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Sample records for adipose tissue fatty

  1. Hepatic oleate regulates adipose tissue lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Burhans, Maggie S; Flowers, Matthew T; Harrington, Kristin R; Bond, Laura M; Guo, Chang-An; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Ntambi, James M

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with detrimental metabolic phenotypes including enhanced risk for diabetes. Stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs) catalyze the synthesis of MUFAs. In mice, genetic ablation of SCDs reduces hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and protects against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and adiposity. To understand the mechanism by which hepatic MUFA production influences adipose tissue stores, we created two liver-specific transgenic mouse models in the SCD1 knockout that express either human SCD5 or mouse SCD3, that synthesize oleate and palmitoleate, respectively. We demonstrate that hepatic de novo synthesized oleate, but not palmitoleate, stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and adiposity, reversing the protective effect of the global SCD1 knockout under lipogenic conditions. Unexpectedly, the accumulation of hepatic lipid occurred without induction of the hepatic DNL program. Changes in hepatic lipid composition were reflected in plasma and in adipose tissue. Importantly, endogenously synthesized hepatic oleate was associated with suppressed DNL and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue. Regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between adipose tissue lipid fuel utilization and hepatic and adipose tissue lipid storage. These data suggest an extrahepatic mechanism where endogenous hepatic oleate regulates lipid homeostasis in adipose tissues.

  2. Adipose tissue n-3 fatty acids and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cespedes, Elizabeth; Baylin, Ana; Campos, Hannia

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding the relationship of n-3 fatty acids (FA) to type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic syndrome components (MetS) is inconsistent. Objective To examine associations of adipose tissue n-3 FA with MetS. Design We studied 1611 participants without prior history of diabetes or heart disease who were participants in a population-based case-control study of diet and heart disease (The Costa Rica Heart Study). We calculated prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for MetS by quartile of n-3 FA in adipose tissue derived mainly from plants [α-Linolenic acid (ALA)], fish [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)], or metabolism [docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), as well as the EPA:ALA ratio, a surrogate marker of delta-6 desaturase activity]. Results N-3 FA levels in adipose tissue were associated with MetS prevalence in opposite directions. The PR (95% CI) for the highest compared to the lowest quartile adjusted for age, sex, BMI, residence, lifestyle, diet and other fatty acids were 0.60 (0.44, 0.81) for ALA, 1.43 (1.12, 1.82) for EPA, 1.63 (1.22, 2.18) for DPA, and 1.47 (1.14, 1.88) for EPA:ALA, all p for trend <0.05. Although these associations were no longer significant (except DPA) after adjustment for BMI, ALA and DPA were associated with lower glucose and higher triglyceride levels, p<0.05 (respectively). Conclusions These results suggest that ALA could exert a modest protective benefit, while EPA and DHA are not implicated in MetS. The positive associations for DPA and MetS could reflect higher delta-6 desaturase activity caused by increased adiposity. PMID:25097001

  3. Subcutaneous adipose tissue fatty acid desaturation in adults with and without rare adipose disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elevated stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity has been described in obese states, with an increased desaturation index (DI) suggesting enhanced lipogenesis. Differences in the DI among various phenotypes of abnormal adiposity have not been studied. Abnormal accumulation of subcutaneous adipose tissue occurs in rare adipose disorders (RADs) including Dercum's disease (DD), multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), and familial multiple lipomatosis (FML). Examining the DI in subcutaneous fat of people with DD, MSL and FML may provide information on adipose tissue fatty acid metabolism in these disorders. The aims of this pilot study were: 1) to determine if differences in adipose tissue DIs are present among RADs, and 2) to determine if the DIs correlate to clinical or biochemical parameters. Methods Subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained from human participants with DD (n = 6), MSL (n = 5), FML (n = 8) and obese Controls (n = 6). Fatty acid composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The DIs (palmitoleic/palmitic, oleic/stearic, vaccenic/stearic ratios) were calculated from the gas chromatogram peak intensities. SCD1 gene expression was determined. Spearman's correlations between the DIs and available clinical or biochemical data were performed. Results In DD subjects, the vaccenic/stearic index was lower (p < 0.05) in comparison to Controls. Percent of total of the saturated fatty acid myristic acid was higher in DD compared with Controls and FML. Percent of monounsaturated vaccenic acid in DD trended lower when compared with Controls, and was decreased in comparison to FML. In MSL, total percent of the polyunsaturated fatty acids was significantly lower than in the Control group (p < 0.05). In the total cohort of subjects, the palmitoleic/palmitic and oleic/stearic DIs positively correlated with age, BMI, and percent body fat. Conclusions The positive associations between the DIs and measures of adiposity (BMI and percent body fat

  4. Adipose tissue monomethyl branched chain fatty acids and insulin sensitivity: effects of obesity and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiong; Magkos, Faidon; Zhou, Dequan; Eagon, J. Christopher; Fabbrini, Elisa; Okunade, Adewole L.; Klein, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Objective An increase in circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with insulin resistance. Adipose tissue is a potentially important site for BCAA metabolism. We evaluated whether monomethyl branched chain fatty acids (mmBCFA) in adipose tissue, which are likely derived from BCAA catabolism, are associated with insulin sensitivity. Design and Methods Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was determined by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with stable isotope glucose tracer infusion, in 9 lean and 9 obese subjects, and in a separate group of 9 obese subjects before and 1 year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery (38% weight loss). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content was measured in tissue biopsies taken in the basal state. Results Total adipose tissue mmBCFA content was ~30% lower in obese than lean subjects (P = 0.02), and increased by ~65% after weight loss in the RYGB group (P = 0.01). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content correlated positively with skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (R2 = 35%, P = 0.01, n = 18). Conclusions These results demonstrate a novel association between adipose tissue mmBCFA content and obesity-related insulin resistance. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the association between adipose tissue mmBCFA and muscle insulin sensitivity is causal or a simple association. PMID:25328153

  5. Adipose Tissue Fatty Acid Patterns and Changes in Anthropometry: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dahm, Christina Catherine; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Schmidt, Erik Berg; Tjønneland, Anne; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Overvad, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Diets rich in n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), but low in n-6 LC-PUFA and 18:1 trans-fatty acids (TFA), may lower the risk of overweight and obesity. These fatty acids have often been investigated individually. We explored associations between global patterns in adipose tissue fatty acids and changes in anthropometry. Methods 34 fatty acid species from adipose tissue biopsies were determined in a random sample of 1100 men and women from a Danish cohort study. We used sex-specific principal component analysis and multiple linear regression to investigate the associations of adipose tissue fatty acid patterns with changes in weight, waist circumference (WC), and WC controlled for changes in body mass index (WCBMI), adjusting for confounders. Results 7 principal components were extracted for each sex, explaining 77.6% and 78.3% of fatty acid variation in men and women, respectively. Fatty acid patterns with high levels of TFA tended to be positively associated with changes in weight and WC for both sexes. Patterns with high levels of n-6 LC-PUFA tended to be negatively associated with changes in weight and WC in men, and positively associated in women. Associations with patterns with high levels of n-3 LC-PUFA were dependent on the context of the rest of the fatty acid pattern. Conclusions Adipose tissue fatty acid patterns with high levels of TFA may be linked to weight gain, but patterns with high n-3 LC-PUFA did not appear to be linked to weight loss. Associations depended on characteristics of the rest of the pattern. PMID:21811635

  6. Regulation of glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis from glucose in sheep adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, James P.; Faulkner, Anne; Vernon, Richard G.

    1982-01-01

    1. The following were measured in adipose-tissue pieces, obtained from 7–9 month-old sheep, before or after the tissue pieces had been maintained in tissue culture for 24 h: the rates of synthesis from glucose of fatty acids, acylglycerol glycerol, pyruvate and lactate; the rate of glucose oxidation to CO2; the rate of glucose oxidation via the pentose phosphate pathway; the activities of hexokinase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and ATP citrate lyase; the intra- and extra-cellular water content; the concentration of various metabolites and ATP, ADP and AMP. 2. The proportion of glucose carbon converted into the various products in sheep adipose tissue differs markedly from that observed in rat adipose tissue. 3. There was a general increase in the rate of glucose utilization by the adipose-tissue pieces after maintenance in tissue culture; largest changes were seen in the rates of glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis from glucose. These increases are paralleled by an increase in pyruvate kinase activity. There was no change in the activities of the other enzymes as measured, although the net flux through all the enzymes increased. 4. Incubation of fresh adipose-tissue pieces for 2–6h led to an increase in the affinity of pyruvate kinase for phosphoenolpyruvate. 5. The rate of pyruvate production by glycolysis was greater than the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase of the tissue. 6. The results suggest that both pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase have important roles in restricting the utilization of glucose carbon for fatty acid synthesis in sheep adipose tissue. PMID:7150263

  7. Fatty acid metabolism and the basis of brown adipose tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Mir, Joan F.; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Serra, Dolors; Herrero, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obesity has reached epidemic proportions, leading to severe associated pathologies such as insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue has become crucial due to its involvement in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced insulin resistance, and traditionally white adipose tissue has captured the most attention. However in the last decade the presence and activity of heat-generating brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans has been rediscovered. BAT decreases with age and in obese and diabetic patients. It has thus attracted strong scientific interest, and any strategy to increase its mass or activity might lead to new therapeutic approaches to obesity and associated metabolic diseases. In this review we highlight the mechanisms of fatty acid uptake, trafficking and oxidation in brown fat thermogenesis. We focus on BAT's morphological and functional characteristics and fatty acid synthesis, storage, oxidation and use as a source of energy. PMID:27386151

  8. Fatty acid metabolism and the basis of brown adipose tissue function.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Mir, Joan F; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Serra, Dolors; Herrero, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions, leading to severe associated pathologies such as insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue has become crucial due to its involvement in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced insulin resistance, and traditionally white adipose tissue has captured the most attention. However in the last decade the presence and activity of heat-generating brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans has been rediscovered. BAT decreases with age and in obese and diabetic patients. It has thus attracted strong scientific interest, and any strategy to increase its mass or activity might lead to new therapeutic approaches to obesity and associated metabolic diseases. In this review we highlight the mechanisms of fatty acid uptake, trafficking and oxidation in brown fat thermogenesis. We focus on BAT's morphological and functional characteristics and fatty acid synthesis, storage, oxidation and use as a source of energy. PMID:27386151

  9. Foraging at wastewater treatment works affects brown adipose tissue fatty acid profiles in banana bats

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kate; van Aswegen, Sunet; Schoeman, M. Corrie; Claassens, Sarina; Jansen van Rensburg, Peet; Naidoo, Samantha; Vosloo, Dalene

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study we tested the hypothesis that the decrease in habitat quality at wastewater treatment works (WWTW), such as limited prey diversity and exposure to the toxic cocktail of pollutants, affect fatty acid profiles of interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBrAT) in bats. Further, the antioxidant capacity of oxidative tissues such as pectoral and cardiac muscle may not be adequate to protect those tissues against reactive molecules resulting from polyunsaturated fatty acid auto-oxidation in the WWTW bats. Bats were sampled at two urban WWTW, and two unpolluted reference sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Brown adipose tissue (BrAT) mass was lower in WWTW bats than in reference site bats. We found lower levels of saturated phospholipid fatty acids and higher levels of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in WWTW bats than in reference site bats, while C18 desaturation and n-6 to n-3 ratios were higher in the WWTW bats. This was not associated with high lipid peroxidation levels in pectoral and cardiac muscle. Combined, these results indicate that WWTW bats rely on iBrAT as an energy source, and opportunistic foraging on abundant, pollutant-tolerant prey may change fatty acid profiles in their tissue, with possible effects on mitochondrial functioning, torpor and energy usage. PMID:26740572

  10. The Effect of Marine Derived n-3 Fatty Acids on Adipose Tissue Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Todorčević, Marijana; Hodson, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue function is key determinant of metabolic health, with specific nutrients being suggested to play a role in tissue metabolism. One such group of nutrients are the n-3 fatty acids, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3). Results from studies where human, animal and cellular models have been utilised to investigate the effects of EPA and/or DHA on white adipose tissue/adipocytes suggest anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects. We review here evidence for these effects, specifically focusing on studies that provide some insight into metabolic pathways or processes. Of note, limited work has been undertaken investigating the effects of EPA and DHA on white adipose tissue in humans whilst more work has been undertaken using animal and cellular models. Taken together it would appear that EPA and DHA have a positive effect on lowering lipogenesis, increasing lipolysis and decreasing inflammation, all of which would be beneficial for adipose tissue biology. What remains to be elucidated is the duration and dose required to see a favourable effect of EPA and DHA in vivo in humans, across a range of adiposity. PMID:26729182

  11. The role of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue fatty acid composition in liver pathophysiology associated with NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Gentile, C L; Weir, T L; Cox-York, K A; Wei, Y; Wang, D; Reese, L; Moran, G; Estrada, A; Mulligan, C; Pagliassotti, M J; Foster, M T

    2015-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is associated with type-2-diabetes, inflammation, dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), whereas subcutaneous adiposity is not. We hypothesized that the link between visceral adiposity and liver pathophysiology involves inherent or diet-derived differences between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue to store and mobilize saturated fatty acids. The goal of the present study was to characterize the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue triglyceride and portal vein fatty acids in relation to indices of liver dysregulation. For 8 weeks rats had free access to control (CON; 12.9% corn/safflower oil; 3.6 Kcal/g), high saturated fat (SAT; 45.2% cocoa butter; 4.5 Kcal/g) or high polyunsaturated fat (PUFA; 45.2% safflower oil; 4.5 Kcal/g) diets. Outcome measures included glucose tolerance, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue triglyceride, liver phospholipids and plasma (portal and systemic) free fatty acid composition, indices of inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the liver and adipose tissue depots and circulating adipo/cytokines. Hepatic triglycerides were significantly increased in both high fat diet groups compared to control and were significantly higher in PUFA compared to SAT. Although glucose tolerance was not different among diet groups, SAT increased markers of inflammation and ER stress in the liver and both adipose tissue depots. Fatty acid composition did not differ among adipose depots or portal blood in any dietary group. Overall, these data suggest that diets enriched in saturated fatty acids are associated with liver inflammation, ER stress and injury, but that any link between visceral adipose tissue and these liver indices does not involve selective changes to fatty acid composition in this depot or the portal vein. PMID:26167414

  12. The role of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue fatty acid composition in liver pathophysiology associated with NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, CL; Weir, TL; Cox-York, KA; Wei, Y; Wang, D; Reese, L; Moran, G; Estrada, A; Mulligan, C; Pagliassotti, MJ; Foster, MT

    2015-01-01

    Visceral adiposity is associated with type-2-diabetes, inflammation, dyslipidemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), whereas subcutaneous adiposity is not. We hypothesized that the link between visceral adiposity and liver pathophysiology involves inherent or diet-derived differences between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue to store and mobilize saturated fatty acids. The goal of the present study was to characterize the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue triglyceride and portal vein fatty acids in relation to indices of liver dysregulation. For 8 weeks rats had free access to control (CON; 12.9% corn/safflower oil; 3.6 Kcal/g), high saturated fat (SAT; 45.2% cocoa butter; 4.5 Kcal/g) or high polyunsaturated fat (PUFA; 45.2% safflower oil; 4.5 Kcal/g) diets. Outcome measures included glucose tolerance, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue triglyceride, liver phospholipids and plasma (portal and systemic) free fatty acid composition, indices of inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the liver and adipose tissue depots and circulating adipo/cytokines. Hepatic triglycerides were significantly increased in both high fat diet groups compared to control and were significantly higher in PUFA compared to SAT. Although glucose tolerance was not different among diet groups, SAT increased markers of inflammation and ER stress in the liver and both adipose tissue depots. Fatty acid composition did not differ among adipose depots or portal blood in any dietary group. Overall, these data suggest that diets enriched in saturated fatty acids are associated with liver inflammation, ER stress and injury, but that any link between visceral adipose tissue and these liver indices does not involve selective changes to fatty acid composition in this depot or the portal vein. PMID:26167414

  13. Free Fatty Acid Storage in Human Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asem H.; Koutsari, Christina; Mundi, Manpreet; Stegall, Mark D.; Heimbach, Julie K.; Taler, Sandra J.; Nygren, Jonas; Thorell, Anders; Bogachus, Lindsey D.; Turcotte, Lorraine P.; Bernlohr, David; Jensen, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Because direct adipose tissue free fatty acid (FFA) storage may contribute to body fat distribution, we measured FFA (palmitate) storage rates and fatty acid (FA) storage enzymes/proteins in omental and abdominal subcutaneous fat. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Elective surgery patients received a bolus of [1-14C]palmitate followed by omental and abdominal subcutaneous fat biopsies to measure direct FFA storage. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase activities, CD36, fatty acid-binding protein, and fatty acid transport protein 1 were measured. RESULTS Palmitate tracer storage (dpm/g adipose lipid) and calculated palmitate storage rates were greater in omental than abdominal subcutaneous fat in women (1.2 ± 0.8 vs. 0.7 ± 0.4 μmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid−1 ⋅ min−1, P = 0.005) and men (0.7 ± 0.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.1, P < 0.001), and both were greater in women than men (P < 0.0001). Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue palmitate storage rates correlated with ACS activity (women: r = 0.66, P = 0.001; men: r = 0.70, P = 0.007); in men, CD36 was also independently related to palmitate storage rates. The content/activity of FA storage enzymes/proteins in omental fat was dramatically lower in those with more visceral fat. In women, only omental palmitate storage rates were correlated (r = 0.54, P = 0.03) with ACS activity. CONCLUSIONS Some adipocyte FA storage factors correlate with direct FFA storage, but sex differences in this process in visceral fat do not account for sex differences in visceral fatness. The reduced storage proteins in those with greater visceral fat suggest that the storage factors we measured are not a predominant cause of visceral adipose tissue accumulation. PMID:21810594

  14. Fatty acid composition of brown adipose tissue in genetically heat-tolerant FOK rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, T.; Furuyama, F.; Kuroshima, A.

    The phospholipid fatty acid composition of brown adipose tissue (BAT) was examined in inbred heat-tolerant FOK rats and compared with that in conventional Wistar rats not previously exposed to heat. The FOK rats showed higher unsaturation states, as indicated by higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and a higher unsaturation index and polyunsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids ratio. This higher level of unsaturation was characterized by the higher amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. It may be concluded that the increased docosahexaenoic acid level in BAT phospholipids brings about the hyperplasia of BAT, causing an enhancement of its in vivo thermogernic activity as well as the systemic non-shivering thermogenesis observed in heat-tolerant FOK rats.

  15. Adiposity, lipogenesis, and fatty acid composition of subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues of Brahman and Angus crossbred cattle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, E M G; Sanders, J O; Lunt, D K; Gill, C A; Taylor, J F; Davis, S K; Riley, D G; Smith, S B

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate differences in aspects of adipose tissue cellularity, lipid metabolism, and fatty and cholesterol composition in Angus and Brahman crossbred cattle. We hypothesized that in vitro measures of lipogenesis would be greater in three-fourths Angus progeny than in three-fourths Brahman progeny, especially in intramuscular (i.m.) adipose tissue. Progeny ( = 227) were fed a standard, corn-based diet for approximately 150 d before slaughter. Breed was considered to be the effect of interest and was forced into the model. There were 9 breed groups including all 4 kinds of three-fourths Angus calves: Angus bulls Angus-sired F cows ( = 32), Angus bulls Brahman-sired F cows ( = 20), Brahman-sired F bulls Angus cows ( = 24), and Angus-sired F bulls Angus cows ( = 20). There were all 4 kinds of three-fourths Brahman calves: Brahman bulls Brahman-sired F cows ( = 21), Brahman bulls Angus-sired F cows ( = 43), Brahman-sired F bulls Brahman cows ( = 26), and Angus-sired F bulls Brahman cows ( = 13). Additionally, F calves (one-half Brahman and one-half Angus) were produced only from Brahman-sired F bulls Angus-sired F cows ( = 28). Contrasts were calculated when breed was an important fixed effect, using the random effect family(breed) as the error term. Most contrasts were nonsignificant ( > 0.10). Those that were significant ( < 0.05) included cholesterol concentration of subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue (three-fourths Angus > F, three-fourths Brahman > F, and three-fourths crossbred progeny combined > F), s.c. adipocyte volume (three-fourths Angus > F and three-fourths bloods combined > F), lipogenesis from acetate in s.c. adipose tissue (three-fourths Brahman calves from Brahman dams > three-fourths Brahman calves from F dams), and percentage 18:3-3 in s.c. adipose tissue (three-fourths Brahman calves from Brahman-sired F dams < three-fourths Brahman calves from Angus-sired F dams). Intramuscular adipocyte volume ( < 0.001) was

  16. Adipose tissue fatty acid chain length and mono-unsaturation increases with obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yew Tan, Chong; Virtue, Samuel; Murfitt, Steven; Robert, Lee D.; Phua, Yi Hui; Dale, Martin; Griffin, Julian L.; Tinahones, Francisco; Scherer, Philipp E.; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The non-essential fatty acids, C18:1n9, C16:0, C16:1n7, C18:0 and C18:1n7 account for over 75% of fatty acids in white adipose (WAT) triacylglycerol (TAG). The relative composition of these fatty acids (FA) is influenced by the desaturases, SCD1-4 and the elongase, ELOVL6. In knock-out models, loss of SCD1 or ELOVL6 results in reduced Δ9 desaturated and reduced 18-carbon non-essential FA respectively. Both Elovl6 KO and SCD1 KO mice exhibit improved insulin sensitivity. Here we describe the relationship between WAT TAG composition in obese mouse models and obese humans stratified for insulin resistance. In mouse models with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, there was an increase in scWAT Δ9 desaturated FAs (SCD ratio) and FAs with 18-carbons (Elovl6 ratio) in mice. Data from mouse models discordant for obesity and insulin resistance (AKT2 KO, Adiponectin aP2-transgenic), suggested that scWAT TAG Elovl6 ratio was associated with insulin sensitivity, whereas SCD1 ratio was associated with fat mass. In humans, a greater SCD1 and Elovl6 ratio was found in metabolically more harmful visceral adipose tissue when compared to subcutaneous adipose tissue. PMID:26679101

  17. Downregulation of de Novo Fatty Acid Synthesis in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Moderately Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Aragonès, Gemma; Aguilar, Carmen; Sabench, Fàtima; Armengol, Sandra; Porras, José Antonio; Martí, Andreu; Jorba, Rosa; Hernández, Mercè; del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the expression of fatty acid metabolism-related genes in human adipose tissue from moderately obese women. We used qRT-PCR and Western Blot to analyze visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue mRNA expression involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis (ACC1, FAS), fatty acid oxidation (PPARα, PPARδ) and inflammation (IL6, TNFα), in normal weight control women (BMI < 25 kg/m2, n = 35) and moderately obese women (BMI 30–38 kg/m2, n = 55). In SAT, ACC1, FAS and PPARα mRNA expression were significantly decreased in moderately obese women compared to controls. The downregulation reported in SAT was more pronounced when BMI increased. In VAT, lipogenic-related genes and PPARα were similar in both groups. Only PPARδ gene expression was significantly increased in moderately obese women. As far as inflammation is concerned, TNFα and IL6 were significantly increased in moderate obesity in both tissues. Our results indicate that there is a progressive downregulation in lipogenesis in SAT as BMI increases, which suggests that SAT decreases the synthesis of fatty acid de novo during the development of obesity, whereas in VAT lipogenesis remains active regardless of the degree of obesity. PMID:26694359

  18. Vitamin D Regulates Fatty Acid Composition in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Through Elovl3.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lijuan; Gupta, Mihir; Feldman, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are a major energy source in the body. White adipose tissue (WAT) is a primary site where FAs are stored as triacylglycerols. Brown adipose tissue also stores and recruits FAs as a carbon source for uncoupled β-oxidation during thermogenesis. The deletion of the vitamin D nuclear hormone receptor (VDR) gene in mice (VDRKO) results in a lean WAT phenotype with increased levels of expression of the brown adipose tissue marker Ucp1 in the WAT. However, the impact of vitamin D/VDR on FA composition in WAT has not been explored in detail. To address this question, we examined the FA composition of sc and visceral white adipose depots of VDRKO mice. We found that the levels of a subset of saturated and monounsaturated FAs of C18-C24 are specifically increased in the sc adipose depot in VDRKO mice. We revealed that a specific elongase enzyme (Elovl3), which has an important role in brown fat biology, is directly regulated by VDR and likely contributes to the altered FA composition in VDRKO mice. We also demonstrate that Elovl3 is regulated by vitamin D in vivo and tissue specifically in the sc WAT depot. We discovered that regulation of Elovl3 expression is mediated by ligand-dependent VDR occupancy of a negative-response element in the promoter proximal region of the Elovl3 gene. These data suggest that vitamin D/VDR tissue specifically modulates FA composition in sc WAT through direct regulation of Elovl3 expression. PMID:26488808

  19. Effect of DNA polymorphisms related to fatty acid composition in adipose tissue of Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Narukami, Takahiro; Sasazaki, Shinji; Oyama, Kenji; Nogi, Takuya; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Mannen, Hideyuki

    2011-06-01

    Fatty acid composition of adipose tissue has been recognized as an important carcass trait because of its relationship with eating quality such as favorable beef flavor and tenderness. Therefore, we investigated the effects of genetic polymorphisms of liver X receptor, alpha (LXR), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), Fatty acid synthase (FASN), and Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) on fatty acid composition in intramuscular fat tissue of Holstein steers. The major allele frequencies were 0.705 in SCD, 0.518 in FABP4, 0.888 in FASN, and 0.984 in LXR. Genotyping of SCD showed significant effect on C14:0, C14:1, C18:0 and saturated fatty acid (P < 0.05). In addition, the result suggested that SCD genotype possibly had effect on composition of C18:1 and monounsaturated fatty acid. Genotype of FABP4 had significant effect on composition of C16:0. Effect of LXR genotypes could not be analyze because of extremely biased genotype frequencies. Our results suggest that genotypes of SCD and FABP4 may in part affect meat quality in Holstein.

  20. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  1. Prohibitin/annexin 2 interaction regulates fatty acid transport in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Daquinag, Alexes C.; Staquicini, Daniela I.; An, Zhiqiang; Pasqualini, Renata; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified prohibitin (PHB) and annexin A2 (ANX2) as proteins interacting on the surface of vascular endothelial cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) of humans and mice. Here, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB also interact in adipocytes. Mice lacking ANX2 have normal WAT vascularization, adipogenesis, and glucose metabolism but display WAT hypotrophy due to reduced fatty acid uptake by WAT endothelium and adipocytes. By using cell culture systems in which ANX2/PHB binding is disrupted either genetically or through treatment with a blocking peptide, we show that fatty acid transport efficiency relies on this protein complex. We also provide evidence that the interaction between ANX2 and PHB mediates fatty acid transport from the endothelium into adipocytes. Moreover, we demonstrate that ANX2 and PHB form a complex with the fatty acid transporter CD36. Finally, we show that the colocalization of PHB and CD36 on adipocyte surface is induced by extracellular fatty acids. Together, our results suggest that an unrecognized biochemical interaction between ANX2 and PHB regulates CD36-mediated fatty acid transport in WAT, thus revealing a new potential pathway for intervention in metabolic diseases. PMID:27468426

  2. Metabolic inflexibility of white and brown adipose tissues in abnormal fatty acid partitioning of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Grenier-Larouche, T; Labbé, S M; Noll, C; Richard, D; Carpentier, A C

    2012-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by a general dysregulation of postprandial energy substrate partitioning. Although classically described in regard to glucose metabolism, it is now evident that metabolic inflexibility of plasma lipid fluxes is also present in T2D. The organ that is most importantly involved in the latter metabolic defect is the white adipose tissue (WAT). Both catecholamine-induced nonesterified fatty acid mobilization and insulin-stimulated storage of meal fatty acids are impaired in many WAT depots of insulin-resistant individuals. Novel molecular imaging techniques now demonstrate that these defects are linked to increased dietary fatty acid fluxes toward lean organs and myocardial dysfunction in humans. Recent findings also demonstrate functional abnormalities of brown adipose tissues in T2D, thus suggesting that a generalized adipose tissue dysregulation of energy storage and dissipation may be at play in the development of lean tissue energy overload and lipotoxicity. PMID:27152152

  3. A radioisotopic technique for analysis of free fatty acid reesterification in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Leibel, R L; Hirsch, J

    1985-01-01

    Reesterification rates of free fatty acids (FFA) formed by intracellular triglyceride hydrolysis in small fragments of human adipose tissue were measured. Subcutaneous gluteal adipose tissue, obtained by needle biopsy, was incubated in a buffered albumin medium containing [3H]palmitate and [14C]glucose, each of high specific activity. In triglycerides (TG) and diglycerides (DG) synthesized by the tissue, [14C]glucose is incorporated exclusively into the glyceride-glycerol moiety, and 3H appears solely in the esterified fatty acids. Since rates of TG and DG synthesis can be determined from 14C accumulation rates in these molecules, the total amounts of FFA esterified can also be calculated. The difference between this estimate of total FFA esterification and the moles of [3H]palmitate esterified to these molecules represents the amount of unlabeled FFA from ongoing TG hydrolysis that was reesterified during the incubation. FFA recycling by the reesterification pathway is an important mechanism for the control of the quantity and proportions of FFA and glycerol leaving the human adipocyte. Fasting and beta-adrenergic stimulation reduce the fraction of endogenously released FFA that are reesterified from resting values of 30-40% to 8-21%, thereby increasing the molar ratio of FFA to glycerol leaving the adipocyte. The technique described can be employed to monitor sequential changes in this important metabolic cycle in humans under a wide range of nutritional and clinical circumstances.

  4. Lipid metabolism during lactation: a review of adipose tissue-liver interactions and the development of fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Richard G

    2005-11-01

    Fatty acids are the major source of energy for most tissues during periods of negative energy balance; however, fatty acids can, in some circumstances, have pathological effects. Fatty acids are stored as triacylglycerols (TAG), mostly in the various adipose tissue depots of the body. However, if blood unesterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels are elevated for prolonged periods, as may occur during lactation or obesity, TAG can accumulate in other tissues including liver and muscle cells (myocytes), and this can have pathological consequences such as the development of ketosis (Grummer, 1993; Drackley et al. 2001) or type 2 diabetes (Boden & Shulman, 2002; McGarry, 2002).

  5. Data on the phospholipid fatty acyl composition of retroperitoneal white adipose tissue in ad libitum fed and fasted mice

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Kristin A.; Marvyn, Phillip M.; Henao, Juan J. Aristizabal; Bradley, Ryan M.; Stark, Ken D.; Duncan, Robin E.

    2016-01-01

    Data are presented on the fatty acyl composition of phospholipid from retroperitoneal white adipose tissue of female mice that were either given ad libitum access to food or fasted for 16 h overnight prior to sacrifice. Our data show that total adipose phospholipid concentrations were more than 2-fold higher in the fasted animals compared with the fed animals (33.48±7.40 versus 16.57±4.43 μg phospholipid fatty acids/100 mg tissue). Concentrations of several individual phospholipid fatty acyl species, including palmitic acid (16:0), vaccenic acid (18:1n-7), linoleic acid (18:2n-6), dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), as well as total phospholipid saturated fatty acids, n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, were significantly higher in adipose tissue from the fasted animals compared with the fed animals. However, when the relative abundance of phospholipid fatty acyl species was analyzed, only 20:4n-6 was specifically enriched (by ~2.5-fold) in adipose phospholipid with fasting. PMID:27014729

  6. Dietary sandalwood seed oil modifies fatty acid composition of mouse adipose tissue, brain, and liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Longmore, R B

    1997-09-01

    Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum) seed oil, which occurs to about 50% of the weight of the seed kernels, contains 30-35% of total fatty acids (FA) as ximenynic acid (XMYA). This study was designed to obtain basic information on changes in tissue FA composition and on the metabolic fate of XMYA in mice fed a sandalwood seed oil (SWSO)-enriched diet. Female mice were randomly divided into three groups, each receiving different semisynthetic diets containing 5.2% (w/w) fat (standard laboratory diet), 15% canola oil, or 15% SWSO for 8 wk. The effects of SWSO as a dietary fat on the FA composition of adipose tissue, brain, and liver lipids were determined by analyses of FA methyl ester derivatives of extracted total lipid. The FA compositions of the liver and adipose tissue were markedly altered by the dietary fats, and mice fed on a SWSO-enriched diet were found to contain XMYA but only in low concentration (0.3-3%) in these tissues; XMYA was not detected in brain. Oleic acid was suggested to be a principal XMYA biotransformation product. The results were interpreted to suggest that the metabolism of XMYA may involve both biohydrogenation and oxidation reactions. PMID:9307938

  7. Understanding the effects of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone in physiological fatty tissue for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-11-01

    Engineering of large vascularized adipose tissue constructs is still a challenge for the treatment of extensive high-graded burns or the replacement of tissue after tumor removal. Communication between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells is important for homeostasis and the maintenance of adipose tissue mass but, to date, is mainly neglected in tissue engineering strategies. Thus, new co-culture strategies are needed to integrate adipocytes and endothelial cells successfully into a functional construct. This review focuses on the cross-talk of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells and considers their influence on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone. In addition, the properties and challenges with regard to these two cell types for vascularized tissue engineering are highlighted.

  8. Understanding the effects of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone in physiological fatty tissue for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-11-01

    Engineering of large vascularized adipose tissue constructs is still a challenge for the treatment of extensive high-graded burns or the replacement of tissue after tumor removal. Communication between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells is important for homeostasis and the maintenance of adipose tissue mass but, to date, is mainly neglected in tissue engineering strategies. Thus, new co-culture strategies are needed to integrate adipocytes and endothelial cells successfully into a functional construct. This review focuses on the cross-talk of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells and considers their influence on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone. In addition, the properties and challenges with regard to these two cell types for vascularized tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26340984

  9. Autologous subcutaneous adipose tissue transplants improve adipose tissue metabolism and reduce insulin resistance and fatty liver in diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Hamdan-Pérez, Nashla; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Tovar, Armando R; Torre-Villalvazo, Ivan; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Morán-Ramos, Sofía; Noriega, Lilia G; Martínez-Benítez, Braulio; López-Garibay, Alejandro; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Ceballos-Cantú, Juan C; Tovar-Palacio, Claudia; Figueroa-Juárez, Elizabeth; Hiriart, Marcia; Medina-Santillán, Roberto; Castillo-Hernández, Carmen; Torres, Nimbe

    2016-09-01

    Long-term dietary and pharmacological treatments for obesity have been questioned, particularly in individuals with severe obesity, so a new approach may involve adipose tissue transplants, particularly autologous transplants. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic effects of autologous subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) transplants into two specific intraabdominal cavity sites (omental and retroperitoneal) after 90 days. The study was performed using two different diet-induced obesity (DIO) rat models: one using a high-fat diet (HFD) and the other using a high-carbohydrate diet (HCHD). Autologous SAT transplant reduced hypertrophic adipocytes, improved insulin sensitivity, reduced hepatic lipid content, and fasting serum-free fatty acids (FFAs) concentrations in the two DIO models. In addition, the reductions in FFAs and glycerol were accompanied by a greater reduction in lipolysis, assessed via the phosphorylation status of HSL, in the transplanted adipose tissue localized in the omentum compared with that localized in the retroperitoneal compartment. Therefore, the improvement in hepatic lipid content after autologous SAT transplant may be partially attributed to a reduction in lipolysis in the transplanted adipose tissue in the omentum due to the direct drainage of FFAs into the liver. The HCHD resulted in elevated fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, which were dramatically reduced by the autologous SAT transplant. In conclusion, the specific intraabdominal localization of the autologous SAT transplant improved the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of adipose tissue in obese rats and selectively corrected the metabolic parameters that are dependent on the type of diet used to generate the DIO model. PMID:27582062

  10. Autologous subcutaneous adipose tissue transplants improve adipose tissue metabolism and reduce insulin resistance and fatty liver in diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Hamdan-Pérez, Nashla; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Tovar, Armando R; Torre-Villalvazo, Ivan; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Morán-Ramos, Sofía; Noriega, Lilia G; Martínez-Benítez, Braulio; López-Garibay, Alejandro; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Ceballos-Cantú, Juan C; Tovar-Palacio, Claudia; Figueroa-Juárez, Elizabeth; Hiriart, Marcia; Medina-Santillán, Roberto; Castillo-Hernández, Carmen; Torres, Nimbe

    2016-09-01

    Long-term dietary and pharmacological treatments for obesity have been questioned, particularly in individuals with severe obesity, so a new approach may involve adipose tissue transplants, particularly autologous transplants. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic effects of autologous subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) transplants into two specific intraabdominal cavity sites (omental and retroperitoneal) after 90 days. The study was performed using two different diet-induced obesity (DIO) rat models: one using a high-fat diet (HFD) and the other using a high-carbohydrate diet (HCHD). Autologous SAT transplant reduced hypertrophic adipocytes, improved insulin sensitivity, reduced hepatic lipid content, and fasting serum-free fatty acids (FFAs) concentrations in the two DIO models. In addition, the reductions in FFAs and glycerol were accompanied by a greater reduction in lipolysis, assessed via the phosphorylation status of HSL, in the transplanted adipose tissue localized in the omentum compared with that localized in the retroperitoneal compartment. Therefore, the improvement in hepatic lipid content after autologous SAT transplant may be partially attributed to a reduction in lipolysis in the transplanted adipose tissue in the omentum due to the direct drainage of FFAs into the liver. The HCHD resulted in elevated fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, which were dramatically reduced by the autologous SAT transplant. In conclusion, the specific intraabdominal localization of the autologous SAT transplant improved the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of adipose tissue in obese rats and selectively corrected the metabolic parameters that are dependent on the type of diet used to generate the DIO model.

  11. Repeated electroacupuncture in obese Zucker diabetic fatty rats: adiponectin and leptin in serum and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Peplow, Philip V

    2015-04-01

    Fasted, male, obese, Zucker, diabetic fatty rats aged 10-16 weeks were anesthetized with 1% halothane in nitrous oxide-oxygen (3:1) on alternate weekdays over 2 weeks. Group 1 (n = 4) did not receive electroacupuncture (controls); Group 2 (n = 4) received electroacupuncture using the Zhongwan and the Guanyuan acupoints; Group 3 (n = 4) received electroacupuncture using the bilateral Zusanli acupoints; Group 4 (n = 6) received neither halothane in nitrous oxide:oxygen nor electroacupuncture. At the end of study, animals were injected with sodium pentobarbitone (60 mg/mL, i.p.), and blood and white adipose tissue were collected. Analysis of variance and Duncan's tests showed that the mean leptin in serum was significantly lower and the adiponectin:leptin ratio was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p < 0.05); for Group 4, the serum leptin was significantly higher than it was for Groups 1-3 (p < 0.05), and the adiponectin:leptin ratio was significantly lower than it was for Group 2 (p < 0.05). Similar changes occurred for the leptin levels in the pelvic adipose tissue. In addition, for Group 2, the mean serum insulin: glucose ratio was significantly higher than it was for Group 1 (p < 0.05); for Group 4 the mean serum insulin and insulin: glucose ratio were significantly higher than they were for Groups 1 and 3 (p < 0.05), but not Group 2 (p > 0.05). No significant differences in the serum or the adipose-tissue measurements between Groups 1 and 3 were observed (p > 0.05). PMID:25952122

  12. Repeated electroacupuncture in obese Zucker diabetic fatty rats: adiponectin and leptin in serum and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Peplow, Philip V

    2015-04-01

    Fasted, male, obese, Zucker, diabetic fatty rats aged 10-16 weeks were anesthetized with 1% halothane in nitrous oxide-oxygen (3:1) on alternate weekdays over 2 weeks. Group 1 (n = 4) did not receive electroacupuncture (controls); Group 2 (n = 4) received electroacupuncture using the Zhongwan and the Guanyuan acupoints; Group 3 (n = 4) received electroacupuncture using the bilateral Zusanli acupoints; Group 4 (n = 6) received neither halothane in nitrous oxide:oxygen nor electroacupuncture. At the end of study, animals were injected with sodium pentobarbitone (60 mg/mL, i.p.), and blood and white adipose tissue were collected. Analysis of variance and Duncan's tests showed that the mean leptin in serum was significantly lower and the adiponectin:leptin ratio was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p < 0.05); for Group 4, the serum leptin was significantly higher than it was for Groups 1-3 (p < 0.05), and the adiponectin:leptin ratio was significantly lower than it was for Group 2 (p < 0.05). Similar changes occurred for the leptin levels in the pelvic adipose tissue. In addition, for Group 2, the mean serum insulin: glucose ratio was significantly higher than it was for Group 1 (p < 0.05); for Group 4 the mean serum insulin and insulin: glucose ratio were significantly higher than they were for Groups 1 and 3 (p < 0.05), but not Group 2 (p > 0.05). No significant differences in the serum or the adipose-tissue measurements between Groups 1 and 3 were observed (p > 0.05).

  13. Restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis: impact on lipid metabolism and adipose tissue and serum fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Marco; Romanato, Giovanna; Manzato, Enzo; Ruffolo, Cesare; Marin, Raffaella; Basato, Silvia; Zambon, Sabina; Filosa, Teresa; Zanoni, Silvia; Pilon, Fabio; Polese, Lino; Sturniolo, Giacomo C; D'Amico, Davide F; Angriman, Imerio

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the changes of the metabolism of circulating and storage lipids in patients with ulcerative colitis after restorative proctocolectomy. Fifteen consecutive patients and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Disease activity, diet, inflammatory parameters, plasma lipoprotein concentrations, and fatty acids (FA) of serum phospholipids and of the subcutaneous adipose tissue were assessed at colectomy and at ileostomy closure. In ulcerative colitis patients, total cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid were lower than in healthy subjects (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). The median interval between colectomy and ileostomy closure was 6 (range 2-9) months. During that interval, the inflammatory parameters improved, high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol increased (p < 0.01), and low-density (LDL) cholesterol decreased (p = 0.01). At ileostomy closure, serum arachidonic acid levels were increased (p = 0.04), whereas serum oleic acid level was decreased (p = 0.02). In this interval, no significant alteration, either in serum n-3 FA precursors or in the FA of subcutaneous adipose tissue, was observed. The increase of serum arachidonic acid after colectomy might suggest a lower utilization for inflammatory process. The reduction of LDL cholesterol is an index of malabsorption probably due to the accelerated transit and to the exclusion of the terminal ileum caused by the covering ileostomy. PMID:17955308

  14. POSTPRANDIAL TRIGLYCERIDES AND ADIPOSE TISSUE STORAGE OF DIETARY FATTY ACIDS: IMPACT OF MENOPAUSE AND ESTRADIOL

    PubMed Central

    Bessesen, DH; Cox-York, KA; Hernandez, TL; Erickson, CB; Wang, H; Jackman, MR; Van Pelt, RE

    2014-01-01

    Objective Postprandial lipemia worsens after menopause, but the mechanism remains unknown. We hypothesized menopause-related postprandial lipemia would be: 1) associated with reduced storage of dietary fatty acids (FA) as triglyceride (TG) in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT); and 2) improved by short-term estradiol (E2). Design and Methods We studied 23 pre- (mean±SD; 42±4yr) and 22 postmenopausal (55±4yr) women with similar total adiposity. A subset of postmenopausal women (n=12) were studied following 2 weeks of E2 (0.15mg) and matching placebo in a random, cross-over design. A liquid meal containing 14C-oleic acid traced appearance of dietary FA in: serum (postprandial TG), breath (oxidation), and abdominal and femoral SAT (TG storage). Results Compared to premenopausal, healthy lean postmenopausal women had increased postprandial glucose and insulin and trend for higher TG, but similar dietary FA oxidation and storage. Adipocytes were larger in post- compared to premenopausal women, particularly in femoral SAT. Short-term E2 reduced postprandial TG and insulin, but had no effect on oxidation or storage of dietary FA. E2 increased the proportion of small adipocytes in femoral (but not abdominal) SAT. Conclusions Short-term E2 attenuated menopause-related increases in postprandial TG and increased femoral adipocyte hyperplasia, but not through increased net storage of dietary FA. PMID:25354893

  15. Fatty acid composition of adipose tissue triglycerides in obese diabetic women after bariatric surgery: a 2-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Kunešová, M; Sedláčková, B; Bradnová, O; Tvrzická, E; Staňková, B; Šrámková, P; DoleŽalová, K; Kalousková, P; Hlavatý, P; Hill, M; Bendlová, B; Fried, M; Hainer, V; Vrbíková, J

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective method in the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different types of bariatric procedures on remission of T2DM and on the fatty acid composition in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Patients included obese diabetic women who underwent bariatric surgery: biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), n=8, laparoscopic gastric banding (LAGB), n=9 or laparoscopic greater curvature plication (LGCP), n=12. Anthropometric characteristics and fatty acid composition of adipose tissue (FA AT) were analyzed before surgery, then 6 months and 2 years after surgery. FA AT was analyzed by gas chromatography. Diabetes remission was estimated. BPD was most efficient in inducing a remission of diabetes (p=0.004). Significantly higher increases in lauric (12:0), myristoleic (14:1n-5) and palmitoleic (16:1n-7) acids and delta-9 desaturase were found two years after BPD, suggesting higher lipogenesis in adipose tissue. Docosatetraenoic acid (22:4n-6) increased significantly after BPD, while docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3) decreased 6 months after BPD and increased after 2 years. No changes were found after LAGB and LGCP after 2 years. Bariatric surgery led to significant changes in the fatty acid composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue in severely obese diabetic women after six months and two years, and was partly influenced by the type of surgery used. PMID:26680476

  16. Selective fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissues of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus mongolicus) during food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Käkelä, Reijo; Asikainen, Juha; Nieminen, Petteri

    2009-01-01

    Avian response to fasting has been examined intensively in penguins (Aptenodytes spp.) adapted to long-term food deprivation but less in species experiencing shorter fasts. Thus, the selectivity in (i) incorporating different fatty acids (FA) from diet into total lipids of white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver and (ii) mobilizing FA from these tissues was examined in pheasants Phasianus colchicus mongolicus fed or fasted for 4 d. Dietary FA were selectively incorporated into intra-abdominal and subcutaneous WAT having a similar composition. The WAT lipids contained higher proportions of saturated and monounsaturated FA and less polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) than the dietary profile. However, the isomers of 20:1 and 22:1 were incorporated inefficiently into the WAT lipids. The essential C18 PUFA precursors having smaller percentages in the pheasant tissues than in the diet were likely converted into longer-chain derivatives probably utilized to a great extent for structural lipids of muscles and organs. During food deprivation, the pheasants preferentially utilized 16:1n-7, 18:3n-3, 18:1n-9, and 16:0 but preserved long-chain saturated and unsaturated FA. Mobilization was more efficient for shorter-chain FA and increased with Delta9-desaturation. The hepatic FA profile was resistant to the 4-d period of food deprivation. The results demonstrate that the incorporation of FA into WAT and their mobilization from lipid stores are selective not only in mammals but also in birds.

  17. Biochemical properties of porcine white adipose tissue mitochondria and relevance to fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koekemoer, T C; Oelofsen, W

    2001-07-01

    The capacity of white adipose tissue mitochondria to support a high beta-oxidative flux was investigated by comparison to liver mitochondria. Based on marker enzyme activities and electron microscopy, the relative purity of the isolated mitochondria was similar thus allowing a direct comparison on a protein basis. The results confirm the comparable capacity of adipose tissue and liver mitochondria for palmitoyl-carnitine oxidation. Relative to liver, both citrate synthase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were increased 7.87- and 10.38-fold, respectively. In contrast, adipose tissue NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase was decreased (2.85-fold). Such modifications in the citric acid cycle are expected to severely restrict citrate oxidation in porcine adipose tissue. Except for cytochrome c oxidase, activities of the enzyme complexes comprising the electron transport chain were not significantly different. The decrease in adipose cytochrome c oxidase activity could partly be attributed to a decreased inner membrane as suggested by lipid and enzyme analysis. In addition, Western blotting indicated that adipose and liver mitochondria possess similar quantities of cytochrome c oxidase protein. Taken together these results indicate that not only is the white adipose tissue protoplasm relatively rich in mitochondria, but that these mitochondria contain comparable enzymatic machinery to support a relatively high beta-oxidative rate. PMID:11435134

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Reduce Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Human Subjects With Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael; Finlin, Brian S.; Unal, Resat; Zhu, Beibei; Morris, Andrew J.; Shipp, Lindsey R.; Lee, Jonah; Walton, R. Grace; Adu, Akosua; Erfani, Rod; Campbell, Marilyn; McGehee, Robert E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.; Kern, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Fish oils (FOs) have anti-inflammatory effects and lower serum triglycerides. This study examined adipose and muscle inflammatory markers after treatment of humans with FOs and measured the effects of ω-3 fatty acids on adipocytes and macrophages in vitro. Insulin-resistant, nondiabetic subjects were treated with Omega-3-Acid Ethyl Esters (4 g/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. Plasma macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) levels were reduced by FO, but the levels of other cytokines were unchanged. The adipose (but not muscle) of FO-treated subjects demonstrated a decrease in macrophages, a decrease in MCP-1, and an increase in capillaries, and subjects with the most macrophages demonstrated the greatest response to treatment. Adipose and muscle ω-3 fatty acid content increased after treatment; however, there was no change in insulin sensitivity or adiponectin. In vitro, M1-polarized macrophages expressed high levels of MCP-1. The addition of ω-3 fatty acids reduced MCP-1 expression with no effect on TNF-α. In addition, ω-3 fatty acids suppressed the upregulation of adipocyte MCP-1 that occurred when adipocytes were cocultured with macrophages. Thus, FO reduced adipose macrophages, increased capillaries, and reduced MCP-1 expression in insulin-resistant humans and in macrophages and adipocytes in vitro; however, there was no measureable effect on insulin sensitivity. PMID:23328126

  19. A high omega 3 fatty acid diet alters fatty acid composition of heart, liver, kidney, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in swine.

    PubMed

    Otten, W; Wirth, C; Iaizzo, P A; Eichinger, H M

    1993-01-01

    The fatty acid profiles and total lipid contents of two skeletal muscles, adipose tissue, heart, liver and kidney of swine fed a diet rich in omega 3 (n-3) fatty acids (i.e., 5% fish oil) was investigated. These values were compared to those determined for animals which were fed an equal caloric diet low in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% coconut oil). All supplementations were given over a 13-week period. The lipids were extracted with chloroform-methanol, trans-esterified and the relative fatty acid methyl-esters concentrations were determined using capillary gas chromatography. The fish oil diet significantly enhanced the relative amounts of n-3 fatty acids (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) in all tissues examined. In the heart, liver and kidney, the increases in n-3 fatty acids were compensated by decreases primarily in arachidonic acid, but in the other tissues the contents of lauric and myristic acids were also reduced. In general, the n-3 fatty acid contents were 40-165% higher in the animals fed the fish oil. Supplementation of n-3 fatty acids in swine induced a significant incorporation of these fatty acids throughout the body, however the extent of this incorporation differed between tissues perhaps due to tissue-specific metabolic pathways. PMID:8373137

  20. Fatty acid binding protein 4 expression marks a population of adipocyte progenitors in white and brown adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Liu, Weiyi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues regulate metabolism, reproduction, and life span. The development and growth of adipose tissue are due to increases of both adipocyte cell size and cell number; the latter is mediated by adipocyte progenitors. Various markers have been used to identify either adipocyte progenitors or mature adipocytes. The fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), commonly known as adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), has been extensively used as a marker for differentiated adipocytes. However, whether aP2 is expressed in adipogenic progenitors is controversial. Using Cre/LoxP-based cell lineage tracing in mice, we have identified a population of aP2-expressing progenitors in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of both white and brown adipose tissues. The aP2-lineage progenitors reside in the adipose stem cell niche and express adipocyte progenitor markers, including CD34, Sca1, Dlk1, and PDGFRα. When isolated and grown in culture, the aP2-expressing SVF cells proliferate and differentiate into adipocytes upon induction. Conversely, ablation of the aP2 lineage greatly reduces the adipogenic potential of SVF cells. When grafted into wild-type mice, the aP2-lineage progenitors give rise to adipose depots in recipient mice. Therefore, the expression of aP2 is not limited to mature adipocytes, but also marks a pool of undifferentiated progenitors associated with the vasculature of adipose tissues. Our finding adds to the repertoire of adipose progenitor markers and points to a new regulator of adipose plasticity.

