Matthew J; Nagai, Ryoji; Carson, James A; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2009-09-18

    S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is formed by reaction of the Krebs cycle intermediate fumarate with cysteine residues in protein, a process termed succination of protein. Both fumarate and succination of proteins are increased in adipocytes cultured in high glucose medium (Nagai, R., Brock, J. W., Blatnik, M., Baatz, J. E., Bethard, J., Walla, M. D., Thorpe, S. R., Baynes, J. W., and Frizzell, N. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 34219-34228). We show here that succination of protein is also increased in epididymal, mesenteric, and subcutaneous adipose tissue of diabetic (db/db) mice and that adiponectin is a major target for succination in both adipocytes and adipose tissue. Cys-39, which is involved in cross-linking of adiponectin monomers to form trimers, was identified as a key site of succination of adiponectin in adipocytes. 2SC was detected on two of seven monomeric forms of adiponectin immunoprecipitated from adipocytes and epididymal adipose tissue. Based on densitometry, 2SC-adiponectin accounted for approximately 7 and 8% of total intracellular adiponectin in cells and tissue, respectively. 2SC was found only in the intracellular, monomeric forms of adiponectin and was not detectable in polymeric forms of adiponectin in cell culture medium or plasma. We conclude that succination of adiponectin blocks its incorporation into trimeric and higher molecular weight, secreted forms of adiponectin. We propose that succination of proteins is a biomarker of mitochondrial stress and accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates in adipose tissue in diabetes and that succination of adiponectin may contribute to the decrease in plasma adiponectin in diabetes.

  12. Increased systemic elastase and C-reactive protein in aggressive periodontitis (CLOI-D-00160R2).

    PubMed

    Wohlfeil, Martin; Scharf, Susanne; Siegelin, Yasemin; Schacher, Beate; Oremek, Gerhard M; Sauer-Eppel, Hildegund; Schubert, Ralf; Eickholz, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The inflammatory mediators, serum elastase and C-reactive protein (CRP), are associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease. Thus, the aim of this study is to compare systemic inflammatory mediators in periodontally healthy controls (C), patients with untreated aggressive (AgP) and chronic (ChP) periodontitis. C [periodontal pocket probing depth (PPD)  <3.6 or <5 mm without bleeding (BOP), BOP < 10%], ChP (PDD ≥ 3.6 mm and probing attachment loss ≥5 mm at >30% of sites; age >35 years), and AgP (clinically healthy; PDD ≥ 3.6 mm at >30% of sites, bone loss ≥50% at ≥2 teeth; age ≤35 years) were examined clinically, and the body mass index was assessed. Blood was sampled for assessment of serum levels of elastase, CRP, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), interleukin (IL) 6, 8, and leukocyte counts. Thirty C, 31 ChP, and 29 AgP were analyzed. Elastase, CRP, LBP, and IL-6 levels were elevated in AgP compared to C (p < 0.013), whereas leukocyte counts and IL-8 were similar. Multiple regression analysis identified AgP (p < 0.001) and education level (p < 0.001) to explain 47% of the variation of elastase. AgP (p = 0.003), African origin (p = 0.006), female sex (p = 0.002), and BMI (p < 0.001) explained 39% of the variation of CRP. Serum elastase and CRP are significantly elevated in AgP compared to C. AgP patients exhibit a stronger systemic inflammatory burden than C patients. PMID:22009184

  13. CRP-mediated activation of complement in vivo: assessment by measuring circulating complement-C-reactive protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Wolbink, G J; Brouwer, M C; Buysmann, S; ten Berge, I J; Hack, C E

    1996-07-01

    The in vivo function of C-reactive protein (CRP) is unknown. Among the in vitro functions assigned to CRP is the ability to activate complement via the classical pathway. To date, there is no evidence supporting that CRP exerts this function in vivo. We here show a novel approach to assess CRP-mediated complement activation in vivo, which is based on the property that activated complement factors C3 and C4 fix to CRP during complement activation induced by this acute phase protein. We developed specific ELISAs for complexes between CRP and C4b, C4d, C3b, or C3d. We established that in vitro complement-CRP complexes were formed only during CRP-dependent activation, and not during activation by other activators, even in the presence of high CRP levels. Circulating levels of complement-CRP complexes were undetectable in normal donors, but significantly increased in nine patients following implantation of a renal allograft. Importantly, levels of complement-CRP complexes did not change in these patients upon a bolus infusion of mAb OKT3, which induces activation of the classical complement pathway, demonstrating in vivo that complement-CRP complexes are not formed during CRP-independent activation of complement, even when CRP is elevated. We conclude that measurement of complement-CRP complexes provides a suitable tool to study CRP-mediated activation of complement in vivo. Furthermore, increased levels of these complexes occur in clinical samples, indicating that CRP may induce activation of complement in vivo.

  14. Detection of C-reactive protein based on magnetic nanoparticles and capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Jyun; Yang, Jian-Ying; Shu, Ting-Yu; Lin, Ting-Yu; Chen, Yen-Yi; Su, Mei-Yu; Li, Wen-Jie; Liu, Mine-Yine

    2013-11-01

    A simple and fast method based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection was developed for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP). To optimize the CZE conditions, several factors including buffer compositions, buffer ionic strength, buffer pH, applied voltage and capillary temperature have been examined. The optimal separation buffer selected was a 30 mM sodium phosphate (PB) buffer, pH 8.0. The optimal CE applied voltage and temperature selected were 20 kV and 35°C, respectively. The CZE profile of the MNP-1°Ab-CRP-2°Ab/FITC bioconjugates showed good reproducibility. One major peak was observed for the MNP bioconjugates. The quantitative analysis also showed good results. The coefficient of variation (CV%) for the major peak area was 8.7%, and the CV% for the major peak migration time was 2.5%. The linear range for CRP analysis was 10-150 μg/mL, and the concentration limit of detection (LOD) was 9.2 μg/mL. Non-specific interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the system can be prevented by including 10% (v/v) of human plasma in the binding buffers. The CE/LIF method might be helpful for analyzing high concentrations of CRP in a patient's plasma after an acute-phase inflammation. This new method demonstrated the possibility of using MNPs and CE/LIF for the detection of proteins, and provided information for the establishment of appropriate CE conditions.

  15. Serum haptoglobin and C-reactive protein concentration in relation to rectal and vaginal temperature of early postpartum sows.

    PubMed

    Stiehler, T; Heuwieser, W; Pfützner, A; Burfeind, O

    2016-08-01

    Various attempts were made to improve the diagnosis of the periparturient hypogalactia syndrome in sows. A new approach was the detection of elevated concentrations of acute phase proteins. The objective of our study was to investigate the serum concentrations of haptoglobin (Hp) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in sows on Day 7 postpartum and relationship to body temperature. From Day 1 to Day 6 postpartum, 199 sows were clinically examined and a blood sample was taken for measuring Hp and CRP at Day 7. The median of Hp and CRP were 1.83 mg/mL (interquartile range: 1.42-2.13 mg/mL) and 60.0 μg/mL (interquartile range: 15.2-216.5 μg/mL). We did not find a correlation between Hp and CRP (ρ = 0.11, P = 0.12) nor a difference between sows categorized as ill and healthy sows in Hp concentration (P = 0.1) and CRP (P = 0.34). Sows with Hp > 2.13 mg/mL had a higher rectal temperature than sows with Hp ≤ 2.13 mg/mL (P = 0.037), but there was no difference in vaginal temperature (P = 0.24). Regarding CRP, sows with CRP greater than 216.5 μg/mL had higher rectal temperature (P = 0.017) and vaginal temperature (P = 0.02) than sows with CRP ≤ 216.5 μg/mL. As demonstrated in this study, Hp and CRP do not support the detection of early postpartum disorders in sows.

  16. Dietary total antioxidant capacity from different assays in relation to serum C-reactive protein among young Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The association between dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from different assays and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) has not been assessed in non-Western populations. We examined the association between dietary TAC and serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women using different four TAC assays. Methods The subjects were 443 young Japanese women aged 18–22 years. Dietary TAC was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire and the TAC value of each food using the following four assays: ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP); oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC); Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC); and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP). Serum CRP concentrations were measured by highly sensitive nephelometry. Results The major contributor to dietary TAC was green, barley, and oolong tea (FRAP: 53%, ORAC: 45%, TEAC: 36%, and TRAP: 44%). The prevalence of elevated CRP concentrations (≥ 1 mg/L) was 5.6%. TAC from FRAP was inversely associated with serum CRP concentrations (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for elevated CRP concentration in high [compared with low] dietary TAC group: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16-0.98]; P = 0.04). TAC from ORAC was inversely associated with CRP, although the association was not significant (OR: 0.48 [95% CI: 0.20-1.14]; P = 0.10). TAC from TEAC was inversely associated with CRP (OR: 0.32 [95% CI: 0.12-0.82]; P = 0.02), as was TAC from TRAP (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.12-0.81]; P = 0.02). Conclusions Dietary TAC was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women regardless of assay. Further studies are needed in other populations to confirm these results. PMID:23110638

  17. Impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels on coronary atheroma regression following high-intensity statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Nissen, Steven E; Shao, Mingyuan; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-11-15

    Guidelines now recommend high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with proven atherosclerotic disease. Yet the impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels on measures of disease regression to this therapy are unknown. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that high-intensity statin therapy causes equivalent degrees of coronary atheroma regression irrespective of baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. In 8 prospective randomized trials using serial coronary intravascular ultrasound, 1,881 patients who maintained or switched to 18- to 24 months of high-intensity statin therapy (rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg) were stratified according to baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. Changes in coronary percentage atheroma volume (PAV) and total atheroma volume (TAV) were evaluated. High-intensity statin therapy produced significant reductions from baseline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 38.4%, non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 33.6%, triglycerides by 13.1%, and CRP by 33.3%, while increasing HDL cholesterol by 11.7% (p <0.001 for all). This was associated with regression of PAV by 0.7% and of TAV by 8.2 mm(3) (p <0.001 for both). No significant differences of changes in PAV and TAV were observed across baseline quintiles of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or CRP. Moreover, across all measured lipoproteins and CRP, most patients demonstrated plaque regression (defined as any change from baseline in PAV or TAV <0). In conclusion, high-intensity statin therapy attenuated the natural progression of coronary atherosclerosis in all strata of patients with coronary artery disease irrespective of baseline lipoprotein or CRP levels. These findings provide support for the latest United States guideline recommendations for the broad use of high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with atherosclerosis, regardless of baseline lipid status.

  18. Preoperative and postoperative serum C-reactive protein levels to predict the outcome of ultrasound-indicated cerclage

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Ji-Eun; Son, Ga Hyun; Lee, Keun Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of preoperative and postoperative serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level on the prediction of pregnancy outcomes following ultrasound-indicated cerclage (UIC). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records 44 women who underwent UIC between January 2011 and December 2011. UIC was performed between 14 and 24 weeks of gestation in women with short cervix. We divided UIC patients into two groups according to the gestational age at delivery (34 weeks) and compared the two groups. Group A was defined as patients who delivered ≥34 weeks of gestation, and group B as patients delivered <34 weeks. Correlation and receiver-operating characteristic curves were also analyzed for the prediction of preterm birth after UIC. Results Thirty women delivered ≥34 weeks (group A) and 14 women delivered <34 weeks (group B). Pre- and post-cerclage CRP were significantly lower in group A (pre-cerclage CRP, 1.1±1.0 vs. 11.4±6.2 mg/dL, P<0.001; post-cerclage CRP, 0.6±0.5 vs. 7.4±7.2 mg/dL, P<0.001). The mean gestational age at delivery in group A was 37.7±1.8 weeks and that in group B was 26.9±4.3 weeks (P<0.001). There were significant negative correlations between pre- and post-cerclage CRP and latency from UIC to delivery (r=-0.82, P<0.001; r=-0.70, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusion Both pre- and post-cerclage CRP were useful in predicting the preterm birth following UIC. PMID:27004199

  19. Targeting C-reactive protein levels using high-dose atorvastatin before coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Krivoy, Norberto; Adler, Zvi; Saloma, Ronen; Hawadie, Ashraf; Azzam, Zaher S

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statin medication exhibits pleiotropic properties, such as improvement of endothelial function. AIM: To determine whether a high loading dose of atorvastatin prescribed before and after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery will attenuate the inflammatory response reflected in kinetic concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). METHODS: The individual area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of CRP concentration was calculated for the first five days after CABG surgery and compared among three groups of patients: group A patients (n=16), who were on chronic statin therapy, were switched to an equivalent therapy of 20 mg atorvastatin daily for 120 h; group B patients (n=15), who were on chronic statin therapy, were switched to 80 mg atorvastatin daily (one dose 24 h before CABG surgery, one on the day of surgery and two further doses after surgery) followed by 40 mg/day up to 120 h after surgery; and group C patients (n=10), who were naive to statin therapy, underwent elective CABG surgery. RESULTS: The three groups were comparable according to measurements of their intra- and postoperative variables, except for their mean weight. The mean (± SEM) AUC-CRP for group B was 13,545±959.9 mg/L·h, significantly smaller (P=0.01) than that for group A (17,085±858.4 mg/L·h). In group C (statin-naïve patients), the AUC-CRP was 16,191±1447 mg/L·h, which was not significantly different from groups A and B, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: High loading doses of atorvastatin before CABG surgery reduced CRP concentration, expressed as AUC-CRP. This effect supports the idea that a high dose of atorvastatin is needed to attenuate the ‘negative’ inflammatory response. The present study also lends support to the possibility that high-dose atorvastatin positively improves post-open-heart surgery results. PMID:19343161

  20. C-reactive protein, lung hyperinflation and heart rate variability in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease --a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Giuseppe Maria; Inchingolo, Riccardo; Sgueglia, Gregory Angelo; Lanza, Gaetano; Valente, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system have been described in subjects with severe disease. We studied heart rate variability (HRV) in COPD patients at rest and during the 6-minute Walk Test (6mWT) and the association with lung function impairment taking into account systemic inflammation. Thirty outpatients with stable COPD underwent lung function measurements, blood gas analysis, ECG Holter and transcutaneous pulse oximetry during 6mWT and then they were classified by BODE index. Also C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured. At rest, we observed a significant reduction of HRV for increasing BODE index. During the 6mWT, HRV tended to decrease in BODE 1 subjects whereas an increase was observed in BODE 2 and BODE 3-4 subjects. Subjects with elevated CRP values had a significant reduction in Standard Deviation of all normal RR intervals at rest (SDNN: p = 0.013), Total Power (TFA: p = 0.04) and Very Low Frequency band (VLF: p = 0.041). At rest, subjects with Inspiratory Capacity-to-Total Lung Capacity ratio (IC/TLC) < 36% had a significant reduced SDNN (p = 0.004), TFA (p = 0.001), VLF (p = 0.001), Low Frequency band (p = 0.007). During 6mWT, changes of HRV parameters were significantly related to airflow obstruction and static hyperinflation indices. At rest and during submaximal exercise, COPD patients with moderate and severe disease had an abnormal cardiac autonomic modulation which was related to both systemic inflammation and lung function impairment.

  1. Pulmonary Arterial Pressure Response During Exercise in COPD: A Correlation with C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP)

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Janos; Palinkas, Attila; Lajko, Imre; Horváth, Ildikó; Boda, Krisztina; Somfay, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Background: The non-invasive assessment of pulmonary haemodynamics during exercise provides complementary data for the evaluation of exercise tolerance in patients with COPD. Methods: Exercise echocardiography in the semi-supine position was performed in 27 patients with COPD (C) with a forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of 36±12% predicted and 13 age and gender-matched non-COPD subjects (NC). COPD patients also underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing with gas exchange detection (CPET). Furthermore, serum high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, was also measured. Results: The maximal work rate (WRmax) and aerobic capacity (VO2peak) were significantly reduced (WRmax: 77±33 Watt, VO2peak: 50±14 %pred) in COPD. Pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PAPs) was higher in COPD versus controls both at rest (39±5 vs. 31±2 mmHg, p<0.001), and at peak exercise (72±12 vs. 52±8 mmHg, p<0.001). In 19 (70%) COPD patients, the increase in PAPs was above 22 mmHg. The change in pressure (dPAPs) correlated with hsCRP (r2=0.53, p<0.0001) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r2=0.18, p<0.001). Conclusion: PAPs at rest and during exercise were significantly higher in COPD patients and correlated with higher hsCRP. This may indicate a role for systemic inflammation and hyperinflation in the pulmonary vasculature in COPD. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov webpage with NCT00949195 registration number. PMID:27019674

  2. C-reactive Protein as Predict of Increased Carotid Intima Media Thickness in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tapashetti, Roopali P; Guvva, Sowjanya; Patil, Sudhir R; Sharma, Sumit; Pushpalatha, H M

    2014-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) - a prototypic marker of inflammation has been shown to be elevated in chronic periodontitis (CP) and also been shown to predict cardiovascular events. Increased carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) has been recently recognized as surrogate marker for atherosclerosis. In this context, we studied to correlate between CIMT and CRP in CP and to know whether CRP predicts the cardiovascular risk in CP. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 30 systemically healthy subjects aged over 40 years - 15 subjects with CP as cases and 15 subjects with no periodontitis as controls. All subjects were subjected to measurement of CRP levels and CIMT in addition to detailed periodontal evaluation. Quantitative determination of CRP was done by turbidimetric immunoassay. IMT of the common carotid arteries was estimated bilaterally using B-mode ultrasound at 6 sites. Positive CRP was defined as more than 10 mg/l. Results: Mean CRP levels were significantly higher in subjects with CP (19.58 ± 17.03), then in non CP (NCP) (5.54 ± 1.63, P < 0.004). Mean CIMT value was significantly higher in subjects with CP (1.09 ± 0.45) than in NCP (0.57 ± 0.06, P < 0.001) and all periodontal indices correlated well with CIMT. Further, there was significant correlation between CRP and increased CIMT in subjects with CP (r = 0.863, P < 0.001). Conclusions: The present study indicates CRP as a possible underlying pathway in the association between periodontal disease and the observed CIMT. CRP can be used as a risk predictor for atherosclerosis in patients with CP. PMID:25214732

  3. IL1B genetic variation and plasma C-reactive protein level among young adults: The CARDIA study

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Rice, Kenneth; Williams, O. Dale; Williams, Michelle A.; Gross, Myron D.; Lewis, Cora E.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Interleukin-1B (IL1B) modulates C-reactive protein (CRP) expression. However, whether IL1B genetic variation is associated with CRP level is unknown. Further, obesity, a state of low-grade inflammation that influences cellular IL-1 functions may modify this association. Methods and results Study participants (N = 3289), 48% blacks and 52% whites, had CRP level measurements at year 7 and year 15 examinations as part of the CARDIA study. Ten tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that characterize common IL1B gene variation were genotyped. In SNP analysis, no significant associations with either level or change in time CRP were observed after multiple testing adjustments. However, global ILIB gene variation was associated with year 7 to year 15 change in CRP (global nominal p = 0.004, multiple testing corrected p = 0.048) among obese blacks. Compared to the commonest haplotype, a common haplotype that includes the SNP rs1143642 was associated with greater increases in CRP from year 7 to year 15 among obese blacks and whites while another common haplotype that includes the SNP rs3917356 was associated with decreased change in CRP from year 7 to year 15 among obese blacks. The rare alleles of ILIB SNPs, SNP 7114 (rs1143642) and SNP 3298 (rs3917356), were associated with greater increases and decreases in CRP from year 7 to year 15 among blacks, respectively, compared to their common variants. Conclusion IL1B genetic variation may have a role in CRP level regulation and this association may be modified by obesity. PMID:18573495

  4. C-reactive protein protects mice against pneumococcal infection via both phosphocholine-dependent and phosphocholine-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gang, Toh B; Hanley, Gregory A; Agrawal, Alok

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of action of C-reactive protein (CRP) in protecting mice against lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is unknown. The involvement of the phosphocholine (PCh)-binding property of CRP in its antipneumococcal function previously has been explored twice, with conflicting results. In this study, using three different intravenous sepsis mouse models, we investigated the role of the PCh-binding property of CRP by employing a CRP mutant incapable of binding to PCh. The ability of wild-type CRP to protect mice against infection was found to differ in the three models; the protective ability of wild-type CRP decreased when the severity of infection was increased, as determined by measuring mortality and bacteremia. In the first animal model, in which we used 25 μg of CRP and 10(7) CFU of pneumococci, both wild-type and mutant CRP protected mice against infection, suggesting that the protection was independent of the PCh-binding activity of CRP. In the second model, in which we used 25 μg of CRP and 5 × 10(7) CFU of pneumococci, mutant CRP was not protective while wild-type CRP was, suggesting that the protection was dependent on the PCh-binding activity of CRP. In the third model, in which we used 150 μg of CRP and 10(7) CFU of pneumococci, mutant CRP was as protective as wild-type CRP, again indicating that the protection was independent of the PCh-binding activity of CRP. We conclude that both PCh-dependent and PCh-independent mechanisms are involved in the CRP-mediated decrease in bacteremia and the resulting protection of mice against pneumococcal infection.

  5. Leucocyte esterase, glucose and C-reactive protein in the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    De Vecchi, E; Villa, F; Bortolin, M; Toscano, M; Tacchini, L; Romanò, C L; Drago, L

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of joint fluid is of paramount importance for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections. Different markers of inflammation and/or infection in joint fluid have been proposed for diagnosis of these infections. In this study we evaluated the performance of leucocyte esterase, C-reactive protein (CRP) and glucose assays in synovial fluids from 129 patients with septic (n = 27) or aseptic (n = 102) prosthetic joint failure. Samples were collected in serum tubes and centrifuged to limit the presence of corpuscle interfering with the assays. Determinations of leucocyte esterase and glucose were carried out by means of enzymatic colorimetric reactions performed on strips for urine analysis. Tests were considered positive when graded + or ++ whereas traces or absence of colour were considered negative. CRP was measured using an automated turbidimetric method and considered suggestive for infections when >10 mg/L. Leucocyte esterase was positive in 25/27 infected patients and negative in 99/102 not infected patients (sensitivity 92.6%, specificity 97.0%). CRP was higher than the threshold in 22/27 infected patients and in 6/102 not infected patients (sensitivity: 81.5%; specificity: 94.1%) whereas glucose showed the lowest sensitivity (77.8%) and specificity (81.4%), being negative in 21/27 and 19/102 infected and not infected patients, respectively. CRP led to a correct diagnosis in 19 of 22 patients with discordant esterase and glucose results. In conclusion, evaluation of leucocyte esterase, glucose and CRP may represent a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections. PMID:27040804

  6. Serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein in early assessment of severity of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, R; Melzi d'Eril, G V; Morselli-Labate, A M; Merlini, G; Barakat, B; Bosoni, T

    2000-06-01

    Amyloid A (SAA) and procalcitonin (PCT) have been reported as useful indicators of inflammation. Our aim was to assess the utility of SAA and PCT in establishing the severity of acute pancreatitis in comparison to C-reactive protein (CRP): Thirty-one patients with acute pancreatitis enrolled within 24 hr from the onset of pain and 31 healthy subjects were studied. Nineteen patients had mild acute pancreatitis, and 12 had severe pancreatitis. Serum SAA, PCT, and CRP were measured in all subjects at admission and, in acute pancreatitis patients, during the following five days. Patients with acute pancreatitis had serum concentrations of SAA, PCT, and CRP significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those of healthy subjects during the entire study period. Using cutoff values ranging from 240 to 250 mg/liter for SAA, from 0.252 to 0.255 ng/ml for PCT, and from 12.8 to 12.9 mg/dl for CRP, the sensitivity (calculated on patients with severe pancreatitis), the specificity (calculated on patients with mild pancreatitis), and the efficiency (calculated as the percentage of correct classifications) were 76.8%, 69.3%, and 72.4% for SAA; 21.7%, 83.2%, and 58.2% for PCT; and 60.9%, 89.1%, and 77.6% for CRP. In conclusion, the sensitivity of SAA is significantly higher than that of PCT and CRP in assessing the severity of pancreatitis, whereas PCT and CRP had a specificity significantly higher than SAA. The accuracy and efficiency were similar for SAA and CRP, and both these markers had an accuracy and efficiency significantly higher than those of PCT.

  7. The Phosphocholine-binding Pocket on C-reactive Protein Is Necessary for Initial Protection of Mice against Pneumococcal Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Toh B.; Hammond, David J.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Ferguson, Donald A.; Mishra, Vinod K.; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) protects mice from lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection when injected into mice within the range of 6 h before to 2 h after the administration of pneumococci. Because CRP binds to phosphocholine-containing substances and subsequently activates the complement system, it has been proposed that the antipneumococcal function of CRP requires the binding of CRP to phosphocholine moieties present in pneumococcal cell wall C-polysaccharide. To test this proposal experimentally, in this study, we utilized a new CRP mutant incapable of binding to phosphocholine. Based on the structure of CRP-phosphocholine complexes, which showed that Phe66, Thr76, and Glu81 formed the phosphocholine-binding pocket, we constructed a CRP mutant F66A/T76Y/E81A in which the pocket was blocked by substituting Tyr for Thr76. When compared with wild-type CRP, mutant CRP bound more avidly to phosphoethanolamine and could be purified by affinity chromatography using phosphoethanolamine-conjugated Sepharose. Mutant CRP did not bind to phosphocholine, C-polysaccharide, or pneumococci. Mutant CRP was free in the mouse serum, and its rate of clearance in vivo was not faster than that of wild-type CRP. When either 25 μg or 150 μg of CRP was administered into mice, unlike wild-type CRP, mutant CRP did not protect mice from lethal pneumococcal infection. Mice injected with mutant CRP had higher mortality rates than mice that received wild-type CRP. Decreased survival was due to the increased bacteremia in mice treated with mutant CRP. We conclude that the phosphocholine-binding pocket on CRP is necessary for CRP-mediated initial protection of mice against lethal pneumococcal infection. PMID:23139417

  8. Usefulness of C-Reactive Protein Plasma Levels to Predict Exercise Intolerance in Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Canada, Justin McNair; Fronk, Daniel Taylor; Cei, Laura Freeman; Carbone, Salvatore; Erdle, Claudia Oddi; Abouzaki, Nayef Antar; Melchior, Ryan David; Thomas, Christopher Scott; Christopher, Sanah; Turlington, Jeremy Shane; Trankle, Cory Ross; Thurber, Clinton Joseph; Evans, Ronald Kenneth; Dixon, Dave L; Van Tassell, Benjamin Wallace; Arena, Ross; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) have evidence of chronic systemic inflammation. Whether inflammation contributes to the exercise intolerance in patients with HF is, however, not well established. We hypothesized that the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), an established inflammatory biomarker, predict impaired cardiopulmonary exercise performance, in patients with chronic systolic HF. We measured CRP using high-sensitivity particle-enhanced immunonephelometry in 16 patients with ischemic heart disease (previous myocardial infarction) and chronic systolic HF, defined as a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 50% and New York Heart Association class II-III symptoms. All subjects with CRP >2 mg/L, reflecting systemic inflammation, underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing using a symptom-limited ramp protocol. CRP levels predicted shorter exercise times (R = -0.65, p = 0.006), lower oxygen consumption (VO2) at the anaerobic threshold (R = -0.66, p = 0.005), and lower peak VO2 (R = -0.70, p = 0.002), reflecting worse cardiovascular performance. CRP levels also significantly correlated with an elevated ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (R = +0.64, p = 0.008), a reduced oxygen uptake efficiency slope (R = -0.55, p = 0.026), and reduced end-tidal CO2 level at rest and with exercise (R = -0.759, p = 0.001 and R = -0.739, p = 0.001, respectively), reflecting impaired gas exchange. In conclusion, the intensity of systemic inflammation, measured as CRP plasma levels, is associated with cardiopulmonary exercise performance, in patients with ischemic heart disease and chronic systolic HF. These data provide the rationale for targeted anti-inflammatory treatments in HF. PMID:26546248

  9. Associations of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with C-reactive protein: A cross-sectional population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Joy E; Neylan, Thomas C; Epel, Elissa; O'Donovan, Aoife

    2016-03-01

    Mounting evidence highlights specific forms of psychological stress as risk factors for ill health. Particularly strong evidence indicates that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma exposure increase risk for physical and psychiatric disorders, and there is emerging evidence that inflammation may play a key role in these relationships. In a population-based sample from the Health and Retirement Study (n=11,198, mean age 69 ± 10), we examine whether childhood adversity, adulthood trauma, and the interaction between them are associated with elevated levels of the systemic inflammatory marker high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). All models were adjusted for age, gender, race, education, and year of data collection, as well as other possible confounds in follow-up sensitivity analyses. In our sample, 67% of individuals had experienced at least one traumatic event during adulthood, and those with childhood adversity were almost three times as likely to have experienced trauma as an adult. Childhood adversities and adulthood traumas were independently associated with elevated levels of hsCRP (β=0.03, p=0.01 and β=0.05, p<0.001, respectively). Those who had experienced both types of stress had higher levels of hsCRP than those with adulthood trauma alone, Estimate=-0.06, 95% CI [-0.003, -0.12], p=0.04, but not compared to those with childhood adversity alone, Estimate=-0.06, 95% CI [0.03, -0.16], p=0.19. There was no interaction between childhood and adulthood trauma exposure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine adulthood trauma exposure and inflammation in a large population-based sample, and the first to explore the interaction of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with inflammation. Our study demonstrates the prevalence of trauma-related inflammation in the general population and suggests that childhood adversity and adulthood trauma are independently associated with elevated inflammation. PMID:26616398

  10. Slower Decline in C-Reactive Protein after an Inflammatory Insult Is Associated with Longer Survival in Older Hospitalised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Goodbrand, James A.; Donnan, Peter T.; McGilchrist, Mark M.; Frost, Helen; McMurdo, Marion E. T.; Witham, Miles D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enhancing biological resilience may offer a novel way to prevent and ameliorate disease in older patients. We investigated whether changes in C-reactive protein (CRP), as a dynamic marker of the acute inflammatory response to diverse stressors, may provide a way to operationalize the concept of resilience in older adults. We tested this hypothesis by examining whether such changes could predict prognosis by identifying which individuals are at greater risk of 6-month mortality. Methods Analysis of prospective, routinely collected datasets containing data on hospitalization, clinical chemistry and rehabilitation outcomes for rehabilitation inpatients between 1999 and 2011. Maximum CRP response during acute illness and CRP recovery indices (time and slope of CRP decay to half maximum, and to <50mg/L if peak values were greater than 50mg/L) was derived from biochemistry data. 6-month survival plots were conducted on quartiles of CRP recovery indices. Cox proportional hazards models were used to test univariate and multivariate predictors of 6-month mortality. Covariates included age, sex, number of medications, serum calcium, haemoglobin level, renal function, and the presence of previous myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic heart failure, COPD and diabetes. Results 3723 patients, mean age 84 years, were included. 1535 (41%) were male and 733 (20%) died during six-month follow-up. The lower an individual’s peak CRP reading, and the longer the time taken for their CRP to fall, the better their 6-month survival. The time for CRP to reach half of its maximum value was the best dynamic CRP index of survival (HR 0.93 per week, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98; p = 0.004); this remained significant even after adjustment for maximum CRP level and covariates listed above. Conclusion CRP recovery indices are associated with survival in older people; further work is required to explain differences in physiology between patients with a fast and slow CRP recovery. PMID:27467771

  11. Monomeric C-reactive protein--a key molecule driving development of Alzheimer's disease associated with brain ischaemia?