  1. Fatty Acid Composition of Muscle, Adipose Tissue and Liver from Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) Living in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Alves, Susana P; Raundrup, Katrine; Cabo, Ângelo; Bessa, Rui J B; Almeida, André M

    2015-01-01

    Information about lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatos) edible tissues is very limited in comparison to other meat sources. Thus, this work aims to present the first in-depth characterization of the FA profile of meat, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver of muskoxen living in West Greenland. Furthermore, we aim to evaluate the effect of sex in the FA composition of these edible tissues. Samples from muscle (Longissimus dorsi), subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver were collected from female and male muskoxen, which were delivered at the butchery in Kangerlussuaq (West Greenland) during the winter hunting season. The lipid content of muscle, adipose tissue and liver averaged 284, 846 and 173 mg/g of dry tissue, respectively. This large lipid contents confirms that in late winter, when forage availability is scarce, muskoxen from West Greenland still have high fat reserves, demonstrating that they are well adapted to seasonal feed restriction. A detailed characterization of FA and dimethylacetal composition of muskoxen muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver showed that there are little differences on FA composition between sexes. Nevertheless, the 18:1cis-9 was the most abundant FA in muscle and adipose tissue, reaching 43% of total FA in muscle. The high content of 18:1cis-9 suggests that it can be selectively stored in muskoxen tissues. Regarding the nutritional composition of muskoxen edible tissues, they are not a good source of polyunsaturated FA; however, they may contribute to a higher fat intake. Information about the FA composition of muskoxen meat and liver is scarce, so this work can contribute to the characterization of the nutritional fat properties of muskoxen edible tissues and can be also useful to update food composition databases.

  2. Fatty Acid Composition of Muscle, Adipose Tissue and Liver from Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) Living in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Alves, Susana P; Raundrup, Katrine; Cabo, Ângelo; Bessa, Rui J B; Almeida, André M

    2015-01-01

    Information about lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatos) edible tissues is very limited in comparison to other meat sources. Thus, this work aims to present the first in-depth characterization of the FA profile of meat, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver of muskoxen living in West Greenland. Furthermore, we aim to evaluate the effect of sex in the FA composition of these edible tissues. Samples from muscle (Longissimus dorsi), subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver were collected from female and male muskoxen, which were delivered at the butchery in Kangerlussuaq (West Greenland) during the winter hunting season. The lipid content of muscle, adipose tissue and liver averaged 284, 846 and 173 mg/g of dry tissue, respectively. This large lipid contents confirms that in late winter, when forage availability is scarce, muskoxen from West Greenland still have high fat reserves, demonstrating that they are well adapted to seasonal feed restriction. A detailed characterization of FA and dimethylacetal composition of muskoxen muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver showed that there are little differences on FA composition between sexes. Nevertheless, the 18:1cis-9 was the most abundant FA in muscle and adipose tissue, reaching 43% of total FA in muscle. The high content of 18:1cis-9 suggests that it can be selectively stored in muskoxen tissues. Regarding the nutritional composition of muskoxen edible tissues, they are not a good source of polyunsaturated FA; however, they may contribute to a higher fat intake. Information about the FA composition of muskoxen meat and liver is scarce, so this work can contribute to the characterization of the nutritional fat properties of muskoxen edible tissues and can be also useful to update food composition databases. PMID:26678792

  3. Fatty Acid Composition of Muscle, Adipose Tissue and Liver from Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) Living in West Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Susana P.; Raundrup, Katrine; Cabo, Ângelo; Bessa, Rui J. B.; Almeida, André M.

    2015-01-01

    Information about lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatos) edible tissues is very limited in comparison to other meat sources. Thus, this work aims to present the first in-depth characterization of the FA profile of meat, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver of muskoxen living in West Greenland. Furthermore, we aim to evaluate the effect of sex in the FA composition of these edible tissues. Samples from muscle (Longissimus dorsi), subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver were collected from female and male muskoxen, which were delivered at the butchery in Kangerlussuaq (West Greenland) during the winter hunting season. The lipid content of muscle, adipose tissue and liver averaged 284, 846 and 173 mg/g of dry tissue, respectively. This large lipid contents confirms that in late winter, when forage availability is scarce, muskoxen from West Greenland still have high fat reserves, demonstrating that they are well adapted to seasonal feed restriction. A detailed characterization of FA and dimethylacetal composition of muskoxen muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver showed that there are little differences on FA composition between sexes. Nevertheless, the 18:1cis-9 was the most abundant FA in muscle and adipose tissue, reaching 43% of total FA in muscle. The high content of 18:1cis-9 suggests that it can be selectively stored in muskoxen tissues. Regarding the nutritional composition of muskoxen edible tissues, they are not a good source of polyunsaturated FA; however, they may contribute to a higher fat intake. Information about the FA composition of muskoxen meat and liver is scarce, so this work can contribute to the characterization of the nutritional fat properties of muskoxen edible tissues and can be also useful to update food composition databases. PMID:26678792

  4. Brown adipose tissue mitochondria: modulation by GDP and fatty acids depends on the respiratory substrates

    PubMed Central

    De Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A.; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Galina, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The UCP1 [first UCP (uncoupling protein)] that is found in the mitochondria of brown adipocytes [BAT (brown adipose tissue)] regulates the heat production, a process linked to non-shivering thermogenesis. The activity of UCP1 is modulated by GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we demonstrate that respiration and heat released by BAT mitochondria vary depending on the respiratory substrate utilized and the coupling state of the mitochondria. It has already been established that, in the presence of pyruvate/malate, BAT mitochondria are coupled by faf-BSA (fatty-acid-free BSA) and GDP, leading to an increase in ATP synthesis and mitochondrial membrane potential along with simultaneous decreases in both the rates of respiration and heat production. Oleate restores the uncoupled state, inhibiting ATP synthesis and increasing the rates of both respiration and heat production. We now show that in the presence of succinate: (i) the rates of uncoupled mitochondria respiration and heat production are five times slower than in the presence of pyruvate/malate; (ii) faf-BSA and GDP accelerate heat and respiration as a result and, in coupled mitochondria, these two rates are accelerated compared with pyruvate/malate; (iii) in spite of the differences in respiration and heat production noted with the two substrates, the membrane potential and the ATP synthesized were the same; and (iv) oleate promoted a decrease in heat production and respiration in coupled mitochondria, an effect different from that observed using pyruvate/malate. These effects are not related to the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species). We suggest that succinate could stimulate a new route to heat production in BAT mitochondria. PMID:21561434

  5. Melatonin improves mitochondrial function in inguinal white adipose tissue of Zücker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Jimenéz-Aranda, Aroa; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Mohammad A-Serrano, María; Reiter, Russel J; Agil, Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue may contribute to obesity-related metabolic derangements such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because mitochondria are a target for melatonin action, the goal of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on mitochondrial function in white (WAT) and beige inguinal adipose tissue of Zücker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, a model of obesity-related T2DM. In this experimental model, melatonin reduces obesity and improves the metabolic profile. At 6 wk of age, ZDF rats and lean littermates (ZL) were subdivided into two groups, each composed of four rats: control (C-ZDF and C-ZL) and treated with oral melatonin in the drinking water (10 mg/kg/day) for 6 wk (M-ZDF and M-ZL). After the treatment period, animals were sacrificed, tissues dissected, and mitochondrial function assessed in isolated organelles. Melatonin increased the respiratory control ratio (RCR) in mitochondria from white fat of both lean (by 26.5%, P < 0.01) and obese (by 34.5%, P < 0.01) rats mainly through a reduction of proton leaking component of respiration (state 4) (28% decrease in ZL, P < 0.01 and 35% in ZDF, P < 0.01). However, melatonin treatment lowered the RCR in beige mitochondria of both lean (by 7%, P < 0.05) and obese (by 13%, P < 0.05) rats by maintaining high rates of uncoupled respiration. Melatonin also lowered mitochondrial oxidative status by reducing nitrite levels and by increasing superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, melatonin treatment also caused a profound inhibition of Ca-induced opening of mPTP in isolated mitochondria from both types of fat, white and beige, in both lean and obese rats. These results demonstrate that chronic oral melatonin improves mitochondrial respiration and reduces the oxidative status and susceptibility to apoptosis in white and beige adipocytes. These melatonin effects help to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and thereby to improve obesity-related metabolic disorders such as

  6. Platelet aggregation in Finnish men and its relation to fatty acids in platelets, plasma and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Salo, M K; Vartiainen, E; Puska, P; Nikkari, T

    1985-10-30

    Platelet aggregation and its relation to fatty acid composition of platelets, plasma and adipose tissue was determined in 196 randomly selected, free-living, 40-49-year-old men in two regions of Finland (east and southwest) with a nearly twofold difference in the IHD rate. There were no significant east-southwest differences in platelet aggregation induced with ADP, thrombin or epinephrine. ADP-induced platelet secondary aggregation showed significant negative associations with all C20-C22 omega 3-fatty acids in platelets (r = -0.26- -0.40) and with the platelet 20: 5 omega 3/20: 4 omega 6 and omega 3/omega 6 ratios, but significant positive correlations with the contents of 18:2 in adipose tissue (r = 0.20) and plasma triglycerides (TG) (r = 0.29). Epinephrine-induced aggregation correlated negatively with 20: 5 omega 3 in plasma cholesteryl esters (CE) (r = -0.23) and TG (r = -0.29), and positively with the total percentage of saturated fatty acids in platelets (r = 0.33), but had no significant correlations with any of the omega 6-fatty acids. Thrombin-induced aggregation correlated negatively with the omega 3/6 omega ratio in adipose tissue (r = -0.25) and the 20: 3 omega 6/20: 4 omega 6 ratio in plasma CE (r = -0.27) and free fatty acids (FFA) (r = -0.23), and positively with adipose tissue 18:2 (r = 0.23) and 20:4 omega 6 (r = 0.22) in plasma phospholipids (PL). The percentages of prostanoid precursors in platelet lipids, i.e. 20:3 omega 6, 20:4 omega 6 and 20:5 omega 3, correlated best with the same fatty acids in plasma CE (r = 0.32 - 0.77) and PL (r = 0.28 - 0.74). Platelet 20:5 omega 3 had highly significant negative correlations with the percentage of 18:2 in adipose tissue and all plasma lipid fractions (r = -0.35 - -0.44).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Adipose Tissue Free Fatty Acid Storage In Vivo: Effects of Insulin Versus Niacin as a Control for Suppression of Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asem H.; Mundi, Manpreet; Koutsari, Christina; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the translocation fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) to plasma membrane, and thus greater free fatty acid (FFA) uptake, in adipocyte cell models. Whether insulin stimulates greater FFA clearance into adipose tissue in vivo is unknown. We tested this hypothesis by comparing direct FFA storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue during insulin versus niacin-medicated suppression of lipolysis. We measured direct FFA storage in abdominal and femoral subcutaneous fat in 10 and 11 adults, respectively, during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia or after oral niacin to suppress FFA compared with 11 saline control experiments. Direct palmitate storage was assessed using a [U-13C]palmitate infusion to measure palmitate kinetics and an intravenous palmitate radiotracer bolus/timed biopsy. Plasma palmitate concentrations and flux were suppressed to 23 ± 3 and 26 ± 5 µmol ⋅ L−1 (P = 0.91) and 44 ± 4 and 39 ± 5 µmol ⋅ min−1 (P = 0.41) in the insulin and niacin groups, respectively, much less (P < 0.001) than the saline control group (102 ± 8 and 104 ± 12 µmol ⋅ min−1, respectively). In the insulin, niacin, and saline groups, abdominal palmitate storage rates were 0.25 ± 0.05 vs. 0.25 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid−1 ⋅ min−1, respectively (P = NS), and femoral adipose storage rates were 0.19 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.05 vs. 0.31 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid−1 ⋅ min−1, respectively (P = NS). In conclusion, insulin does not increase FFA storage in adipose tissue compared with niacin, which suppresses lipolysis via a different pathway. PMID:25883112

  8. Adipose Tissue Free Fatty Acid Storage In Vivo: Effects of Insulin Versus Niacin as a Control for Suppression of Lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asem H; Mundi, Manpreet; Koutsari, Christina; Bernlohr, David A; Jensen, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    Insulin stimulates the translocation fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) to plasma membrane, and thus greater free fatty acid (FFA) uptake, in adipocyte cell models. Whether insulin stimulates greater FFA clearance into adipose tissue in vivo is unknown. We tested this hypothesis by comparing direct FFA storage in subcutaneous adipose tissue during insulin versus niacin-medicated suppression of lipolysis. We measured direct FFA storage in abdominal and femoral subcutaneous fat in 10 and 11 adults, respectively, during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia or after oral niacin to suppress FFA compared with 11 saline control experiments. Direct palmitate storage was assessed using a [U-(13)C]palmitate infusion to measure palmitate kinetics and an intravenous palmitate radiotracer bolus/timed biopsy. Plasma palmitate concentrations and flux were suppressed to 23 ± 3 and 26 ± 5 µmol ⋅ L(-1) (P = 0.91) and 44 ± 4 and 39 ± 5 µmol ⋅ min(-1) (P = 0.41) in the insulin and niacin groups, respectively, much less (P < 0.001) than the saline control group (102 ± 8 and 104 ± 12 µmol ⋅ min(-1), respectively). In the insulin, niacin, and saline groups, abdominal palmitate storage rates were 0.25 ± 0.05 vs. 0.25 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid(-1) ⋅ min(-1), respectively (P = NS), and femoral adipose storage rates were 0.19 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.05 vs. 0.31 ± 0.05 µmol ⋅ kg adipose lipid(-1) ⋅ min(-1), respectively (P = NS). In conclusion, insulin does not increase FFA storage in adipose tissue compared with niacin, which suppresses lipolysis via a different pathway.

  9. Shallow hypothermia depends on the level of fatty acid unsaturation in adipose and liver tissues in a tropical heterothermic primate.

    PubMed

    Vuarin, Pauline; Henry, Pierre-Yves; Guesnet, Philippe; Alessandri, Jean-Marc; Aujard, Fabienne; Perret, Martine; Pifferi, Fabien

    2014-07-01

    Optimal levels of unsaturated fatty acids have positive impacts on the use of prolonged bouts of hypothermia in mammalian hibernators, which generally have to face low winter ambient temperatures. Unsaturated fatty acids can maintain the fluidity of fat and membrane phospholipids at low body temperatures. However, less attention has been paid to their role in the regulation of shallow hypothermia, and in tropical species, which may be challenged more by seasonal energetic and/or water shortages than by low temperatures. The present study assessed the relationship between the fatty acids content of white adipose and liver tissues and the expression of shallow hypothermia in a tropical heterothermic primate, the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). The adipose tissue is the main tissue for fat storage and the liver is involved in lipid metabolism, so both tissues were expected to influence hypothermia dependence on fatty acids. As mouse lemurs largely avoid deep hypothermia (i.e. torpor) use under standard captive conditions, the expression of hypothermia was triggered by food-restricting experimental animals. Hypothermia depth increased with time, with a stronger increase for individuals that exhibited higher contents of unsaturated fatty acids suggesting that they were more flexible in their use of hypothermia. However these same animals delayed the use of long hypothermia bouts relative to individuals with a higher level of saturated fatty acids. This study evidences for the first time that body fatty acids unsaturation levels influence the regulation of body temperature not only in cold-exposed hibernators but also in tropical, facultative heterotherms.

  10. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modify fatty acid composition in hepatic and abdominal adipose tissue of sucrose-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Aguilera, Alfonso; Berruezo, Silvia; Hernández-Diaz, Guillermo; Angulo, Ofelia; Oliart-Ros, Rosamaria

    2011-12-01

    The fatty acid profile of hepatocytes and adipocytes is determined by the composition of the dietary lipids. It remains unclear which fatty acid components contribute to the development or reduction of insulin resistance. The present work examined the fatty acid composition of both tissues in sucrose-induced obese rats receiving fish oil to determine whether the effect of dietary (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the reversion of metabolic syndrome in these rats is associated to changes in the fatty acid composition of hepatocyte and adipocyte membrane lipids. Animals with metabolic syndrome were divided into a corn-canola oil diet group and a fish oil diet group, and tissues fatty acids composition were analyzed after 6 weeks of dietary treatment. Fatty acid profiles of the total membrane lipids were modified by the fatty acid composition of the diets fed to rats. N-3 PUFAs levels in animals receiving the fish oil diet plus sucrose in drinking water were significantly higher than in animals under corn-canola oil diets. It is concluded that in sucrose-induced obese rats, consumption of dietary fish oil had beneficial effects on the metabolic syndrome and that such effects would be conditioned by the changes in the n-3 PUFAs composition in hepatic and adipose tissues because they alter membrane properties and modify the type of substrates available for the production of active lipid metabolites acting on insulin resistance and obesity. PMID:21695545

  11. Adaptive modification of membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition and metabolic thermosuppression of brown adipose tissue in heat-acclimated rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S. K.; Ohno, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Kuroshima, A.

    Thermogenesis, especially facultative thermogenesis by brown adipose tissue (BAT), is less important in high ambient temperature and the heat-acclimated animals show a lower metabolic rate. Adaptive changes in the metabolic activity of BAT are generally found to be associated with a modification of membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition. However, the effect of heat acclimation on membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition is as yet unknown. In this study, we examined the thermogenic activity and phospholipid fatty acid composition of interscapular BAT from heat-acclimated rats (control: 25+/-1°C, 50% relative humidity and heat acclimation: 32+/-0.5°C, 50% relative humidity). Basal thermogenesis and the total thermogenic capacity after noradrenaline stimulation, as estimated by in vitro oxygen consumption of BAT (measured polarographically using about 1-mm3 tissue blocks), were smaller in the heat-acclimated group than in the control group. There was no difference in the tissue content of phospholipids between the groups when expressed per microgram of DNA. The phospholipid fatty acid composition was analyzed by a capillary gas chromatograph. The state of phospholipid unsaturation, as estimated by the number of double bonds per fatty acid molecule, was similar between the groups. The saturated fatty acid level was higher in the heat-acclimated group. Among the unsaturated fatty acids, heat acclimation decreased docosahexaenoic acid and oleic acid levels, and increased the arachidonic acid level. The tissue level of docosahexaenoic acid correlated with the basal oxygen consumption of BAT (r=0.6, P<0.01) and noradrenaline-stimulated maximum values of oxygen consumption (r=0.5, P<0.05). Our results show that heat acclimation modifies the BAT phospholipid fatty acids, especially the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid, which is possibly involved in the metabolic thermosuppression.

  12. Storage rates of circulating free fatty acid into adipose tissue during eating or walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Koutsari, Christina; Mundi, Manpreet S; Ali, Asem H; Jensen, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    We measured subcutaneous adipose tissue free fatty acid (FFA) storage rates in postprandial and walking conditions to better understand the contributions of this pathway to body fat distribution. Palmitate tracers were infused intravenously and fat biopsies collected to measure palmitate storage in upper- (UBSQ) and lower-body subcutaneous (LBSQ) fat in 41 (17 men) and 40 (16 men) volunteers under postprandial and under postabsorptive walking conditions, respectively. Postprandial palmitate storage was greater in women than men in UBSQ (0.50±0.25 vs. 0.33±0.37 μmol⋅kg fat(-1)⋅min(-1); P=0.007) and LBSQ fat (0.37±0.25 vs. 0.22±0.20 μmol⋅kg fat(-1)⋅min(-1); P=0.005); storage rates were significantly greater in UBSQ than LBSQ fat in both sexes. During walking, UBSQ palmitate storage did not differ between sexes, whereas LBSQ storage was greater in women than men (0.40±0.22 vs. 0.25±0.15 μmol⋅kg fat(-1)⋅min(-1); P=0.01). In women only, walking palmitate storage was significantly greater in LBSQ than UBSQ fat. Adipocyte CD36 and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) correlated with LBSQ palmitate storage in the postprandial and walking condition, respectively. We conclude that UBSQ fat is the preferred postprandial FFA storage depot for both sexes, whereas walking favors storage in LBSQ fat in women. Transmembrane transport (CD36) and esterification into triglycerides (DGAT) may be rate-limiting steps for LBSQ FFA storage during feeding and exercise.

  13. Calculating the iodine value for Italian heavy pig subcutaneous adipose tissue from fatty acid methyl ester profiles.

    PubMed

    Lo Fiego, Domenico Pietro; Minelli, Giovanna; Volpelli, Luisa Antonella; Ulrici, Alessandro; Macchioni, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    In this work, different equations were compared as for their effectiveness in predicting the iodine value (IV), based on fatty acid (FA) composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue of Italian heavy pigs. In particular, six equations were tested: AOCS (1); modified AOCS (2), including all unsaturated FA (UFA); regression models obtained using the stepwise regression procedure as variable selection method, calculated considering only UFA (3) or all the FA (4); regression models obtained using the backward elimination procedure, calculated considering only UFA (5) or all the FA (6). The comparison of the equations performance, estimated using an external test set, showed that the use of regression models led to significant enhancements of prediction accuracy with respect to the AOCS equations. Using both equations 4 and 6, the average paired differences between experimental and predicted IV values were not statistically significant. Therefore, it is possible to use these equations for IV estimation of the subcutaneous adipose tissue of Italian heavy pigs. PMID:27522249

  14. Effects of various dietary lipid additives on lamb performance, carcass characteristics, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and wool characteristics.

    PubMed

    Meale, S J; Chaves, A V; He, M L; Guan, L L; McAllister, T A

    2015-06-01

    Tasco (Ascophyllum nodosum; TA) was compared to canola (CO), flax (FO), and safflower oils (SO) for effects on performance, carcass characteristics, and fatty acid profiles of adipose tissue in skirt muscle (SM), subcutaneous and perirenal adipose tissues, and wool production and quality characteristics of Canadian Arcott lambs. Fifty-six lambs were randomly assigned to dietary treatments (n = 14 per treatment). Diets consisted of a pelleted, barley-based finishing diet containing either TA, CO, FO, or SO (2% of dietary DM). Feed deliveries and orts were recorded daily. Lambs were weighed weekly and slaughtered once they reached ≥ 45 kg BW. Carcass characteristics, rumen pH, and liver weights were determined at slaughter. Wool yield was determined on mid-side patches of 100 cm2 shorn at d 0 and on the day before slaughter (d 105 or 140). Dye-bands were used to determine wool growth, micrometer and staple length. Adipose tissues and SM samples were taken at slaughter and analyzed for FA profiles. No effects were observed on intake, growth, or carcass characteristics. A greater (P = 0.02) staple strength of lambs fed CO was the only effect observed in wool. Flax oil increased total n-3 and decreased the n-6/n-3 ratio in tissue FA profiles (P < 0.001) in comparison to other diets. Tasco increased (P ≤ 0.001) SFA/PUFA in all tissues, whereas concentrations of CLA c-9, t-11 were greatest with SO in all tissues (P ≤ 0.02), compared to other diets. These results suggest Tasco supplementation did not improve the n-3/n-6 or SFA/PUFA ratios of lamb adipose tissues compared to other dietary lipid additives.

  15. Effects of various dietary lipid additives on lamb performance, carcass characteristics, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and wool characteristics.

    PubMed

    Meale, S J; Chaves, A V; He, M L; Guan, L L; McAllister, T A

    2015-06-01

    Tasco (Ascophyllum nodosum; TA) was compared to canola (CO), flax (FO), and safflower oils (SO) for effects on performance, carcass characteristics, and fatty acid profiles of adipose tissue in skirt muscle (SM), subcutaneous and perirenal adipose tissues, and wool production and quality characteristics of Canadian Arcott lambs. Fifty-six lambs were randomly assigned to dietary treatments (n = 14 per treatment). Diets consisted of a pelleted, barley-based finishing diet containing either TA, CO, FO, or SO (2% of dietary DM). Feed deliveries and orts were recorded daily. Lambs were weighed weekly and slaughtered once they reached ≥ 45 kg BW. Carcass characteristics, rumen pH, and liver weights were determined at slaughter. Wool yield was determined on mid-side patches of 100 cm2 shorn at d 0 and on the day before slaughter (d 105 or 140). Dye-bands were used to determine wool growth, micrometer and staple length. Adipose tissues and SM samples were taken at slaughter and analyzed for FA profiles. No effects were observed on intake, growth, or carcass characteristics. A greater (P = 0.02) staple strength of lambs fed CO was the only effect observed in wool. Flax oil increased total n-3 and decreased the n-6/n-3 ratio in tissue FA profiles (P < 0.001) in comparison to other diets. Tasco increased (P ≤ 0.001) SFA/PUFA in all tissues, whereas concentrations of CLA c-9, t-11 were greatest with SO in all tissues (P ≤ 0.02), compared to other diets. These results suggest Tasco supplementation did not improve the n-3/n-6 or SFA/PUFA ratios of lamb adipose tissues compared to other dietary lipid additives. PMID:26115297

  16. Analysis of porcine adipose tissue transcriptome reveals differences in de novo fatty acid synthesis in pigs with divergent muscle fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In pigs, adipose tissue is one of the principal organs involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. It is particularly involved in the overall fatty acid synthesis with consequences in other lipid-target organs such as muscles and the liver. With this in mind, we have used massive, parallel high-throughput sequencing technologies to characterize the porcine adipose tissue transcriptome architecture in six Iberian x Landrace crossbred pigs showing extreme phenotypes for intramuscular fatty acid composition (three per group). Results High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to generate a whole characterization of adipose tissue (backfat) transcriptome. A total of 4,130 putative unannotated protein-coding sequences were identified in the 20% of reads which mapped in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 36% of the unmapped reads were represented by interspersed repeats, SINEs being the most abundant elements. Differential expression analyses identified 396 candidate genes among divergent animals for intramuscular fatty acid composition. Sixty-two percent of these genes (247/396) presented higher expression in the group of pigs with higher content of intramuscular SFA and MUFA, while the remaining 149 showed higher expression in the group with higher content of PUFA. Pathway analysis related these genes to biological functions and canonical pathways controlling lipid and fatty acid metabolisms. In concordance with the phenotypic classification of animals, the major metabolic pathway differentially modulated between groups was de novo lipogenesis, the group with more PUFA being the one that showed lower expression of lipogenic genes. Conclusions These results will help in the identification of genetic variants at loci that affect fatty acid composition traits. The implications of these results range from the improvement of porcine meat quality traits to the application of the pig as an animal model of human metabolic diseases. PMID:24289474

  17. Effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, breed and dietary vitamin E on the fatty acids of lamb muscle, liver and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Demirel, G; Wachira, A M; Sinclair, L A; Wilkinson, R G; Wood, J D; Enser, M

    2004-04-01

    The effect of feeding n-3 PUFA on the fatty acid composition of muscle, adipose tissue and liver of lambs was investigated. Groups of eight ram lambs per breed, SuffolkxLleyn (24 kg live weight) and Scottish Blackface (18 kg live weight), were each fed one of six diets containing one of three fat sources (50 g fatty acids/kg DM; Megalac((R)) (calcium soap of palm fatty acid distillate; Volac Ltd, Royston, Herts., UK) and formaldehyde-treated whole linseed (Trouw Nutrition UK, Northwich, Ches., UK) either alone or with fish oil (1:1, w/w) and either 100 or 500 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg DM. Feed was offered ad libitum until slaughter at approximately half breed mature live weight. The type of dietary fat had no effect on intake, growth rate or feed conversion ratio. The 3.0-fold higher concentration of 18 : 3n-3 in the linseed compared with the Megalac((R)) diet approximately doubled (P<0.001) the concentration in the neutral and polar lipid fractions of musculus semimembranosus and liver, and in adipose tissue it increased 2.5-fold. Feeding protected linseed also increased (P<0.001) concentrations of 20 : 5n-3 and 22 : 5n-3 in muscle polar lipids and both lipid fractions of liver. The linseed-fish oil raised the 20 : 5n-3 concentrations above those for the linseed diet and also increased 22 : 6n-3. Scottish Blackface lambs had lower concentrations of 18 : 3n-3 in all lipids compared with Suffolk x Lleyn lambs, but more 20 : 5n-3 in the polar lipids of muscle and liver. High levels of dietary vitamin E were associated with small decreases in the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids and increases in PUFA. Linseed raised the PUFA : saturated fatty acid ratios in liver and adipose tissue but not in muscle, and improved the n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratio, as did the linseed-fish oil. Different combinations of dietary fatty acids and better protection against rumen biohydrogenation are required to improve muscle PUFA : saturated fatty acids ratios.

  18. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Reija; Borra, Ronald; Ojanen, Xiaowei; Xu, Leiting; Törmäkangas, Timo; Alen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49) and women (n = 52) with and without NAFLD. Methods Hepatic fat content was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). Serum samples were analyzed using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics platform. Global gene expression profiles of adipose tissues and skeletal muscle were analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays and quantitative PCR. Muscle protein expression was analyzed by Western blot. Results Increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), aromatic amino acid (AAA) and orosomucoid were associated with liver fat accumulation already in its early stage, independent of sex, obesity or insulin resistance (p<0.05 for all). Significant down-regulation of BCAA catabolism and fatty acid and energy metabolism was observed in the adipose tissue of the NAFLD group (p<0.001for all), whereas no aberrant gene expression in the skeletal muscle was found. Reduced BCAA catabolic activity was inversely associated with serum BCAA and liver fat content (p<0.05 for all). Conclusions Liver fat accumulation, already in its early stage, is associated with increased serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. The observed associations of decreased BCAA catabolism activity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and serum BCAA concentration with liver fat content suggest that adipose tissue dysfunction may have a key role in the systemic nature of NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:26439744

  19. Quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Esben; Jensen, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    In metabolically healthy humans, adipose tissue is exquisitely sensitive to insulin. Similar to muscle and liver, adipose tissue lipolysis is insulin resistant in adults with central obesity and type 2 diabetes. Perhaps uniquely, however, insulin resistance in adipose tissue may directly contribute to development of insulin resistance in muscle and liver because of the increased delivery of free fatty acids to those tissues. It has been hypothesized that insulin adipose tissue resistance may precede other metabolic defects in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, precise and reproducible quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity, in vivo, in humans, is an important measure. Unfortunately, no consensus exists on how to determine adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. We review the methods available to quantitate adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and will discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

  20. Epicardial and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Fatty Acids Profiles in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Candidate for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshkian, Masood; Mahtabipour, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We have recently shown that in high cholesterol-fed rabbits, the sensitivity of epicardial adipose tissue to changes in dietary fat is higher than that of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Although the effects of diabetes on epicardial adipose tissue thickness have been studied, the influence of diabetes on profile of epicardial free fatty acids (FFAs) has not been studied. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of diabetes on the FFAs composition in serum and in the subcutaneous and epicardial adipose tissues in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Methods: Forty non-diabetic and twenty eight diabetic patients candidate for CABG with >75% stenosis participated in this study. Fasting blood sugar (FBS) and lipid profiles were assayed by auto analyzer. Phospholipids and non-estrified FFA of serum and the fatty acids profile of epicardial and subcutaneous adipose tissues were determined using gas chromatography method. Results: In the phospholipid fraction of diabetic patients’ serum, the percentage of 16:0, 18:3n-9, 18:2n-6 and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) was lower than the corresponding values of the non-diabetics; whereas, 18:0 value was higher. A 100% increase in the amount of 18:0 and 35% decrease in the level of 18:1n-11 was observed in the diabetic patients’ subcutaneous adipose tissue. In epicardial adipose tissue, the increase of 18:0 and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA) and decrease of 18:1n-11, w3 (20:5n-3) and 22:6n-3 were significant; but, the contents of arachidonic acid and its precursor linoleic acid were not affected by diabetes. Conclusion: The fatty acids’ profile of epicardial and subcutaneous adipose tissues is not equally affected by diabetes. The significant decrease of 16:0 and w3 fatty acids and increase of trans and conjugated fatty acids in epicardial adipose tissue in the diabetic patients may worsen the formation of atheroma in the related arteries. PMID:23878791

  1. Adipose tissue angiogenesis assay.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rodriguez, Raziel; Gealekman, Olga; Kruse, Maxwell E; Rosenthal, Brittany; Rao, Kishore; Min, Soyun; Bellve, Karl D; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Corvera, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Changes in adipose tissue mass must be accompanied by parallel changes in microcirculation. Investigating the mechanisms that regulate adipose tissue angiogenesis could lead to better understanding of adipose tissue function and reveal new potential therapeutic strategies. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new capillaries from existing microvessels. This process can be recapitulated in vitro, by incubation of tissue in extracellular matrix components in the presence of pro-angiogenic factors. Here, we describe a method to study angiogenesis from adipose tissue fragments obtained from mouse and human tissue. This assay can be used to define effects of diverse factors added in vitro, as well as the role of endogenously produced factors on angiogenesis. We also describe approaches to quantify angiogenic potential for the purpose of enabling comparisons between subjects, thus providing information on the role of physiological conditions of the donor on adipose tissue angiogenic potential.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids in adipose tissue of obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus reflect long-term dietary intake of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Popp-Snijders, C; Blonk, M C

    1995-02-01

    We examined the relationship between long-term dietary intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and the relative content of these fatty acids in adipose tissue triglycerides from 53 obese Dutch subjects--19 men and 34 women--with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Adipose tissue fatty acid profiles analyzed in three samples taken from each subject at 1-y intervals showed no within-subject differences for EPA and DHA. Dietary intake was estimated from 12 3-d dietary records made over 2 y at 2-mo intervals. EPA and DHA intakes showed high within-subject variation. Correlation coefficients (Spearman) between the dietary intake of EPA (% of total fat) and EPA in adipose tissue (% of total fatty acids) were 0.76 for men and 0.57 for women. For DHA these coefficients were 0.75 for men and 0.48 for women. We conclude that the analysis of fatty acids in one adipose tissue biopsy provides information on long-term EPA and DHA intakes in obese subjects with NIDDM, and can replace otherwise necessarily frequent diet analyses over a long period.

  3. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA. PMID:26707880

  4. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA.

  5. Fatty acid signatures of stomach oil and adipose tissue of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) in Alaska: Implications for diet analysis of Procellariiform birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, S.W.; Iverson, S.J.; Springer, A.M.; Hatch, Shyla A.

    2007-01-01

    Procellariiforms are unique among seabirds in storing dietary lipids in both adipose tissue and stomach oil. Thus, both lipid sources are potentially useful for trophic studies using fatty acid (FA) signatures. However, little is known about the relationship between FA signatures in stomach oil and adipose tissue of individuals or whether these signatures provide similar information about diet and physiology. We compared the FA composition of stomach oil and adipose tissue biopsies of individual northern fulmars (N = 101) breeding at three major colonies in Alaska. Fatty acid signatures differed significantly between the two lipid sources, reflecting differences in dietary time scales, metabolic processing, or both. However, these signatures exhibited a relatively consistent relationship between individuals, such that the two lipid sources provided a similar ability to distinguish foraging differences among individuals and colonies. Our results, including the exclusive presence of dietary wax esters in stomach oil but not adipose tissue, are consistent with the notion that stomach oil FA signatures represent lipids retained from prey consumed during recent foraging and reflect little metabolic processing, whereas adipose tissue FA signatures represent a longer-term integration of dietary intake. Our study illustrates the potential for elucidating short- versus longer-term diet information in Procellariiform birds using different lipid sources. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Prepartum nutrition alters fatty acid composition in plasma, adipose tissue, and liver lipids of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Douglas, G N; Rehage, J; Beaulieu, A D; Bahaa, A O; Drackley, J K

    2007-06-01

    The fatty acyl profile of phospholipids (PL) determines the fluidity of cell membranes and affects cell function. The degree to which long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) composition of PL and triacylglycerols (TG) in liver and total lipids in adipose tissue can be altered by prepartum nutrition in peripartal dairy cows is unclear. Multiparous Holsteins (n = 25) were assigned to 1 of 4 prepartal diets: 1) CA, the control diet fed to meet 120% of energy requirements; 2) CR, a control diet fed to meet 80% of requirements; 3) S, a diet supplemented with mostly saturated free fatty acids (47% 16:0, 36% 18:0, 14% cis-18:1) and fed to meet 120% of requirements; or 4) U, a diet similar to S except that cows were abomasally infused with soybean oil so that the diet plus infused fat would meet 120% of requirements. Diets were fed for 40 d prepartum; all cows received a lactation diet postpartum. Groups CR and U had lower prepartum intakes of dry matter and net energy, but glucose concentrations in plasma were similar among treatments. Cows fed S, U, or CR had greater nonesterified fatty acids in plasma prepartum, but cows fed U had decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate postpartum. Postpartal concentrations of total lipids and glycogen in liver tissue were similar among treatments. Cows in group U had a greater percentage of 18:2 but less 16:0, 18:0, and 20:4 in plasma total lipids than cows fed S. Treatment U increased 18:2 and 18:3 and decreased 18:1 in subcutaneous adipose tissue at 1 d postpartum. Across diets, percentages of 16:0 and trans-18:1 were increased, and 18:0, 20:3, and 20:5 were decreased, in hepatic PL at d 1 postpartum. Significant treatment x time interactions indicated that treatment U increased 18:2 in hepatic PL at the expense of 18:1, 20:3, 20:4, 22:6, and 24:0 on d 1 postpartum, but changes were normalized by d 65 postpartum. The unsaturation index of hepatic PL was lower at d 1 than at d -45 or 65, which implies that hepatic membrane fluidity decreased around

  7. Effects of a Diet Enriched with Polyunsaturated, Saturated, or Trans Fatty Acids on Cytokine Content in the Liver, White Adipose Tissue, and Skeletal Muscle of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Bruno; Estadella, Debora; Hachul, Ana Cláudia Losinskas; Okuda, Marcos Hiromu; Moreno, Mayara Franzoi; Oyama, Lila Missae; Ribeiro, Eliane Beraldi; Oller do Nascimento, Claudia Maria da Penha

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the effect of diet enriched with 30% lipids on cytokines content in different tissues. Swiss male mice were distributed into four groups treated for 8 weeks with control (C, normolipidic diet); soybean oil (S); lard (L); and hydrogenated vegetable fat (H). We observed an increase in carcass fat in groups S and L, and the total amount of fatty deposits was only higher in group L compared with C group. The serum levels of free fatty acids were lower in the L group, and insulin, adiponectin, lipid profile, and glucose levels were similar among the groups. IL-10 was lower in group L in mesenteric and retroperitoneal adipose tissues. H reduced IL-10 only in retroperitoneal adipose tissue. There was an increase in IL-6 in the gastrocnemius muscle of the L group, and a positive correlation between TNF-α and IL-10 was observed in the livers of groups C, L, and H and in the muscles of all groups studied. The results suggested relationships between the quantity and quality of lipids ingested with adiposity, the concentration of free fatty acids, and cytokine production in white adipose tissue, gastrocnemius muscle, and liver. PMID:24027356

  8. A fish protein hydrolysate alters fatty acid composition in liver and adipose tissue and increases plasma carnitine levels in a mouse model of chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) diets affect mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism in animals. The aim of the study was to determine if FPH could influence fatty acid metabolism and inflammation in transgene mice expressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNFα). Methods hTNFα mice (C57BL/6 hTNFα) were given a high-fat (23%, w/w) diet containing 20% casein (control group) or 15% FPH and 5% casein (FPH group) for two weeks. After an overnight fast, blood, adipose tissue, and liver samples were collected. Gene expression and enzyme activity was analysed in liver, fatty acid composition was analyzed in liver and ovarian white adipose tissue, and inflammatory parameters, carnitine, and acylcarnitines were analyzed in plasma. Results The n-3/n-6 fatty acid ratio was higher in mice fed the FPH diet than in mice fed the control diet in both adipose tissue and liver, and the FPH diet affected the gene expression of ∆6 and ∆9 desaturases. Mice fed this diet also demonstrated lower hepatic activity of fatty acid synthase. Concomitantly, a lower plasma INF-γ level was observed. Plasma carnitine and the carnitine precursor γ-butyrobetaine was higher in the FPH-group compared to control, as was plasma short-chained and medium-chained acylcarnitine esters. The higher level of plasma acetylcarnitine may reflect a stimulated mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids, as the hepatic activities of peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase-II were higher in the FPH-fed mice. Conclusions The FPH diet was shown to influence hepatic fatty acid metabolism and fatty acid composition. This indicates that effects on fatty acid metabolism are important for the bioactivity of protein hydrolysates of marine origin. PMID:24098955

  9. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote the reversion of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Liao, Naishun; Pan, Fan; Wang, Yingchao; Zheng, Youshi; Xu, Bo; Chen, Wenwei; Gao, Yunzhen; Cai, Zhixiong; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver injury and seriously affects human health. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether adipose tissue-derived stem cell (ADSC) transplantation in combination with dietary modification was capable of reversing the progression of NAFLD. After establishing a rat model of NAFLD by feeding them a high-fat diet (HFD), ADSCs were transplanted via the portal vein into rats with HFD-induced NAFLD, and simultaneously fed a modified diet. Thereafter, gross liver morphology, the hepatosomatic (HSI) index and indicators of liver function, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and total bilirubin (TBIL) were evaluated. Subsequently, the serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs) and fatty acids (FAs) were also assayed. Furthermore, H&E and oil red O staining were used to confirm the pathological effects of NAFLD in the rat livers. Although dietary modification alone caused liver function to recover, ADSC transplantation in combination with dietary modification further decreased the HSI index, the serum levels of ALT, TBIL, TC, TGs, FAs, reduced lipid accumulation to normal levels, and reversed the hepatic pathological changes in the rat livers. Taken together, these findings suggest that ADSC transplantation assists in the reversion of NAFLD by improving liver function and promoting lipid metabolism, thereby exerting hepatoprotective effects. Thus, we suggest that ADSC transplantation is a promising, potential therapeutic strategy for NAFLD treatment. PMID:26986083

  10. Hypothalamic control of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, A; Wiedmann, N M; Adler, E S; Oldfield, B J

    2014-10-01

    A detailed appreciation of the control of adipose tissue whether it be white, brown or brite/beige has never been more important to the development of a framework on which to build therapeutic strategies to combat obesity. This is because 1) the rate of fatty acid release into the circulation from lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) is integrally important to the development of obesity, 2) brown adipose tissue (BAT) has now moved back to center stage with the realization that it is present in adult humans and, in its activated form, is inversely proportional to levels of obesity and 3) the identification and characterization of "brown-like" or brite/beige fat is likely to be one of the most exciting developments in adipose tissue biology in the last decade. Central to all of these developments is the role of the CNS in the control of different fat cell functions and central to CNS control is the integrative capacity of the hypothalamus. In this chapter we will attempt to detail key issues relevant to the structure and function of hypothalamic and downstream control of WAT and BAT and highlight the importance of developing an understanding of the neural input to brite/beige fat cells as a precursor to its recruitment as therapeutic target.

  11. Epicardial Adipose Tissue (EAT) Thickness Is Associated with Cardiovascular and Liver Damage in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Giuseppina; Consonni, Dario; Tiraboschi, Silvia; Baragetti, Andrea; Bertelli, Cristina; Norata, Giuseppe Danilo; Dongiovanni, Paola; Valenti, Luca; Grigore, Liliana; Tonella, Tatiana; Catapano, Alberico; Fargion, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has been proposed as a cardiometabolic and hepatic fibrosis risk factor in patients with non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of EAT in NAFLD by analyzing 1) the association between EAT, the other metabolic parameters and the severity of steatosis 2) the relationship between cardiovascular (cIMT, cplaques, E/A), liver (presence of NASH and significant fibrosis) damage and metabolic risk factors including EAT 3) the relationship between EAT and genetic factors strongly influencing liver steatosis. Methods In a cross-sectional study, we considered 512 consecutive patients with NAFLD (confirmed by biopsy in 100). EAT, severity of steatosis, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaques were evaluated by ultrasonography and results analysed by multiple linear and logistic regression models. Variables independently associated with EAT (mm) were female gender (p = 0.003), age (p = 0.001), BMI (p = 0.01), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.009), steatosis grade 2 (p = 0.01) and 3 (p = 0.04), fatty liver index (p = 0.001) and statin use (p = 0.03). Variables independently associated with carotid IMT were age (p = 0.0001), hypertension (p = 0.009), diabetes (p = 0.04), smoking habits (p = 0.04) and fatty liver index (p = 0.02), with carotid plaques age (p = 0.0001), BMI (p = 0.03), EAT (p = 0.02),) and hypertension (p = 0.02), and with E/A age (p = 0.0001), diabetes (p = 0.005), hypertension (p = 0.04) and fatty liver index (p = 0.004). In the 100 patients with available liver histology non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was independently associated with EAT (p = 0.04) and diabetes (p = 0.054) while significant fibrosis with EAT (p = 0.02), diabetes (p = 0.01) and waist circumference (p = 0.05). No association between EAT and PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 polymorphisms was found. Conclusion In patients with NAFLD, EAT is associated with the severity of liver and vascular damage

  12. Selective mobilization of fatty acids in adipose tissue of heavy pigs.

    PubMed

    Bochicchio, D; Comellini, M; Lambertini, P; Marchetto, G; Della Casa, G

    2015-01-01

    The mobilization of fatty acids during food deprivation is a selective process studied in different species (humans, rodents, birds, viverrids). The aim of this work was to study the effect of fasting on selective mobilization in commercial pigs. A total of 16 barrows (Large White×Landrace (167 kg±12.5 kg live weight) were subdivided into two homogeneous groups, one subjected to 12 h and the other to 60 h of fasting (fasting time) before slaughtering. For each pig inner and outer backfat layer were sampled at slaughter and at ham trimming 24 h later (sampling time). Increasing the fasting time and the sampling time after slaughter caused an increase in the amount of free fatty acids in both layers. Therefore it can be argued that during fasting lipolysis is stimulated and remains active also after slaughtering. The factors that stimulate lipolysis determine a greater mobilization of unsaturated fatty acids than saturated ones. Thus fasting time may influence the suitability of pork for processing and conservation, since free fatty acids are more suitable for oxidation than the esterified ones. PMID:25170962

  13. Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    McGown, Christine; Birerdinc, Aybike; Younossi, Zobair M

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is one of the most important health challenges faced by developed countries and is increasingly affecting adolescents and children. Obesity is also a considerable risk factor for the development of numerous other chronic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The epidemic proportions of obesity and its numerous comorbidities are bringing into focus the highly complex and metabolically active adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is increasingly being considered as a functional endocrine organ. This article discusses the endocrine effects of adipose tissue during obesity and the systemic impact of this signaling.

  14. Targeting adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Two different types of adipose tissues can be found in humans enabling them to respond to starvation and cold: white adipose tissue (WAT) is generally known and stores excess energy in the form of triacylglycerol (TG), insulates against cold, and serves as a mechanical cushion. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) helps newborns to cope with cold. BAT has the capacity to uncouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thereby generating heat rather than adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The previously widely held view was that BAT disappears rapidly after birth and is no longer present in adult humans. Using positron emission tomography (PET), however, it was recently shown that metabolically active BAT occurs in defined regions and scattered in WAT of the adult and possibly has an influence on whole-body energy homeostasis. In obese individuals adipose tissue is at the center of metabolic syndrome. Targeting of WAT by thiazolidinediones (TZDs), activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) a ‘master’ regulator of fat cell biology, is a current therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Since its unique capacity to increase energy consumption of the body and to dissipate surplus energy as heat, BAT offers new perspectives as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Recent discoveries of new signaling pathways of BAT development give rise to new therapeutic possibilities in order to influence BAT content and activity. PMID:23102228

  15. Brain, liver, and adipose tissue erucic and very long chain fatty acid levels in adrenoleukodystrophy patients treated with glyceryl trierucate and trioleate oils (Lorenzo's oil).

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, M; Moser, A B; Borel, J; Khangoora, S; Moser, H W

    1994-08-01

    Brain, liver, and adipose lipids were studied in the postmortem tissues of four adrenoleukodystrophy patients who had been treated with a mixture of glyceryl trioleate and trierucate oils ("Lorenzo's Oil") and compared to 7 untreated ALD patients and 3 controls. The dietary therapy appeared to reduce the levels of saturated very long chain fatty acids in the plasma, adipose tissue and liver; in the brain they were reduced in only one of the four patients. While substantial amounts of erucic acid were present in some of the tissues even 12 months after therapy had been discontinued, the levels in brain did not exceed those in controls at any time. The failure of erucic acid to enter the brain in significant quantity may be a factor in the disappointing results of dietary therapy for adrenoleukodystrophy.

  16. Fatty acid profile of plasma, muscle and adipose tissues in Chilota lambs grazing on two different low quality pasture types in Chiloé Archipelago (Chile).

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Maria A; Dannenberger, Dirk; Rivero, Jordana; Pulido, Ruben; Nuernberg, Karin

    2014-11-01

    There is no information about the effect of different pasture types on tissue fatty acid profiles of a native rustic lamb breed of the Chiloe Archipelago, the Chilota. Eight Chilota lambs were grazed on a 'Calafatal' pasture (CP), a typical secondary succession of Chiloé Archipelago (Chile) and eight Chilota lambs were located to graze on naturalized pasture (NP) of Chiloé. Botanical, chemical and lipid composition of the two types of pastures and of different lamb tissues (muscle, subcutaneous - and tail adipose tissues) and plasma were performed. Both pasture types induced high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and CLAcis-9,trans-11 proportions in Chilota meat. Thus, in muscle, Chilota lambs grazing CP showed higher sum PUFA, sum n-6 PUFA proportion and n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio compared with Chilota lambs grazing NP. In tail fats of Chilota lambs grazing CP significantly higher proportions of 18:3n-3, sum saturated fatty acids, sum PUFA, n-3 and n-6 PUFA were detected compared with Chilota lambs grazing NP. Feeding of different pasture types (CP vs. NP) caused significant differences in fatty acid composition of muscle and the two fat depots in Chilota lambs, but also point to tissue-specific responses of de novo synthesized fatty acid deposition in the tissues.

  17. Adipose tissue immunity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2013-10-02

    Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete pro-inflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching toward M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumor growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumor cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumor microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoral drugs.

  18. The fatty acid composition of muscle and adipose tissue of steers offered unwilted or wilted grass silage supplemented with sunflower oil and fishoil.

    PubMed

    Noci, F; Monahan, F J; Scollan, N D; Moloney, A P

    2007-03-01

    The effects of the type of grass silage and dietary inclusion of fish oil (FO) on the fatty acid profile of bovine intramuscular and subcutaneous adipose tissue were investigated. Eighty Friesian steers were assigned (n 10) to unwilted or wilted silage, and to one of four rations which contained, per kg, 80 g of sunflower oil and either 0, 10, 20 or 40 g of FO replacing lard. Animals were slaughtered after 108 d and the fatty acid profile of the neutral, polar and total lipid fractions of the M. longissimus dorsi, and the total lipid fraction of the subcutaneous adipose tissue were determined. Wilting of grass prior to ensiling increased the concentration of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in intramuscular total lipid (P<0 x 01), but did not affect the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio. Increasing FO supply linearly increased (P<0 x 05) the concentration of the cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 isomers of CLA and trans-11 18 : 1 predominantly in the neutral lipid fraction of intramuscular total lipid, and linearly decreased the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio. Wilting of grass prior to ensiling increased the concentration of CLA in subcutaneous adipose tissue (P<0 x 001), while increasing FO supply linearly increased the concentration of cis-9, trans-11 CLA. From a human nutrition perspective, increasing the level of FO in the ration or wilting of grass prior to ensiling appear to modify the fatty acid composition of beef muscle favourably. However, the health implications of associated increases in trans fatty acids remain to be elucidated.

  19. Circulating insulin stimulates fatty acid retention in white adipose tissue via KATP channel activation in the central nervous system only in insulin-sensitive mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Coomans, Claudia P.; Geerling, Janine J.; Guigas, Bruno; van den Hoek, Anita M.; Parlevliet, Edwin T.; Ouwens, D. Margriet; Pijl, Hanno; Voshol, Peter J.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Havekes, Louis M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) is required for the inhibitory effect of insulin on glucose production. Our aim was to determine whether the CNS is also involved in the stimulatory effect of circulating insulin on the tissue-specific retention of fatty acid (FA) from plasma. In wild-type mice, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions stimulated the retention of both plasma triglyceride-derived FA and plasma albumin-bound FA in the various white adipose tissues (WAT) but not in other tissues, including brown adipose tissue (BAT). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of insulin induced a similar pattern of tissue-specific FA partitioning. This effect of ICV insulin administration was not associated with activation of the insulin signaling pathway in adipose tissue. ICV administration of tolbutamide, a KATP channel blocker, considerably reduced (during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions) and even completely blocked (during ICV administration of insulin) WAT-specific retention of FA from plasma. This central effect of insulin was absent in CD36-deficient mice, indicating that CD36 is the predominant FA transporter in insulin-stimulated FA retention by WAT. In diet-induced insulin-resistant mice, these stimulating effects of insulin (circulating or ICV administered) on FA retention in WAT were lost. In conclusion, in insulin-sensitive mice, circulating insulin stimulates tissue-specific partitioning of plasma-derived FA in WAT in part through activation of KATP channels in the CNS. Apparently, circulating insulin stimulates fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in BAT, directly and indirectly through the CNS. PMID:21700834

  20. Steroid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Vihma, Veera

    2015-11-01

    Tissue-specific expression of steroidogenic enzymes allows the modulation of active steroid levels in a local manner. Thus, the measurement of local steroid concentrations, rather than the circulating levels, has been recognized as a more accurate indicator of the steroid action within a specific tissue. Adipose tissue, one of the largest endocrine tissues in the human body, has been established as an important site for steroid storage and metabolism. Locally produced steroids, through the enzymatic conversion from steroid precursors delivered to adipose tissue, have been proven to either functionally regulate adipose tissue metabolism, or quantitatively contribute to the whole body's steroid levels. Most recently, it has been suggested that adipose tissue may contain the steroidogenic machinery necessary for the initiation of steroid biosynthesis de novo from cholesterol. This review summarizes the evidence indicating the presence of the entire steroidogenic apparatus in adipose tissue and discusses the potential roles of local steroid products in modulating adipose tissue activity and other metabolic parameters.

  1. Direct determination of flavor relevant and further branched-chain fatty acids from sheep subcutaneous adipose tissue by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaffarnik, Stefanie; Preuß, Siegfried; Vetter, Walter

    2014-07-11

    4-Methyloctanoic acid, 4-ethyloctanoic acid and 4-methylnonanoic acid are key-flavor compounds of sheep and goat. Yet, the low amounts of these volatile branched-chain fatty acids (vBCFAs) in the fat of the ruminants hampered their determination on a routine basis. In this work we developed a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC/MS-SIM) method for the direct determination of the vBCFAs as methyl esters, which were obtained after transesterification of subcutaneous adipose tissue of sheep. The excellent sensitivity of the GC/MS-SIM method (limit of quantification, LOQ, 3.6-4.8μg/g; limit of detection, LOD, 1.1-1.4μg/g for 4-Me-8:0, 4-Et-8:0 and 4-Me-9:0) enabled us to determine the three vBCFAs without an enrichment step. Subcutaneous adipose sheep tissue of three different breeds contained 23-88μg/g 4-methyloctanoic acid, 13-26μg/g 4-ethyloctanoic acid and ∼2.9-18μg/g 4-methylnonanoic acid. Since all fatty acids were present in the FAME fraction, the samples could be screened for further branched-chain FAMEs. After elimination of unsaturated fatty acids by hydrogenation (the presence of some unsaturated fatty acids could be verified by this measure), additional measurements in SIM and full scan modes of methyl esters and picolinyl esters enabled the determination of further 97 saturated fatty acids in the samples with eight to 20 carbons. The method is suited for routine analysis and may be useful to investigate the reasons for the abundance/absence of 4-methyloctanoic acid, 4-ethyloctanoic acid and 4-methylnonanoic acid and further branched-chain fatty acids in sheep and goat.

  2. Adipose tissue extract promotes adipose tissue regeneration in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zijing; Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    An adipose tissue engineering chamber model of spontaneous adipose tissue generation from an existing fat flap has been described. However, the chamber does not completely fill with adipose tissue in this model. Here, the effect of adipose tissue extract (ATE) on adipose tissue regeneration was investigated. In vitro, the adipogenic and angiogenic capacities of ATE were evaluated using Oil Red O and tube formation assays on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs), respectively. In vivo, saline or ATE was injected into the adipose tissue engineering chamber 1 week after its implantation. At different time points post-injection, the contents were morphometrically, histologically, and immunohistochemically evaluated, and the expression of growth factors and adipogenic genes was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time PCR. With the exception of the baseline control group, in which fat flaps were not inserted into a chamber, the total volume of fat flap tissue increased significantly in all groups, especially in the ATE group. Better morphology and structure, a thinner capsule, and more vessels were observed in the ATE group than in the control group. Expression of angiogenic growth factors and adipogenic markers were significantly higher in the ATE group. ATE therefore significantly promoted adipose tissue regeneration and reduced capsule formation in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model. These data suggest that ATE provides a more angiogenic and adipogenic microenvironment for adipose tissue formation by releasing various cytokines and growth factors that also inhibit capsule formation.

  3. Bioengineering Beige Adipose Tissue Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tharp, Kevin M; Stahl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the therapeutic potential of brown/beige adipose tissue requires technological advancements that enable the controlled expansion of this uniquely thermogenic tissue. Transplantation of brown fat in small animal model systems has confirmed the expectation that brown fat expansion could possibly provide a novel therapeutic to combat obesity and related disorders. Expansion and/or stimulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1)-positive adipose tissues have repeatedly demonstrated physiologically beneficial reductions in circulating glucose and lipids. The recent discovery that brown adipose tissue (BAT)-derived secreted factors positively alter whole body metabolism further expands potential benefits of brown or beige/brite adipose expansion. Unfortunately, there are no sources of transplantable BATs for human therapeutic purposes at this time. Recent developments in bioengineering, including novel hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels, have enabled non-immunogenic, functional tissue allografts that can be used to generate large quantities of UCP1-positive adipose tissue. These sophisticated tissue-engineering systems have provided the methodology to develop metabolically active brown or beige/brite adipose tissue implants with the potential to be used as a metabolic therapy. Unlike the pharmacological browning of white adipose depots, implantation of bioengineered UCP1-positive adipose tissues offers a spatially controlled therapeutic. Moving forward, new insights into the mechanisms by which extracellular cues govern stem-cell differentiation and progenitor cell recruitment may enable cell-free matrix implant approaches, which generate a niche sufficient to recruit white adipose tissue-derived stem cells and support their differentiation into functional beige/brite adipose tissues. This review summarizes clinically relevant discoveries in tissue-engineering and biology leading toward the recent development of biomaterial supported beige adipose tissue implants and

  4. Bioengineering Beige Adipose Tissue Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tharp, Kevin M; Stahl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the therapeutic potential of brown/beige adipose tissue requires technological advancements that enable the controlled expansion of this uniquely thermogenic tissue. Transplantation of brown fat in small animal model systems has confirmed the expectation that brown fat expansion could possibly provide a novel therapeutic to combat obesity and related disorders. Expansion and/or stimulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1)-positive adipose tissues have repeatedly demonstrated physiologically beneficial reductions in circulating glucose and lipids. The recent discovery that brown adipose tissue (BAT)-derived secreted factors positively alter whole body metabolism further expands potential benefits of brown or beige/brite adipose expansion. Unfortunately, there are no sources of transplantable BATs for human therapeutic purposes at this time. Recent developments in bioengineering, including novel hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels, have enabled non-immunogenic, functional tissue allografts that can be used to generate large quantities of UCP1-positive adipose tissue. These sophisticated tissue-engineering systems have provided the methodology to develop metabolically active brown or beige/brite adipose tissue implants with the potential to be used as a metabolic therapy. Unlike the pharmacological browning of white adipose depots, implantation of bioengineered UCP1-positive adipose tissues offers a spatially controlled therapeutic. Moving forward, new insights into the mechanisms by which extracellular cues govern stem-cell differentiation and progenitor cell recruitment may enable cell-free matrix implant approaches, which generate a niche sufficient to recruit white adipose tissue-derived stem cells and support their differentiation into functional beige/brite adipose tissues. This review summarizes clinically relevant discoveries in tissue-engineering and biology leading toward the recent development of biomaterial supported beige adipose tissue implants and

  5. Bioengineering Beige Adipose Tissue Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tharp, Kevin M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the therapeutic potential of brown/beige adipose tissue requires technological advancements that enable the controlled expansion of this uniquely thermogenic tissue. Transplantation of brown fat in small animal model systems has confirmed the expectation that brown fat expansion could possibly provide a novel therapeutic to combat obesity and related disorders. Expansion and/or stimulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1)-positive adipose tissues have repeatedly demonstrated physiologically beneficial reductions in circulating glucose and lipids. The recent discovery that brown adipose tissue (BAT)-derived secreted factors positively alter whole body metabolism further expands potential benefits of brown or beige/brite adipose expansion. Unfortunately, there are no sources of transplantable BATs for human therapeutic purposes at this time. Recent developments in bioengineering, including novel hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels, have enabled non-immunogenic, functional tissue allografts that can be used to generate large quantities of UCP1-positive adipose tissue. These sophisticated tissue-engineering systems have provided the methodology to develop metabolically active brown or beige/brite adipose tissue implants with the potential to be used as a metabolic therapy. Unlike the pharmacological browning of white adipose depots, implantation of bioengineered UCP1-positive adipose tissues offers a spatially controlled therapeutic. Moving forward, new insights into the mechanisms by which extracellular cues govern stem-cell differentiation and progenitor cell recruitment may enable cell-free matrix implant approaches, which generate a niche sufficient to recruit white adipose tissue-derived stem cells and support their differentiation into functional beige/brite adipose tissues. This review summarizes clinically relevant discoveries in tissue-engineering and biology leading toward the recent development of biomaterial supported beige adipose tissue implants and

  6. Dietary sunflower oil modulates milk fatty acid composition without major changes in adipose and mammary tissue fatty acid profile or related gene mRNA abundance in sheep.

    PubMed

    Castro-Carrera, T; Frutos, P; Leroux, C; Chilliard, Y; Hervás, G; Belenguer, A; Bernard, L; Toral, P G

    2015-04-01

    There are very few studies in ruminants characterizing mammary and adipose tissue (AT) expression of genes and gene networks for diets causing variations in milk fatty acid (FA) composition without altering milk fat secretion, and even less complementing this information with data on tissue FA profiles. This work was conducted in sheep in order to investigate the response of the mammary gland and the subcutaneous and perirenal AT, in terms of FA profile and mRNA abundance of genes involved in lipid metabolism, to a diet known to modify milk FA composition. Ten lactating Assaf ewes were randomly assigned to two treatments consisting of a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and a concentrate (60 : 40) supplemented with 0 (control diet) or 25 (SO diet) g of sunflower oil/kg of diet dry matter for 7 weeks. Milk composition, including FA profile, was analysed after 48 days on treatments. On day 49, the animals were euthanized and tissue samples were collected to analyse FA and mRNA abundance of 16 candidate genes. Feeding SO did not affect animal performance but modified milk FA composition. Major changes included decreases in the concentration of FA derived from de novo synthesis (e.g. 12:0, 14:0 and 16:0) and increases in that of long-chain FA (e.g. 18:0, c9-18:1, trans-18:1 isomers and c9,t11-CLA); however, they were not accompanied by significant variations in the mRNA abundance of the studied lipogenic genes (i.e. ACACA, FASN, LPL, CD36, FABP3, SCD1 and SCD5) and transcription factors (SREBF1 and PPARG), or in the constituent FA of mammary tissue. Regarding the FA composition of AT, the little influence of SO did not appear to be linked to changes in gene mRNA abundance (decreases of GPAM and SREBF1 in both tissues, and of PPARG in the subcutaneous depot). Similarly, the great variation between AT (higher contents of saturated FA and trans-18:1 isomers in the perirenal, and of cis-18:1, c9,t11-CLA and n-3 PUFA in the subcutaneous AT) could not be related to

  7. Fatty Acid Composition of Adipose Tissues in Obese Mice and SD Rats Fed with Isaria sinclairii Powder

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Mi Young; Seo, Yun Jung; Ji, Sang Deok; Han, Jea Woong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Yun, Eun Young

    2010-01-01

    Isaria sinclairii (Cicada Dongchunghacho) was studied as a potential crude natural food in powdered form. The role of tissue fatty acids in relation to the anti-obesity effects of I. sinclairii (IS) was examined by feeding the powder to SD rats ad libitum at 0, 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10% (calculated about 8 g/kg) of the feed for a period of 3 months and 6 months. The fatty acid composition profile as indicated GC-MS, showed significantly slight dose-dependent increases in the levels of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly, arachidonic acid (C20: 4n6) , oleic acid, linoleic acid, eicosadienoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (C20: 5) concentration in the the ad libitum IS-fed groups compared to the control group in SD abdominal fat over 6 month period. Over viewing of the SD and Ob mice treated Isaria sinclairii powder; there were increases in the single (mono) unsaturated fatty acids ratio but decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid. In IS-fed groups in proportion to the treatment period, this Dongchunghacho also induced an increase in the level of same result of unsaturated fatty acid in C57BL/6 obese (ob/ob) mice over a 6-month period treatment compared to those given 10% dry mulberry leaf powder (ML) or silkworm powder mixed with the standard diet. PMID:24278523

  8. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, blood metabolites, and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue in finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Van Bibber-Krueger, C L; Miller, K A; Parsons, G L; Thompson, L K; Drouillard, J S

    2015-05-01

    The effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on blood metabolites and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue were evaluated in crossbred finishing steers (n = 18, BW 639 ± 12.69 kg) that were stratified by BW and randomly assigned, within strata (block), to receive 0 (control) or 8.33 mg/kg diet DM ZH. Cattle were fed once daily ad libitum in individual feeding pens (9 pens/treatment). Zilpaterol hydrochloride was fed for 23 d and withdrawn 3 d before harvest. Blood samples and measures of BW were taken on d 0, 7, 14, and 21. Concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), glucose, and lactate were determined from whole blood. Nonesterified fatty acids, urea nitrogen (PUN), glucose, lactate, and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) concentrations were analyzed from plasma. Postharvest, adipose tissue samples (approximately 20 g) from subcutaneous fat covering the lumbar vertebrae were collected after 48 h of refrigeration and analyzed for LCFA profiles. Feeding ZH decreased DMI by 8% (P = 0.03) but did not affect BW gain or efficiency (P = 0.83 and P = 0.56, respectively). Addition of ZH resulted in greater HCW, dressing percentage, and LM area ( P = 0.02, P = 0.08, and P = 0.07, respectively) but did not influence other carcass traits (P > 0.10). A ZH × d interaction was observed for PUN and whole-blood glucose concentrations (P = 0.06), in which concentrations decreased in cattle receiving ZH. Nonesterified fatty acids, BHB, plasma glucose, whole-blood, and plasma lactate concentrations were unaffected by ZH (P > 0.10). Zilpaterol hydrochloride increased plasma concentrations of elaidic (P = 0.03), vaccenic (P = 0.006), and docosapentaenoic acids ( P= 0.08), but LCFA concentrations of adipose tissue were unaffected ( P> 0.10), suggesting no preferential oxidation of specific fatty acids. In conclusion, ZH supplementation decreased PUN concentration possibly due to decreased muscle catabolism, but components of blood related to lipid oxidation were unaffected

  9. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, blood metabolites, and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue in finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Van Bibber-Krueger, C L; Miller, K A; Parsons, G L; Thompson, L K; Drouillard, J S

    2015-05-01

    The effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on blood metabolites and fatty acid profiles of plasma and adipose tissue were evaluated in crossbred finishing steers (n = 18, BW 639 ± 12.69 kg) that were stratified by BW and randomly assigned, within strata (block), to receive 0 (control) or 8.33 mg/kg diet DM ZH. Cattle were fed once daily ad libitum in individual feeding pens (9 pens/treatment). Zilpaterol hydrochloride was fed for 23 d and withdrawn 3 d before harvest. Blood samples and measures of BW were taken on d 0, 7, 14, and 21. Concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), glucose, and lactate were determined from whole blood. Nonesterified fatty acids, urea nitrogen (PUN), glucose, lactate, and long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) concentrations were analyzed from plasma. Postharvest, adipose tissue samples (approximately 20 g) from subcutaneous fat covering the lumbar vertebrae were collected after 48 h of refrigeration and analyzed for LCFA profiles. Feeding ZH decreased DMI by 8% (P = 0.03) but did not affect BW gain or efficiency (P = 0.83 and P = 0.56, respectively). Addition of ZH resulted in greater HCW, dressing percentage, and LM area ( P = 0.02, P = 0.08, and P = 0.07, respectively) but did not influence other carcass traits (P > 0.10). A ZH × d interaction was observed for PUN and whole-blood glucose concentrations (P = 0.06), in which concentrations decreased in cattle receiving ZH. Nonesterified fatty acids, BHB, plasma glucose, whole-blood, and plasma lactate concentrations were unaffected by ZH (P > 0.10). Zilpaterol hydrochloride increased plasma concentrations of elaidic (P = 0.03), vaccenic (P = 0.006), and docosapentaenoic acids ( P= 0.08), but LCFA concentrations of adipose tissue were unaffected ( P> 0.10), suggesting no preferential oxidation of specific fatty acids. In conclusion, ZH supplementation decreased PUN concentration possibly due to decreased muscle catabolism, but components of blood related to lipid oxidation were unaffected.

  10. Effects of different fatty acids and dietary lipids on adiponectin gene expression in 3T3-L1 cells and C57BL/6J mice adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Allain Amador; Oyama, Lila Missae; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Pisani, Luciana Pelegrini; Ribeiro, Eliane Beraldi; Silveira, Vera Lucia Flor; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia Maria

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is positively correlated to dietary lipid intake, and the type of lipid may play a causal role in the development of obesity-related pathologies. A major protein secreted by adipose tissue is adiponectin, which has antiatherogenic and antidiabetic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of four different high-fat diets (enriched with soybean oil, fish oil, coconut oil, or lard) on adiponectin gene expression and secretion by the white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice fed on a selected diet for either 2 (acute treatment) or 60 days (chronic treatment). Additionally, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated for 48 h with six different fatty acids: palmitic, linoleic, eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosahexaenoic (DHA), lauric, or oleic acid. Serum adiponectin concentration was reduced in the soybean-, coconut-, and lard-enriched diets in both groups. Adiponectin gene expression was lower in retroperitoneal WAT after acute treatment with all diets. The same reduction in levels of adiponectin gene expression was observed in epididymal adipose tissue of animals chronically fed soybean and coconut diets and in 3T3-L1 cells treated with palmitic, linoleic, EPA, and DHA acids. These results indicate that the intake of certain fatty acids may affect serum adiponectin levels in mice and adiponectin gene expression in mouse WAT and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The effects appear to be time dependent and depot specific. It is postulated that the downregulation of adiponectin expression by dietary enrichment with soybean oil or coconut oil may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis.

  11. Differential regulation of adipose tissue glucose transporters in genetic obesity (fatty rat). Selective increase in the adipose cell/muscle glucose transporter (GLUT 4) expression.

    PubMed

    Hainault, I; Guerre-Millo, M; Guichard, C; Lavau, M

    1991-03-01

    Adipocytes from young obese Zucker rats exhibit a hyperresponsive insulin-mediated glucose transport, together with a marked increase in cytochalasin B binding as compared with lean rat adipocytes. Here, we examined in these cells the expression of two isoforms of glucose transporter, the erythroid (GLUT 1) and the adipose cell/muscle (GLUT 4) types, in rats aged 16 or 30 d, i.e., before and after the emergence of hyperinsulinemia. GLUT 1 protein and mRNA levels were identical in the two genotypes at both ages. In contrast, the levels of GLUT 4 protein in obese rat adipocytes were 2.4- and 4.5-fold those of lean littermates at 16 and 30 d of age, respectively, in perfect agreement with the genotype effect on insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity. The levels of GLUT 4 mRNA per fat pad were increased 2.3- and 6.2-fold in obese vs. lean rats 16- and 30-d-old, indicating a pretranslational level of regulation. The obese phenotype was not associated with overexpression of GLUT 4 mRNA in gastrocnemius muscle. This work indicates that the fa gene exerts a differential control on the expression of GLUT 1 and GLUT 4 in adipose tissue and provides evidence that independent of hyperinsulinemia, genotype is a major regulatory factor of GLUT 4 expression in this tissue.

  12. Sex dimorphism and depot differences in adipose tissue function.

    PubMed

    White, Ursula A; Tchoukalova, Yourka D

    2014-03-01

    Obesity, characterized by excessive adiposity, is a risk factor for many metabolic pathologies, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Numerous studies have shown that adipose tissue distribution may be a greater predictor of metabolic health. Upper-body fat (visceral and subcutaneous abdominal) is commonly associated with the unfavorable complications of obesity, while lower-body fat (gluteal-femoral) may be protective. Current research investigations are focused on analyzing the metabolic properties of adipose tissue, in order to better understand the mechanisms that regulate fat distribution in both men and women. This review will highlight the adipose tissue depot- and sex-dependent differences in white adipose tissue function, including adipogenesis, adipose tissue developmental patterning, the storage and release of fatty acids, and secretory function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  13. Metabolic and immunomodulatory effects of n-3 fatty acids are different in mesenteric and epididymal adipose tissue of diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Tobias; Worsch, Stefanie; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Daniel, Hannelore; Hauner, Hans; Bader, Bernhard L

    2013-06-01

    In studies emphasizing antiobesogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n-3 PUFA), diets with very high fat content, not well-defined fat quality, and extreme n-6/n-3 PUFA ratios have been applied frequently. Additionally, comparative analyses of visceral adipose tissues (VAT) were neglected. Considering the link of visceral obesity to insulin resistance or inflammatory bowel diseases, we hypothesized that VAT, especially mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT), may exhibit differential responsiveness to diets through modulation of metabolic and inflammatory processes. Here, we aimed to assess dietary LC-n-3 PUFA effects on MAT and epididymal adipose tissue (EAT) and on MAT-adjacent liver and intestine in diet-induced obese mice fed defined soybean/palm oil-based diets. High-fat (HF) and LC-n-3 PUFA-enriched high-fat diet (HF/n-3) contained moderately high fat with unbalanced and balanced n-6/n-3 PUFA ratios, respectively. Body composition/organ analyses, glucose tolerance test, measurements of insulin, lipids, mRNA and protein expression, and immunohistochemistry were applied. Compared with HF, HF/n-3 mice showed reduced fat mass, smaller adipocytes in MAT than EAT, improved insulin level, and lower hepatic triacylglycerol and plasma NEFA levels, consistent with liver and brown fat gene expression. Gene expression arrays pointed to immune cell activation in MAT and alleviation of intestinal endothelial cell activation. Validations demonstrated simultaneously upregulated pro- (TNFα, MCP-1) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines and M1/M2-macrophage markers in VAT and reduced CD4/CD8α expression in MAT and spleen. Our data revealed differential responsiveness to diets for VAT through preferentially metabolic alterations in MAT and inflammatory processes in EAT. LC-n-3 PUFA effects were pro- and anti-inflammatory and disclose T cell-immunosuppressive potential.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in adipose tissue augments lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Bogdanovic, Elena; Kraus, Nicole; Patsouris, David; Diao, Li; Wang, Vivian; Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle important for protein synthesis and folding, lipid synthesis and Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Consequently, ER stress or dysfunction affects numerous cellular processes and has been implicated as a contributing factor in several pathophysiological conditions. Tunicamycin induces ER stress in various cell types in vitro as well as in vivo. In mice, a hallmark of tunicamycin administration is the development of fatty livers within 24-48 hrs accompanied by hepatic ER stress. We hypothesized that tunicamycin would induce ER stress in adipose tissue that would lead to increased lipolysis and subsequently to fatty infiltration of the liver and hepatomegaly. Our results show that intraperitoneal administration of tunicamycin rapidly induced an ER stress response in adipose tissue that correlated with increased circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) and glycerol along with decreased adipose tissue mass and lipid droplet size. Furthermore, we found that in addition to fatty infiltration of the liver as well as hepatomegaly, lipid accumulation was also present in the heart, skeletal muscle and kidney. To corroborate our findings to a clinical setting, we examined adipose tissue from burned patients where increases in lipolysis and the development of fatty livers have been well documented. We found that burned patients displayed significant ER stress within adipose tissue and that ER stress augments lipolysis in cultured human adipocytes. Our results indicate a possible role for ER stress induced lipolysis in adipose tissue as an underlying mechanism contributing to increases in circulating FFAs and fatty infiltration into other organs.

  15. Fatty acid profiles and relative mobilization during fasting in adipose tissue depots of the American marten (Martes americana).

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Petteri; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti; Collinsb, Danielle; Grant, Judy; Mustonen, Anne-Mari

    2006-03-01

    The American marten (Martes americana) is a boreal forest marten with low body adiposity but high metabolic rate. The study describes the FA composition in white adipose tissue depots of the species and the influence of food deprivation on them. American marten (n = 8) were fasted for 2 d with 7 control animals. Fasting resulted in a 13.4% weight loss, while the relative fat mass was >25% lower in the fasted animals. The FA composition of the fat depots of the trunk was quite similar to other previously studied mustelids with 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 16:1 n-7, 18:1 n-9, and 18:2n-6 as the most abundant FA. In the extremities, there were higher proportions of monounsaturated FA (MUFA) and PUFA. Food deprivation decreased the proportions of 16:0 and 16:1 n-7, while the proportion of long-chain MUFA increased in the trunk. The mobilization of FA was selective, as 16:1 n-7, 18:1 n-9, and particular n-3 PUFA were preferentially mobilized. Relative mobilization correlated negatively with the carbon chain length in saturated FA (SFA) and n-9 MUFA. The delta9-desaturation of SFA enhanced the mobilization of the corresponding MUFA, but the positional isomerism of the first double bond did not correlate consistently with relative mobilization in MUFA or PUFA. In the marten, the FA composition of the extremities was highly resistant to fasting, and the tail tip and the paws contained more long-chain PUFA to prevent the solidification of lipids and to maintain cell membrane fluidity during cooling.

  16. Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Galic, Sandra; Oakhill, Jon S; Steinberg, Gregory R

    2010-03-25

    Obesity is characterized by increased storage of fatty acids in an expanded adipose tissue mass and is closely associated with the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle and the liver. In addition to being the largest source of fuel in the body, adipose tissue and resident macrophages are also the source of a number of secreted proteins. Cloning of the obese gene and the identification of its product, leptin, was one of the first discoveries of an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule and established an important role for adipose tissue as an endocrine organ. Since then, leptin has been found to have a profound role in the regulation of whole-body metabolism by stimulating energy expenditure, inhibiting food intake and restoring euglycemia, however, in most cases of obesity leptin resistance limits its biological efficacy. In contrast to leptin, adiponectin secretion is often diminished in obesity. Adiponectin acts to increase insulin sensitivity, fatty acid oxidation, as well as energy expenditure and reduces the production of glucose by the liver. Resistin and retinol binding protein-4 are less well described. Their expression levels are positively correlated with adiposity and they are both implicated in the development of insulin resistance. More recently it has been acknowledged that macrophages are an important part of the secretory function of adipose tissue and the main source of inflammatory cyokines, such as TNFalpha and IL-6. An increase in circulating levels of these macrophage-derived factors in obesity leads to a chronic low-grade inflammatory state that has been linked to the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. These proteins commonly known as adipokines are central to the dynamic control of energy metabolism, communicating the nutrient status of the organism with the tissues responsible for controlling both energy intake and expenditure as well as insulin sensitivity. PMID:19723556

  17. Adipose tissues and thyroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Obregon, Maria-Jesus

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of energy balance is regulated by complex homeostatic mechanisms, including those emanating from adipose tissue. The main function of the adipose tissue is to store the excess of metabolic energy in the form of fat. The energy stored as fat can be mobilized during periods of energy deprivation (hunger, fasting, diseases). The adipose tissue has also a homeostatic role regulating energy balance and functioning as endocrine organ that secretes substances that control body homeostasis. Two adipose tissues have been identified: white and brown adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) with different phenotype, function and regulation. WAT stores energy, while BAT dissipates energy as heat. Brown and white adipocytes have different ontogenetic origin and lineage and specific markers of WAT and BAT have been identified. “Brite” or beige adipose tissue has been identified in WAT with some properties of BAT. Thyroid hormones exert pleiotropic actions, regulating the differentiation process in many tissues including the adipose tissue. Adipogenesis gives raise to mature adipocytes and is regulated by several transcription factors (c/EBPs, PPARs) that coordinately activate specific genes, resulting in the adipocyte phenotype. T3 regulates several genes involved in lipid mobilization and storage and in thermogenesis. Both WAT and BAT are targets of thyroid hormones, which regulate genes crucial for their proper function: lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, mitochondrial function, transcription factors, the availability of nutrients. T3 acts directly through specific TREs in the gene promoters, regulating transcription factors. The deiodinases D3, D2, and D1 regulate the availability of T3. D3 is activated during proliferation, while D2 is linked to the adipocyte differentiation program, providing T3 needed for lipogenesis and thermogenesis. We examine the differences between BAT, WAT and brite/beige adipocytes and the process that lead to activation of UCP1 in WAT

  18. Thioesterase superfamily member 1 suppresses cold thermogenesis by limiting the oxidation of lipid droplet-derived fatty acids in brown adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kosuke; LeClair, Katherine B.; Zhang, Yongzhao; Li, Yingxia; Ozdemir, Cafer; Krisko, Tibor I.; Hagen, Susan J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Banks, Alexander S.; Cohen, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Non-shivering thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a central role in energy homeostasis. Thioesterase superfamily member 1 (Them1), a BAT-enriched long chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase, is upregulated by cold and downregulated by warm ambient temperatures. Them1−/− mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and resistance to diet-induced obesity and diabetes, but the mechanistic contribution of Them1 to the regulation of cold thermogenesis remains unknown. Methods Them1−/− and Them1+/+ mice were subjected to continuous metabolic monitoring to quantify the effects of ambient temperatures ranging from thermoneutrality (30 °C) to cold (4 °C) on energy expenditure, core body temperature, physical activity and food intake. The effects of Them1 expression on O2 consumption rates, thermogenic gene expression and lipolytic protein activation were determined ex vivo in BAT and in primary brown adipocytes. Results Them1 suppressed thermogenesis in mice even in the setting of ongoing cold exposure. Without affecting thermogenic gene transcription, Them1 reduced O2 consumption rates in both isolated BAT and primary brown adipocytes. This was attributable to decreased mitochondrial oxidation of endogenous but not exogenous fatty acids. Conclusions These results show that Them1 may act as a break on uncontrolled heat production and limit the extent of energy expenditure. Pharmacologic inhibition of Them1 could provide a targeted strategy for the management of metabolic disorders via activation of brown fat. PMID:27110486

  19. Reduction of obesity-associated white adipose tissue inflammation by rosiglitazone is associated with reduced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in LDLr-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Petra; Morrison, Martine C.; Verschuren, Lars; Liang, Wen; van Bockel, J. Hajo; Kooistra, Teake; Wielinga, Peter Y.; Kleemann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation that drives the development of metabolic diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We recently showed that white adipose tissue (WAT) constitutes an important source of inflammatory factors. Hence, interventions that attenuate WAT inflammation may reduce NAFLD development. Male LDLr−/− mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 9 weeks followed by 7 weeks of HFD with or without rosiglitazone. Effects on WAT inflammation and NAFLD development were analyzed using biochemical and (immuno)histochemical techniques, combined with gene expression analyses. Nine weeks of HFD feeding induced obesity and WAT inflammation, which progressed gradually until the end of the study. Rosiglitazone fully blocked progression of WAT inflammation and activated PPARγ significantly in WAT. Rosiglitazone intervention did not activate PPARγ in liver, but improved liver histology and counteracted the expression of genes associated with severe NAFLD in humans. Rosiglitazone reduced expression of pro-inflammatory factors in WAT (TNF-α, leptin) and increased expression of adiponectin, which was reflected in plasma. Furthermore, rosiglitazone lowered circulating levels of pro-inflammatory saturated fatty acids. Together, these observations provide a rationale for the observed indirect hepatoprotective effects and suggest that WAT represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity-associated NAFLD. PMID:27545964

  20. Reduction of obesity-associated white adipose tissue inflammation by rosiglitazone is associated with reduced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in LDLr-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Petra; Morrison, Martine C; Verschuren, Lars; Liang, Wen; van Bockel, J Hajo; Kooistra, Teake; Wielinga, Peter Y; Kleemann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation that drives the development of metabolic diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We recently showed that white adipose tissue (WAT) constitutes an important source of inflammatory factors. Hence, interventions that attenuate WAT inflammation may reduce NAFLD development. Male LDLr-/- mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 9 weeks followed by 7 weeks of HFD with or without rosiglitazone. Effects on WAT inflammation and NAFLD development were analyzed using biochemical and (immuno)histochemical techniques, combined with gene expression analyses. Nine weeks of HFD feeding induced obesity and WAT inflammation, which progressed gradually until the end of the study. Rosiglitazone fully blocked progression of WAT inflammation and activated PPARγ significantly in WAT. Rosiglitazone intervention did not activate PPARγ in liver, but improved liver histology and counteracted the expression of genes associated with severe NAFLD in humans. Rosiglitazone reduced expression of pro-inflammatory factors in WAT (TNF-α, leptin) and increased expression of adiponectin, which was reflected in plasma. Furthermore, rosiglitazone lowered circulating levels of pro-inflammatory saturated fatty acids. Together, these observations provide a rationale for the observed indirect hepatoprotective effects and suggest that WAT represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity-associated NAFLD. PMID:27545964

  1. Secretory function of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuryszko, J; Sławuta, P; Sapikowski, G

    2016-01-01

    There are two kinds of adipose tissue in mammals: white adipose tissue - WAT and brown adipose tissue - BAT. The main function of WAT is accumulation of triacylglycerols whereas the function of BAT is heat generation. At present, WAT is also considered to be an endocrine gland that produces bioactive adipokines, which take part in glucose and lipid metabolism. Considering its endocrine function, the adipose tissue is not a homogeneous gland but a group of a few glands which act differently. Studies on the secretory function of WAT began in 1994 after discovery of leptin known as the satiation hormone, which regulates body energy homeostasis and maintainence of body mass. Apart from leptin, the following belong to adipokines: adiponectin, resistin, apelin, visfatin and cytokines: TNF and IL 6. Adiponectin is a polypeptide hormone of antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity. It plays a key role in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Resistin exerts a counter effect compared to adiponectin and its physiological role is to maintain fasting glycaemia. Visfatin stimulates insulin secretion and increases insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake by muscle cells and adipocytes. Apelin probably increases the insulin sensitivity of tissues. TNF evokes insulin resistance by blocking insulin receptors and inhibits insulin secretion. Approximately 30% of circulating IL 6 comes from adipose tissue. It causes insulin resistance by decreasing the expression of insulin receptors, decreases adipogenesis and adiponectin and visfatin secretion, and stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis. In 2004, Bays introduced the notion of adiposopathy, defined as dysfunction of the adipose tissue, whose main feature is insulin and leptin resistance as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines: TNF and IL 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein. This means that excess of adipose tissue, especially visceral adipose tissue, leads to the development of a chronic subclinical

  2. The regulation of triglyceride synthesis and fatty acid synthesis in rat epididymal adipose tissue. Effects of insulin, adrenaline and some metabolites in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Saggerson, E. D.; Greenbaum, A. L.

    1970-01-01

    1. Adipose tissues from rats fed a balanced diet were incubated in the presence of glucose (20mm) with the following additions: insulin, anti-insulin serum, insulin+acetate, insulin+pyruvate, insulin+lactate, insulin+phenazine methosulphate, insulin+oleate+albumin, insulin+adrenaline+albumin, insulin+6-N-2′-O-dibutyryl 3′:5′-cyclic AMP+albumin. 2. Measurements were made of the whole tissue concentrations of adenine nucleotides, hexose phosphates, triose phosphates, glycerol 1-phosphate, 3 phosphoglycerate, 6-phosphogluconate, long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, acid-soluble CoA, citrate, isocitrate, malate and 2-oxoglutarate, and of the release into the incubation medium of lactate, pyruvate and glycerol after 1h of incubation. 3. Fluxes of [14C]glucose carbon through the major pathways of glucose metabolism were calculated from the yields of 14C in various products after 2h of incubation. Fluxes of [14C]acetate, [14C]pyruvate or [14C]lactate carbon in the presence of glucose were also determined. 4. Measurements were also made of the whole-tissue concentrations of metabolites in tissues taken directly from Nembutal-anaesthetized rats. 5. Whole tissue mass-action ratios for phosphofructokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase and the combined (aldolase×triose phosphate isomerase) reaction were similar in vivo and in vitro. The reactants of phosphofructokinase appeared to be far from mass-action equilibrium. In vitro, the reactants of hexokinase also appeared to be far from mass-action equilibrium. 6. Correlation of observed changes in glycolytic flux with changes in fructose 6-phosphate concentration suggested that phosphofructokinase may show regulatory behaviour. The enzyme appeared to be activated in the presence of oleate or adrenaline and to be inhibited in the presence of lactate or pyruvate. 7. Evidence is presented that the reactants of lactate dehydrogenase and glycerol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase may be near to mass-action equilibrium in the cytoplasm. 8. No

  3. Adipose tissue macrophages: amicus adipem?

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Justin I.; Ganeshan, Kirthana; Chawla, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Chronic overnutrition drives complex adaptations within both professional metabolic and bystander tissues that, despite intense investigation, are still poorly understood. Xu et al. (2013) now describe the unexpected ability of adipose tissue macrophages to buffer lipids released from obese adipocytes in a manner independent of inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:24315364

  4. Additional effect of metformin and celecoxib against lipid dysregulation and adipose tissue inflammation in high-fat fed rats with insulin resistance and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chieh-Hua; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan

    2016-10-15

    We investigated the effects of metformin and celecoxib on obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation, insulin resistance (IR), fatty liver, and high blood pressure in high-fat (HF) fed rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either regular or HF diet for 8 weeks. Rats fed with regular diet were treated with vehicle for further 4 weeks. HF fed rats were divided into 6 groups, namely, vehicle, celecoxib (30mg/kg/day), metformin (300mg/kg/day), metformin (150mg/kg/day), metformin (300mg/kg/day) with celecoxib (30mg/kg/day), and metformin (150mg/kg/day) with celecoxib (15mg/kg/day) for additional 4 weeks. Increased body weight in HF fed rats was significantly reduced by metformin alone and metformin combined with celecoxib. The increases in the HOMA-IR value and the area under the curve of glucose following an oral glucose tolerance test, systolic blood pressure, and adipocyte size were significantly diminished in treated rats, especially rats undergoing combined treatment. Treatments with either celecoxib or in combination with metformin resulted in a reduction in AT macrophage infiltration and decreases in levels of adipose tissue TNF-α, MCP-1, and leptin levels in high-fat (HF) fed rats. Furthermore, the elevated hepatic triglycerides content was significantly decreased in the combined treatment group compared to that of groups of celecoxib or metformin alone. Celecoxib exerts a synergistic beneficial effect with metformin on and obesity-associated metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in high-fat fed rats.

  5. Adiposity is associated with DNA methylation profile in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Golareh; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T; Eaton, Charles B; Buka, Stephen L; Loucks, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adiposity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, suggesting an important role for adipose tissue in the development of these conditions. The epigenetic underpinnings of adiposity are not well understood, and studies of DNA methylation in relation to adiposity have rarely focused on target adipose tissue. Objectives were to evaluate whether genome-wide DNA methylation profiles in subcutaneous adipose tissue and peripheral blood leukocytes are associated with measures of adiposity, including central fat mass, body fat distribution and body mass index. Methods: Participants were 106 men and women (mean age 47 years) from the New England Family Study. DNA methylation was evaluated using the Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip. Adiposity phenotypes included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-assessed android fat mass, android:gynoid fat ratio and trunk:limb fat ratio, as well as body mass index. Results: Adipose tissue genome-wide DNA methylation profiles were associated with all four adiposity phenotypes, after adjusting for race, sex and current smoking (omnibus p-values <0.001). After further adjustment for adipose cell-mixture effects, associations with android fat mass, android:gynoid fat ratio, and trunk:limb fat ratio remained. In gene-specific analyses, adiposity phenotypes were associated with adipose tissue DNA methylation in several genes that are biologically relevant to the development of adiposity, such as AOC3, LIPE, SOD3, AQP7 and CETP. Blood DNA methylation profiles were not associated with adiposity, before or after adjustment for blood leukocyte cell mixture effects. Conclusion: Findings show that DNA methylation patterns in adipose tissue are associated with adiposity. PMID:25541553

  6. Triacylglycerol metabolism in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian, Maryam; Duncan, Robin E; Jaworski, Kathy; Sarkadi-Nagy, Eszter; Sul, Hei Sook

    2009-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) in adipose tissue serves as the major energy storage form in higher eukaryotes. Obesity, resulting from excess white adipose tissue, has increased dramatically in recent years resulting in a serious public health problem. Understanding of adipocyte-specific TAG synthesis and hydrolysis is critical to the development of strategies to treat and prevent obesity and its closely associated diseases, for example, Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerosis. In this review, we present an overview of the major enzymes in TAG synthesis and lipolysis, including the recent discovery of a novel adipocyte TAG hydrolase. PMID:19194515

  7. PRESS echo time behavior of triglyceride resonances at 1.5 T: Detecting ω-3 fatty acids in adipose tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundbom, Jesper; Heikkinen, Sami; Fielding, Barbara; Hakkarainen, Antti; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Lundbom, Nina

    2009-11-01

    AimThis study investigated the impact of fatty acid (FA) composition on the echo time behavior of triglyceride resonances in a clinical setting. The feasibility of 1H NMR spectroscopy to detect these resonances was also evaluated in human adipose tissue in vivo. MethodTen edible oils chosen to cover a wide spectrum of FA compositions were used as phantom material. The detailed FA composition and intrinsic proton spectra of the oils were characterized by gas chromatography and high-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy (11.7 T), respectively. The detailed echo time behavior of the oils were subsequently measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy in a clinical scanner (1.5 T) using PRESS. The effect of temperature was investigated in five oils. ResultsThe olefinic (5.3 ppm) and diallylic (2.8 ppm) resonances exhibited distinct J-modulation patterns independent of oil FA composition. The methylene resonance (1.3 ppm) displayed an exponential decay, with the apparent T2 showing a weak positive correlation with oil unsaturation ( R = 0.628, P = 0.052), probably a result of changes in viscosity. For the methyl resonance (0.9 ppm), oils high in ω-3 FA displayed a markedly different J-modulation pattern compared to non-ω-3 oils. The characteristic J-modulation of the ω-3 methyl group could be attributed to the phase behavior of the ω-3 methyl triplet signal (all triplet lines in-phase at TE of 135 ms), a result of the ω-3 methyl end forming a first order spin system. The ω-3 methyl outer triplet line at 1.08 ppm of the TE = 140 ms spectrum was found to be useful for determining the ω-3 content of the oils ( R = 0.999, standard error of estimate (SE) 0.80). The olefinic and diallylic proton resonance (measured at TE = 50 ms) areas correlated with the olefinic ( R = 0.993, SE 0.33) and diallylic ( R = 0.997, SE 0.19) proton contents calculated from the GC data. Information derived from long echo time spectra (TE = 200) demonstrated good correlations to GC data and showed no change with

  8. Lactate and the GPR81 receptor in metabolic regulation: implications for adipose tissue function and fatty acid utilisation by muscle during exercise.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Kieron; Trayhurn, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Lactate is increasingly recognised to be more than a simple end product of anaerobic glycolysis. Skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue are considered to be the main sites of lactate production and release. Recent studies have demonstrated that there is a specific G-protein coupled receptor for lactate, GPR81, which is expressed primarily in adipose tissue, and also in muscle. Lactate inhibits lipolysis in adipose tissue by mediating, through GPR81, the anti-lipolytic action of insulin. A high proportion (50 % or more) of the glucose utilised by white adipose tissue is converted to lactate and lactate production by the tissue increases markedly in obesity; this is likely to reflect a switch towards anaerobic metabolism with the development of hypoxia in the tissue. During exercise, there is a shift in fuel utilisation by muscle from lipid to carbohydrate, but this does not appear to be a result of the inhibition of lipolysis in the main adipose tissue depots by muscle-derived lactate. It is suggested instead that a putative autocrine lactate loop in myocytes may regulate fuel utilisation by muscle during exercise, operating via a muscle GPR81 receptor. In addition to being an important substrate, lactate is a key signal in metabolic regulation.

  9. [Adipose tissue inflammation and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Shwarts, V

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ secreting more than 30 various adipokines which regulate wide spectrum of metabolic and immune processes. Obesity is associated with development of adipose tissue inflammation. This inflammation is characterized by infiltration with macrophages, alterations of adipokine secretion, development of insulin resistance. All these factors promote atherosclerosis. Inflammation of perivascular adipose tissue is especially important. Adipokines damage vascular endothelium via paracrine pathway. Cytokines released by macrophages as well as changes of adipokine secretion lead to endothelial dysfunction - the first stage of atherogenesis. Besides specific action curative factors used in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus also produce anti-inflammatory effect and thus diminish risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, rate of their development, and alleviate manifestations of atherosclerosis. Inflammation of adipose tissue is a connecting link between obesity and atherosclerosis. This review contains an outline of roles of various major adipokines in development of atherosclerosis as well as synopsis of anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects of glytazones , metformin, rimonabant, statins, and of lowering of body weight.

  10. Effects of Addition of Linseed and Marine Algae to the Diet on Adipose Tissue Development, Fatty Acid Profile, Lipogenic Gene Expression, and Meat Quality in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Olaia; Mendizabal, José Antonio; Insausti, Kizkitza; Soret, Beatriz; Purroy, Antonio; Arana, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of linseed and algae on growth and carcass parameters, adipocyte cellularity, fatty acid profile and meat quality and gene expression in subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues (AT) in lambs. After weaning, 33 lambs were fed three diets up to 26.7 ± 0.3 kg: Control diet (barley and soybean); L diet (barley, soybean and 10% linseed) and L-A diet (barley, soybean, 5% linseed and 3.89% algae). Lambs fed L-A diet showed lower average daily gain and greater slaughter age compared to Control and L (P < 0.001). Carcass traits were not affected by L and L-A diets, but a trend towards greater adipocyte diameter was observed in L and L-A in the subcutaneous AT (P = 0.057). Adding either linseed or linseed and algae increased α-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid contents in both AT (P < 0.001); however, docosahexaenoic acid was increased by L-A (P < 0.001). The n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001). Algae had adverse effects on meat quality, with greater lipid oxidation and reduced ratings for odor and flavor. The expression of lipogenic genes was downregulated in the subcutaneous AT (P < 0.05): acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACACA) in L and L-A and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in L-A. Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) and fatty acid elongase 5 (ELOVL5) were unaffected. In the subcutaneous AT, supplementing either L or L-A increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and CAAT-enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) (P < 0.05), although it had no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 (SREBF1). In the intramuscular AT, expression of ACACA, SCD, FADS1 and FADS2 decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001) and LPL in L (P < 0.01), but PPARG, CEBPA and SREBF1 were unaffected. PMID:27253325

  11. Effects of Addition of Linseed and Marine Algae to the Diet on Adipose Tissue Development, Fatty Acid Profile, Lipogenic Gene Expression, and Meat Quality in Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Urrutia, Olaia; Mendizabal, José Antonio; Insausti, Kizkitza; Soret, Beatriz; Purroy, Antonio; Arana, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of linseed and algae on growth and carcass parameters, adipocyte cellularity, fatty acid profile and meat quality and gene expression in subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues (AT) in lambs. After weaning, 33 lambs were fed three diets up to 26.7 ± 0.3 kg: Control diet (barley and soybean); L diet (barley, soybean and 10% linseed) and L-A diet (barley, soybean, 5% linseed and 3.89% algae). Lambs fed L-A diet showed lower average daily gain and greater slaughter age compared to Control and L (P < 0.001). Carcass traits were not affected by L and L-A diets, but a trend towards greater adipocyte diameter was observed in L and L-A in the subcutaneous AT (P = 0.057). Adding either linseed or linseed and algae increased α-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid contents in both AT (P < 0.001); however, docosahexaenoic acid was increased by L-A (P < 0.001). The n-6/n-3 ratio decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001). Algae had adverse effects on meat quality, with greater lipid oxidation and reduced ratings for odor and flavor. The expression of lipogenic genes was downregulated in the subcutaneous AT (P < 0.05): acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACACA) in L and L-A and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in L-A. Fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) and fatty acid elongase 5 (ELOVL5) were unaffected. In the subcutaneous AT, supplementing either L or L-A increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) and CAAT-enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) (P < 0.05), although it had no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 (SREBF1). In the intramuscular AT, expression of ACACA, SCD, FADS1 and FADS2 decreased in L and L-A (P < 0.001) and LPL in L (P < 0.01), but PPARG, CEBPA and SREBF1 were unaffected. PMID:27253325

  12. Free fatty acids and IL-6 induce adipocyte galectin-3 which is increased in white and brown adipose tissues of obese mice.

    PubMed

    Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina; Hader, Yvonne; Buechler, Christa

    2014-10-01

    Galectin-3 regulates immune cell function and clearance of advanced glycation end products. Galectin-3 is increased in serum of obese humans and mice and most studies suggest that this protein protects from inflammation in metabolic diseases. Current data show that galectin-3 is markedly elevated in the liver, subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat depots of mice fed a high fat diet and ob/ob mice. Galectin-3 is also increased in brown adipose tissues of these animals and immunohistochemistry confirms higher levels in adipocytes. Raised galectin-3 in obese white adipocytes has been described in the literature and regulation of adipocyte galectin-3 by metabolites with a role in obesity has been analyzed. Galectin-3 is expressed in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and human preadipocytes and is modestly induced in mature adipocytes. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes galectin-3 is localized in the cytoplasm and is also detected in cell supernatants. Glucose does not alter soluble galectin-3. Lipopolysaccharide has no effect while TNF reduces and IL-6 raises this lectin in cell supernatants. Palmitate and oleate modestly elevate soluble galectin-3. Differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells in the presence of 100 μM and 200 μM linoleate induces soluble galectin-3 and cellular levels are upregulated by the higher concentration. Current data suggest that free fatty acids and IL-6 increase galectin-3 in adipocytes and thereby may contribute to higher levels in obesity.

  13. Effect of rate of weight gain of steers during the stocker phase. IV. Rumen fermentation characteristics and expression of genes involved in substrate utilization for fatty acid synthesis in adipose tissues of growing-finishing beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, P A; Sharman, E D; Horn, G W; Krehbiel, C R; Dillwith, J W; Starkey, J D

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of stocker production systems differing in growth rate on rumen fermentation characteristics and utilization of substrates for fatty acid synthesis in intramuscular (IM), subcutaneous (SC), and perirenal (PR) adipose tissues. Angus steers were assigned to 4 stocker cattle production systems in 2 consecutive years: 1) 1.0 kg/d of 40% CP cottonseed meal–based supplement while grazing dormant native range (CON), 2) ground corn/soybean meal–based supplement while grazing dormant native range fed at 1% of BW (CORN), 3) grazing wheat pasture at a high stocking rate to achieve a low rate of BW gain (LGWP), and 4) grazing wheat pasture at a low stocking rate for a high rate of BW gain (HGWP). Eight ruminally cannulated steers were used to determine rumen fermentation characteristics. Steers were harvested during the stocker phase at similar age (different carcass weight) in Exp. 1 (3 steers/treatment) or at similar carcass weight in Exp. 2 (4 steers/treatment). Adipose tissues were analyzed for mRNA expression of genes involved in glucose (solute carrier family 2, member 4 [GLUT4], glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PDH], phosphofructokinase, muscle [PFKM], and pyruvate kinase 2, muscle [PK2]), lactate (lactate dehydrogenase B [LDHB]), and acetate (acetyl-CoA synthetase, cytosol [ACSS2]) utilization for fatty acid synthesis. The acetate:propionate ratio was least (P < 0.05) for HGWP steers, intermediate for CORN and LGWP steers, and greatest for CON steers. At similar age, LGWP and HGWP steers tended (F-test; P < 0.15) to have greater (P < 0.10) G6PDH and ACSS2 mRNA expression than CON and CORN steers in SC and PR but not IM adipose tissue. Expression of PFKM and PK2 mRNA tended (F-test; P < 0.15) to be greater (P < 0.10) in HGWP than CON and LGWP steers in IM but not SC or PR adipose tissue. At similar HCW, expression of GLUT4 and G6PDH mRNA were greater (P < 0.10) in SC adipose tissue of LGWP and HGWP steers

  14. Effect of rate of weight gain of steers during the stocker phase. IV. Rumen fermentation characteristics and expression of genes involved in substrate utilization for fatty acid synthesis in adipose tissues of growing-finishing beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, P A; Sharman, E D; Horn, G W; Krehbiel, C R; Dillwith, J W; Starkey, J D

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of stocker production systems differing in growth rate on rumen fermentation characteristics and utilization of substrates for fatty acid synthesis in intramuscular (IM), subcutaneous (SC), and perirenal (PR) adipose tissues. Angus steers were assigned to 4 stocker cattle production systems in 2 consecutive years: 1) 1.0 kg/d of 40% CP cottonseed meal–based supplement while grazing dormant native range (CON), 2) ground corn/soybean meal–based supplement while grazing dormant native range fed at 1% of BW (CORN), 3) grazing wheat pasture at a high stocking rate to achieve a low rate of BW gain (LGWP), and 4) grazing wheat pasture at a low stocking rate for a high rate of BW gain (HGWP). Eight ruminally cannulated steers were used to determine rumen fermentation characteristics. Steers were harvested during the stocker phase at similar age (different carcass weight) in Exp. 1 (3 steers/treatment) or at similar carcass weight in Exp. 2 (4 steers/treatment). Adipose tissues were analyzed for mRNA expression of genes involved in glucose (solute carrier family 2, member 4 [GLUT4], glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PDH], phosphofructokinase, muscle [PFKM], and pyruvate kinase 2, muscle [PK2]), lactate (lactate dehydrogenase B [LDHB]), and acetate (acetyl-CoA synthetase, cytosol [ACSS2]) utilization for fatty acid synthesis. The acetate:propionate ratio was least (P < 0.05) for HGWP steers, intermediate for CORN and LGWP steers, and greatest for CON steers. At similar age, LGWP and HGWP steers tended (F-test; P < 0.15) to have greater (P < 0.10) G6PDH and ACSS2 mRNA expression than CON and CORN steers in SC and PR but not IM adipose tissue. Expression of PFKM and PK2 mRNA tended (F-test; P < 0.15) to be greater (P < 0.10) in HGWP than CON and LGWP steers in IM but not SC or PR adipose tissue. At similar HCW, expression of GLUT4 and G6PDH mRNA were greater (P < 0.10) in SC adipose tissue of LGWP and HGWP steers

  15. Adipose tissue, diet and aging.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Mauro; Rossi, Andrea P; Fantin, Francesco; Zamboni, Giulia; Chirumbolo, Salvatore; Zoico, Elena; Mazzali, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Age related increase in body fat mass, visceral adipose tissue (AT), and ectopic fat deposition are strongly related to worse health conditions in the elderly. Moreover, with aging higher inflammation in adipose tissue may be observed and may contribute to inflammaging. Aging may significantly affect AT function by modifying the profile of adipokines produced by adipose cells, reducing preadipocytes number and their function and increasing AT macrophages infiltration. The initiating events of the inflammatory cascade promoting a greater AT inflammatory profile are not completely understood. Nutrients may determine changes in the amount of body fat, in its distribution as well as in AT function with some nutrients showing a pro-inflammatory effect on AT. Evidences are sparse and quite controversial with only a few studies performed in older subjects. Different dietary patterns are the result of the complex interaction of foods and nutrients, thus more studies are needed to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and changes in adipose tissue structure, distribution and function in the elderly.