    PubMed

    Slevin, M; Matou, S; Zeinolabediny, Y; Corpas, R; Weston, R; Liu, D; Boras, E; Di Napoli, M; Petcu, E; Sarroca, S; Popa-Wagner, A; Love, S; Font, M A; Potempa, L A; Al-Baradie, R; Sanfeliu, C; Revilla, S; Badimon, L; Krupinski, J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases dramatically in patients with ischaemic stroke. Monomeric C-reactive protein (mCRP) appears in the ECM of ischaemic tissue after stroke, associating with microvasculature, neurons and AD-plaques, Aβ, also, being able to dissociate native-CRP into inflammatory, mCRP in vivo. Here, mCRP injected into the hippocampal region of mice was retained within the retrosplenial tract of the dorsal 3rd ventrical and surrounding major vessels. Mice developed behavioural/cognitive deficits within 1 month, concomitant with mCRP staining within abnormal looking neurons expressing p-tau and in beta-amyloid 1-42-plaque positive regions. mCRP co-localised with CD105 in microvessels suggesting angiogenesis. Phospho-arrays/Western blotting identified signalling activation in endothelial cells and neurons through p-IRS-1, p-Tau and p-ERK1/2-which was blocked following pre-incubation with mCRP-antibody. mCRP increased vascular monolayer permeability and gap junctions, increased NCAM expression and produced haemorrhagic angiogenesis in mouse matrigel implants. mCRP induced tau244-372 aggregation and assembly in vitro. IHC study of human AD/stroke patients revealed co-localization of mCRP with Aβ plaques, tau-like fibrils and IRS-1/P-Tau positive neurons and high mCRP-levels spreading from infarcted core regions matched reduced expression of Aβ/Tau. mCRP may be responsible for promoting dementia after ischaemia and mCRP clearance could inform therapeutic avenues to reduce the risk of future dementia. PMID:26335098

  12. Child maltreatment, inflammation, and internalizing symptoms: Investigating the roles of C-reactive protein, gene variation, and neuroendocrine regulation.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, Dante; Handley, Elizabeth D; Rogosch, Fred A

    2015-05-01

    Prior research has found inconsistent evidence regarding the association among childhood adversity, inflammation, and internalizing symptoms, perhaps because previous studies have yet to adequately integrate important factors such as the timing of the adversity, genetic variation, and other relevant processes such as neuroendocrine regulation. The aims of the present study were threefold: (a) to determine whether the effect of the timing of child maltreatment on C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, varies by CRP gene variation; (b) to explore whether links between salivary CRP and childhood internalizing symptoms depend on the presence and timing of maltreatment experiences; and (c) to investigate the role of CRP in the relations between child neuroendocrine regulation and internalizing symptoms and examine whether these associations are moderated by the presence and timing of child maltreatment. Participants included a sample of 267 maltreated and 222 nonmaltreated children (M age = 9.72, SD = 0.99; 52.4% male; 66% African American) who attended a summer day camp research program designed for school-aged low-income children. Department of Human Services records were examined to determine the onset and recency of maltreatment for children in the maltreated group. The results indicated that among children with recent onset maltreatment, those with at least one A allele from CRP single nucleotide polymorphism rs1417938 evidenced significantly higher CRP levels compared to recently maltreated children carrying the TT genotype. Moreover, higher levels of CRP were associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms only for recently maltreated children. Finally, we did not find support for salivary CRP as a mechanism in the relation between neuroendocrine regulation and childhood internalizing symptoms. Our findings highlight the importance of the timing of child maltreatment and have important implications for characterizing variability in inflammation

  13. Validation of a commercially available automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric method for measuring canine C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Hillström, Anna; Hagman, Ragnvi; Tvedten, Harold; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammatory disease in canine patients. An automated human immunoturbidimetric assay has been validated for measuring canine CRP, but cross-reactivity with canine CRP is unpredictable. Objective The purpose of the study was to validate a new automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP method (Gentian cCRP). Methods Studies of imprecision, accuracy, prozone effect, interference, limit of quantification, and stability under different storage conditions were performed. The new method was compared with a human CRP assay previously validated for canine CRP determination. Samples from 40 healthy dogs were analyzed to establish a reference interval. Results Total imprecision was < 2.4% for 4 tested serum pools analyzed twice daily over 10 days. The method was linear under dilution, and no prozone effect was detected at a concentration of 1200 mg/L. Recovery after spiking serum with purified canine CRP at 2 different concentrations was 123% and 116%, respectively. No interference from hemoglobin or triglycerides (10 g/L) was detected. CRP was stable for 14 days at 4°C and 22°C. In the method comparison study, there was good agreement between the validated human CRP assay and the new canine-specific assay. Healthy dogs had CRP concentrations that were less than the limit of quantification of the Gentian cCRP method (6.8 mg/L). Conclusions The new canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP assay is a reliable and rapid method for measuring canine CRP, suitable for clinical use due to the option for an automated assay. PMID:24798319

  14. Child maltreatment, inflammation, and internalizing symptoms: Investigating the roles of C-reactive protein, gene variation, and neuroendocrine regulation.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, Dante; Handley, Elizabeth D; Rogosch, Fred A

    2015-05-01

    Prior research has found inconsistent evidence regarding the association among childhood adversity, inflammation, and internalizing symptoms, perhaps because previous studies have yet to adequately integrate important factors such as the timing of the adversity, genetic variation, and other relevant processes such as neuroendocrine regulation. The aims of the present study were threefold: (a) to determine whether the effect of the timing of child maltreatment on C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, varies by CRP gene variation; (b) to explore whether links between salivary CRP and childhood internalizing symptoms depend on the presence and timing of maltreatment experiences; and (c) to investigate the role of CRP in the relations between child neuroendocrine regulation and internalizing symptoms and examine whether these associations are moderated by the presence and timing of child maltreatment. Participants included a sample of 267 maltreated and 222 nonmaltreated children (M age = 9.72, SD = 0.99; 52.4% male; 66% African American) who attended a summer day camp research program designed for school-aged low-income children. Department of Human Services records were examined to determine the onset and recency of maltreatment for children in the maltreated group. The results indicated that among children with recent onset maltreatment, those with at least one A allele from CRP single nucleotide polymorphism rs1417938 evidenced significantly higher CRP levels compared to recently maltreated children carrying the TT genotype. Moreover, higher levels of CRP were associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms only for recently maltreated children. Finally, we did not find support for salivary CRP as a mechanism in the relation between neuroendocrine regulation and childhood internalizing symptoms. Our findings highlight the importance of the timing of child maltreatment and have important implications for characterizing variability in inflammation

  15. C-reactive protein and cardiac vagal activity following resistance exercise training in young African-American and white men.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Jae, Sae Young; Vieira, Victoria J; Iwamoto, Gary A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Woods, Jeffrey A; Fernhall, Bo

    2009-04-01

    African Americans have a greater prevalence of hypertension and diabetes compared with white Americans, and both autonomic dysregulation and inflammation have been implicated in the etiology of these disease states. The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiac autonomic and systemic inflammatory response to resistance training in young African-American and white men. Linear (time and frequency domain) and nonlinear (sample entropy) heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, tonic and reflex vagal activity, and postexercise heart rate recovery were used to assess cardiac vagal modulation. C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count were used as inflammatory markers. Twenty two white and 19 African-American men completed 6 wk of resistance training followed by 4 wk of exercise detraining (Post 2). Sample entropy, tonic and reflex vagal activity, and heart rate recovery were increased in white and African-American men following resistance training (P < 0.05). Following detraining (Post 2), sample entropy, tonic and reflex vagal activity, and heart rate recovery returned to baseline values in white men but remained above baseline in African-American men. While there were no changes in white blood cell count or CRP in white men, these inflammatory markers decreased in African-American men following resistance training, with reductions being maintained following detraining (P < 0.05). In conclusion, resistance training improves cardiac autonomic function and reduces inflammation in African-American men, and these adaptations remained after the cessation of training. Resistance training may be an important lifestyle modification for improving cardiac autonomic health and reducing inflammation in young African-American men.

  16. The phosphocholine-binding pocket on C-reactive protein is necessary for initial protection of mice against pneumococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Gang, Toh B; Hammond, David J; Singh, Sanjay K; Ferguson, Donald A; Mishra, Vinod K; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-12-14

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) protects mice from lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection when injected into mice within the range of 6 h before to 2 h after the administration of pneumococci. Because CRP binds to phosphocholine-containing substances and subsequently activates the complement system, it has been proposed that the antipneumococcal function of CRP requires the binding of CRP to phosphocholine moieties present in pneumococcal cell wall C-polysaccharide. To test this proposal experimentally, in this study, we utilized a new CRP mutant incapable of binding to phosphocholine. Based on the structure of CRP-phosphocholine complexes, which showed that Phe(66), Thr(76), and Glu(81) formed the phosphocholine-binding pocket, we constructed a CRP mutant F66A/T76Y/E81A in which the pocket was blocked by substituting Tyr for Thr(76). When compared with wild-type CRP, mutant CRP bound more avidly to phosphoethanolamine and could be purified by affinity chromatography using phosphoethanolamine-conjugated Sepharose. Mutant CRP did not bind to phosphocholine, C-polysaccharide, or pneumococci. Mutant CRP was free in the mouse serum, and its rate of clearance in vivo was not faster than that of wild-type CRP. When either 25 μg or 150 μg of CRP was administered into mice, unlike wild-type CRP, mutant CRP did not protect mice from lethal pneumococcal infection. Mice injected with mutant CRP had higher mortality rates than mice that received wild-type CRP. Decreased survival was due to the increased bacteremia in mice treated with mutant CRP. We conclude that the phosphocholine-binding pocket on CRP is necessary for CRP-mediated initial protection of mice against lethal pneumococcal infection. PMID:23139417

  17. CANNABIS SMOKING AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN: A QUANTILE REGRESSIONS APPROACH BASED ON NHANES 2005–2010*

    PubMed Central

    Alshaarawy, Omayma; Anthony, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-clinical studies link cannabinoid-1 receptor activation to inflammation and atherosclerotic effects; anti-inflammation and immunosuppression seem to be mediated by cannabinoid-2 receptor activation. In this epidemiological study, we aim to present estimates on suspected cannabis-attributable immunomodulation as manifest in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels as non-specific inflammatory markers with interpretable clinical values. With strength of data from recent large nationally representative community sample surveys, the research approach illustrates value of a quantile regressions approach in lieu of the commonly used but relatively arbitrary cutpoints for CRP values. Methods The study population encompasses 20–59 year old participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2005–2010 (n = 1115 recently active cannabis smokers and 8041 non-smokers, identified via confidential Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interviews). Age, sex, race, education, income-poverty ratio, alcohol consumption, and tobacco smoking also were measured, together with body mass index (BMI), which actually might be on a mediational path. Quantile regressions, with bootstrapping for variance estimation, made it possible to hold these covariates constant while estimating cannabis-CRP associations. Results Evidence suggesting possible cannabis-attributable immunomodulation emerges at CRP levels below the median (p<0.05). Whereas BMI might help explain a cannabis link with serum CRP, but BMI-stratified analyses disclosed no appreciable variation of the cannabis-CRP relationship across BMI subgroups. Conclusions Extending pre-clinical research on cannabis-attributable immunomodulation, this study’s CRP evidence points toward possible anti-inflammatory effects of cannabis smoking. More definitive evidence can be derived by combining pre-clinical research, studies of patients, and epidemiological research approaches. PMID:25529540

  18. Relationships of High-sensitive C-reactive Protein and P-wave Dispersion in Lone Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li-Hui; Yao, Yan; Wu, Ling-Min; Zhang, Kui-Jun; Zhang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current evidence links atrial fibrillation (AF) to the inflammation. Inflammatory indexes such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have been related to the development and persistence of AF. However, the role of inflammation in the atrial electrophysiological remodeling indexed by P-wave dispersion (Pd) remains unclear. Methods: The study consisted of 71 patients with lone paroxysmal AF (AF group) and 71 age- and gender-matched controls of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia without history of AF (control group). Electrocardiography, Pd, hs-CRP, and other clinical characteristics were compared between the two groups. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding age, gender, hyperlipidemia, etc. Compared to controls, left atrial diameter (44 ± 7 vs 39 ± 7 mm), Pd (49 ± 13 vs 26 ± 8 ms), and hs-CRP (2.17 [1.46–2.89] vs 1.12 [0.74–1.41] mg/L) were increased (P < 0.05), respectively. Linear regression identified hs-CRP as an independent correlation of Pd level both in the total population and the AF group (r = 0.464 and 0.313; P < 0.001, respectively). Multiple logistic regression revealed hs-CRP as an independent determinant of AF (odds ratio [OR] =15.430, 95% confidence interval: 6.031–39.476: P <0.001). Further adjusted for Pd, both Pd and hs-CRP were independent predictors for AF, but the OR for hs-CRP in predicting AF has been attenuated from 15.430 to 6.246. Conclusions: In lone AF, Pd and plasma hs-CRP concentration are inter-associated and related to AF. The interaction between hs-CRP and AF may be mediated by Pd, suggesting an important role of inflammation in the atrial electrophysiological remodeling predisposing to AF. PMID:26021499

  19. C-reactive protein response to influenza vaccination as a model of mild inflammatory stimulation in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Thomas W.; Borja, Judith B.; Kuzawa, Christopher W.; Perez, Tita Lorna L.; Adair, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly measured as a marker of systemic inflammation that predicts elevated risk for cardiovascular disease. Influenza vaccination is a mild pro-inflammatory stimulus, and the CRP response to vaccination may provide additional information on individual differences in inflammatory response and risk for disease. Aim To document the pattern of CRP response to influenza vaccination among a large sample of older women in the Philippines. The Philippines exemplifies current global trends toward increasing rates of overweight/obesity, but also maintains relatively high rates of infectious disease. The secondary aim of the study is to investigate the impact of infectious symptoms on the pattern of response to vaccination. Methods A community-based sample of 934 women (mean age=55.4 years) received the influenza vaccine. CRP was assessed at baseline and 72 hours post-vaccination. Descriptive, non-parametric, and parametric analyses were implemented to assess the magnitude of CRP response, and to investigate whether responses were associated with baseline CRP or the presence of infectious symptoms prior to vaccination. Results Influenza vaccination resulted in a statistically significant CRP response of 0.35 mg/L (p<0.001), representing a 30.2% increase from baseline. For individuals with symptoms of infectious disease at baseline, the CRP response was smaller (12.9%) and not statistically significant (p=0.77). Lower CRP at baseline was associated with larger CRP response to vaccination in the entire sample, and among participants without recent symptoms of infection. Conclusions Influenza vaccination produces a mild CRP response in the Philippines. This study extends prior research in US and European populations validating influenza vaccination as an in vivo model for investigating the dynamics of inflammation, but also raises potential complications in settings where rates of infectious disease are elevated. PMID:25795257

  20. Child Maltreatment, Inflammation, and Internalizing Symptoms: Investigating the Roles of C-Reactive Protein, Gene Variation and Neuroendocrine Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cicchetti, Dante; Handley, Elizabeth D.; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has found inconsistent evidence regarding the association among childhood adversity, inflammation, and internalizing symptoms, perhaps because previous studies have yet to adequately integrate important factors such as the timing of the adversity, genetic variation, and other relevant processes such as neuroendocrine regulation. The aims of the present study were threefold: 1) Determine whether the effect of the timing of child maltreatment on C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, varies by CRP gene variation; 2) Explore whether links between salivary CRP and childhood internalizing symptoms depend on the presence and timing of maltreatment experiences; 3) Investigate the role of CRP in the relations between child neuroendocrine regulation and internalizing symptoms and examine whether these associations are moderated by the presence and timing of child maltreatment. Participants included a sample of 267 maltreated and 222 nonmaltreated children (M age= 9.72, SD=0.99; 52.4% male; 66% African-American) who attended a summer day camp research program designed for school-aged low-income children. Department of Human Services records were examined to determine the onset and recency of maltreatment for children in the maltreated group. Results indicated that among children with recent onset maltreatment, those with at least one A allele from CRP SNP rs1417938 evidenced significantly higher CRP levels compared to recently maltreated children carrying the TT genotype. Moreover, higher levels of CRP were associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms only for recently maltreated children. Finally, we did not find support for salivary CRP as a mechanism in the relation between neuroendocrine regulation and childhood internalizing symptoms. Our findings highlight the importance of the timing of child maltreatment and have important implications for characterizing variability in inflammation and internalizing symptoms among youth. PMID

  1. C-reactive protein and its relation to high blood pressure in overweight or obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Juliana Andreia F.; Medeiros, Carla Campos M.; Cardoso, Anajás da Silva; Gonzaga, Nathalia Costa; Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira; Ramos, André Luiz C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and high blood pressure (BP) in overweight or obese children and adolescents. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 184 overweight or obese children and adolescents aged from two to 18 years old, from April, 2009 to April, 2010. The classification of nutritional status used the body mass index (BMI). Based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention curve, individuals were classified as: overweight (BMI between the 85th-95th percentiles), obesity (BMI between 95th-97th percentiles) and severe obesity (BMI >97th percentile). Abnormal values were considered for systolic BP (SBP) and/or diastolic (DBP) if ≥90th percentile of the BP curve recommended for children and adolescents in the V Brazilian Guidelines on Hypertension, for waist circumference (WC) if ≥90th percentile of the curve established by the National Cholesterol Education Program, and for high sensitive CRP (hs-CRP) if >3mg/dL. To evaluate the association of inadequate values of CRP and the studied groups, chi-square test and analysis of variance were applied, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17.0 and adopting a significance level of 5%. RESULTS Among the evaluated sample, 66.3% were female, 63.5%, non-white, 64.1% had severe obesity, 78.3% had altered WC and 70.6% presented high BP. There was a significant association of CRP high levels with altered WC and BMI ≥97th percentile. In adolescents, high CRP was related to high SBP. CRP mean values were higher in individuals with elevated SBP. CONCLUSIONS Inadequate values of hs-CRP were associated with severe obesity and high SBP in the studied population. These markers can be used to identify children and adolescents at higher risk for developing atherosclerosis. PMID:24142315

  2. The Association of C-Reactive Protein and Physical Activity Among a Church-Based Population of African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Swann Arp; Wirth, Michael D.; Khan, Samira; Murphy, E. Angela; Heiney, Sue P.; Davis, Lisa C.; Davis, Briana; Drayton, Ruby F.; Hurley, Thomas G.; Blair, Steven M.; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Regular physical activity can reduce systemic inflammation and, thereby, the burden of chronic inflammatory-related conditions. This study examined whether regular physical activity, measured subjectively (Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity [RAPA]) and objectively (Bodymedia’s SenseWear® activity monitor [SWA]), is associated with inflammatory or glycemic control markers. Methods Subjects were 345 participants of the Healthy Eating and Active Living in the Spirit (HEALS) lifestyle intervention among African-American (AA) churches in South Carolina in 2009. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between both subjectively- and objectively- measured physical activity and inflammatory markers including high sensitivity c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Results Those who participated in regular physical activity (RAPA) had lower CRP values compared to those who were sedentary (2.3 vs. 3.8 mg/L, p<0.01). Lower levels of CRP or IL-6 were observed among those in the highest quartile of active energy expenditure (CRP: 2.0 vs. 3.6 mg/L, p=0.01) or moderate-vigorous physical activity minutes (CRP=1.7 vs. 4.5 mg/L, p<0.01; IL-6=1.5 vs. 2.1 pg/mL, p=0.01) compared to their lowest respective quartiles as measured by the SWA. Conclusion Physical activity may improve chronic inflammation, which is a primary pathophysiological mechanism for numerous chronic disorders, especially among minority populations. PMID:26007295

  3. Secondary analysis of APPLE study suggests atorvastatin may reduce atherosclerosis progression in pubertal lupus patients with higher C reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Ardoin, Stacy P; Schanberg, Laura Eve; Sandborg, Christy I; Barnhart, Huiman X; Evans, Greg W; Yow, Eric; Mieszkalski, Kelly L; Ilowite, Norman T; Eberhard, Anne; Imundo, Lisa F; Kimura, Yuki; Levy, Deborah; von Scheven, Emily; Silverman, Earl; Bowyer, Suzanne L; Punaro, L; Singer, Nora G; Sherry, David D; McCurdy, Deborah K; Klein-Gitelman, Marissa; Wallace, Carol; Silver, Richard M; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Higgins, Gloria C; Brunner, Hermine I; Jung, Lawrence; Soep, Jennifer B; Reed, Ann M; Thompson, Susan D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Participants in the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Paediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) trial were randomised to placebo or atorvastatin for 36 months. The primary endpoint, reduced carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT) progression, was not met but atorvastatin-treated participants showed a trend of slower CIMT progression. Post-hoc analyses were performed to assess subgroup benefit from atorvastatin therapy. Methods Subgroups were prespecified and defined by age (> or ≤15.5 years), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) duration (> or ≤24 months), pubertal status (Tanner score ≥4 as post-pubertal or <4 as pre-pubertal), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) (≥ or <110 mg/dl) and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) (≥ or <1.5 mg/l). A combined subgroup (post-pubertal and hsCRP≥1.5 mg/l) was compared to all others. Longitudinal linear mixed-effects models were developed using 12 CIMT and other secondary APPLE outcomes (lipids, hsCRP, disease activity and damage, and quality of life). Three way interaction effects were assessed for models. Results Significant interaction effects with trends of less CIMT progression in atorvastatin-treated participants were observed in pubertal (3 CIMT segments), high hsCRP (2 CIMT segments), and the combined high hsCRP and pubertal group (5 CIMT segments). No significant treatment effect trends were observed across subgroups defined by age, SLE duration, LDL for CIMT or other outcome measures. Conclusions Pubertal status and higher hsCRP were linked to lower CIMT progression in atorvastatin-treated subjects, with most consistent decreases in CIMT progression in the combined pubertal and high hsCRP group. While secondary analyses must be interpreted cautiously, results suggest further research is needed to determine whether pubertal lupus patients with high CRP benefit from statin therapy. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00065806. PMID:23436914

  4. Evaluation of the Relationship between Selected Reticulocyte Parameters and Inflammation determined by Plasma C-reactive Protein in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Lazo, A; Tvarijonaviciute, A; Cerón, J J; Planellas, M; Pastor, J

    2015-05-01

    Anaemia secondary to inflammatory disease is one of the main causes of anaemia in veterinary and human medicine and impairment of iron homeostasis due to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines is one of the aetiological mechanisms involved. Because reticulocytes are recently produced cells, reticulocyte indices are early indicators of iron deficiency anaemia in man and dogs and reticulocyte indices may be affected during the course of inflammatory processes earlier than indices related to mature red blood cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible influence of inflammation on reticulocyte parameters including concentration, mean reticulocyte volume, volume distribution width, percentage of microcytic reticulocytes, percentage of macrocytic reticulocytes, mean reticulocyte haemoglobin content (CHr), haemoglobin distribution width, cell haemoglobin concentration, mean percentage of hypochromic reticulocytes, percentage of reticulocytes with low CHr and immature reticulocyte factor medium and high, and on white blood cell concentration by using C-reactive protein (CRP) as an inflammatory biomarker. Samples from 175 diseased dogs and 16 healthy dogs were included in the study. The diseased dogs were grouped according to plasma CRP and ferritin concentrations, the presence and type of anaemia and different aetiopathological categories. Dogs with high plasma CRP concentrations had lower CHr (median 23.3 pg) and percentage of reticulocytes with high CHr (median 35.5%) and higher percentage of reticulocytes with low CHr (median 14.6%) compared with dogs without inflammation (median 24.9 pg, median 50.9% and median 7.8%, respectively) and healthy dogs (median 25.1 pg, median 50.0% and median 6.1%, respectively), with no differences between the last two groups. Reticulocyte parameters, particularly those related to haemoglobin concentration, are therefore affected by inflammatory conditions in anaemic and in non-anaemic dogs.

  5. Monomeric C-reactive protein-a key molecule driving development of Alzheimer’s disease associated with brain ischaemia?

    PubMed Central

    Slevin, M.; Matou, S.; Zeinolabediny, Y.; Corpas, R.; Weston, R.; Liu, D.; Boras, E.; Di Napoli, M.; Petcu, E.; Sarroca, S.; Popa-Wagner, A.; Love, S.; Font, M. A.; Potempa, L. A.; Al-baradie, R.; Sanfeliu, C.; Revilla, S.; Badimon, L.; Krupinski, J.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) increases dramatically in patients with ischaemic stroke. Monomeric C-reactive protein (mCRP) appears in the ECM of ischaemic tissue after stroke, associating with microvasculature, neurons and AD-plaques, Aβ, also, being able to dissociate native-CRP into inflammatory, mCRP in vivo. Here, mCRP injected into the hippocampal region of mice was retained within the retrosplenial tract of the dorsal 3rd ventrical and surrounding major vessels. Mice developed behavioural/cognitive deficits within 1 month, concomitant with mCRP staining within abnormal looking neurons expressing p-tau and in beta-amyloid 1-42-plaque positive regions. mCRP co-localised with CD105 in microvessels suggesting angiogenesis. Phospho-arrays/Western blotting identified signalling activation in endothelial cells and neurons through p-IRS-1, p-Tau and p-ERK1/2-which was blocked following pre-incubation with mCRP-antibody. mCRP increased vascular monolayer permeability and gap junctions, increased NCAM expression and produced haemorrhagic angiogenesis in mouse matrigel implants. mCRP induced tau244–372 aggregation and assembly in vitro. IHC study of human AD/stroke patients revealed co-localization of mCRP with Aβ plaques, tau-like fibrils and IRS-1/P-Tau positive neurons and high mCRP-levels spreading from infarcted core regions matched reduced expression of Aβ/Tau. mCRP may be responsible for promoting dementia after ischaemia and mCRP clearance could inform therapeutic avenues to reduce the risk of future dementia. PMID:26335098

  6. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome on Blood Pressure and C-Reactive Protein in Male Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Huang, Hui; Song, Ligong; Hao, Hua; Ying, Mingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Background The influences of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) on blood pressure and C-reactive protein (CRP) were observed, and the underlying mechanism was investigated. Methods Respiratory sleep monitoring was performed on 188 male patients who were newly diagnosed with hypertension. Based on the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) results, patients were divided into a normal control group (AHI ≤ 5, n = 35), a mild OSAHS group (5 < AHI ≤ 15, n = 28), a moderate OSAHS group (15 < AHI ≤ 30, n = 57), and a severe OSAHS group (AHI > 30, n = 68). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted on patients in each group, and blood samples were collected to detect indicators, including fasting blood glucose (FBG), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP). Results TG and hs-CRP in patients in the moderate and severe OSAHS groups were higher than those in the normal control group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). Additionally, their mean nocturnal systolic blood pressure (nSBP) and nocturnal diastolic blood pressure (nDBP) were higher than those in the normal control group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). However, the percentage of blood pressure reduction at night was significantly lower than that in the normal control group (P < 0.01). AHI and hs-CRP positively correlated with nSBP (adjusted R2 = 0.46) and nDBP (adjusted R2 = 0.38) and negatively correlated with the nocturnal blood pressure reduction percentage (adjusted R2 = 0.48). Conclusion Moderate and severe OSAHS induced increases in nocturnal blood pressure and CRP content in the body, resulting in further damage to the circadian rhythms of blood pressure. PMID:26858795

  7. Vascular C-reactive protein in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: role of vascular inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Nobutaka

    2006-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered to be a chronic inflammatory disease. Vascular inflammation occurs in response to injury induced by various stimuli, such as oxidative stress, shear stress, infection, and so on. This concept is supported by the recent clinical findings that C-reactive protein (CRP) is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. CRP, which was originally identified as a protein that could precipitate the C-polysaccharide of pneumococcal cell walls, has been widely used as a clinical marker of the state of inflammation, since its production by hepatocytes increases during the acute phase of the inflammatory response. Recent investigations have provided two new concepts for the research field of CRP, namely, its extra-hepatic production and its potent biological activities such as the induction of adhesion molecules and chemokines. Recently, we demonstrated that smooth muscle cells and macrophages in coronary arteries expressed CRP protein and mRNA, as evaluated using coronary specimens of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients obtained by atherectomy. The expression of vascular CRP was closely associated with NAD(P)H oxidase, an important enzymatic origin of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vessel walls. Furthermore, CRP directly up-regulated NAD(P)H oxidase p22(phox) and enhanced ROS generation in cultured coronary artery smooth muscle cells. Thus, vascular CRP is likely to be a direct participant in vascular inflammation and lesion formation via its potent biological effects. Since lysophosphatidylcholine, a major atherogenic lipid of oxidized LDL, was reported to activate vascular NAD(P)H oxidase, we speculate that there is a vicious circle consisting of vascular NAD(P)H oxidase, ROS and oxidized LDL. Since phagocytic NAD(P)H oxidase is at the first line of the host defense system, it is important to selectively suppress vascular NAD(P)H oxidase in the localized inflammatory lesions in therapeutic strategies for CAD. In this review, we

  8. Evaluation of C-reactive protein as a clinical biomarker in naturally heartworm-infected dogs: a field study.

    PubMed

    Venco, Luigi; Bertazzolo, Walter; Giordano, Guglielmo; Paltrinieri, Saverio

    2014-11-15

    Canine heartworm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis is considered a pulmonary disease, which leads to pulmonary hypertension, and in the late stage, may induce right cardiac insufficiency. Adult worms are localized in the pulmonary arteries, which undergo endothelial damage (proliferative endoarteritis), the severity of which depends on the duration of infection and the worm burden. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a major canine acute-phase protein that rapidly increases in a wide range of inflammatory conditions and rapidly decreases when inflammation resolves. CRP is therefore considered a sensitive but nonspecific marker of inflammation. Pulmonary arterial damage in canine heartworm may induce an increase in CRP concentrations similar to what occurs in humans with endoarteritis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether CRP may be a diagnostic and/or prognostic marker in canine heartworm, whether it may be used for staging and monitoring canine heartworm, and whether its concentration depends on worm burden or on pulmonary arterial damage. Serum CRP concentrations were determined in 57 dogs with heartworm disease, 47 of which were grouped according to parasite burden (low: n=11; high: n=10) or on severity of pulmonary hypertension (mild: n=16; severe: n=10). An additional 23 heartworm-free cardiopathic dogs were grouped on the absence of pulmonary hypertension (n=8), presence of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) (n=6), or presence of cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension (n=3) due to previous heartworm disease that had been treated (n=6). Twenty control dogs also were sampled for CRP concentrations. Results show that CRP was significantly increased (p<0.001) in dogs with heartworm or cardiomyopathy compared with concentrations in controls. In the heartworm group, CRP was significantly increased (p<0.001) in dogs with mild or severe pulmonary hypertension but not in dogs with low or high parasite burden without pulmonary hypertension. Heartworm

  9. Effects of Metformin on Tissue Oxidative and Dicarbonyl Stress in Transgenic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Expressing Human C-Reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Malínská, Hana; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Škop, Vojtěch; Šilhavý, Jan; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Kazdová, Ludmila; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative and dicarbonyl stress play important roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the first-line drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because it effectively suppresses gluconeogenesis in the liver. However, its "pleiotropic" effects remain controversial. In the current study, we tested the effects of metformin on inflammation, oxidative and dicarbonyl stress in an animal model of inflammation and metabolic syndrome, using spontaneously hypertensive rats that transgenically express human C-reactive protein (SHR-CRP). We treated 8-month-old male transgenic SHR-CRP rats with metformin (5 mg/kg/day) mixed as part of a standard diet for 4 weeks. A corresponding untreated control group of male transgenic SHR-CRP rats were fed a standard diet without metformin. In a similar fashion, we studied a group of nontransgenic SHR treated with metformin and an untreated group of nontransgenic SHR controls. In each group, we studied 6 animals. Parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism and oxidative and dicarbonyl stress were measured using standard methods. Gene expression profiles were determined using Affymetrix GeneChip Arrays. Statistical significance was evaluated by two-way ANOVA. In the SHR-CRP transgenic strain, we found that metformin treatment decreased circulating levels of inflammatory response marker IL-6, TNFα and MCP-1 while levels of human CRP remained unchanged. Metformin significantly reduced oxidative stress (levels of conjugated dienes and TBARS) and dicarbonyl stress (levels of methylglyoxal) in left ventricles, but not in kidneys. No significant effects of metformin on oxidative and dicarbonyl stress were observed in SHR controls. In addition, metformin treatment reduced adipose tissue lipolysis associated with human CRP. Possible molecular mechanisms of metformin action-studied by gene expression profiling in the liver-revealed deregulated genes from inflammatory and insulin signaling, AMP

  10. C-reactive protein is associated with cigarette smoking-induced hyperfiltration and proteinuria in an apparently healthy population.

    PubMed

    Sauriasari, Rani; Sakano, Noriko; Wang, Da-Hong; Takaki, Jiro; Takemoto, Kei; Wang, BingLing; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Yoshie; Takigawa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Noriko; Kanbara, Sakiko; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ogino, Keiki

    2010-11-01

    Although cigarette smoking is known to be an important risk factor for renal disease, the mechanism by which smoking induces progressive renal disease in a healthy population has not been established. We hypothesized that oxidative stress (measured as 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α), 8-iso-PGF2a), inflammation (highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), hs-CRP) and nitric oxide may be associated with an alteration in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and proteinuria in otherwise healthy smokers. A total of 649 eligible subjects were classified according to their smoking status. Plasma NOx was measured using ozone-based chemiluminescence, urinary 8-iso-PGF2a was measured using enzyme immunoassay and serum hs-CRP was measured using a latex aggregation nephelometry method. The levels of 8-iso-PGF2a and hs-CRP increased in current smokers (P=0.001 and P=0.029, respectively), although there was not an increase in the NOx level. The prevalence of a high eGFR increased in light smokers (odds ratio (OR) 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.61-2.17)) and heavy smokers (OR 2.33 (95% CI, 1.06-5.10)) when compared with non- and past smokers (P for trend=0.024). The multivariable-adjusted mean values of the eGFR in current smokers, reported from the lowest to the highest quintiles of hs-CRP levels, were 82.1, 85.1, 86.4 and 88.5 ml per min per 1.73 m² (P for trend=0.027). The mean values of proteinuria were 28.6, 34.6, 37.2 and 39.5 mg g⁻¹ creatinine (P for trend=0.003). The correlation coefficient between hs-CRP and eGFR was increased significantly (P=0.03) across non- (r=0.03), past (r=-0.17), light (r=0.13) and heavy smokers (r=0.31). In conclusion, cigarette smoking is a risk factor for renal function alteration in healthy smokers and is characterized by a high eGFR and a high urinary protein associated with an increase in the hs-CRP. This finding suggests that hs-CRP may help mediate the alteration of renal function in smokers. PMID:20703235

  11. Effects of Metformin on Tissue Oxidative and Dicarbonyl Stress in Transgenic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Expressing Human C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Malínská, Hana; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Škop, Vojtěch; Šilhavý, Jan; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Kazdová, Ludmila; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative and dicarbonyl stress play important roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the first-line drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because it effectively suppresses gluconeogenesis in the liver. However, its “pleiotropic” effects remain controversial. In the current study, we tested the effects of metformin on inflammation, oxidative and dicarbonyl stress in an animal model of inflammation and metabolic syndrome, using spontaneously hypertensive rats that transgenically express human C-reactive protein (SHR-CRP). We treated 8-month-old male transgenic SHR-CRP rats with metformin (5 mg/kg/day) mixed as part of a standard diet for 4 weeks. A corresponding untreated control group of male transgenic SHR-CRP rats were fed a standard diet without metformin. In a similar fashion, we studied a group of nontransgenic SHR treated with metformin and an untreated group of nontransgenic SHR controls. In each group, we studied 6 animals. Parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism and oxidative and dicarbonyl stress were measured using standard methods. Gene expression profiles were determined using Affymetrix GeneChip Arrays. Statistical significance was evaluated by two-way ANOVA. In the SHR-CRP transgenic strain, we found that metformin treatment decreased circulating levels of inflammatory response marker IL-6, TNFα and MCP-1 while levels of human CRP remained unchanged. Metformin significantly reduced oxidative stress (levels of conjugated dienes and TBARS) and dicarbonyl stress (levels of methylglyoxal) in left ventricles, but not in kidneys. No significant effects of metformin on oxidative and dicarbonyl stress were observed in SHR controls. In addition, metformin treatment reduced adipose tissue lipolysis associated with human CRP. Possible molecular mechanisms of metformin action–studied by gene expression profiling in the liver–revealed deregulated genes from inflammatory and insulin signaling, AMP

  12. Effect of antispastic agents (calcium antagonists and/or isosorbide dinitrate) on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with coronary vasospastic angina pectoris and no hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Jui; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Yang, Ning-I

    2005-01-01

    Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured before and after 3 months of treatment with antispastic agents (calcium antagonists and/or isosorbide dinitrate) in 27 patients who had coronary vasospastic angina pectoris and no hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. Levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein decreased after treatment with antispastic agents.