  16. CREBH-FGF21 axis improves hepatic steatosis by suppressing adipose tissue lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Gil; Xu, Xu; Cho, Sungyun; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kersten, Sander; Lee, Ann-Hwee

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue lipolysis produces glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) that serve as energy sources during nutrient scarcity. Adipose tissue lipolysis is tightly regulated and excessive lipolysis causes hepatic steatosis, as NEFA released from adipose tissue constitutes a major source of TG in the liver of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases. Here we show that the liver-enriched transcription factor CREBH is activated by TG accumulation and induces FGF21, which suppresses adipose tissue lipolysis, ameliorating hepatic steatosis. CREBH-deficient mice developed severe hepatic steatosis due to increased adipose tissue lipolysis, when fasted or fed a high-fat low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet. FGF21 production was impaired in CREBH-deficient mice, and adenoviral overexpression of FGF21 suppressed adipose tissue lipolysis and improved hepatic steatosis in these mice. Thus, our results uncover a negative feedback loop in which CREBH regulates NEFA flux from adipose tissue to the liver via FGF21. PMID:27301791

  17. Fasting-induced G0/G1 switch gene 2 and FGF21 expression in the liver are under regulation of adipose tissue derived fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Doris; Schoiswohl, Gabriele; Hofer, Peter; Schreiber, Renate; Schweiger, Martina; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Pollak, Nina M.; Poecher, Nadja; Grabner, Gernot F.; Zierler, Kathrin A.; Eder, Sandra; Kolb, Dagmar; Radner, Franz P.W.; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Kershaw, Erin E.; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Adipose tissue (AT)-derived fatty acids (FAs) are utilized for hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) generation upon fasting. However, their potential impact as signaling molecules is not established. Herein we examined the role of exogenous AT-derived FAs in the regulation of hepatic gene expression by investigating mice with a defect in AT-derived FA supply to the liver. Methods Plasma FA levels, tissue TG hydrolytic activities and lipid content were determined in mice lacking the lipase co-activator comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) selectively in AT (CGI-58-ATko) applying standard protocols. Hepatic expression of lipases, FA oxidative genes, transcription factors, ER stress markers, hormones and cytokines were determined by qRT-PCR, Western blotting and ELISA. Results Impaired AT-derived FA supply upon fasting of CGI-58-ATko mice causes a marked defect in liver PPARα-signaling and nuclear CREBH translocation. This severely reduced the expression of respective target genes such as the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene-2 (G0S2) and the endocrine metabolic regulator FGF21. These changes could be reversed by lipid administration and raising plasma FA levels. Impaired AT-lipolysis failed to induce hepatic G0S2 expression in fasted CGI-58-ATko mice leading to enhanced ATGL-mediated TG-breakdown strongly reducing hepatic TG deposition. On high fat diet, impaired AT-lipolysis counteracts hepatic TG accumulation and liver stress linked to improved systemic insulin sensitivity. Conclusions AT-derived FAs are a critical regulator of hepatic fasting gene expression required for the induction of G0S2-expression in the liver to control hepatic TG-breakdown. Interfering with AT-lipolysis or hepatic G0S2 expression represents an effective strategy for the treatment of hepatic steatosis. PMID:25733154

  18. Assessment of brown adipose tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Sam; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this review we discuss practical considerations for the assessment of brown adipose tissue in rodent models, focusing on mice. The central aim of the review is to provide a critical appraisal of the utility of specialized techniques for assessing brown adipose tissue function in vivo. We cover several of the most common specialized methods for analysing brown adipose tissue function in vivo, including assessment of maximal thermogenic capacity by indirect calorimetry and the measurement of sympathetic tone to brown adipose tissue. While these techniques are powerful, they are not readily available to all laboratories; therefore we also cover several simple measurements that, particularly in combination, can be used to determine if a mouse model is likely to have alterations in brown adipose tissue function. Such techniques include: pair feeding, analysis of brown adipose tissue lipid content and mRNA and protein markers of brown adipose tissue activation. PMID:23760815

  19. Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue: To Be or Not To Be a Typical Adipose Tissue?

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Pierre; Rharass, Tareck; Lucas, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) emerges as a distinct fat depot whose importance has been proved in the bone-fat interaction. Indeed, it is well recognized that adipokines and free fatty acids released by adipocytes can directly or indirectly interfere with cells of bone remodeling or hematopoiesis. In pathological states, such as osteoporosis, each of adipose tissues - subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT), visceral WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and BMAT - is differently associated with bone mineral density (BMD) variations. However, compared with the other fat depots, BMAT displays striking features that makes it a substantial actor in bone alterations. BMAT quantity is well associated with BMD loss in aging, menopause, and other metabolic conditions, such as anorexia nervosa. Consequently, BMAT is sensed as a relevant marker of a compromised bone integrity. However, analyses of BMAT development in metabolic diseases (obesity and diabetes) are scarce and should be, thus, more systematically addressed to better apprehend the bone modifications in that pathophysiological contexts. Moreover, bone marrow (BM) adipogenesis occurs throughout the whole life at different rates. Following an ordered spatiotemporal expansion, BMAT has turned to be a heterogeneous fat depot whose adipocytes diverge in their phenotype and their response to stimuli according to their location in bone and BM. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies point to a detrimental role of BM adipocytes (BMAs) throughout the release of paracrine factors that modulate osteoblast and/or osteoclast formation and function. However, the anatomical dissemination and the difficulties to access BMAs still hamper our understanding of the relative contribution of BMAT secretions compared with those of peripheral adipose tissues. A further characterization of the phenotype and the functional regulation of BMAs are ever more required. Based on currently available data and comparison with other fat tissues

  20. Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue: To Be or Not To Be a Typical Adipose Tissue?

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Pierre; Rharass, Tareck; Lucas, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) emerges as a distinct fat depot whose importance has been proved in the bone-fat interaction. Indeed, it is well recognized that adipokines and free fatty acids released by adipocytes can directly or indirectly interfere with cells of bone remodeling or hematopoiesis. In pathological states, such as osteoporosis, each of adipose tissues - subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT), visceral WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and BMAT - is differently associated with bone mineral density (BMD) variations. However, compared with the other fat depots, BMAT displays striking features that makes it a substantial actor in bone alterations. BMAT quantity is well associated with BMD loss in aging, menopause, and other metabolic conditions, such as anorexia nervosa. Consequently, BMAT is sensed as a relevant marker of a compromised bone integrity. However, analyses of BMAT development in metabolic diseases (obesity and diabetes) are scarce and should be, thus, more systematically addressed to better apprehend the bone modifications in that pathophysiological contexts. Moreover, bone marrow (BM) adipogenesis occurs throughout the whole life at different rates. Following an ordered spatiotemporal expansion, BMAT has turned to be a heterogeneous fat depot whose adipocytes diverge in their phenotype and their response to stimuli according to their location in bone and BM. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies point to a detrimental role of BM adipocytes (BMAs) throughout the release of paracrine factors that modulate osteoblast and/or osteoclast formation and function. However, the anatomical dissemination and the difficulties to access BMAs still hamper our understanding of the relative contribution of BMAT secretions compared with those of peripheral adipose tissues. A further characterization of the phenotype and the functional regulation of BMAs are ever more required. Based on currently available data and comparison with other fat tissues

  1. Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue: To Be or Not To Be a Typical Adipose Tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Hardouin, Pierre; Rharass, Tareck; Lucas, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) emerges as a distinct fat depot whose importance has been proved in the bone–fat interaction. Indeed, it is well recognized that adipokines and free fatty acids released by adipocytes can directly or indirectly interfere with cells of bone remodeling or hematopoiesis. In pathological states, such as osteoporosis, each of adipose tissues – subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT), visceral WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and BMAT – is differently associated with bone mineral density (BMD) variations. However, compared with the other fat depots, BMAT displays striking features that makes it a substantial actor in bone alterations. BMAT quantity is well associated with BMD loss in aging, menopause, and other metabolic conditions, such as anorexia nervosa. Consequently, BMAT is sensed as a relevant marker of a compromised bone integrity. However, analyses of BMAT development in metabolic diseases (obesity and diabetes) are scarce and should be, thus, more systematically addressed to better apprehend the bone modifications in that pathophysiological contexts. Moreover, bone marrow (BM) adipogenesis occurs throughout the whole life at different rates. Following an ordered spatiotemporal expansion, BMAT has turned to be a heterogeneous fat depot whose adipocytes diverge in their phenotype and their response to stimuli according to their location in bone and BM. In vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies point to a detrimental role of BM adipocytes (BMAs) throughout the release of paracrine factors that modulate osteoblast and/or osteoclast formation and function. However, the anatomical dissemination and the difficulties to access BMAs still hamper our understanding of the relative contribution of BMAT secretions compared with those of peripheral adipose tissues. A further characterization of the phenotype and the functional regulation of BMAs are ever more required. Based on currently available data and comparison with other fat

  2. Types of oilseed and adipose tissue influence the composition and relationships of polyunsaturated fatty acid biohydrogenation products in steers fed a grass hay diet.

    PubMed

    Mapiye, C; Aalhus, J L; Turner, T D; Rolland, D C; Basarab, J A; Baron, V S; McAllister, T A; Block, H C; Proctor, S D; Dugan, M E R

    2014-03-01

    The current study evaluated the composition and relationships of polyunsaturated fatty acid biohydrogenation products (PUFA-BHP) from the perirenal (PRF) and subcutaneous fat (SCF) of yearling steers fed a 70 % grass hay diet with concentrates containing either sunflower-seed (SS) or flaxseed (FS). Analysis of variance indicated several groups or families of structurally related FA, and individual FA within these were affected by a number of novel oilseed by fat depot interactions (P < 0.05). Feeding diets containing SS increased the proportions of non-conjugated 18:2 BHP (i.e., atypical dienes, AD) and conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) with the first double bond from carbon 7 to 9, trans-18:1 isomers with double bonds from carbon 6 to 12, and these PUFA-BHP had greater proportions in SCF compared to PRF (P < 0.05). Enrichment of conjugated linolenic acids, AD and CLA isomers with the first double bond in position 11 or 12, and t-18:1 isomers with double bonds from carbon 13 to 16 were achieved by feeding diets containing FS, with PRF having greater proportions than SCF (P < 0.05). Principal component analysis visually confirmed interaction effects on these groups/families of FA, and further confirmed or suggested a number of relationships between PUFA-BHP. Feeding SS or FS in a grass hay diet and exploiting adipose tissue differences, therefore, present unique opportunities to differentially enrich a number of PUFA-BHP which seem to have positive health potential in humans (i.e., t11-18:1, c9,t11-18:2 and c9,t11,c15-18:3).

  3. The Combination of Resveratrol and Quercetin Attenuates Metabolic Syndrome in Rats by Modifying the Serum Fatty Acid Composition and by Upregulating SIRT 1 and SIRT 2 Expression in White Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Peredo-Escárcega, Ana Elena; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Ortega-Ocampo, Sergio; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Castrejón-Tellez, Vicente; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) and quercetin (QRC) modify energy metabolism and reduce cardiovascular risk factors included in the metabolic syndrome (MetS). These natural compounds upregulate and activate sirtuins (SIRTs), a family of NAD-dependent histone deacetylases. We analyzed the effect of two doses of a commercial combination of RSV and QRC on serum fatty acid composition and their regulation of SIRTs 1–3 and PPAR-γ expression in white adipose tissue. MetS was induced in Wistar rats by adding 30% sucrose to drinking water for five months. Rats were divided into control and two groups receiving the two different doses of RSV and QRC in drinking water daily for 4 weeks following the 5 months of sucrose treatment. Commercial kits were used to determine serum parameters and the expressions of SIRTs in WAT were analysed by western blot. In MetS rats body mass, central adiposity, insulin, triglycerides, non-HDL-C, leptin, adiponectin, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) were increased, while polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and HDL-C were decreased. SIRT 1 and SIRT 2 were downregulated, while PPAR-γ was increased. RSV + QRC administration improved the serum health parameters modified by MetS and upregulate SIRT 1 and SIRT 2 expression in white abdominal tissue in MetS animals. PMID:26609312

  4. Isoliquiritigenin Attenuates Adipose Tissue Inflammation in vitro and Adipose Tissue Fibrosis through Inhibition of Innate Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasuharu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroe; Okamoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Seiji; Hamashima, Takeru; Ishii, Yoko; Tanaka, Miyako; Suganami, Takayoshi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ILG) is a flavonoid derived from Glycyrrhiza uralensis and potently suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation resulting in the improvement of diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation. However, whether ILG affects other pathways besides the inflammasome in adipose tissue inflammation is unknown. We here show that ILG suppresses adipose tissue inflammation by affecting the paracrine loop containing saturated fatty acids and TNF-α by using a co-culture composed of adipocytes and macrophages. ILG suppressed inflammatory changes induced by the co-culture through inhibition of NF-κB activation. This effect was independent of either inhibition of inflammasome activation or activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Moreover, ILG suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of adipocytes, coincident with inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation. Additionally, TNF-α-mediated inhibition of Akt phosphorylation under insulin signaling was alleviated by ILG in adipocytes. ILG suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of macrophages, with decreasing the level of phosphorylated Jnk expression. Intriguingly, ILG improved high fat diet-induced fibrosis in adipose tissue in vivo. Finally, ILG inhibited TLR4- or Mincle-stimulated expression of fibrosis-related genes in stromal vascular fraction from obese adipose tissue and macrophages in vitro. Thus, ILG can suppress adipose tissue inflammation by both inflammasome-dependent and -independent manners and attenuate adipose tissue fibrosis by targeting innate immune sensors. PMID:26975571

  5. Adipose tissues as endocrine target organs.

    PubMed

    Lanthier, Nicolas; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2014-08-01

    In the context of obesity, white adipocyte hypertrophy and adipose tissue macrophage infiltration result in the production of pro-inflammatory adipocytokines inducing insulin resistance locally but also in distant organs and contributing to low grade inflammatory status associated with the metabolic syndrome. Visceral adipose tissue is believed to play a prominent role. Brown and beige adipose tissues are capable of energy dissipation, but also of cytokine production and their role in dysmetabolic syndrome is emerging. This review focuses on metabolic and inflammatory changes in these adipose depots and contribution to metabolic syndrome. Also we will review surgical and pharmacological procedures to target adiposity as therapeutic interventions to treat obesity-associated disorders.

  6. Dietary supplementation with long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids attenuates obesity-related metabolic dysfunction and increases expression of PPAR gamma in adipose tissue in type 2 diabetic KK-Ay mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of present study was to examine the effect of long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids (LC-MUFAs) with chain lengths longer than 18 (i.e., C20:1 and C22:1 isomers combined) on obesity-related metabolic dysfunction and its molecular mechanisms. Type-2 diabetic KK-Ay mice (n = 20) were randomly assigned to the 7% soybean oil-diet group (control group) and 4% LC-MUFA concentrate-supplemented-diet group (LC-MUFA group). At 8 weeks on the diet, the results showed that plasma, liver and adipose tissue levels of C20:1 and C22:1 isomers increased significantly with LC-MUFA treatment. Supplementation with LC-MUFAs markedly reduced white fat pad weight as well as adipocyte size in the mice. The levels of plasma free fatty acids, insulin, and leptin concentration in the obese diabetic mice of the LC-MUFA group were also decreased as compared with the mice in the soybean oil-diet control group. Dietary LC-MUFAs significantly increased the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), lipoprotein lipase (Lpl), fatty acid transport protein (Fatp), fatty acid translocase/CD36 (Cd36), as well as mRNA expression of genes involved in lipid oxidation such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (Cpt1a) and citrate synthase (Cs), and decreased the mRNA expression of inflammatory marker serum amyloid A 3 (Saa3) in the adipose tissues of diabetic mice. The results suggest that LC-MUFAs may ameliorate obesity-related metabolic dysfunction partly through increased expression of Pparg as well as its target genes, and decreased inflammatory marker expression in white adipose tissue. PMID:23360495

  7. Role of adipose tissue in haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Faber, D R; de Groot, Ph G; Visseren, F L J

    2009-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased incidence of insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. The increased risk for cardiovascular diseases could partly be caused by a prothrombotic state that exists because of abdominal obesity. Adipose tissue induces thrombocyte activation by the production of adipose tissue-derived hormones, often called adipokines, of which some such as leptin and adiponectin have been shown to directly interfere with platelet function. Increased adipose tissue mass induces IR and systemic low-grade inflammation, also affecting platelet function. It has been demonstrated that adipose tissue directly impairs fibrinolysis by the production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and possibly thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. Adipose tissue may contribute to enhanced coagulation by direct tissue factor production, but hypercoagulability is likely to be primarily caused by affecting hepatic synthesis of the coagulation factors fibrinogen, factor VII, factor VIII and tissue factor, by releasing free fatty acids and pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and interleukin-6) into the portal circulation and by inducing hepatic IR. Adipose tissue dysfunction could thus play a causal role in the prothrombotic state observed in obesity, by directly and indirectly affecting haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:19460118

  8. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response.

  9. Adipose Tissue Remodeling: Its Role in Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Sung Sik; Huh, Jin Young; Hwang, In Jae; Kim, Jong In; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    The adipose tissue is a central metabolic organ in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. The white adipose tissue functions as a key energy reservoir for other organs, whereas the brown adipose tissue accumulates lipids for cold-induced adaptive thermogenesis. Adipose tissues secrete various hormones, cytokines, and metabolites (termed as adipokines) that control systemic energy balance by regulating appetitive signals from the central nerve system as well as metabolic activity in peripheral tissues. In response to changes in the nutritional status, the adipose tissue undergoes dynamic remodeling, including quantitative and qualitative alterations in adipose tissue-resident cells. A growing body of evidence indicates that adipose tissue remodeling in obesity is closely associated with adipose tissue function. Changes in the number and size of the adipocytes affect the microenvironment of expanded fat tissues, accompanied by alterations in adipokine secretion, adipocyte death, local hypoxia, and fatty acid fluxes. Concurrently, stromal vascular cells in the adipose tissue, including immune cells, are involved in numerous adaptive processes, such as dead adipocyte clearance, adipogenesis, and angiogenesis, all of which are dysregulated in obese adipose tissue remodeling. Chronic overnutrition triggers uncontrolled inflammatory responses, leading to systemic low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance. This review will discuss current mechanistic understandings of adipose tissue remodeling processes in adaptive energy homeostasis and pathological remodeling of adipose tissue in connection with immune response. PMID:27148161

  10. Functions of AMP-activated protein kinase in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Daval, Marie; Foufelle, Fabienne; Ferré, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is involved in cellular energy homeostasis. Its functions have been extensively studied in muscles and liver. AMPK stimulates pathways which increase energy production (glucose transport, fatty acid oxidation) and switches off pathways which consume energy (lipogenesis, protein synthesis, gluconeogenesis). This has led to the concept that AMPK has an interesting pharmaceutical potential in situations of insulin resistance and it is indeed the target of existing drugs and hormones which improve insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue is a key player in energy metabolism through the release of substrates and hormones involved in metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Activation of AMPK in adipose tissue can be achieved through situations such as fasting and exercise. Leptin and adiponectin as well as hypoglycaemic drugs are activators of adipose tissue AMPK. This activation probably involves changes in the AMP/ATP ratio and the upstream kinase LKB1. When activated, AMPK limits fatty acid efflux from adipocytes and favours local fatty acid oxidation. Since fatty acids have a key role in insulin resistance, especially in muscles, activating AMPK in adipose tissue might be found to be beneficial in insulin-resistant states, particularly as AMPK activation also reduces cytokine secretion in adipocytes. PMID:16709632

  11. Adipose-derived stem cell differentiation as a basic tool for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Huber, Birgit; Kluger, Petra J

    2016-01-01

    The development of in vitro adipose tissue constructs is highly desired to cope with the increased demand for substitutes to replace damaged soft tissue after high graded burns, deformities or tumor removal. To achieve clinically relevant dimensions, vascularization of soft tissue constructs becomes inevitable but still poses a challenge. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) represent a promising cell source for the setup of vascularized fatty tissue constructs as they can be differentiated into adipocytes and endothelial cells in vitro and are thereby available in sufficiently high cell numbers. This review summarizes the currently known characteristics of ASCs and achievements in adipogenic and endothelial differentiation in vitro. Further, the interdependency of adipogenesis and angiogenesis based on the crosstalk of endothelial cells, stem cells and adipocytes is addressed at the molecular level. Finally, achievements and limitations of current co-culture conditions for the construction of vascularized adipose tissue are evaluated. PMID:26976717

  12. Sex differences in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Ros, Purificación; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and its associated secondary complications are active areas of investigation in search of effective treatments. As a result of this intensified research numerous differences between males and females at all levels of metabolic control have come to the forefront. These differences include not only the amount and distribution of adipose tissue, but also differences in its metabolic capacity and functions between the sexes. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of these dimorphisms and emphasize the fact that these differences between males and females must be taken into consideration in hopes of obtaining successful treatments for both sexes. PMID:23991358

  13. In vivo characterization of fatty acids in human adipose tissue using natural abundance 1H decoupled 13C MRS at 1.5 T: clinical applications to dietary therapy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jong-Hee; Bluml, Stefan; Leaf, Alexander; Ross, Brian D

    2003-05-01

    Natural abundance proton-decoupled (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to establish the in vivo lipid composition of normal adipose tissue and the corresponding effects of altered lipid diets. Experiments were performed on a standard 1.5 T clinical MR scanner using a double-tuned (1)H-(13)C coil. Peaks from double-bonded and methylene carbons were analyzed. Normal lipid composition was established in 20 control subjects. For comparison, five subjects on altered lipid diets were studied. Four subjects were on a fish oil supplement diet or predominantly seafood diet (polyunsaturated fatty acids), and one subject was on a Lorenzo's oil diet (monounsaturated fatty acids). Well-resolved (13)C spectra were obtained from the calf adipose tissue with a total acquisition time of 10 min. Model oil solutions were used to identify specific (13)C resonances. Subjects on lipid diets showed significantly elevated levels of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids for Lorenzo's and fish oil diets, respectively. We conclude that (13)C MR spectroscopy can readily detect changes in lipid composition due to medium- and long-term therapeutic lipid diets. Since the examination is rapid, robust and noninvasive, opportunities arise for large clinical trials of preventive or therapeutic diets to be performed with (13)C MRS on a clinical MR scanner.

  14. Gene Expression Signature in Adipose Tissue of Acromegaly Patients.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Irit; Tran, Quynh T; Barkan, Ariel L; Saltiel, Alan R; Chandler, William F; Bridges, Dave

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of chronic excess growth hormone on adipose tissue, we performed RNA sequencing in adipose tissue biopsies from patients with acromegaly (n = 7) or non-functioning pituitary adenomas (n = 11). The patients underwent clinical and metabolic profiling including assessment of HOMA-IR. Explants of adipose tissue were assayed ex vivo for lipolysis and ceramide levels. Patients with acromegaly had higher glucose, higher insulin levels and higher HOMA-IR score. We observed several previously reported transcriptional changes (IGF1, IGFBP3, CISH, SOCS2) that are known to be induced by GH/IGF-1 in liver but are also induced in adipose tissue. We also identified several novel transcriptional changes, some of which may be important for GH/IGF responses (PTPN3 and PTPN4) and the effects of acromegaly on growth and proliferation. Several differentially expressed transcripts may be important in GH/IGF-1-induced metabolic changes. Specifically, induction of LPL, ABHD5, and NRIP1 can contribute to enhanced lipolysis and may explain the elevated adipose tissue lipolysis in acromegalic patients. Higher expression of TCF7L2 and the fatty acid desaturases FADS1, FADS2 and SCD could contribute to insulin resistance. Ceramides were not different between the two groups. In summary, we have identified the acromegaly gene expression signature in human adipose tissue. The significance of altered expression of specific transcripts will enhance our understanding of the metabolic and proliferative changes associated with acromegaly.

  15. Gene Expression Signature in Adipose Tissue of Acromegaly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Irit; Tran, Quynh T.; Barkan, Ariel L.; Saltiel, Alan R.; Chandler, William F.; Bridges, Dave

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of chronic excess growth hormone on adipose tissue, we performed RNA sequencing in adipose tissue biopsies from patients with acromegaly (n = 7) or non-functioning pituitary adenomas (n = 11). The patients underwent clinical and metabolic profiling including assessment of HOMA-IR. Explants of adipose tissue were assayed ex vivo for lipolysis and ceramide levels. Patients with acromegaly had higher glucose, higher insulin levels and higher HOMA-IR score. We observed several previously reported transcriptional changes (IGF1, IGFBP3, CISH, SOCS2) that are known to be induced by GH/IGF-1 in liver but are also induced in adipose tissue. We also identified several novel transcriptional changes, some of which may be important for GH/IGF responses (PTPN3 and PTPN4) and the effects of acromegaly on growth and proliferation. Several differentially expressed transcripts may be important in GH/IGF-1-induced metabolic changes. Specifically, induction of LPL, ABHD5, and NRIP1 can contribute to enhanced lipolysis and may explain the elevated adipose tissue lipolysis in acromegalic patients. Higher expression of TCF7L2 and the fatty acid desaturases FADS1, FADS2 and SCD could contribute to insulin resistance. Ceramides were not different between the two groups. In summary, we have identified the acromegaly gene expression signature in human adipose tissue. The significance of altered expression of specific transcripts will enhance our understanding of the metabolic and proliferative changes associated with acromegaly. PMID:26087292

  16. Characterization and comparison of adipose tissue-derived cells from human subcutaneous and omental adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Mito; Matsubara, Yoshinori; Lin, Konghua; Sugimachi, Keizou; Furue, Masutaka

    2009-10-01

    Different fat depots contribute differently to disease and function. These differences may be due to the regional variation in cell types and inherent properties of fat cell progenitors. To address the differences of cell types in the adipose tissue from different depots, the phenotypes of freshly isolated adipose tissue-derived cells (ATDCs) from subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) adipose tissues were compared using flow cytometry. Our results showed that CD31(-)CD34(+)CD45(-)CD90(-)CD105(-)CD146(+) population, containing vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes, was specifically defined in the SC adipose tissue while no such population was observed in OM adipose tissue. On the other hand, CD31(-)CD34(+)CD45(-)CD90(-)CD105(-)CD146(-) population, which is an undefined cell population, were found solely in OM adipose tissue. Overall, the SC adipose tissue contained more ATDCs than OM adipose tissue, while OM adipose tissue contained more blood-derived cells. Regarding to the inherent properties of fat cell progenitors from the two depots, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) from SC had higher capacity to differentiate into both adipogenic and osteogenic lineages than those from OM, regardless of that the proliferation rates of ADSCs from both depots were similar. The higher differentiation capacity of ADSCs from SC adipose tissue suggests that SC tissue is more suitable cell source for regenerative medicine than OM adipose tissue.

  17. Brown adipose tissue and bone

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, M E; Enerbäck, S

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is capable of transforming chemically stored energy, in the form of triglycerides, into heat. Recent studies have shown that metabolically active BAT is present in a large proportion of adult humans, where its activity correlates with a favorable metabolic status. Hence, the tissue is now regarded as an interesting target for therapies against obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes, the hypothesis being that an induction of BAT would be beneficial for these disease states. Apart from the association between BAT activity and a healthier metabolic status, later studies have also shown a positive correlation between BAT volume and both bone cross-sectional area and bone mineral density, suggesting that BAT might stimulate bone anabolism. The aim of this review is to give the reader a brief overview of the BAT research field and to summarize and discuss recent findings regarding BAT being a potential player in bone metabolism. PMID:27152171

  18. Adipose tissue: cell heterogeneity and functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Esteve Ràfols, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    There are two types of adipose tissue in the body whose function appears to be clearly differentiated. White adipose tissue stores energy reserves as fat, whereas the metabolic function of brown adipose tissue is lipid oxidation to produce heat. A good balance between them is important to maintain energy homeostasis. The concept of white adipose tissue has radically changed in the past decades, and is now considered as an endocrine organ that secretes many factors with autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions. In addition, we can no longer consider white adipose tissue as a single tissue, because it shows different metabolic profiles in its different locations, with also different implications. Although the characteristic cell of adipose tissue is the adipocyte, this is not the only cell type present in adipose tissue, neither the most abundant. Other cell types in adipose tissue described include stem cells, preadipocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. The balance between these different cell types and their expression profile is closely related to maintenance of energy homeostasis. Increases in adipocyte size, number and type of lymphocytes, and infiltrated macrophages are closely related to the metabolic syndrome diseases. The study of regulation of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and stem cells, and understanding of the interrelationship between the different cell types will provide new targets for action against these diseases. PMID:23834768

  19. Adipose tissue: cell heterogeneity and functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Esteve Ràfols, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    There are two types of adipose tissue in the body whose function appears to be clearly differentiated. White adipose tissue stores energy reserves as fat, whereas the metabolic function of brown adipose tissue is lipid oxidation to produce heat. A good balance between them is important to maintain energy homeostasis. The concept of white adipose tissue has radically changed in the past decades, and is now considered as an endocrine organ that secretes many factors with autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions. In addition, we can no longer consider white adipose tissue as a single tissue, because it shows different metabolic profiles in its different locations, with also different implications. Although the characteristic cell of adipose tissue is the adipocyte, this is not the only cell type present in adipose tissue, neither the most abundant. Other cell types in adipose tissue described include stem cells, preadipocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. The balance between these different cell types and their expression profile is closely related to maintenance of energy homeostasis. Increases in adipocyte size, number and type of lymphocytes, and infiltrated macrophages are closely related to the metabolic syndrome diseases. The study of regulation of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and stem cells, and understanding of the interrelationship between the different cell types will provide new targets for action against these diseases.

  20. Adipose and mammary epithelial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Nelson, Celeste M

    2013-01-01

    Breast reconstruction is a type of surgery for women who have had a mastectomy, and involves using autologous tissue or prosthetic material to construct a natural-looking breast. Adipose tissue is the major contributor to the volume of the breast, whereas epithelial cells comprise the functional unit of the mammary gland. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can differentiate into both adipocytes and epithelial cells and can be acquired from autologous sources. ASCs are therefore an attractive candidate for clinical applications to repair or regenerate the breast. Here we review the current state of adipose tissue engineering methods, including the biomaterials used for adipose tissue engineering and the application of these techniques for mammary epithelial tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering combined with microfabrication approaches to engineer the epithelium represents a promising avenue to replicate the native structure of the breast.

  1. Mitochondria and endocrine function of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Medina-Gómez, Gema

    2012-12-01

    Excess of adipose tissue is accompanied by an increase in the risk of developing insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other complications. Nevertheless, total or partial absence of fat or its accumulation in other tissues (lipotoxicity) is also associated to these complications. White adipose tissue (WAT) was traditionally considered a metabolically active storage tissue for lipids while brown adipose tissue (BAT) was considered as a thermogenic adipose tissue with higher oxidative capacity. Nowadays, WAT is also considered an endocrine organ that contributes to energy homeostasis. Experimental evidence tends to link the malfunction of adipose mitochondria with the development of obesity and T2D. This review discusses the importance of mitochondrial function in adipocyte biology and the increased evidences of mitochondria dysfunction in these epidemics. New strategies targeting adipocyte mitochondria from WAT and BAT are also discussed as therapies against obesity and its complications in the near future. PMID:23168280

  2. Adipose and mammary epithelial tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenting; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast reconstruction is a type of surgery for women who have had a mastectomy, and involves using autologous tissue or prosthetic material to construct a natural-looking breast. Adipose tissue is the major contributor to the volume of the breast, whereas epithelial cells comprise the functional unit of the mammary gland. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can differentiate into both adipocytes and epithelial cells and can be acquired from autologous sources. ASCs are therefore an attractive candidate for clinical applications to repair or regenerate the breast. Here we review the current state of adipose tissue engineering methods, including the biomaterials used for adipose tissue engineering and the application of these techniques for mammary epithelial tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering combined with microfabrication approaches to engineer the epithelium represents a promising avenue to replicate the native structure of the breast. PMID:23628872

  3. Profiling of chicken adipose tissue gene expression by genome array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Bao; Li, Hui; Wang, Qi-Gui; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Wang, Shou-Zhi; Wang, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Background Excessive accumulation of lipids in the adipose tissue is a major problem in the present-day broiler industry. However, few studies have analyzed the expression of adipose tissue genes that are involved in pathways and mechanisms leading to adiposity in chickens. Gene expression profiling of chicken adipose tissue could provide key information about the ontogenesis of fatness and clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying obesity. In this study, Chicken Genome Arrays were used to construct an adipose tissue gene expression profile of 7-week-old broilers, and to screen adipose tissue genes that are differentially expressed in lean and fat lines divergently selected over eight generations for high and low abdominal fat weight. Results The gene expression profiles detected 13,234–16,858 probe sets in chicken adipose tissue at 7 weeks, and genes involved in lipid metabolism and immunity such as fatty acid binding protein (FABP), thyroid hormone-responsive protein (Spot14), lipoprotein lipase(LPL), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7(IGFBP7) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC), were highly expressed. In contrast, some genes related to lipogenesis, such as leptin receptor, sterol regulatory element binding proteins1 (SREBP1), apolipoprotein B(ApoB) and insulin-like growth factor 2(IGF2), were not detected. Moreover, 230 genes that were differentially expressed between the two lines were screened out; these were mainly involved in lipid metabolism, signal transduction, energy metabolism, tumorigenesis and immunity. Subsequently, real-time RT-PCR was performed to validate fifteen differentially expressed genes screened out by the microarray approach and high consistency was observed between the two methods. Conclusion Our results establish the groundwork for further studies of the basic genetic control of growth and development of chicken adipose tissue, and will be beneficial in clarifying the molecular mechanism of obesity in chickens. PMID

  4. Imaging white adipose tissue with confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Santibañez, Gabriel; Cho, Kae Won; Lumeng, Carey N

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is composed of a variety of cell types that include mature adipocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, adipocyte progenitors, and a range of inflammatory leukocytes. These cells work in concert to promote nutrient storage in adipose tissue depots and vary widely based on location. In addition, overnutrition and obesity impart significant changes in the architecture of adipose tissue that are strongly associated with metabolic dysfunction. Recent studies have called attention to the importance of adipose tissue microenvironments in regulating adipocyte function and therefore require techniques that preserve cellular interactions and permit detailed analysis of three-dimensional structures in fat. This chapter summarizes our experience with the use of laser scanning confocal microscopy for imaging adipose tissue in rodents.

  5. Control of adipose tissue lipolysis in ectotherm vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, R H; Lima-Verde, J S; Machado, C R; Cardona, G M; Garofalo, M A; Kettelhut, I C

    1992-10-01

    Lipolytic activity of fish (Hoplias malabaricus), toad (Bufo paracnemis), and snake (Philodryas patagoniensis) adipose tissue was investigated in vivo and in vitro. Catecholamines or glucagon did not affect the release of free fatty acids (FFA) by incubated fish and toad adipose tissue. Catecholamines also failed to activate snake adipose tissue lipolysis, which even decreased in the presence of epinephrine. However, glucagon stimulated both the lipolytic activity of reptilian tissue in vitro and the mobilization of FFA to plasma when administered to snakes in vivo. The release of FFA from incubated fish, amphibian, and reptilian adipose tissue increased markedly in the presence of cAMP or xanthine derivatives, inhibitors of phosphodiesterase. Forskolin or fluoride, activators of specific components of the adenylate cyclase system, strongly stimulated toad adipose tissue lipolysis. The data suggest that adipocyte triacylglycerol lipase of ectotherm vertebrates is activated by a cAMP-mediated phosphorylation and that the organization of the membrane-bound adenylate cyclase system is similar to that of mammals.

  6. Serum glucose, serum free fatty acids and adipose tissue lipids after fatal hypothermia of cold acclimatized, reserpine or propranolol treated guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, J; Huttunen, P; Vapaatalo, H

    1976-03-24

    Surviving ability in frost (-20 degree C) was studied in cold acclimatized guinea-pigs given either reserpine, propranolol or saline. Survival time, rectal temperature at death, serum glucose, serum FFA and triglycerides in the interscapular adipose tissue were determined. Rectal temperature was highest in the reserpine group, in the same animals that endured the frost the shortest time. The survival time had decreased by about a half of that in the controls. Propranolol treatment decreased the living time only slightly. The fact that serum glucose remained high in the reserpine treated animals was obviously related to the short survival time. In the propranolol group glucose values were somewhat higher than in the control group (saline-animals). Reserpine seemed to have inhibited the release of FFA in the warm-acclimatized animals as interpreted from the low serum values. On the other hand, FFA were rather high in the cold-acclimatized reserpine animals. The blocking effect of reserpine reflected also in the higher contents of triglycerides in the adipose tissue both in cold-acclimatized and warm-acclimatized animals. Propranolol prevented slightly the depletion of the triglycerides. Amount of total lipids in the adipose tissue was lower in the cold-acclimatized animals than in the warm-acclimatized ones because of the change of the type of the adipocytes from unilocular to multilocular. The results corroborated the importance of FFA for longer survival in severe cold. Sensitization to reserpine seems to develop during cold-acclimatization. It calls attention to a possible hazard of reserpine treatment in cold environment. PMID:961065

  7. The adipose organ: morphological perspectives of adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Cinti, S

    2001-08-01

    Anatomically, an organ is defined as a series of tissues which jointly perform one or more interconnected functions. The adipose organ qualifies for this definition as it is made up of two tissue types, the white and brown adipose tissues, which collaborate in partitioning the energy contained in lipids between thermogenesis and the other metabolic functions. In rats and mice the adipose organ consists of several subcutaneous and visceral depots. Some areas of these depots are brown and correspond to brown adipose tissue, while many are white and correspond to white adipose tissue. The number of brown adipocytes found in white areas varies with age, strain of animal and environmental conditions. Brown and white adipocyte precursors are morphologically dissimilar. Together with a rich vascular supply, brown areas receive abundant noradrenergic parenchymal innervation. The gross anatomy and histology of the organ vary considerably in different physiological (cold acclimation, warm acclimation, fasting) and pathological conditions such as obesity; many important genes, such as leptin and uncoupling protein-1, are also expressed very differently in the two cell types. These basic mechanisms should be taken into account when addressing the physiopathology of obesity and its treatment. PMID:11681806

  8. Differential effects of reduced protein diets on fatty acid composition and gene expression in muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of Alentejana purebred and Large White × Landrace × Pietrain crossbred pigs.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta S; Pires, Virgínia M R; Alfaia, Cristina M; Costa, Ana S H; Luxton, Richard; Doran, Olena; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José A M

    2013-07-28

    The present study assessed the effect of pig genotype (fatty v. lean) and dietary protein and lysine (Lys) levels (normal v. reduced) on intramuscular fat (IMF) content, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) deposition, fatty acid composition and mRNA levels of genes controlling lipid metabolism. The experiment was conducted on sixty intact male pigs (thirty Alentejana purebred and thirty Large White × Landrace × Pietrain crossbred), from 60 to 93 kg of live weight. Animals were divided into three groups fed with the following diets: control diet equilibrated for Lys (17·5 % crude protein (CP) and 0·7 % Lys), reduced protein diet (RPD) equilibrated for Lys (13·2 % CP and 0·6 % Lys) and RPD not equilibrated for Lys (13·1 % CP and 0·4 % Lys). It was shown that the RPD increased fat deposition in the longissimus lumborum muscle in the lean but not in the fatty pig genotype. It is strongly suggested that the effect of RPD on the longissimus lumborum muscle of crossbred pigs is mediated via Lys restriction. The increase in IMF content under the RPD was accompanied by increased stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and PPARG mRNA levels. RPD did not alter backfat thickness, but increased the total fatty acid content in both lean and fatty pig genotype. The higher amount of SAT in fatty pigs, when compared with the lean ones, was associated with the higher expression levels of ACACA, CEBPA, FASN and SCD genes. Taken together, the data indicate that the mechanisms regulating fat deposition in pigs are genotype and tissue specific, and are associated with the expression regulation of the key lipogenic genes. PMID:23286604

  9. Linoleic acid content in adipose tissue and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Riemersma, R A; Wood, D A; Butler, S; Elton, R A; Oliver, M; Salo, M; Nikkari, T; Vartiainen, E; Puska, P; Gey, F

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of an inverse relation between essential fatty acids in adipose tissue, in particular linoleic acid, and mortality from coronary heart disease was studied by a cross sectional survey of random population samples of apparently healthy men aged 40-49 from four European regions with differing mortality from coronary heart disease. The proportion of linoleic acid in adipose tissue was lowest in men from north Karelia, Finland, where mortality from coronary heart disease is highest, and highest in men from Italy, where mortality is lowest, with intermediate proportions in men from Scotland and south west Finland. Similar gradients were observed for the desaturation and elongation products dihomo-gamma-linolenic and arachidonic acid. The proportion of saturated fatty acids in adipose tissue was highest in Finland, intermediate in Scotland, and lowest in Italy. Italian men also had the highest proportion of oleate in their adipose tissue and the lowest proportion of myristoleate and palmitoleate. Finnish men were more obese and had a higher blood pressure. Serum cholesterol concentration was higher in north Karelia and south west Finland than in Scotland or Italy. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations reflected the regional differences in serum cholesterol, being higher in Finland and lower in Italy. The ratios of HDL cholesterol to total cholesterol, however, did not differ. The regional differences in linoleic acid in adipose tissue remained highly significant when the observed differences in other known risk factors for coronary heart disease among the four areas were taken into account by multivariate analysis. The gradients in proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids probably reflect differences in dietary intake of linoleic acid. PMID:3087455

  10. Brown adipose tissue, thermogenesis, angiogenesis: pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Honek, Jennifer; Lim, Sharon; Fischer, Carina; Iwamoto, Hideki; Seki, Takahiro; Cao, Yihai

    2014-07-01

    The number of obese and overweight individuals is globally rising, and obesity-associated disorders such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are among the most common causes of death. While white adipose tissue is the key player in the storage of energy, active brown adipose tissue expends energy due to its thermogenic capacity. Expanding and activating brown adipose tissue using pharmacological approaches therefore might offer an attractive possibility for therapeutic intervention to counteract obesity and its consequences for metabolic health.

  11. Identification of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl in human adipose tissue and serum.

    PubMed

    Sledzinski, Tomasz; Mika, Adriana; Stepnowski, Piotr; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Kaska, Lukasz; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Swierczynski, Julian

    2013-08-01

    Fatty acids containing a cyclopropane ring in their structure (cyclopropane FA) have been found in a wide variety of bacteria, a number of protozoa, and Myriapoda. Little is known about cyclopropane FA in mammal, especially in human tissues. The present study deals with the identification of cyclopropane FA in adipose tissue and serum of humans and rats. Fatty acids extracted from the adipose tissue and serum obtained from obese women during bariatric surgery were methylated and analyzed on GC-MS. We have identified: cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl, cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-octyl, cyclopropanenonanoic acid, and 2-[[2-[(2-ethylcyclopropyl)methyl]cyclopropyl]methyl] acid in human adipose tissue. We confirmed the presence of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl by derivatization of FA extracted from human adipose tissue to picolinyl esters. Cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl was the main cyclopropane FA (approximately 0.4 % of total fatty acids in human adipose tissue, and about 0.2 % of total fatty acids in the serum). In adipose tissue cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl was found mainly in triacylglycerols, whereas in serum in phospholipids and triacylglycerols. The cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl has also been found in serum, and adipose tissue of rats in amounts comparable to humans. The content of cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl decreased in adipose tissue of rats maintained on a restricted diet for 1 month. In conclusion, we demonstrated that cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl is present in human adipose tissue and serum. Adipose tissue cyclopropaneoctanoic acid 2-hexyl is stored mainly in triacylglycerols and the storage of this cyclopropane FA is affected by food restriction.

  12. Brown adipose tissue and its therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lidell, M E; Betz, M J; Enerbäck, S

    2014-10-01

    Obesity and related diseases are a major cause of human morbidity and mortality and constitute a substantial economic burden for society. Effective treatment regimens are scarce, and new therapeutic targets are needed. Brown adipose tissue, an energy-expending tissue that produces heat, represents a potential therapeutic target. Its presence is associated with low body mass index, low total adipose tissue content and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Knowledge about the development and function of thermogenic adipocytes in brown adipose tissue has increased substantially in the last decade. Important transcriptional regulators have been identified, and hormones able to modulate the thermogenic capacity of the tissue have been recognized. Intriguingly, it is now clear that humans, like rodents, possess two types of thermogenic adipocytes: the classical brown adipocytes found in the interscapular brown adipose organ and the so-called beige adipocytes primarily found in subcutaneous white adipose tissue after adrenergic stimulation. The presence of two distinct types of energy-expending adipocytes in humans is conceptually important because these cells might be stimulated and recruited by different signals, raising the possibility that they might be separate potential targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we will discuss important features of the energy-expending brown adipose tissue and highlight those that may serve as potential targets for pharmacological intervention aimed at expanding the tissue and/or enhancing its function to counteract obesity.

  13. Immunological contributions to adipose tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    DiSpirito, Joanna R; Mathis, Diane

    2015-09-01

    Adipose tissue is composed of many functionally and developmentally distinct cell types, the metabolic core of which is the adipocyte. The classification of "adipocyte" encompasses three primary types - white, brown, and beige - with distinct origins, anatomic distributions, and homeostatic functions. The ability of adipocytes to store and release lipids, respond to insulin, and perform their endocrine functions (via secretion of adipokines) is heavily influenced by the immune system. Various cell populations of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system can resist or exacerbate the development of the chronic, low-grade inflammation associated with obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Here, we discuss these interactions, with a focus on their consequences for adipocyte and adipose tissue function in the setting of chronic overnutrition. In addition, we will review the effects of diet composition on adipose tissue inflammation and recent evidence suggesting that diet-driven disruption of the gut microbiota can trigger pathologic inflammation of adipose tissue.

  14. Intermuscular and intramuscular adipose tissues: Bad vs. good adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hausman, Gary J; Basu, Urmila; Du, Min; Fernyhough-Culver, Melinda; Dodson, Michael V

    2014-01-01

    Human studies of the influence of aging and other factors on intermuscular fat (INTMF) were reviewed. Intermuscular fat increased with weight loss, weight gain, or with no weight change with age in humans. An increase in INTMF represents a similar threat to type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance as does visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Studies of INTMF in animals covered topics such as quantitative deposition and genetic relationships with other fat depots. The relationship between leanness and higher proportions of INTMF fat in pigs was not observed in human studies and was not corroborated by other pig studies. In humans, changes in muscle mass, strength and quality are associated with INTMF accretion with aging. Gene expression profiling and intrinsic methylation differences in pigs demonstrated that INTMF and VAT are primarily associated with inflammatory and immune processes. It seems that in the pig and humans, INTMF and VAT share a similar pattern of distribution and a similar association of components dictating insulin sensitivity. Studies on intramuscular (IM) adipocyte development in meat animals were reviewed. Gene expression analysis and genetic analysis have identified candidate genes involved in IM adipocyte development. Intramuscular (IM) adipocyte development in human muscle is only seen during aging and some pathological circumstance. Several genetic links between human and meat animal adipogenesis have been identified. In pigs, the Lipin1 and Lipin 2 gene have strong genetic effects on IM accumulation. Lipin1 deficiency results in immature adipocyte development in human lipodystrophy. In humans, overexpression of Perilipin 2 (PLIN2) facilitates intramyocellular lipid accretion whereas in pigs PLIN2 gene expression is associated with IM deposition. Lipins and perilipins may influence intramuscular lipid regardless of species. PMID:26317048

  15. Intermuscular and intramuscular adipose tissues: Bad vs. good adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Hausman, Gary J; Basu, Urmila; Du, Min; Fernyhough-Culver, Melinda; Dodson, Michael V

    2014-01-01

    Human studies of the influence of aging and other factors on intermuscular fat (INTMF) were reviewed. Intermuscular fat increased with weight loss, weight gain, or with no weight change with age in humans. An increase in INTMF represents a similar threat to type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance as does visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Studies of INTMF in animals covered topics such as quantitative deposition and genetic relationships with other fat depots. The relationship between leanness and higher proportions of INTMF fat in pigs was not observed in human studies and was not corroborated by other pig studies. In humans, changes in muscle mass, strength and quality are associated with INTMF accretion with aging. Gene expression profiling and intrinsic methylation differences in pigs demonstrated that INTMF and VAT are primarily associated with inflammatory and immune processes. It seems that in the pig and humans, INTMF and VAT share a similar pattern of distribution and a similar association of components dictating insulin sensitivity. Studies on intramuscular (IM) adipocyte development in meat animals were reviewed. Gene expression analysis and genetic analysis have identified candidate genes involved in IM adipocyte development. Intramuscular (IM) adipocyte development in human muscle is only seen during aging and some pathological circumstance. Several genetic links between human and meat animal adipogenesis have been identified. In pigs, the Lipin1 and Lipin 2 gene have strong genetic effects on IM accumulation. Lipin1 deficiency results in immature adipocyte development in human lipodystrophy. In humans, overexpression of Perilipin 2 (PLIN2) facilitates intramyocellular lipid accretion whereas in pigs PLIN2 gene expression is associated with IM deposition. Lipins and perilipins may influence intramuscular lipid regardless of species.

  16. Influencing Factors of Thermogenic Adipose Tissue Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoqing; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Cuiqing

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an escalating public health challenge and contributes tremendously to the disease burden globally. New therapeutic strategies are required to alleviate the health impact of obesity-related metabolic dysfunction. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized for dissipating chemical energy for thermogenesis as a defense against cold environment. Intriguingly, the brown-fat like adipocytes that dispersed throughout white adipose tissue (WAT) in rodents and humans, called “brite” or “beige” adipocytes, share similar thermogenic characteristics to brown adipocytes. Recently, researchers have focused on cognition of these thermogenic adipose tissues. Some factors have been identified to regulate the development and function of thermogenic adipose tissues. Cold exposure, pharmacological conditions, and lifestyle can enhance non-shivering thermogenesis and metabolism via some mechanisms. However, environmental pollutants, such as ambient fine particulates and ozone, may impair the function of these thermogenic adipose tissues and thereby induce metabolic dysfunction. In this review, the origin, function and influencing factors of thermogenic adipose tissues were summarized and it will provide insights into identifying new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases. PMID:26903879

  17. Influencing Factors of Thermogenic Adipose Tissue Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqing; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Cuiqing

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an escalating public health challenge and contributes tremendously to the disease burden globally. New therapeutic strategies are required to alleviate the health impact of obesity-related metabolic dysfunction. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized for dissipating chemical energy for thermogenesis as a defense against cold environment. Intriguingly, the brown-fat like adipocytes that dispersed throughout white adipose tissue (WAT) in rodents and humans, called "brite" or "beige" adipocytes, share similar thermogenic characteristics to brown adipocytes. Recently, researchers have focused on cognition of these thermogenic adipose tissues. Some factors have been identified to regulate the development and function of thermogenic adipose tissues. Cold exposure, pharmacological conditions, and lifestyle can enhance non-shivering thermogenesis and metabolism via some mechanisms. However, environmental pollutants, such as ambient fine particulates and ozone, may impair the function of these thermogenic adipose tissues and thereby induce metabolic dysfunction. In this review, the origin, function and influencing factors of thermogenic adipose tissues were summarized and it will provide insights into identifying new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity and obesity-related diseases. PMID:26903879

  18. Adipose tissue plasticity from WAT to BAT and in between.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Mottillo, Emilio P; Granneman, James G

    2014-03-01

    Adipose tissue plays an essential role in regulating energy balance through its metabolic, cellular and endocrine functions. Adipose tissue has been historically classified into anabolic white adipose tissue and catabolic brown adipose tissue. An explosion of new data, however, points to the remarkable heterogeneity among the cells types that can become adipocytes, as well as the inherent metabolic plasticity of mature cells. These data indicate that targeting cellular and metabolic plasticity of adipose tissue might provide new avenues for treatment of obesity-related diseases. This review will discuss the developmental origins of adipose tissue, the cellular complexity of adipose tissues, and the identification of progenitors that contribute to adipogenesis throughout development. We will touch upon the pathological remodeling of adipose tissue and discuss how our understanding of adipose tissue remodeling can uncover new therapeutic targets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  19. Short-term oleoyl-estrone treatment affects capacity to manage lipids in rat adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Anna; Noé, Véronique; Ciudad, Carlos J; Romero, M Mar; Remesar, Xavier; Esteve, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    Background Short-term OE (oleoyl-estrone) treatment causes significant decreases in rat weight mainly due to adipose tissue loss. The aim of this work was to determine if OE treatment affects the expression of genes that regulate lipid metabolism in white adipose tissue. Results Gene expression in adipose tissue from female treated rats (48 hours) was analysed by hybridization to cDNA arrays and levels of specific mRNAs were determined by real-time PCR. Treatment with OE decreased the expression of 232 genes and up-regulated 75 other genes in mesenteric white adipose tissue. The use of real-time PCR validate that, in mesenteric white adipose tissue, mRNA levels for Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL) were decreased by 52%, those of Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) by 95%, those of Hormone Sensible Lipase (HSL) by 32%, those of Acetyl CoA Carboxylase (ACC) by 92%, those of Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) by 45%, and those of Fatty Acid Transport Protein 1 (FATP1) and Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein (FABP4) by 52% and 49%, respectively. Conversely, Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNFα) values showed overexpression (198%). Conclusion Short-term treatment with OE affects adipose tissue capacity to extract fatty acids from lipoproteins and to deal with fatty acid transport and metabolism. PMID:17725831

  20. Brown adipose tissue growth and development.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is uniquely able to rapidly produce large amounts of heat through activation of uncoupling protein (UCP) 1. Maximally stimulated brown fat can produce 300 watts/kg of heat compared to 1 watt/kg in all other tissues. UCP1 is only present in small amounts in the fetus and in precocious mammals, such as sheep and humans; it is rapidly activated around the time of birth following the substantial rise in endocrine stimulatory factors. Brown adipose tissue is then lost and/or replaced with white adipose tissue with age but may still contain small depots of beige adipocytes that have the potential to be reactivated. In humans brown adipose tissue is retained into adulthood, retains the capacity to have a significant role in energy balance, and is currently a primary target organ in obesity prevention strategies. Thermogenesis in brown fat humans is environmentally regulated and can be stimulated by cold exposure and diet, responses that may be further modulated by photoperiod. Increased understanding of the primary factors that regulate both the appearance and the disappearance of UCP1 in early life may therefore enable sustainable strategies in order to prevent excess white adipose tissue deposition through the life cycle.

  1. Studies of vegans: the fatty acid composition of plasma choline phosphoglycerides, erythrocytes, adipose tissue, and breast milk, and some indicators of susceptibility to ischemic heart disease in vegans and omnivore controls.

    PubMed

    Sanders, T A; Ellis, F R; Dickerson, J W

    1978-05-01

    The fatty acid composition of erythrocytes, of plasma choline phosphoglycerides, and of adipose tissue, serum cholesterol, triglyceride and vitamin B12 concentrations, weights, heights and skinfold thickness were determined on 22 vegans and 22 age and sex matched omnivore controls. The fatty acid composition of breast milk from four vegan and four omnivore control mothers, and of erythrocytes from three infants breast fed by vegan mothers and six infants breast fed by omnivore control mothers was determined. The proportions of linoleic acid and its long-chain derivatives were higher, the proportion of the long-chain derivatives of alpha-linolenic acid was lower, and the ratio of 22:5omega3/22:6omega3 was greater in the tissues of the vegans and infants breast-fed by vegans than in controls; the most marked differences were in the proportions of linoleic (18:2omega6) and docosahexenoic (22:6omega3) acids. Weights, skinfold thickness, serum vitamin B12, cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were less in vegans than in controls. The difference in serum cholesterol concentration was most marked. It is concluded that a vegan-type diet may be the one of choice in the treatment of ischemic heart disease, angina pectoris, and certain hyperlipidemias.

  2. Studies of vegans: the fatty acid composition of plasma choline phosphoglycerides, erythrocytes, adipose tissue, and breast milk, and some indicators of susceptibility to ischemic heart disease in vegans and omnivore controls.

    PubMed

    Sanders, T A; Ellis, F R; Dickerson, J W

    1978-05-01

    The fatty acid composition of erythrocytes, of plasma choline phosphoglycerides, and of adipose tissue, serum cholesterol, triglyceride and vitamin B12 concentrations, weights, heights and skinfold thickness were determined on 22 vegans and 22 age and sex matched omnivore controls. The fatty acid composition of breast milk from four vegan and four omnivore control mothers, and of erythrocytes from three infants breast fed by vegan mothers and six infants breast fed by omnivore control mothers was determined. The proportions of linoleic acid and its long-chain derivatives were higher, the proportion of the long-chain derivatives of alpha-linolenic acid was lower, and the ratio of 22:5omega3/22:6omega3 was greater in the tissues of the vegans and infants breast-fed by vegans than in controls; the most marked differences were in the proportions of linoleic (18:2omega6) and docosahexenoic (22:6omega3) acids. Weights, skinfold thickness, serum vitamin B12, cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were less in vegans than in controls. The difference in serum cholesterol concentration was most marked. It is concluded that a vegan-type diet may be the one of choice in the treatment of ischemic heart disease, angina pectoris, and certain hyperlipidemias. PMID:645628

  3. Tissue engineering chamber promotes adipose tissue regeneration in adipose tissue engineering models through induced aseptic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhangsong; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Zhan, Weiqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Shengchang; Lu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) makes it possible to generate significant amounts of mature, vascularized, stable, and transferable adipose tissue. However, little is known about the role of the chamber in tissue engineering. Therefore, to investigate the role of inflammatory response and the change in mechanotransduction started by TEC after implantation, we placed a unique TEC model on the surface of the groin fat pads in rats to study the expression of cytokines and tissue development in the TEC. The number of infiltrating cells was counted, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression levels in the chamber at multiple time points postimplantation were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tissue samples were collected at various time points and labeled for specific cell populations. The result showed that new adipose tissue formed in the chamber at day 60. Also, the expression of MCP-1 and VEGF in the chamber decreased slightly from an early stage as well as the number of the infiltrating cells. A large number of CD34+/perilipin- perivascular cells could be detected at day 30. Also, the CD34+/perilipin+ adipose precursor cell numbers increased sharply by day 45 and then decreased by day 60. CD34-/perilipin+ mature adipocytes were hard to detect in the chamber content at day 30, but their number increased and then peaked at day 60. Ki67-positive cells could be found near blood vessels and their number decreased sharply over time. Masson's trichrome showed that collagen was the dominant component of the chamber content at early stage and was replaced by newly formed small adipocytes over time. Our findings suggested that the TEC implantation could promote the proliferation of adipose precursor cells derived from local adipose tissue, increase angiogenesis, and finally lead to spontaneous adipogenesis by inducing aseptic inflammation and changing local mechanotransduction.

  4. Adipose Tissue - Adequate, Accessible Regenerative Material

    PubMed Central

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth.; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kutcham, Rupa Sruthi

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seen to be an ideal population of stem cells in particular, Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) which can be obtained in large number and easily harvested from adipose tissue. It is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources as easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells yield a high amount of stem cells which is essential for stem cell based therapies and tissue engineering. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using ASCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because various secreted growth factors from ASCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. This review summarizes the sources, isolation and characteristics of adipose derived stem cells and its potential role in periodontal regeneration is discussed. PMID:26634060

  5. Adipose Tissue - Adequate, Accessible Regenerative Material.

    PubMed

    Kolaparthy, Lakshmi Kanth; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kutcham, Rupa Sruthi

    2015-11-01

    The potential use of stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues offers a paradigm shift that may provide alternative therapeutic solutions for a number of diseases. The use of either embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells in clinical situations is limited due to cell regulations and to technical and ethical considerations involved in genetic manipulation of human ESCs, even though these cells are highly beneficial. Mesenchymal stem cells seen to be an ideal population of stem cells in particular, Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) which can be obtained in large number and easily harvested from adipose tissue. It is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources as easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells yield a high amount of stem cells which is essential for stem cell based therapies and tissue engineering. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using ASCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because various secreted growth factors from ASCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. This review summarizes the sources, isolation and characteristics of adipose derived stem cells and its potential role in periodontal regeneration is discussed. PMID:26634060

  6. Circadian Regulation of Lipid Mobilization in White Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Anton; Meyer-Kovac, Judit; Oster, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a network of circadian clocks regulates 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology. Circadian disruption promotes obesity and the development of obesity-associated disorders, but it remains unclear to which extent peripheral tissue clocks contribute to this effect. To reveal the impact of the circadian timing system on lipid metabolism, blood and adipose tissue samples from wild-type, ClockΔ19, and Bmal1−/− circadian mutant mice were subjected to biochemical assays and gene expression profiling. We show diurnal variations in lipolysis rates and release of free fatty acids (FFAs) and glycerol into the blood correlating with rhythmic regulation of two genes encoding the lipolysis pacemaker enzymes, adipose triglyceride (TG) lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase, by self-sustained adipocyte clocks. Circadian clock mutant mice show low and nonrhythmic FFA and glycerol blood content together with decreased lipolysis rates and increased sensitivity to fasting. Instead circadian clock disruption promotes the accumulation of TGs in white adipose tissue (WAT), leading to increased adiposity and adipocyte hypertrophy. In summary, circadian modulation of lipolysis rates regulates the availability of lipid-derived energy during the day, suggesting a role for WAT clocks in the regulation of energy homeostasis. PMID:23434933

  7. [Use of adipose tissue in regenerative medicine].

    PubMed

    Casteilla, L; Planat-Benard, V; Bourin, P; Laharrague, P; Cousin, B

    2011-04-01

    Adipose tissue is abundant and well known for its involvement in obesity and associated metabolic disorders. Its uses in regenerative medicine recently attracted many investigators, as large amounts of this tissue can be easily obtained using liposuction and it contains several populations of immature cells. The largest pool of such cells corresponds to immature stromal cells, called adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs). These cells are purified after proteolytic digestion of adipose tissue and selection by an adherent step. ADSCs display many common features with mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, including paracrine activity, but with some specific features, among which a greater angiogenic potential. This potential is now investigating at clinical level to treat critical ischemic hindlimb by autologous cells. Other potentials are also investigated and the treatment of fistula associated or not with Crohn's disease is reaching now phase III level.

  8. Structural and functional characterization of the mouse fatty acid translocase promoter: activation during adipose differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Teboul, L; Febbraio, M; Gaillard, D; Amri, E Z; Silverstein, R; Grimaldi, P A

    2001-01-01

    Fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is a cell-surface glycoprotein that functions as a receptor/transporter for long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), and interacts with other protein and lipid ligands. FAT/CD36 is expressed by various cell types, including platelets, monocytes/macrophages and endothelial cells, and tissues with an active LCFA metabolism, such as adipose, small intestine and heart. FAT/CD36 expression is induced during adipose cell differentiation and is transcriptionally up-regulated by LCFAs and thiazolidinediones in pre-adipocytes via a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-mediated process. We isolated and analysed the murine FAT/CD36 promoter employing C(2)C(12)N cells directed to differentiate to either adipose or muscle. Transient transfection studies revealed that the 309 bp upstream from the start of exon 1 confer adipose specific activity. Sequence analysis of this DNA fragment revealed the presence of two imperfect direct repeat-1 elements. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay demonstrated that these elements were peroxisome-proliferator-responsive elements (PPREs). Mutagenesis and transfection experiments indicated that both PPREs co-operate to drive strong promoter activity in adipose cells. We conclude that murine FAT/CD36 expression in adipose tissue is dependent upon transcriptional activation via PPARs through binding to two PPREs located at -245 to -233 bp and -120 to -108 bp from the transcription start site. PMID:11716758

  9. Influence of betaine and arginine supplementation of reduced protein diets on fatty acid composition and gene expression in the muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of cross-bred pigs.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta S; Rolo, Eva S; Alfaia, Cristina M; Pires, Virgínia R; Luxton, Richard; Doran, Olena; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José A M

    2016-03-28

    The isolated or combined effects of betaine and arginine supplementation of reduced protein diets (RPD) on fat content, fatty acid composition and mRNA levels of genes controlling lipid metabolism in pig m. longissimus lumborum and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were assessed. The experiment was performed on forty intact male pigs (Duroc×Large White×Landrace cross-breed) with initial and final live weights of 60 and 93 kg, respectively. Pigs were randomly assigned to one of the following five diets (n 8): 16·0 % of crude protein (control), 13·0 % of crude protein (RPD), RPD supplemented with 0·33 % of betaine, RPD supplemented with 1·5 % of arginine and RPD supplemented with 0·33 % of betaine and 1·5 % of arginine. Data confirmed that RPD increase intramuscular fat (IMF) content and total fat content in SAT. The increased total fat content in SAT was accompanied by higher GLUT type 4, lipoprotein lipase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA expression levels. In addition, the supplementation of RPD with betaine and/or arginine did not affect either IMF or total fat in SAT. However, dietary betaine supplementation slightly affected fatty acid composition in both muscle and SAT. This effect was associated with an increase of carnitine O-acetyltransferase mRNA levels in SAT but not in muscle, which suggests that betaine might be involved in the differential regulation of some key genes of lipid metabolism in pig muscle and SAT. Although the arginine-supplemented diet decreased the mRNA expression level of PPARG in muscle and SAT, it did not influence fat content or fatty acid composition in any of these pig tissues.

  10. The development and endocrine functions of adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White adipose tissue is a mesenchymal tissue that begins developing in the fetus. Classically known for storing the body’s fuel reserves, adipose tissue is now recognized as an endocrine organ. As such, the secretions from adipose tissue are known to affect several systems such as the vascular and...

  11. Carotenoids in Adipose Tissue Biology and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Bonet, M Luisa; Canas, Jose A; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Cell, animal and human studies dealing with carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives as nutritional regulators of adipose tissue biology with implications for the etiology and management of obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases are reviewed. Most studied carotenoids in this context are β-carotene, cryptoxanthin, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, together with β-carotene-derived retinoids and some other apocarotenoids. Studies indicate an impact of these compounds on essential aspects of adipose tissue biology including the control of adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis), adipocyte metabolism, oxidative stress and the production of adipose tissue-derived regulatory signals and inflammatory mediators. Specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives restrain adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy while enhancing fat oxidation and energy dissipation in brown and white adipocytes, and counteract obesity in animal models. Intake, blood levels and adipocyte content of carotenoids are reduced in human obesity. Specifically designed human intervention studies in the field, though still sparse, indicate a beneficial effect of carotenoid supplementation in the accrual of abdominal adiposity. In summary, studies support a role of specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives in the prevention of excess adiposity, and suggest that carotenoid requirements may be dependent on body composition. PMID:27485231

  12. High intensity interval training improves liver and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Marcinko, Katarina; Sikkema, Sarah R.; Samaan, M. Constantine; Kemp, Bruce E.; Fullerton, Morgan D.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endurance exercise training reduces insulin resistance, adipose tissue inflammation and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an effect often associated with modest weight loss. Recent studies have indicated that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) lowers blood glucose in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of weight loss; however, the organs affected and mechanisms mediating the glucose lowering effects are not known. Intense exercise increases phosphorylation and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in muscle, adipose tissue and liver. AMPK and ACC are key enzymes regulating fatty acid metabolism, liver fat content, adipose tissue inflammation and insulin sensitivity but the importance of this pathway in regulating insulin sensitivity with HIIT is unknown. Methods In the current study, the effects of 6 weeks of HIIT were examined using obese mice with serine–alanine knock-in mutations on the AMPK phosphorylation sites of ACC1 and ACC2 (AccDKI) or wild-type (WT) controls. Results HIIT lowered blood glucose and increased exercise capacity, food intake, basal activity levels, carbohydrate oxidation and liver and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed WT and AccDKI mice. These changes occurred independently of weight loss or reductions in adiposity, inflammation and liver lipid content. Conclusions These data indicate that HIIT lowers blood glucose levels by improving adipose and liver insulin sensitivity independently of changes in adiposity, adipose tissue inflammation, liver lipid content or AMPK phosphorylation of ACC. PMID:26909307

  13. Injectable Biomaterials for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Young, D. Adam; Christman, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineering has recently gained significant attention from materials scientists as a result of the exponential growth of soft tissue filler procedures being performed within the clinic. While several injectable materials are currently being marketed for filling subcutaneous voids, they often face limited longevity due to rapid resorption. Their inability to encourage natural adipose formation or ingrowth necessitates repeated injections for a prolonged effect, and thus classifies them as temporary fillers. As a result, a significant need for injectable materials that not only act as fillers, but also promote in vivo adipogenesis is beginning to be realized. This review will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of commercially available soft tissue fillers. It will then summarize the current state of research using injectable synthetic materials, biopolymers, and extracellular matrix-derived materials for adipose tissue engineering. Furthermore, the successful attributes observed across each of these materials will be outlined along with a discussion of the current difficulties and future directions for adipose tissue engineering. PMID:22456805

  14. The role of adipose tissue in mediating the beneficial effects of dietary fish oil

    PubMed Central

    Puglisi, Michael J.; Hasty, Alyssa H.; Saraswathi, Viswanathan

    2010-01-01

    Fish oil improves several features of metabolic syndrome such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Fish oil may mediate some of its beneficial effects by modulating the storage and/or secretory functions of adipose tissue. The storage of triglycerides in adipose tissue is regulated by the availability of free fatty acids as well as the degree of lipolysis in adipose tissue. Fish oil has been shown to reduce lipolysis in several studies indicating improved triglyceride storage. Importantly, adipose tissue secretes a variety of adipokines and fish oil feeding is associated with remarkable changes in the plasma levels of two key adipokines, adiponectin and leptin. Much attention has been focused on the contribution of adiponectin in fish oil mediated improvements in metabolic syndrome. However, emerging evidence also indicates a role of leptin in modulating the components of the metabolic syndrome upon fish oil feeding. In addition to improving the storage and secretory functions of adipose tissue, fish oil, and the n-3 fatty acids found in fish oil, has been shown to reduce inflammation in adipose tissue. These effects may be in part a result of activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ or inhibition of toll-like receptor 4. Thus, there is compelling evidence that fish oil mediates its beneficial effects on metabolic syndrome by improving adipose tissue storage and secretory functions and by reducing inflammation. PMID:21145721

  15. The impact of dietary fats, photoperiod, temperature and season on morphological variables, torpor patterns, and brown adipose tissue fatty acid composition of hamsters, Phodopus sungorus.

    PubMed

    Geiser, F; Heldmaier, G

    1995-01-01

    We investigated how dietary fats and oils of different fatty acid composition influence the seasonal change of body mass, fur colour, testes size and torpor in Djungarian hamsters, Phodopus sungorus, maintained from autumn to winter under different photoperiods and temperature regimes. Dietary fatty acids influenced the occurrence of spontaneous torpor (food and water ad libitum) in P. sungorus maintained at 18 degrees C under natural and artificial short photoperiods. Torpor was most pronounced in individuals on a diet containing 10% safflower oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids), intermediate in individuals on a diet containing 10% olive oil (rich in monounsaturated fatty acids) and least pronounced in individuals on a diet containing 10% coconut fat (rich in saturated fatty acids). Torpor in P. sungorus on chow containing no added fat or oil was intermediate between those on coconut fat and olive oil. Dietary fatty acids had little effect on torpor in animals maintained at 23 degrees C. Body mass, fur colour and testes size were also little affected by dietary fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of brown fat from hamsters maintained at 18 degrees C and under natural photoperiod strongly reflected that of the dietary fatty acids. Our study suggests that the seasonal change of body mass, fur colour and testes size are not significantly affected by dietary fatty acids. However, dietary fats influence the occurrence of torpor in individuals maintained at low temperatures and that have been photoperiodically primed for the display of torpor.

  16. Reduction of Adipose Tissue Mass by the Angiogenesis Inhibitor ALS-L1023 from Melissa officinalis.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung Young; Lee, Hyunghee; Woo, Sangee; Yoon, Miso; Kim, Jeongjun; Hong, Yeonhee; Lee, Hee Suk; Park, Eun Kyu; Hahm, Jong Cheon; Kim, Jin Woo; Shin, Soon Shik; Kim, Min-Young; Yoon, Michung

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that angiogenesis modulates adipogenesis and obesity. This study was undertaken to determine whether ALS-L1023 (ALS) prepared by a two-step organic solvent fractionation from Melissa leaves, which exhibits antiangiogenic activity, can regulate adipose tissue growth. The effects of ALS on angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling were measured using in vitro assays. The effects of ALS on adipose tissue growth were investigated in high fat diet-induced obese mice. ALS inhibited VEGF- and bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in vitro. Compared to obese control mice, administration of ALS to obese mice reduced body weight gain, adipose tissue mass and adipocyte size without affecting appetite. ALS treatment decreased blood vessel density and MMP activity in adipose tissues. ALS reduced the mRNA levels of angiogenic factors (VEGF-A and FGF-2) and MMPs (MMP-2 and MMP-9), whereas ALS increased the mRNA levels of angiogenic inhibitors (TSP-1, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2) in adipose tissues. The protein levels of VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were also decreased by ALS in adipose tissue. Metabolic changes in plasma lipids, liver triglycerides, and hepatic expression of fatty acid oxidation genes occurred during ALS-induced weight loss. These results suggest that ALS, which has antiangiogenic and MMP inhibitory activities, reduces adipose tissue mass in nutritionally obese mice, demonstrating that adipose tissue growth can be regulated by angiogenesis inhibitors.

  17. Reduction of Adipose Tissue Mass by the Angiogenesis Inhibitor ALS-L1023 from Melissa officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung Young; Lee, Hyunghee; Woo, Sangee; Yoon, Miso; Kim, Jeongjun; Hong, Yeonhee; Lee, Hee Suk; Park, Eun Kyu; Hahm, Jong Cheon; Kim, Jin Woo; Shin, Soon Shik; Kim, Min-Young; Yoon, Michung

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that angiogenesis modulates adipogenesis and obesity. This study was undertaken to determine whether ALS-L1023 (ALS) prepared by a two-step organic solvent fractionation from Melissa leaves, which exhibits antiangiogenic activity, can regulate adipose tissue growth. The effects of ALS on angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling were measured using in vitro assays. The effects of ALS on adipose tissue growth were investigated in high fat diet-induced obese mice. ALS inhibited VEGF- and bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in vitro. Compared to obese control mice, administration of ALS to obese mice reduced body weight gain, adipose tissue mass and adipocyte size without affecting appetite. ALS treatment decreased blood vessel density and MMP activity in adipose tissues. ALS reduced the mRNA levels of angiogenic factors (VEGF-A and FGF-2) and MMPs (MMP-2 and MMP-9), whereas ALS increased the mRNA levels of angiogenic inhibitors (TSP-1, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2) in adipose tissues. The protein levels of VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were also decreased by ALS in adipose tissue. Metabolic changes in plasma lipids, liver triglycerides, and hepatic expression of fatty acid oxidation genes occurred during ALS-induced weight loss. These results suggest that ALS, which has antiangiogenic and MMP inhibitory activities, reduces adipose tissue mass in nutritionally obese mice, demonstrating that adipose tissue growth can be regulated by angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26599360

  18. [White adipose tissue dysfunction observed in obesity].

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Ewa; Zieliński, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a disease with continuingly increasing prevalence. It occurs worldwide independently of age group, material status or country of origin. At these times the most common reasons for obesity are bad eating habits and dramatic reduction of physical activity, which cause the energy imbalance of organism. Fundamental alteration observed in obese subjects is white adipose tissue overgrowth, which is linked to increased incidence of obesity-related comorbidities, such as: cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes or digestive tract diseases. What is more, obesity is also a risk factor for some cancers. Special risk for diseases linked to excessive weight is associated with overgrowth of visceral type of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue, which is the main energy storehouse in body and acts also as an endocrine organ, undergoes both the morphological and the functional changes in obesity, having a negative impact on whole body function. In this article we summarize the most important alterations in morphology and function of white adipose tissue, observed in obese subjects.

  19. Does bariatric surgery improve adipose tissue function?

    PubMed

    Frikke-Schmidt, H; O'Rourke, R W; Lumeng, C N; Sandoval, D A; Seeley, R J

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. Not only do these types of surgeries produce significant weight loss but also they improve insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolic function. The aim of this review is to explore how altered physiology of adipose tissue may contribute to the potent metabolic effects of some of these procedures. This includes specific effects on various fat depots, the function of individual adipocytes and the interaction between adipose tissue and other key metabolic tissues. Besides a dramatic loss of fat mass, bariatric surgery shifts the distribution of fat from visceral to the subcutaneous compartment favoring metabolic improvement. The sensitivity towards lipolysis controlled by insulin and catecholamines is improved, adipokine secretion is altered and local adipose inflammation as well as systemic inflammatory markers decreases. Some of these changes have been shown to be weight loss independent, and novel hypothesis for these effects includes include changes in bile acid metabolism, gut microbiota and central regulation of metabolism. In conclusion bariatric surgery is capable of improving aspects of adipose tissue function and do so in some cases in ways that are not entirely explained by the potent effect of surgery. © 2016 World Obesity.

  20. [White adipose tissue dysfunction observed in obesity].

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Ewa; Zieliński, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a disease with continuingly increasing prevalence. It occurs worldwide independently of age group, material status or country of origin. At these times the most common reasons for obesity are bad eating habits and dramatic reduction of physical activity, which cause the energy imbalance of organism. Fundamental alteration observed in obese subjects is white adipose tissue overgrowth, which is linked to increased incidence of obesity-related comorbidities, such as: cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes or digestive tract diseases. What is more, obesity is also a risk factor for some cancers. Special risk for diseases linked to excessive weight is associated with overgrowth of visceral type of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue, which is the main energy storehouse in body and acts also as an endocrine organ, undergoes both the morphological and the functional changes in obesity, having a negative impact on whole body function. In this article we summarize the most important alterations in morphology and function of white adipose tissue, observed in obese subjects. PMID:27234867

  1. Sustainable three-dimensional tissue model of human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Evangelia; Marra, Kacey G; Kaplan, David L

    2013-10-01

    The need for physiologically relevant sustainable human adipose tissue models is crucial for understanding tissue development, disease progression, in vitro drug development and soft tissue regeneration. The coculture of adipocytes differentiated from human adipose-derived stem cells, with endothelial cells, on porous silk protein matrices for at least 6 months is reported, while maintaining adipose-like outcomes. Cultures were assessed for structure and morphology (Oil Red O content and CD31 expression), metabolic functions (leptin, glycerol production, gene expression for GLUT4, and PPARγ) and cell replication (DNA content). The cocultures maintained size and shape over this extended period in static cultures, while increasing in diameter by 12.5% in spinner flask culture. Spinner flask cultures yielded improved adipose tissue outcomes overall, based on structure and function, when compared to the static cultures. This work establishes a tissue model system that can be applied to the development of chronic metabolic dysfunction systems associated with human adipose tissue, such as obesity and diabetes, due to the long term sustainable functions demonstrated here.

  2. Proteomic characterization of adipose tissue constituents, a necessary step for understanding adipose tissue complexity.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Juan R; Pardo, María; de la Rosa, Olga; Malagón, Maria M

    2012-02-01

    The original concept of adipose tissue as an inert storage depot for the excess of energy has evolved over the last years and it is now considered as one of the most important organs regulating body homeostasis. This conceptual change has been supported by the demonstration that adipose tissue serves as a major endocrine organ, producing a wide variety of bioactive molecules, collectively termed adipokines, with endocrine, paracrine and autocrine activities. Adipose tissue is indeed a complex organ wherein mature adipocytes coexist with the various cell types comprising the stromal-vascular fraction (SVF), including preadipocytes, adipose-derived stem cells, perivascular cells, and blood cells. It is known that not only mature adipocytes but also the components of SVF produce adipokines. Furthermore, adipokine production, proliferative and metabolic activities and response to regulatory signals (i.e. insulin, catecholamines) differ between the different fat depots, which have been proposed to underlie their distinct association to specific diseases. Herein, we discuss the recent proteomic studies on adipose tissue focused on the analysis of the separate cellular components and their secretory products, with the aim of identifying the basic features and the contribution of each component to different adipose tissue-associated pathologies.

  3. Inhibition of Sam68 triggers adipose tissue browning

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junlan; Cheng, Min; Boriboun, Chan; Ardehali, Mariam Mina; Jiang, Changfei; Liu, Qinghua; Han, Shuling; Goukassian, David A.; Tang, Yao-Liang; Zhao, Ting C.; Zhao, Ming; Cai, Lu; Richard, Stéphane; Kishore, Raj; Qin, Gangjian

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; molecular mechanisms promoting energy expenditure may be utilized for effective therapy. Src-associated-in-mitosis-of-68kDa (Sam68) is potentially significant because knockout (KO) of Sam68 leads to markedly-reduced adiposity. Here we sought to determine the mechanism by which Sam68 regulates adiposity and energy homeostasis. We firstly found in Sam68-KO mice a significantly-reduced body weight with the difference explained entirely by decreased adiposity. Interestingly, these effects were not mediated by a difference in food intake, but rather associated with enhanced physical activity. When fed high-fat diet, Sam68-KO mice gained much lesser body weight and fat mass as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates and displayed an improved glucose and insulin tolerance. The brown adipose tissue (BAT), inguinal and epididymal depots are smaller and their adipocytes less hypertrophy in Sam68-KO mice than in WT littermates. The BAT of Sam68-KO mice exhibited reduced lipid stores and expressed higher levels of Ucp1 and key thermogenic and fatty-acid-oxidation genes. Similarly, depots of inguinal and epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT) in Sam68-KO mice appeared browner, their multilocular Ucp1-positive cells were much more abundant, and the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16 and Ppargc1a genes was greater as compared to WT controls, suggesting that loss of Sam68 also promotes WAT browning. Furthermore, in all fat depots of Sam68-KO mice, the expression of M2 macrophage markers were upregulated and M1 markers downregulated. Thus Sam68 plays a crucial role in the control of thermogenesis and may be targeted to combat obesity and associated disorders. PMID:25934704

  4. Inhibition of Sam68 triggers adipose tissue browning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junlan; Cheng, Min; Boriboun, Chan; Ardehali, Mariam M; Jiang, Changfei; Liu, Qinghua; Han, Shuling; Goukassian, David A; Tang, Yao-Liang; Zhao, Ting C; Zhao, Ming; Cai, Lu; Richard, Stéphane; Kishore, Raj; Qin, Gangjian

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; molecular mechanisms that promote energy expenditure can be utilized for effective therapy. Src-associated in mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) is potentially significant, because knockout (KO) of Sam68 leads to markedly reduced adiposity. In the present study, we sought to determine the mechanism by which Sam68 regulates adiposity and energy homeostasis. We first found that Sam68 KO mice have a significantly reduced body weight as compared to controls, and the difference is explained entirely by decreased adiposity. Interestingly, these effects were not mediated by a difference in food intake; rather, they were associated with enhanced physical activity. When they were fed a high-fat diet, Sam68 KO mice gained much less body weight and fat mass than their WT littermates did, and they displayed an improved glucose and insulin tolerance. In Sam68 KO mice, the brown adipose tissue (BAT), inguinal, and epididymal depots were smaller, and their adipocytes were less hypertrophied as compared to their WT littermates. The BAT of Sam68 KO mice exhibited reduced lipid stores and expressed higher levels of Ucp1 and key thermogenic and fatty acid oxidation genes. Similarly, depots of inguinal and epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT) in Sam68 KO mice appeared browner, their multilocular Ucp1-positive cells were much more abundant, and the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16, and Ppargc1a genes was greater as compared to WT controls, which suggests that the loss of Sam68 also promotes WAT browning. Furthermore, in all of the fat depots of the Sam68 KO mice, the expression of M2 macrophage markers was up-regulated, and that of M1 markers was down-regulated. Thus, Sam68 plays a crucial role in controlling thermogenesis and may be targeted to combat obesity and associated disorders.

  5. Evolution of the fatty acid profile of subcutaneous back-fat adipose tissue in growing Iberian and Landrace × Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Barea, R; Isabel, B; Nieto, R; López-Bote, C; Aguilera, J F

    2013-04-01

    The lipid content and fatty acid (FA) profile in pig tissues are strongly influenced by genotype and nutrient supply, with implications in meat quality. The de novo lipid synthesis and pattern of FA unsaturation could be an important cause of variation in the overall efficiency of energy utilization among breeds. To test the effects of pig genotype and CP supply on the evolution of back-fat tissue FA profile throughout the growing and finishing stages, 32 Iberian (IB) and Landrace × Large White (LR × LW) barrows were offered one of two diets differing in CP content (13% or 17% as fed). A pair-fed procedure (0.8 × ad libitum intake of IB pigs) was used. Subcutaneous fat samples were taken at the dorso-lumbar region at ∼38, 50, 65, 90 and 115 kg BW. Higher proportions of total monounsaturated FA (MUFA; P < 0.01) and lower proportions of total saturated FA (SFA; P < 0.01 to 0.05) were found in the outer back-fat layer of pigs both at 50 and 115 kg BW. Pig genotype affected the FA composition of both subcutaneous back-fat layers. The proportions of C18:0 and SFA in fat tissue were higher in IB than in LR × LW pigs from 38 to 65 kg BW, especially in the outer layer. In addition, MUFA contents were higher in IB pigs at 115 kg BW in both layers (+5% on average; P < 0.01). Increased proportions of C18:2 n-6 and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) were found in LR × LW pigs, irrespective of the stage of growth and back-fat layer (P⩽0.02). At 50 kg BW, pigs receiving the high-protein diet presented the highest C18:2 n-6, C18:3 n-3, C20:5 n-3 and PUFA contents. A significant genotype × CP content interaction was observed for C18:3 n-3 because of the increased concentration of this FA in LR × LW pigs when offered the 17% CP diet (P < 0.05). Higher C16:0 and SFA contents (+5%; P = 0.03) were found in pigs offered the 13% CP diet and slaughtered at 115 kg BW. There was a genotype × CP interaction for MUFA concentration because of the higher MUFA content observed in IB pigs

  6. Effects of adipocyte lipoprotein lipase on de novo lipogenesis and white adipose tissue browning.

    PubMed

    Bartelt, Alexander; Weigelt, Clara; Cherradi, M Lisa; Niemeier, Andreas; Tödter, Klaus; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger

    2013-05-01

    Efficient storage of dietary and endogenous fatty acids is a prerequisite for a healthy adipose tissue function. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the master regulator of fatty acid uptake from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. In addition to LPL-mediated fatty acid uptake, adipocytes are able to synthesize fatty acids from non-lipid precursor, a process called de novo lipogenesis (DNL). As the physiological relevance of fatty acid uptake versus DNL for brown and white adipocyte function remains unclear, we studied the role of adipocyte LPL using adipocyte-specific LPL knockout animals (aLKO). ALKO mice displayed a profound increase in DNL-fatty acids, especially palmitoleate and myristoleate in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) depots while essential dietary fatty acids were markedly decreased. Consequently, we found increased expression in adipose tissues of genes encoding DNL enzymes (Fasn, Scd1, and Elovl6) as well as the lipogenic transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein-β. In a high-fat diet (HFD) study aLKO mice were characterized by reduced adiposity and improved plasma insulin and adipokines. However, neither glucose tolerance nor inflammatory markers were ameliorated in aLKO mice compared to controls. No signs of increased BAT activation or WAT browning were detected in aLKO mice either on HFD or after 1 week of β3-adrenergic stimulation using CL316,243. We conclude that despite a profound increase in DNL-derived fatty acids, proposed to be metabolically favorable, aLKO mice are not protected from metabolic disease per se. In addition, induction of DNL alone is not sufficient to promote browning of WAT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brown and White Fat: From Signaling to Disease.

  7. [Cancer cachexia and white adipose tissue browning].

    PubMed

    Zhang, S T; Yang, H M

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cachexia occurs in a majority of advanced cancer patients. These patients with impaired physical function are unable to tolerance cancer treatment well and have a significantly reduced survival rate. Currently, there is no effective clinical treatment available for cancer cachexia, therefore, it is necessary to clarify the molecular mechanisms of cancer cachexia, moreover, new therapeutic targets for cancer cachexia treatment are urgently needed. Very recent studies suggest that, during cancer cachexia, white adipose tissue undergo a 'browning' process, resulting in increased lipid mobilization and energy expenditure, which may be necessary for the occurrence of cancer cachexia. In this article, we summarize the definition and characteristics of cancer cachexia and adipose tissue 'browning', then, we discuss the new study directions presented in latest research. PMID:27531474

  8. Brown adipose tissue and novel therapeutic approaches to treat metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabiniano; Agil, Ahmad; Peran, Macarena; Alvaro-Galue, Eduardo; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco J; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Marchal, Juan A

    2015-04-01

    In humans, 2 functionally different types of adipose tissue coexist: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). WAT is involved in energy storage, whereas BAT is involved in energy expenditure. Increased amounts of WAT may contribute to the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the thermogenic function of BAT allows high consumption of fatty acids because of the activity of uncoupling protein 1 in the internal mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, obesity reduction and insulin sensitization have been achieved by BAT activation-regeneration in animal models. This review describes the origin, function, and differentiation mechanisms of BAT to identify new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metabolic disorders related to obesity. On the basis of the animal studies, novel approaches for BAT regeneration combining stem cells from the adipose tissue with active components, such as melatonin, may have potential for the treatment of metabolic disorders in humans.

  9. Brown adipose tissue and novel therapeutic approaches to treat metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabiniano; Agil, Ahmad; Peran, Macarena; Alvaro-Galue, Eduardo; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco J; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Marchal, Juan A

    2015-04-01

    In humans, 2 functionally different types of adipose tissue coexist: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). WAT is involved in energy storage, whereas BAT is involved in energy expenditure. Increased amounts of WAT may contribute to the development of metabolic disorders, such as obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the thermogenic function of BAT allows high consumption of fatty acids because of the activity of uncoupling protein 1 in the internal mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, obesity reduction and insulin sensitization have been achieved by BAT activation-regeneration in animal models. This review describes the origin, function, and differentiation mechanisms of BAT to identify new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metabolic disorders related to obesity. On the basis of the animal studies, novel approaches for BAT regeneration combining stem cells from the adipose tissue with active components, such as melatonin, may have potential for the treatment of metabolic disorders in humans. PMID:25433289

  10. Fatty acid composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue from entire male pigs with extremely divergent levels of boar taint compounds--an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Mörlein, Daniel; Tholen, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the variability of fatty acid composition in entire male pigs with extremely divergent levels of boar taint compounds. Fatty acids were quantified in back fat samples from 20 selected carcasses of Pietrain*F1 sired boars (average carcass weight 84 kg) with extremely low (LL) or extremely high (HH) levels of androstenone, skatole, and indole. Concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were significantly (p<0.05) increased in LL boars (23.4%) compared to HH boars (19.7%). This was mainly due to increased levels of linoleic acid (C18:2 n-6) and α-linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3). Correspondingly, unsaturated fatty acids (SFA) were significantly lower (p<0.05) in LL boars (35.2%) compared to HH boars (37.7%). The findings are discussed with respect to potential effects on flavor formation in boar fat and meat. Further research is needed to study the gender specificity and the interplay of the synthesis and the metabolism of steroids, lipids, and the clearance of skatole in pigs. PMID:25280356

  11. Adipose tissue depot specific differences of PLIN protein content in endurance trained rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sofhia V; Turnbull, Patrick C; MacPherson, Rebecca E K

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue is classified as either white (WAT) or brown (BAT) and differs not only by anatomical location but also in function. WAT is the main source of stored energy and releases fatty acids in times of energy demand, whereas BAT plays a role in regulating non-shivering thermogenesis and oxidizes fatty acids released from the lipid droplet. The PLIN family of proteins has recently emerged as being integral in the regulation of fatty acid storage and release in adipose tissue. Previous work has demonstrated that PLIN protein content varies among adipose tissue depots, however an examination of endurance training-induced depot specific changes in PLIN protein expression has yet to be done. Male Sprague-dawley rats (n = 10) underwent 8-weeks of progressive treadmill training (18-25 m/min for 30-60 min at 10% incline) or remained sedentary as control. Following training, under isoflurane induced anesthesia epidydmal (eWAT), inguinal subcutaneous (iWAT) and intrascapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) was excised, and plasma was collected. Endurance training resulted in an increase in BAT PLIN5 and iWAT PLIN3 content, while there was no difference in PLIN protein content in endurance trained eWAT. Interestingly, endurance training resulted in a robust increase in ATGL and CGI-58 in eWAT alone. Together these results suggest the potential of a depot specific function of PLIN3 and PLIN5 in adipose tissue in response to endurance training. PMID:27386161

  12. A metabolomic study of adipose tissue in mice with a disruption of the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Castro, C; Briggs, W; Paschos, G K; FitzGerald, G A; Griffin, J L

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue functions in terms of energy homeostasis as a rheostat for blood triglyceride, regulating its concentration, in response to external stimuli. In addition it acts as a barometer to inform the central nervous system of energy levels which can vary dramatically between meals and according to energy demand. Here a metabolomic approach, combining both Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, was used to analyse both white and brown adipose tissue in mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of Arntl (also known as Bmal1), a gene encoding a core molecular clock component. The results are consistent with a peripheral circadian clock playing a central role in metabolic regulation of both brown and white adipose tissue in rodents and show that Arntl induced global changes in both tissues which were distinct for the two types. In particular, anterior subcutaneous white adipose tissue (ASWAT) tissue was effected by a reduction in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids, while brown adipose tissue (BAT) changes were associated with a reduction in chain length. In addition the aqueous fraction of metabolites in BAT were profoundly affected by Arntl disruption, consistent with the dynamic role of this tissue in maintaining body temperature across the day-night cycle and an upregulation in fatty acid oxidation and citric acid cycle activity to generate heat during the day when rats are inactive (increases in 3-hydroxybutyrate and glutamate), and increased synthesis and storage of lipids during the night when rats feed more (increased concentrations of glycerol, choline and glycerophosphocholine).

  13. A metabolomic study of adipose tissue in mice with a disruption of the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Castro, C; Briggs, W; Paschos, G K; FitzGerald, G A; Griffin, J L

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue functions in terms of energy homeostasis as a rheostat for blood triglyceride, regulating its concentration, in response to external stimuli. In addition it acts as a barometer to inform the central nervous system of energy levels which can vary dramatically between meals and according to energy demand. Here a metabolomic approach, combining both Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, was used to analyse both white and brown adipose tissue in mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of Arntl (also known as Bmal1), a gene encoding a core molecular clock component. The results are consistent with a peripheral circadian clock playing a central role in metabolic regulation of both brown and white adipose tissue in rodents and show that Arntl induced global changes in both tissues which were distinct for the two types. In particular, anterior subcutaneous white adipose tissue (ASWAT) tissue was effected by a reduction in the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids, while brown adipose tissue (BAT) changes were associated with a reduction in chain length. In addition the aqueous fraction of metabolites in BAT were profoundly affected by Arntl disruption, consistent with the dynamic role of this tissue in maintaining body temperature across the day-night cycle and an upregulation in fatty acid oxidation and citric acid cycle activity to generate heat during the day when rats are inactive (increases in 3-hydroxybutyrate and glutamate), and increased synthesis and storage of lipids during the night when rats feed more (increased concentrations of glycerol, choline and glycerophosphocholine). PMID:25907923

  14. Adipose tissue lipolysis and energy metabolism in early cancer cachexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Kliewer, Kara L; Ke, Jia-Yu; Tian, Min; Cole, Rachel M; Andridge, Rebecca R; Belury, Martha A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a progressive metabolic disorder that results in depletion of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. A growing body of literature suggests that maintaining adipose tissue mass in cachexia may improve quality-of-life and survival outcomes. Studies of lipid metabolism in cachexia, however, have generally focused on later stages of the disorder when severe loss of adipose tissue has already occurred. Here, we investigated lipid metabolism in adipose, liver and muscle tissues during early stage cachexia - before severe fat loss - in the colon-26 murine model of cachexia. White adipose tissue mass in cachectic mice was moderately reduced (34-42%) and weight loss was less than 10% of initial body weight in this study of early cachexia. In white adipose depots of cachectic mice, we found evidence of enhanced protein kinase A - activated lipolysis which coincided with elevated total energy expenditure and increased expression of markers of brown (but not white) adipose tissue thermogenesis and the acute phase response. Total lipids in liver and muscle were unchanged in early cachexia while markers of fatty oxidation were increased. Many of these initial metabolic responses contrast with reports of lipid metabolism in later stages of cachexia. Our observations suggest intervention studies to preserve fat mass in cachexia should be tailored to the stage of cachexia. Our observations also highlight a need for studies that delineate the contribution of cachexia stage and animal model to altered lipid metabolism in cancer cachexia and identify those that most closely mimic the human condition.

  15. A novel ChREBP isoform in adipose tissue regulates systemic glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Mark A.; Peroni, Odile D.; Villoria, Jorge; Schön, Michael R.; Abumrad, Nada A.; Blüher, Matthias; Klein, Samuel; Kahn, Barbara B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of obesity and type 2-diabetes is increasing worldwide and threatens to shorten lifespan. Impaired insulin action in peripheral tissues is a major pathogenic factor. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in adipose tissue through the Glut4-glucose transporter and alterations in adipose-Glut4 expression or function regulate systemic insulin sensitivity. Downregulation of adipose tissue-Glut4 occurs early in diabetes development. Here we report that adipose tissue-Glut4 regulates the expression of carbohydrate responsive-element binding protein (ChREBP), a transcriptional regulator of lipogenic and glycolytic genes. Furthermore, adipose-ChREBP is a major determinant of adipose tissue fatty acid synthesis and systemic insulin sensitivity. We discovered a new mechanism for glucose-regulation of ChREBP: Glucose-mediated activation of the canonical ChREBP isoform (ChREBPα) induces expression of a novel, potent isoform (ChREBPβ) that is transcribed from an alternative promoter. ChREBPβ expression in human adipose tissue predicts insulin sensitivity indicating that it may be an effective target for treating diabetes. PMID:22466288

  16. Adipose tissue angiogenesis: impact on obesity and type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Silvia; Gealekman, Olga

    2014-03-01

    The growth and function of tissues are critically dependent on their vascularization. Adipose tissue is capable of expanding many-fold during adulthood, therefore requiring the formation of new vasculature to supply growing and proliferating adipocytes. The expansion of the vasculature in adipose tissue occurs through angiogenesis, where new blood vessels develop from those pre-existing within the tissue. Inappropriate angiogenesis may underlie adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity, which in turn increases type-2 diabetes risk. In addition, genetic and developmental factors involved in vascular patterning may define the size and expandability of diverse adipose tissue depots, which are also associated with type-2 diabetes risk. Moreover, the adipose tissue vasculature appears to be the niche for pre-adipocyte precursors, and factors that affect angiogenesis may directly impact the generation of new adipocytes. Here we review recent advances on the basic mechanisms of angiogenesis, and on the role of angiogenesis in adipose tissue development and obesity. A substantial amount of data points to a deficit in adipose tissue angiogenesis as a contributing factor to insulin resistance and metabolic disease in obesity. These emerging findings support the concept of the adipose tissue vasculature as a source of new targets for metabolic disease therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  17. Adipose tissue and its role in organ crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Romacho, T; Elsen, M; Röhrborn, D; Eckel, J

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of adipokines has revealed adipose tissue as a central node in the interorgan crosstalk network, which mediates the regulation of multiple organs and tissues. Adipose tissue is a true endocrine organ that produces and secretes a wide range of mediators regulating adipose tissue function in an auto-/paracrine manner and important distant targets, such as the liver, skeletal muscle, the pancreas and the cardiovascular system. In metabolic disorders such as obesity, enlargement of adipocytes leads to adipose tissue dysfunction and a shift in the secretory profile with an increased release of pro-inflammatory adipokines. Adipose tissue dysfunction has a central role in the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Besides the well-acknowledged role of adipokines in metabolic diseases, and the increasing number of adipokines being discovered in the last years, the mechanisms underlying the release of many adipokines from adipose tissue remain largely unknown. To combat metabolic diseases, it is crucial to better understand how adipokines can modulate adipose tissue growth and function. Therefore, we will focus on adipokines with a prominent role in auto-/paracrine crosstalk within the adipose tissue such as RBP4, HO-1, WISP2, SFRPs and chemerin. To depict the endocrine crosstalk between adipose tissue with skeletal muscle, the cardiovascular system and the pancreas, we will report the main findings regarding the direct effects of adiponectin, leptin, DPP4 and visfatin on skeletal muscle insulin resistance, cardiovascular function and β-cell growth and function.

  18. Adipose tissue-derived cells: from physiology to regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Casteilla, L; Dani, C

    2006-11-01

    During the last past years, the importance and the role of adipose tissues have been greatly expanded. After finding that adipose tissues are metabolically very active, the discovery of leptin moved the status of adipose tissue towards an endocrine tissue able to interact with all major organs via secretion of adipokines. Some years ago, the presence of adipocyte precursors, termed preadipocytes, has been described in all adipose tissue depots from various species of different age. More recently, the discovery that different phenotypes can be obtained from stroma cells of adipose tissue has largely emphazised the concept of adipose tissue plasticity. Therefore, raising great hope in regenerative medicine as adipose tissue can be easily harvested in adults it could represent an abundant source of therapeutic cells. Thus, adipose tissue plays the dual role of Mr Obese Hyde as a main actor of obesity and of Dr Regenerative Jekyll as a source of therapeutic cells. Adipose tissue has not yet revealed all its mysteries although one facet could not be well understood without the other one. PMID:17110894

  19. Retinoids and nuclear retinoid receptors in white and brown adipose tissues: physiopathologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Flajollet, Sébastien; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin A, ingested either as retinol or β-carotene from animal- or plant-derived foods respectively, is a nutrient essential for many biological functions such as embryonic development, vision, immune response, tissue remodeling, and metabolism. Its main active metabolite is all trans-retinoic acid (atRA), which regulates gene expression through the activation of α, β, and γ isotypes of the nuclear atRA receptor (RAR). More recently, retinol derivatives were also shown to control the RAR activity, enlightening the interplay between vitamin A metabolism and RAR-mediated transcriptional control. The white and brown adipose tissues regulate the energy homeostasis by providing dynamic fatty acid storing and oxidizing capacities to the organism, in connection with the other fatty acid-consuming tissues. This concerted interorgan response to fatty acid fluxes is orchestrated, in part, by the endocrine activity of the adipose tissue depots. The adipose tissues are also sites for synthesizing and storing vitamin A derivatives, which will act as hormonal cues or intracellularly to regulate essential aspects of adipocyte biology. As agents that prevent adipocyte differentiation hence, expected to decrease fat mass, and inducers of uncoupling protein expression, thus, favoring energy expenditure, retinoids have prompted many investigations to decipher their roles in adipose tissue pathophysiology, which are summarized in this review.

  20. Hepatic ANGPTL3 regulates adipose tissue energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; McNutt, Markey C.; Banfi, Serena; Levin, Michael G.; Holland, William L.; Gusarova, Viktoria; Gromada, Jesper; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Hobbs, Helen H.

    2015-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a circulating inhibitor of lipoprotein and endothelial lipase whose physiological function has remained obscure. Here we show that ANGPTL3 plays a major role in promoting uptake of circulating very low density lipoprotein-triglycerides (VLDL-TGs) into white adipose tissue (WAT) rather than oxidative tissues (skeletal muscle, heart brown adipose tissue) in the fed state. This conclusion emerged from studies of Angptl3−/− mice. Whereas feeding increased VLDL-TG uptake into WAT eightfold in wild-type mice, no increase occurred in fed Angptl3−/− animals. Despite the reduction in delivery to and retention of TG in WAT, fat mass was largely preserved by a compensatory increase in de novo lipogenesis in Angptl3−/− mice. Glucose uptake into WAT was increased 10-fold in KO mice, and tracer studies revealed increased conversion of glucose to fatty acids in WAT but not liver. It is likely that the increased uptake of glucose into WAT explains the increased insulin sensitivity associated with inactivation of ANGPTL3. The beneficial effects of ANGPTL3 deficiency on both glucose and lipoprotein metabolism make it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26305978

  1. Hepatic ANGPTL3 regulates adipose tissue energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; McNutt, Markey C; Banfi, Serena; Levin, Michael G; Holland, William L; Gusarova, Viktoria; Gromada, Jesper; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H

    2015-09-15

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a circulating inhibitor of lipoprotein and endothelial lipase whose physiological function has remained obscure. Here we show that ANGPTL3 plays a major role in promoting uptake of circulating very low density lipoprotein-triglycerides (VLDL-TGs) into white adipose tissue (WAT) rather than oxidative tissues (skeletal muscle, heart brown adipose tissue) in the fed state. This conclusion emerged from studies of Angptl3(-/-) mice. Whereas feeding increased VLDL-TG uptake into WAT eightfold in wild-type mice, no increase occurred in fed Angptl3(-/-) animals. Despite the reduction in delivery to and retention of TG in WAT, fat mass was largely preserved by a compensatory increase in de novo lipogenesis in Angptl3(-/-) mice. Glucose uptake into WAT was increased 10-fold in KO mice, and tracer studies revealed increased conversion of glucose to fatty acids in WAT but not liver. It is likely that the increased uptake of glucose into WAT explains the increased insulin sensitivity associated with inactivation of ANGPTL3. The beneficial effects of ANGPTL3 deficiency on both glucose and lipoprotein metabolism make it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26305978

  2. Fatty acids of Pinus elliottii tissues.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Lawler, G. C.; Walkinshaw, C. H.; Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The total fatty constituents of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) tissue cultures, seeds, and seedlings were examined by GLC and MS. Qualitatively, the fatty acid composition of these tissues was found to be very similar to that reported for other pine species. The fatty acid contents of the tissue cultures resembled that of the seedling tissues. The branched-chain C(sub 17) acid reported for several other Pinus species was confirmed as the anteiso isomer.