  13. Univariate and multivariate analysis of risk factors for severe clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea: Importance of co-morbidity and serum C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Hardt, Christian; Berns, Thomas; Treder, Wolfgang; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate risk factors for severe clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) in hospitalized patients. METHODS: We analysed risk factors for severe CDAD (associated with systemic signs of hypovolemia) in 124 hospitalized patients by retrospective chart review. RESULTS: Severe CDAD was present in 27 patients (22%). Statistical analysis showed a significant association with a higher 30-d mortality (33% vs 4%, P < 0.001) and a higher proportion of longer hospital stay exceeding 14 d (74% vs 52%, P = 0.048). Charlson co-morbidity score (OR 1.29 for 1 point increment, P < 0.05) and serum C-reactive protein at diagnosis (OR 1.15 for 10 mg/L increment, P < 0.001) were independent predictors of severe CDAD. CONCLUSION: Patients with a severe level of co-morbidity and high serum C-reactive protein levels at the time of diagnosis should receive particular attention. PMID:18666322

  14. Elevated Expression of Pentraxin 3 in Anti-neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Glomerulonephritis with Normal Serum C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Risa; Nakai, Kentaro; Fujii, Hideki; Goto, Shunsuke; Hara, Shigeo; Imai, Naofumi; Nishi, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with an elevated serum creatinine level of 1.61 mg/dL and a normal C-reactive protein level of less than 0.1 mg/dL. Her myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) titer was slightly increased at 9.2 U/mL; a kidney biopsy revealed that 23 of 32 glomeruli had crescents. The expression of pentraxin 3 was detected in her kidney and her plasma pentraxin 3 level was elevated at 63.53 ng/mL. Plasma pentraxin 3 levels may be an activity marker for ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis, particularly when serum C-reactive protein levels are within the normal limits.

  15. C-reactive Protein Concentration Is Associated With a Higher Risk of Mortality in a Rural Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Shin, Min-Ho; Shin, Dong Hoon; Koh, Sang-Baek; Ahn, Song Vogue; Lee, Tae-Yong; Ryu, So Yeon; Song, Jae-Sok; Choe, Hong-Soon; Lee, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory biomarker, has been widely used as a preclinical marker predictive of morbidity and mortality. Although many studies have reported a positive association between CRP and mortality, uncertainty still remains about this association in various populations, especially in rural Korea. Methods A total of 23 233 middle-aged participants (8862 men and 14 371 women) who were free from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and acute inflammation (defined by a CRP level ≥10 mg/L) were drawn from 11 rural communities in Korea between 2005 and 2011. Blood CRP concentration was analyzed as a categorical variable (low: 0.0-0.9 mg/L; intermediate: 1.0-3.0 mg/L; high: 3.1-9.9 mg/L) as well as a continuous variable. Each participant’s vital status through December 2013 was confirmed by death statistics from the National Statistical Office. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the independent association between CRP and mortality after adjusting for other risk factors. Results The total quantity of observed person-years was 57 975 for men and 95 146 for women, and the number of deaths was 649 among men and 367 among women. Compared to the low-CRP group, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality of the intermediate group was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.40) for men and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.61) for women, and the corresponding values for the high-CRP group were 1.98 (95% CI, 1.61 to 2.42) for men and 1.41 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.95) for women. Similar trends were found for CRP evaluated as a continuous variable and for cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions Higher CRP concentrations were associated with higher mortality in a rural Korean population, and this association was more prominent in men than in women. PMID:27744669

  16. Antioxidant Response of Osteoblasts to Doxycycline in an Inflammatory Model Induced by C-reactive Protein and Interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Tilakaratne, A.; Soory, Mena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Investigation of osteoblastic responses to oxidative stress, induced by C-reactive protein (CRP) and IL-6 and ameliorating effects of doxycycline (Dox); using assays for 5-alpha dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as an antioxidant marker of healing. IL-6 and CRP are risk markers of periodontitis and prevalent comorbidities in periodontitis subjects. Methods: Confluent monolayer cultures of osteoblasts were incubated with radiolabelled testosterone (14C-T) as substrate, in the presence or absence (Control) of pre-determined optimal concentrations of CRP, IL-6, Dox; alone and in combination (n=8) for 24h in MEM. The eluent was solvent-extracted for steroid metabolites. They were separated using TLC in a benzene/ acetone solvent system 4:1 v/v; and quantified using radioisotope scanning. The identity of formed metabolites was confirmed using the mobility of cold standards added to the samples and disclosed in iodine. Further confirmation of the authenticity of DHT was carried out by combined gas chromatrography-mass spectrometry, after derivatization to pentafluorobenzyloxime trimethyl silyl ether. Results: The yields of DHT from 14C-testosterone showed 2-fold and 1.8-fold- inhibition in response to IL-6 and CRP respectively and 28% stimulation in response to Dox, via the 5-alpha reductase pathway. The combination of IL-6 + CRP showed a 2-fold reduction in the yields of DHT, elevated to control values when combined with Dox (n=8; p<0.001). Yields of 4-androstenedione showed an inverse relationship to those of DHT, in response to the agents tested, in keeping with the 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase pathway. Conclusions: Inhibition of DHT synthesis in osteoblasts by IL-6 and CRP was overcome by doxycycline. Oxidative actions of IL-6 and CRP; and antioxidant actions of Dox are reinforced by the metabolic yields of DHT in response to agents tested. Using a novel metabolically active model allows closer extrapolation to in vivo conditions; in the context of

  17. Decreases in procalcitonin and C-reactive protein are strong predictors of survival in ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Renato; Meisner, Michael; Lisboa, Thiago C; Hertz, Felipe T; Filippin, Tania B; Fachel, Jandyra MG; Teixeira, Paulo JZ

    2006-01-01

    Introduction This study sought to assess the prognostic value of the kinetics of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP) and clinical scores (clinical pulmonary infection score (CPIS), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)) in the outcome of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) at an early time point, when adequacy of antimicrobial treatment is evaluated. Methods This prospective observational cohort study was conducted in a teaching hospital. The subjects were 75 patients consecutively admitted to the intensive care unit from October 2003 to August 2005 who developed VAP. Patients were followed for 28 days after the diagnosis, when they were considered survivors. Patients who died before the 28th day were non-survivors. There were no interventions. Results PCT, CRP and SOFA score were determined on day 0 and day 4. Variables included in the univariable logistic regression model for survival were age, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, decreasing ΔSOFA, decreasing ΔPCT and decreasing ΔCRP. Survival was directly related to decreasing ΔPCT with odds ratio (OR) = 5.67 (95% confidence interval 1.78 to 18.03), decreasing ΔCRP with OR = 3.78 (1.24 to 11.50), decreasing ΔSOFA with OR = 3.08 (1.02 to 9.26) and APACHE II score with OR = 0.92 (0.86 to 0.99). In a multivariable logistic regression model for survival, only decreasing ΔPCT with OR = 4.43 (1.08 to 18.18) and decreasing ΔCRP with OR = 7.40 (1.58 to 34.73) remained significant. Decreasing ΔCPIS was not related to survival (p = 0.59). There was a trend to correlate adequacy to survival. Fifty percent of the 20 patients treated with inadequate antibiotics and 65.5% of the 55 patients on adequate antibiotics survived (p = 0.29). Conclusion Measurement of PCT and CRP at onset and on the fourth day of treatment can predict survival of VAP patients. A decrease in either one of these marker values predicts survival. PMID:16956405

  18. Concurrent Anemia and Elevated C-Reactive Protein Predicts HIV Clinical Treatment Failure, Including Tuberculosis, After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Yang, Wei-Teng; Gupte, Nikhil; Berendes, Sima; Rosa, Alberto La; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Riviere, Cynthia; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Santos, Brento; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Tripathy, Srikanth; Bollinger, Robert C.; Currier, Judith S.; Tang, Alice M.; Semba, Richard D.; Christian, Parul; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a known risk factor for clinical failure following antiretroviral therapy (ART). Notably, anemia and inflammation are interrelated, and recent studies have associated elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammation marker, with adverse human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment outcomes, yet their joint effect is not known. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and risk factors of anemia in HIV infection and to determine whether anemia and elevated CRP jointly predict clinical failure post-ART. Methods. A case-cohort study (N = 470 [236 cases, 234 controls]) was nested within a multinational randomized trial of ART efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings [PEARLS]). Cases were incident World Health Organization stage 3, 4, or death by 96 weeks of ART treatment (clinical failure). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for pre-ART (baseline) anemia (females: hemoglobin <12.0 g/dL; males: hemoglobin <13.0 g/dL). Association of anemia as well as concurrent baseline anemia and inflammation (CRP ≥10 mg/L) with clinical failure were assessed using multivariable Cox models. Results. Baseline anemia prevalence was 51% with 15% prevalence of concurrent anemia and inflammation. In analysis of clinical failure, multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios were 6.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.82–14.57) for concurrent anemia and inflammation, 0.77 (95% CI, .37–1.58) for anemia without inflammation, and 0.45 (95% CI, .11–1.80) for inflammation without anemia compared to those without anemia and inflammation. Conclusions. ART-naive, HIV-infected individuals with concurrent anemia and inflammation are at particularly high risk of failing treatment, and understanding the pathogenesis could lead to new interventions. Reducing inflammation and anemia will likely improve HIV disease outcomes. Alternatively, concurrent anemia and inflammation could represent

  19. Ability of Serum C-Reactive Protein Concentrations to Predict Complications After Laparoscopy-Assisted Gastrectomy: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kecheng; Xi, Hongqing; Wu, Xiaosong; Cui, Jianxin; Bian, Shibo; Ma, Liangang; Li, Jiyang; Wang, Ning; Wei, Bo; Chen, Lin

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC), are widely available in clinical practice. However, their predictive roles for infectious complications following laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) have not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of CRP concentrations and WBC counts for early detection of infectious complications following LAG and to construct a nomogram for clinical decision-making.The clinical data of consecutive patients who underwent LAG with curative intent between December 2013 and March 2015 were prospectively collected. Postoperative complications were recorded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. The diagnostic value of CRP concentrations and WBC counts was evaluated by area under the curve of receiver-operating characteristic curves. Optimal cutoff values were determined by Youden index. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors for complications, after which a nomogram was constructed.Twenty-nine of 278 patients (10.4%) who successfully underwent LAG developed major complications (grade ≥III). CRP concentration on postoperative day 3 (POD 3) and WBC count on POD 7 had the highest diagnostic accuracy for major complications with an area under the curve value of 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.92] and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.56-0.79) respectively. An optimal cutoff value of 172.0 mg/L was identified for CRP, yielding a sensitivity of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.60-0.92) and specificity 0.74 (95% CI, 0.68-0.80). Multivariate analysis identified POD3 CRP concentrations ≥172.0 mg/L, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status ≥1, presence of preoperative comorbidity, and operation time ≥240 min as risk factors for major complications after LAG.The optimal cut-off value of CRP on POD3 to predict complications following LAG was 172.0 mg/L and a CRP-based nomogram may contribute to early

  20. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence determination of C-reactive protein with carboxyl CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijun; Harris, Emma; Shi, Jian; Chen, Alfred; Parajuli, Suman; Jing, Xiaohui; Miao, Wujian

    2010-09-14

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of water-soluble core/shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) coated with carboxylated polyethylene glycol polymers ("Qdot 625") was investigated in aqueous solutions using 2-(dibutylamino)ethanol (DBAE) and tri-n-propylamine (TPrA) as ECL coreactants. In both cases, ECL emissions at glassy carbon (GC) electrode appeared at the same potential of approximately 0.80 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3.0 M KCl), which was approximately 200 and approximately 150 mV more positive compared with the oxidation potentials for DBAE (approximately +0.60 V vs. Ag/AgCl) and TPrA (approximately +0.65 V vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. The ECL intensity, however, was significantly affected by the type and the concentration of the ECL coreactant used as well as the nature of the working electrode. Under the present experimental conditions, ECL from DBAE was approximately 17 times stronger than that from TPrA. The maximum ECL was obtained at GC electrode when [DBAE] approximately = 53 mM, where a ratio of 11:3:1 in ECL intensity was evaluated for GC, Au, and Pt electrodes, respectively. The ECL emission of the Qdot 625/DBAE system had an apparent peak value of approximately 625 nm that matched well the fluorescence data. The QD as a label for ECL-based immunoassays of C-reactive protein (CRP) was realized by covalent binding of avidin on its surface, which allowed biotinylated anti-CRP to be attached and interacted with solution-phase CRP and the anti-CRP linked to micro-sized magnetic beads. The newly formed sandwich type aggregates were separated magnetically from the solution matrix, followed by the ECL generation at partially transparent Au nanoparticle-coated ITO electrode or Au/CD electrode in the presence of DBAE. Much stronger ECL responses were observed from the Au/CD electrode, at which a dynamic range of 1.0-10.0 microg mL(-1) CRP and a limit of detection of 1.0 microg mL(-1) CRP were obtained, respectively.

  1. C-reactive protein in outpatients with acute exacerbation of COPD: its relationship with microbial etiology and severity

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Miguel; Pomares, Xavier; Capilla, Silvia; Marcos, Maria Angeles; Suárez, David; Monsó, Eduard; Montón, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement has proven valuable for detecting exacerbations, but its usefulness in predicting etiology remains controversial. Likewise, its potential value as a marker of severity, which is well established in patients with pneumonia, remains unproven in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. Methods A cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD and acute infectious exacerbations were included and followed up over 1 year. Episodes of exacerbations meeting Anthonisen’s criteria type I–II were evaluated, analyzing the etiology and inflammatory response as measured by CRP in blood. Results A total of 380 episodes were recorded. Full microbiological analysis was available in 265 samples. Haemophilus influenzae was the most commonly isolated bacteria and rhinovirus the most common virus. Median CRP levels from the 265 episodes were higher in the cases with positive cultures for bacteria (58.30 mg/L, interquartile range [IQR] 21.0–28.2) than in episodes only positive for viruses (37.3 mg/L, IQR 18.6–79.1) and cases negative for any microorganism (36.4 mg/L, IQR 10.8–93.7) (P<0.014). H. influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae reached the highest CRP levels of 74.5 mg/L (IQR 23.9–167.9) and 74.1 mg/L (IQR 42.0–220.7), respectively. In the 380 exacerbations studied, 227 (~60%) were community-managed, while 153 (~40%) required hospital admission. In the multivariate analysis to assess the influence of inflammatory response on exacerbation severity, baseline hypercapnia (odds ratio [OR]: 2.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46–4.9) and CRP levels >100 mg/L (OR: 4.23, 95% CI: 2.12–8.44) were independent predictors after adjustment for baseline characteristics. Conclusion CRP level was higher in bacterial infections, especially when H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae were isolated. CRP values >100 mg/L were associated with a fourfold increased risk of hospital admission. Therefore, CRP blood levels may

  2. The Relationship between C-Reactive Protein Level and Discharge Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Geng, He-Hong; Wang, Xin-Wang; Fu, Rong-Li; Jing, Meng-Juan; Huang, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker, was associated with stroke severity and long-term outcome. However, the relationship between the acute-phase CRP level and discharge outcome has received little attention. We prospectively studied 301 patients with acute ischemic stroke (over a period of two weeks) from two hospital stroke wards and one rehabilitation department in Henan, China. Patients’ demographic and clinical data were collected and evaluated at admission. Poor discharge outcome was assessed in patients at discharge using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS > 2). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the risk factors of poor discharge outcome after adjusting for potential confounders. Poor discharge outcome was observed in 78 patients (25.9%). Univariate analyses showed that factors significantly influencing poor discharge outcome were age, residence, recurrent acute ischemic stroke, coronary heart disease, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score at admission, non-lacunar stroke, time from onset of stroke to admission, CRP, TBIL (total bilirubin), direct bilirubin (DBIL), ALB (albumin), FIB (fibrinogen) and D-dimer (p < 0.05). After adjusting for age, residence, recurrent ischemic stroke, coronary heart disease, NIHSS score at admission, lacunar stroke, time from onset of stroke to admission, CRP, TBIL, DBIL, ALB, FIB and D-dimer, multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that poor outcome at discharge was associated with recurrent acute ischemic stroke (OR, 2.115; 95% CI, 1.094–4.087), non-lacunar stroke (OR, 2.943; 95% CI, 1.436–6.032), DBIL (OR, 1.795; 95% CI, 1.311–2.458), and CRP (OR, 4.890; 95% CI, 3.063–7.808). In conclusion, the CRP level measured at admission was found to be an independent predictor of poor outcome at discharge. Recurrent acute ischemic stroke, non-lacunar stroke and DBIL were also significantly associated with discharge

  3. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens; Sales, Allan Robson Kluser; Rocha, Natália Galito; da Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. Objective To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. Methods One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. Results The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (psex < 0.01). Conclusions Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions. PMID:27027366

  4. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid with the metabolic syndrome components.

    PubMed

    Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khatiwada, Saroj; Pandey, Sunil; Kc, Rajendra; Das, Binod Kumar Lal; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been found to be associated with inflammatory molecules. This study was conducted among 125 MetS patients at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal to find an association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum uric acid with MetS components. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, medical history and blood samples were taken. Estimation of hs-CRP, serum uric acid, blood glucose, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was done. hs-CRP had positive correlation with blood glucose (r = 0.2, p = 0.026) and negative with HDL cholesterol (r = -0.361, p < 0.001). Serum uric acid had positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.178, p = 0.047). Patients with elevated hs-CRP and uric acid had higher waist circumference (p = 0.03), diastolic BP (p = 0.002) and lower HDL cholesterol (p = 0.004) than others. Elevated hs-CRP and high uric acid were individually associated with higher odds for low HDL cholesterol (7.992; 1.785-35.774, p = 0.002) and hyperglycemia (2.471; 1.111-5.495, p = 0.029) respectively. Combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid was associated with severity of MetS (p < 0.001) and higher odds for hyperglycemia (8.036; 2.178-29.647, p = 0.001) as compared to individual rise of hs-CRP or uric acid. The present study demonstrates that hs-CRP and serum uric acid are associated with MetS components, and the combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid is associated with the increase in severity of MetS. PMID:27006878

  5. Effects of Different Anesthetic Techniques on Serum Leptin, C-reactive Protein, and Cortisol Concentrations in Anorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Buyukkocak, Unase; Daphan, Cagatay; Caglayan, Osman; Aydinuraz, Kuzey; Kaya, Tahsin; Saygun, Oral; Agalar, Fatih

    2006-01-01

    Aim To compare the effects of intratracheal general anesthesia (ITGA) and regional (saddle block) anesthesia on leptin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and cortisol blood concentrations during anorectal surgery. Methods Fifty-eight patients suffering from hemorrhoidal disease, pilonidal sinus, anal fissure, or anal fistula were included the study. Patients were randomly assigned into one of the two groups (n = 29). Patients in one group received ITGA. After thiopental and fentanyl induction, vecuronium was used as a muscle relaxant. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane. In the other group we applied saddle block, injecting hyperbaric bupivacaine into the subarachnoid space, through the L3-L4 intervertebral space, in the sitting position. Blood samples were collected for leptin, CRP, and cortisol analysis before the induction of anesthesia at 3 and 24 hours postoperatively. Results Preoperative leptin, CRP, and cortisol concentrations were comparable between the groups. There was no significant difference in postoperative levels of leptin and CRP in both groups. Although not significant, leptin and CRP concentrations were lower in the saddle block group at three hours postoperatively (mean ± SD, 6.95 ± 8.59 and 6.02 ± 12.25, respectively) than in the ITGA group (mean ± SD, 9.04 ± 9.89 and 8.40 ± 15.75, respectively). During early postoperative period, cortisol increased slightly in the ITGA group and remained at similar level in the saddle block group, but later decreased in both groups. Cortisol levels in the saddle block group were significantly lower than in the ITGA group at 3 hours postoperatively (343.7 ± 329.6 vs 611.4 ± 569.8; P = 0.034). Conclusion Saddle block, a regional anesthetic technique, may attenuate stress response in patients undergoing anorectal surgery, by blocking afferent neural input during early postoperative period. PMID:17167859

  6. Elevated Baseline C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Outcome After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data From the Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (STASH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Budohoski, Karol; Smith, Christopher; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a proportion of patients with unfavorable outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, of particular relevance in those who present with a good clinical grade. A forewarning of those at risk provides an opportunity towards more intensive monitoring, investigation, and prophylactic treatment prior to the clinical manifestation of advancing cerebral injury. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether biochemical markers sampled in the first days after the initial hemorrhage can predict poor outcome. METHODS: All patients recruited to the multicenter Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Hemorrhage Trial (STASH) were included. Baseline biochemical profiles were taken between time of ictus and day 4 post ictus. The t-test compared outcomes, and a backwards stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the factors providing independent prediction of an unfavorable outcome. RESULTS: Baseline biochemical data were obtained in approximately 91% of cases from 803 patients. On admission, 73% of patients were good grade (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grades 1 or 2); however, 84% had a Fisher grade 3 or 4 on computed tomographic scan. For patients presenting with good grade on admission, higher levels of C-reactive protein, glucose, and white blood cells and lower levels of hematocrit, albumin, and hemoglobin were associated with poor outcome at discharge. C-reactive protein was found to be an independent predictor of outcome for patients presenting in good grade. CONCLUSION: Early recording of C-reactive protein may prove useful in detecting those good grade patients who are at greater risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome. ABBREVIATIONS: ALP, alkaline phosphatase ALT, alanine aminotransferase CK, creatine kinase CRP, C-reactive protein EVD, external ventricular drainage ICH GCP, International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for good clinical practice mRS, modified Rankin Scale SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage STASH, Simvastatin in

  7. Effect of point of care testing for C reactive protein and training in communication skills on antibiotic use in lower respiratory tract infections: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher C; Hopstaken, Rogier M; Hood, Kerenza; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of general practitioner testing for C reactive protein (disease approach) and receiving training in enhanced communication skills (illness approach) on antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection. Design Pragmatic, 2×2 factorial, cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 20 general practices in the Netherlands. Participants 40 general practitioners from 20 practices recruited 431 patients with lower respiratory tract infection. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was antibiotic prescribing at the index consultation. Secondary outcomes were antibiotic prescribing during 28 days’ follow-up, reconsultation, clinical recovery, and patients’ satisfaction and enablement. Interventions General practitioners’ use of C reactive protein point of care testing and training in enhanced communication skills separately and combined, and usual care. Results General practitioners in the C reactive protein test group prescribed antibiotics to 31% of patients compared with 53% in the no test group (P=0.02). General practitioners trained in enhanced communication skills prescribed antibiotics to 27% of patients compared with 54% in the no training group (P<0.01). Both interventions showed a statistically significant effect on antibiotic prescribing at any point during the 28 days’ follow-up. Clinicians in the combined intervention group prescribed antibiotics to 23% of patients (interaction term was non-significant). Patients’ recovery and satisfaction were similar in all study groups. Conclusion Both general practitioners’ use of point of care testing for C reactive protein and training in enhanced communication skills significantly reduced antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection without compromising patients’ recovery and satisfaction with care. A combination of the illness and disease focused approaches may be necessary to achieve the greatest reduction in antibiotic prescribing for this

  8. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35-76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants' health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0-0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1-57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0-88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7-5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is suggested. PMID

  9. Thymic function failure and C-reactive protein levels are independent predictors of all-cause mortality in healthy elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; Romero-Sánchez, María Concepción; Solana, Rafael; Delgado, Juan; de la Rosa, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Angeles; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel; Leal, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    Relationship between thymic function and elderly survival has been suspected, despite the fact that formal proof is elusive due to technical limitations of thymic function-related markers. The newly described sj/β-TREC ratio allows now, by overcoming these limitations, an accurate measurement of thymic output in elderly humans. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the impact of thymic function and inflammatory markers on healthy elderly human survival. Healthy volunteers (n = 151), aged over 65, were asked to participate (CARRERITAS cohort). Subjects were excluded if diagnosed of dementia or, during the last 6 months, had clinical data of infection, hospital admission, antitumor therapy, or any treatment that could influence the immune status. Thymic function (sj/β-TREC ratio), CD4:CD8 T cell ratio, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and neutrophilia were determined from basal samples. All basal variables and age were associated with 2-year all-cause mortality. Multivariate analysis showed that only thymic function and C-reactive protein were independently associated with time to death. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, the direct role of thymic function in human survival. C-reactive protein raise is also a marker of mortality in the healthy elderly, in a thymic-independent way.

  10. The role of serum C-reactive protein measured by high-sensitive method in thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Owecki, Maciej; Zgorzalewicz-Stachowiak, Małgorzata; Woliński, Kosma; Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Budny, Bartłomiej; Florek, Ewa; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Miechowicz, Izabela; Bączyk, Maciej; Sawicka, Nadia; Dhir, Sumit; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration as a marker of the inflammatory state in many different thyroid diseases and its dependence on the stage and duration of disease. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 444 randomly selected patients with different kinds of thyroid disease (106 men and 338 women, ranging 18-72 years of age; mean 56.2 ± 5.0 years; median 52 years). Group 1 (G1) comprised 250 patients with hyperthyroidism. Group 2 (G2) consisted of 72 euthyroid patients. Group 3 (G3) consisted of 122 patients with hypothyroidism. Free T4, free T3, and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were measured using the electrochemiluminescent method. Human serum thyroglobulin autoantibodies (Tg-Abs), thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (TPO-Abs), and autoantibodies against the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR-Abs) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The high-sensitive CRP (Hs-CRP) level (reference range <3 mg/L) was determined with a highly sensitive latex-based immunoassay. The mean value of Hs-CRP in G1 was 3.6 ± 2.8 mg/L, in G2 2.5 ± 1.5 mg/L and in G3 5.9 ± 5.8 mg/L. Hs-CRP (in mg/L) medians, interquartile and the total ranges in G1 were 3.0 (2.0 [0.1-21.0] 4.0); in G2: 2.3 [1.8 (0.2-9.2) 3.2]; and in G3: 4.3 [2.2 (0.3-31.5) 7.8]. We found statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis test) in serum Hs-CRP values between G1 and G2 (P = 0.007), G1 and G3 (P = 0.001), G2 and G3 (P < 0.001). In G1, statistically significant correlation was confirmed between Hs-CRP and Tg-Abs (r = -0.22, P = 0.0016), CRP and TPO-Abs (r = -0.26, P < 0.001), and also between Hs-CRP and TSHR-Abs (r = -0.18, P = 0.02). In the remaining cases, differences between Hs-CRP and TSH levels (r = -0.09, P = 0.16) were not statistically significant. In G2, no statistically significant correlation was observed: Hs-CRP and Tg-Abs (r = -0.18, P = 0.13), Hs-CRP and TPO-Abs (r = -0.17, P = 0.15), Hs-CRP and TSH (r = 0.01, P = 0.91), Hs-CRP and TSHR-Abs (r

  11. The acute phase response of C3, C5, ceruloplasmin, and C-reactive protein induced by turpentine pleurisy in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Giclas, P. C.; Manthei, U.; Strunk, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of five serum proteins, C3, C5, ceruloplasmin, C-reactive protein, and albumin, have been measured during the acute phase response in rabbits with turpentine-induced pleurisy. C-reactive protein concentrations in the circulation rose abruptly between 12 and 36 hours to a level greater than 50 times the pretreatment concentration, then returned to undetectable amounts by 96 hours. C3 and ceruloplasmin both showed some increase in concentration by 12 hours and reached their maximum concentrations of two to three times the baseline levels 48-72 hours after the turpentine treatment. Concentrations were still elevated at 120 hours, after which time they gradually returned to normal. C5 and albumin concentrations in the turpentine-treated rabbits did not differ from the baseline concentrations. The same five proteins were measured in the inflammatory exudate. C-reactive protein was not detectable at any of the time points. C3, C5, ceruloplasmin, and albumin were present in normal pleural fluid at roughly half their serum concentrations. The activities of C3, C5, and ceruloplasmin were low in the early exudate, but C3 and C5 activity rose relative to their concentrations in the later samples of pleural fluid. The specific activities of C3 and C5 were higher in the pleural fluid at 72 hours than in plasma, while that of ceruloplasmin remained less in the pleural fluid than in plasma throughout the experiment. The involvement of these proteins and their relation to the inflammatory response are discussed. Images Figure 6 PMID:2409807

  12. Effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on plasma acylation stimulating protein, leptin, and adiponectin: Relationships with metabolic outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: The effects of fructose and glucose consumption on plasma acylation stimulating protein (ASP), adiponectin, and leptin concentrations relative to energy intake, body weight, adiposity, circulating triglycerides, and insulin sensitivity were determined. DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirty two over...

  13. Posttranscriptional Regulation of the Inflammatory Marker C-Reactive Protein by the RNA-Binding Protein HuR and MicroRNA 637.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoonseo; Noren Hooten, Nicole; Dluzen, Douglas F; Martindale, Jennifer L; Gorospe, Myriam; Evans, Michele K

    2015-12-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute-phase plasma protein, is a major component of inflammatory reactions functioning as a mediator of innate immunity. It has been widely used as a validated clinical biomarker of the inflammatory state in trauma, infection, and age-associated chronic diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite this, the molecular mechanisms that regulate CRP expression are not well understood. Given that the CRP 3' untranslated region (UTR) is long and AU rich, we hypothesized that CRP may be regulated posttranscriptionally by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and by microRNAs. Here, we found that the RBP HuR bound directly to the CRP 3' UTR and affected CRP mRNA levels. Through this interaction, HuR selectively increased CRP mRNA stability and promoted CRP translation. Interestingly, treatment with the age-associated inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased binding of HuR to CRP mRNA, and conversely, HuR was required for IL-6-mediated upregulation of CRP expression. In addition, we identified microRNA 637 (miR-637) as a microRNA that potently inhibited CRP expression in competition with HuR. Taken together, we have uncovered an important posttranscriptional mechanism that modulates the expression of the inflammatory marker CRP, which may be utilized in the development of treatments for inflammatory processes that cause CVD and age-related diseases.

  14. Acute Phase Responses to Novel, Investigational Vaccines in Toxicology Studies: The Relationship Between C-Reactive Protein and Other Acute Phase Proteins.

    PubMed

    Green, Martin D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of investigational vaccine candidates on acute-phase proteins (APPs) as determined in GLP toxicology studies. Sixty-four GLP toxicity studies, which were submitted to the Food and Drug Administration from 2008 to 2012 in support of proposed clinical investigations, were reviewed and entered into a database. These studies employed the intramuscular route of injection and were conducted using New Zealand White rabbits. A retrospective review of these GLP toxicity studies was conducted to evaluate the changes in plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and albumin as APPs following the administration of various investigational vaccines. The incidence and intensity of responses associated with acute-phase responses both positive and negative were observed to increase in animals when treated with vaccines containing more potent immunological components such as novel adjuvants that activate Toll-like receptors in the investigational vaccine products. Changes in plasma levels of CRP were prominent among these responses and provided a basis to propose a classification scheme of H, M, L, and N responding groups. These changes in plasma proteins reflect an activation of the acute-phase response and indicate increasing levels of systemic inflammation, which potentially may be correlated with important clinical adverse events.

  15. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP.

  16. Purification and determination of C-reactive protein and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 in dogs after major surgery through generation of specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; García, N; Unzueta, A; Piñeiro, M; Álava, M A; Lampreave, F

    2016-10-15

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been isolated from acute phase dog sera by affinity chromatography with insolubilized polyclonal antibodies anti pig Major Acute phase Protein (Pig-MAP) and with p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline, respectively. Isolated proteins were used to prepare specific polyclonal rabbit antisera that have allowed quantifying their concentration in serum samples by single radial immunodifussion. Both proteins were quantified in sera from female dogs that had undergone ovariohysterectomy (OVH, n=9) or mastectomy (n=10). The observed increases in CRP concentrations showed that surgical traumas induced an acute phase response of a great magnitude in the dogs. In both surgeries a four-fold increase of ITIH4 concentrations was detected. It can be concluded that ITIH4 is a new positive acute phase protein in dogs, as reported in other species.

  17. Purification and determination of C-reactive protein and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 in dogs after major surgery through generation of specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; García, N; Unzueta, A; Piñeiro, M; Álava, M A; Lampreave, F

    2016-10-15

    Inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4 (ITIH4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been isolated from acute phase dog sera by affinity chromatography with insolubilized polyclonal antibodies anti pig Major Acute phase Protein (Pig-MAP) and with p-Aminophenyl Phosphoryl Choline, respectively. Isolated proteins were used to prepare specific polyclonal rabbit antisera that have allowed quantifying their concentration in serum samples by single radial immunodifussion. Both proteins were quantified in sera from female dogs that had undergone ovariohysterectomy (OVH, n=9) or mastectomy (n=10). The observed increases in CRP concentrations showed that surgical traumas induced an acute phase response of a great magnitude in the dogs. In both surgeries a four-fold increase of ITIH4 concentrations was detected. It can be concluded that ITIH4 is a new positive acute phase protein in dogs, as reported in other species. PMID:27590422

  18. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Thanakun, Supanee; Pornprasertsuk-Damrongsri, Suchaya; Gokyu, Misa; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35–76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008), regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants’ health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001). Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0–0.7), but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1–57.0), high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0–88.2) and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7–5.2), are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is

  19. C-reactive protein and chitinase 3-like protein 1 as biomarkers of spatial redistribution of retinal blood vessels on digital retinal photography in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cekić, Sonja; Cvetković, Tatjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Pešić, Milica; Babić, Gordana Stanković; Milenković, Svetislav; Risimić, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) in blood samples with morpohometric parameters of retinal blood vessels in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Blood laboratory examination of 90 patients included the measurement of glycemia, HbA1C, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides and CRP. Levels of YKL-40 were detected and measured in serum by ELISA (Micro VueYKL-40 EIA Kit, Quidel Corporation, San Diego, USA). YKL-40 correlated positively with diameter and negatively with number of retinal blood vessels. The average number of the blood vessels per retinal zone was significantly higher in the group of patients with mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy than in the group with severe form in the optic disc and all five retinal zones. The average outer diameter of the evaluated retinal zones and optic disc vessels was significantly higher in the group with severe compared to the group with mild diabetic retinopathy. Morphological analysis of the retinal vessels on digital fundus photography and correlation with YKL-40 may be valuable for the follow-up of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25172979

  20. C-reactive protein and chitinase 3-like protein 1 as biomarkers of spatial redistribution of retinal blood vessels on digital retinal photography in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cekić, Sonja; Cvetković, Tatjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Pesić, Milica; Stanković Babić, Gordana; Milenković, Svetislav; Risimić, Dijana

    2014-08-20

    The aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) in blood samples with morpohometric parameters of retinal blood vessels in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Blood laboratory examination of 90 patients included the measurement of glycemia, HbA1C, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides and CRP. Levels of YKL-40 were detected and measured in serum by ELISA (Micro VueYKL-40 EIA Kit, Quidel Corporation, San Diego, USA). YKL-40 correlated positively with diameter and negatively with number of retinal blood vessels. The average number of the blood vessels per retinal zone was significantly higher in the group of patients with mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy than in the group with severe form in the optic disc and all five retinal zones. The average outer diameter of the evaluated retinal zones and optic disc vessels was significantly higher in the group with severe compared to the group with mild diabetic retinopathy. Morphological analysis of the retinal vessels on digital fundus photography and correlation with YKL-40 may be valuable for the follow-up of diabetic retinopathy.

  1. Small interfering-RNA to protein kinase C-delta reduces the proinflammatory effects of human C-reactive protein in biobreeding diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jialal, I; Machha, A; Devaraj, S

    2013-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is a proinflammatory state characterized by increased C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Previously we reported that human CRP accentuated macrophage activity in spontaneously diabetic biobreeding (BB) rats and also increased protein kinase C (PKC) delta. Hence we tested the effect of molecular inhibition of PKC delta on plasma and macrophage proinflammatory biomarkers using small interfering (si)RNA to PKC delta. Prior to administration of human CRP, daily for 3 days to diabetic rats, scrambled siRNA or siRNA to PKC delta was also delivered for the 3 days, and the animals were sacrificed on day 4. Peritoneal macrophages and plasma were obtained. Compared to scrambled siRNA, siRNA to PKC delta resulted in a significant decrease in biomediators of inflammation in plasma and from macrophages (IL-1, TNF-alpha, IL-6, MCP-1, KC/IL-8, and PAI -1). However, siRNA to PKC delta has no effect on superoxide release from macrophages. In conclusion, our novel data suggests that siRNA to PKC delta attenuates the proinflammatory effect of human CRP in spontaneously diabetic BB rats and could have implications with regard to attenuating inflammation and vascular complications in T1DM.

  2. Regulation of complement activation by C-reactive protein: targeting of the inhibitory activity of C4b-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Andreas P; Trouw, Leendert A; McGrath, Fabian D G; Hack, C Erik; Blom, Anna M

    2006-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the major acute phase protein in humans. It has been shown that CRP interacts with factor H, an inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement, and now we demonstrate binding of CRP to the fluid-phase inhibitor of the classical pathway, C4b-binding protein (C4BP). C4BP bound to directly immobilized recombinant CRP as well as CRP attached to phosphorylcholine. The binding was sensitive to ionic strength and was enhanced in the presence of calcium. C4BP lacking beta-chain and protein S, which is a form of C4BP increasing upon inflammation, bound CRP with higher affinity than the C4BP-protein S complex. The binding could not be blocked with mAbs directed against peripheral parts of the alpha-chains of C4BP while the isolated central core of C4BP obtained by partial proteolytic digestion bound CRP, indicating that the binding site for CRP is localized in the central core of the C4BP molecule. Furthermore, we found complexes in serum from a patient with an elevated CRP level and trace amounts of CRP were also identified in a plasma-derived C4BP preparation. We were also able to detect C4BP-CRP complexes in solution and established that C4BP retains full complement regulatory activity in the presence of CRP. In addition, we found that C4BP can compete with C1q for binding to immobilized CRP and that it inhibits complement activation locally. We hypothesize that CRP limits excessive complement activation on targets via its interactions with both factor H and C4BP.

  3. Nitric oxide-induced expression of C-reactive protein in islet cells as a very early marker for islet stress in the rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Fehsel, K; Plewe, D; Kolb-Bachofen, V

    1997-06-01

    In searches for marker molecules specifically expressed in nitric oxide-treated islet cells as a means to recognize early events in islet destruction, we now establish the presence of neo-C-reactive protein (neoCRP) in rat islet cells as early as 2 hr after treatment. We detected this altered molecular form of the acute-phase-reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) using immunocytochemistry with an anti-neoCRP-specific monoclonal antibody as well as reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with CRP-specific primers and in situ hybridization to demonstrate the presence of CRP-specific mRNA. After induction of a generalized inflammatory reaction in rats with heat-inactivated Corynebacterium parvum in vivo, neoCRP expression in islets is also found and within the pancreas restricted to pancreatic islet cells only. Our findings suggest an early heat-shock-like expression of this molecule in response to local nitrite oxide production or to exogeneously added nitric oxide in islet cells. PMID:9704587

  4. Concentrations of C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, and haptoglobin in uterine arterial and peripheral blood in bitches with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Roman; Kostro, Krzysztof; Szczubiał, Marek

    2013-09-15

    Pyometra is a life-threatening reproductive disorder that affects the uterus of female dogs. This study was designed to identify the possible indicators of uterine inflammation by comparing C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and haptoglobin (Hp) concentrations in uterine arterial and peripheral venous blood in bitches with open- and closed-cervix pyometra. CRP, SAA, and Hp concentrations were higher in bitches with closed-cervix pyometra irrespective of the site of blood collection. Higher acute-phase protein concentrations were observed in peripheral compared with uterine arterial blood in bitches with closed-cervix pyometra, whereas the levels were comparable in dogs with open-cervix pyometra. Our results indicate that mean acute-phase protein concentrations differ according to pyometra type/severity and blood source and suggest the possible use of peripheral blood levels of CRP, SAA, and Hp to monitor inflammation during the course of pyometra. PMID:23810209

  5. Adiponectin in chronic kidney disease has an opposite impact on protein-energy wasting and cardiovascular risk: two sides of the same coin.

    PubMed

    Park, S-H; Carrero, J J; Lindholm, B; Stenvinkel, P

    2009-08-01

    Adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic and insulin sensitizing adipokine exists in several isoforms in the circulation. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), circulating levels of total as well as high-molecular-weight adiponectin are elevated. In contrast to initial studies, several recent and larger studies on outcomes do not support a protective effect of high adiponectin on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and overall mortality in CKD patients. Paradoxically, high adiponectin predicts increased overall and cardiovascular mortality in CKD patients. This effect seems unrelated to a direct effect of adiponectin, but rather due to a process of protein-energy (PEW) wasting. This review summarizes recent conflicting findings on adiponectin in relation to outcomes and discusses the pathophysiologic roles of adiponectin in PEW, insulin resistance and vascular injuries of CKD patients.

  6. Retinol Binding Protein-4 and Adiponectin Levels in Thyroid Overt and Subclinical Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, S; Papazoglou, D; Zisimopoulos, A; Papanas, N; Tiaka, E; Antonoglou, C; Maltezos, E

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is accompanied by numerous changes in intermediary metabolism. Retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4) and adiponectin are 2 adipocytokines that have multiple metabolic functions. The aim of our study was to examine serum RBP4 and adiponectin levels in clinical (before and after therapy) and subclinical hyperthyroid and hypothyroid subjects as compared to controls.150 patients with thyroid dysfunction were recruited (65 hyperthyroid and 85 hypothyroid) while 28 euthyroid subjects served as a control group. We measured anthropometric, biochemical and hormonal (free T4, free T3, TSH, insulin) parameters in all participants. RBP-4 and adiponectin were measured using commercial ELISA kits.Mean baseline levels of RBP-4 were higher in patients with clinical hypothyroidism (29.0±10.2 ng/ml, 25.1±12.6 ng/ml, 38.8±16.5 ng/ml, 31.9±13.2 ng/ml, 20.4±8.2 ng/ml in patients with hyperthyroidism, subclinical hyperthryrodism, hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism and controls respectively, F=4.86, P<0.001) and decreased significantly in patients with clinical hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism after normalization of thyroid hormones' levels (from 29.0±10.2 to 24.9±8.4 ng/ml, p=0.003 and from 38.8±16.5 to 29.0±10.8 ng/ml, p=0.001 respectively). We did not observe analogous changes in adiponectin levels in any of the studied groups.RBP-4 levels are higher in patients with clinical hypothyroidism and exhibit a marked decrease after normalization of thyroid function in both hyper and hypothyroid patients. We suggest that RBP-4 may play a role in the metabolic disturbances which accompany thyroid dysfunction. PMID:26575118

  7. Dietary inflammatory index is associated with serum C-reactive protein and protein energy wasting in hemodialysis patients: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tengilimoglu-Metin, M. Merve; Gumus, Damla; Sevim, Sumeyra; Turkoglu, İnci; Mandiroglu, Fahri

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE Malnutrition and inflammation are reported as the most powerful predictors of mortality and morbidity in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Diet has a key role in modulating inflammation and dietary inflammatory index (DII) is a new tool for assessment of inflammatory potential of diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of DII on dietary intake of HD patients and examine the associations between DII and malnutrition-inflammation markers. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 105 subjects were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements, 3-day dietary recall, and pre-dialysis biochemical parameters were recorded for each subject. Subjective global assessment (SGA), which was previously validated for HD patients, and malnutrition inflammation score (MIS) were used for the diagnosis of protein energy wasting. DII was calculated according to average of 3-day dietary recall data. RESULTS DII showed significant correlation with reliable malnutrition and inflammation indicators including SGA (r = 0.28, P < 0.01), MIS (r = 0.28, P < 0.01), and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.35, P < 0.001) in HD patients. When the study population was divided into three subgroups according to their DII score, significant increasing trends across the tertiles of DII were observed for SGA score (P = 0.035), serum CRP (P = 0.001), dietary energy (P < 0.001), total fat (P < 0.001), saturated fatty acids (P < 0.001), polyunsaturated fatty acids (P = 0.006), and omega-6 fatty acids (P = 0.01) intakes. CONCLUSION This study shows that DII is a good tool for assessing the overall inflammatory potential of diet in HD patients. PMID:27478547

  8. Usefulness of C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A component, and haptoglobin determinations in bitches with pyometra for monitoring early post-ovariohysterectomy complications.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, R; Kostro, K; Lisiecka, U; Szczubiał, M; Krakowski, L

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A component (SAA), and haptoglobin (Hp) in bitches with pyometra undergoing ovariohysterectomy that developed postoperative wound infection-related complications. The study revealed that difficulties in postoperative wound healing were induced by infections with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus spp. leading to re-increased levels of CRP and SAA immediately after surgery and persistently high Hp levels throughout the experiment. Our results indicate that acute-phase proteins in bitches undergoing surgery because of pyometra are useful markers for monitoring the postoperative period. Moreover, they enable prompt therapeutic management once complications develop. PMID:19477501

  9. Adiponectin enhances bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell resistance to flow shear stress through AMP-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Fan, Chongxi; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dongjin; Deng, Chao; Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Di, Shouyi; Qin, Zhigang; Lv, Jianjun; Sun, Yang; Yi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin has been demonstrated to protect the cardiovascular system and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it is unclear whether adiponectin can protect BMSCs against flow shear stress (FSS). In this study, our aim was to explore the effects of adiponectin on BMSCs and to explore the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in this process. Shear stress significantly inhibits the survival and increases the apoptosis of BMSCs in an intensity-dependent manner. The expression levels of TGF-β, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF, and Bcl2 are simultaneously reduced, and the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC, as well as the expression level of Bax, are increased. Supplementation with adiponectin promotes the survival of BMSCs; reverses the changes in the expression levels of TGF-β, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF, Bcl2, and Bax; and further amplifies the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Furthermore, the protective effects of adiponectin can be partially neutralized by AMPK siRNA. In summary, we have demonstrated for the first time that adiponectin can effectively protect BMSCs from FSS and that this effect depends, at least in part, on the activation of AMPK signaling. PMID:27418435

  10. Adiponectin enhances bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell resistance to flow shear stress through AMP-activated protein kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin; Fan, Chongxi; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dongjin; Deng, Chao; Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Di, Shouyi; Qin, Zhigang; Lv, Jianjun; Sun, Yang; Yi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin has been demonstrated to protect the cardiovascular system and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). However, it is unclear whether adiponectin can protect BMSCs against flow shear stress (FSS). In this study, our aim was to explore the effects of adiponectin on BMSCs and to explore the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in this process. Shear stress significantly inhibits the survival and increases the apoptosis of BMSCs in an intensity-dependent manner. The expression levels of TGF-β, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF, and Bcl2 are simultaneously reduced, and the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC, as well as the expression level of Bax, are increased. Supplementation with adiponectin promotes the survival of BMSCs; reverses the changes in the expression levels of TGF-β, bFGF, VEGF, PDGF, Bcl2, and Bax; and further amplifies the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Furthermore, the protective effects of adiponectin can be partially neutralized by AMPK siRNA. In summary, we have demonstrated for the first time that adiponectin can effectively protect BMSCs from FSS and that this effect depends, at least in part, on the activation of AMPK signaling. PMID:27418435

  11. AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor-Based Biosensor for the Detection of C-Reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Ho; Bae, Myunghan; Jo, Sung-Hyun; Shin, Jang-Kyoo; Son, Dong Hyeok; Won, Chul-Ho; Jeong, Hyun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kang, Shin-Won

    2015-07-28

    In this paper, we propose an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT)-based biosensor for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) using a null-balancing circuit. A null-balancing circuit was used to measure the output voltage of the sensor directly. The output voltage of the proposed biosensor was varied by antigen-antibody interactions on the gate surface due to CRP charges. The AlGaN/GaN HFET-based biosensor with null-balancing circuit applied shows that CRP can be detected in a wide range of concentrations, varying from 10 ng/mL to 1000 ng/mL. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was carried out to verify the immobilization of self-assembled monolayer with Au on the gated region.

  12. A rapid and sensitive automated light scattering immunoassay for serum C-reactive protein and the definition of a reference range in healthy blood donors.

    PubMed

    Price, C P; Calvin, J; Walker, S A; Trull, A; Newman, D J; Gorman, E G

    1999-02-01

    The increasing interest in the measurement of serum C-reactive protein in relation to the risk stratification of patients with chest pain has demonstrated the need for more sensitive routine methods of measurement and an accurate definition of the reference range. We report the determination of a reference range in serum samples from 491 blood donors using a particle enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay that has been modified to offer better imprecision within the reference range. The median values were found to be 2.40 and 2.20 mg/l for males and females, respectively with 95th percentile range of 1.20-5.20 and 0.40-5.40 mg/l, respectively.

  13. Persistently Elevated C-Reactive Protein Level in the First Year of Antiretroviral Therapy, Despite Virologic Suppression, Is Associated With HIV Disease Progression in Resource-Constrained Settings.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Yang, Wei-Teng; Berendes, Sima; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Santos, Breno; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Tripathy, Srikanth; Riviere, Cynthia; Lama, Javier R; Cardoso, Sandra W; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Balagopal, Ashwin; Gupte, Nikhil; Semba, Richard D; Campbell, Thomas B; Bollinger, Robert C; Gupta, Amita

    2016-04-01

    A case-cohort analysis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) was performed within a multicountry randomized trial (PEARLS) to assess the prevalence of persistently elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, based on serial measurements of CRP levels, and their association with HIV clinical failure. A persistently elevated CRP level in plasma (defined as ≥ 5 mg/L at both baseline and 24 weeks after ART initiation) was observed in 50 of 205 individuals (24%). A persistently elevated CRP level but not an elevated CRP level only at a single time point was independently associated with increased clinical failure, compared with a persistently low CRP level, despite achievement of virologic suppression. Serial monitoring of CRP levels could identify individuals who are at highest risk of HIV progression and may benefit from future adjunct antiinflammatory therapies. PMID:26621909

  14. AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor-Based Biosensor for the Detection of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Ho; Bae, Myunghan; Jo, Sung-Hyun; Shin, Jang-Kyoo; Son, Dong Hyeok; Won, Chul-Ho; Jeong, Hyun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kang, Shin-Won

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT)-based biosensor for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) using a null-balancing circuit. A null-balancing circuit was used to measure the output voltage of the sensor directly. The output voltage of the proposed biosensor was varied by antigen-antibody interactions on the gate surface due to CRP charges. The AlGaN/GaN HFET-based biosensor with null-balancing circuit applied shows that CRP can be detected in a wide range of concentrations, varying from 10 ng/mL to 1000 ng/mL. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was carried out to verify the immobilization of self-assembled monolayer with Au on the gated region. PMID:26225981

  15. Cumulative meta-analysis of interleukins 6 and 1β, tumour necrosis factor α and C-reactive protein in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Haapakoski, Rita; Mathieu, Julia; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Alenius, Harri; Kivimäki, Mika

    2015-10-01

    Cumulative meta-analyses are used to evaluate the extent to which further studies are needed to confirm or refute a hypothesis. We used this approach to assess observational evidence on systemic inflammation in individuals with major depressive disorder. We identified 58 studies of four common inflammatory markers in a literature search of PubMed, Embase and PsychInfo databases in May 2014. Pooled data from the earliest eight studies already showed an association between interleukin-6 concentrations and major depression; 23 more recent studies confirmed this finding (d=0.54, p<0.0001). A significant association between C-reactive protein levels and major depression was noted after 14 studies and this did not change after addition of six more studies (d=0.47, p<0.0001). For these two inflammatory markers, there was moderate heterogeneity in study-specific estimates, subgroup differences were small, and publication bias appeared to be an unlikely explanation for the findings. Sensitivity analyses including only high-quality studies and subjects free of antidepressant medication further verified the associations. While there was a link between tumour necrosis factor-α levels and major depression (d=0.40, p=0.002), the cumulative effect remained uncertain due to the extensive heterogeneity in study-specific estimates and inconsistencies between subgroups. No evidence was found for the association between interleukin-1β levels and major depression (d=-0.05, p=0.86). In conclusion, this cumulative meta-analysis confirmed higher mean levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in patients with major depression compared to non-depressed controls. No consistent association between tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and major depression was observed. Future studies should clarify the specific immune mechanisms involved as well as continue testing anti-inflammatory therapies in patients suffering from major depression.

  16. Inflammatory mediators in dengue virus infection in children: interleukin-6 and its relation to C-reactive protein and secretory phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Juffrie, M; Meer, G M; Hack, C E; Haasnoot, K; Sutaryo; Veerman, A J; Thijs, L G

    2001-07-01

    To assess the potential role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the pathogenesis of dengue virus infection, levels of this cytokine were measured in children with dengue virus infection on admission to the hospital. As presumed surrogate markers of IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP) and secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) were measured. Three groups were studied: 33 apparently healthy children as negative controls, 11 children with bacterial infections as positive controls, and 186 children with serologically documented dengue virus infection. One-hundred and fifteen patients had dengue fever (DF) and 71 had dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Compared with healthy controls, dengue shock syndrome (DSS) patients had significantly higher levels of IL-6 on admission (P < 0.05), comparable with those in positive controls. Dengue patients with shock had significantly higher levels of IL-6 than normotensive patients (P < 0.001) and higher levels of IL-6 were associated with a higher incidence of ascites. C-reactive protein concentrations in dengue patients and in healthy children were not different, but lower than in children with bacterial infections (P = 0.008). Secretory phospholipase A2 levels were higher in dengue patients than in apparently healthy children (P < or = 0.05) and similar to those in children with bacterial infection. Dengue shock syndrome patients had significantly higher sPLA2 concentrations than normotensive patients (P = 0.02). These data indicate that IL-6 and sPLA2 may have a pathogenetic role only in the most severe forms of dengue virus infection.

  17. Evaluation of intrathecal serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) synthesis in Alzheimer's disease with the use of index values.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Sandra D; Hack, C Erik; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Veerhuis, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are proteins involved in innate immunity. The expression of SAP and CRP is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue, compared to healthy controls. Although both proteins are found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), their origin is unclear. We investigated if increased local production of SAP and CRP in AD brain results in higher levels in CSF with the use of index values. To study this, SAP, CRP, and albumin levels were determined in CSF and serum samples of 30 control (65 ± 11 years; 57% female) and 140 AD subjects (65 ± 9 years; 53% female). To correct for inter-individual differences in protein diffusion from blood to CSF, quotients (Q =CSF/serum) of SAP, CRP, and albumin and index values (Qprotein/Qalb) were calculated. The results showed no significant differences in SAP and CRP index values between control and AD subjects, although eight percent of individual AD patients showed evidence of intrathecal SAP or CRP production using the Reiber hyperbolic model. Interestingly, the SAP index value was much lower than expected, based on its molecular size. In conclusion, these data suggest that local production of SAP and CRP in the AD brain does not substantially contribute to the CSF levels.

  18. Synovial Fluid C-reactive Protein as a Diagnostic Marker for Periprosthetic Joint Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Wang, Qi; Li, Rui; Duan, Jin-Yan; Wang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the main cause of failure following total joint arthroplasty. Until now, the diagnosis of PJI is still confronted with technical limitations, and the question of whether synovial fluid biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), can provide high value in the diagnosis of PJI remains unanswered and, therefore, was the aim of the study. Methods: First, we conducted a systematic review on CRP in the diagnosis of PJI by searching online databases using keywords such as “periprosthetic joint infection”, “synovial fluid”, and “C-reactive protein”. Eligible studies providing sufficient data to construct 2 × 2 contingency tables were then selected based on the list of criteria and the quality of included studies was assessed subsequently. Finally, the reported sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve, and the area under the SROC (AUSROC) were pooled together and used to evaluate overall diagnostic performance. Results: Seven studies were included in our review, six of which comprising a total of 456 participants were further investigated in our meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–0.96), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.93), and 101.40 (95% CI: 48.07–213.93), respectively. The AUSROC was 0.9663 (standard error, 0.0113). Conclusions: Synovial fluid CRP is a good biomarker for the diagnosis of PJI with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27503025

  19. Development of C-reactive protein certified reference material NMIJ CRM 6201-b: optimization of a hydrolysis process to improve the accuracy of amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Megumi; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yoshioka, Mariko; Goto, Mari; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-04-01

    To standardize C-reactive protein (CRP) assays, the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) has developed a C-reactive protein solution certified reference material, CRM 6201-b, which is intended for use as a primary reference material to enable the SI-traceable measurement of CRP. This study describes the development process of CRM 6201-b. As a candidate material of the CRM, recombinant human CRP solution was selected because of its higher purity and homogeneity than the purified material from human serum. Gel filtration chromatography was used to examine the homogeneity and stability of the present CRM. The total protein concentration of CRP in the present CRM was determined by amino acid analysis coupled to isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS-AAA). To improve the accuracy of IDMS-AAA, we optimized the hydrolysis process by examining the effect of parameters such as the volume of protein samples taken for hydrolysis, the procedure of sample preparation prior to the hydrolysis, hydrolysis temperature, and hydrolysis time. Under optimized conditions, we conducted two independent approaches in which the following independent hydrolysis and liquid chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS) were combined: one was vapor-phase acid hydrolysis (130 °C, 24 h) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) method, and the other was microwave-assisted liquid-phase acid hydrolysis (150 °C, 3 h) and pre-column derivatization liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. The quantitative values of the two different amino acid analyses were in agreement within their uncertainties. The certified value was the weighted mean of the results of the two methods. Uncertainties from the value-assignment method, between-method variance, homogeneity, long-term stability, and short-term stability were taken into account in evaluating the uncertainty for a certified value. The certified value and the

  20. The Effect of Vegan Protein-Based Diets on Metabolic Parameters, Expressions of Adiponectin and Its Receptors in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie-Hua; Song, Jia; Chen, Yan; Ding, Qiang; Peng, Anfang; Mao, Limei

    2016-01-01

    Vegan protein-based diet has attracted increasing interest in the prevention of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Meanwhile, adiponectin has become a highly potential molecular target in the prevention of MetS. Our study will identify a potential vegan protein diet for the prevention of MetS using rat models. Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups and given diets containing one of the following proteins for 12 weeks: casein (CAS, control diet), soy protein (SOY), and gluten-soy mixed protein (GSM). Changes in metabolic parameters as well as the expressions of adiponectin and its receptors were identified. Compared to CAS diet, both SOY and GSM diets led to decreases in blood total cholesterol and triglycerides, but only GSM diet led to an increase in HDL-cholesterol; no marked difference was observed in blood glucose in all three groups; HOMA-IR was found lower only in SOY group. Among groups, the order of serum adiponectin level was found as GSM > SOY > CAS. Similar order pattern was also observed in expression of adiponectin in adipose tissue and AdipoR1 mRNA in skeletal muscle. Our results suggested for the first time that, besides SOY diet, GSM diet could also be a possible substitute of animal protein to prevent MetS. PMID:27763537

  1. Changes in haptoglobin, C-reactive protein and pig-MAP during a housing period following long distance transport in swine.

    PubMed

    Salamano, Germana; Mellia, Elisabetta; Candiani, Denise; Ingravalle, Francesco; Bruno, Renato; Ru, Giuseppe; Doglione, Luca

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a housing period following long distance transport on haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and pig major acute phase protein (pig-MAP) in swine. After transportation, 80 gilts were allotted to group A, B, C, or D. Blood samples were collected on arrival and 28 days later; additional samples were collected from Group C on day 14, and from Group D on days 3, 5 and 14. Acute phase proteins (APPs) in Group A were significantly lower on day 28 than on day 1; the opposite occurred in Group B because of a tail biting episode. In Group C, values remained elevated on day 14 and showed a reduction on day 28; in Group D elevated levels detected on day 14 were preceded by a decrease from days 1 to 5. The results indicate that stressors associated with transportation and new accommodation can cause an increase in APPs that could be useful indicators of welfare during transport and routine management. PMID:17509918

  2. Disposable integrated bismuth citrate-modified screen-printed immunosensor for ultrasensitive quantum dot-based electrochemical assay of C-reactive protein in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Prodromidis, Mamas; Economou, Anastasios; Petrou, Panagiota; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2015-07-30

    A novel immunosensor based on graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) modified with bismuth citrate was developed for the voltammetric determination of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum using quantum dots (QDs) labels. The sandwich-type immunoassay involved physisorption of CRP capture antibody on the surface of the sensor, sequential immunoreactions with CRP and biotinylated CRP reporter antibody and finally reaction with streptavidin-conjugated PbS QDs. The quantification of the target protein was performed with acidic dissolution of the PbS QDs and anodic stripping voltammetric detection of the Pb(II) released. Detection was performed at bismuth nanodomains formed on the sensor surface during the electrolytic preconcentration step, as bismuth citrate was reduced to metallic bismuth simultaneously with the deposition of Pb on the surface of the immunosensor. Under optimal conditions, the response was linear over the range 0.2-100 ng mL(-1) CRP and the limit of detection was 0.05 ng mL(-1) CRP. Since the modified SPE serves as both the biorecognition element and the QDs reader, the analytical procedure is simplified, the drawbacks of existing electroplated immunosensors are minimized while the proposed disposable sensing platform provides convenient, low-cost and ultrasensitive detection of proteins and wider scope for mass-production. PMID:26320633

  3. Localized surface plasmon resonance nanosensing of C-reactive protein with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted gold nanoparticles prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Yukiya; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Highly sensitive and selective protein nanosensing based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on which polymerized specific ligands were grafted as an artificial protein recognition layer for the target protein were demonstrated. As a model, optical nanosensing for C-reactive protein (CRP), a known biomarker for chronic inflammation that predicts the risk of arteriosclerosis or heart attacks, was achieved by measuring the shift of LSPR spectra derived from the change of permittivity of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted AuNPs (PMPC-g-AuNPs) upon interacting with CRP, in which the PMPC-g-AuNPs layer were grafted on AuNPs by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). This nanosensing system was effective even for detecting CRP concentrations in a human serum solution diluted to 1% (w/w), at which point a limit of detection was ~50 ng/mL and nonspecific adsorption of other proteins was negligible. The nanosensing system using specific ligand-grafted AuNPs has several strengths, such as low preparation cost, avoiding the need for expensive instruments, no necessary complex pretreatments, and high stability, because it does not contain biobased molecules. We believe this novel synthetic route for protein nanosensors, composed of AuNPs and a polymerized specific ligand utilizing surface-initiated controlled/living radical polymerization, will provide a foundation for the design and synthesis of nanosensors targeting various other biomarker proteins, paving the way for future advances in the field of biosensing.

  4. C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis, Gingivitis, and Gingival Recessions.

    PubMed

    Podzimek, Stepan; Mysak, Jaroslav; Janatova, Tatjana; Duskova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    CRP is a plasma protein that reflects a measure of the acute phase response to inflammation and is one of the markers of choice in monitoring this response. CRP can be used for the prediction and early detection of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the systemic levels of CRP in the peripheral blood samples of patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis, gingivitis, and gingival recessions and compare them with periodontal clinical parameters. All patients (N = 158) were examined prior to the initiation of periodontal treatment. Patients were divided into four groups. Group A consisted of 26 patients with aggressive periodontitis, Group B consisted of 111 patients with chronic periodontitis, Group C consisted of 13 patients with gingivitis, and Group D consisted of 8 patients with gingival recessions. Our study results indicate that CRP levels increase subsequently with the severity of the periodontal disease and that the bleeding on probing index showed much better positive correlation with the CRP levels compared to the pocket depth index in both periodontitis patients groups, especially in aggressive periodontitis patients.

  5. C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis, Gingivitis, and Gingival Recessions

    PubMed Central

    Podzimek, Stepan; Mysak, Jaroslav; Janatova, Tatjana; Duskova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    CRP is a plasma protein that reflects a measure of the acute phase response to inflammation and is one of the markers of choice in monitoring this response. CRP can be used for the prediction and early detection of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the systemic levels of CRP in the peripheral blood samples of patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis, gingivitis, and gingival recessions and compare them with periodontal clinical parameters. All patients (N = 158) were examined prior to the initiation of periodontal treatment. Patients were divided into four groups. Group A consisted of 26 patients with aggressive periodontitis, Group B consisted of 111 patients with chronic periodontitis, Group C consisted of 13 patients with gingivitis, and Group D consisted of 8 patients with gingival recessions. Our study results indicate that CRP levels increase subsequently with the severity of the periodontal disease and that the bleeding on probing index showed much better positive correlation with the CRP levels compared to the pocket depth index in both periodontitis patients groups, especially in aggressive periodontitis patients. PMID:26346216

  6. Macrophage uptake of low-density lipoprotein bound to aggregated C-reactive protein: possible mechanism of foam-cell formation in atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tao; Borensztajn, Jayme

    2002-01-01

    Foam cells found in atherosclerotic lesions are believed to derive from macrophages that take up aggregated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles bound to the extracellular matrix of arterial walls. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein found in atherosclerotic lesions, which when immobilized on a solid phase, can bind and cluster LDL particles in a calcium-dependent manner. In the present study, we examined whether CRP-bound aggregated LDL could be taken up by macrophages in culture. CRP molecules were aggregated in the presence of calcium and immobilized on the surface of polystyrene microtitre wells. Human LDL added to the wells bound to and aggregated on the immobilized CRP, also in a calcium-dependent manner. On incubation with macrophages, the immobilized CRP-bound LDL aggregates were readily taken up by the cells, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy, by the cellular accumulation of cholesterol and by the overexpression of adipophilin. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow-cytometry analysis established that the uptake of the LDL-CRP complex was not mediated by the CRP receptor CD32. These observations with immobilized CRP and LDL, approximating the conditions that exist in the extracellular matrix of the arterial wall, thus suggest that CRP may contribute to the formation of foam cells in atherosclerotic lesions by causing the aggregation of LDL molecules that are then taken up by macrophages through a CD32-independent pathway. PMID:12033985

  7. C-reactive protein impairs angiogenic functions and decreases the secretion of arteriogenic chemo-cytokines in human endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Wonhee; Kim, Koung Li; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Young-Sam; Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Jeong-Min; Jang, Hyung-Suk; Shin, In-Soon; Lee, Jung-Sun; Byun, Jonghoe; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2004-08-13

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a predictor of future cardiovascular diseases, has been reported to damage the vascular wall by inducing endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. This proatherogenic CRP was speculated to have a role in attenuating angiogenic functions of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), possibly impairing vascular regeneration and increasing cardiovascular vulnerability to ischemic injury. Herein, we investigated the direct effect of CRP on angiogenic activity and gene expression in human EPCs. Incubation of EPCs with human recombinant CRP significantly inhibited EPC migration in response to vascular endothelial growth factor, possibly by decreasing the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and subsequent nitric oxide production. In addition, CRP-treated EPCs showed the reduced adhesiveness onto an endothelial cell monolayer. When assayed for the gene expression of arteriogenic chemo-cytokines, CRP substantially decreased their expression levels in EPC, in part due to the upregulation of suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins. These results suggest that CRP directly attenuates the angiogenic and possibly arteriogenic functions of EPCs. This CRP-induced EPC dysfunction may impair the vascular regenerative capacity of EPCs, thereby leading to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Comparative evaluation of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the different histological subtypes of esophageal cancer (squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of esophagus).

    PubMed

    Lukaszewicz-Zając, Marta; Mroczko, Barbara; Kozłowski, Mirosław; Nikliński, Jacek; Laudański, Jerzy; Siewko, Maria; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2012-02-01

    Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been found in patients with several malignancies. The aim of the present study was to analyze the diagnostic and prognostic values of CRP levels measurement in esophageal cancer (EC) patients in relation to its different histological subtypes (squamous cell carcinoma-ESCC and adenocarcinoma-AC of esophagus) and compared them with classic tumor markers-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cell cancer antigen (SCC-Ag). The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) for all the proteins tested were defined. Serum CRP levels were statistically higher in EC, ESCC, and AC patients compared to healthy subjects and significantly increased in EC and ESCC patients with the presence of lymph node and distant metastases. The percentage of elevated CRP results in all the analyzed subgroups (EC, ESCC, and AC) was higher than CEA and SCC-Ag, similarly as AUC for CRP in comparison to SCC-Ag. Serum CRP level was a significant predictor of EC and ESCC patients' survival in univariate analysis. In conclusion, these results indicate that CRP can be used as an adjunct in evaluating the tumor markers-CEA and SCC-Ag and may improve the clinical diagnosis and follow-up of EC patients, especially for ESCC subgroup.

  9. Solid-phase classical complement activation by C-reactive protein (CRP) is inhibited by fluid-phase CRP-C1q interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoewall, Christopher; Askendal, Agneta; Almroth, Gunnel

    2007-01-05

    C-reactive protein (CRP) interacts with phosphorylcholine (PC), Fc{gamma} receptors, complement factor C1q and cell nuclear constituents, yet its biological roles are insufficiently understood. The aim was to characterize CRP-induced complement activation by ellipsometry. PC conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (PC-KLH) was immobilized to cross-linked fibrinogen. A low-CRP serum with different amounts of added CRP was exposed to the PC-surfaces. The total serum protein deposition was quantified and deposition of IgG, C1q, C3c, C4, factor H, and CRP detected with polyclonal antibodies. The binding of serum CRP to PC-KLH dose-dependently triggered activation of the classical pathway. Unexpectedly, the activation was efficiently down-regulated at CRP levels >150 mg/L. Using radial immunodiffusion, CRP-C1q interaction was observed in serum samples with high CRP concentrations. We propose that the underlying mechanism depends on fluid-phase interaction between C1q and CRP. This might constitute another level of complement regulation, which has implications for systemic lupus erythematosus where CRP is often low despite flare-ups.