  3. Loss of adipose fatty acid oxidation does not potentiate obesity at thermoneutrality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Aja, Susan; Scafidi, Susanna; Wolfgang, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Ambient temperature affects energy intake and expenditure to maintain homeostasis in a continuously fluctuating environment. Here, mice with an adipose-specific defect in fatty acid oxidation (Cpt2A−/−) were subjected to varying temperatures to determine the role of adipose bioenergetics in environmental adaptation and body weight regulation. Microarray analysis of mice acclimatized to thermoneutrality revealed that Cpt2A−/− interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) failed to induce the expression of thermogenic genes such as Ucp1 and Pgc1α in response to adrenergic stimulation, and increasing ambient temperature exacerbated these defects. Furthermore, thermoneutral housing induced mitochondrial DNA stress in Cpt2A−/− BAT and ultimately resulted in a loss of interscapular BAT. Although the loss of adipose fatty acid oxidation resulted in clear molecular, cellular and physiologic deficits in BAT, body weight gain and glucose tolerance were similar in control and Cpt2A−/− mice in response to a high fat diet, even when mice were housed at thermoneutrality. PMID:26854223

  4. Adipocyte Fetuin-A Contributes to Macrophage Migration into Adipose Tissue and Polarization of Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Ray, Sukanta; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue during obesity and their phenotypic conversion from anti-inflammatory M2 to proinflammatory M1 subtype significantly contributes to develop a link between inflammation and insulin resistance; signaling molecule(s) for these events, however, remains poorly understood. We demonstrate here that excess lipid in the adipose tissue environment may trigger one such signal. Adipose tissue from obese diabetic db/db mice, high fat diet-fed mice, and obese diabetic patients showed significantly elevated fetuin-A (FetA) levels in respect to their controls; partially hepatectomized high fat diet mice did not show noticeable alteration, indicating adipose tissue to be the source of this alteration. In adipocytes, fatty acid induces FetA gene and protein expressions, resulting in its copious release. We found that FetA could act as a chemoattractant for macrophages. To simulate lipid-induced inflammatory conditions when proinflammatory adipose tissue and macrophages create a niche of an altered microenvironment, we set up a transculture system of macrophages and adipocytes; the addition of fatty acid to adipocytes released FetA into the medium, which polarized M2 macrophages to M1. This was further confirmed by direct FetA addition to macrophages. Taken together, lipid-induced FetA from adipocytes is an efficient chemokine for macrophage migration and polarization. These findings open a new dimension for understanding obesity-induced inflammation. PMID:23943623

  5. Adipocyte fetuin-A contributes to macrophage migration into adipose tissue and polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Priyajit; Seal, Soma; Mukherjee, Sandip; Kundu, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Ray, Sukanta; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Majumdar, Subeer S; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2013-09-27

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue during obesity and their phenotypic conversion from anti-inflammatory M2 to proinflammatory M1 subtype significantly contributes to develop a link between inflammation and insulin resistance; signaling molecule(s) for these events, however, remains poorly understood. We demonstrate here that excess lipid in the adipose tissue environment may trigger one such signal. Adipose tissue from obese diabetic db/db mice, high fat diet-fed mice, and obese diabetic patients showed significantly elevated fetuin-A (FetA) levels in respect to their controls; partially hepatectomized high fat diet mice did not show noticeable alteration, indicating adipose tissue to be the source of this alteration. In adipocytes, fatty acid induces FetA gene and protein expressions, resulting in its copious release. We found that FetA could act as a chemoattractant for macrophages. To simulate lipid-induced inflammatory conditions when proinflammatory adipose tissue and macrophages create a niche of an altered microenvironment, we set up a transculture system of macrophages and adipocytes; the addition of fatty acid to adipocytes released FetA into the medium, which polarized M2 macrophages to M1. This was further confirmed by direct FetA addition to macrophages. Taken together, lipid-induced FetA from adipocytes is an efficient chemokine for macrophage migration and polarization. These findings open a new dimension for understanding obesity-induced inflammation.

  6. Substituting redberry juniper for oat hay in lamb feedlot diets: Carcass characteristics, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and sensory panel traits.

    PubMed

    Whitney, T R; Smith, S B

    2015-06-01

    We hypothesized that ground juniper and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) fed to lambs would have no negative effects on end products. Lambs were individually fed diets containing mainly sorghum grain and oat hay (control) or DDGS-based diets consisting mainly of DDGS, sorghum grain, and oat hay (0JUN), or 33% (33JUN), 66% (66JUN), or 100% (100JUN) of the hay replaced by juniper. Lambs fed control had greater (P<0.03) shrunk BW and HCW vs. lambs fed 0JUN, but other carcass characteristics and sensory panel traits were similar (P>0.23). As juniper increased in the DDGS-based diets, HCW increased quadratically (P=0.01) and LM fatty acid composition was altered. Feeding juniper did not negatively affect (P>0.57) off-flavor in chops, but enhanced (linear, P<0.05) juiciness, tenderness, and flavor intensity. Lambs fed diets with a combination of oat hay and ground juniper appeared to produce the most acceptable carcasses and lamb chops.

  7. Cidea controls lipid droplet fusion and lipid storage in brown and white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lizhen; Zhou, Linkang; Chen, Cheng; Gong, Jingyi; Xu, Li; Ye, Jing; Li, De; Li, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Excess lipid storage in adipose tissue results in the development of obesity and other metabolic disorders including diabetes, fatty liver and cardiovascular diseases. The lipid droplet (LD) is an important subcellular organelle responsible for lipid storage. We previously observed that Fsp27, a member of the CIDE family proteins, is localized to LD-contact sites and promotes atypical LD fusion and growth. Cidea, a close homolog of Fsp27, is expressed at high levels in brown adipose tissue. However, the exact role of Cidea in promoting LD fusion and lipid storage in adipose tissue remains unknown. Here, we expressed Cidea in Fsp27-knockdown adipocytes and observed that Cidea has similar activity to Fsp27 in promoting lipid storage and LD fusion and growth. Next, we generated Cidea and Fsp27 double-deficient mice and observed that these animals had drastically reduced adipose tissue mass and a strong lean phenotype. In addition, Cidea/Fsp27 double-deficient mice had improved insulin sensitivity and were intolerant to cold. Furthermore, we observed that the brown and white adipose tissues of Cidea/Fsp27 double-deficient mice had significantly reduced lipid storage and contained smaller LDs compared to those of Cidea or Fsp27 single deficient mice. Overall, these data reveal an important role of Cidea in controlling lipid droplet fusion, lipid storage in brown and white adipose tissue, and the development of obesity.

  8. Brown Adipose Tissue in Cetacean Blubber

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Ohtsuki, Hirofumi; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Amou, Kento; Sato, Ryo; Doi, Satoru; Kobayashi, Sara; Matsuda, Ayaka; Sugiyama, Makoto; Funaba, Masayuki; Matsuishi, Takashi; Terasawa, Fumio; Shindo, Junji; Endo, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermoregulation in species living in cold environments, given heat can be generated from its chemical energy reserves. Here we investigate the existence of BAT in blubber in four species of delphinoid cetacean, the Pacific white-sided and bottlenose dolphins, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens and Tursiops truncates, and Dall’s and harbour porpoises, Phocoenoides dalli and Phocoena phocoena. Histology revealed adipocytes with small unilocular fat droplets and a large eosinophilic cytoplasm intermingled with connective tissue in the innermost layers of blubber. Chemistry revealed a brown adipocyte-specific mitochondrial protein, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), within these same adipocytes, but not those distributed elsewhere throughout the blubber. Western blot analysis of extracts from the inner blubber layer confirmed that the immunohistochemical positive reaction was specific to UCP1 and that this adipose tissue was BAT. To better understand the distribution of BAT throughout the entire cetacean body, cadavers were subjected to computed tomography (CT) scanning. Resulting imagery, coupled with histological corroboration of fine tissue structure, revealed adipocytes intermingled with connective tissue in the lowest layer of blubber were distributed within a thin, highly dense layer that extended the length of the body, with the exception of the rostrum, fin and fluke regions. As such, we describe BAT effectively enveloping the cetacean body. Our results suggest that delphinoid blubber could serve a role additional to those frequently attributed to it: simple insulation blanket, energy storage, hydrodynamic streamlining or contributor to positive buoyancy. We believe delphinoid BAT might also function like an electric blanket, enabling animals to frequent waters cooler than blubber as an insulator alone might otherwise allow an animal to withstand, or allow animals to maintain body temperature in cool waters during

  9. Brown adipose tissue in cetacean blubber.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Ohtsuki, Hirofumi; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Amou, Kento; Sato, Ryo; Doi, Satoru; Kobayashi, Sara; Matsuda, Ayaka; Sugiyama, Makoto; Funaba, Masayuki; Matsuishi, Takashi; Terasawa, Fumio; Shindo, Junji; Endo, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermoregulation in species living in cold environments, given heat can be generated from its chemical energy reserves. Here we investigate the existence of BAT in blubber in four species of delphinoid cetacean, the Pacific white-sided and bottlenose dolphins, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens and Tursiops truncates, and Dall's and harbour porpoises, Phocoenoides dalli and Phocoena phocoena. Histology revealed adipocytes with small unilocular fat droplets and a large eosinophilic cytoplasm intermingled with connective tissue in the innermost layers of blubber. Chemistry revealed a brown adipocyte-specific mitochondrial protein, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), within these same adipocytes, but not those distributed elsewhere throughout the blubber. Western blot analysis of extracts from the inner blubber layer confirmed that the immunohistochemical positive reaction was specific to UCP1 and that this adipose tissue was BAT. To better understand the distribution of BAT throughout the entire cetacean body, cadavers were subjected to computed tomography (CT) scanning. Resulting imagery, coupled with histological corroboration of fine tissue structure, revealed adipocytes intermingled with connective tissue in the lowest layer of blubber were distributed within a thin, highly dense layer that extended the length of the body, with the exception of the rostrum, fin and fluke regions. As such, we describe BAT effectively enveloping the cetacean body. Our results suggest that delphinoid blubber could serve a role additional to those frequently attributed to it: simple insulation blanket, energy storage, hydrodynamic streamlining or contributor to positive buoyancy. We believe delphinoid BAT might also function like an electric blanket, enabling animals to frequent waters cooler than blubber as an insulator alone might otherwise allow an animal to withstand, or allow animals to maintain body temperature in cool waters during

  10. Brown adipose tissue in cetacean blubber.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Ohtsuki, Hirofumi; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Amou, Kento; Sato, Ryo; Doi, Satoru; Kobayashi, Sara; Matsuda, Ayaka; Sugiyama, Makoto; Funaba, Masayuki; Matsuishi, Takashi; Terasawa, Fumio; Shindo, Junji; Endo, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermoregulation in species living in cold environments, given heat can be generated from its chemical energy reserves. Here we investigate the existence of BAT in blubber in four species of delphinoid cetacean, the Pacific white-sided and bottlenose dolphins, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens and Tursiops truncates, and Dall's and harbour porpoises, Phocoenoides dalli and Phocoena phocoena. Histology revealed adipocytes with small unilocular fat droplets and a large eosinophilic cytoplasm intermingled with connective tissue in the innermost layers of blubber. Chemistry revealed a brown adipocyte-specific mitochondrial protein, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), within these same adipocytes, but not those distributed elsewhere throughout the blubber. Western blot analysis of extracts from the inner blubber layer confirmed that the immunohistochemical positive reaction was specific to UCP1 and that this adipose tissue was BAT. To better understand the distribution of BAT throughout the entire cetacean body, cadavers were subjected to computed tomography (CT) scanning. Resulting imagery, coupled with histological corroboration of fine tissue structure, revealed adipocytes intermingled with connective tissue in the lowest layer of blubber were distributed within a thin, highly dense layer that extended the length of the body, with the exception of the rostrum, fin and fluke regions. As such, we describe BAT effectively enveloping the cetacean body. Our results suggest that delphinoid blubber could serve a role additional to those frequently attributed to it: simple insulation blanket, energy storage, hydrodynamic streamlining or contributor to positive buoyancy. We believe delphinoid BAT might also function like an electric blanket, enabling animals to frequent waters cooler than blubber as an insulator alone might otherwise allow an animal to withstand, or allow animals to maintain body temperature in cool waters during

  11. Irbesartan increased PPAR{gamma} activity in vivo in white adipose tissue of atherosclerotic mice and improved adipose tissue dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Masaru; Kanno, Harumi; Senba, Izumi; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Moritani, Tomozo; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoEKO) mice were treated with irbesartan. {yields} Irbesartan decreased white adipose tissue weight without affecting body weight. {yields} DNA-binding for PPAR{gamma} was increased in white adipose tissue in vivo by irbesartan. {yields} Irbesartan increased adipocyte number in white adipose tissue. {yields} Irbesatan increased the expression of adiponectin and leptin in white adipose tissue. -- Abstract: The effect of the PPAR{gamma} agonistic action of an AT{sub 1} receptor blocker, irbesartan, on adipose tissue dysfunction was explored using atherosclerotic model mice. Adult male apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoEKO) mice at 9 weeks of age were treated with a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) with or without irbesartan at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. The weight of epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue was decreased by irbesartan without changing food intake or body weight. Treatment with irbesartan increased the expression of PPAR{gamma} in white adipose tissue and the DNA-binding activity of PPAR{gamma} in nuclear extract prepared from adipose tissue. The expression of adiponectin, leptin and insulin receptor was also increased by irbesartan. These results suggest that irbesartan induced activation of PPAR{gamma} and improved adipose tissue dysfunction including insulin resistance.

  12. Selective suppression of adipose tissue apoE expression impacts systemic metabolic phenotype and adipose tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi H; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S; Maeda, Nobuyo; Mazzone, Theodore

    2015-02-01

    apoE is a multi-functional protein expressed in several cell types and in several organs. It is highly expressed in adipose tissue, where it is important for modulating adipocyte lipid flux and gene expression in isolated adipocytes. In order to investigate a potential systemic role for apoE that is produced in adipose tissue, mice were generated with selective suppression of adipose tissue apoE expression and normal circulating apoE levels. These mice had less adipose tissue with smaller adipocytes containing fewer lipids, but no change in adipocyte number compared with control mice. Adipocyte TG synthesis in the presence of apoE-containing VLDL was markedly impaired. Adipocyte caveolin and leptin gene expression were reduced, but adiponectin, PGC-1, and CPT-1 gene expression were increased. Mice with selective suppression of adipose tissue apoE had lower fasting lipid, insulin, and glucose levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests were consistent with increased insulin sensitivity. Lipid storage in muscle, heart, and liver was significantly reduced. Adipose tissue macrophage inflammatory activation was markedly diminished with suppression of adipose tissue apoE expression. Our results establish a novel effect of adipose tissue apoE expression, distinct from circulating apoE, on systemic substrate metabolism and adipose tissue inflammatory state.

  13. Macrophage elastase suppresses white adipose tissue expansion with cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takao; Kelly, Neil J; Takahashi, Saeko; Leme, Adriana S; Houghton, A McGarry; Shapiro, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage elastase (MMP12) is a key mediator of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema, yet its role in other smoking related pathologies remains unclear. The weight suppressing effects of smoking are a major hindrance to cessation efforts, and MMP12 is known to suppress the vascularization on which adipose tissue growth depends by catalyzing the formation of antiangiogenic peptides endostatin and angiostatin. The goal of this study was to determine the role of MMP12 in adipose tissue growth and smoking-related suppression of weight gain. Whole body weights and white adipose depots from wild-type and Mmp12-deficient mice were collected during early postnatal development and after chronic CS exposure. Adipose tissue specimens were analyzed for angiogenic and adipocytic markers and for content of the antiangiogenic peptides endostatin and angiostatin. Cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with adipose tissue homogenate to examine its effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion. MMP12 content and activity were increased in the adipose tissue of wild-type mice at 2 weeks of age, leading to elevated endostatin production, inhibition of VEGF secretion, and decreased adipose tissue vascularity. By 8 weeks of age, adipose MMP12 levels subsided, and the protein was no longer detectable. However, chronic CS exposure led to macrophage accumulation and restored adipose MMP12 activity, thereby suppressing adipose tissue mass and vascularity. Our results reveal a novel systemic role for MMP12 in postnatal adipose tissue expansion and smoking-associated weight loss by suppressing vascularity within the white adipose tissue depots.

  14. Macrophage Elastase Suppresses White Adipose Tissue Expansion with Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Takao; Kelly, Neil J.; Takahashi, Saeko; Leme, Adriana S.; McGarry Houghton, A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage elastase (MMP12) is a key mediator of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema, yet its role in other smoking related pathologies remains unclear. The weight suppressing effects of smoking are a major hindrance to cessation efforts, and MMP12 is known to suppress the vascularization on which adipose tissue growth depends by catalyzing the formation of antiangiogenic peptides endostatin and angiostatin. The goal of this study was to determine the role of MMP12 in adipose tissue growth and smoking-related suppression of weight gain. Whole body weights and white adipose depots from wild-type and Mmp12-deficient mice were collected during early postnatal development and after chronic CS exposure. Adipose tissue specimens were analyzed for angiogenic and adipocytic markers and for content of the antiangiogenic peptides endostatin and angiostatin. Cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with adipose tissue homogenate to examine its effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion. MMP12 content and activity were increased in the adipose tissue of wild-type mice at 2 weeks of age, leading to elevated endostatin production, inhibition of VEGF secretion, and decreased adipose tissue vascularity. By 8 weeks of age, adipose MMP12 levels subsided, and the protein was no longer detectable. However, chronic CS exposure led to macrophage accumulation and restored adipose MMP12 activity, thereby suppressing adipose tissue mass and vascularity. Our results reveal a novel systemic role for MMP12 in postnatal adipose tissue expansion and smoking-associated weight loss by suppressing vascularity within the white adipose tissue depots. PMID:24914890

  15. Changes in white adipose tissue metabolism induced by resveratrol in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A remarkable range of biological functions have been ascribed to resveratrol. Recently, this polyphenol has been shown to have body fat lowering effects. The aim of the present study was to assess some of the potential underlying mechanisms of action which take place in adipose tissue. Methods Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: control and treated with 30 mg resveratrol/kg body weight/d. All rats were fed an obesogenic diet and after six weeks of treatment white adipose tissues were dissected. Lipoprotein lipase activity was assessed by fluorimetry, acetyl-CoA carboxylase by radiometry, and malic enzyme, glucose-6P-dehydrogenase and fatty acid synthase by spectrophotometry. Gene expression levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, lipoprotein lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, adipose triglyceride lipase, PPAR-gamma, SREBP-1c and perilipin were assessed by Real time RT-PCR. The amount of resveratrol metabolites in adipose tissue was measured by chromatography. Results There was no difference in the final body weight of the rats; however, adipose tissues were significantly decreased in the resveratrol-treated group. Resveratrol reduced the activity of lipogenic enzymes, as well as that of heparin-releasable lipoprotein lipase. Moreover, a significant reduction was induced by this polyphenol in hormone-sensitive lipase mRNA levels. No significant changes were observed in other genes. Total amount of resveratrol metabolites in adipose tissue was 2.66 ± 0.55 nmol/g tissue. Conclusions It can be proposed that the body fat-lowering effect of resveratrol is mediated, at least in part, by a reduction in fatty acid uptake from circulating triacylglycerols and also in de novo lipogenesis. PMID:21569266

  16. Glucose metabolism and the response to insulin by human adipose tissue in spontaneous and experimental obesity. Effects of dietary composition and adipose cell size.

    PubMed

    Salans, L B; Bray, G A; Cushman, S W; Danforth, E; Glennon, J A; Horton, E S; Sims, E A

    1974-03-01

    [1-(14)C]glucose oxidation to CO(2) and conversion into glyceride by adipose tissue from nonobese and obese subjects has been studied in vitro in the presence of varying medium glucose and insulin concentrations as functions of adipose cell size, the composition of the diet, and antecedent weight gain or loss. Increasing medium glucose concentrations enhance the incorporation of glucose carbons by human adipose tissue into CO(2) and glyceride-glycerol. Insulin further stimulates the conversion of glucose carbons into CO(2), but not into glyceride-glycerol. Incorporation of [1-(14)C]glucose into glyceride-fatty acids by these tissues could not be demonstrated under any of the conditions tested. Both adipose cell size and dietary composition influence the in vitro metabolism of glucose in, and the response to insulin by, human adipose tissue. During periods of ingestion of weight-maintenance isocaloric diets of similar carbohydrate, fat, and protein composition, increasing adipose cell size is associated with (a) unchanging rates of glucose oxidation and increasing rates of glucose carbon incorporation into glyceride-glycerol in the absence of insulin, but (b) decreasing stimulation of glucose oxidation by insulin. On the other hand, when cell size is kept constant, increasing dietary carbohydrate intake is associated with an increased basal rate of glucose metabolism and response to insulin by both small and large adipose cells. Thus, the rate of glucose oxidation and the magnitude of the insulin response of large adipose cells from individuals ingesting a high carbohydrate diet may be similar to or greater than that in smaller cells from individuals ingesting an isocaloric lower carbohydrate diet.The alterations in basal glucose metabolism and insulin response observed in adipose tissue from patients with spontaneous obesity are reproduced by weight gain induced experimentally in nonobese volunteers; these metabolic changes are reversible with weight loss. The

  17. Adipokines and the Endocrine Role of Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Giralt, Marta; Cereijo, Rubén; Villarroya, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a shift in the consideration of white adipose tissue as a mere repository of fat to be used when food becomes scarce to a true endocrine tissue releasing regulatory signals, the so-called adipokines, to the whole body. The control of eating behavior, the peripheral insulin sensitivity, and even the development of the female reproductive system are among the physiological events controlled by adipokines. Recently, the role of brown adipose tissue in human physiology has been recognized. The metabolic role of brown adipose tissue is opposite to white fat; instead of storing fat, brown adipose tissue is a site of energy expenditure via adaptive thermogenesis. There is growing evidence that brown adipose tissue may have its own pattern of secreted hormonal factors, the so-called brown adipokines, having distinctive biological actions on the overall physiological adaptations to enhance energy expenditure.

  18. Cardiac adipose tissue and its relationship to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Adam M; Dua, Kirandeep; Devadoss, Ramprakash; Chhabra, Lovely

    2014-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) plays a central role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, its relationship to epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) and pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) in particular is important in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease. Owing to its close proximity to the heart and coronary vasculature, EAT exerts a direct metabolic impact by secreting proinflammatory adipokines and free fatty acids, which promote CVD locally. In this review, we have discussed the relationship between T2DM and cardiac fat deposits, particularly EAT and PAT, which together exert a big impact on the cardiovascular health. PMID:25512789

  19. Monounsaturated fatty acid-enriched high-fat diets impede adipose NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion and insulin resistance despite obesity.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Orla M; Lyons, Claire L; Murphy, Aoife M; Reynolds, Clare M; Klinger, Rut; Healy, Niamh P; Cooke, Aoife A; Coll, Rebecca C; McAllan, Liam; Nilaweera, Kanishka N; O'Reilly, Marcella E; Tierney, Audrey C; Morine, Melissa J; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; O'Connor, Darran P; O'Neill, Luke A; McGillicuddy, Fiona C; Roche, Helen M

    2015-06-01

    Saturated fatty acid (SFA) high-fat diets (HFDs) enhance interleukin (IL)-1β-mediated adipose inflammation and insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms by which different fatty acids regulate IL-1β and the subsequent effects on adipose tissue biology and insulin sensitivity in vivo remain elusive. We hypothesized that the replacement of SFA for monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) in HFDs would reduce pro-IL-1β priming in adipose tissue and attenuate insulin resistance via MUFA-driven AMPK activation. MUFA-HFD-fed mice displayed improved insulin sensitivity coincident with reduced pro-IL-1β priming, attenuated adipose IL-1β secretion, and sustained adipose AMPK activation compared with SFA-HFD-fed mice. Furthermore, MUFA-HFD-fed mice displayed hyperplastic adipose tissue, with enhanced adipogenic potential of the stromal vascular fraction and improved insulin sensitivity. In vitro, we demonstrated that the MUFA oleic acid can impede ATP-induced IL-1β secretion from lipopolysaccharide- and SFA-primed cells in an AMPK-dependent manner. Conversely, in a regression study, switching from SFA- to MUFA-HFD failed to reverse insulin resistance but improved fasting plasma insulin levels. In humans, high-SFA consumers, but not high-MUFA consumers, displayed reduced insulin sensitivity with elevated pycard-1 and caspase-1 expression in adipose tissue. These novel findings suggest that dietary MUFA can attenuate IL-1β-mediated insulin resistance and adipose dysfunction despite obesity via the preservation of AMPK activity.

  20. Fish Oil-Derived Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Reduce Expression of M1-Associated Macrophage Markers in an ex vivo Adipose Tissue Culture Model, in Part through Adiponectin.

    PubMed

    De Boer, Anna A; Monk, Jennifer M; Liddle, Danyelle M; Power, Krista A; Ma, David W L; Robinson, Lindsay E

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) macrophages (ATM) play a key role in obesity-associated pathologies, and their phenotype can be influenced by the local tissue microenvironment. Interestingly, long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) and the LC n-3 PUFA-upregulated adipokine, adiponectin (Ad), may mitigate excessive ATM inflammatory M1-polarization responses. However, to what extent LC n-3 PUFA and Ad work in concert to affect macrophage phenotype has not been examined. Thus, we used an established ex vivo AT organ culture model using visceral AT from mice fed a control (CON; 10% w/w safflower oil) n-6 PUFA-rich diet or an isocaloric fish oil (FO; 3% w/w menhaden oil + 7% w/w safflower oil)-derived LC n-3 PUFA-rich diet to generate AT conditioned media (ACM). We then evaluated if CON or FO ACM affected macrophage polarization markers in a model designed to mimic acute [18 h ACM plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for the last 6 h] or chronic (macrophages treated with LPS-challenged CON or FO ACM for 24 h) inflammation ± Ad-neutralizing antibody and the LPS-neutralizing agent, polymyxin B. In the acute inflammation model, macrophages treated with FO ACM had decreased lipid uptake and mRNA expression of M1 markers (Nos2, Nfκb, Il6, Il18, Ccl2, and Ccl5) compared with CON ACM (p ≤ 0.05); however, these effects were largely attenuated when Ad was neutralized (p > 0.05). Furthermore, in the chronic inflammation model, macrophages treated with FO ACM had decreased mRNA expression of M1 markers (Nos2, Tnfα, Ccl2, and Il1β) and IL-6 and CCL2 secretion (p ≤ 0.05); however, some of these effects were lost when Ad was neutralized, and were further exacerbated when both Ad and LPS were neutralized. Taken together, this work shows that LC n-3 PUFA and Ad work in concert to suppress certain M1 macrophage responses. Thus, future strategies to modulate the ATM phenotype should consider the role of both LC n-3 PUFA and Ad in mitigating obese AT

  1. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  2. Involvement of mast cells in adipose tissue fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Shizuka; Ohyane, Chie; Kim, Young-Il; Lin, Shan; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kim, Chu-Sook; Kang, Jihey; Yu, Rina; Kawada, Teruo

    2014-02-01

    Recently, fibrosis is observed in obese adipose tissue; however, the pathogenesis remains to be clarified. Obese adipose tissue is characterized by chronic inflammation with massive accumulation of immune cells including mast cells. The objective of the present study was to clarify the relationship between fibrosis and mast cells in obese adipose tissue, as well as to determine the origin of infiltrating mast cells. We observed the enhancement of mast cell accumulation and fibrosis in adipose tissue of severely obese diabetic db/db mice. Furthermore, adipose tissue-conditioned medium (ATCM) from severely obese diabetic db/db mice significantly enhanced collagen 5 mRNA expression in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, and this enhancement was suppressed by the addition of an anti-mast cell protease 6 (MCP-6) antibody. An in vitro study showed that only collagen V among various types of collagen inhibited preadipocyte differentiation. Moreover, we found that ATCM from the nonobese but not obese stages of db/db mice significantly enhanced the migration of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). These findings suggest that immature mast cells that infiltrate into adipose tissue at the nonobese stage gradually mature with the progression of obesity and diabetes and that MCP-6 secreted from mature mast cells induces collagen V expression in obese adipose tissue, which may contribute to the process of adipose tissue fibrosis. Induction of collagen V by MCP-6 might accelerate insulin resistance via the suppression of preadipocyte differentiation.

  3. Cell supermarket: Adipose tissue as a source of stem cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue is derived from numerous sources, and in recent years has been shown to provide numerous cells from what seemingly was a population of homogeneous adipocytes. Considering the types of cells that adipose tissue-derived cells may form, these cells may be useful in a variety of clinical ...

  4. Regulation of systemic energy homeostasis by serotonin in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Namkung, Jun; Go, Younghoon; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Kyuho; Kim, Hyeongseok; Park, Bo-Yoon; Lee, Ho Won; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Song, Junghan; Shong, Minho; Yadav, Vijay K; Karsenty, Gerard; Kajimura, Shingo; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Hail

    2015-01-01

    Central serotonin (5-HT) is an anorexigenic neurotransmitter in the brain. However, accumulating evidence suggests peripheral 5-HT may affect organismal energy homeostasis. Here we show 5-HT regulates white and brown adipose tissue function. Pharmacological inhibition of 5-HT synthesis leads to inhibition of lipogenesis in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT), induction of browning in inguinal WAT and activation of adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Mice with inducible Tph1 KO in adipose tissues exhibit a similar phenotype as mice in which 5-HT synthesis is inhibited pharmacologically, suggesting 5-HT has localized effects on adipose tissues. In addition, Htr3a KO mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with an Htr2a antagonist reduces lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These data suggest important roles for adipocyte-derived 5-HT in controlling energy homeostasis. PMID:25864946

  5. Regulation of systemic energy homeostasis by serotonin in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Myung; Namkung, Jun; Go, Younghoon; Shong, Ko Eun; Kim, Kyuho; Kim, Hyeongseok; Park, Bo-Yoon; Lee, Ho Won; Jeon, Yong Hyun; Song, Junghan; Shong, Minho; Yadav, Vijay K; Karsenty, Gerard; Kajimura, Shingo; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Sangkyu; Kim, Hail

    2015-04-13

    Central serotonin (5-HT) is an anorexigenic neurotransmitter in the brain. However, accumulating evidence suggests peripheral 5-HT may affect organismal energy homeostasis. Here we show 5-HT regulates white and brown adipose tissue function. Pharmacological inhibition of 5-HT synthesis leads to inhibition of lipogenesis in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT), induction of browning in inguinal WAT and activation of adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Mice with inducible Tph1 KO in adipose tissues exhibit a similar phenotype as mice in which 5-HT synthesis is inhibited pharmacologically, suggesting 5-HT has localized effects on adipose tissues. In addition, Htr3a KO mice exhibit increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with an Htr2a antagonist reduces lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These data suggest important roles for adipocyte-derived 5-HT in controlling energy homeostasis.

  6. Non-invasive Assessments of Adipose Tissue Metabolism In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Borowsky, Francis E; Quinn, Kyle P; Bernstein, David L; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L

    2016-03-01

    Adipose tissue engineering is a diverse area of research where the developed tissues can be used to study normal adipose tissue functions, create disease models in vitro, and replace soft tissue defects in vivo. Increasing attention has been focused on the highly specialized metabolic pathways that regulate energy storage and release in adipose tissues which affect local and systemic outcomes. Non-invasive, dynamic measurement systems are useful to track these metabolic pathways in the same tissue model over time to evaluate long term cell growth, differentiation, and development within tissue engineering constructs. This approach reduces costs and time in comparison to more traditional destructive methods such as biochemical and immunochemistry assays and proteomics assessments. Towards this goal, this review will focus on important metabolic functions of adipose tissues and strategies to evaluate them with non-invasive in vitro methods. Current non-invasive methods, such as measuring key metabolic markers and endogenous contrast imaging will be explored.

  7. The Ontogeny of Brown Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Michael E; Pope, Mark; Budge, Helen

    2015-01-01

    There are three different types of adipose tissue (AT)-brown, white, and beige-that differ with stage of development, species, and anatomical location. Of these, brown AT (BAT) is the least abundant but has the greatest potential impact on energy balance. BAT is capable of rapidly producing large amounts of heat through activation of the unique uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) located within the inner mitochondrial membrane. White AT is an endocrine organ and site of lipid storage, whereas beige AT is primarily white but contains some cells that possess UCP1. BAT first appears in the fetus around mid-gestation and is then gradually lost through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. We focus on the interrelationships between adipocyte classification, anatomical location, and impact of diet in early life together with the extent to which fat development differs between the major species examined. Ultimately, novel dietary interventions designed to reactivate BAT could be possible.

  8. The Ontogeny of Brown Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Michael E; Pope, Mark; Budge, Helen

    2015-01-01

    There are three different types of adipose tissue (AT)-brown, white, and beige-that differ with stage of development, species, and anatomical location. Of these, brown AT (BAT) is the least abundant but has the greatest potential impact on energy balance. BAT is capable of rapidly producing large amounts of heat through activation of the unique uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) located within the inner mitochondrial membrane. White AT is an endocrine organ and site of lipid storage, whereas beige AT is primarily white but contains some cells that possess UCP1. BAT first appears in the fetus around mid-gestation and is then gradually lost through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. We focus on the interrelationships between adipocyte classification, anatomical location, and impact of diet in early life together with the extent to which fat development differs between the major species examined. Ultimately, novel dietary interventions designed to reactivate BAT could be possible. PMID:26076904

  9. Resistin in Dairy Cows: Plasma Concentrations during Early Lactation, Expression and Potential Role in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Reverchon, Maxime; Ramé, Christelle; Cognié, Juliette; Briant, Eric; Elis, Sébastien; Guillaume, Daniel; Dupont, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Resistin is an adipokine that has been implicated in energy metabolism regulation in rodents but has been little studied in dairy cows. We determined plasma resistin concentrations in early lactation in dairy cows and investigated the levels of resistin mRNA and protein in adipose tissue and the phosphorylation of several components of insulin signaling pathways one week post partum (1 WPP) and at five months of gestation (5 MG). We detected resistin in mature bovine adipocytes and investigated the effect of recombinant bovine resistin on lipolysis in bovine adipose tissue explants. ELISA showed that plasma resistin concentration was low before calving, subsequently increasing and reaching a peak at 1 WPP, decreasing steadily thereafter to reach pre-calving levels at 6 WPP. Plasma resistin concentration was significantly positively correlated with plasma non esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels and negatively with milk yield, dry matter intake and energy balance between WPP1 to WPP22. We showed, by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, that resistin mRNA and protein levels in adipose tissue were higher at WPP1 than at 5 MG. The level of phosphorylation of several early and downstream insulin signaling components (IRβ, IRS-1, IRS-2, Akt, MAPK ERK1/2, P70S6K and S6) in adipose tissue was also lower at 1 WPP than at 5 MG. Finally, we showed that recombinant bovine resistin increased the release of glycerol and mRNA levels for ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase) and HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase) in adipose tissue explants. Overall, resistin levels were high in the plasma and adipose tissue and were positively correlated with NEFA levels after calving. Resistin is expressed in bovine mature adipocytes and promotes lipid mobilization in adipose explants in vitro. PMID:24675707

  10. Resistin in dairy cows: plasma concentrations during early lactation, expression and potential role in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Reverchon, Maxime; Ramé, Christelle; Cognié, Juliette; Briant, Eric; Elis, Sébastien; Guillaume, Daniel; Dupont, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Resistin is an adipokine that has been implicated in energy metabolism regulation in rodents but has been little studied in dairy cows. We determined plasma resistin concentrations in early lactation in dairy cows and investigated the levels of resistin mRNA and protein in adipose tissue and the phosphorylation of several components of insulin signaling pathways one week post partum (1 WPP) and at five months of gestation (5 MG). We detected resistin in mature bovine adipocytes and investigated the effect of recombinant bovine resistin on lipolysis in bovine adipose tissue explants. ELISA showed that plasma resistin concentration was low before calving, subsequently increasing and reaching a peak at 1 WPP, decreasing steadily thereafter to reach pre-calving levels at 6 WPP. Plasma resistin concentration was significantly positively correlated with plasma non esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels and negatively with milk yield, dry matter intake and energy balance between WPP1 to WPP22. We showed, by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, that resistin mRNA and protein levels in adipose tissue were higher at WPP1 than at 5 MG. The level of phosphorylation of several early and downstream insulin signaling components (IRβ, IRS-1, IRS-2, Akt, MAPK ERK1/2, P70S6K and S6) in adipose tissue was also lower at 1 WPP than at 5 MG. Finally, we showed that recombinant bovine resistin increased the release of glycerol and mRNA levels for ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase) and HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase) in adipose tissue explants. Overall, resistin levels were high in the plasma and adipose tissue and were positively correlated with NEFA levels after calving. Resistin is expressed in bovine mature adipocytes and promotes lipid mobilization in adipose explants in vitro. PMID:24675707

  11. Visceral adipose tissue as a source of inflammation and promoter of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos; Katritsis, Demosthenes; Raggi, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    The current epidemic of obesity with the associated increasing incidence of insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis affecting a large proportion of the North American and Western populations, has generated a strong interest in the potential role of visceral adipose tissue in the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. The intra-abdominal and epicardial space are two compartments that contain visceral adipose tissue with a similar embryological origin. These visceral fats are highly inflamed in obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and in those with established coronary artery disease; additionally they are capable of secreting large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines and free fatty acids. There is accumulating evidence to support a direct involvement of these regional adipose tissue deposits in the development of atherosclerosis and its complicating events, as will be reviewed in this article.

  12. Brown Adipose Tissue Activation Is Linked to Distinct Systemic Effects on Lipid Metabolism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Chondronikola, Maria; Volpi, Elena; Børsheim, Elisabet; Porter, Craig; Saraf, Manish K; Annamalai, Palam; Yfanti, Christina; Chao, Tony; Wong, Daniel; Shinoda, Kosaku; Labbė, Sebastien M; Hurren, Nicholas M; Cesani, Fernardo; Kajimura, Shingo; Sidossis, Labros S

    2016-06-14

    Recent studies suggest that brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a role in energy and glucose metabolism in humans. However, the physiological significance of human BAT in lipid metabolism remains unknown. We studied 16 overweight/obese men during prolonged, non-shivering cold and thermoneutral conditions using stable isotopic tracer methodologies in conjunction with hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT) biopsies. BAT volume was significantly associated with increased whole-body lipolysis, triglyceride-free fatty acid (FFA) cycling, FFA oxidation, and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. Functional analysis of BAT and WAT demonstrated the greater thermogenic capacity of BAT compared to WAT, while molecular analysis revealed a cold-induced upregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism only in BAT. The accelerated mobilization and oxidation of lipids upon BAT activation supports a putative role for BAT in the regulation of lipid metabolism in humans. PMID:27238638

  13. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Nonlinearly Related to Anthropometric Measures and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Šram, Miroslav; Vrselja, Zvonimir; Lekšan, Igor; Ćurić, Goran; Selthofer-Relatić, Kristina; Radić, Radivoje

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Adipose tissue is the largest endocrine organ, composed of subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT), the latter being highly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). Expansion of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is linked to CAD. One way of assessing the CAD risk is with low-cost anthropometric measures, although they are inaccurate and cannot discriminate between VAT and SAT. The aim of this study is to evaluate (1) the relationship between EAT thickness, SAT thickness and anthropometric measures in a cohort of patients assessed at the cardiology unit and (2) determine predictive power of anthropometric measures and EAT and SAT thickness in establishment of CAD. Methods. Anthropometric measures were obtained from 53 CAD and 42 non-CAD patients. Vascular and structural statuses were obtained with coronarography and echocardiography, as well as measurements of the EAT and SAT thickness. Results. Anthropometric measures showed moderate positive correlation with EAT and SAT thickness. Anthropometric measures and SAT follow nonlinear S curve relationship with EAT. Strong nonlinear power curve relationship was observed between EAT and SAT thinner than 10 mm. Anthropometric measures and EAT and SAT were poor predictors of CAD. Conclusion. Anthropometric measures and SAT have nonlinear relationship with EAT. EAT thickness and anthropometric measures have similar CAD predictive value. PMID:26124828

  14. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Nonlinearly Related to Anthropometric Measures and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Šram, Miroslav; Vrselja, Zvonimir; Lekšan, Igor; Ćurić, Goran; Selthofer-Relatić, Kristina; Radić, Radivoje

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Adipose tissue is the largest endocrine organ, composed of subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT), the latter being highly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). Expansion of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is linked to CAD. One way of assessing the CAD risk is with low-cost anthropometric measures, although they are inaccurate and cannot discriminate between VAT and SAT. The aim of this study is to evaluate (1) the relationship between EAT thickness, SAT thickness and anthropometric measures in a cohort of patients assessed at the cardiology unit and (2) determine predictive power of anthropometric measures and EAT and SAT thickness in establishment of CAD. Methods. Anthropometric measures were obtained from 53 CAD and 42 non-CAD patients. Vascular and structural statuses were obtained with coronarography and echocardiography, as well as measurements of the EAT and SAT thickness. Results. Anthropometric measures showed moderate positive correlation with EAT and SAT thickness. Anthropometric measures and SAT follow nonlinear S curve relationship with EAT. Strong nonlinear power curve relationship was observed between EAT and SAT thinner than 10 mm. Anthropometric measures and EAT and SAT were poor predictors of CAD. Conclusion. Anthropometric measures and SAT have nonlinear relationship with EAT. EAT thickness and anthropometric measures have similar CAD predictive value. PMID:26124828

  15. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Nonlinearly Related to Anthropometric Measures and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Šram, Miroslav; Vrselja, Zvonimir; Lekšan, Igor; Ćurić, Goran; Selthofer-Relatić, Kristina; Radić, Radivoje

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Adipose tissue is the largest endocrine organ, composed of subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT), the latter being highly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). Expansion of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is linked to CAD. One way of assessing the CAD risk is with low-cost anthropometric measures, although they are inaccurate and cannot discriminate between VAT and SAT. The aim of this study is to evaluate (1) the relationship between EAT thickness, SAT thickness and anthropometric measures in a cohort of patients assessed at the cardiology unit and (2) determine predictive power of anthropometric measures and EAT and SAT thickness in establishment of CAD. Methods. Anthropometric measures were obtained from 53 CAD and 42 non-CAD patients. Vascular and structural statuses were obtained with coronarography and echocardiography, as well as measurements of the EAT and SAT thickness. Results. Anthropometric measures showed moderate positive correlation with EAT and SAT thickness. Anthropometric measures and SAT follow nonlinear S curve relationship with EAT. Strong nonlinear power curve relationship was observed between EAT and SAT thinner than 10 mm. Anthropometric measures and EAT and SAT were poor predictors of CAD. Conclusion. Anthropometric measures and SAT have nonlinear relationship with EAT. EAT thickness and anthropometric measures have similar CAD predictive value.

  16. Role of adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Rahul; Pouliopoulos, Jim; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Kovoor, Pramesh

    2016-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue is present in normal healthy individuals. It is a unique fat depot that, under physiologic conditions, plays a cardioprotective role. However, excess epicardial adipose tissue has been shown to be associated with prevalence and severity of atrial fibrillation. In arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and myotonic dystrophy, fibrofatty infiltration of the myocardium is associated with ventricular arrhythmias. In the ovine model of ischemic cardiomyopathy, the presence of intramyocardial adipose or lipomatous metaplasia has been associated with increased propensity to ventricular tachycardia. These observations suggest a role of adipose tissue in the pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias. In this article, we review the role of cardiac adipose tissue in various cardiac arrhythmias and discuss the possible pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  17. The impact of adiposity on adipose tissue-resident lymphocyte activation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Travers, R L; Motta, A C; Betts, J A; Bouloumié, A; Thompson, D

    2015-01-01

    Background/objectives: The presence of T lymphocytes in human adipose tissue has only recently been demonstrated and relatively little is known of their potential relevance in the development of obesity-related diseases. We aimed to further characterise these cells and in particular to investigate how they interact with modestly increased levels of adiposity typical of common overweight and obesity. Subjects/methods: Subcutaneous adipose tissue and fasting blood samples were obtained from healthy males aged 35–55 years with waist circumferences in lean (<94 cm), overweight (94–102 cm) and obese (>102 cm) categories. Adipose tissue-resident CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes together with macrophages were identified by gene expression and flow cytometry. T lymphocytes were further characterised by their expression of activation markers CD25 and CD69. Adipose tissue inflammation was investigated using gene expression analysis and tissue culture. Results: Participants reflected a range of adiposity from lean to class I obesity. Expression of CD4 (T-helper cells) and CD68 (macrophage), as well as FOXP3 RNA transcripts, was elevated in subcutaneous adipose tissue with increased levels of adiposity (P<0.001, P<0.001 and P=0.018, respectively). Flow cytometry revealed significant correlations between waist circumference and levels of CD25 and CD69 expression per cell on activated adipose tissue-resident CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes (P-values ranging from 0.053 to <0.001). No such relationships were found with blood T lymphocytes. This increased T lymphocyte activation was related to increased expression and secretion of various pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines from subcutaneous whole adipose tissue explants. Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate that even modest levels of overweight/obesity elicit modifications in adipose tissue immune function. Our results underscore the importance of T lymphocytes during adipose tissue expansion, and the presence of

  18. The 2012 CDA-CIHR INMD young investigator award lecture: dysfunction of adipose tissues and the mechanisms of ectopic fat deposition in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, André C

    2013-04-01

    Ectopic fat deposition in skeletal muscles, liver, heart, and other tissues has been closely linked with the development of lean tissues' insulin resistance and progression toward type 2 diabetes mellitus. Mechanisms of overexposure of these tissues to fatty acids include increased de novo lipogenesis, impaired fatty acid oxidation and increased fatty acid flux to these organs. White adipose tissues are the main organs responsible for the regulation of circulating fatty acids. It has been clearly demonstrated that pre-diabetes individuals and individuals with diabetes display impaired adipose tissue dietary fatty acid storage that may lead to increased circulating flux and exaggerated lean tissue fatty acid exposure. Additionally, brown adipose tissue depots are less metabolically active in individuals with type 2 diabetes. We have developed a series of novel in vivo investigative tools using positron emission tomography to comprehensively assess postprandial interorgan fatty acid partitioning and white and brown adipose tissue metabolism in subjects with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Our findings shed new lights into the sophisticated mechanisms that regulate fatty acid partitioning and energy homeostasis during the development of type 2 diabetes. New links between abnormal dietary fatty acid metabolism and early myocardial metabolic and functional defects are now being uncovered in humans with the hope to find novel ways to predict and avoid the devastating complications of diabetes.

  19. Proline oxidase–adipose triglyceride lipase pathway restrains adipose cell death and tissue inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lettieri Barbato, D; Aquilano, K; Baldelli, S; Cannata, S M; Bernardini, S; Rotilio, G; Ciriolo, M R

    2014-01-01

    The nutrient-sensing lipolytic enzyme adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) has a key role in adipose tissue function, and alterations in its activity have been implicated in many age-related metabolic disorders. In adipose tissue reduced blood vessel density is related to hypoxia state, cell death and inflammation. Here we demonstrate that adipocytes of poorly vascularized enlarged visceral adipose tissue (i.e. adipose tissue of old mice) suffer from limited nutrient delivery. In particular, nutrient starvation elicits increased activity of mitochondrial proline oxidase/dehydrogenase (POX/PRODH) that is causal in triggering a ROS-dependent induction of ATGL. We demonstrate that ATGL promotes the expression of genes related to mitochondrial oxidative metabolism (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α), thus setting a metabolic switch towards fat utilization that supplies energy to starved adipocytes and prevents cell death, as well as adipose tissue inflammation. Taken together, these results identify ATGL as a stress resistance mediator in adipocytes, restraining visceral adipose tissue dysfunction typical of age-related metabolic disorders. PMID:24096872

  20. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle blood flow during mental stress

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, B.; Hjemdahl, P.; Freyschuss, U.; Juhlin-Dannfelt, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mental stress (a modified Stroop color word conflict test (CWT)) increased adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF; 133Xe clearance) by 70% and reduced adipose tissue vascular resistance (ATR) by 25% in healthy male volunteers. The vasculatures of adipose tissue (abdomen as well as thigh), skeletal muscle of the calf (133Xe clearance), and the entire calf (venous occlusion plethysmography) responded similarly. Arterial epinephrine (Epi) and glycerol levels were approximately doubled by stress. Beta-Blockade by metoprolol (beta 1-selective) or propranolol (nonselective) attenuated CWT-induced tachycardia similarly. Metoprolol attenuated stress-induced vasodilation in the calf and tended to do so in adipose tissue. Propranolol abolished vasodilation in the calf and resulted in vasoconstriction during CWT in adipose tissue. Decreases in ATR, but not in skeletal muscle or calf vascular resistances, were correlated to increases in arterial plasma glycerol (r = -0.42, P less than 0.05), whereas decreases in skeletal muscle and calf vascular resistances, but not in ATR, were correlated to increases in arterial Epi levels (r = -0.69, P less than 0.01; and r = -0.43, P less than 0.05, respectively). The results suggest that mental stress increases nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle considerably, both through the elevation of perfusion pressure and via vasodilatation. Withdrawal of vasoconstrictor nerve activity, vascular beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation by circulating Epi, and metabolic mechanisms (in adipose tissue) may contribute to the vasodilatation.

  1. Role of inflammatory factors and adipose tissue in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Part I: Rheumatoid adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Prohorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Saied, Fadhil; Maśliński, Włodzimierz

    2013-06-01

    For many years, it was thought that synovial cells and chondrocytes are the only sources of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors found in the synovial fluid in patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Currently, it is more and more frequently indicated that adipose tissue plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of these diseases as well as that a range of pathological processes that take place in the adipose tissue, synovial membrane and cartilage are interconnected. The adipose tissue is considered a specialized form of the connective tissue containing various types of cells which produce numerous biologically active factors. The latest studies reveal that, similarly to the synovial membrane, articular adipose tissue may take part in the local inflammatory response and affect the metabolism of the cartilage and subchondral osseous tissue. In in vitro conditions, the explants of this tissue obtained from patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis produce similar pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to the explants of the synovial membrane. At this stage already, knowledge translates into imaging diagnostics. In radiological images, the shadowing of the periarticular soft tissues may not only reflect synovial membrane pathologies or joint effusion, but may also suggest inflammatory edema of the adipose tissue. On ultrasound examinations, abnormal presentation of the adipose tissue, i.e. increased echogenicity and hyperemia, may indicate its inflammation. Such images have frequently been obtained during ultrasound scanning and have been interpreted as inflammation, edema, hypertrophy or fibrosis of the adipose tissue. At present, when the knowledge concerning pathogenic mechanisms is taken into account, abnormal echogenicity and hyperemia of the adipose tissue may be considered as a proof of its inflammation. In the authors' own practice, the inflammation of the adipose tissue usually accompanies synovitis

  2. Cell Supermarket: Adipose Tissue as a Source of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, M.V.; Wei, S.; Duarte, M.; Du, M.; Jiang, Z.; Hausman, G.J.; Bergen, W.G.

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is derived from numerous sources, and in recent years this tissue has been shown to provide numerous cells from what seemingly was a population of homogeneous adipocytes. Considering the types of cells that adipose tissue-derived cells may form, these cells may be useful in a variety of clinical and scientific applications. The focus of this paper is to reflect on this area of research and to provide a list of potential (future) research areas. PMID:25031654

  3. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Acute Adipose Tissue Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Sung; Rongisch, Robert; Hager, Stephan; Grieb, Gerrit; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; Bucala, Richard; Bernhagen, Juergen; Pallua, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine and has been implicated in inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the regulation of MIF in adipose tissue and its impact on wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate MIF expression in inflamed adipose and determine its role in inflammatory cell recruitment and wound healing. Adipose tissue was harvested from subcutaneous adipose tissue layers of 24 healthy subjects and from adipose tissue adjacent to acutely inflamed wounds of 21 patients undergoing wound debridement. MIF protein and mRNA expression were measured by ELISA and RT-PCR. Cell-specific MIF expression was visualized by immunohistochemistry. The functional role of MIF in cell recruitment was investigated by a chemotaxis assay and by flow cytometry of labeled macrophages that were injected into Mif-/-and wildtype mice. Wound healing was evaluated by an in vitro scratch assay on human fibroblast monolayers. MIF protein levels of native adipose tissue and supernatants from acutely inflamed wounds were significantly elevated when compared to healthy controls. MIF mRNA expression was increased in acutely inflamed adipose tissue indicating the activation of MIF gene transcription in response to adipose tissue inflammation. MIF is expressed in mature adipocytes and in infiltrated macrophages. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell migration was significantly increased towards supernatants derived from inflamed adipose tissue. This effect was partially abrogated by MIF-neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, when compared to wildtype mice, Mif-/-mice showed reduced infiltration of labeled macrophages into LPS-stimulated epididymal fat pads in vivo. Finally, MIF antibodies partially neutralized the detrimental effect of MIF on fibroblast wound healing. Our results indicate that increased MIF expression and rapid activation of the MIF gene in fat tissue adjacent to acute wound healing disorders may play a role in cell

  4. Insulin action in morbid obesity: a focus on muscle and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Mitrou, Panayota; Raptis, Sotirios A; Dimitriadis, George

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in morbid obesity. Glucose regulation by insulin depends on the suppression of endogenous glucose production and stimulation of glucose disposal. In morbid obesity, glucose production by the liver is increased. Moreover, the sensitivity of glucose metabolism to insulin is impaired both in muscle (due to defects in insulin-stimulated glucose utilization and decreased blood flow) and in adipose tissue (due to decreased blood flow). However, recent studies suggest that expanded total fat mass becomes a major consumer of glucose providing a sink for glucose and compensating for insulin resistance. Metabolism and immunity are closely linked. Bearing in mind the crosstalk between inflammatory pathways and the insulin signaling cascade, adipose tissue derived cytokines may represent a link between inflammation and metabolic signals and mediate, at least in part, insulin resistance. Adipose tissue plays a crucial role by buffering daily influx of dietary fat, suppressing the release of non-esterified fatty acids into the circulation and increasing triacylglycerol clearance. However, in morbid obesity there is an impairment of the normal ability of adipose tissue to buffer fatty acids, despite hyperinsulinemia. Lipotoxicity gradually impairs insulin action in the liver and muscle, aggravating insulin resistance.