  10. Censored Data Analysis Reveals Effects of Age and Hepatitis C Infection on C-Reactive Protein Levels in Healthy Adult Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Ely, John J.; Zavaskis, Tony; Lammey, M. Lon

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein, a conserved acute-phase protein synthesized in the liver and involved in inflammation, infection, and tissue damage, is an informative biomarker for human cardiovascular disease. Out of 258 captive adult common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) assayed for CRP, 27.9% of the data were below the quantitation limit. Data were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and results compared to other methods for handling censored data (including deletion, replacement, and imputation). Kaplan-Meier results demonstrated a modest age effect and a strong effect of HCV infection in reducing CRP but did not allow inference of reference intervals. Results of other methods varied considerably. Substitution schemes differed widely in statistical significance, with estimated group means biased by the size of the substitution constant, while inference of unbiased reference intervals was impossible. Single imputation gave reasonable statistical inferences but unreliable reference intervals. Multiple imputation gave reliable results, for both statistical inference and reference intervals, and was comparable to the Kaplan-Meier standard. Other methods should be avoided. CRP did not predict cardiovascular disease, but CRP levels were reduced by 50% in animals with hepatitis C infection and showed inverse relationships with 2 liver function enzymes. Results suggested that hsCRP can be an informative biomarker of chronic hepatic dysfunction. PMID:26317021

  11. Censored Data Analysis Reveals Effects of Age and Hepatitis C Infection on C-Reactive Protein Levels in Healthy Adult Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Ely, John J; Zavaskis, Tony; Lammey, M Lon

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein, a conserved acute-phase protein synthesized in the liver and involved in inflammation, infection, and tissue damage, is an informative biomarker for human cardiovascular disease. Out of 258 captive adult common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) assayed for CRP, 27.9% of the data were below the quantitation limit. Data were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and results compared to other methods for handling censored data (including deletion, replacement, and imputation). Kaplan-Meier results demonstrated a modest age effect and a strong effect of HCV infection in reducing CRP but did not allow inference of reference intervals. Results of other methods varied considerably. Substitution schemes differed widely in statistical significance, with estimated group means biased by the size of the substitution constant, while inference of unbiased reference intervals was impossible. Single imputation gave reasonable statistical inferences but unreliable reference intervals. Multiple imputation gave reliable results, for both statistical inference and reference intervals, and was comparable to the Kaplan-Meier standard. Other methods should be avoided. CRP did not predict cardiovascular disease, but CRP levels were reduced by 50% in animals with hepatitis C infection and showed inverse relationships with 2 liver function enzymes. Results suggested that hsCRP can be an informative biomarker of chronic hepatic dysfunction. PMID:26317021

  12. Measurement of C-reactive protein and prostaglandin F2α metabolite concentrations in differentiation of canine pyometra and cystic endometrial hyperplasia/mucometra.

    PubMed

    Enginler, S O; Ateş, A; Diren Sığırcı, B; Sontaş, B H; Sönmez, K; Karaçam, E; Ekici, H; Evkuran Dal, G; Gürel, A

    2014-08-01

    Canine pyometra is a dioestrus period disease in which systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a common outcome due to the response of the body to the bacterial infection. The purpose of this study was i) to differentiate canine pyometra and cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH)/mucometra by measuring serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and prostaglandin F2α metabolite (PGFM) concentrations in blood and ii) to compare serum concentrations of CRP and PGFM in bitches with a pathological uterus (pyometra or CEH/mucometra) to concentrations in bitches with a healthy uterus. Mean CRP concentrations were found significantly higher (p < 0.001) in dogs with pyometra compared to those with CEH/mucometra or healthy uterus. However, no statistical difference could be detected between the groups for mean PGFM concentrations. Mean white blood cell count (WBC), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total protein concentrations were found significantly higher (p < 0.001) in dogs with pyometra. Escherichia coli was the most frequently isolated microorganism from dogs with pyometra (64.3%). Edwardsiella spp. was detected in a single case of pyometra for the first time. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that serum CRP concentrations were increased in dogs with pyometra and thus we conclude that serum CRP concentration but not PGFM might be useful as a marker to differentiate a case of CEH/mucometra from pyometra in female dogs. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report in which Edwardsiella spp. has been isolated in the canine uterus. PMID:24889379

  13. Increased concentrations of C-reactive protein but not high-mobility group box 1 in dogs with naturally occurring sepsis.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, I; Wernersson, S; Ambrosen, A; Kindahl, H; Södersten, F; Wang, L; Hagman, R

    2013-11-15

    Sepsis is difficult to diagnose and remains a common mortality cause worldwide in both humans and animals. The uterine infection pyometra causes sepsis in more than half of affected dogs and therefore allows the natural physiological development of sepsis to be studied. To find a sepsis-specific biochemical marker that could be combined with conventional clinical criteria for a more robust and quick diagnosis of sepsis, we measured systemic concentrations of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in 23 healthy control dogs and in 27 dogs with pyometra, 74% of which had sepsis. We also measured concentrations of the major acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) and an indicator for endotoxaemia, prostaglandin F2α metabolite (PGM) to assess the relative contribution of HMGB1 to the detection of systemic inflammation and endotoxaemia. We found that HMGB1 concentrations, in line with concentrations of CRP and PGM, were significantly increased in dogs with pyometra, and that concentrations of CRP, but not HMGB1, were significantly higher in dogs with sepsis compared to dogs without sepsis. Although serum HMGB1 did not differ between dogs with or without sepsis and was not correlated with either CRP or PGM concentrations, HMGB1 was correlated with the total white blood cell counts, suggesting an independent regulation and involvement in inflammation. PMID:24120445

  14. Effect of Urinary Kallidinogenase on Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Expression in Rat Focal Cerebral Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ting-Fang; Lv, Hai-Xia; Niu, Xiao-Lu; Gui, Yong-Kun; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Hai-Qing; Li, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study we investigated the effect of urinary kallidinogenase (UK) on transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) expression in brain tissue. We also explored the neuroprotective mechanism of UK against ischemic injury by measuring serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level changes after rat cerebral ischemic injury. Material/Methods The rat middle cerebral artery ischemia/reperfusion model was established using the suture method. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: treatment, Gegen control, and blank control. Each group was subsequently divided into 5 subgroups according to time (6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h). Rats in the treatment group were administered UK as treatment. TGF-β1 expression was observed at each time point using SABC and immunohistochemical staining methods to estimate cerebral infarct volume percentage. Serum hs-CRP levels were also measured. Results TGF-β1 protein expression in ischemic brain tissues of the treatment group significantly increased at each time point (P<0.01) compared with both control groups. Treatment group serum hs-CRP levels significantly decreased at each time point (P<0.05) compared with both control groups. Conclusions UK exerts a neuroprotective effect by upregulating TGF-β1 expression and inhibiting excessive inflammatory responses. PMID:27521289

  15. (-)-Catechin suppresses expression of Kruppel-like factor 7 and increases expression and secretion of adiponectin protein in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Si Young; Park, Pil Joon; Shin, Hyun Jung; Kim, Young-Kyung; Shin, Dong Wook; Shin, Eui Seok; Lee, Hyoung Ho; Lee, Byeong Gon; Baik, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2007-04-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-specific secretory hormone that can increase insulin sensitivity and promote adipocyte differentiation. Administration of adiponectin to obese or diabetic mice reduces plasma glucose and free fatty acid levels. Green tea polyphenols possess many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiobesity, and antidiabetic activities. To investigate whether green tea polyphenols have an effect on the regulation of adiponectin, we measured expression and secretion levels of adiponectin protein after treatment of each green tea polyphenols in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found that (-)-catechin enhanced the expression and secretion of adiponectin protein in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment of (-)-catechin increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in differentiated adipocytes and augmented the expression of adipogenic marker genes, including PPARgamma, CEBPalpha, FAS, and SCD-1, when (-)-catechin was treated during adipocyte differentiation. In search of the molecular mechanism responsible for inducible effect of (-)-catechin on adiponectin expression, we found that (-)-catechin markedly suppresses the expression of Kruppel-like factor 7 (KLF7) protein, which has recently been reported to inhibit the expression of adiponectin and other adipogenesis related genes, including leptin, PPARgamma, C/EBPalpha, and aP2 in adipocytes. KLF7 is a transcription factor in adipocyte and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Taken together, these data suggest that the upregulation of adiponectin protein by (-)-catechin may involve, at least in part, suppression of KLF7 in 3T3-L1 cells.

  16. Diagnosis and prognosis of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation in a general hospital -- meaning of the ISTH score system, fibrin monomers, and lipoprotein-C-reactive protein complex formation.

    PubMed

    Cauchie, Ph; Cauchie, Ch; Boudjeltia, K Zouaoui; Carlier, E; Deschepper, N; Govaerts, D; Migaud-Fressart, M; Woodhams, B; Brohée, D

    2006-06-01

    The meaning, the utility, and the prognostic significance of the International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) score and other parameters of coagulation activation including soluble fibrin monomer complexes (SFMC), antithrombin and protein C consumption, and formation of lipoprotein-C-reactive protein (LP-CRP) complexes (MDA slope 1 and flag A2) were evaluated in 165 inpatients from a general hospital for whom DIC testing was required by the attending physicians. Of these 165 patients, 148 had an underlying disease that clearly justified the laboratory request from our systematic post hoc review of the clinical charts. Of these 148 patients, 28 had a positive overt DIC score, 19 had an A2 flag, and 4 had both. The DIC score was strongly related to several major markers of coagulation activation such as D-dimers, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and soluble fibrin and was inversely related to antithrombin and protein C levels, which began to fall from DIC score 4 or higher. The formation of LP-CRP complexes was only related to Gram-negative sepsis and these patients had a strong inflammatory reaction. Independent risk factors for death were high creatininemia, positive overt DIC score, and/or presence of SFMC. In patients with positive DIC score, SFMC positivity and low levels of antithrombin and/or protein C were additional risk factors. The ISTH overt DIC score proves useful and adequate as a marker for clinically significant DIC. Illness severity is further defined by SFMC, antithrombin, and protein C levels. LP-CRP complexes are related to sepsis but not to actual overt DIC and lethal prognosis.

  17. Assessing salivary C-reactive protein: longitudinal associations with systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease risk in women exposed to intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Out, Dorothée; Hall, Rosalie J; Granger, Douglas A; Page, Gayle G; Woods, Stephanie J

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluated individual differences in levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) measured in saliva, cross-sectionally and prospectively, in relation to systemic inflammation and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Plasma and saliva samples, later assayed for CRP, were collected multiple times from an ethnically diverse group of women seeking help from domestic violence crisis shelters-agencies (N=107; mean age at study start=34 years). Plasma and saliva CRP levels were moderately associated cross-sectionally and across two years. There were indications that saliva CRP levels were, on average, higher in the morning than evening. Higher levels of saliva and plasma CRP were associated with a higher body mass index, but did not differ between women who did and did not smoke. Salivary CRP reliably discriminated between high and low levels of plasma CRP, using a clinically relevant cutoff point of 3mg/L, recommended by the American Heart Association. Results build upon an emerging literature suggesting that under specific conditions levels of CRP in saliva may reflect low-grade inflammation and have the potential to serve as a screen for CVD risk status. PMID:22326517

  18. Assessing salivary C-reactive protein: Longitudinal associations with systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease risk in women exposed to intimate partner violence

    PubMed Central

    Out, Dorothée; Hall, Rosalie J.; Granger, Douglas A.; Page, Gayle G.; Woods, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated individual differences in levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) measured in saliva, cross-sectionally and prospectively, in relation to systemic inflammation and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Plasma and saliva samples, later assayed for CRP, were collected multiple times from an ethnically diverse group of women seeking help from domestic violence crisis shelters-agencies (N = 107; mean age at study start = 34 years). Plasma and saliva CRP levels were moderately associated cross-sectionally and across two years. There were indications that saliva CRP levels were, on average, higher in the morning than evening. Higher levels of saliva and plasma CRP were associated with a higher body mass index, but did not differ between women who did and did not smoke. Salivary CRP reliably discriminated between high and low levels of plasma CRP, using a clinically relevant cutoff point of 3 mg/L, recommended by the American Heart Association. Results build upon an emerging literature suggesting that under specific conditions levels of CRP in saliva may reflect low-grade inflammation and have the potential to serve as a screen for CVD risk status. PMID:22326517

  19. Lymphocyte count was significantly associated with hyper-LDL cholesterolemia independently of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in apparently healthy Japanese.

    PubMed

    Oda, Eiji; Kawai, Ryu; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between leukocyte subtype counts and hyper-LDL cholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia. Logistic regressions using hyper-LDL cholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypo-HDL cholesterolemia as a dependent variable and total leukocyte, basophil, eosinophil, neutrophil, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts as an independent variable were calculated adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), smoking, drinking, and physical activity in apparently healthy Japanese men (1,803) and women (1,150). The odds ratio (OR) of hyper-LDL cholesterolemia for total leukocyte, eosinophil, and lymphocyte counts, the OR of hypertriglyceridemia for total leukocyte, eosinophil, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts, and the OR of hypo-HDL cholesterolemia for total leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts were significant in men, and the OR of hyper-LDL cholesterolemia, for lymphocyte count, and the OR of hypo-HDL cholesterolemia for eosinophil count were significant in women. Lymphocyte count was significantly associated with hyper-LDL cholesterolemia independently of hs-CRP in apparently healthy Japanese. PMID:21655904

  20. The role of C-reactive protein as a diagnostic predictor of sepsis in a multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care center in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Saurabh; Ghimire, Ashish; Bhattarai, Balkrishna; Khanal, Bashudha; Pokharel, Krishna; Lamsal, Madhab; Koirala, Sidhhartha

    2016-01-01

    Aim: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a commonly used biomarker of sepsis, the leading cause of mortality in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). However, sufficient data are still lacking to strongly recommend it in clinical practice. The present study is aimed to find out its reliability in diagnosing sepsis. Materials and Methods: CRP was measured in ICU-admitted patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and compared using a cutoff of 50 mg/L with the gold standard for diagnosing sepsis, taken as isolation of organism from a suspected source of infection or the Centers for Disease Control criteria for clinical sepsis. Results: CRP had a sensitivity and specificity of 84.3% and 46.15%, respectively. Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was calculated to be 0.683 (±0.153, P < 0.05). The cutoff value with the best diagnostic accuracy was found to be 61 mg/L. Conclusion: CRP is a sensitive marker of sepsis, but it is not specific. PMID:27555697

  1. The usefulness of serum C-reactive protein and total bilirubin levels for distinguishing between dengue fever and malaria in returned travelers.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Satoshi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kato, Yasuyuki; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Momoko; Takeshita, Nozomi; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2014-03-01

    The clinical manifestations of dengue fever (DF) and malaria are similar. Specific diagnostic tests are not always available. A retrospective study to compare the laboratory results of malaria and DF was conducted at the National Center for Global Health and Medicine in Japan from January of 2005 to March of 2013. Febrile returned travelers from overseas diagnosed with malaria or DF were included; 86 malaria and 85 DF cases were identified. C-reactive protein (CRP) and total bilirubin (T-bil) had high area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (> 0.9). A cutoff value of CRP > 2.4 mg/dL to predict malaria as opposed to DF had a sensitivity of 91.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 83.9-96.7%) and specificity of 90.6% (95% CI = 82.3-95.8%). A cutoff value of T-bil > 0.9 mg/dL to predict malaria as opposed to DF had a sensitivity of 73.8% (95% CI = 62.7-83%) and a specificity of 95.1% (95% CI = 88-98.6%). CRP and T-bil are useful to distinguish between DF and malaria in returned travelers.

  2. C-reactive protein haplotype is associated with high PSA as a marker of metastatic prostate cancer but not with overall cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, C M; Tammela, T L J; Schleutker, J; Hurme, M

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence points to a role for inflammation in prostate carcinogenesis. The significance of C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory and innate immunity molecule, has not been evaluated thoroughly in prostate cancer (PC). In this study of 739 Finnish patients with PC and 760 healthy men, we evaluated the associations of CRP genotypes and haplotypes with total PC risk and PC progression, using prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a marker of metastatic disease. Although the haplotype frequencies were similar in patients and controls, an association between haplotype ACCCA and patients' PSA levels was found. The carriers more often had a high PSA than non-carriers (P=0.0002) and the SNP rs2794521 A-allele and rs1800947 C-allele carriers had a higher PSA than non-carriers (P=0.009 and P=0.0004, respectively). A trend for a younger age at diagnosis was found among the carriers of ACCCA (P=0.07) and the rs1800947 C-allele (P=0.06), as well as a trend for the latter to have more likely metastases (P=0.06), but not after Bonferroni correction (α=0.00208). This is the first study to suggest association between PSA and CRP variants in PC and, therefore, further studies are warranted. CRP alleles previously found to protect against increased CRP levels are now suggested to be associated with metastatic PC, indicated by elevated PSA. PMID:19436291

  3. Association of the C-Reactive Protein Gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T Polymorphism with Aortic Valve Calcification in Patients with Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wypasek, Ewa; Potaczek, Daniel P.; Undas, Anetta

    2015-01-01

    Elevation in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been shown in patients with aortic valve stenosis (AS). Minor allele of the CRP gene (CRP) rs1205 C>T polymorphism has been associated with lower plasma CRP concentrations in cohorts of healthy and atherosclerotic patients. Considering the existing similarities between atherosclerosis and AS, we examined the effect of CRP rs1205 C>T polymorphism on the AS severity. Three hundred consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with AS were genotyped for the rs1205 C>T polymorphism using the TaqMan assay. Severity of the AS was assessed using transthoracic echocardiography. The degree of calcification was analyzed semi-quantitatively. Carriers of the rs1205 T allele were characterized by elevated serum CRP levels (2.53 (1.51–3.96) vs. 1.68 (0.98–2.90) mg/L, p < 0.001) and a higher proportion of the severe aortic valve calcification (70.4% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.01) compared with major homozygotes. The effect of CRP rs1205 polymorphism on CRP levels is opposite in AS-affected than in unaffected subjects, suggesting existence of a disease-specific molecular regulatory mechanism. Furthermore, rs1205 variant allele predisposes to larger aortic valve calcification, potentially being a novel genetic risk marker of disease progression. PMID:26473826

  4. Heparin-protamine complexes and C-reactive protein induce activation of the classical complement pathway: studies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bruins, P; te Velthuis, H; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Yazdanbakhsh, A P; de Beaumont, E M; Eijsman, L; Trouwborst, A; Hack, C E

    2000-08-01

    The administration of protamine to patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to neutralize heparin and to reduce the risk of bleeding, induces activation of the classical complement pathway mainly by heparin-protamine complexes. We investigated whether C-reactive protein (CRP) contributes to protamine-induced complement activation. In 24 patients during myocardial revascularization, we measured complement, CRP, and complement-CRP complexes, reflecting CRP-mediated complement activation in vivo. We also incubated plasma from healthy volunteers and patients with heparin and protamine in vitro to study CRP-mediated complement activation. During CPB, CRP levels remained unchanged while C3 activation products increased. C4 activation occurred after protamine administration. CRP-complement complexes increased at the end of CPB and upon protamine administration. Incubation of plasma with heparin and protamine in vitro generated complement-CRP complexes, which was blocked by phosphorylcholine and stimulated by exogenous CRP. C4d-CRP complex formation after protamine administration correlated clinically with the incidence of postoperative arrhythmia. Protamine administration during cardiac surgery induces complement activation which in part is CRP-dependent, and correlates with postoperative arrhythmia.

  5. Inhibition of sPLA2-IIA, C-reactive protein or complement: new therapy for patients with acute myocardial infarction?

    PubMed

    Krijnen, Paul A J; Meischl, Christof; Nijmeijer, Remco; Visser, Cees A; Hack, C Erik; Niessen, Hans W M

    2006-06-01

    Reperfusion of ischemic myocardium after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) induces a local activation of inflammatory reactions that results in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-injury. I/R-injury contributes considerably to the total cell damage in the heart after AMI. Secretory phospolipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA), C-reactive protein (CRP) and complement are inflammatory mediators that have been demonstrated to play key roles in I/R injury. From studies by us and others a mechanism emerged in which sPLA2-IIA binds to reversibly damaged cardiomyocytes and subsequently induces cell death, partly by potentiating binding of CRP and subsequent complement activation. Next to this, sPLA2-IIA also has a direct toxic effect, independent of CRP or complement. Therefore, these studies indicate a crucial role of inflammatory mediators in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This review will focus on the pathogenic effects of sPLA2-IIA, CRP and complement and on the putative therapeutic effects of inhibitors of these inflammatory mediators in acute myocardial infarction.

  6. Multifaceted anti-amyloidogenic and pro-amyloidogenic effects of C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Daisaku; Nomura, Ryo; Mangione, P Patrizia; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Okoshi, Tadakazu; Porcari, Riccardo; Bellotti, Vittorio; Naiki, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP), two major classical pentraxins in humans, are soluble pattern recognition molecules that regulate the innate immune system, but their chaperone activities remain poorly understood. Here, we examined their effects on the amyloid fibril formation from Alzheimer's amyloid β (Aβ) (1-40) and on that from D76N β2-microglobulin (β2-m) which is related to hereditary systemic amyloidosis. CRP and SAP dose-dependently and substoichiometrically inhibited both Aβ(1-40) and D76N β2-m fibril formation in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. CRP and SAP interacted with fresh and aggregated Aβ(1-40) and D76N β2-m on the fibril-forming pathway. Interestingly, in the presence of Ca(2+), SAP first inhibited, then significantly accelerated D76N β2-m fibril formation. Electron microscopically, the surface of the D76N β2-m fibril was coated with pentameric SAP. These data suggest that SAP first exhibits anti-amyloidogenic activity possibly via A face, followed by pro-amyloidogenic activity via B face, proposing a model that the pro- and anti-amyloidogenic activities of SAP are not mutually exclusive, but reflect two sides of the same coin, i.e., the B and A faces, respectively. Finally, SAP inhibits the heat-induced amorphous aggregation of human glutathione S-transferase. A possible role of pentraxins to maintain extracellular proteostasis is discussed. PMID:27380955

  7. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels. PMID:27630402

  8. Cinnamon may have therapeutic benefits on lipid profile, liver enzymes, insulin resistance, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Askari, Faezeh; Rashidkhani, Bahram; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2014-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent cause of hepatic injury in the world. One of the most important therapeutic strategies for this disease is modulating insulin resistance and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that supplementation with cinnamon exerts an insulin sensitizer effect in patients with NAFLD. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with two parallel groups, fifty patients with NAFLD were randomized to receive daily supplementation with either two capsules of cinnamon (each capsule contain 750 mg cinnamon) or 2 placebo capsules, daily for 12 weeks. During the intervention, all patients were given advice on how to implement a balanced diet and physical activity into their daily lives. In the treatment group (P < .05), significant decreases in HOMA (Homeostatic Model Assessment) index, FBS (fasting blood glucose), total cholesterol, triglyceride, ALT (alanine aminotransferase), AST (aspartate aminotransferase), GGT (gamma glutamine transpeptidase), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were seen, but there was no significant change in serum high-density lipoproteins levels (P = .122). In both groups, low-density lipoproteins decreased significantly (P < .05). In conclusion, the study suggests that taking 1500 mg cinnamon daily may be effective in improving NAFLD characteristics.

  9. Coronary Plaque Characteristics Assessed by 256-Slice Coronary CT Angiography and Association with High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Symptomatic Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinling; Lv, Zhehao; Zhao, Deli; Liu, Lili; Wan, Yong; Fan, Tingting; Li, Huimin; Guan, Ying; Liu, Bailu

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding plaque distribution, composition, and the association with inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This study aimed to assess the relationship between coronary plaque subtypes and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels. Coronary CTA were performed in 98 symptomatic DM2 patients and 107 non-DM2 patients using a 256-slice CT. The extent and types of plaque as well as luminal narrowing were evaluated. Patients with DM2 were more likely to have significant stenosis (>50%) with calcified plaques in at least one coronary segment (p < 0.01); the prevalence rates of diffuse calcified plaques in the DM2 and non-DM2 groups were 31.6% and 4.7%, respectively (p < 0.01). Plasma hs-CRP levels in DM2 with calcified plaques were higher compared with values obtained for the non-DM2 group (p < 0.01). In conclusion, combination of coronary CTA and hs-CRP might improve risk stratification in symptomatic DM2 patients. PMID:27579325

  10. Genetics of C-reactive protein and complement factor H have an epistatic effect on carotid artery compliance: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study

    PubMed Central

    Jylhävä, J; Eklund, C; Pessi, T; Raitakari, O T; Juonala, M; Kähönen, M; Viikari, J S A; Lehtimäki, T; Hurme, M

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by a prominent inflammatory component and C-reactive protein (CRP) has been implicated to modulate the complement activity in atherosclerotic arteries via complement factor H (CFH) binding. In this study, we examined whether the gene-gene interactions between CRP haplotypes and CFH Tyr402His functional polymorphism exerted an effect on early atherosclerosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CFH (Tyr402His) and CRP (−717A > G, −286C > T > A, +1059G > C, +1444C > T and +1846G > A) were genotyped in the participants of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (n = 1698, aged 24–39 years). The CRP SNPs were further constructed into haplotypes and their interactive effects with the CFH Tyr402His polymorphism on the early atherogenic vascular changes [i.e. carotid artery compliance (CAC) and intima-media thickness (IMT)] were examined. After risk factor adjustment, a significant gene-gene interaction (P = 0·007) on CAC was observed between CRP haplotype ATGTG and CFH Tyr402His polymorphism in males. Furthermore, logistic regression analysis verified the risk-modifying interactive effect on CAC between these loci (OR 3·70, 95% CI 1·37–10·02, P = 0·010). No effects on CAC were observed in females and no effects on IMT were detected in either sex. We conclude that the combined presence of CRP haplotype ATGTG and CFH 402His allele may be disadvantageous to carotid artery elasticity in males. PMID:19076828

  11. Change in Growth Differentiation Factor 15, but Not C-Reactive Protein, Independently Predicts Major Cardiac Events in Patients with Non-ST Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Baldomero, Idaira F.; Bosa-Ojeda, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Among the numerous emerging biomarkers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and growth-differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) have received widespread interest, with their potential role as predictors of cardiovascular risk. The concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers, however, are influenced, among others, by physiological variations, which are the natural, within-individual variation occurring over time. The aims of our study are: (a) to describe the changes in hsCRP and GDF-15 levels over a period of time and after an episode of non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and (b) to examine whether the rate of change in hsCRP and GDF-15 after the acute event is associated with long-term major cardiovascular adverse events (MACE). Two hundred and Fifty five NSTE-ACS patients were included in the study. We measured hsCRP and GDF-15 concentrations, at admission and again 36 months after admission (end of the follow-up period). The present study shows that the change of hsCRP levels, measured after 36 months, does not predict MACE in NSTEACS-patients. However, the level of GDF-15 measured, after 36 months, was a stronger predictor of MACE, in comparison to the acute unstable phase. PMID:24839357

  12. Multifaceted anti-amyloidogenic and pro-amyloidogenic effects of C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Daisaku; Nomura, Ryo; Mangione, P. Patrizia; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Okoshi, Tadakazu; Porcari, Riccardo; Bellotti, Vittorio; Naiki, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP), two major classical pentraxins in humans, are soluble pattern recognition molecules that regulate the innate immune system, but their chaperone activities remain poorly understood. Here, we examined their effects on the amyloid fibril formation from Alzheimer’s amyloid β (Aβ) (1-40) and on that from D76N β2-microglobulin (β2-m) which is related to hereditary systemic amyloidosis. CRP and SAP dose-dependently and substoichiometrically inhibited both Aβ(1-40) and D76N β2-m fibril formation in a Ca2+-independent manner. CRP and SAP interacted with fresh and aggregated Aβ(1-40) and D76N β2-m on the fibril-forming pathway. Interestingly, in the presence of Ca2+, SAP first inhibited, then significantly accelerated D76N β2-m fibril formation. Electron microscopically, the surface of the D76N β2-m fibril was coated with pentameric SAP. These data suggest that SAP first exhibits anti-amyloidogenic activity possibly via A face, followed by pro-amyloidogenic activity via B face, proposing a model that the pro- and anti-amyloidogenic activities of SAP are not mutually exclusive, but reflect two sides of the same coin, i.e., the B and A faces, respectively. Finally, SAP inhibits the heat-induced amorphous aggregation of human glutathione S-transferase. A possible role of pentraxins to maintain extracellular proteostasis is discussed. PMID:27380955

  13. CRP and SAA1 Haplotypes Are Associated with Both C-Reactive Protein and Serum Amyloid A Levels: Role of Suppression Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yu-Lin; Hsu, Lung-An; Wu, Semon; Teng, Ming-Sheng; Chou, Hsin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    To test the statistical association of the CRP and SAA1 locus variants with their corresponding circulating levels and metabolic and inflammatory biomarker levels by using mediation analysis, a sample population of 599 Taiwanese subjects was enrolled and five CRP and four SAA1 variants were genotyped. Correlation analysis revealed that C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) levels were significantly associated with multiple metabolic phenotypes and inflammatory marker levels. Our data further revealed a significant association of CRP and SAA1 variants with both CRP and SAA levels. Mediation analysis revealed that SAA levels suppressed the association between SAA1 genotypes/haplotypes and CRP levels and that CRP levels suppressed the association between CRP haplotypes and SAA levels. In conclusion, genetic variants at the CRP and SAA1 loci independently affect both CRP and SAA levels, and their respective circulating levels act as suppressors. These results provided further evidence of the role of the suppression effect in biological science and may partially explain the missing heritability in genetic association studies. PMID:27313400

  14. Effects of Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound and Cryotherapy on Recovery of Joint Function and C-reactive Protein Levels in Patients after Total Knee Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Il; Kim, Yong-Nam; Choi, Hyun

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and cryotherapy on joint function recovery and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of patients with total knee replacement. [Subjects] Forty-six patients with total knee replacement were recruited and allocated to either low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy (n=15), cryotherapy (n=15), or a combination of both (n=16). Therapy was administered once a day, 5 times a week for 3 weeks. To determine functional joint recovery and reduction of inflammation, changes in the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (K-WOMAC), range of motion (ROM), and CRP were assessed postsurgically and four times over a 3-week period. Using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), homogeneity tests were performed based on participants' general characteristics. To recognize changes in time-variant K-WOMAC, ROM, and CRP values between groups, repeated measures ANOVA was performed, and Tukey's test was used for post-test analysis. Values at α=0.05 were considered significant. [Results] We found a difference between groups and times, and the group that received the combined therapies showed greater changes in outcomes than the group that received low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy alone. [Conclusion] Applying both low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and cryotherapy can relieve inflammation and enhance joint function in patients who undergo total knee replacement.

  15. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels.

  16. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 and C-reactive protein concentrations before and after ovariohysterectomy in bitches with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Roman; Szczubiał, Marek; Kostro, Krzysztof; Wawron, Władysław; Ceron, Jose J; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2015-03-01

    Pyometra is one of the most common diseases of the reproductive system in bitches. The inflammatory processes occurring in the uterus result in changes in concentrations of numerous serum biomarkers, which are used for monitoring the postoperative period. The aim of the present report was to study the evolution of serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in bitches suffered from pyometra and after ovariohysterectomy in comparison with the control group of healthy dogs submitted to the surgery. Our results indicate that the serum level of IGF-1 is decreased (101.6 ng/mL [73.8-177.8 ng/mL]), whereas CRP is increased (114.6 μg/mL [95.3-131.6 μg/mL]) during severe inflammation. When inflammation caused by pyometra and surgery is resolved, the level of IGF-1 is increased (186.0 ng/mL [94.6-344.3 ng/mL], P < 0.05) and CRP decreased (23.3 μg/mL [9.9-77.0 μg/mL], P < 0.01), suggesting that these markers could be useful for assessment of the postoperative period in bitches. PMID:25476824

  17. Assessing salivary C-reactive protein: longitudinal associations with systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease risk in women exposed to intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Out, Dorothée; Hall, Rosalie J; Granger, Douglas A; Page, Gayle G; Woods, Stephanie J

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluated individual differences in levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) measured in saliva, cross-sectionally and prospectively, in relation to systemic inflammation and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Plasma and saliva samples, later assayed for CRP, were collected multiple times from an ethnically diverse group of women seeking help from domestic violence crisis shelters-agencies (N=107; mean age at study start=34 years). Plasma and saliva CRP levels were moderately associated cross-sectionally and across two years. There were indications that saliva CRP levels were, on average, higher in the morning than evening. Higher levels of saliva and plasma CRP were associated with a higher body mass index, but did not differ between women who did and did not smoke. Salivary CRP reliably discriminated between high and low levels of plasma CRP, using a clinically relevant cutoff point of 3mg/L, recommended by the American Heart Association. Results build upon an emerging literature suggesting that under specific conditions levels of CRP in saliva may reflect low-grade inflammation and have the potential to serve as a screen for CVD risk status.

  18. Circulating C-Reactive Protein and Breast Cancer Risk-Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Chan, Doris S M; Bandera, Elisa V; Greenwood, Darren C; Norat, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review to explore the association between circulating C-reactive protein (CRP), a low-grade inflammation biomarker, and breast cancer risk. Relevant prospective studies in women were identified in PubMed and Web of Science until February 2015. Random-effects dose-response meta-analysis was conducted, overall and in postmenopausal women. Twelve out of 15 studies identified were included in the meta-analysis on any breast cancers (3,522 cases; 69,610 women) and nine on postmenopausal breast cancer (2,516 cases; 36,847 women). For each doubling of CRP concentration, a 7% [95% confidence interval (CI), 2%-12%] and 6% (95% CI, 1%-11%) increased risk was observed (I(2) = 47% and 32%; Pheterogeneity = 0.04 and 0.17), respectively. The association was linear over most of the range of CRP concentrations. Positive associations remained in the studies that examined the exclusion of early years of follow-up. Associations were attenuated in studies adjusted for lifestyle factors, which partly explained the significant heterogeneity between studies in the overall analysis. On average, the associations in studies adjusted or not adjusted for body mass index were similar. Low-grade inflammation may have a role in breast cancer development. Additional prospective studies are needed to better understand confounding and effect modification from lifestyle factors. PMID:26224798

  19. New compact-type latex photometric immunoassay system for hemoglobin and three acute inflammation markers: neutrophil count, C-reactive protein, and anti-streptolysin O.

    PubMed

    Fukumori, Tatsuo; Ohta, Hironobu; Okubo, Akio; Hino, Masayuki; Ohta, Kensuke; Yamane, Takahisa; Tatsumi, Noriyuki

    2002-01-01

    A new compact-type latex photometric immunoassay system, SPOTCHEM IM SI-3510 (ARKRAY, Inc., Kyoto, Japan), which assays three kinds of inflammatory markers-neutrophil count (NPC), C-reactive protein (CRP), and anti-streptolysin O (ASO)-was evaluated. Hemoglobin (Hb), which is a good marker for anemia, can also be measured with it. NPC and CRP are measured using antibodies against neutrophilic elastase and CRP, purified streptolysin O was used for ASO determination, and Hb was measured by an azide-methemoglobin method. Whole blood, serum, and plasma specimens can be used as samples with this system. In this study, whole blood treated with dipotassium ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid was used for evaluation. Linearity and reproducibility were good for all of the items studied. Good correlations were observed between the results obtained by this system and those obtained by routine methods. Since NPC exhibited a high correlation with the routine white blood cell (WBC) counts, it was judged to be useful as a substitute for WBC counting. Since this system is small and easy to operate, and evaluation revealed reliable results, it was judged to be practical for small laboratories, and satellite testing in hospitals and physicians' office laboratories for patients suspected to have acute inflammation. PMID:11948799

  20. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels.

  1. Serum level of C-reactive protein is not a parameter to determine the difference between viral and atypical bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Durán, Anyelo; González, Andrea; Delgado, Lineth; Mosquera, Jesús; Valero, Nereida

    2016-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant that increases in the circulation in response to a variety of inflammatory stimuli. Elevated levels in serum during several infectious diseases have been reported. In this study, a highly sensitive CRP enzyme immunoassay was used to evaluate serum CRP values in patients with viral and atypical bacterial infections. Patients (n = 139) with different viral or atypical bacterial infections (systemic or respiratory) and healthy controls (n = 40) were tested for circulating CRP values. High levels of IgM antibodies against several viruses: Dengue virus (n = 36), Cytomegalovirus (n = 9), Epstein Barr virus (n = 17), Parvovirus B19 (n = 26), Herpes simplex 1 and 2 virus (n = 3) and Influenza A and B (n = 8) and against atypical bacteria: Legionella pneumophila (n = 15), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 21) and Coxiella burnetii (n = 4) were found. High values of CRP in infected patients compared with controls (P < 0.001) were found; however, no significant differences between viral and atypical bacterial infections were found. Low levels of CRP in respiratory and Coxiella burnetii infections compared with exanthematic viral and other atypical bacterial infections were found. This study suggests that CRP values are useful to define viral and atypical bacterial infections compared with normal values, but, it is not useful to define type of infection.

  2. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid and serum in severe head injury: relationship to tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Is, Merih; Coskun, Abdurrahman; Sanus, Galip Zihni; Tanriverdi, Taner; Kafadar, Ali Metin; Hanimoglu, Hakan; Tanriover, Necmettin; Gezen, Ferruh; Uzan, Mustafa

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in inflammatory diseases; however, it is unclear whether this molecule has a role after severe head injury (SHI). Our aim was to evaluate the levels of hsCRP in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from patients after SHI. The study focused on 11 patients with SHI, and evaluated CSF and serum levels of hsCRP, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a 10-day period following the head trauma. The values were compared with those from nine control patients, who had normal pressure hydrocephalus. In the CSF and serum of the patients after SHI, HsCRP was found to be significantly higher, at all times, than in the controls; TNF-alpha and IL-6 levels were also higher in these patients. However, hsCRP levels did not correlate with either TNF-alpha or IL-6. TNF-alpha and IL-6 increased during the period immediately following the SHI, and intrathecal levels were always higher than those of the serum. This study demonstrates for the first time that hsCRP reaches high levels in both CSF and serum in patients with SHI, and it may therefore be used as an inflammatory index. This finding suggests a need for further studies in this area, which are larger in scope than the present study.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at five loci are associated with C-reactive protein levels in a cohort of Filipino young adults

    PubMed Central

    Curocichin, Ghenadie; Wu, Ying; McDade, Thomas W.; Kuzawa, Christopher; Borja, Judith B.; Qin, Li; Lange, Ethan M.; Adair, Linda S.; Lange, Leslie A.; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a component of non-specific immune defense and is a reliable marker of low-grade inflammation involved in obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in middle-aged and elderly populations, predominantly of European descent, demonstrated associations of CRP levels with SNPs at several loci. To examine whether the variants identified are replicated in Filipino young adults, we applied Tobit regression models to study the association of plasma CRP with 12 SNPs at seven loci in a cohort of 1,691 Filipino young adults (aged 21.5 ± 0.3 years) from the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (CLHNS). SNPs in or near CRP (P = 3.2 × 10-11), HNF1A, IL6R, APOE-APOC1 and LEPR showed significant associations (P < 0.05) and together explained 4.8% of the total variation in CRP. Modest interactions were observed between LEPR rs1892534 and waist circumference (uncorrected Pinteraction = 0.020) and between APOE rs769449 and pathogen exposure (uncorrected Pinteraction = 0.0073) in models predicting CRP. Our results demonstrated that variants in several loci are significantly associated with plasma CRP in Filipino young adults, suggesting shared genetic influences on circulating CRP across populations and age groups. PMID:21937998

  4. The Effect of Symbiotic Supplementation on Liver Enzymes, C-reactive Protein and Ultrasound Findings in Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Asgharian, Atefe; Askari, Gholamreza; Esmailzade, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat; Mohammadi, Vida

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regarding to the growing prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), concentrating on various strategies to its prevention and management seems necessary. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of symbiotic on C-reactive protein (CRP), liver enzymes, and ultrasound findings in patients with NAFLD. Methods: Eighty NAFLD patients were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Participants received symbiotic in form of a 500 mg capsule (containing seven species of probiotic bacteria and fructooligosaccharides) or a placebo capsule daily for 8 weeks. Ultrasound grading, CRP, and liver enzymes were evaluated at the baseline and the end of the study. Results: In the symbiotic group, ultrasound grade decreased significantly compared to baseline (P < 0.005) but symbiotic supplementation was not associated with changes in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels. In the placebo group, there was no significant change in steatosis grade whereas ALT and AST levels were significantly increased (P = 0.002, P = 0.02, respectively). CRP values remained static in either group. Conclusions: Symbiotic supplementation improved steatosis in NAFLD patients and might be useful in the management of NAFLD or protective against its progression. PMID:27076897

  5. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels. PMID:27630402

  6. Complement factor H binding of monomeric C-reactive protein downregulates proinflammatory activity and is impaired with at risk polymorphic CFH variants

    PubMed Central

    Molins, Blanca; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Adán, Alfredo; Antón, Rosa; Arostegui, Juan I.; Yagüe, Jordi; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and immune-mediated processes are pivotal to the pathogenic progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk for AMD, the pathophysiological importance of the prototypical acute-phase reactant in the etiology of the disease is unknown, and data regarding the exact role of CRP in ocular inflammation are limited. In this study, we provide mechanistic insight into how CRP contributes to the development of AMD. In particular, we show that monomeric CRP (mCRP) but not the pentameric form (pCRP) upregulates IL-8 and CCL2 levels in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Further, we show that complement factor H (FH) binds mCRP to dampen its proinflammatory activity. FH from AMD patients carrying the “risk” His402 polymorphism displays impaired binding to mCRP, and therefore proinflammatory effects of mCRP remain unrestrained. PMID:26961257

  7. Disease Phenotype, Activity and Clinical Course Prediction Based on C-Reactive Protein Levels at Diagnosis in Patients with Crohn’s Disease: Results from the CONNECT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jee Hye; Im, Jong Pil; Ye, Byong Duk; Cheon, Jae Hee; Jang, Hyun Joo; Lee, Kang Moon; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Sang Wook; Kim, Young Ho; Song, Geun Am; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims C-reactive protein (CRP) is an easily measured index of disease activity, but its ability to predict clinical course is controversial. We therefore designed a study to determine whether the CRP level at Crohn’s disease (CD) diagnosis is a valuable indicator of the disease phenotype, activity, and clinical course. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 705 CD patients from 32 institutions. The patients were classified into two groups according to CRP level. The patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics and their use of immunosuppressive or biological agents were recorded. Disease location and behavior, hospitalization, and surgery were analyzed. Results A high CRP was associated with younger age, steroid use, colonic or ileocolonic location, high CD activity index, and active inflammation at colonoscopy (p<0.001). As the disease progressed, patients with high CRP were more likely to exhibit strictures (p=0.027). There were significant differences in the use of 5-aminosalicylic acid, antibiotics, corticosteroids, azathioprine, and infliximab (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.023, respectively). Hospitalization was also more frequent in patients with high CRP. Conclusions The CRP level at diagnosis is useful for evaluating the phenotype, activity, and clinical course of CD. Closer follow-up strategies, with early aggressive treatment, could be considered for patients with high CRP. PMID:27021506

  8. C-reactive protein, waist circumference, and family history of heart attack are independent predictors of body iron stores in apparently healthy premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ortegón, M F; Arbeláez, A; Mosquera, M; Méndez, F; Aguilar-de Plata, C

    2012-08-01

    Ferritin levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prediction of ferritin levels by variables related to cardiometabolic disease risk in a multivariate analysis. For this aim, 123 healthy women (72 premenopausal and 51 posmenopausal) were recruited. Data were collected through procedures of anthropometric measurements, questionnaires for personal/familial antecedents, and dietary intake (24-h recall), and biochemical determinations (ferritin, C reactive protein (CRP), glucose, insulin, and lipid profile) in blood serum samples obtained. Multiple linear regression analysis was used and variables with no normal distribution were log-transformed for this analysis. In premenopausal women, a model to explain log-ferritin levels was found with log-CRP levels, heart attack familial history, and waist circumference as independent predictors. Ferritin behaves as other cardiovascular markers in terms of prediction of its levels by documented predictors of cardiometabolic disease and related disorders. This is the first report of a relationship between heart attack familial history and ferritin levels. Further research is required to evaluate the mechanism to explain the relationship of central body fat and heart attack familial history with body iron stores values.

  9. Graphene-based rapid and highly-sensitive immunoassay for C-reactive protein using a smartphone-based colorimetric reader.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Marion Schneider, E; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix; Luong, John H T

    2015-04-15

    A novel immunoassay (IA) has been developed for human C-reactive protein (CRP), an important biomarker and tissue preserving factor for infection and inflammation. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) were admixed and covalently attached to a polystyrene based-microtiter plate (MTP), pretreated with KOH. The resulting surface served as a stable layer for the covalent attachment of the anti-human CRP antibody. The IA procedure was based on the one-step kinetics-based sandwich IA employing a minimum number of process steps, whereas the enzymatic reaction solution was monitored by a smartphone-based colorimetric reader. With a limit of detection and a limit of quantification of 0.07ngmL(-1) and 0.9ngmL(-1), it precisely detected CRP spiked in diluted human whole blood and plasma as well as the CRP levels in clinical plasma samples. The results obtained for "real-world" patient samples agreed well with those of the conventional immunosorbent assay and the clinically-accredited analyzer-based IA. The antibody-bound GNP-functionalized MTPs retained its original activity after 6 weeks of storage in 0.1M PBS, pH 7.4 at 4°C.

  10. One-step kinetics-based immunoassay for the highly sensitive detection of C-reactive protein in less than 30 min.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Czilwik, Gregor; van Oordt, Thomas; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Marion Schneider, E; Luong, John H T

    2014-07-01

    This article reveals a rapid sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the highly sensitive detection of human C-reactive protein (CRP) in less than 30 min. It employs a one-step kinetics-based highly simplified and cost-effective sandwich ELISA procedure with minimal process steps. The procedure involves the formation of a sandwich immune complex on capture anti-human CRP antibody-bound Dynabeads in 15 min, followed by two magnet-assisted washings and one enzymatic reaction. The developed sandwich ELISA detects CRP in the dynamic range of 0.3 to 81 ng ml(-1) with a limit of detection of 0.4 ng ml(-1) and an analytical sensitivity of 0.7 ng ml(-1). It detects CRP spiked in diluted human whole blood and serum with high analytical precision, as confirmed by conventional sandwich ELISA. Moreover, the results of the developed ELISA for the determination of CRP in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plasma samples of patients are in good agreement with those obtained by the conventional ELISA. The developed immunoassay has immense potential for the development of rapid and cost-effective in vitro diagnostic kits.

  11. Cells and mediators of inflammation (C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, platelets and neutrophils) in the acute and convalescent phases of uncomplicated Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection.

    PubMed

    Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Pereira, Virgínia Araújo; Storer, Fábio Luiz; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana de Souza; Fabrino, Daniela Leite; Santos, Fátima; Banic, Dalma Maria; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli de

    2012-12-01

    The haematological changes and release of soluble mediators, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP) and nitric oxide (NO), during uncomplicated malaria have not been well studied, especially in Brazilian areas in which the disease is endemic. Therefore, the present study examined these factors in acute (day 0) and convalescent phase (day 15) patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria in the Brazilian Amazon. Haematologic parameters were measured using automated cell counting, CRP levels were measured with ELISA and NO plasma levels were measured by the Griess reaction. Our data indicate that individuals with uncomplicated P. vivax and P. falciparum infection presented similar inflammatory profiles with respect to white blood cells, with high band cell production and a considerable degree of thrombocytopaenia during the acute phase of infection. Higher CRP levels were detected in acute P. vivax infection than in acute P. falciparum infection, while higher NO was detected in patients with acute and convalescent P. falciparum infections. Although changes in these mediators cannot predict malaria infection, the haematological aspects associated with malaria infection, especially the roles of platelets and band cells, need to be investigated further.

  12. [Two cases of malignant lymphoma with high fever and C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)].

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Yuko; Mukoyama, Naoki; Nishida, Katsuji; Shimizu, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nomura, Kenichi; Horiike, Shigeo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2006-01-01

    We present two cases of malignant lymphoma that developed a high fever that eventually reached an extremely high 38.9 degrees C. The C-reactive protein( CRP) elevation also climbed to a very high 12.2 mg/dl after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). In the one case, after stem cells were mobilized with CHASER therapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, etoposide, dexamethasone and rituximab) followed by G-CSF (filgrastim 600 microg/day) subcutaneous daily, the serum CRP level rose to a maximum of 5.6 mg/dl, with a maximum fever elevation of 38.9 degrees C. In the other case, after the subject was given CHASE therapy followed by subcutaneous treatment with G-CSF (filgrastim 75 microg/day) daily, the maximum serum CRP level was 12.2 mg/dl along with a maximum fever of 38.9 degrees C. Although no infection was found in either case, multiple antibacterial agents were ineffective;after discontinuation of G-CSF, fever dissipated and the serum CRP level became negative. G-CSF induces the proliferation and differentiation of neutrophils and also causes the mobilization of mature neutrophils from hematopoietic tissues. With the increasing propensity to G-CSF, we must keep in mind the possibility of such adverse reactions so as to serve the overall best interests of the patient.

  13. The burden of comorbidity and the C-reactive protein levels in nonthyroidal illness syndrome with metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, Antonio; Cola, Silvia; Frugoni, Patrizia; Indiano, Ilaria; D'Urso, Rosaria; Falaschi, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Thyroid hormones undergo significant modifications during severe illnesses, and the low T3 levels are the hallmark of nonthyoidal illness syndrome (NTIS), due to a reduced extrathyroidal conversion from T4. We examined 41 patients with NTIS by a modified cumulative illness rating scale (CIRS) and the measurement of FT3, FT4, TSH, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Fifty-seven control subjects were enrolled. We observed reduced FT3 and increased FT4 levels in NTIS patients (P < 0.05). The CIRS scores (severity and comordity index) were inversely related to FT3 and positively related to FT4 levels (P < 0.05). The CRP and the FT4 concentrations were positively associated (P < 0.01). Our study showed that the reduced FT3 and increased FT4 levels were significantly related to the comorbidity and severity of systemic illnesses, probably as a result of impairment in the peripheral hormonal conversion. The CIRS scale and the CRP are useful tools for a better evaluation of these patients.

  14. Lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in obese and non-obese subjects undergoing non-surgical periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zuza, Elizangela P; Barroso, Eliane M; Fabricio, Mariana; Carrareto, Ana Luiza V; Toledo, Benedicto E C; R Pires, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal treatment may improve the metabolic control of dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in obese and non-obese patients undergoing periodontal therapy. Patients with generalized chronic periodontitis were divided into obese (n = 28) and non-obese groups (n = 26). The periodontal parameters (visible plaque index, gingival bleeding index, probing depth, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing), anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist circumference, and body fat), and serum analyses (triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and hs-CRP) were measured at baseline and 90 days after periodontal treatment. The results showed that the obese subjects presented alterations in triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and hs-CRP at baseline when compared with non-obese patients (P < 0.05). Periodontal treatment could improve the periodontal parameters in both groups similarly (P > 0.05). Obese subjects showed a significant decrease in the levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and hs-CRP post-therapy (P < 0.05), while non-obese patients showed improvement only in hs-CRP (P < 0.05). In conclusion, periodontal treatment could improve the periodontal parameters and circulating hs-CRP in obese and non-obese subjects. Lipid profile was modified only in obese patients post-therapy. (J Oral Sci 58, 423-430, 2016). PMID:27665983

  15. Lifestyle intervention and/or statins for the reduction of C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetes: From the Look AHEAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Belalcazar, L.M.; Haffner, S.M.; Lang, W.; Hoogeveen, R.C.; Rushing, J.; Schwenke, D.C.; Tracy, R.P.; Pi-Sunyer, F.X.; Kriska, A.M.; Ballantyne, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular risk remains high despite statin use. Overweight/obese diabetic persons usually have normal/low LDL-cholesterol but high C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. We aimed to examine the effects of intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss (ILI) on CRP levels in overweight/obese diabetic individuals by statin use. Design and Methods Look AHEAD was a randomized trial in overweight/obese type 2 diabetic individuals testing whether ILI would reduce cardiovascular mortality, when compared to usual care. We evaluated CRP changes in 1,431 participants with biomarker levels, who remained on or off statin treatment for 1-year. Results The reduction in CRP levels with ILI at 1 year in men and women on statins was −44.9 and −42.3 %, respectively, compared to −13.7 and −21.0 % for those on statins and usual care (p<0.0001). At 1 year, median CRP levels were: 1.8 mg/L in participants randomized to ILI on statin therapy; 2.6 mg/L for those on statins randomized to usual care and 2.9 mg/L for participants not on statins but randomized to ILI. Weight loss was associated with 1-year CRP reduction (p<0.0001) in statin and non-statin users. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in overweight/obese diabetic persons, ILI and statin therapy may have substantial additive anti-inflammatory benefits. PMID:23512860

  16. Energy balance and macronutrient distribution in relation to C-reactive protein and HbA1c levels among patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bawadi, Hiba; Katkhouda, Rami; Al-Haifi, Ahmad; Tayyem, Reema; Elkhoury, Cosette Fakih; Jamal, Zeina

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently growing evidence indicates that obesity and diabetes are states of inflammation associated with elevated circulation of inflammatory mediators. Excess adiposity and oxidative stress, induced by feeding, may also lead to a state of low-grade inflammation. Objective This study aimed at investigating energy balance and distribution in relation to low-grade inflammation among patients with type 2 diabetes. Design A cross-sectional study included 198 male and female patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients’ weight, height, waist circumference, total body fat and truncal fat percent, energy, and macronutrient intake were measured. Venous blood specimens were collected, and levels of HbA1c and serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were determined. Results After adjusting for covariates (body mass index, total body fat, and truncal fat), energy balance was positively correlated with hs-CRP and HbA1c. A positive energy balance was also associated with increased waist circumference and truncal fat percent (p<0.05). Total energy intake, percent energy from fat (p=0.04), and percent energy from proteins (p=0.03), but not percent energy from carbohydrates (p=0.12), were also correlated with higher hs-CRP levels among poorly glycemic-controlled patients. Conclusion Positive energy balance is associated with elevations in hs-CRP. Increased energy intake and increased percentages of energy from fat and protein are associated with elevated hs-CRP among patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27238554

  17. Synthesis of grafted phosphorylcholine polymer layers as specific recognition ligands for C-reactive protein focused on grafting density and thickness to achieve highly sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Kamon, Yuri; Kitayama, Yukiya; Itakura, Akiko N; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-04-21

    We studied the effects of layer thickness and grafting density of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) thin layers as specific ligands for the highly sensitive binding of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMPC layer thickness was controlled by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). PMPC grafting density was controlled by utilizing mixed self-assembled monolayers with different incorporation ratios of the bis[2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)undecyl] disulfide ATRP initiator, as modulated by altering the feed molar ratio with (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the modified surfaces. PMPC grafting densities were estimated from polymer thickness and the molecular weight obtained from sacrificial initiator during surface-initiated AGET ATRP. The effects of thickness and grafting density of the obtained PMPC layers on CRP binding performance were investigated using surface plasmon resonance employing a 10 mM Tris-HCl running buffer containing 140 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2 (pH 7.4). Furthermore, the non-specific binding properties of the obtained layers were investigated using human serum albumin (HSA) as a reference protein. The PMPC layer which has 4.6 nm of thickness and 1.27 chains per nm(2) of grafting density showed highly sensitive CRP detection (limit of detection: 4.4 ng mL(-1)) with low non-specific HSA adsorption, which was improved 10 times than our previous report of 50 ng mL(-1). PMID:25783194

  18. Prediction of Cortical Defect Using C-Reactive Protein and Urine Sodium to Potassium Ratio in Infants with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, urine protein-creatinine ratio (uProt/Cr), and urine electrolytes can be useful for discriminating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from other febrile illnesses or the presence of a cortical defect on 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scanning (true APN) from its absence in infants with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Materials and Methods We examined 150 infants experiencing their first febrile UTI and 100 controls with other febrile illnesses consecutively admitted to our hospital from January 2010 to December 2012. Blood (CRP, electrolytes, Cr) and urine tests [uProt/Cr, electrolytes, and sodium-potassium ratio (uNa/K)] were performed upon admission. All infants with UTI underwent DMSA scans during admission. All data were compared between infants with UTI and controls and between infants with or without a cortical defect on DMSA scans. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, the ability of the parameters to predict true APN was analyzed. Results CRP levels and uProt/Cr were significantly higher in infants with true APN than in controls. uNa levels and uNa/K were significantly lower in infants with true APN than in controls. CRP levels and uNa/K were relevant factors for predicting true APN. The method using CRP levels, u-Prot/Cr, u-Na levels, and uNa/K had a sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 65%, positive predictive value of 60%, and negative predictive value of 95% for predicting true APN. Conclusion We conclude that these parameters are useful for discriminating APN from other febrile illnesses or discriminating true APN in infants with febrile UTI. PMID:26632389

  19. Vitamin D deficiency is common and associated with increased C-reactive protein in children and young adults with lupus: an Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus substudy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Angela Byun; Tangpricha, Vin; Yow, Eric; Gurion, Reut; McComsey, Grace A; Schanberg, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epidemiological associations suggest vitamin D may play a role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Using frozen serum and data from the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) trial, we assessed associations between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and measures of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and cardiovascular risk. Methods Baseline APPLE serum samples were used to measure 25(OH)D levels. Logistic regression models for vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D levels <20 ng/mL] were constructed using baseline variables collected as part of the trial, including race, season, latitude, disease duration, disease activity, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), proteinuria, fasting lipids and carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT). Results Samples were available from 201 of 221 APPLE subjects; 61/201 (30%) had vitamin D deficiency at baseline. In univariable analysis, baseline vitamin D deficiency was associated with season (p<0.01), minority status (p<0.01), body mass index (p=0.04), duration of SLE (p<0.01), SLICC damage index (p=0.04), hsCRP (p<0.01), mean–max CIMT (p=0.01), LDL-cholesterol (p=0.03) and timed urine protein (p=0.03). In multivariable modelling, vitamin D deficiency was associated with age, latitude, season, minority status, proteinuria and hsCRP. Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency is common in paediatric lupus and is independently associated with elevated hsCRP, a marker of inflammation that predicts cardiovascular disease risk. Although association is not proof of causation, this association is novel in the paediatric SLE population and suggests that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to heightened inflammation and cardiovascular risk in this population. Trial register number NCT00065806. PMID:25396060

  20. Nanomolar aluminum induces expression of the inflammatory systemic biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) in human brain microvessel endothelial cells (hBMECs).

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Peter N; Kruck, Theodore P A; Lukiw, Walter J

    2015-11-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP; also known as pentraxin 1, PTX1), a 224 amino acid soluble serum protein organized into a novel pentameric ring-shaped structure, is a highly sensitive pathogenic biomarker for systemic inflammation. High CRP levels are found in practically every known inflammatory state, and elevated CRP levels indicate an increased risk for several common age-related human degenerative disorders, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). While the majority of CRP is synthesized in the liver for secretion into the systemic circulation, it has recently been discovered that an appreciable amount of CRP is synthesized in highly specialized endothelial cells that line the vasculature of the brain and central nervous system (CNS). These highly specialized cells, the major cell type lining the human CNS vasculature, are known as human brain microvessel endothelial cells (hBMECs). In the current pilot study we examined (i) CRP levels in human serum obtained from AD and age-matched control patients; and (ii) analyzed the effects of nanomolar aluminum sulfate on CRP expression in primary hBMECs. The three major findings in this short communication are: (i) that CRP is up-regulated in AD serum; (ii) that CRP serum levels increased in parallel with AD progression; and (iii) for the first time show that nanomolar aluminum potently up-regulates CRP expression in hBMECs to many times its 'basal abundance'. The results suggest that aluminum-induced CRP may in part contribute to a pathophysiological state associated with a chronic systemic inflammation of the human vasculature.

  1. Label-free optical detection of C-reactive protein by nanoimprint lithography-based 2D-photonic crystal film.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tatsuro; Kajita, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Yukio; Kosaka, Terumasa; Himi, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-sensitive, and cost-effective novel biosensors have been strongly desired for future medical diagnostics. To develop novel biosensor, the authors focused on the specific optical characteristics of photonic crystal. In this study, a label-free optical biosensor, polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PhC) film fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL), was developed for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum. The nano-hole array constructed NIL-based 2D-PhC (hole diameter: 230 nm, distance: 230, depth: 200 nm) was fabricated on a cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) film (100 µm) using thermal NIL and required surface modifications to reduce nonspecific adsorption of target proteins. Antigen-antibody reactions on the NIL-based 2D-PhC caused changes to the surrounding refractive index, which was monitored as reflection spectrum changes in the visible region. By using surface modified 2D-PhC, the calculated detection limit for CRP was 12.24 pg/mL at an extremely short reaction time (5 min) without the need for additional labeling procedures and secondary antibody. Furthermore, using the dual-functional random copolymer, CRP could be detected in a pooled blood serum diluted 100× with dramatic reduction of nonspecific adsorption. From these results, the NIL-based 2D-PhC film has great potential for development of an on-site, high-sensitivity, cost-effective, label-free biosensor for medical diagnostics applications. PMID:27150702

  2. Synthesis of grafted phosphorylcholine polymer layers as specific recognition ligands for C-reactive protein focused on grafting density and thickness to achieve highly sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Kamon, Yuri; Kitayama, Yukiya; Itakura, Akiko N; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-04-21

    We studied the effects of layer thickness and grafting density of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) thin layers as specific ligands for the highly sensitive binding of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMPC layer thickness was controlled by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). PMPC grafting density was controlled by utilizing mixed self-assembled monolayers with different incorporation ratios of the bis[2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)undecyl] disulfide ATRP initiator, as modulated by altering the feed molar ratio with (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the modified surfaces. PMPC grafting densities were estimated from polymer thickness and the molecular weight obtained from sacrificial initiator during surface-initiated AGET ATRP. The effects of thickness and grafting density of the obtained PMPC layers on CRP binding performance were investigated using surface plasmon resonance employing a 10 mM Tris-HCl running buffer containing 140 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2 (pH 7.4). Furthermore, the non-specific binding properties of the obtained layers were investigated using human serum albumin (HSA) as a reference protein. The PMPC layer which has 4.6 nm of thickness and 1.27 chains per nm(2) of grafting density showed highly sensitive CRP detection (limit of detection: 4.4 ng mL(-1)) with low non-specific HSA adsorption, which was improved 10 times than our previous report of 50 ng mL(-1).

  3. Three-month variation of plasma pentraxin 3 compared with C-reactive protein, albumin and homocysteine levels in haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, Bodil; Snaedal, Sunna; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Heimbürger, Olof; Bárány, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory markers vary considerably over time in haemodialysis (HD) patients, yet the variability is poorly defined. The aim of the study was to assess changes of plasma levels of pentraxin-3 (PTX-3), C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin and homocysteine (Hcy) over 3 months and the association between the changes in these biomarkers and mortality. Methods In 188 prevalent HD patients, inflammatory markers were measured at inclusion and after 3 months. Mortality was recorded during a median follow-up of 41 months. The changes of the biomarker levels were categorized according to change in tertile for the specific biomarker. The variation was calculated as the intra-class correlation (ICC). Mortality was analysed by Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards model. The predictive strength was calculated for single measurements and for the variation of each inflammatory marker. Results The intra-individual variation (low ICC) was largest for PTX-3 [ICC 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33–0.55], albumin (ICC 0.58; 95% CI: 0.49–0.67) and CRP (ICC 0.59; 95% CI: 0.51–0.68) and lowest for Hcy (ICC 0.81; 95% CI: 0.77–0.86). During follow-up, 88 patients died. Conclusions PTX-3 measurements are less stable and show higher variation within patients than CRP, albumin and Hcy. Persistently elevated PTX-3 levels are associated with high mortality. Moreover, in multivariate logistic regression we found that stable high PTX-3 adds to the mortality risk, even after inclusion of clinical factors and the three other biomarkers. The associations of decreasing albumin levels as well as low Hcy levels with worse outcome reflect protein-energy wasting. PMID:25852911

  4. Impact of post-laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy weight loss on C-reactive protein, lipid profile and CA-125 in morbidly obese women

    PubMed Central

    Fathy, Samah M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity increases production of adipose tissue-derived proteins, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Also there are elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and IL-6, CD8, and CD4, indicating chronic subclinical inflammation. Since obesity represents a serious risk factor in several metabolic diseases, identifying the status of carbohydrate antigen-125 (CA-125) would further link obesity and tumors. Aim To examine the effect of weight loss by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on plasma CRP, lipid profiles and CA-125 level in morbidly obese patients. Material and methods This prospective study was conducted in the Surgery Department, Fayoum University Hospital, between August 2013 and September 2015. To assess the effect of excess weight loss following this operation CRP, lipid profile and CA-125 were measured before and 12 months after the LSG operation for weight loss. The study included 30 cases of morbidly obese patients: 30 (100%) females aged 23–55 years who were considered clinically obese with a mean body mass index of 42.71 ±4.3 (38–46) kg/m2 and mean age of 40.3 ±8.5 (23–55) years. The National Institute of Health (NIH) inclusion criteria for bariatric surgery were used. Results A mean weight loss of 29.30% decreased plasma CRP, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL cholesterol), CA-125 level and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL cholesterol) The percentage weight loss was significantly associated with changes in plasma CRP, triglycerides, total cholesterol, total HDL cholesterol and CA-125. Conclusions Weight loss by LSG improves inflammation, dyslipidemia and CA-125 level. PMID:26865887

  5. Genetic Architecture of Plasma Adiponectin Overlaps With the Genetics of Metabolic Syndrome–Related Traits

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Peter; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Frants, Rune R.; Zorkoltseva, Irina V.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Frolich, Marijke; Oostra, Ben A.; van Dijk, Ko Willems; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Adiponectin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, is of particular interest in metabolic syndrome, because it is inversely correlated with obesity and insulin sensitivity. However, it is not known to what extent the genetics of plasma adiponectin and the genetics of obesity and insulin sensitivity are interrelated. We aimed to evaluate the heritability of plasma adiponectin and its genetic correlation with the metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome–related traits and the association between these traits and 10 ADIPOQ single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We made use of a family-based population, the Erasmus Rucphen Family study (1,258 women and 967 men). Heritability analysis was performed using a polygenic model. Genetic correlations were estimated using bivariate heritability analyses. Genetic association analysis was performed using a mixed model. RESULTS Plasma adiponectin showed a heritability of 55.1%. Genetic correlations between plasma adiponectin HDL cholesterol and plasma insulin ranged from 15 to 24% but were not significant for fasting glucose, triglycerides, blood pressure, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and C-reactive protein. A significant association with plasma adiponectin was found for ADIPOQ variants rs17300539 and rs182052. A nominally significant association was found with plasma insulin and HOMA-IR and ADIPOQ variant rs17300539 after adjustment for plasma adiponectin. CONCLUSIONS The significant genetic correlation between plasma adiponectin and HDL cholesterol and plasma insulin should be taken into account in the interpretation of genome-wide association studies. Association of ADIPOQ SNPs with plasma adiponectin was replicated, and we showed association between one ADIPOQ SNP and plasma insulin and HOMA-IR. PMID:20067957

  6. Leptin and adiponectin levels in middle-aged postmenopausal women: associations with lifestyle habits, hormones, and inflammatory markers--a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Yves M; Perry, Horace M; Patrick, Ping; Banks, William A; Morley, John E