  5. Hypoxia and adipose tissue function and dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Trayhurn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The rise in the incidence of obesity has led to a major interest in the biology of white adipose tissue. The tissue is a major endocrine and signaling organ, with adipocytes, the characteristic cell type, secreting a multiplicity of protein factors, the adipokines. Increases in the secretion of a number of adipokines occur in obesity, underpinning inflammation in white adipose tissue and the development of obesity-associated diseases. There is substantial evidence, particularly from animal studies, that hypoxia develops in adipose tissue as the tissue mass expands, and the reduction in Po(2) is considered to underlie the inflammatory response. Exposure of white adipocytes to hypoxic conditions in culture induces changes in the expression of >1,000 genes. The secretion of a number of inflammation-related adipokines is upregulated by hypoxia, and there is a switch from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. Glucose utilization is increased in hypoxic adipocytes with corresponding increases in lactate production. Importantly, hypoxia induces insulin resistance in fat cells and leads to the development of adipose tissue fibrosis. Many of the responses of adipocytes to hypoxia are initiated at Po(2) levels above the normal physiological range for adipose tissue. The other cell types within the tissue also respond to hypoxia, with the differentiation of preadipocytes to adipocytes being inhibited and preadipocytes being transformed into leptin-secreting cells. Overall, hypoxia has pervasive effects on the function of adipocytes and appears to be a key factor in adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity.

  6. Adipose Tissue: Sanctuary for HIV/SIV Persistence and Replication.

    PubMed

    Pallikkuth, Suresh; Mohan, Mahesh

    2015-12-01

    This commentary highlights new findings from a recent study identifying adipose tissue as a potential HIV reservoir and a major site of inflammation during chronic human/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV) infection. A concise discussion about upcoming challenges and new research avenues for reducing chronic adipose inflammation during HIV/SIV infection is presented.

  7. Total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, N.; Harsas, W.; Marolt, R.S.; Morton, M.; Pollack, J.K.

    1988-12-01

    As far as the authors could ascertain only 4 well-documented analytical studies have been carried out in Australia determining the total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue. The latest of these studies was published over 16 years ago. Therefore it is timely and important to re-examine the total DDT and dieldrin concentration within the adipose tissue of the Australian population. The present investigation has analyzed 290 samples of human adipose tissue obtained from Westmead Hospital situated in an outer suburb of Sydney, New South Wales for their content of total DDT and dieldrin.

  8. Self-synthesized extracellular matrix contributes to mature adipose tissue regeneration in a tissue engineering chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Weiqing; Chang, Qiang; Xiao, Xiaolian; Dong, Ziqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The development of an engineered adipose tissue substitute capable of supporting reliable, predictable, and complete fat tissue regeneration would be of value in plastic and reconstructive surgery. For adipogenesis, a tissue engineering chamber provides an optimized microenvironment that is both efficacious and reproducible; however, for reasons that remain unclear, tissues regenerated in a tissue engineering chamber consist mostly of connective rather than adipose tissue. Here, we describe a chamber-based system for improving the yield of mature adipose tissue and discuss the potential mechanism of adipogenesis in tissue-chamber models. Adipose tissue flaps with independent vascular pedicles placed in chambers were implanted into rabbits. Adipose volume increased significantly during the observation period (week 1, 2, 3, 4, 16). Histomorphometry revealed mature adipose tissue with signs of adipose tissue remolding. The induced engineered constructs showed high-level expression of adipogenic (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ), chemotactic (stromal cell-derived factor 1a), and inflammatory (interleukin 1 and 6) genes. In our system, the extracellular matrix may have served as a scaffold for cell migration and proliferation, allowing mature adipose tissue to be obtained in a chamber microenvironment without the need for an exogenous scaffold. Our results provide new insights into key elements involved in the early development of adipose tissue regeneration.

  9. Adipose tissue distribution, plasma insulin, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Björntorp, P

    1987-07-01

    Hyperinsulinaemia is of great importance, being a primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes (NIDDM). Furthermore, unwanted effects of increased exposure of tissues to insulin are known. Hyperinsulinaemia may, in principle, be caused by primary hypersecretion, or be a secondary consequence of diminished effectiveness of insulin in the periphery. Obesity is the commonest condition characterized by insulin resistance, which is seen most frequently when excess adipose tissue is localized to the abdominal region. Insulin resistance in obesity is found in several tissues, however, with liver and muscle being quantitative the most important. Muscle insulin sensitivity is regulated by genetic factors, hormonal effects, and the influence of free fatty acids, as well as the state of physical activity. There is evidence for the action of each of these factors in obesity. The pathogenetic mechanisms linking hyperinsulinaemia with cardiovascular disease and NIDDM are unknown. Comparisons between development of NIDDM in experimental animal models and in humans in prospective studies however, provide useful hypotheses for further studies.

  10. Isolation and Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Porcine Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Liu, Hui-Yu; Chang, Yun-Tsui; Cheng, Ying-Hung; Mersmann, Harry J; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2016-03-31

    Obesity is an unconstrained worldwide epidemic. Unraveling molecular controls in adipose tissue development holds promise to treat obesity or diabetes. Although numerous immortalized adipogenic cell lines have been established, adipose-derived stem cells from the stromal vascular fraction of subcutaneous white adipose tissues provide a reliable cellular system ex vivo much closer to adipose development in vivo. Pig adipose-derived stem cells (pADSC) are isolated from 7- to 9-day old piglets. The dorsal white fat depot of porcine subcutaneous adipose tissues is sliced, minced and collagenase digested. These pADSC exhibit strong potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Moreover, the pADSC also possess multipotency, assessed by selective stem cell markers, to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell types including adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. These pADSC can be used for clarification of molecular switches in regulating classical adipocyte differentiation or in direction to other mesenchymal cell types of mesodermal origin. Furthermore, extended lineages into cells of ectodermal and endodermal origin have recently been achieved. Therefore, pADSC derived in this protocol provide an abundant and assessable source of adult mesenchymal stem cells with full multipotency for studying adipose development and application to tissue engineering of regenerative medicine.

  11. Isolation and Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells from Porcine Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Liu, Hui-Yu; Chang, Yun-Tsui; Cheng, Ying-Hung; Mersmann, Harry J.; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an unconstrained worldwide epidemic. Unraveling molecular controls in adipose tissue development holds promise to treat obesity or diabetes. Although numerous immortalized adipogenic cell lines have been established, adipose-derived stem cells from the stromal vascular fraction of subcutaneous white adipose tissues provide a reliable cellular system ex vivo much closer to adipose development in vivo. Pig adipose-derived stem cells (pADSC) are isolated from 7- to 9-day old piglets. The dorsal white fat depot of porcine subcutaneous adipose tissues is sliced, minced and collagenase digested. These pADSC exhibit strong potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Moreover, the pADSC also possess multipotency, assessed by selective stem cell markers, to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell types including adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. These pADSC can be used for clarification of molecular switches in regulating classical adipocyte differentiation or in direction to other mesenchymal cell types of mesodermal origin. Furthermore, extended lineages into cells of ectodermal and endodermal origin have recently been achieved. Therefore, pADSC derived in this protocol provide an abundant and assessable source of adult mesenchymal stem cells with full multipotency for studying adipose development and application to tissue engineering of regenerative medicine. PMID:27077225

  12. Broiler chicken adipose tissue dynamics during the first two weeks post-hatch.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shiping; Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Shuai; Rice, Brittany Breon; Cline, Mark Andrew; Gilbert, Elizabeth Ruth

    2015-11-01

    Selection of broiler chickens for growth has led to increased adipose tissue accretion. To investigate the post-hatch development of adipose tissue, the abdominal, clavicular, and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots were collected from broiler chicks at 4 and 14 days post-hatch. As a percent of body weight, abdominal fat increased (P<0.001) with age. At day 4, clavicular and subcutaneous fat depots were heavier (P<0.003) than abdominal fat whereas at day 14, abdominal and clavicular weighed more (P<0.003) than subcutaneous fat. Adipocyte area and diameter were greater in clavicular and subcutaneous than abdominal fat at 4 and 14 days post-hatch (P<0.001). Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) activity increased (P<0.001) in all depots from day 4 to 14, and at both ages was greatest in subcutaneous, intermediate in clavicular, and lowest in abdominal fat (P<0.05). In clavicular fat, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBP)α, CEBPβ, fatty acid synthase (FASN), fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and NPY receptor 5 (NPYR5) mRNA increased and NPYR2 mRNA decreased from day 4 to 14 (P<0.001). Thus, there are site-specific differences in broiler chick adipose development, with larger adipocytes and greater G3PDH activity in subcutaneous fat at day 4, more rapid growth of abdominal fat, and clavicular fat intermediate for most traits. Adipose tissue expansion was accompanied by changes in gene expression of adipose-associated factors.

  13. New concepts in white adipose tissue physiology.

    PubMed

    Proença, A R G; Sertié, R A L; Oliveira, A C; Campaña, A B; Caminhotto, R O; Chimin, P; Lima, F B

    2014-02-01

    Numerous studies address the physiology of adipose tissue (AT). The interest surrounding the physiology of AT is primarily the result of the epidemic outburst of obesity in various contemporary societies. Briefly, the two primary metabolic activities of white AT include lipogenesis and lipolysis. Throughout the last two decades, a new model of AT physiology has emerged. Although AT was considered to be primarily an abundant energy source, it is currently considered to be a prolific producer of biologically active substances, and, consequently, is now recognized as an endocrine organ. In addition to leptin, other biologically active substances secreted by AT, generally classified as cytokines, include adiponectin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, resistin, vaspin, visfatin, and many others now collectively referred to as adipokines. The secretion of such biologically active substances by AT indicates its importance as a metabolic regulator. Cell turnover of AT has also recently been investigated in terms of its biological role in adipogenesis. Consequently, the objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive critical review of the current literature concerning the metabolic (lipolysis, lipogenesis) and endocrine actions of AT.

  14. Hypothalamic control of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Sebastien M.; Caron, Alexandre; Lanfray, Damien; Monge-Rofarello, Boris; Bartness, Timothy J.; Richard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known, in large part from animal studies, that the control of brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is insured by the central nervous system (CNS), which integrates several stimuli in order to control BAT activation through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). SNS-mediated BAT activity is governed by diverse neurons found in brain structures involved in homeostatic regulations and whose activity is modulated by various factors including oscillations of energy fluxes. The characterization of these neurons has always represented a challenging issue. The available literature suggests that the neuronal circuits controlling BAT thermogenesis are largely part of an autonomic circuitry involving the hypothalamus, brainstem and the SNS efferent neurons. In the present review, we recapitulate the latest progresses in regards to the hypothalamic regulation of BAT metabolism. We briefly addressed the role of the thermoregulatory pathway and its interactions with the energy balance systems in the control of thermogenesis. We also reviewed the involvement of the brain melanocortin and endocannabinoid systems as well as the emerging role of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) neurons in BAT thermogenesis. Finally, we examined the link existing between these systems and the homeostatic factors that modulate their activities. PMID:26578907

  15. Dynamics of adipose tissue development by 2H2O labeling.

    PubMed

    Pouteau, Etienne; Beysen, Carine; Saad, Nabil; Turner, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue development undergoes remodeling in terms of newly synthesized cells (hyperplasia) and newly synthesized lipids that accumulate in adipocytes (hypertrophy). Synthesis and/or breakdown rates of adipose cells and lipids follow a continuous and dynamic pattern, e.g., during obesity development. This chapter describes a unique in vivo method to measure the dynamics of adipose tissue growth using 2H2O labeling and mass spectrometry analyses. The approach uses 2H2O as a metabolic tracer to label the adipose tissue components such as the triglycerides (TG), the fatty acids, and the genomic DNA. Deuterium from 2H2O incorporates in the C-H bonds of glycerol moiety of TG through glyceroneogenesis as well as in palmitate moiety through de novo lipogenesis (DNL). Deuterium also incorporates into DNA through the de novo nucleoside synthesis pathway. The labeled water, 2H2O, is administrated intraperitoneally and/or orally in rodents or in humans for a defined duration and biopsies are collected at the end of the labeling period. We describe the procedure to extract, isolate, and purify the adipose components (TG-glycerol, TG-palmitate, and genomic DNA) and the derivation procedure to analyze the isotopic 2H-enrichment of these components by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The calculation principles are described to obtain the fractional and absolute synthesis rates of TG, of DNL, and of DNA measured in the adipose tissues. The method is nonradioactive, nonhazardous, accurate, reproducible, and very sensitive. We present recent in vivo data on the ontogeny of adipose tissue growth dynamics in young and adult obese Zucker rats compared with lean Zucker rats. PMID:19763484

  16. Morphological and inflammatory changes in visceral adipose tissue during obesity.

    PubMed

    Revelo, Xavier S; Luck, Helen; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a major health burden worldwide and is a major factor in the development of insulin resistance and metabolic complications such as type II diabetes. Chronic nutrient excess leads to visceral adipose tissue (VAT) expansion and dysfunction in an active process that involves the adipocytes, their supporting matrix, and immune cell infiltrates. These changes contribute to adipose tissue hypoxia, adipocyte cell stress, and ultimately cell death. Accumulation of lymphocytes, macrophages, and other immune cells around dying adipocytes forms the so-called "crown-like structure", a histological hallmark of VAT in obesity. Cross talk between immune cells in adipose tissue dictates the overall inflammatory response, ultimately leading to the production of pro-inflammatory mediators which directly induce insulin resistance in VAT. In this review, we summarize recent studies demonstrating the dramatic changes that occur in visceral adipose tissue during obesity leading to low-grade chronic inflammation and metabolic disease.

  17. Adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Morikuni; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Innovative developments in the multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering have yielded various implementation strategies and the possibility of functional tissue regeneration. Technologic advances in the combination of stem cells, biomaterials, and growth factors have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in vivo and in vitro. The therapeutic potential of human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are harvested from bone marrow and adipose tissue, has generated increasing interest in a wide variety of biomedical disciplines. These cells can differentiate into a variety of tissue types, including bone, cartilage, fat, and nerve tissue. Adipose-derived stem cells have some advantages compared with other sources of stem cells, most notably that a large number of cells can be easily and quickly isolated from adipose tissue. In current clinical therapy for periodontal tissue regeneration, several methods have been developed and applied either alone or in combination, such as enamel matrix proteins, guided tissue regeneration, autologous/allogeneic/xenogeneic bone grafts, and growth factors. However, there are various limitations and shortcomings for periodontal tissue regeneration using current methods. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using MSCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because the various secreted growth factors from MSCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissue but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. Adipose-derived stem cells are especially effective for neovascularization compared with other MSC sources. In this review, the possibility and potential of adipose-derived stem cells for regenerative medicine are introduced. Of particular interest, periodontal tissue regeneration with adipose-derived stem cells is discussed.

  18. The adipose tissue in farm animals: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, Helga; Bendixen, Emoke; Restelli, Laura; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2014-03-01

    Adipose tissue is not only a tissue where energy is stored but is also involved in regulating several body functions such as appetite and energy expenditure via its endocrine activity. Moreover, it thereby modulates complex processes like reproduction, inflammation and immune response. The products secreted from adipose tissue comprise hormones and cytokines that are collectively termed as adipocytokines or "adipokines"; the discovery and characterization of new proteins secreted by adipose tissue is still ongoing and their number is thus increasing. Adipokines act in both endocrine manner as well as locally, as autocrine or paracrine effectors. Proteomics has emerged as a valuable technique to characterize both cellular and secreted proteomes from adipose tissues, including those of main cellular fractions, i.e. the adipocytes or the stromal vascular fraction containing mainly adipocyte precursors and immune cells. The scientific interest in adipose tissue is largely based on the worldwide increasing prevalence of obesity in humans; in contrast, obesity is hardly an issue for farmed animals that are fed according to their well-defined needs. Adipose tissue is nevertheless of major importance in these animals, as the adipose percentage of the bodyweight is a major determinant for the efficiency of transferring nutrients from feed into food products and thus for the economic value from meat producing animals. In dairy animals, the importance of adipose tissue is based on its function as stromal structure for the mammary gland and on its role in participating in and regulating of energy metabolism and other functions. Moreover, as pig has recently become an important model organism to study human diseases, the knowledge of adipose tissue metabolism in pig is relevant for the study of obesity and metabolic disorders. We herein provide a general overview of adipose tissue functions and its importance in farm animals. This review will summarize recent achievements in

  19. n-3 PUFA: bioavailability and modulation of adipose tissue function.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, Jan; Rossmeisl, Martin; Flachs, Pavel; Kuda, Ondrej; Brauner, Petr; Jilkova, Zuzana; Stankova, Barbora; Tvrzicka, Eva; Bryhn, Morten

    2009-11-01

    Adipose tissue has a key role in the development of metabolic syndrome (MS), which includes obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and other disorders. Systemic insulin resistance represents a major factor contributing to the development of MS in obesity. The resistance is precipitated by impaired adipose tissue glucose and lipid metabolism, linked to a low-grade inflammation of adipose tissue and secretion of pro-inflammatory adipokines. Development of MS could be delayed by lifestyle modifications, while both dietary and pharmacological interventions are required for the successful therapy of MS. The n-3 long-chain (LC) PUFA, EPA and DHA, which are abundant in marine fish, act as hypolipidaemic factors, reduce cardiac events and decrease the progression of atherosclerosis. Thus, n-3 LC PUFA represent healthy constituents of diets for patients with MS. In rodents n-3 LC PUFA prevent the development of obesity and impaired glucose tolerance. The effects of n-3 LC PUFA are mediated transcriptionally by AMP-activated protein kinase and by other mechanisms. n-3 LC PUFA activate a metabolic switch toward lipid catabolism and suppression of lipogenesis, i.e. in the liver, adipose tissue and small intestine. This metabolic switch improves dyslipidaemia and reduces ectopic deposition of lipids, resulting in improved insulin signalling. Despite a relatively low accumulation of n-3 LC PUFA in adipose tissue lipids, adipose tissue is specifically linked to the beneficial effects of n-3 LC PUFA, as indicated by (1) the prevention of adipose tissue hyperplasia and hypertrophy, (2) the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis in adipocytes, (3) the induction of adiponectin and (4) the amelioration of adipose tissue inflammation by n-3 LC PUFA. PMID:19698199

  20. Exercise and Adipose Tissue Macrophages: New Frontiers in Obesity Research?

    PubMed

    Goh, Jorming; Goh, Kian Peng; Abbasi, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem in the twenty-first century. Mutations in genes that regulate substrate metabolism, subsequent dysfunction in their protein products, and other factors, such as increased adipose tissue inflammation, are some underlying etiologies of this disease. Increased inflammation in the adipose tissue microenvironment is partly mediated by the presence of cells from the innate and adaptive immune system. A subset of the innate immune population in adipose tissue include macrophages, termed adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which are central players in adipose tissue inflammation. Being extremely plastic, their responses to diverse molecular signals in the microenvironment dictate their identity and functional properties, where they become either pro-inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2). Endurance exercise training exerts global anti-inflammatory responses in multiple organs, including skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. The purpose of this review is to discuss the different mechanisms that drive ATM-mediated inflammation in obesity and present current evidence of how exercise training, specifically endurance exercise training, modulates the polarization of ATMs from an M1 to an M2 anti-inflammatory phenotype. PMID:27379017

  1. Adipose Natural Killer Cells Regulate Adipose Tissue Macrophages to Promote Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Pae, Munkyong; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Eberlé, Delphine; Shimada, Takeshi; Kamei, Nozomu; Park, Hee-Sook; Sasorith, Souphatta; Woo, Ju Rang; You, Jia; Mosher, William; Brady, Hugh J M; Shoelson, Steven E; Lee, Jongsoon

    2016-04-12

    Obesity-induced inflammation mediated by immune cells in adipose tissue appears to participate in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We show that natural killer (NK) cells in adipose tissue play an important role. High-fat diet (HFD) increases NK cell numbers and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, notably TNFα, in epididymal, but not subcutaneous, fat depots. When NK cells were depleted either with neutralizing antibodies or genetic ablation in E4bp4(+/-) mice, obesity-induced insulin resistance improved in parallel with decreases in both adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) numbers, and ATM and adipose tissue inflammation. Conversely, expansion of NK cells following IL-15 administration or reconstitution of NK cells into E4bp4(-/-) mice increased both ATM numbers and adipose tissue inflammation and exacerbated HFD-induced insulin resistance. These results indicate that adipose NK cells control ATMs as an upstream regulator potentially by producing proinflammatory mediators, including TNFα, and thereby contribute to the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance.

  2. Galectin-3 is a regulator of metaflammation in adipose tissue and pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Pejnovic, Nada N; Pantic, Jelena M; Jovanovic, Ivan P; Radosavljevic, Gordana D; Djukic, Aleksandar Lj; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa N; Lukic, Miodrag L

    2013-01-01

    The cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems have been implicated in the development of obesity-induced metaflammation and metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes. Galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, modulates immune/inflammatory responses and specifically binds to advanced glycation end products (AGE), modified lipoproteins, and endotoxin. In the recently published study we demonstrate proinflammatory changes in the visceral adipose tissue and pancreatic islets in galectin-3-deficient mice fed high-fat diet which also exhibited excess adiposity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and systemic inflammation compared with their diet matched wild-type controls. This was associated with the increased incidence of Type-1 T and NKT cells and pro-inflammatory CD11c+CD11b+ macrophages in the visceral adipose tissue. Severe insulitis, infiltration of macrophages expressing NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β, and enhanced accumulation of AGE were present within the pancreatic islets in obese LGALS3−/− mice. Moreover, increased caspase-1 dependent IL-1β secretion with increased expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and phospho-NFκBp65 were observed in LGALS3−/− peritoneal macrophages stimulated in vitro by lipopolysaccharide and/or saturated fatty acid palmitate. The amplified high-fat diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia and exacerbated inflammation in adipose tissue and pancreatic islets in LGALS3−/− mice suggest an important role for galectin-3 in the regulation of adiposity, metaflammation and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24052904

  3. Galectin-3 is a regulator of metaflammation in adipose tissue and pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Pejnovic, Nada N; Pantic, Jelena M; Jovanovic, Ivan P; Radosavljevic, Gordana D; Djukic, Aleksandar Lj; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa N; Lukic, Miodrag L

    2013-10-01

    The cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems have been implicated in the development of obesity-induced metaflammation and metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes. Galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, modulates immune/inflammatory responses and specifically binds to advanced glycation end products (AGE), modified lipoproteins, and endotoxin. In the recently published study we demonstrate proinflammatory changes in the visceral adipose tissue and pancreatic islets in galectin-3-deficient mice fed high-fat diet which also exhibited excess adiposity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and systemic inflammation compared with their diet matched wild-type controls. This was associated with the increased incidence of Type-1 T and NKT cells and pro-inflammatory CD11c(+)CD11b(+) macrophages in the visceral adipose tissue. Severe insulitis, infiltration of macrophages expressing NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β, and enhanced accumulation of AGE were present within the pancreatic islets in obese LGALS3(-/-) mice. Moreover, increased caspase-1 dependent IL-1β secretion with increased expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and phospho-NFκBp65 were observed in LGALS3(-/-) peritoneal macrophages stimulated in vitro by lipopolysaccharide and/or saturated fatty acid palmitate. The amplified high-fat diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia and exacerbated inflammation in adipose tissue and pancreatic islets in LGALS3(-/-) mice suggest an important role for galectin-3 in the regulation of adiposity, metaflammation and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24052904

  4. Hypertrophy and/or Hyperplasia: Dynamics of Adipose Tissue Growth.

    PubMed

    Jo, Junghyo; Gavrilova, Oksana; Pack, Stephanie; Jou, William; Mullen, Shawn; Sumner, Anne E; Cushman, Samuel W; Periwal, Vipul

    2009-03-01

    Adipose tissue grows by two mechanisms: hyperplasia (cell number increase) and hypertrophy (cell size increase). Genetics and diet affect the relative contributions of these two mechanisms to the growth of adipose tissue in obesity. In this study, the size distributions of epididymal adipose cells from two mouse strains, obesity-resistant FVB/N and obesity-prone C57BL/6, were measured after 2, 4, and 12 weeks under regular and high-fat feeding conditions. The total cell number in the epididymal fat pad was estimated from the fat pad mass and the normalized cell-size distribution. The cell number and volume-weighted mean cell size increase as a function of fat pad mass. To address adipose tissue growth precisely, we developed a mathematical model describing the evolution of the adipose cell-size distributions as a function of the increasing fat pad mass, instead of the increasing chronological time. Our model describes the recruitment of new adipose cells and their subsequent development in different strains, and with different diet regimens, with common mechanisms, but with diet- and genetics-dependent model parameters. Compared to the FVB/N strain, the C57BL/6 strain has greater recruitment of small adipose cells. Hyperplasia is enhanced by high-fat diet in a strain-dependent way, suggesting a synergistic interaction between genetics and diet. Moreover, high-fat feeding increases the rate of adipose cell size growth, independent of strain, reflecting the increase in calories requiring storage. Additionally, high-fat diet leads to a dramatic spreading of the size distribution of adipose cells in both strains; this implies an increase in size fluctuations of adipose cells through lipid turnover.

  5. The role of adipose cell size and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity in the carbohydrate intolerance of human obesity.

    PubMed

    Salans, L B; Knittle, J L; Hirsch, J

    1968-01-01

    Glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity of isolated human adipose tissue was studied as a function of adipose cell size and number. Glucose metabolism by these tissues was closely related to the number of cells in the fragment, irrespective of cell size. Adipose cells of obese individuals metabolized glucose to carbon dioxide and triglyceride at rates similar to adipose cells of nonobese subjects. In contrast, insulin responsiveness of adipose tissue was dependent upon adipose cell size. The larger its adipose cells the less insulin sensitive was the tissue. Thus, adipose tissue of obese subjects, with enlarged cells, showed a diminished response to insulin. After weight loss and reduction in adipose cell size, insulin sensitivity of the adipose tissue of obese patients was restored to normal. When adipose tissue of obese individuals showed impaired responsiveness to insulin, their plasma insulin levels, after oral glucose, were elevated. Weight loss and reduction in adipose cell size restored plasma insulin concentration to normal, concomitant with the return of normal tissue insulin sensitivity.

  6. From neutrophils to macrophages: differences in regional adipose tissue depots.

    PubMed

    Dam, V; Sikder, T; Santosa, S

    2016-01-01

    Currently, we do not fully understand the underlying mechanisms of how regional adiposity promotes metabolic dysregulation. As adipose tissue expands, there is an increase in chronic systemic low-grade inflammation due to greater infiltration of immune cells and production of cytokines. This chronic inflammation is thought to play a major role in the development of metabolic complications and disease such as insulin resistance and diabetes. We know that different adipose tissue depots contribute differently to the risk of metabolic disease. People who have an upper body fat distribution around the abdomen are at greater risk of disease than those who tend to store fat in their lower body around the hips and thighs. Thus, it is conceivable that adipose tissue depots contribute differently to the inflammatory milieu as a result of varied infiltration of immune cell types. In this review, we describe the role and function of major resident immune cells in the development of adipose tissue inflammation and discuss their regional differences in the context of metabolic disease risk. We find that although initial studies have found regional differences, a more comprehensive understanding of how immune cells interrupt adipose tissue homeostasis is needed.

  7. Ghrelin receptor regulates adipose tissue inflammation in aging

    PubMed Central

    Buras, Eric D.; Yu, Kaijiang; Wang, Ruitao; Smith, C. Wayne; Wu, Huaizhu; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Sun, Yuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with low-grade adipose inflammation, which is closely linked to insulin resistance. Ghrelin is the only circulating orexigenic hormone which is known to increase obesity and insulin resistance. We previously reported that the expression of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), increases in adipose tissues during aging, and old Ghsr−/− mice exhibit a lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype. Macrophages are major mediators of adipose tissue inflammation, which consist of pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes. Here, we show that in aged mice, GHS-R ablation promotes macrophage phenotypical shift toward anti-inflammatory M2. Old Ghsr−/− mice have reduced macrophage infiltration, M1/M2 ratio, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in white and brown adipose tissues. We also found that peritoneal macrophages of old Ghsr−/− mice produce higher norepinephrine, which is in line with increased alternatively-activated M2 macrophages. Our data further reveal that GHS-R has cell-autonomous effects in macrophages, and GHS-R antagonist suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that ghrelin signaling has an important role in macrophage polarization and adipose tissue inflammation during aging. GHS-R antagonists may serve as a novel and effective therapeutic option for age-associated adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:26837433

  8. Differential effects of a gelatinase inhibitor on adipocyte differentiation and adipose tissue development.

    PubMed

    Van Hul, Matthias; Bauters, Dries; Lijnen, Roger H

    2013-10-01

    (1) A potential role for the gelatinases in adipocyte differentiation in vitro and adipose tissue development in vivo was investigated using the gelatinase inhibitor tolylsam ((R)-3-methyl-2-[4-(3-p-tolyl-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-5-yl)-benzenesulphonylamino]-butyric acid). (2) Differentiation of murine 3T3-F442A preadipocytes (12 days after reaching confluence) into mature adipocytes in vitro was promoted in the presence of tolylsam (10-100 μmol/L). (3) De novo development of fat tissue in nude mice injected with preadipocytes and kept on a high-fat diet was significantly impaired following treatment with tolylsam (100 mg/kg per day for 4 weeks). (4) Adipose tissue development in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 deficient mice, kept on a high-fat diet, was significantly impaired following administration of tolylsam (100 mg/kg per day for 15 weeks). This was associated with markedly enhanced metabolic rate. (5) Treatment of MMP-2-deficient mice with tolylsam (100 mg/kg per day, 15 weeks) was associated with the preservation of collagen and a reduction in blood vessel size in adipose tissues in vivo. (6) Furthermore, plasma levels of triglycerides and free fatty acids were reduced by tolylsam treatment of MMP-2-deficient mice (100 mg/kg per day, 15 weeks), whereas nutrient adsorption in the intestine was not affected. (7) The results of the present study indicate that tolylsam promotes preadipocyte differentiation in vitro, but impairs adipose tissue development in vivo.

  9. Myocardial fat as a part of cardiac visceral adipose tissue: physiological and pathophysiological view.

    PubMed

    Selthofer-Relatić, K; Bošnjak, I

    2015-09-01

    Thoracic fat includes extra-pericardial (outside the visceral pericardium) and intra-pericardial (inside the visceral pericardium) adipose tissue. It is called ectopic adipose tissue although it is a normal anatomical structure. Intra-pericardial adipose tissue, which is predominantly composed of epicardial and pericoronary adipose tissue, has a significant role in cardiovascular system function. It provides metabolic-mechanical support to the heart and blood vessels in physiological conditions, while it represents metabolic-cardiovascular risk in case of qualitative and quantitative structural changes in the tissue: it correlates with coronary atherosclerotic disease, left ventricular mass, left atrium enlargement and atrial fibrillation presence. In the last decade there has been mounting evidence of fat cells presence in the myocardium of healthy (non-diseased) persons as well as in persons with both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. Thus, it is necessary to clarify the incidence, aetiology, physiological role of fat cells in the myocardium, as well as the clinical significance of pathological fatty infiltration of the myocardium.

  10. Cold-Induced Changes in Gene Expression in Brown Adipose Tissue, White Adipose Tissue and Liver

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Andrew M.; Karamitri, Angeliki; Kemp, Paul; Speakman, John R.; Graham, Neil S.; Lomax, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Cold exposure imposes a metabolic challenge to mammals that is met by a coordinated response in different tissues to prevent hypothermia. This study reports a transcriptomic analysis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), white adipose (WAT) and liver of mice in response to 24 h cold exposure at 8°C. Expression of 1895 genes were significantly (P<0.05) up- or down-regulated more than two fold by cold exposure in all tissues but only 5 of these genes were shared by all three tissues, and only 19, 14 and 134 genes were common between WAT and BAT, WAT and liver, and BAT and liver, respectively. We confirmed using qRT-PCR, the increased expression of a number of characteristic BAT genes during cold exposure. In both BAT and the liver, the most common direction of change in gene expression was suppression (496 genes in BAT and 590 genes in liver). Gene ontology analysis revealed for the first time significant (P<0.05) down regulation in response to cold, of genes involved in oxidoreductase activity, lipid metabolic processes and protease inhibitor activity, in both BAT and liver, but not WAT. The results reveal an unexpected importance of down regulation of cytochrome P450 gene expression and apolipoprotein, in both BAT and liver, but not WAT, in response to cold exposure. Pathway analysis suggests a model in which down regulation of the nuclear transcription factors HNF4α and PPARα in both BAT and liver may orchestrate the down regulation of genes involved in lipoprotein and steroid metabolism as well as Phase I enzymes belonging to the cytochrome P450 group in response to cold stress in mice. We propose that the response to cold stress involves decreased gene expression in a range of cellular processes in order to maximise pathways involved in heat production. PMID:23894377

  11. [Interests and potentials of adipose tissue in scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Daumas, A; Eraud, J; Hautier, A; Sabatier, F; Magalon, G; Granel, B

    2013-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a disorder involving the connective tissue, arterioles and microvessels. It is characterized by skin and visceral fibrosis and ischemic phenomena. Currently, therapy is limited and no antifibrotic treatment has proven its efficacy. Beyond some severe organ lesions (pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma renal crisis), which only concern a minority of patients, the skin sclerosis of hands and face and the vasculopathy lead to physical and psychological disability in most patients. Thus, functional improvement of hand motion and face represents a priority for patient therapy. Due to its easy obtention by fat lipopaspirate and adipocytes survival, re injection of adipose tissue is a common therapy used in plastic surgery for its voluming effect. Identification and characterization of the adipose tissue-derived stroma vascular fraction, mainly including mesenchymal stem cells, have revolutionized the science showing that adipose tissue is a valuable source of multipotent stem cells, able to migrate to site of injury and to differentiate according to the receiver tissue's needs. Due to easy harvest by liposuction, its abundance in mesenchymal cells far higher that the bone marrow, and stroma vascular fraction's ability to differentiate and secrete growth angiogenic and antiapoptotic factors, the use of adipose tissue is becoming more attractive in regenerative medicine. We here present the interest of adipose tissue use in the treatment of the hands and face in scleroderma. PMID:24050783

  12. Inflammation and adipose tissue macrophages in lipodystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Laura; Shapiro, Hagit; Nayer, Ali; Lee, Jongsoon; Shoelson, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    Lipodystrophy and obesity are opposites in terms of a deficiency versus excess of adipose tissue mass, yet these conditions are accompanied by similar metabolic consequences, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, and increased risk for diabetes and atherosclerosis. Hepatic and myocellular steatosis likely contribute to metabolic dysregulation in both states. Inflammation and macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue also appear to participate in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced insulin resistance, but their contributions to lipodystrophy-induced insulin resistance have not been evaluated. We used aP2-nSREBP-1c transgenic (Tg) mice, an established model of lipodystrophy, to ask this question. Circulating cytokine elevations suggested systemic inflammation but even more dramatic was the number of infiltrating macrophages in all white and brown adipose tissue depots of the Tg mice; in contrast, there was no evidence of inflammatory infiltrates or responses in any other tissue including liver. Despite there being overt evidence of adipose tissue inflammation, antiinflammatory strategies including salicylate treatment and genetic suppression of myeloid NF-kappaB signaling that correct insulin resistance in obesity were ineffective in the lipodystrophic mice. We further showed that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in lipodystrophy and obesity are very different in terms of activation state, gene expression patterns, and response to lipopolysaccharide. Although ATMs are even more abundant in lipodystrophy than in obesity, they have distinct phenotypes and likely roles in tissue remodeling, but do not appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  13. Inflammation and adipose tissue macrophages in lipodystrophic mice

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Laura; Shapiro, Hagit; Nayer, Ali; Lee, Jongsoon; Shoelson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    Lipodystrophy and obesity are opposites in terms of a deficiency versus excess of adipose tissue mass, yet these conditions are accompanied by similar metabolic consequences, including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, and increased risk for diabetes and atherosclerosis. Hepatic and myocellular steatosis likely contribute to metabolic dysregulation in both states. Inflammation and macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue also appear to participate in the pathogenesis of obesity-induced insulin resistance, but their contributions to lipodystrophy-induced insulin resistance have not been evaluated. We used aP2-nSREBP-1c transgenic (Tg) mice, an established model of lipodystrophy, to ask this question. Circulating cytokine elevations suggested systemic inflammation but even more dramatic was the number of infiltrating macrophages in all white and brown adipose tissue depots of the Tg mice; in contrast, there was no evidence of inflammatory infiltrates or responses in any other tissue including liver. Despite there being overt evidence of adipose tissue inflammation, antiinflammatory strategies including salicylate treatment and genetic suppression of myeloid NF-κB signaling that correct insulin resistance in obesity were ineffective in the lipodystrophic mice. We further showed that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in lipodystrophy and obesity are very different in terms of activation state, gene expression patterns, and response to lipopolysaccharide. Although ATMs are even more abundant in lipodystrophy than in obesity, they have distinct phenotypes and likely roles in tissue remodeling, but do not appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. PMID:20007767

  14. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M.; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pool that also gives rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes, among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here, we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions, and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption, and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high-fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone – a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk – mice demonstrate a fivefold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise

  15. Exercise Regulation of Marrow Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) pool that also gives rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes, among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here, we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions, and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption, and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent work, osmium-based 3D quantification shows a robust response of MAT to both dietary and exercise intervention in that MAT is elevated in response to high-fat diet and can be suppressed following daily exercise. Exercise-induced bone formation correlates with suppression of MAT, such that exercise effects might be due to either calorie expenditure from this depot or from mechanical biasing of MSC lineage away from fat and toward bone, or a combination thereof. Following treatment with the anti-diabetes drug rosiglitazone - a PPARγ-agonist known to increase MAT and fracture risk - mice demonstrate a fivefold higher femur MAT volume compared to the controls. In addition to preventing MAT accumulation in control mice, exercise intervention significantly lowers MAT accumulation in rosiglitazone-treated mice. Importantly, exercise induction of trabecular bone volume is unhindered by rosiglitazone. Thus, despite rosiglitazone augmentation of MAT, exercise significantly

  16. Zilpaterol hydrochloride alters abundance of β-adrenergic receptors in bovine muscle cells but has little effect on de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in bovine subcutaneous adipose tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Miller, E K; Chung, K Y; Hutcheson, J P; Yates, D A; Smith, S B; Johnson, B J

    2012-04-01

    We predicted that zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH), a β-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist, would depress mRNA and protein abundance of β-AR in bovine satellite cells. We also predicted that ZH would decrease total lipid synthesis in bovine adipose tissue. Bovine satellite cells isolated from the semimembranosus muscle were plated on tissue culture plates coated with reduced growth factor matrigel or collagen. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to measure specific gene expression after 48 h of ZH exposure in proliferating satellite cells and fused myoblasts. There was no effect of ZH dose on [(3)H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in proliferating myoblasts. Zilpaterol hydrochloride at 1 µM decreased (P < 0.05) β1-AR mRNA, and 0.01 and 1 µM ZH decreased (P < 0.05) β2-AR and β3-AR mRNA in myoblasts. The expression of IGF-I mRNA tended to increase (P = 0.07) with 1 µM ZH. There was no effect (P > 0.10) of ZH on the β-AR or IGF-I gene expression in fused myotube cultures at 192 h or on fusion percentage. The β2-AR antagonist ICI-118, 551 at 0.1 µM attenuated (P < 0.05) the effect of 0.1 µM ZH to reduce expression of β1- and β2-AR mRNA. The combination of 0.01 µM ZH and 0.1 µM ICI-118, 551 caused an increase (P < 0.05) in β1-AR gene expression. There was no effect (P > 0.10) of ICI-118, 551 or ZH on β3-AR or IGF-I. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein content of β2-AR in ZH-treated myotube cultures decreased (P < 0.05) relative to control. Total lipid synthesis from acetate was increased by ZH in bovine subcutaneous adipose tissue explants in the absence of theophylline but was decreased by ZH when theophylline was included in the incubation medium. These data indicate that ZH alters mRNA and protein concentrations of β-AR in satellite cell cultures, which in turn could affect responsiveness of cells to prolonged ZH exposure in vivo. Similar to other β-adrenergic agonists, ZH had only modest effects on lipid metabolism in adipose tissue

  17. White Adipose Tissue Resilience to Insulin Deprivation and Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Hadji, Lilas; Berger, Emmanuelle; Soula, Hédi; Vidal, Hubert; Géloën, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipocyte size and body fat distribution are strongly linked to the metabolic complications of obesity. The aim of the present study was to test the plasticity of white adipose tissue in response to insulin deprivation and replacement. We have characterized the changes of adipose cell size repartition and gene expressions in type 1 diabetes Sprague-Dawley rats and type 1 diabetic supplemented with insulin. Methods Using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, we induced rapid changes in rat adipose tissue weights to study the changes in the distribution of adipose cell sizes in retroperitoneal (rWAT), epididymal (eWAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissues (scWAT). Adipose tissue weights of type 1 diabetic rats were then rapidly restored by insulin supplementation. Cell size distributions were analyzed using multisizer IV (Beckman Coulter). Cell size changes were correlated to transcriptional regulation of genes coding for proteins involved in lipid and glucose metabolisms and adipocytokines. Results The initial body weight of the rats was 465±5.2 g. Insulin privation was stopped when rats lost 100 g which induced reductions in fat mass of 68% for rWAT, 42% for eWAT and 59% for scWAT corresponding to decreased mode cell diameters by 31.1%, 20%, 25.3%, respectively. The most affected size distribution by insulin deprivation was observed in rWAT. The bimodal distribution of adipose cell sizes disappeared in response to insulin deprivation in rWAT and scWAT. The most important observation is that cell size distribution returned close to control values in response to insulin treatment. mRNAs coding for adiponectin, leptin and apelin were more stimulated in scWAT compared to other depots in diabetic plus insulin group. Conclusion Fat depots have specific responses to insulin deprivation and supplementation. The results show that insulin is a major determinant of bimodal cell repartition in adipose tissues. PMID:25170835

  18. An in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the relationship between diet and adipose tissue composition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Frost, G; Barnard, M L; Bryant, D J; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Simbrunner, J; Coutts, G A; Burl, M; Bloom, S R; Sales, K D; Bell, J D

    1996-02-01

    13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a noninvasive technique used in the study of lipids. We applied 13C MRS to assess the effects of long-term dietary variation on adipose tissue composition in humans. In vivo 13C MRS was used to analyze the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue in 88 healthy volunteers with significantly different diets (38 vegans, 11 vegetarians, and 39 omnivores) assessed by analysis of dietary records. Results were compared with the serum lipid profile. 13C MRS revealed clear differences in the adipose tissue composition of vegans, which contained more unsaturated (P < 0.01) and fewer saturated fatty acids (P < 0.01) compared with omnivores and vegetarians. The vegan subjects had a significantly lower intake of saturated fatty acids and higher intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids than either the omnivore or the vegetarian groups (P < 0.01). These findings were associated with significantly lower levels of serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the vegan group compared with the omnivores. Our results demonstrate the use of 13C MRS for the noninvasive study of adipose tissue composition and its application to the study of the interaction between long-term dietary and metabolic risk factors in humans. PMID:8835401

  19. An in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the relationship between diet and adipose tissue composition.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Frost, G; Barnard, M L; Bryant, D J; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Simbrunner, J; Coutts, G A; Burl, M; Bloom, S R; Sales, K D; Bell, J D

    1996-02-01

    13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a noninvasive technique used in the study of lipids. We applied 13C MRS to assess the effects of long-term dietary variation on adipose tissue composition in humans. In vivo 13C MRS was used to analyze the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue in 88 healthy volunteers with significantly different diets (38 vegans, 11 vegetarians, and 39 omnivores) assessed by analysis of dietary records. Results were compared with the serum lipid profile. 13C MRS revealed clear differences in the adipose tissue composition of vegans, which contained more unsaturated (P < 0.01) and fewer saturated fatty acids (P < 0.01) compared with omnivores and vegetarians. The vegan subjects had a significantly lower intake of saturated fatty acids and higher intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids than either the omnivore or the vegetarian groups (P < 0.01). These findings were associated with significantly lower levels of serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the vegan group compared with the omnivores. Our results demonstrate the use of 13C MRS for the noninvasive study of adipose tissue composition and its application to the study of the interaction between long-term dietary and metabolic risk factors in humans.

  20. Continuous low-dose infusion of tumor necrosis factor alpha in adipose tissue elevates adipose tissue interleukin 10 abundance and fails to alter metabolism in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Martel, Cynthia A; Mamedova, Laman K; Minton, J Ernest; Jones, Meredyth L; Carroll, Jeff A; Bradford, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    Repeated bolus doses of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) alters systemic metabolism in lactating cows, but whether chronic release of inflammatory cytokines from adipose tissue has similar effects is unclear. Late-lactation Holstein cows (n=9-10/treatment) were used to evaluate the effects of continuous adipose tissue TNFα administration on glucose and fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Cows were blocked by feed intake and milk yield and randomly assigned within block to control or TNFα treatments. Treatments (4mL of saline or 14µg/kg of TNFα in 4mL of saline) were infused continuously over 7d via 2 osmotic pumps implanted in a subcutaneous adipose depot. Plasma, milk samples, milk yield, and feed intake data were collected daily, and plasma glucose turnover rate was measured on d 7. At the end of d 7, pumps were removed and liver and contralateral tail-head adipose biopsies were collected. Results were modeled with the fixed effect of treatment and the random effect of block. Treatment with TNFα increased plasma concentrations of the acute phase protein haptoglobin, but did not alter plasma TNFα, IL-4, IL-6, or IFN-γ concentrations, feed intake, or rectal temperature. Milk yield and composition were unchanged, and treatments did not alter the proportion of short- versus long-chain FA in milk on d 7. Treatments did not alter plasma free FA concentration, liver triglyceride content, or plasma glucose turnover rate. Surprisingly, TNFα infusion tended to decrease liver TNFα and IL-1 receptor 1 mRNA abundance and significantly increased adipose tissue IL-10 protein concentration. Continuous infusion of TNFα did not induce the metabolic responses previously observed following bolus doses delivered at the same rate per day. Metabolic homeostasis may have been protected by an adaptive anti-inflammatory response to control systemic inflammation.

  1. Studies of human adipose tissue. Adipose cell size and number in nonobese and obese patients.

    PubMed

    Salans, L B; Cushman, S W; Weismann, R E

    1973-04-01

    The cellular character of the adipose tissue of 21 nonobese and 78 obese patients has been examined. Adipose cell size (lipid per cell) was determined in three different subcutaneous and deep fat depots in each patient and the total number of adipose cells in the body estimated by division of total body fat by various combinations of the adipose cell sizes at six different sites. Cell number has also been estimated on the basis of various assumed distribution of total fat between the subcutaneous and deep fat depots. Obese patients, as a group, have larger adipose cells than do nonobese patients; cell size, however, varies considerably among the fat depots of individuals of either group. The variation in cell size exists not only between, but also within subcutaneous and deep sites. Estimates of total adipose cell number for a given individual based upon cell size can, therefore, vary by as much as 85%. On the basis of these studies it is suggested that the total adipose number of an individual is best and most practically estimated, at this time, by division of total body fat by the mean of the adipose cell sizes of at least three subcutaneous sites. IRRESPECTIVE OF THE METHOD BY WHICH TOTAL ADIPOSE CELL NUMBER IS ESTIMATED, TWO PATTERNS OF OBESITY EMERGE WITH RESPECT TO THE CELLULAR CHARACTER OF THE ADIPOSE TISSUE MASS OF THESE PATIENTS: hyperplastic, with increased adipose cell number and normal or increased size, and hypertrophic, with increased cell size alone. These two cellular patterns of obesity are independent of a variety of assumed distributions of fat among the subcutaneous and deep depots. When these different cellular patterns are examined in terms of various aspects of body size, body composition, and the degree, duration, and age of onset of obesity, only the latter uniquely distinguishes the hyperplastic from the hypertrophic: hyperplastic obesity is characterized by an early age of onset, hypertrophic, by a late age of onset. These studies

  2. Enzymatic intracrine regulation of white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    DiSilvestro, David; Petrosino, Jennifer; Aldoori, Ayat; Melgar-Bermudez, Emiliano; Wells, Alexandra; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal fat formation has become a permanent risk factor for metabolic syndrome and various cancers in one-third of the world's population of obese and even lean patients. Formation of abdominal fat involves additional mechanisms beyond an imbalance in energy intake and expenditure, which explains systemic obesity. In this review, we briefly summarized autonomous regulatory circuits that locally produce hormones from inactive precursors or nutrients for intra-/auto-/paracrine signaling in white adipose depots. Enzymatic pathways activating steroid and thyroid hormones in adipose depots were compared with enzymatic production of retinoic acid from vitamin A. We discussed the role of intracrine circuits in fat-depot functions and strategies to reduce abdominal adiposity through thermogenic adipocytes with interrupted generation of retinoic acid. PMID:25390015

  3. Nutrition-/diet-induced changes in gene expression in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, Hadi; Joost, Hans-Georg

    2005-12-01

    Nutrients regulate metabolic fluxes and homeostasis through transcriptional and translational control of enzyme concentrations and allosteric modulation of enzyme activity. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been shown to exert a variety of beneficial health effects such as reducing adiposity and increasing insulin sensitivity in rodents. It is now clear that PUFAs regulate fundamental adipose cell and liver functions through modulation of activity and abundance of key transcription factors that act as nutrient sensors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARalpha/delta/gamma), sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP-1/2), and liver X receptors (LXRalpha/beta). However, in the state of obesity, where adipose tissue shows elevated storage of triglycerides, many lipogenic genes that are essential for adipose cell function including PPARgamma, SREBP-1c, CCAAT-enhancer binding protein alpha and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 are downregulated, apparently due to desensitization of the very same crucial nutrient sensors. This chapter will summarize recent studies of PUFA- and obesity-induced changes in gene expression in white adipose tissue.