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the relationships between blood levels of leptin or adiponectin and lifestyle habits, hormones, and inflammatory markers, we measured parameters of alcohol intake, smoking, physical activity, and blood levels of leptin, adiponectin, testosterone, estrone, estradiol, cortisol, dihydroepiandrostenedione, luteinizing hormone, thyroxin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukin 6 and interleukin 2 receptor in 76 healthy middle-aged postmenopausal women. Anthropometric measures and body composition (evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and lipid profiles were also assessed. By simple regression, leptin correlated positively with fat and lean masses, glucose, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total cholesterol, and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Adioponectin correlated negatively with fat and lean masses and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and positively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Leptin concentration was correlated inversely with adiponectin (r = -0.26, P < .05) and positively with CRP (r = 0.56, P < .01). Adiponectin concentration was negatively correlated with time since last alcoholic drink (r = -0.24, P < .05) and CRP (r = -0.27, P < .05) and positively with testosterone level (r = 0.23, P < .05). By multiple regression analysis, leptin concentration was predicted by age (P < .05), testosterone (P < .05), adiponectin (P < .05), CRP (P < .01), and interleukin 6 receptor (P < .01). Adiponectin concentration was predicted by the time since last alcoholic drink (P < .05), testosterone (P < .05), leptin (P < .05), and C-reactive protein (P = .05). Similar results were found when leptin or adiponectin concentration was adjusted for fat mass. These results suggested that levels of leptin and adiponectin in middle-aged postmenopausal women are partially determined by sexual hormones and inflammatory marker levels, and both predicted one another. Moreover, adiponectin level may be

  7. Differential Associations between CDH13 Genotypes, Adiponectin Levels, and Circulating Levels of Cellular Adhesive Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ming-Sheng; Wu, Semon; Hsu, Lung-An; Chou, Hsin-Hua; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    CDH13 gene variants with lower adiponectin levels are paradoxically associated with a more favorable metabolic profile. We investigated the statistical association between CDH13 locus variants and adiponectin levels by examining 12 circulating inflammation marker levels and adiposity status in 530 Han Chinese people in Taiwan. After adjustments for clinical covariates, adiponectin levels were positively associated with soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM1) levels and negatively associated with adiposity status and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM1). In addition, minor alleles of the CDH13 rs12051272 polymorphism were found to have lower adiponectin levels and higher CRP, sE-selectin, sICAM1, and sVCAM1 levels as well as higher body mass indices and waist circumferences in participants (all P < 0.05). In a subgroup analysis stratified by sex, significant associations between CDH13 genotypes and sE-selectin levels occurred only in men (P = 3.9 × 10−4 and interaction P = 0.005). CDH13 locus variants and adiponectin levels are associated with circulating levels of cellular adhesion molecules and adiposity status in a differential manner that interacts with sex. These results provide further evidence for the crucial role of adiponectin levels and CDH13 gene variants in immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26600672

  8. Ability of serum C-reactive protein and white blood cell cout in predicting acute schemic stroke. A short -term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshayesh-Eghbali, Babak; Roudbary, Seyed-Ali; Basir Jafari, Seddigheh; Nabizadeh, Seyedeh-Parand; Naderi-Asrami, Naghmeh; Sohrabnejad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is one of the leading causes of mortality and long-term morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the ability of baseline serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC) values in predicting the outcome of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Methods: This study consisted of patients with first AIS referred to Poursina Hospital, Rasht, Iran. Severity of stroke was determined according to the National Institute of Health (NIH) Stroke Scale at the time of admission. Serum CRP levels and WBC count were measured at the time of admission. All patients were followed-up for 90 days after discharge and the severity of stroke was assessed using modified Rankin Scale. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used for calculating the most appropriate cutoff point of CRP and WBC count for differentiating patients with and without poor outcome at the end of the study period. Results: A total of 53 out of 102 patients (52%) had poor outcome. The most appropriate cutoff value for CRP in differentiating patients with and without poor outcome was 8.5mg/l (sensitivity: 73.1%, specificity: 69.4%) and for WBC the difference did not reach to a significant level. The cutoff points of CRP > 10.5 mg/ml yielded a predictive ability at sensitivity: 75%, specificity: 63.8% whereas predictive ability of WBC for mortality was at a borderline level. Conclusion: These findings indicate that high levels of serum CRP in AIS at the time of admission is associated with poor prognosis. However, this study found no ability for WBC in predicting AIS outcome. PMID:27757207

  9. Effect of pioglitazone therapy on high sensitive C-reactive protein and lipid profile in diabetic patients with renal transplantation; a randomize clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Arashnia, Rana; Roohi-Gilani, Kobra; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Nikjoo, Niloofar; Bahramifar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation has a major role in disease lead to renal failure and diabetes mellitus, controlling inflammation in diabetic kidney receivers could decrease morbidity and mortality. Objectives: This study designed for evaluating the efficacy of pioglitazone on C-reactive protein and lipid profile in diabetic kidney transplant receivers. Patients and Methods: In this double blinded clinical trial, 58 diabetic renal transplant receivers, in first month after transplantation, randomized into two groups; receiving insulin and pioglitazone (15 mg tablet daily, group A); and insulin and placebo (group B). Blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI) and laboratory data compared in before and after 4-month treatment in two groups by SPSS. Results: Fifty-eight patients with mean age of 44.15 ± 2 years included. There were no significant difference between groups in demographic data and other baseline measured variables (P > 0.05) .The mean weigh and BMI were slightly increased in group A and decreased in group B. The mean hs-CRP was decreased 4.82 mg/dL in group A and 1.93 mg/dL in group B (P = 0.007). The mean total serum cholesterol was significantly decreased 34 mg/dL in group A and 18.07 mg/dL in group B (P = 0.027). The mean serum HDL-C was significantly increased 13.31 mg/dL in group A and 5.89 mg/dl in group B (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Pioglitazone seems to be a safe drug for reducing serum lipids and CRP in kidney transplant receivers with diabetes mellitus in short term. Long term effect of this drug could be evaluated in future studies. PMID:25964889

  10. [THE INFLUENCE OF EXTRACT FROM EMBRYONIC CHICKEN TISSUE ON THE DYNAMIC CHANGES OF MICE BLOOD SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND CYTOKINES AFTER γ-IRRADIATION].

    PubMed

    Pogorelaya, M S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of preparations from embryonic chicken tissue on the dynamic changes in the levels of interleukins: 1β (IL-1 β), 6 (IL-6), 4 (IL-4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were investigated in vivo, in the blood serum of white female laboratory mice exposed to single total γ-irradiation in a dose of 5 Gy. The experiments found that during the first days after the action of γ-radiation the indices of resistance of the organism undergoe significant destabilizing changes. These changes are manifested by an increase in IL-1β proinflammatory cytokine in response to external influences. However, the rapid decline in its level during the first days after irradiation reflects alterations in its production. The content of the serum IL-4 in all time points was higher than in the intact group. Moreover, the dynamics of its level during the first days after the irradiation was observed. An increased level of CRP was detected 6 hours after the exposure, indicating the dynamic changes of the severity of the inflammatory process. Administration of preparations from embryonic chicken tissue causes a considerable increase in the content of IL-1β and IL-6 in 3 and 6 hours after the r-irradiation, with stabilization after 12 hours. When using the preparations before an irradiation, a significantly lower level of CRP was detected in comparison to animals that did not get the preparations. When using the embryonic preparations, the stimulation of synthesis of IL-4 was observed, whose level increased in every time of taking blood samples. Possibility for induction of row of cytokines, in particular, IL-1β and IL-6, plays an important role in stimulation of hematopoiesis and provides a basis to consider this substance as an immunomodulator in pathologic immunosuppressive states. The decrease of serum CRP level can indicate the ability to reduce the severity of radiation injury. In the experimental conditions, an embryonic preparation exhibits inertness relative to the healthy

  11. Label-free C-reactive protein electronic detection with an electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor-based immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Maria; De Tullio, Donato; Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Albers, Willem M; Munter, Tony; Manoli, Kyriaki; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution, we propose a label-free immunosensor, based on a novel type of electrolyte-gated field-effect transistor (EGOFET), for ultrasensitive detection of the C-reactive protein (CRP). The recognition layer of the biosensor is fabricated by physical adsorption of the anti-CRP monoclonal antibody onto a poly-3-hexyl thiophene (P3HT) organic semiconductor surface. A supplementary nonionic hydrophilic polymer is used as a blocking agent preventing nonspecific interactions and allowing a better orientation of the antibodies immobilized onto the P3HT surface. The whole biomolecule immobilization procedure does not require any pretreatment of the organic semiconductor surface, and the whole functionalization process is completed in less than 30 min. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements were performed to assess the amount of biomolecules physisorbed onto the P3HT and to evaluate the CRP binding proprieties of the deposited anti-CRP layer. A partial surface coverage of about 23 % of adsorbed antibody molecules was found to most efficiently sense the CRP. The electrical performance of the EGOFET immunosensor was comparable to that of a bare P3HT EGOFET device, and the obtained CRP calibration curve was linear over six orders of magnitude (from 4 pM to 2 μM). The relative standard deviation of the individual calibration points, measured on immunosensors fabricated on different chips, ranged between 1 and 14 %, and a detection limit of 2 pM (220 ng/L) was established. The novel electronic immunosensor is compatible with low-cost fabrication procedures and was successfully employed for the detection of the CRP biomarker in the clinically relevant matrix serum. Graphical abstract Schematic of the EGOFET immunosensor for CRP detection. The anti-CRP monoclonal antibody layer is physisorbed on the P3HT organic semiconductor and the CRP is directly measured by a label-free electronic EGOFET transducer.

  12. C-reactive protein levels in the perioperative period as a predictive marker of endoscopic recurrence after ileo-colonic resection for Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Iaculli, E; Agostini, M; Biancone, L; Fiorani, C; Di Vizia, A; Montagnese, F; Sibio, S; Manzelli, A; Tesauro, M; Rufini, A; Sica, GS

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the perioperative behavior of C-reactive protein (CRP) in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients undergoing elective ileo-cecal (IC) resection and to identify association between perioperative CRP levels and endoscopic recurrence at 1 year. Study hypothesis was that perioperative CRP changes are disease specific and could detect subset of patients with more aggressive pathopysiology. Seventy-five patients undergoing IC resection for CD were prospectively enrolled. Serial CRP levels were assessed: preoperative, postoperative day 1 (POD1) and day 5 (POD5). CD patients’ values were compared against same interval assessments of control groups undergoing right colectomy and appendicectomy. At POD1, the serum concentration increase was significantly higher in CD patients than in controls. Comparing with control groups, CRP levels remained remarkably high and showed a lower reduction in CD at POD5. Difference between groups was statistically significant. Optimal cutoff levels have been identified: serum CRP concentrations of >39.8 mg/l at POD1 and of >23.2 mg/l at POD5 have shown a significant association to endoscopic recurrence when using bivariate correlation. In this preliminary series, binary logistic regression could not demonstrate statistical relationship between endoscopic recurrence and any of the variables evaluated as prognostic factor. This is the only study so far that investigates and confirms a disease-specific upregulation of CRP response in the perioperative period for CD patients undergoing surgery. The postoperative CRP levels and kinetics seem to be related to the grade of mucosal inflammation and recurrence rate according to our 12 months endoscopic evaluation. PMID:27551522

  13. Effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy on serum lipids and C-reactive protein among hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tawfig, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on plasma lipid levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis in the age group of 30–70 years, undergoing treatment in Ahmed Gasim Cardiac and Renal transplant Centre in north Sudan were recruited for the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the study and control groups. The study group received non-surgical periodontal therapy – oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing. The control group participants received only oral hygiene instructions. Lipid profile [total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG)], C-reactive protein (CRP), and periodontal parameters [Plaque index (PI), Gingival index (GI), probing pocket depth (PD), and attachment loss (ATL)] were measured and compared at baseline and after 3 months of the respective intervention. Between-groups analysis was done using independent “t” test and within-group analysis was done using dependent “t” test. Results: At baseline, groups were comparable based on lipid profile and periodontal parameters. After 3 months, the control group showed significant decrease in the PI and GI scores while there was no significant change in the other parameters. However, the study group showed significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels along with a significant decrease in PD, ATL, PI, and GI scores, compared to the baseline values. Conclusion: Local non-surgical periodontal therapy resulted in improved periodontal health, with significant decrease in the LDL and CRP levels in hyperlipidemic patients with chronic periodontitis. Hence, local non-surgical periodontal therapy may be considered as an adjunct in the control of hyperlipidemia, along with standard care. PMID:25984468

  14. Association of decreased variation of R-R interval and elevated serum C-reactive protein level in a general population in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kon, Hisashi; Nagano, Masahide; Tanaka, Fumitaka; Satoh, Kenyu; Segawa, Toshie; Nakamura, Motoyuki

    2006-11-01

    Several studies have suggested that an increased high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level is a strong independent predictor of increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) has also been reported to predict cardiovascular events such as sudden death and myocardial infarction in apparently healthy subjects. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to test the possible correlation between variation of the R-R interval as one of the markers of HRV and serum hsCRP levels in a general population in Japan. Resting, supine, 2-minute, beat-to-beat heart rate data were collected in 823 randomly selected participants enrolled in our cohort study. The coefficient of variation of the R-R interval (CVrr) was obtained as a parameter of HRV. To determine which factors predict the presence of low CVrr (below the 5 percentile) in this group, we performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis using cardiovascular risk factors and an elevated hsCRP level as independent variables. The lowest CVrr group showed significantly higher hsCRP levels compared to those of other quartiles (P < 0.01). After adjustment for confounding factors such as age, heart rate, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension by multivariate logistic analysis, an elevated hsCRP level (OR = 3.11, 95%CI; 1.27-7.60: P < 0.02) was a significant independent predictor of low CVrr. The results of the present study indicate that an increased serum hsCRP level is significantly associated with reduced CVrr in this general population. It is conceivable that the parasympathetic nerve withdrawal and inflammation could interact with each other, resulting in the progression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:17268121

  15. Label-free C-reactive protein electronic detection with an electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor-based immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Maria; De Tullio, Donato; Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Albers, Willem M; Munter, Tony; Manoli, Kyriaki; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution, we propose a label-free immunosensor, based on a novel type of electrolyte-gated field-effect transistor (EGOFET), for ultrasensitive detection of the C-reactive protein (CRP). The recognition layer of the biosensor is fabricated by physical adsorption of the anti-CRP monoclonal antibody onto a poly-3-hexyl thiophene (P3HT) organic semiconductor surface. A supplementary nonionic hydrophilic polymer is used as a blocking agent preventing nonspecific interactions and allowing a better orientation of the antibodies immobilized onto the P3HT surface. The whole biomolecule immobilization procedure does not require any pretreatment of the organic semiconductor surface, and the whole functionalization process is completed in less than 30 min. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements were performed to assess the amount of biomolecules physisorbed onto the P3HT and to evaluate the CRP binding proprieties of the deposited anti-CRP layer. A partial surface coverage of about 23 % of adsorbed antibody molecules was found to most efficiently sense the CRP. The electrical performance of the EGOFET immunosensor was comparable to that of a bare P3HT EGOFET device, and the obtained CRP calibration curve was linear over six orders of magnitude (from 4 pM to 2 μM). The relative standard deviation of the individual calibration points, measured on immunosensors fabricated on different chips, ranged between 1 and 14 %, and a detection limit of 2 pM (220 ng/L) was established. The novel electronic immunosensor is compatible with low-cost fabrication procedures and was successfully employed for the detection of the CRP biomarker in the clinically relevant matrix serum. Graphical abstract Schematic of the EGOFET immunosensor for CRP detection. The anti-CRP monoclonal antibody layer is physisorbed on the P3HT organic semiconductor and the CRP is directly measured by a label-free electronic EGOFET transducer. PMID:27032409

  16. Prospective Evaluation of Procalcitonin, Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 and C-Reactive Protein in Febrile Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chou-Han; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Keng, Li-Ta; Lee, Ho-Sheng; Chang, Hou-Tai; Liao, Wei-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Both procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) have been investigated separately as indicators of infection in patients with autoimmune diseases. Our study simultaneously evaluated both PCT and sTREM-1 along with C-reactive protein (CRP) in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. Methods Fifty-nine patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were categorized into the infection group (n = 24) or the disease flare group (n = 35). sTREM-1, PCT and CRP concentrations at fever onset were compared between the two groups of patients. Results sTREM-1 and CRP did not differ between the two groups. PCT [median (range), ng/ml] was higher in the infection group than in the disease flare group [0.53 (0.02–12.85) vs. 0.12 (0.02–19.23), p = 0.001]. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) for diagnosis of infection was 0.75 for PCT (p = 0.001), 0.63 for CRP (p = 0.09) and 0.52 for sTREM-1 (p = 0.79). Using 0.2 ng/ml as the cutoff value for PCT, sensitivity was 0.75 and specificity was 0.77. Negative predictive values for PCT were 92%, 87% and 82% for a prevalence of infection of 20%, 30%, and 40%, respectively. Neither immunosuppressants nor biomodulators affected the level of the three biomarkers. However, in patients treated with corticosteroids, the levels of sTREM-1 and CRP were significantly decreased compared with the untreated patients. Conclusions Setting PCT at a lower cutoff value could provide useful information on excluding infection in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. The possible effect of corticosteroids on the level of sTREM-1 as an infection marker deserves further study. PMID:27096761

  17. Associations of C-Reactive Protein, Granulocytes and Granulocyte-to-Lymphocyte Ratio with Mortality from Breast Cancer in Non-Institutionalized American Women.

    PubMed

    Wulaningsih, Wahyu; Holmberg, Lars; Abeler-Doner, Lucie; Ng, Tony; Rohrmann, Sabine; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation may play a role in breast cancer, but evidence in the general population is lacking. We investigated the association between serum inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein (CRP), absolute granulocyte count (AGC) and granulocyte-to-lymphocyte (G/L) ratio) and breast cancer (BCa) mortality in American women while accounting for adiposity. From the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) we selected all women aged 20+ without any known history of cancer (n = 7,780). Multivariable Cox regression models were used to assess CRP, AGC and G/L ratio in relation to mortality from BCa, all cancer, cardiovascular disease and all causes. Stratification analyses by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were performed to investigate the effect of adiposity on this association. During a mean follow-up of 167 months, 44 women died from BCa. After adjustments for BMI and waist circumference, only G/L ratio was associated to risk of BCa death (e.g. HR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.36-4.06 for the 3rd compared to the 1st tertile, Ptrend = 0.01). Except for a borderline interaction between CRP categories and obesity by BMI, no statistically significant interaction between markers and categories of BMI or waist circumference was observed. All three markers were associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease and all causes. Our findings support a role of inflammation in BCa mortality which may involve mechanisms apart from obesity, and potential usefulness of GLR as a marker in assessing inflammation and cancer. PMID:27294662

  18. Association between waist-to-height ratio, isolated and combined morbidities and C-reactive protein in the elderly: a clinical-epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jousianny Patrício; Lima, Raquel Patrícia Ataíde; de Carvalho Pereira, Danielle; de Oliveira Silva, Cassia Surama; Gonçalves, Maria da Conceiço Rodrigues; Filho, Malaquias Batista; Filizola, Rosália Gouveia; de Moraes, Ronei Marcos; Asciutti, Luiza Sonia Rios; de Carvalho Costa, Maria José

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the elderly (considering their most prevalent morbidities and lifestyles), to investigate the relationship between this anthropometric index and the presence of the most prevalent morbidities (isolated or combined), and to identify which morbidities (analyzed individually) would have greater associations with WHtR. This cross-sectional population-based epidemiological study of a stratified sampling comprised 170 elderly individuals between 60 and 90 years of age (both genders). Home visits were used to administer questionnaires and to perform anthropometric measurements and blood collection. The mean patient age was younger than 70 years, with women comprising the majority (69.41%) and with 90% of the patients presenting with inadequate WHtR. Hypertension was the most prevalent morbidity in this cohort (58.52%), and when analyzed in combination, hypertension plus obesity were the most frequently diagnosed morbidities (17.65%). Obesity, which was among the most prevalent comorbidities, was the only comorbidity combined with WHtR (p = 0.0019). Individuals with no morbidities had lower mean WHtR values compared with individuals with at least one morbidity (p = 0.0075). In the multiple linear regression model, it was identified that when individuals had one or more of the most prevalent comorbidities, the mean WHtR increased by 0.0415 (p = 0.0065). A correlation between WHtR and CRP (p = 0.0379) was also verified. Based on the relationships observed between WHtR (isolated or in combination, data unpublished) and CRP among the elderly, WHtR may represent a screening tool because it is a simple and effective anthropometric index.

  19. Association Between Waist-to-Height Ratio, Isolated and Combined Morbidities and C-Reactive Protein in the Elderly: A Clinical-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Jousianny Patrício; Lima, Raquel Patrícia Ataíde; de Carvalho Pereira, Danielle; de Oliveira Silva, Cassia Surama; da Conceição Rodrigues Gonçalves, Maria; Filho, Malaquias Batista; Filizola, Rosália Gouveia; de Moraes, Ronei Marcos; Asciutti, Luiza Sonia Rios; de Carvalho Costa, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the elderly (considering their most prevalent morbidities and lifestyles), to investigate the relationship between this anthropometric index and the presence of the most prevalent morbidities (isolated or combined), and to identify which morbidities (analyzed individually) would have greater associations with WHtR. This cross-sectional population-based epidemiological study of a stratified sampling comprised 170 elderly individuals between 60 and 90 years of age (both genders). Home visits were used to administer questionnaires and to perform anthropometric measurements and blood collection. The mean patient age was younger than 70 years, with women comprising the majority (69.41%) and with 90% of the patients presenting with inadequate WHtR. Hypertension was the most prevalent morbidity in this cohort (58.52%), and when analyzed in combination, hypertension plus obesity were the most frequently diagnosed morbidities (17.65%). Obesity, which was among the most prevalent comorbidities, was the only comorbidity combined with WHtR (p = 0.0019). Individuals with no morbidities had lower mean WHtR values compared with individuals with at least one morbidity (p = 0.0075). In the multiple linear regression model, it was identified that when individuals had one or more of the most prevalent comorbidities, the mean WHtR increased by 0.0415 (p = 0.0065). A correlation between WHtR and CRP (p = 0.0379) was also verified. Based on the relationships observed between WHtR (isolated or in combination, data unpublished) and CRP among the elderly, WHtR may represent a screening tool because it is a simple and effective anthropometric index. PMID:25229696

  20. Study of atherogenic lipid profile, high sensitive C-reactive protein neurological deficit and short-term outcome in stroke subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Aparna; Shrivastava, Amit; Solanki, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stroke is one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide and has significant clinical and socioeconomic impact. Hyperlipidemia and inflammation play major roles in atherothrombosis and in stroke. This study is conducted to compare the high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels and the lipid profile parameters between stroke patients and control group and demonstrate correlation between markers, neurological deficit, and short-term outcome. Methods: We have studied a total 162 patients according to inclusion criteria. Serum level of hs-CRP and lipid profile estimated and correlated with neurological deficit and short-term outcome. Results: We found stroke patients had significantly higher levels of hs-CRP, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and low level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) than control. When we compared ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke (HS), data show increased level of triglyceride, LDL and HDL, and decreased the level of hs-CRP in ischemic stroke group than HS group. However, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score significantly higher in HS as compared to ischemic stroke at the time of admission and on the 7th day. Conclusion: Thus, continuous clinical observation is necessary for clear differentiation of those changes. Furthermore, the determination of some reliable soluble markers of neuronal damage in blood and cerebrospinal fluid in the early infarction period would be much easier and more useful for tracking the course and prognosis of the disease and for any appropriate therapeutic approach. PMID:27648176

  1. Childhood trauma is associated with increased Body Mass Index and increased C-reactive protein levels in first-episode psychosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hepgul, Nilay; Pariante, Carmine M.; Dipasquale, Salvatore; DiForti, Marta; Taylor, Heather; Marques, Tiago Reis; Morgan, Craig; Dazzan, Paola; Murray, Robin M.; Mondelli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Background The high incidence of metabolic syndrome in patients with psychosis is mainly attributed to antipsychotic treatment. However, it has been suggested that psychological stress also plays a role, by inducing a chronic inflammatory process which may predispose to the development of metabolic abnormalities. We investigated the association between psychosocial stress and inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers in subjects with first-episode psychosis and healthy controls. Methods Body Mass Index (BMI), weight and waist circumference were measured in 96 first-episode psychosis patients and 99 healthy controls. High sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and leptin were measured in a sub-sample of 37 patients and 49 controls. In all the subjects we collected information on childhood trauma and recent stressors. Results Only patients with childhood trauma had higher BMI (24.9±0.5 kg/m2) and higher hsCRP (0.8±0.3 mg/dl) when compared with healthy controls (23.4±0.4 kg/m2, p=0.018 and 0.2±0.1 mg/dl, p=0.043 respectively). This was specific to childhood sexual abuse; patients who had experienced childhood sexual abuse had higher BMI (26.2±1.0 kg/m2) and hsCRP (1.9±2.5 mg/dl) not only compared with controls, but also compared with patients who had not experienced childhood sexual abuse (24.3±0.5 kg/m2, p=0.055; 0.5±0.2 mg/dl, p=0.001). Conclusions Childhood trauma is cross-sectionally associated with both increased inflammation and worse metabolic profile in first-episode psychosis. Further studies need to confirm the causal relationship between childhood trauma and higher BMI, and whether this is indeed mediated by the increased inflammation. PMID:22260948

  2. Association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and change in mammographic density over time in the SWAN mammographic density subcohort

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ellen B.; Harvey, Danielle J.; Butler, Lesley M.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose High mammographic density (MD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Chronic inflammation may be related to breast cancer risk through a mechanism involving the percent of breast area that is dense (percent MD). Longitudinal assessments, however, are lacking and thus were constructed to evaluate the relationship between chronic inflammation and percent MD. Methods We evaluated whether elevated (>3 mg/L) high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a biomarker of inflammation, was associated with change in percent MD among 653 women aged 42–52 years at baseline in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation, a longitudinal study of midlife women. We used a mixed model to analyze data from an average of 4.7 mammograms per woman collected during an average follow-up of 4.9 years (SD = 1.47). Results Elevated hsCRP at baseline was associated with lower baseline percent MD and a significantly slower annual decline over time of percent MD in an adjusted model that did not include body mass index (BMI) (β = 0.88, 95 % CI 0.44, 1.31). This association was attenuated and nonsignificant when BMI was included in the model (β = 0.37, 95 % CI −0.09, 0.84). Elevated hsCRP levels over time (time-varying elevated hsCRP levels) were also associated with a significantly slower decline in percent MD (β = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.30, 0.94). This association was attenuated, but still significant after adjusting for baseline BMI (β = 0.40, 95 % CI 0.07, 0.73). Conclusion These results suggest that inflammation may be related to slower reduction in percent MD. PMID:25604866

  3. Elevated levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein correlate positively with C-reactive protein in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-chen; Wei, Jing-jing; Wang, Fei; Chen, Man-tian; Zhang, Mao-zhen

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is unknown. We, therefore, measured serum levels of Ox-LDL and high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP in 90 ACS patients, 45 stable angina pectoris (SAP) patients, and 66 healthy controls using sandwich ELISA. ACS patients were subdivided into: (1) acute myocardial infarction (AMI; n = 45); (2) unstable angina pectoris (UAP; n = 45) groups. In AMI patients, Ox-LDL (177.5 mmol/l) and hs-CRP (25.40 mg/l) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than in UAP (Ox-LDL:107.5 mmol/l, hs-CRP:10.7 mg/l) and SAP (Ox-LDL:82.3 mmol/l, hs-CRP:2.10 mg/l) patients as well as controls (Ox-LDL:41.4 mmol/l, hs-CRP:1.76 mg/l). Ox-LDL/hs-CRP levels in UAP patients were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than in SAP patients and controls. Importantly, a positive correlation was found between Ox-LDL and CRP (r = 0.622; P < 0.01) levels. Serum levels of total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol did not differ among these patient groups. In conclusion, our data show that Ox-LDL and hs-CRP levels correlate positively in ACS patients, supporting the hypothesis that Ox-LDL and CRP may play a direct role in promoting the inflammatory component of atherosclerosis in these individuals. We suggest that Ox-LDL/CRP elevated levels may serve as markers of the severity of the disease in evaluation and management of ACS patients.

  4. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein have combined utility for better predicting prognosis after acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-chen; Tang, Yong; Chen, Yu; Huang, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Min; Chen, Jian; Sun, Ying-gang; Li, Yi-gang

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that the elevated concentrations of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) or high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) are predictive of future cardiovascular events for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. But, the combined value of Ox-LDL and hs-CRP for predicting cardiovascular events is still unknown. Serum concentrations of Ox-LDL, hs-CRP, and cTnT were measured in a prospective cohort of 425 selective ACS patients followed 3-5 years for the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or death (AMI/death). Among 425 enrolled patients, 124 patients demonstrated AMI/death. Baseline levels of Ox-LDL, hs-CRP, and cTnT were significantly higher in AMI/death group than the event-free survival group. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses supported that elevations in Ox-LDL or hs-CRP predicted increased cardiovascular events risks. However, the strongest risk prediction was achieved by assessing Ox-LDL and hs-CRP together. Patients with high levels of Ox-LDL and hs-CRP were more likely to experience AMI or death than those with either Ox-LDL or hs-CRP elevated. Receiver-operating characteristic curves showed that Ox-LDL and hs-CRP have higher sensitivity and specificity than those of cTnT for predicting AMI or death. This was reflected by the AUC values for Ox-LDL, hs-CRP, and cTnT, which were 0.891, 0.834, and 0.626, respectively. The combined use of Ox-LDL and hs-CRP may improve prognosis after ACS with high-sensitivity and specificity.

  5. Associations of Apolipoprotein A, High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Fasting Plasma Insulin in Obese Children With and Without Family History of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karabouta, Zacharoula; Papandreou, Dimitrios; Makedou, Areti; Rousso, Israel; Athanassiadou, Fani

    2016-01-01

    Background The worldwide prevalence of childhood obesity has increased from 4.2% to 6.7% during the last two decades. Pediatric obesity is a major health problem, which is dramatically increasing in Greece. A variety of inflammatory variables have been also found to associate with cardiometabolic (CV) risk in obese children. The purpose of this study was to identify and examine the effects of possible CV risk factors in obese and non-obese children with and without family history (FH) of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods Sixty-eight (68) healthy children and adolescents aged 7 - 13 years participated in the study. Anthropometrical and biochemical indexes were obtained from all children as well as FH of CVD. Results Systolic blood pressure (SBP), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), fasting plasma insulin (FPI) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels were found statistically significantly higher in the obese group compared to the non-obese one. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels were observed to be statistically significantly lower in the obese children compared to their normal peers. Conclusions Apolipoprotein A, hsCRP and FPI levels were significantly higher in the obese children with FH of CVD compared to the ones without FH of CVD. TC and SBP were found to be independently associated with obesity (odds ratio (OR): 1.965, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.935 - 2.97, P < 0.031 and OR: 1.045, 95% CI: 1.016 - 1.074, P < 0.002, respectively). PMID:27222670

  6. The relationship of management modality in Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes to components of metabolic syndrome, γ glutamyl transferase and highly sensitive C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Bahijri, Suhad M.; Ahmed, Maimoona; Al-Shali, Khalid; Bokhari, Samia; Alhozali, Amani; Borai, Anwar; Gusti, Amani; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Alghamdi, Ahmed; Asiri, Mohammed; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship among management modality, glycemic control, components of metabolic syndrome (MS) and serum levels of γ glutamyl transferase (GGT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: Patients with T2DM, not suffering from diabetes complications, were recruited from outpatients clinics at two hospitals in Jeddah. Anthropometric measurements and blood pressure (BP) were taken. A treatment plan was recorded. Fasting blood samples were obtained to measure glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lipids profile, highly sensitive (hs)-CRP and GGT. Results: A total of 71 men and 82 women were recruited. Lower mean HbA1c was found in people receiving oral glucose-lowering drugs compared with those on insulin therapy (p < 0.001). Management modality had no effect on mean GGT or hs-CRP. Higher mean GGT was associated with poor glycemic control, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and abdominal obesity. GGT correlated significantly (p < 0.05) and directly with triglycerides in men (r = 0.401) and diastolic BP (r = 0.279 for men, r = 0.194, for women), but inversely with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (r = −0.298 for men, r = −0.171 for women). hs-CRP correlated with waist circumference (p < 0.05, r = 0.312, for men, r = 0.305, for women), with a higher mean being found in men with poor glycemic control (p = 0.015), in hypertensive women (p = 0.030), and in patients who were abdominally obese (p < 0.05). Conclusions: High levels of GGT and hs-CRP are associated with components of MS and poor glycemic control, hence increased cardiovascular risk. Due to their value as independent risk predictors of vascular injury, these measures should be included in routine monitoring of patients with T2DM. PMID:27583124

  7. C-reactive protein levels in the perioperative period as a predictive marker of endoscopic recurrence after ileo-colonic resection for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Iaculli, E; Agostini, M; Biancone, L; Fiorani, C; Di Vizia, A; Montagnese, F; Sibio, S; Manzelli, A; Tesauro, M; Rufini, A; Sica, G S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the perioperative behavior of C-reactive protein (CRP) in Crohn's disease (CD) patients undergoing elective ileo-cecal (IC) resection and to identify association between perioperative CRP levels and endoscopic recurrence at 1 year. Study hypothesis was that perioperative CRP changes are disease specific and could detect subset of patients with more aggressive pathopysiology. Seventy-five patients undergoing IC resection for CD were prospectively enrolled. Serial CRP levels were assessed: preoperative, postoperative day 1 (POD1) and day 5 (POD5). CD patients' values were compared against same interval assessments of control groups undergoing right colectomy and appendicectomy. At POD1, the serum concentration increase was significantly higher in CD patients than in controls. Comparing with control groups, CRP levels remained remarkably high and showed a lower reduction in CD at POD5. Difference between groups was statistically significant. Optimal cutoff levels have been identified: serum CRP concentrations of >39.8 mg/l at POD1 and of >23.2 mg/l at POD5 have shown a significant association to endoscopic recurrence when using bivariate correlation. In this preliminary series, binary logistic regression could not demonstrate statistical relationship between endoscopic recurrence and any of the variables evaluated as prognostic factor. This is the only study so far that investigates and confirms a disease-specific upregulation of CRP response in the perioperative period for CD patients undergoing surgery. The postoperative CRP levels and kinetics seem to be related to the grade of mucosal inflammation and recurrence rate according to our 12 months endoscopic evaluation. PMID:27551522

  8. Exploration and Validation of C-Reactive Protein/Albumin Ratio as a Novel Inflammation-Based Prognostic Marker in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Liu, Xu; Chen, Lei; Li, Wen-Fei; Tang, Ling-Long; Liu, Qing; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prognostic value of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio (CRP/Alb), a novel inflammation-based marker, remains unknown in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 1572 consecutive patients with non-metastatic NPC. Patients were randomly divided into a training set (n = 514) and validation set (n = 1058). The prognostic value of the CRP/Alb ratio and the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS; a well-recognized inflammation-based score) was assessed. Results: Receiver-operating characteristic analysis identified 0.05 as the optimal CRP/Alb cut-off value for disease failure in the training set. Patients with a CRP/Alb > 0.05 had poorer overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in the training set (all P < 0.05). These results were confirmed in the validation set (all P < 0.05) and the whole cohort (all P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis of the entire cohort, the pretreatment CRP/Alb ratio was an independent prognostic factor for OS (HR, 1.394; 95% CI, 1.004-1.937; P = 0.048) and DMFS (HR, 1.545; 95% CI, 1.124-2.122; P = 0.007), but not for DFS (P = 0.083). The mGPS had no significant independent prognostic value for any end-point. Conclusion: CRP/Alb ratio is an useful prognostic indicator in patients with NPC, independent of disease stage. PMID:27471556

  9. Life History, Immune Function, and Intestinal Helminths: Trade-Offs Among Immunoglobulin E, C-Reactive Protein, and Growth in an Amazonian Population

    PubMed Central

    BLACKWELL, AARON D.; SNODGRASS, J. JOSH; MADIMENOS, FELICIA C.; SUGIYAMA, LAWRENCE S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Infection with helminths is associated with shifts in host immunity, including increased production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and reduced inflammation. Given limited energy budgets, these shifts may involve changes in energy allocation toward competing demands. Here we test for potential trade-offs between growth, IgE, and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). Methods Dried blood spots and anthropometrics were collected from 162 Shuar forager-horticulturalists from a village in southeastern Ecuador. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to measure IgE and CRP. Relationships among IgE, CRP, and anthropometrics were examined in three groups: children aged 2–7 years (n = 63), children aged 8–15 (n = 61), and adults over age 18 (n = 37). Results Geometric mean IgE was 1,196 IU ml−1 while geometric mean CRP was 1.33 mg l−1. In children, IgE and CRP were negatively correlated (r = −0.21, P = 0.02, df = 122). Controlling for fat stores and age, IgE was associated with lower stature in children (t = −2.04, P = 0.04, df = 109), and adults (t = −3.29, P < 0.01, df = 33). In children there was a significant interaction between age and CRP, such that in younger children CRP was associated with shorter stature, but in older children was associated with greater stature (t = 2.15, P = 0.04, df = 109). Conclusions These results suggest that infection with helminths may have hidden costs associated with immunological changes, and that these costs may ultimately affect growth and other life history parameters. PMID:20865759

  10. Role of C-reactive protein in determining microvascular function in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Murat; Akdeniz, Cansu; Aslanger, Emre; Kaplan, Abdullah; Yilmaz, Akar; Guz, Goksel; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra; Umman, Sabahattin

    2013-06-15

    The extent of coronary microvascular dysfunction might be related, not only to patient characteristics and procedural factors, but also to the inflammatory status. The aim of the present study was to examine a possible association between inflammation, as reflected by the serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and the extent of baseline and post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) coronary microvascular dysfunction in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing PCI. A total of 42 patients undergoing PCI for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome were enrolled. Coronary microvascular resistance (MR) was determined in the territory of culprit artery using a Doppler probe- and a pressure sensor-equipped guidewire both before (taking the collateral blood into account) and after PCI. The periprocedural changes in MR were calculated. The CRP levels at admission were correlated with the pre-PCI MR (r = 0.498, p = 0.001), post-PCI MR (r = 0.429, p = 0.005), and periprocedural changes in MR (r = 0.785, p <0.001). On multivariate regression analysis, the only predictor of the pre-PCI (β = 0.531, p = 0.002) and post-PCI (β = 0.471, p = 0.012) MR was the serum CRP concentration. Likewise, the periprocedural changes in MR was predicted by the serum CRP levels (β = 0.677, p = 0.001) and the presence of angiographic thrombus (β = -0.275, p = 0.02). In conclusion, these results have shown that the CRP level is related to increased coronary MR in the territory of the culprit lesion. This suggests that inflammatory processes might play a role in microvascular impairment in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. PMID:23558042

  11. Plasma C-reactive protein and homocysteine concentrations are related to frequent fruit and vegetable intake in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white elders.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Bermudez, Odilia I; Tucker, Katherine L

    2004-04-01

    Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) were recently identified as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, few studies have related fruit and vegetable consumption to these markers of inflammation and B vitamin deficiency, particularly in the Hispanic population. We examined the relation of fruit and vegetable intake with plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations in a cross-sectional study. Subjects were 445 Hispanic elders and 154 neighborhood-based non-Hispanic white elders living in Massachusetts. Diet was assessed with a FFQ designed for this population. There were significant inverse dose-response associations between fruit and vegetable intake and plasma CRP (P for trend = 0.010) and Hcy (P for trend = 0.033) concentrations, after adjustment for potential confounders. The prevalence of high plasma CRP (> 10 mg/L), and high Hcy (>10.4 micromol/L for women and >11.4 micromol/L for men), was significantly greater among subjects in the lowest quartile of fruit and vegetable consumption relative to those in the highest quartile, 17.9 vs. 9.1% and 58.7 vs. 44.4%, respectively. With each additional serving of fruit and vegetable intake, adjusted odd ratios for high plasma CRP and Hcy were 0.79 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.97) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.72 to 0.96), respectively. Greater frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was associated with significantly lower plasma CRP and Hcy concentrations. Because both of these metabolites are known risk factors for CVD, these findings contribute to the evidence that a higher intake of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of CVD.

  12. Contributions of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein to a diagnosis of pneumonia in acute lower respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hopstaken, R M; Muris, J W; Knottnerus, J A; Kester, A D; Rinkens, P E; Dinant, G J

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnostic tests enabling general practitioners (GPs) to differentiate rapidly between pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are needed to prevent increase of bacterial resistance by unjustified antibiotic prescribing. AIMS: To assess the diagnostic value of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) for pneumonia; to derive a prediction rule for the presence of pneumonia; and to identify a low-risk group of patients who do not require antibiotic treatment. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Fifteen GP surgeries in the southern part of The Netherlands. METHOD: Twenty-five GPs recorded clinical information and diagnosis in 246 adult patients presenting with LRTI. Venous blood samples for CRP and ESR were taken and chest radiographs (reference standard) were made. Odds ratios, describing the relationships between discrete diagnostic variables and reference standard (pneumonia or no pneumonia) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of ESR, CRP, and final models for pneumonia was performed. Prediction rules for pneumonia were derived from multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Dry cough, diarrhoea, and a recorded temperature of > or = 38 degrees C were independent and statistically significant predictors of pneumonia, whereas abnormal pulmonary auscultation and clinical diagnosis of pneumonia by the GPs were not. ESR and CRP had higher diagnostic odds ratios than any of the symptoms and signs. Adding CRP to the final 'symptoms and signs' model significantly increased the probability of correct diagnosis. Applying a prediction rule for low-risk patients, including a CRP of < 20, 80 of the 193 antibiotic prescriptions could have been prevented with a maximum risk of 2.5% of missing a pneumonia case. CONCLUSION: Most symptoms and signs traditionally associated with pneumonia are not predictive of pneumonia in general practice. The prediction rule for low

  13. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shrotriya, Shiva; Walsh, Declan; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thomas, Shirley; Lorton, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence. Methods MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms were used to search multiple electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, EBM-Cochrane). Two independent reviewers selected research papers. We also included a quality Assessment (QA) score. Reports with QA scores <50% were excluded. PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) methodology was utilized for this review (S1 PRISMA Checklist). Results 271 articles were identified for final review. There were 45% prospective studies and 52% retrospective. 264 had intermediate QA score (≥50% but <80%); Seven were adequate (80% -100%); A high CRP was predictive of prognosis in 90% (245/271) of studies—80% of the 245 studies by multivariate analysis, 20% by univariate analysis. Many (52%) of the articles were about gastrointestinal malignancies (GI) or kidney malignancies. A high CRP was prognostic in 90% (127 of 141) of the reports in those groups of tumors. CRP was also prognostic in most reports in other solid tumors primary sites. Conclusions A high CRP was associated with higher mortality in 90% of reports in people with solid tumors primary sites. This was particularly notable in GI malignancies and kidney malignancies. In other solid tumors (lung, pancreas, hepatocellular cancer, and bladder) an elevated CRP also predicted prognosis. In addition there is also evidence to support the use of CRP to help decide treatment response and identify tumor recurrence. Better designed large scale studies should be conducted to examine these issues more comprehensively. PMID:26717416

  14. Preengraftment serum C-reactive protein (CRP) value may predict acute graft-versus-host disease and nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Shigeo; Kim, Sung-Won; Fukuda, Takahiro; Mori, Shin-ichiro; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Morita-Hoshi, Yuriko; Ohara-Waki, Fusako; Heike, Yuji; Tobinai, Kensei; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Takaue, Yoichi

    2008-05-01

    In a mouse model, inflammatory cytokines play a primary role in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Here, we retrospectively evaluated whether the preengraftment C-reactive protein (CRP) value, which is used as a surrogate marker of inflammation, could predict posttransplant complications including GVHD. Two hundred twenty-four adult patients (median age, 47 years; range: 18-68 years) underwent conventional stem cell transplantation (CST, n = 105) or reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST, n = 119). Patients were categorized according to the maximum CRP value during neutropenia: the "low-CRP" group (CRP < 15 mg/dL, n = 157) and the "high-CRP" group (CRP >or= 15 mg/dL, n = 67). The incidence of documented infections during neutropenia was higher in the high-CRP group (34% versus 17%, P = .004). When patients with proven infections were excluded, the CRP value was significantly lower after RIST than after CST (P = .017) or after related than after unrelated transplantation (P < .001). A multivariate analysis showed that male sex, unrelated donor, and HLA-mismatched donor were associated with high CRP values. The high-CRP group developed significantly more grade II-IV aGVHD (P = .01) and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (P < .001), but less relapse (P = .02). The present findings suggest that the CRP value may reflect the net degree of tissue damage because of the conditioning regimen, infection, and allogeneic immune reactions, all of which lead to subsequent aGVHD and NRM.

  15. Effect of resistance training on C-reactive protein, blood glucose and lipid profile in older women with differing levels of RT experience.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alex S; Tomeleri, Crisieli M; Souza, Mariana F; Pina, Fábio Luiz C; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Nascimento, Matheus A; Venturini, Danielle; Barbosa, Décio S; Cyrino, Edilson S

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a progressive resistance training (RT) program on C-reactive protein (CRP), blood glucose (GLU), and lipid profile in older women with differing levels of RT experience. Sixty-five older women (68.9 ± 6.1 years, 67.1 ± 13.1 kg) were separated according to RT experience: an advanced group composed by 35 participants who previously carried out 24 weeks of RT and a novice group composed by 30 participants without previous experience in RT (n = 30). Both groups performed a RT program comprised of eight exercises targeting all the major muscles. Training was carried out 3 days/week for 8 weeks. Serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), GLU, and CRP concentrations were determined pre- and post- intervention after 12 h fasting. A significant group by time interaction (P < 0.05) for the TC (novice = -1.9% vs. advanced = 1.0%), and CRP (novice = -22.9% vs. advanced = -54.5%) was observed. A main effect of time (P < 0.05) was identified for the GLU (novice = -2.6% vs. advanced = -6.6%), TG (novice = -12.9% vs. advanced = -5.7%), HDL-C (novice = +6.7% vs. advanced = +2.6%), and LDL-C (novice = -34.0% vs. advanced = -25.4%). These results suggest that RT improves the metabolic profile of older women and that training for a longer period of time seems to produce more pronounced reductions mainly on CRP. PMID:26499819

  16. Associations of C-Reactive Protein, Granulocytes and Granulocyte-to-Lymphocyte Ratio with Mortality from Breast Cancer in Non-Institutionalized American Women

    PubMed Central

    Wulaningsih, Wahyu; Holmberg, Lars; Abeler-Doner, Lucie; Ng, Tony; Rohrmann, Sabine; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation may play a role in breast cancer, but evidence in the general population is lacking. We investigated the association between serum inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein (CRP), absolute granulocyte count (AGC) and granulocyte-to-lymphocyte (G/L) ratio) and breast cancer (BCa) mortality in American women while accounting for adiposity. From the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) we selected all women aged 20+ without any known history of cancer (n = 7,780). Multivariable Cox regression models were used to assess CRP, AGC and G/L ratio in relation to mortality from BCa, all cancer, cardiovascular disease and all causes. Stratification analyses by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were performed to investigate the effect of adiposity on this association. During a mean follow-up of 167 months, 44 women died from BCa. After adjustments for BMI and waist circumference, only G/L ratio was associated to risk of BCa death (e.g. HR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.36–4.06 for the 3rd compared to the 1st tertile, Ptrend = 0.01). Except for a borderline interaction between CRP categories and obesity by BMI, no statistically significant interaction between markers and categories of BMI or waist circumference was observed. All three markers were associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease and all causes. Our findings support a role of inflammation in BCa mortality which may involve mechanisms apart from obesity, and potential usefulness of GLR as a marker in assessing inflammation and cancer. PMID:27294662

  17. Prasugrel Results in Higher Decrease in High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Comparing to Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Chitsazan, Mandana; Chitsazan, Mitra; Salehi, Negar; Amin, Ahmad; Bidokhti, Arash Amin; Babaali, Nima; Bordbar, Armin; Hejrati, Maral; Moghadami, Samar

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES A growing body of clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we compared the effects of clopidogrel and prasugrel on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS The present randomized, double-blind clinical trial included 120 patients who underwent PCI. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to one of the two groups: 80 patients in the first group received clopidogrel (Plavix®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 300 and 75 mg daily, respectively) and 40 patients in the second group received prasugrel (Effient®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 60 and 10 mg, respectively) for 12 weeks. The hs-CRP levels between baseline and 12th week were compared. RESULTS Of the 120 patients, 69 patients (57.5%) were male. Pretreatment hs-CRP level was statistically comparable in clopidogrel (median, 15.10 mg/dL; interquartile range [IQR], 9.62–23.75 mg/dL) and prasugrel groups (median, 18 mg/dL; IQR, 14.25–22 mg/dL; P = 0.06). Patients taking clopidogrel showed a significant reduction in hs-CRP level compared with the baseline values (P < 0.001). Prasugrel administration also resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP level (P < 0.001). A significant 73% overall reduction in the hs-CRP level was seen with prasugrel compared with 39% overall reduction in hs-CRP level with clopidogrel (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Prasugrel seems to be superior to clopidogrel in the reduction of hs-CRP in patients undergoing PCI.

  18. Contribution of apolipoprotein A-I to the reduction in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels by different statins: comparative study of pitavastatin and atorvastatin.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Recently, investigation may have focused on modification of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) associated with anti-inflammatory effect for the potential prevention of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of atorvastatin and pitavastatin on serum apoA-I levels and to investigate the role of apoA-I in the anti-inflammatory effect of statin. We conducted a 6-month, prospective, randomized, open-label study in which we assigned hypercholesterolemic patients to a pitavastatin group (n = 52; 2 mg/day) or an atorvastatin group (n = 52; 10 mg/day) to investigate the effects of these two statins on the serum apoA-I levels and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the changes in the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or hs-CRP levels, but the change in apoA-I in the pitavastatin group was significantly greater than in the atorvastatin group (5.3 vs. 1.4 %; p = 0.0001). A stepwise regression analysis revealed that the percent change in (Δ) serum apoA-I level was an independent predictor of the Δ serum hs-CRP (standard correlation coefficient = -0.198; p = 0.047). However, there was a significant negative correlation between the Δ apoA-I levels and Δ hs-CRP levels in the pitavastatin group (r = -0.283, p = 0.042), but not the atorvastatin group (r = -0.133, p = 0.356). The results suggest that the contribution of apoA-I to the reduction in serum hs-CRP levels by these two statins may be different. A decrease in hs-CRP level accompanied by an increase in apoA-I level may be involved in the pleiotropic effects of pitavastatin.

  19. Serum insulin-like growth factor-I, iron, C-reactive protein, and serum amyloid A for prediction of outcome in dogs with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Jitpean, Supranee; Holst, Bodil Ström; Höglund, Odd V; Pettersson, Ann; Olsson, Ulf; Strage, Emma; Södersten, Fredrik; Hagman, Ragnvi

    2014-07-01

    Pyometra, accumulation of pus in the uterus, is a bacterial infection that frequently initiates systemic inflammation. The disease may have lethal consequences when the systemic effects are severe or complications occur. Markers for identifying high-risk patients and predicting outcome are therefore in high demand. The objective of this study was to measure serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), iron, C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum amyloid A (SAA) in bitches with pyometra and to explore the possible value of these variables for detection of increased morbidity. In total, 31 bitches were diagnosed with pyometra and destined for surgical treatment (ovariohysterectomy) and 17 healthy bitches were included in the study. Concentrations of IGF-I and iron were lower in the pyometra group (mean concentration 221.2 ± 22.5 ng/mL and 16.9 ± 1.6 μmol/L, respectively) compared with the healthy control group (mean concentration 366.7 ± 46.2 ng/mL and 38.1 ± 2.7 μmol/L, respectively). In contrast, concentrations of CRP and SAA were significantly higher in bitches with pyometra (mean concentrations 212.9 ± 17.3 mg/L and 119.9 ± 8.5 mg/L, respectively) compared with the control group (<5 mg/L and <10 mg/L, respectively). None of the explored variables were associated with morbidity as measured by duration of postoperative hospitalization. In conclusion, IGF-I and iron concentrations were decreased in pyometra, whereas SAA and CRP concentrations were increased in the disease. Although unspecific, measurement of these variables may be valuable as adjunctive markers for prognosis in cases of pyometra. PMID:24661434

  20. Relation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level with coronary vasospastic angina pectoris in patients without hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Jui; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yang, Ning-I; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Li, Li-Fu

    2005-12-01

    We prospectively investigated the relation of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to coronary vasospasm and no hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in a sample of 428 patients who underwent coronary angiography. These patients were assigned to 1 of 3 groups. The control group consisted of 66 patients who had no coronary vasospasm and no hemodynamically significant CAD. The vasospasm group consisted of 116 patients who had coronary vasospasm and no hemodynamically significant CAD. The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) group consisted of 246 patients who had ACS and hemodynamically significant CAD. Serum hs-CRP was measured immediately before coronary angiography. Patients were followed for subsequent cardiac events and mortality. Median hs-CRP levels in the control, vasospasm, and ACS groups were 1.0, 5.5, and 8.2 mg/L, respectively. The proportion of hs-CRP increased from the lowest to the highest tertile in the control, vasospasm, and ACS groups, respectively. In the control and vasospasm groups, multivariate analysis showed that hs-CRP was independently associated with a diagnosis of coronary vasospastic angina pectoris (odds ratio 68.74, 95% confidence interval 8.03 to 588.71, p<0.001). During a median follow-up period of 26 months (range 0.4 to 48), 27 cardiac deaths occurred in the ACS group, whereas no cardiac death occurred in the control and vasospasm groups. In conclusion, serum hs-CRP level measured immediately before coronary angiography was an independent marker of coronary vasospasm in patients who had no hemodynamically significant CAD.

  1. C-reactive protein is an independent predictor for carotid artery intima-media thickness progression in asymptomatic younger adults (from the Bogalusa Heart Study)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Conflicting information exists regarding the association between hsCRP and the progression of early stages of atherosclerosis. The purpose of the study was to investigate the association of high sensitiviy c-reactive protein (hsCRP) along with major cardiovascular (CV) risk factors on early carotid atherosclerosis progression in a large, population-based cohort study. Methods The study cohort included 839 young adults (aged 24 to 43 years, 70% white, 42% men) enrolled in Bogalusa Heart Study, who in 2001-2002 attended baseline examination with measurements of CV risk factors. Progression of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) was assessed during a mean follow-up of 2.4 years. Results Carotid artery IMT progression rates were as follows: composite carotid artery = 9.2 ± 52 μm/y, common carotid artery = 0.0 ± 51 μm/y, carotid bulb = 8.8 ± 103 μm/y, and internal carotid artery = 18.9 ± 81 μm/y. Elevated baseline hsCRP, reflecting an inflammatory state, showed independent association with composite carotid artery IMT progression. Increased age, systolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, LDL cholesterol, and current smoking were other risk associates of carotid artery IMT progression in young adults, indicating an underlying burden on the CV system by multiple risk factors. Conclusion In this population-based study, we observed independent categorical association of increased hsCRP with carotid artery IMT progression in young adults. This study underlines the importance of assesssing hsCRP levels along with smoking and traditional CV risk factor profiles in asymptomatic young adults. PMID:22208681

  2. A Prospective Study of Circulating C-Reactive Protein, Interleukin-6, and Tumor Necrosis Factor α Receptor 2 Levels and Risk of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Elizabeth M.; Lee, I-Min; Ridker, Paul M.; Buring, Julie E.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation may play a role in ovarian carcinogenesis. We examined associations between 3 plasma biomarkers of inflammation—C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor α receptor 2—and risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer in prospectively collected samples from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS; 1989–2010), Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II; 1996–2009), and the Women's Health Study (WHS; 1992–2011) and performed a meta-analysis including data from previous publications. Associations with ovarian cancer risk were calculated using logistic regression (NHS/NHS II; n = 217 cases) or Cox proportional hazards regression (WHS; n = 159 cases). Study-specific results were combined using random-effects meta-analysis. In the NHS/NHS II and WHS, we observed a 53% increased risk of invasive ovarian cancer when comparing women in the fourth quartile of CRP with women in the first quartile (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 2.23). A CRP level of >10 mg/L versus a level of ≤1 mg/L was associated with a 2.16-fold increased risk (95% CI: 1.23, 3.78). In a meta-analysis of published studies, women in the third tertile of CRP had a 35% increased risk (95% CI: 1.10, 1.67) compared with women in the first tertile. There were no significant associations between interleukin 6 or tumor necrosis factor α receptor 2 and risk in the NHS/NHS II. Our results support the hypothesis that higher levels of circulating CRP are associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer, indicating that the role of inflammation in ovarian cancer requires further elucidation. PMID:23966559

  3. Point-of-care C reactive protein for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infection in NHS primary care: a qualitative study of barriers and facilitators to adoption

    PubMed Central

    Huddy, Jeremy R; Ni, Melody Z; Barlow, James; Hanna, George B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Point-of-care (POC) C reactive protein (CRP) is incorporated in National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for the diagnosis of pneumonia, reduces antibiotic prescribing and is cost effective. Aim To determine the barriers and facilitators to adoption of POC CRP testing in National Health Service (NHS) primary care for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infection. Design The study followed a qualitative methodology based on grounded theory. The study was undertaken in 2 stages. Stage 1 consisted of semistructured interviews with 8 clinicians from Europe and the UK who use the test in routine practice, and focused on their subjective experience in the challenges of implementing POC CRP testing. Stage 2 was a multidisciplinary-facilitated workshop with NHS stakeholders to discuss barriers to adoption, impact of adoption and potential adoption scenarios. Emergent theme analysis was undertaken. Participants Participants included general practitioners (including those with commissioning experience), biochemists, pharmacists, clinical laboratory scientists and industry representatives from the UK and abroad. Results Barriers to the implementation of POC CRP exist, but successful adoption has been demonstrated abroad. Analysis highlighted 7 themes: reimbursement and incentivisation, quality control and training, laboratory services, practitioner attitudes and experiences, effects on clinic flow and workload, use in pharmacy and gaps in evidence. Conclusions Successful adoption models from the UK and abroad demonstrate a distinctive pattern and involve collaboration with central laboratory services. Incorporating antimicrobial stewardship into quality improvement frameworks may incentivise adoption. Further research is needed to develop scaling-up strategies to address the resourcing, clinical governance and economic impact of widespread NHS implementation. PMID:26940107

  4. Severity and prognosis of acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning are indicated by C-reactive protein and copeptin levels and APACHE II score

    PubMed Central

    WU, XINKUAN; XIE, WEI; CHENG, YUELEI; GUAN, QINGLONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and copeptin, in addition to the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, in patients with acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning (AOPP). A total of 100 patients with AOPP were included and divided into mild, moderate and severe groups according to AOPP diagnosis and classification standards. Blood samples were collected from all patients on days 1, 3 and 7 following AOPP. The concentrations of CRP and copeptin in the plasma were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All AOPP patients underwent APACHE II scoring and the diagnostic value of these scores was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). On days 1, 3 and 7 after AOPP, the levels of CRP and copeptin were increased in correlation with the increase in AOPP severity, and were significantly higher compared with the control groups. Furthermore, elevated CRP and copeptin plasma levels were detected in patients with severe AOPP on day 7, whereas these levels were reduced in patients with mild or moderate AOPP. APACHE II scores, blood lactate level, acetylcholine esterase level, twitch disappearance time, reactivating agent dose and inability to raise the head were the high-risk factors that affected the prognosis of AOPP. Patients with plasma CRP and copeptin levels higher than median values had worse prognoses. The areas under curve for ROCs were 0.89, 0.75 and 0.72 for CRP levels, copeptin levels and APACHE II scores, respectively. In addition, the plasma contents of CRP and copeptin are increased according to the severity of AOPP. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that CRP and copeptin levels and APACHE II scores may be used for the determination of AOPP severity and the prediction of AOPP prognosis. PMID:26997996

  5. The association of high-sensitivity c-reactive protein and other biomarkers with cardiovascular disease in patients treated for HIV: a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population, but its role as a predictive marker in HIV-positive patients remains unclear. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether hsCRP or other biomarkers are independent predictors of CVD risk in HIV-infected patients. Methods Retrospective, nested case–control study. HIV-positive men and women (35–69 years of age) receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) were included. Cases (n = 35) had a major CVD event. Controls (n = 74) free from CVD events for at least 5 years from starting ART were matched on diabetes and smoking. HsCRP, D-dimer, P-selectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were measured. Results High hsCRP was associated with CVD risk, independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, HIV replication and the type of ART received at the time of sampling (adjusted odds ratio 8.00 [1.23-51.94] comparing >3.3 mg/L with <0.9 mg/L; P = 0.03). Higher IL-6 and P-selectin levels were also independently associated with increased CVD risk, although the association was weaker than for hsCRP. Higher total cholesterol and lower HDL cholesterol increased CVD risk, independent of hsCRP. Conclusion hsCRP may be a useful additional biomarker to predict CVD risk in HIV-infected patients receiving cART. PMID:24004495

  6. Changes in C-reactive protein during weight loss and the association with changes in anthropometric variables in men and women: LIFE Study

    PubMed Central

    Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Jeffery, Robert W; Langer, Shelby L; Mitchell, Nathan; Flood, Andrew P; Welsh, Ericka M; Jaeb, Melanie A; Laqua, Patricia S; Crowell, Michael; Levy, Rona L

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether sex differences exist in the pattern of change in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels during weight loss, and whether the associations between weight change and CRP change differ by the types of anthropometric variables. Design Longitudinal, prospective analysis of subjects participating in an intentional weight loss trial (the Lose It For Ever: LIFE Study) followed-up for 30 months. Subjects 212 healthy, obese men and women (age: 23–77y, BMI: 30–39kg/m2). Measurements Body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumferences, and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), CRP, and lifestyle variables repeatedly measured at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 30-month follow-up. Results Weight change was J-shaped with a nadir at 12-months in both men and women (P for month2 <0.0001). CRP level was consistently higher in women than in men, but the differences were less prominent and were not statistically significant at 12-month and 18-month follow-up. CRP changes between any two consecutive visits were significantly associated with changes in BMI during the same period in women. However, the associations between CRP changes and changes in waist or hip circumference were not as consistent, especially between 18- to 30-month follow-up when CRP significantly increased. The associations in men were generally similar among the different anthropometric measures. The association between changes in BMI and CRP were stronger in men than in women. Conclusion BMI change generally correlated well with CRP changes in both men and women in the course of follow-up. Significant sex-difference in CRP level at baseline diminished at 12- and 18-month follow-up, when both sexes had maintained the lost weight. PMID:20856254

  7. Prognostic and diagnostic value of eosinopenia, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and circulating cell-free DNA in critically ill patients admitted with suspicion of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to assess the reliability of circulating cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) concentrations, compared with C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT) and eosinophil count, in the diagnosis of infections in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and their prognostic values in a cohort of critically ill patients. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in a medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Eosinophil count and concentrations of cf-DNA, CRP, and PCT were measured in patients who fulfilled SIRS criteria at admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and a second determination 24 hours later. DNA levels were determined by a PCR method using primers for the human beta-haemoglobin gene. Results One hundred and sixty consecutive patients were included: 43 SIRS without sepsis and 117 with sepsis. Levels of CRP and PCT, but not cf-DNA or eosinophil count, were significantly higher in patients with sepsis than in SIRS-no sepsis group on days 1 and 2. PCT on day 1 achieves the best area under the curve (AUC) for sepsis diagnosis (0.87; 95% confidence interval = 0.81-0.94). Levels of cf-DNA do not predict outcome and the accuracy of these biomarkers for mortality prediction was lower than that shown by APACHE II score. PCT decreases significantly from day 1 to day 2 in survivors in the entire cohort and in patients with sepsis without significant changes in the other biomarkers. Conclusions Our data do not support the clinical utility of cf-DNA measurement in critical care patients with SIRS. PCT is of value especially for infection identification in patients with SIRS at admission to the ICU. PMID:24903083

  8. Comparison of effects of ezetimibe/simvastatin versus simvastatin versus atorvastatin in reducing C-reactive protein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Thomas; Ballantyne, Christie; Sisk, Christine; Shah, Arvind; Veltri, Enrico; Maccubbin, Darbie

    2007-06-15

    The lowering effects of ezetimibe/simvastatin combination therapy on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) were compared with those of simvastatin or atorvastatin monotherapy in a large cohort of patients with primary hypercholesterolemia. To compare ezetimibe/simvastatin with simvastatin, data were combined from 3 identical, prospective 12-week trials in which patients were randomized to receive placebo; ezetimibe 10 mg; ezetimibe 10 mg added to simvastatin 10, 20, 40, or 80 mg; or simvastatin 10, 20, 40, or 80 mg. To compare ezetimibe/simvastatin with atorvastatin, data were analyzed from a phase III double-blind, active-controlled study in which patients were randomized equally to receive ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/10, 10/20, 10/40, or 10/80 mg or atorvastatin 10, 20, 40, or 80 mg for 6 weeks. When averaged across doses, ezetimibe/simvastatin produced significantly greater reductions compared with simvastatin alone in LDL cholesterol (52.5% vs 38.0%, respectively) and CRP levels (31.0% vs 14.3%, respectively). At each individual simvastatin dose, co-administration with ezetimibe produced significant further CRP reductions versus simvastatin alone. Ezetimibe/simvastatin was significantly more effective at lowering LDL cholesterol than atorvastatin when pooled across doses (53.4% vs 45.3%, respectively) and in each milligram-equivalent dose comparison. Reductions in CRP of similar magnitude were observed with ezetimibe/simvastatin and atorvastatin when averaged across doses and at each milligram-equivalent statin dose comparison. In conclusion, the lipid-modulating and anti-inflammatory effects of ezetimibe/simvastatin provide additional benefits not realized by statin monotherapy alone.

  9. C-reactive protein levels in the perioperative period as a predictive marker of endoscopic recurrence after ileo-colonic resection for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Iaculli, E; Agostini, M; Biancone, L; Fiorani, C; Di Vizia, A; Montagnese, F; Sibio, S; Manzelli, A; Tesauro, M; Rufini, A; Sica, G S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the perioperative behavior of C-reactive protein (CRP) in Crohn's disease (CD) patients undergoing elective ileo-cecal (IC) resection and to identify association between perioperative CRP levels and endoscopic recurrence at 1 year. Study hypothesis was that perioperative CRP changes are disease specific and could detect subset of patients with more aggressive pathopysiology. Seventy-five patients undergoing IC resection for CD were prospectively enrolled. Serial CRP levels were assessed: preoperative, postoperative day 1 (POD1) and day 5 (POD5). CD patients' values were compared against same interval assessments of control groups undergoing right colectomy and appendicectomy. At POD1, the serum concentration increase was significantly higher in CD patients than in controls. Comparing with control groups, CRP levels remained remarkably high and showed a lower reduction in CD at POD5. Difference between groups was statistically significant. Optimal cutoff levels have been identified: serum CRP concentrations of >39.8 mg/l at POD1 and of >23.2 mg/l at POD5 have shown a significant association to endoscopic recurrence when using bivariate correlation. In this preliminary series, binary logistic regression could not demonstrate statistical relationship between endoscopic recurrence and any of the variables evaluated as prognostic factor. This is the only study so far that investigates and confirms a disease-specific upregulation of CRP response in the perioperative period for CD patients undergoing surgery. The postoperative CRP levels and kinetics seem to be related to the grade of mucosal inflammation and recurrence rate according to our 12 months endoscopic evaluation.

  10. Decreased C-reactive protein induces abnormal vascular structure in a rat model of liver dysfunction induced by bile duct ligation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Ji Hye; Choi, Jong Ho; Bae, Si Hyun; Oh, Seh Hoon; Kim, Gi Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic liver disease leads to liver fibrosis, and although the liver does have a certain regenerative capacity, this disease is associated with dysfunction of the liver vessels. C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced in the liver and circulated from there for metabolism. CRP was recently shown to inhibit angiogenesis by inducing endothelial cell dysfunction. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of CRP levels on angiogenesis in a rat model of liver dysfunction induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Methods The diameter of the hepatic vein was analyzed in rat liver tissues using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The expression levels of angiogenic factors, albumin, and CRP were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. A tube formation assay was performed to confirm the effect of CRP on angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with lithocholic acid (LCA) and siRNA-CRP. Results The diameter of the hepatic portal vein increased significantly with the progression of cirrhosis. The expression levels of angiogenic factors were increased in the cirrhotic liver. In contrast, the expression levels of albumin and CRP were significantly lower in the liver tissue obtained from the BDL rat model than in the normal liver. The CRP level was correlated with the expression of albumin in hepatocytes treated with LCA and siRNA-CRP. Tube formation was significantly decreased in HUVECs when they were treated with LCA or a combination of LCA and siRNA-CRP. Conclusion CRP seems to be involved in the abnormal formation of vessels in hepatic disease, and so it could be a useful diagnostic marker for hepatic disease. PMID:27729629

  11. Association of High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein with the Components of Metabolic Syndrome in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Individuals