  4. Adipose Tissue Residing Progenitors (Adipocyte Lineage Progenitors and Adipose Derived Stem Cells (ADSC)

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Ryan; Rodeheffer, Matthew S.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Horowitz, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of brown, white and beige adipocytes have been a subject of intense scientific interest in recent years due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States and around the world. This interest has led to the identification and characterization of specific tissue resident progenitor cells that give rise to each adipocyte population in vivo. However, much still remains to be discovered about each progenitor population in terms of their “niche” within each tissue and how they are regulated at the cellular and molecular level during healthy and diseased states. While our knowledge of brown, white and beige adipose tissue is rapidly increasing, little is still known about marrow adipose tissue and its progenitor despite recent studies demonstrating possible roles for marrow adipose tissue in regulating the hematopoietic space and systemic metabolism at large. This chapter focuses on our current knowledge of brown, white, beige and marrow adipose tissue with a specific focus on the formation of each tissue from tissue resident progenitor cells. PMID:26526875

  5. Lipid signaling in adipose tissue: Connecting inflammation & metabolism.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Mojgan; Kuda, Ondrej; Rossmeisl, Martin; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Obesity-associated low-grade inflammation of white adipose tissue (WAT) contributes to development of insulin resistance and other disorders. Accumulation of immune cells, especially macrophages, and macrophage polarization from M2 to M1 state, affect intrinsic WAT signaling, namely anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines, fatty acids (FA), and lipid mediators derived from both n-6 and n-3 long-chain PUFA such as (i) arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and endocannabinoids, and (ii) specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators including resolvins derived from both eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), lipoxins (AA metabolites), protectins and maresins (DHA metabolites). In this respect, potential differences in modulating adipocyte metabolism by various lipid mediators formed by inflammatory M1 macrophages typical of obese state, and non-inflammatory M2 macrophages typical of lean state remain to be established. Studies in mice suggest that (i) transient accumulation of M2 macrophages could be essential for the control of tissue FA levels during activation of lipolysis, (ii) currently unidentified M2 macrophage-borne signaling molecule(s) could inhibit lipolysis and re-esterification of lipolyzed FA back to triacylglycerols (TAG/FA cycle), and (iii) the egress of M2 macrophages from rebuilt WAT and removal of the negative feedback regulation could allow for a full unmasking of metabolic activities of adipocytes. Thus, M2 macrophages could support remodeling of WAT to a tissue containing metabolically flexible adipocytes endowed with a high capacity of both TAG/FA cycling and oxidative phosphorylation. This situation could be exemplified by a combined intervention using mild calorie restriction and dietary supplementation with EPA/DHA, which enhances the formation of "healthy" adipocytes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance." PMID:25311170

  6. Resistin induces lipolysis and suppresses adiponectin secretion in cultured human visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Neng; Zhou, Lingmei; Zhang, Zixiang; Xu, Jiaying; Wan, Zhongxiao; Qin, Liqiang

    2014-11-01

    Resistin is an adipokine secreted from adipose tissue, which is likely involved in the development of obesity and insulin resistance via its interaction with other organs, as well as affecting adipose tissue function. The impact of resistin treatment on lipolysis and adiponectin secretion in human visceral adipose tissue is currently unknown. Mesenteric adipose tissue samples were obtained from 14 male subjects [age 54±6 yr, body mass index (BMI) 23.59±0.44 kg/m(2)] undergoing abdominal surgeries. Adipose tissues were cultured and treated with resistin (100 ng/mL, 24h) in the absence or presence of different signaling inhibitors: H89 (1 μM), PD98059 (25 μM) and SB201290 (20 μM) for glycerol and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) measurement. Adiponectin level from media at 24 h was also measured via ELISA. Adipose tissue minces after resistin incubation (100 ng/mL, 24 h) were also collected for further Western blotting analysis. Resistin resulted in significant induction of glycerol (3.62±0.57 vs. 5.30±1.11 mmol/L/g tissue, p<0.05) and NEFA (5.99±1.06 vs. 8.48±1.57 mmol/L/g tissue, p<0.05) release at 24 h. H89 and PD98059 partially inhibited resistin induced glycerol and NEFA release, while SB201290 has no such effect. Resistin induced the phosphorylation of p-HSL at serine 563, PKA at ~62 kDa and ERK1/2 as measured by Western blotting. Resistin led to significant reduction of the secretion of adiponectin (38.16±10.43 vs. 21.81±4.21 ng/mL/g tissue, p<0.05). Our current findings implicate that resistin might play a significant role in obesity related pathologies in various tissues via its effect on adipose tissue function.

  7. Comparative evaluation of rumen-protected fat, coconut oil and various oilseeds supplemented to fattening bulls. 2. Effects on composition and oxidative stability of adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Casutt, M M; Scheeder, M R; Ossowski, D A; Sutter, F; Sliwinski, B J; Danilo, A A; Kreuzer, M

    2000-01-01

    The effects of five different dietary fat supplements on fatty acid composition and oxidative stability of subcutaneous and kidney fat were evaluated in 36 Brown Swiss bulls and compared to a low fat diet in a monofactorial design. The following fat supplements were provided as additional fat at 30 g per kg feed dry matter: crystalline rumen-protected fat, coconut oil, and three types of crushed whole oilseeds (rapeseed, sunflower seed and linseed). Adipose tissues reflected differences (P < 0.05) in dietary fatty acid composition although to a lower extent. Using protected fat, which contained elevated levels of trans fatty acids, and sunflower seed, containing a high proportion of linoleic acid, significantly increased C18:1 trans fatty acid proportion in the adipose tissues. The use of sunflower seed increased conjugated linoleic acid. The oilseeds resulted in lower amounts of C16:0 in favour of C18:0. Except for linseed, all fat supplemented groups improved oxidative stability of adipose tissues as compared with control. This was explained by lower proportions of unsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissue (protected fat), by elevated alpha-tocopherol contents (rapeseed, sunflower seed) or by a combination of both (coconut oil). Fat colour remained unaffected by treatments. Compared to other fat supplements oilseeds, especially sunflower seed and rapeseed, can therefore be recommended to be fed to bulls in order to increase the proportions of C18 unsaturated fatty acids in adipose tissues and to maintain or improve oxidative stability.

  8. Characteristic expression of extracellular matrix in subcutaneous adipose tissue development and adipogenesis; comparison with visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinobu; Kiuchi, Satomi; Ouchi, Atsushi; Hase, Tadashi; Murase, Takatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a connective tissue specified for energy metabolism and endocrines, but functional differences between subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) have not been fully elucidated. To reveal the physiological role of SAT, we characterized in vivo tissue development and in vitro adipocyte differentiation. In a DNA microarray analysis of SAT and VAT in Wistar rats, functional annotation clusters of extracellular matrix (ECM)-related genes were found in SAT, and major ECM molecules expressed in adipose tissues were profiled. In a histological analysis and quantitative expression analysis, ECM expression patterns could be classified into two types: (i) a histogenesis-correlated type such as type IV and XV collagen, and laminin subunits, (ii) a high-SAT expression type such as type I, III, and V collagen and minor characteristic collagens. Type (i) was related to basal membrane and up-regulated in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells and in histogenesis at depot-specific timings. In contrast, type (ii) was related to fibrous forming and highly expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Exceptionally, fibronectin was abundant in developed adipose tissue, although it was highly expressed in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The present study showed that adipose tissues site-specifically regulate molecular type and timing of ECM expression, and suggests that these characteristic ECM molecules provide a critical microenvironment, which may affect bioactivity of adipocyte itself and interacts with other tissues. It must be important to consider the depot-specific property for the treatment of obesity-related disorders, dermal dysfunction and for the tissue regeneration.

  9. Adipose tissue-liver axis in alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Dou, Xiao-Bing; Zhou, Zhan-Xiang; Song, Zhen-Yuan

    2016-02-15

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains an important health problem worldwide. The disease spectrum is featured by early steatosis, steatohepatitis (steatosis with inflammatory cells infiltration and necrosis), with some individuals ultimately progressing to fibrosis/cirrhosis. Although the disease progression is well characterized, no effective therapies are currently available for the treatment in humans. The mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of ALD are multifactorial and complex. Emerging evidence supports that adipose tissue dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of ALD. In the first part of this review, we discuss the mechanisms whereby chronic alcohol exposure contributed to adipose tissue dysfunction, including cell death, inflammation and insulin resistance. It has been long known that aberrant hepatic methionine metabolism is a major metabolic abnormality induced by chronic alcohol exposure and plays an etiological role in the pathogenesis of ALD. The recent studies in our group documented the similar metabolic effect of chronic alcohol drinking on methionine in adipose tissue. In the second part of this review, we also briefly discuss the recent research progress in the field with a focus on how abnormal methionine metabolism in adipose tissue contributes to adipose tissue dysfunction and liver damage. PMID:26909225

  10. A stringent validation of mouse adipose tissue identity markers.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Jasper M A; Larsson, Ola; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2015-06-15

    The nature of brown adipose tissue in humans is presently debated: whether it is classical brown or of brite/beige nature. The dissimilar developmental origins and proposed distinct functions of the brown and brite/beige tissues make it essential to ascertain the identity of human depots with the perspective of recruiting and activating them for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. For identification of the tissues, a number of marker genes have been proposed, but the validity of the markers has not been well documented. We used established brown (interscapular), brite (inguinal), and white (epididymal) mouse adipose tissues and corresponding primary cell cultures as validators and examined the informative value of a series of suggested markers earlier used in the discussion considering the nature of human brown adipose tissue. Most of these markers unexpectedly turned out to be noninformative concerning tissue classification (Car4, Cited1, Ebf3, Eva1, Fbxo31, Fgf21, Lhx8, Hoxc8, and Hoxc9). Only Zic1 (brown), Cd137, Epsti1, Tbx1, Tmem26 (brite), and Tcf21 (white) proved to be informative in these three tissues. However, the expression of the brite markers was not maintained in cell culture. In a more extensive set of adipose depots, these validated markers provide new information about depot identity. Principal component analysis supported our single-gene conclusions. Furthermore, Zic1, Hoxc8, Hoxc9, and Tcf21 displayed anteroposterior expression patterns, indicating a relationship between anatomic localization and adipose tissue identity (and possibly function). Together, the observed expression patterns of these validated marker genes necessitates reconsideration of adipose depot identity in mice and humans.

  11. ABCD2 identifies a subclass of peroxisomes in mouse adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoxi Liu, Jingjing Lester, Joshua D. Pijut, Sonja S. Graf, Gregory A.

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examined the D2 localization and the proteome of D2-containing compartment in mouse adipose tissue. • We confirmed the presence of D2 on a subcellular compartment that has typical structure as a microperoxisome. • We demonstrated the scarcity of peroxisome markers on D2-containing compartment. • The D2-containing compartment may be a subpopulation of peroxisome in mouse adipose tissue. • Proteomic data suggests potential association between D2-containing compartment and mitochondria and ER. - Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter D2 (D2) is an ABC half transporter that is thought to promote the transport of very long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs into peroxisomes. Both D2 and peroxisomes increase during adipogenesis. Although peroxisomes are essential to both catabolic and anabolic lipid metabolism, their function, and that of D2, in adipose tissues remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the D2 localization and the proteome of D2-containing organelles, in adipose tissue. Centrifugation of mouse adipose homogenates generated a fraction enriched with D2, but deficient in peroxisome markers including catalase, PEX19, and ABCD3 (D3). Electron microscopic imaging of this fraction confirmed the presence of D2 protein on an organelle with a dense matrix and a diameter of ∼200 nm, the typical structure and size of a microperoxisome. D2 and PEX19 antibodies recognized distinct structures in mouse adipose. Immunoisolation of the D2-containing compartment confirmed the scarcity of PEX19 and proteomic profiling revealed the presence of proteins associated with peroxisome, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and mitochondria. D2 is localized to a distinct class of peroxisomes that lack many peroxisome proteins, and may associate physically with mitochondria and the ER.

  12. NPY antagonism reduces adiposity and attenuates age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjoon; Fujishita, Chika; Komatsu, Toshimitsu; Kim, Sang Eun; Chiba, Takuya; Mori, Ryoichi; Shimokawa, Isao

    2014-12-01

    An orexigenic hormone, neuropeptide Y (NPY), plays a role not only in the hypothalamic regulation of appetite, but also in the peripheral regulation of lipid metabolism. However, the intracellular mechanisms triggered by NPY to regulate lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we report that NPY deficiency reduces white adipose tissue (WAT) mass and ameliorates the age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism in mice. Gene expression involved in adipogenesis/lipogenesis was found to decrease, whereas proteins involved in lipolysis increased in gonadal WAT (gWAT) of NPY-knockout mice. These changes were associated with an activated SIRT1- and PPARγ-mediated pathway. Moreover, the age-related decrease of de novo lipogenesis in gWAT and thermogenesis in inguinal WAT was inhibited by NPY deficiency. Further analysis using 3T3-L1 cells showed that NPY inhibited lipolysis through the Y1 receptor and enhanced lipogenesis following a reduction in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and SIRT1 protein expression. Therefore, NPY appears to act as a key regulator of adipose tissue metabolism via the CREB-SIRT1 signaling pathway. Taken together, NPY deficiency reduces adiposity and ameliorates the age-related imbalance of adipose tissue metabolism, suggesting that antagonism of NPY may be a promising target for drug development to prevent age-related metabolic diseases.

  13. Obesity Alters Adipose Tissue Macrophage Iron Content and Tissue Iron Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Jeb S.; Kennedy, Arion; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K.; Webb, Corey D.; Fordahl, Steve C.; Erikson, Keith M.; Zhang, Yaofang; Etzerodt, Anders; Moestrup, Søren K.; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion is accompanied by the infiltration and accumulation of AT macrophages (ATMs), as well as a shift in ATM polarization. Several studies have implicated recruited M1 ATMs in the metabolic consequences of obesity; however, little is known regarding the role of alternatively activated resident M2 ATMs in AT homeostasis or how their function is altered in obesity. Herein, we report the discovery of a population of alternatively activated ATMs with elevated cellular iron content and an iron-recycling gene expression profile. These iron-rich ATMs are referred to as MFehi, and the remaining ATMs are referred to as MFelo. In lean mice, ~25% of the ATMs are MFehi; this percentage decreases in obesity owing to the recruitment of MFelo macrophages. Similar to MFelo cells, MFehi ATMs undergo an inflammatory shift in obesity. In vivo, obesity reduces the iron content of MFehi ATMs and the gene expression of iron importers as well as the iron exporter, ferroportin, suggesting an impaired ability to handle iron. In vitro, exposure of primary peritoneal macrophages to saturated fatty acids also alters iron metabolism gene expression. Finally, the impaired MFehi iron handling coincides with adipocyte iron overload in obese mice. In conclusion, in obesity, iron distribution is altered both at the cellular and tissue levels, with AT playing a predominant role in this change. An increased availability of fatty acids during obesity may contribute to the observed changes in MFehi ATM phenotype and their reduced capacity to handle iron. PMID:24130337

  14. Dietary whole cottonseed depresses lipogenesis but has no effect on stearoyl coenzyme desaturase activity in bovine subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Page, A M; Sturdivant, C A; Lunt, D K; Smith, S B

    1997-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of long-term feeding of whole cottonseed (WCS) on lipogenesis and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase activity in growing steers. Brangus steers were fed either a control, cornbased diet (n = 11) or 30% WCS (n = 12). The 30% WCS contributed an estimated 6.6% additional lipid to the diet. Steers fed the added WCS had greater live weights (P = 0.04) and kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (P = 0.005). Subcutaneous fat thickness was not different (P = 0.20) between treatment groups, although WCS elicited an increase in the proportion of large diameter subcutaneous adipocytes. The rate of [U-14C]acetate incorporation into fatty acids in subcutaneous adipose tissue was reduced by dietary WCS (171.4 vs 122.1 nmol x 100 mg adipose tissue-1 x 2 hr-1, P = 0.03), indicating that the increased dietary fat depressed de novo lipogenesis. Hepatic desaturase activity was much lower than that of subcutaneous adipose tissue, a feature common to cattle. We anticipated that added WCS also would depress stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver due to its cyclopropene fatty acid content. Instead, desaturase activity was numerically (although not significantly) greater in liver (P = 0.37) and adipose tissue (P = 0.23). PMID:9417995

  15. Postpartal subclinical endometritis alters transcriptome profiles in liver and adipose tissue of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Haji; Cardoso, Felipe C; Meier, Susanne; Burke, Christopher; McDougall, Scott; Mitchell, Murray; Walker, Caroline; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Roche, John R; Loor, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome alterations in liver and adipose tissue of cows with subclinical endometritis (SCE) at 29 d postpartum were evaluated. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using the Dynamic Impact Approach by means of KEGG and DAVID databases. Milk production, blood metabolites (non-esterified fatty acids, magnesium), and disease biomarkers (albumin, aspartate aminotransferase) did not differ greatly between healthy and SCE cows. In liver tissue of cows with SCE, alterations in gene expression revealed an activation of complement and coagulation cascade, steroid hormone biosynthesis, apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, MAPK signaling, and the formation of fibrinogen complex. Bioinformatics analysis also revealed an inhibition of vitamin B3 and B6 metabolism with SCE. In adipose, the most activated pathways by SCE were nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, long-chain fatty acid transport, oxidative phosphorylation, inflammation, T cell and B cell receptor signaling, and mTOR signaling. Results indicate that SCE in dairy cattle during early lactation induces molecular alterations in liver and adipose tissue indicative of immune activation and cellular stress. PMID:24578603

  16. Postpartal Subclinical Endometritis Alters Transcriptome Profiles in Liver and Adipose Tissue of Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Haji; Cardoso, Felipe C.; Meier, Susanne; Burke, Christopher; McDougall, Scott; Mitchell, Murray; Walker, Caroline; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.; Everts, Robin E.; Lewin, Harris A.; Roche, John R.; Loor, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome alterations in liver and adipose tissue of cows with subclinical endometritis (SCE) at 29 d postpartum were evaluated. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using the Dynamic Impact Approach by means of KEGG and DAVID databases. Milk production, blood metabolites (non-esterified fatty acids, magnesium), and disease biomarkers (albumin, aspartate aminotransferase) did not differ greatly between healthy and SCE cows. In liver tissue of cows with SCE, alterations in gene expression revealed an activation of complement and coagulation cascade, steroid hormone biosynthesis, apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, MAPK signaling, and the formation of fibrinogen complex. Bioinformatics analysis also revealed an inhibition of vitamin B3 and B6 metabolism with SCE. In adipose, the most activated pathways by SCE were nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, long-chain fatty acid transport, oxidative phosphorylation, inflammation, T cell and B cell receptor signaling, and mTOR signaling. Results indicate that SCE in dairy cattle during early lactation induces molecular alterations in liver and adipose tissue indicative of immune activation and cellular stress. PMID:24578603

  17. Postpartal subclinical endometritis alters transcriptome profiles in liver and adipose tissue of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Haji; Cardoso, Felipe C; Meier, Susanne; Burke, Christopher; McDougall, Scott; Mitchell, Murray; Walker, Caroline; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Roche, John R; Loor, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome alterations in liver and adipose tissue of cows with subclinical endometritis (SCE) at 29 d postpartum were evaluated. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using the Dynamic Impact Approach by means of KEGG and DAVID databases. Milk production, blood metabolites (non-esterified fatty acids, magnesium), and disease biomarkers (albumin, aspartate aminotransferase) did not differ greatly between healthy and SCE cows. In liver tissue of cows with SCE, alterations in gene expression revealed an activation of complement and coagulation cascade, steroid hormone biosynthesis, apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, MAPK signaling, and the formation of fibrinogen complex. Bioinformatics analysis also revealed an inhibition of vitamin B3 and B6 metabolism with SCE. In adipose, the most activated pathways by SCE were nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, long-chain fatty acid transport, oxidative phosphorylation, inflammation, T cell and B cell receptor signaling, and mTOR signaling. Results indicate that SCE in dairy cattle during early lactation induces molecular alterations in liver and adipose tissue indicative of immune activation and cellular stress.

  18. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J.; Grüttner, Cordula; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time.

  19. Epicardial adipose tissue in endocrine and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Gianluca

    2014-05-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue has recently emerged as new risk factor and active player in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Albeit its physiological and pathological roles are not completely understood, a body of evidence indicates that epicardial adipose tissue is a fat depot with peculiar and unique features. Epicardial fat is able to synthesize, produce, and secrete bioactive molecules which are then transported into the adjacent myocardium through vasocrine and/or paracrine pathways. Based on these evidences, epicardial adipose tissue can be considered an endocrine organ. Epicardial fat is also thought to provide direct heating to the myocardium and protect the heart during unfavorable hemodynamic conditions, such as ischemia or hypoxia. Epicardial fat has been suggested to play an independent role in the development and progression of obesity- and diabetes-related cardiac abnormalities. Clinically, the thickness of epicardial fat can be easily and accurately measured. Epicardial fat thickness can serve as marker of visceral adiposity and visceral fat changes during weight loss interventions and treatments with drugs targeting the fat. The potential of modulating the epicardial fat with targeted pharmacological agents can open new avenues in the pharmacotherapy of endocrine and metabolic diseases. This review article will provide Endocrine's reader with a focus on epicardial adipose tissue in endocrinology. Novel, established, but also speculative findings on epicardial fat will be discussed from the unexplored perspective of both clinical and basic Endocrinologist.

  20. An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vernia, Santiago; Edwards, Yvonne Jk; Han, Myoung Sook; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia. PMID:27635635

  1. Recent Advances in Proteomic Studies of Adipose Tissues and Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Won Kon; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Han, Baek Soo; Lee, Sang Chul; Bae, Kwang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that is associated with significantly increased levels of risk of a number of metabolic disorders. Despite these enhanced health risks, the worldwide prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically over the past few decades. Obesity is caused by the accumulation of an abnormal amount of body fat in adipose tissue, which is composed mostly of adipocytes. Thus, a deeper understanding of the regulation mechanism of adipose tissue and/or adipocytes can provide a clue for overcoming obesity-related metabolic diseases. In this review, we describe recent advances in the study of adipose tissue and/or adipocytes, focusing on proteomic approaches. In addition, we suggest future research directions for proteomic studies which may lead to novel treatments of obesity and obesity-related diseases. PMID:25734986

  2. Developmental Programming of Fetal Skeletal Muscle and Adipose Tissue Development

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xu; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Dodson, Michael V.; Du, Min

    2013-01-01

    All important developmental milestones are accomplished during the fetal stage, and nutrient fluctuation during this stage produces lasting effects on offspring health, so called fetal programming or developmental programming. The fetal stage is critical for skeletal muscle development, as well as adipose and connective tissue development. Maternal under-nutrition at this stage affects the proliferation of myogenic precursor cells and reduces the number of muscle fibers formed. Maternal over-nutrition results in impaired myogenesis and elevated adipogenesis. Because myocytes, adipocytes and fibrocytes are all derived from mesenchymal stem cells, molecular events which regulate the commitment of stem cells to different lineages directly impact fetal muscle and adipose tissue development. Recent studies indicate that microRNA is intensively involved in myogenic and adipogenic differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells, and epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation are expected to alter cell lineage commitment during fetal muscle and adipose tissue development. PMID:25031653

  3. Changes in adipose tissue composition in malnourished patients before and after liver transplantation: a carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas-liquid chromatography study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Barnard, M L; Frost, G; Sargentoni, J; Davidson, B R; Cunnane, S C; Bell, J D

    1997-01-01

    We investigated adipose tissue fatty acid composition in 22 moderately to severely malnourished patients with cirrhosis and in 22 healthy volunteers by in vivo carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of adipose tissue samples was also performed in 11 of the patients and in 4 volunteers. In vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectra were obtained from the subcutaneous adipose tissue before and after eight weeks following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Adipose tissue biopsy samples were obtained for GLC analysis at the time of transplantation in the patients and at inguinal hernia repair in the 4 volunteers. No significant differences were found in the subcutaneous adipose tissue total-saturated, -polyunsaturated or -monounsaturated fatty acid composition between patients and healthy volunteers by in vivo 13C MRS. GLC analysis of adipose tissue samples confirmed that total levels of saturated, poly-, and monounsaturated fatty acids remained the same but revealed significant differences in levels of individual fatty acids, particularly n-3 fatty acids (total n-3, cirrhotics: .84% +/- .07% vs. controls: 1.36% +/- .13%, P < .01). Eight weeks following transplantation, recipients showed a considerable increase in body mass (pretransplantation: 59.3 +/- 3.2 vs. posttransplantation: 63.2 +/- 3 kg, P < .01). 13C MRS revealed a significant increase in saturated fatty acids (pretransplantation: 21.6 +/- 2.8 vs. posttransplantation: 25.5% +/- 1.2%, P < .05) and a significant decrease in unsaturated fatty acids. The application of noninvasive MRS techniques may be important to identify the differential uptake of fats, examining both specific fatty acids and different body fat compartments. In the future, this may be useful in optimizing the dietary management of severely malnourished patients with chronic liver disease before liver transplantation. PMID:8985287

  4. Changes in adipose tissue composition in malnourished patients before and after liver transplantation: a carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas-liquid chromatography study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Barnard, M L; Frost, G; Sargentoni, J; Davidson, B R; Cunnane, S C; Bell, J D

    1997-01-01

    We investigated adipose tissue fatty acid composition in 22 moderately to severely malnourished patients with cirrhosis and in 22 healthy volunteers by in vivo carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of adipose tissue samples was also performed in 11 of the patients and in 4 volunteers. In vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectra were obtained from the subcutaneous adipose tissue before and after eight weeks following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Adipose tissue biopsy samples were obtained for GLC analysis at the time of transplantation in the patients and at inguinal hernia repair in the 4 volunteers. No significant differences were found in the subcutaneous adipose tissue total-saturated, -polyunsaturated or -monounsaturated fatty acid composition between patients and healthy volunteers by in vivo 13C MRS. GLC analysis of adipose tissue samples confirmed that total levels of saturated, poly-, and monounsaturated fatty acids remained the same but revealed significant differences in levels of individual fatty acids, particularly n-3 fatty acids (total n-3, cirrhotics: .84% +/- .07% vs. controls: 1.36% +/- .13%, P < .01). Eight weeks following transplantation, recipients showed a considerable increase in body mass (pretransplantation: 59.3 +/- 3.2 vs. posttransplantation: 63.2 +/- 3 kg, P < .01). 13C MRS revealed a significant increase in saturated fatty acids (pretransplantation: 21.6 +/- 2.8 vs. posttransplantation: 25.5% +/- 1.2%, P < .05) and a significant decrease in unsaturated fatty acids. The application of noninvasive MRS techniques may be important to identify the differential uptake of fats, examining both specific fatty acids and different body fat compartments. In the future, this may be useful in optimizing the dietary management of severely malnourished patients with chronic liver disease before liver transplantation.

  5. Adipocyte insulin receptor activity maintains adipose tissue mass and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Max; Hudak, Carolyn S; Warren, Curtis R; Xia, Fang; Cowan, Chad A

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes follows a well-defined progressive pathogenesis, beginning with insulin resistance in metabolic tissues such as the adipose. Intracellular signaling downstream of insulin receptor activation regulates critical metabolic functions of adipose tissue, including glucose uptake, lipogenesis, lipolysis and adipokine secretion. Previous studies have used the aP2 promoter to drive Cre recombinase expression in adipose tissue. Insulin receptor (IR) knockout mice created using this aP2-Cre strategy (FIRKO mice) were protected from obesity and glucose intolerance. Later studies demonstrated the promiscuity of the aP2 promoter, casting doubts upon the tissue specificity of aP2-Cre models. It is our goal to use the increased precision of the Adipoq promoter to investigate adipocyte-specific IR function. Towards this end we generated an adipocyte-specific IR knockout (AIRKO) mouse using an Adipoq-driven Cre recombinase. Here we report AIRKO mice are less insulin sensitive throughout life, and less glucose tolerant than wild-type (WT) littermates at the age of 16 weeks. In contrast to WT littermates, the insulin sensitivity of AIRKO mice is unaffected by age or dietary regimen. At any age, AIRKO mice are comparably insulin resistant to old or obese WT mice and have a significantly reduced lifespan. Similar results were obtained when these phenotypes were re-examined in FIRKO mice. We also found that the AIRKO mouse is protected from high-fat diet-induced weight gain, corresponding with a 90% reduction in tissue weight of major adipose depots compared to WT littermates. Adipose tissue mass reduction is accompanied by hepatomegaly and increased hepatic steatosis. These data indicate that adipocyte IR function is crucial to systemic energy metabolism and has profound effects on adiposity, hepatic homeostasis and lifespan. PMID:27246738

  6. Developmental regulation of adipose tissue growth through hyperplasia and hypertrophy in the embryonic Leghorn and broiler.

    PubMed

    Chen, Paula; Suh, Yeunsu; Choi, Young Min; Shin, Sangsu; Lee, Kichoon

    2014-07-01

    The United States is a world leader in poultry production, which is the reason why achieving better performance and muscle growth each year is a necessity. Reducing accretion of adipose tissue is another important factor for poultry producers because this allows more nutrients to be directed toward muscle growth, but the effect of embryonic adipose growth on posthatch development has not been fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the total DNA mass, morphological characteristics, differentiation markers, and triglyceride breakdown factors of embryonic adipose tissue, and their relation to hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth within layers (Leghorn) and meat-type chickens (broilers). After embryonic day (E) 12, broiler weight was significantly higher than Leghorn, and this trend continued throughout the rest of incubation and posthatch (P < 0.05). Neck and leg fat pad weights between the 2 breeds did not differ at most of the time points. A remarkable increase in total DNA mass was observed between E12 and E14 in both Leghorn and broilers (P < 0.05), indicating a high potential for hyperplastic growth during this time. Histological analysis revealed clusters of preadipocytes at E12; however, the majority of these cells differentiated by E14 and continued to grow until the time of hatch. The adipocyte sizes between both breeds did not generally differ, even though broilers are known to have larger adipocytes posthatch. Fatty acid-binding protein 4 expression levels in Leghorn and broilers continued to rise with each time point, which paralleled the expansion of mature adipocytes. Adipose triglyceride lipase was highly expressed at E20 and d 1 posthatch to mobilize triglyceride degradation for energy during hatching. Thus, embryonic chicken adipose tissue was found to develop by hyperplastic mechanisms followed by hypertrophy. At embryonic stages and early posthatch, layer- and meat-type chicken adipose growth does not differ, which suggests

  7. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue are activated in lean mice.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Taisuke; Toyoshima, Yujiro; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues are closely connected with the immune system. It has been suggested that metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes, arteriosclerosis and liver steatosis can be attributed to adipose tissue inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration. To understand a physiological and pathological role of natural killer T (NKT) cells on inflammation in adipose tissue, we characterized a subset of NKT cells in abdominal and subcutaneous adipose tissues in C57BL/6J mice fed normal or high-fat diets. NKT cells comprised a larger portion of lymphocytes in adipose tissues compared with the spleen and peripheral blood, with epididymal adipose tissue having the highest number of NKT cells. Furthermore, some NKT cells in adipose tissues expressed higher levels of CD69 and intracellular interferon-γ, whereas the Vβ repertoires of NKT cells in adipose tissues were similar to other cells. In obese mice fed a high-fat diet, adipose tissue inflammation had little effect on the Vβ repertoire of NKT cells in epididymal adipose tissues. We speculate that the NKT cells in adipose tissues may form an equivalent subset in other tissues and that these subsets are likely to participate in adipose tissue inflammation. Additionally, the high expression level of CD69 and intracellular IFN-γ raises the possibility that NKT cells in adipose tissue may be stimulated by some physiological mechanism.

  8. The browning of white adipose tissue: some burning issues.

    PubMed

    Nedergaard, Jan; Cannon, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Igniting thermogenesis within white adipose tissue (i.e., promoting expression and activity of the uncoupling protein UCP1) has attracted much interest. Numerous "browning agents" have now been described (gene ablations, transgenes, food components, drugs, environments, etc.). The implied action of browning agents is that they increase UCP1 through this heat production, leading to slimming. Here, we particularly point to the possibility that cause and effect may on occasion be the reverse: browning agents may disrupt, for example, the fur, leading to increased heat loss, increased thermogenic demand to counteract this heat loss, and thus, through sympathetic nervous system activation, to enhanced UCP1 expression in white (and brown) adipose tissues.

  9. Developmental Programming: Impact of Prenatal Testosterone Excess on Insulin Sensitivity, Adiposity, and Free Fatty Acid Profile in Postpubertal Female Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Lopez, A.; Moeller, J.; Patel, D.; Ye, W.; Pease, A.; Kinns, J.

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal T excess causes reproductive and metabolic disruptions including insulin resistance, attributes of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. This study tested whether increases in visceral adiposity, adipocyte size, and total free fatty acids underlie the insulin resistance seen in prenatal T-treated female sheep. At approximately 16 months of age, insulin resistance and adipose tissue partitioning were determined via hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and computed tomography, respectively, in control and prenatal T-treated females. Three months later, adipocyte size and free fatty acid composition were determined. Results revealed that at the postpubertal time points tested, insulin sensitivity was increased, visceral adiposity and adipocyte size in both the sc and the visceral compartments were reduced, and circulating palmitic acid was increased in prenatal T-treated females relative to controls. In parallel studies, 20-month-old prenatal T-treated females tended to have increased basal insulin to glucose ratio. Relative to earlier findings of reduced insulin sensitivity of prenatal T-treated females during early life and adulthood, these findings of increased insulin sensitivity and reduced adiposity postpubertally are suggestive of a period of developmental adaptation. The disruption observed in free fatty acid metabolism a few months later correspond to a time point when the insulin sensitivity indices of prenatal T-treated animals appear to shift toward insulin resistance. In summary, current findings of improved insulin sensitivity and reduced visceral adiposity in postpubertal prenatal T-treated sheep relative to our earlier findings of reduced insulin sensitivity during early postnatal life and adulthood are indicative of a period of developmental adaptation. PMID:23525243

  10. Transplantation of human adipose tissue to nude mice.

    PubMed

    Bach-Mortensen, N; Romert, P; Ballegaard, S

    1976-08-01

    Human adipose tissue was transplanted to the mouse mutant nude (nu/nu). All the grafts were accepted and contained fat cells easily distinguishable from those of the mouse. No detectable relation between the histological pictures before and after grafting was found. In some transplants nerve tissue, and in others macrophages containing fat droplets, were found. The fat tissue graft might be useful for investigation of the influence of various hormones on human fat cells.

  11. Vitamin D and adipose tissue-more than storage.

    PubMed

    Mutt, Shivaprakash J; Hyppönen, Elina; Saarnio, Juha; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Herzig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The pandemic increase in obesity is inversely associated with vitamin D levels. While a higher BMI was causally related to lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), no evidence was obtained for a BMI lowering effect by higher 25(OH)D. Some of the physiological functions of 1,25(OH)2D3 (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or calcitriol) via its receptor within the adipose tissue have been investigated such as its effect on energy balance, adipogenesis, adipokine, and cytokine secretion. Adipose tissue inflammation has been recognized as the key component of metabolic disorders, e.g., in the metabolic syndrome. The adipose organ secretes more than 260 different proteins/peptides. However, the molecular basis of the interactions of 1,25(OH)2D3, vitamin D binding proteins (VDBPs) and nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR) after sequestration in adipose tissue and their regulations are still unclear. 1,25(OH)2D3 and its inactive metabolites are known to inhibit the formation of adipocytes in mouse 3T3-L1 cell line. In humans, 1,25(OH)2D3 promotes preadipocyte differentiation under cell culture conditions. Further evidence of its important functions is given by VDR knock out (VDR(-/-)) and CYP27B1 knock out (CYP27B1 (-/-)) mouse models: Both VDR(-/-) and CYP27B1(-/-) models are highly resistant to the diet induced weight gain, while the specific overexpression of human VDR in adipose tissue leads to increased adipose tissue mass. The analysis of microarray datasets from human adipocytes treated with macrophage-secreted products up-regulated VDR and CYP27B1 genes indicating the capacity of adipocytes to even produce active 1,25(OH)2D3. Experimental studies demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2D3 has an active role in adipose tissue by modulating inflammation, adipogenesis and adipocyte secretion. Yet, further in vivo studies are needed to address the effects and the effective dosages of vitamin D in human adipose tissue and its relevance in the associated diseases. PMID:25009502

  12. Differential modulation of the functionality of white adipose tissue of obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats by the type of protein and the amount and type of fat.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Granados, Omar; González-Palacios, Berenice; Tovar-Palacio, Claudia; Torre-Villalvazo, Ivan; Olivares-García, Verónica; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidence indicates that several metabolic abnormalities developed during obesity are associated with the presence of dysfunctional adipose tissue. Diet is a key factor that modulates several functions of adipose tissue; however, each nutrient in the diet produces specific changes. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the effect of the interaction of the type (coconut or soybean oil) and amount (5% or 10%) of fat with the type of dietary protein (casein or soy protein) on the functionality of white adipose tissue of Zucker (fa/fa) rats. The results showed that soybean oil reduced adipocyte size and decreased esterified saturated fatty acids in white adipose tissue. Excess dietary fat also modified the composition of esterified fatty acids in white adipose tissue, increased the secretion of saturated fatty acids to serum from white adipose tissue and reduced the process of fatty acids re-esterification. On the other hand, soy protein sensitized the activation of the hormone-sensitive lipase by increasing the phosphorylation of this enzyme (Ser 563) despite rats fed soy protein were normoglucagonemic, in contrast with rats fed casein that showed hyperglucagonemia but reduced hormone-sensitive lipase phosphorylation. Finally, in white adipose tissue, the interaction between the tested dietary components modulated the transcription/translation process of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism genes via the activity of the PERK-endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, our results showed that the type of protein and the type and amount of dietary fat selectively modify the activity of white adipose tissue, even in a genetic model of obesity.

  13. Leukemic Stem Cells Evade Chemotherapy by Metabolic Adaptation to an Adipose Tissue Niche.

    PubMed

    Ye, Haobin; Adane, Biniam; Khan, Nabilah; Sullivan, Timothy; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Gasparetto, Maura; Stevens, Brett; Pei, Shanshan; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Klemm, Dwight J; Woolthuis, Carolien M; Stranahan, Alec W; Park, Christopher Y; Jordan, Craig T

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) has previously been identified as an extra-medullary reservoir for normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and may promote tumor development. Here, we show that a subpopulation of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) can utilize gonadal adipose tissue (GAT) as a niche to support their metabolism and evade chemotherapy. In a mouse model of blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adipose-resident LSCs exhibit a pro-inflammatory phenotype and induce lipolysis in GAT. GAT lipolysis fuels fatty acid oxidation in LSCs, especially within a subpopulation expressing the fatty acid transporter CD36. CD36(+) LSCs have unique metabolic properties, are strikingly enriched in AT, and are protected from chemotherapy by the GAT microenvironment. CD36 also marks a fraction of human blast crisis CML and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells with similar biological properties. These findings suggest striking interplay between leukemic cells and AT to create a unique microenvironment that supports the metabolic demands and survival of a distinct LSC subpopulation. PMID:27374788

  14. Myocardial regeneration potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xiaowen; Alt, Eckhard

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving tremendous attention from basic scientists and clinicians and hold great promise for myocardial regeneration. {yields} For practical reasons, human adipose tissue-derived stem cells are attractive stem cells for future clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium. {yields} This review summarizes the characteristics of cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential and the, underlying mechanisms, and safety issues. -- Abstract: Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving attention from basic scientists and clinicians as they hold promise for myocardial regeneration. For practical reasons, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium based on the following advantages: abundant adipose tissue in most patients and easy accessibility with minimally invasive lipoaspiration procedure. Several recent studies have demonstrated that both cultured and freshly isolated ASCs could improve cardiac function in animal model of myocardial infarction. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of ASCs on myocardial regeneration are not fully understood. Growing evidence indicates that transplantation of ASCs improve cardiac function via the differentiation into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and through paracrine pathways. Paracrine factors secreted by injected ASCs enhance angiogenesis, reduce cell apoptosis rates, and promote neuron sprouts in damaged myocardium. In addition, Injection of ASCs increases electrical stability of the injured heart. Furthermore, there are no reported cases of arrhythmia or tumorigenesis in any studies regarding myocardial regeneration with ASCs. This review summarizes the characteristics of both cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential, and the

  15. Simple and longstanding adipose tissue engineering in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Wakako; Inamoto, Takashi; Ito, Ran; Morimoto, Naoki; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Toi, Masakazu

    2013-03-01

    Adipose tissue engineering for breast reconstruction can be performed for patients who have undergone breast surgery. We have previously confirmed adipogenesis in mice implanted with type I collagen sponge with controlled release of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and human adipose tissue-derived stem cells. However, in order to use this approach to treat breast cancer patients, a large amount of adipose tissue is needed, and FGF2 is not readily available. Thus, we aimed to regenerate large amounts of adipose tissue without FGF2 for a long period. Under general anesthesia, cages made of polypropylene mesh were implanted into the rabbits' bilateral fat pads. Each cage was 10 mm in radius and 10 mm in height. Minced type I collagen sponge was injected as a scaffold into the cage. Regenerated tissue in the cage was examined with ultrasonography, and the cages were harvested 3, 6, and 12 months after the implantation. Ultrasonography revealed a gradually increasing homogeneous high-echo area in the cage. Histology of the specimen was assessed with hematoxylin and eosin staining. The percentages of regenerated adipose tissue area were 76.2 ± 13.0 and 92.8 ± 6.6 % at 6 and 12 months after the implantation, respectively. Our results showed de novo adipogenesis 12 months after the implantation of only type I collagen sponge inside the space. Ultrasonography is a noninvasive and useful method of assessing the growth of the tissue inside the cage. This simple method could be a promising clinical modality in breast reconstruction. PMID:23114565

  16. Browning of white adipose tissue: role of hypothalamic signaling.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Li, Lin

    2013-10-01

    Two types of fat, white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), exist in mammals including adult humans. While WAT stores excess calories and an excessive accumulation of fat causes obesity, BAT dissipates energy to produce heat through nonshivering thermogenesis for protection against cold environments and provides the potential for the development of novel anti-obesity treatments. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of energy balance. Specifically, recent observations indicate the importance of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) in thermoregulation. We have found that the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the DMH has distinct actions in modulating adiposity and BAT thermogenesis. Knockdown of NPY in the DMH elevates the thermogenic activity of classic BAT and promotes the development of brown adipocytes in WAT, leading to increased thermogenesis. These findings identify a novel potential target for combating obesity.

  17. Physiological and pathological impact of exosomes of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Mei; Tian, Weidong

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that have emerged as a new intercellular communication system for transporting proteins and RNAs; recent studies have shown that they play a role in many physiological and pathological processes such as immune regulation, cell differentiation, infection and cancer. By transferring proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs, exosomes act as information vehicles that alter the behavior of recipient cells. Compared to direct cell-cell contact or secreted factors, exosomes can affect recipient cells in more efficient ways. In whole adipose tissues, it has been shown that exosomes exist in supernatants of adipocytes and adipose stromal cells (ADSCs). Adipocyte exosomes are linked to lipid metabolism and obesity-related insulin resistance and exosomes secreted by ADSCs are involved in angiogenesis, immunomodulation and tumor development. This review introduces characteristics of exosomes in adipose tissue, summarizes their functions in different physiological and pathological processes and provides the further insight into potential application of exosomes to disease diagnosis and treatment.

  18. ABCD2 identifies a subclass of peroxisomes in mouse adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Liu, Jingjing; Lester, Joshua D; Pijut, Sonja S; Graf, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter D2 (D2) is an ABC half transporter that is thought to promote the transport of very long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs into peroxisomes. Both D2 and peroxisomes increase during adipogenesis. Although peroxisomes are essential to both catabolic and anabolic lipid metabolism, their function, and that of D2, in adipose tissues remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the D2 localization and the proteome of D2-containing organelles, in adipose tissue. Centrifugation of mouse adipose homogenates generated a fraction enriched with D2, but deficient in peroxisome markers including catalase, PEX19, and ABCD3 (D3). Electron microscopic imaging of this fraction confirmed the presence of D2 protein on an organelle with a dense matrix and a diameter of ∼ 200 nm, the typical structure and size of a microperoxisome. D2 and PEX19 antibodies recognized distinct structures in mouse adipose. Immunoisolation of the D2-containing compartment confirmed the scarcity of PEX19 and proteomic profiling revealed the presence of proteins associated with peroxisome, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and mitochondria. D2 is localized to a distinct class of peroxisomes that lack many peroxisome proteins, and may associate physically with mitochondria and the ER.

  19. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Extracellular Matrix and Methylcellulose Hydrogels Augments and Regenerates the Paralyzed Vocal Fold

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Na; Sung, Myung Whun; Kwon, Tack-Kyun; Cho, Yong Woo; Kwon, Seong Keun

    2016-01-01

    Vocal fold paralysis results from various etiologies and can induce voice changes, swallowing complications, and issues with aspiration. Vocal fold paralysis is typically managed using injection laryngoplasty with fat or synthetic polymers. Injection with autologous fat has shown excellent biocompatibility. However, it has several disadvantages such as unpredictable resorption rate, morbidities associated with liposuction procedure which has to be done in operating room under general anesthesia. Human adipose-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) grafts have been reported to form new adipose tissue and have greater biostability than autologous fat graft. Here, we present an injectable hydrogel that is constructed from adipose tissue derived soluble extracellular matrix (sECM) and methylcellulose (MC) for use in vocal fold augmentation. Human sECM derived from adipose tissue was extracted using two major steps—ECM was isolated from human adipose tissue and was subsequently solubilized. Injectable sECM/MC hydrogels were prepared by blending of sECM and MC. Sustained vocal fold augmentation and symmetric vocal fold vibration were accomplished by the sECM/MC hydrogel in paralyzed vocal fold which were confirmed by laryngoscope, histology and a high-speed imaging system. There were increased number of collagen fibers and fatty granules at the injection site without significant inflammation or fibrosis. Overall, these results indicate that the sECM/MC hydrogel can enhance vocal function in paralyzed vocal folds without early resorption and has potential as a promising material for injection laryngoplasty for stable vocal fold augmentation which can overcome the shortcomings of autologous fat such as unpredictable duration and morbidity associated with the fat harvest. PMID:27768757

  20. Molecular pathways regulating the formation of brown-like adipocytes in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jianfei; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Huiqin; Mao, Yushan; Wang, Anshi; Wang, Xin; Zou, Zuquan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue is functionally composed of brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue. The unique thermogenic capacity of brown adipose tissue results from expression of uncoupling protein 1 in the mitochondrial inner membrane. On the basis of recent findings that adult humans have functionally active brown adipose tissue, it is now recognized as playing a much more important role in human metabolism than was previously thought. More importantly, brown-like adipocytes can be recruited in white adipose tissue upon environmental stimulation and pharmacologic treatment, and this change is associated with increased energy expenditure, contributing to a lean and healthy phenotype. Thus, the promotion of brown-like adipocyte development in white adipose tissue offers novel possibilities for the development of therapeutic strategies to combat obesity and related metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the recruitment of brown-like adipocyte in white adipose tissue.

  1. Colonic Macrophages "Remote Control" Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subhra K; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-08-01

    The early events linking diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Kawano et al. (2016) show that infiltration of colonic pro-inflammatory macrophages orchestrated by the intestinal CCL2/CCR2 axis kick-starts this process during high-fat-diet feeding. PMID:27508866

  2. Browning attenuates murine white adipose tissue expansion during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Lasar, D; Julius, A; Fromme, T; Klingenspor, M

    2013-05-01

    During postnatal development of mice distinct white adipose tissue depots display a transient appearance of brown-like adipocytes. These brite (brown in white) adipocytes share characteristics with classical brown adipocytes including a multilocular appearance and the expression of the thermogenic protein uncoupling protein 1. In this study, we compared two inbred mouse strains 129S6sv/ev and C57BL6/N known for their different propensity to diet-induced obesity. We observed transient browning in retroperitoneal and inguinal adipose tissue depots of these two strains. From postnatal day 10 to 20 the increase in the abundance of multilocular adipocytes and uncoupling protein 1 expression was higher in 129S6sv/ev than in C57BL6/N pups. The parallel increase in the mass of the two fat depots was attenuated during this browning period. Conversely, epididymal white and interscapular brown adipose tissue displayed a steady increase in mass during the first 30 days of life. In this period, 129S6sv/ev mice developed a significantly higher total body fat mass than C57BL6/N. Thus, while on a local depot level a high number of brite cells is associated with the attenuation of adipose tissue expansion the strain comparison reveals no support for a systemic impact on energy balance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brown and White Fat: From Signaling to Disease.

  3. Endocrine modulators of mouse subcutaneous adipose tissue beige adipocyte markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of subcutaneous adipose tissue contains precursors that can give rise to beige adipocytes. Beige adipocytes are characterized by the expression of specific markers, but it is not clear which markers best evaluate beige adipocyte differentiation. Both regulators of...

  4. Human omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibit specific lipidomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Despite their differential effects on human metabolic pathophysiology, the differences in omental and subcutaneous lipidomes are largely unknown. To explore this field, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for lipidome analyses of adipose tissue samples (visceral and subcutaneous) selected from a group of obese subjects (n=38). Transcriptomics and in vitro studies in adipocytes were used to confirm the pathways affected by location. The analyses revealed the existence of obesity-related specific lipidome signatures in each of these locations, attributed to selective enrichment of specific triglycerides, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, because these were not observed in adipose tissues from nonobese individuals. The changes were compatible with subcutaneous enrichment in pathways involved in adipogenesis, triacylglyceride synthesis, and lipid droplet formation, as well as increased α-oxidation. Marked differences between omental and subcutaneous depots in obese individuals were seen in the association of lipid species with metabolic traits (body mass index and insulin sensitivity). Targeted studies also revealed increased cholesterol (Δ56%) and cholesterol epoxide (Δ34%) concentrations in omental adipose tissue. In view of the effects of cholesterol epoxide, which induced enhanced expression of adipocyte differentiation and α-oxidation genes in human omental adipocytes, a novel role for cholesterol epoxide as a signaling molecule for differentiation is proposed. In summary, in obesity, adipose tissue exhibits a location-specific differential lipid profile that may contribute to explaining part of its distinct pathogenic role.

  5. Spice Up Your Life: Adipose Tissue and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Cells of the immune system are now recognized in the adipose tissue which, in obesity, produces proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Several herbs and spices have been in use since ancient times which possess anti-inflammatory properties. In this perspective, I discuss and propose the usage of these culinary delights for the benefit of human health. PMID:24701352

  6. A computational model of adipose tissue metabolism: Evidence for intracellular compartmentation and differential activation of lipases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M.; Kalhan, Satish C.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of lipolysis in adipose tissue is critical to whole body fuel homeostasis and to the development of insulin resistance. Due to the challenging nature of laboratory investigations of regulatory mechanisms in adipose tissue, mathematical models could provide a valuable adjunct to such experimental work. We have developed a computational model to analyze key components of adipose tissue metabolism in vivo in human in the fasting state. The various key components included triglyceride-fatty acid cycling, regulation of lipolytic reactions, and glyceroneogenesis. The model, consisting of spatially lumped blood and cellular compartments, included essential transport processes and biochemical reactions. Concentration dynamics for major substrates were described by mass balance equations. Model equations were solved numerically to simulate dynamic responses to intravenous epinephrine infusion. Model simulations were compared with the corresponding experimental measurements of the arteriovenous difference across the abdominal subcutaneous fat bed in humans. The model can simulate physiological responses arising from the different expression levels of lipases. Key findings of this study are as follows: (1) Distinguishing the active metabolic subdomain (~3% of total tissue volume) is critical for simulating data. (2) During epinephrine infusion, lipases are differentially activated such that diglyceride breakdown is ~4 times faster than triglyceride breakdown. (3) Glyceroneogenesis contributes more to glycerol-3-phosphate synthesis during epinephrine infusion when pyruvate oxidation is inhibited by a high acetyl-CoA/free-CoA ratio. PMID:18234232

  7. [Epicardial adipose tissue and its role in cardiac physiology and disease].

    PubMed

    Toczyłowski, Kacper; Gruca, Michał; Baranowski, Marcin

    2013-06-20

    Adipose tissue secretes a number of cytokines, referred to as adipokines. Intensive studies conducted over the last two decades showed that adipokines exert broad effects on cardiac metabolism and function. In addition, the available data strongly suggests that these cytokines play an important role in development of cardiovascular diseases. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has special properties that distinguish it from other deposits of visceral fat. Overall, there appears to be a close functional and anatomic relationship between the EAT and the cardiac muscle. They share the same coronary blood supply, and there is no structure separating the adipose tissue from the myocardium or coronary arteries. The role of EAT in osierdziocardiac physiology remains unclear. Its putative functions include buffering coronary arteries against the torsion induced by the arterial pulse wave and cardiac contraction, regulating fatty acid homeostasis in the coronary microcirculation, thermogenesis, and neuroprotection of the cardiac autonomic ganglia and nerves. Obesity (particularly the abdominal phenotype) leads to elevated EAT content, and the available data suggests that high amount of this fat depot is associated with increased risk of ischemic heart disease, cardiac hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. The mass of EAT is small compared to other fat deposits in the body. Nevertheless, its close anatomic relationship to the heart suggests that this organ is highly exposed to EAT-derived adipokines which makes this tissue a very promising area of research. In this paper we review the current knowledge on the role of EAT in cardiac physiology and development of heart disease.

  8. Human mediastinal adipose tissue displays certain characteristics of brown fat

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, L; Gertow, J; Werngren, O; Folkersen, L; Petrovic, N; Nedergaard, J; Franco-Cereceda, A; Eriksson, P; Fisher, R M

    2013-01-01

    Background: The amount of intra-thoracic fat, of which mediastinal adipose tissue comprises the major depot, is related to various cardiometabolic risk factors. Autopsy and imaging studies indicate that the mediastinal depot in adult humans could contain brown adipose tissue (BAT). To gain a better understanding of this intra-thoracic fat depot, we examined possible BAT characteristics of human mediastinal in comparison with subcutaneous adipose tissue. Materials and methods: Adipose tissue biopsies from thoracic subcutaneous and mediastinal depots were obtained during open-heart surgery from 33 subjects (26 male, 63.7±13.8 years, body mass index 29.3±5.1 kg m−2). Microarray analysis was performed on 10 patients and genes of interest confirmed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in samples from another group of 23 patients. Adipocyte size was determined and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) protein expression investigated with immunohistochemistry. Results: The microarray data showed that a number of BAT-specific genes had significantly higher expression in the mediastinal depot than in the subcutaneous depot. Higher expression of UCP1 (24-fold, P<0.001) and PPARGC1A (1.7-fold, P=0.0047), and lower expression of SHOX2 (0.12-fold, P<0.001) and HOXC8 (0.14-fold, P<0.001) in the mediastinal depot was confirmed by qPCR. Gene set enrichment analysis identified two gene sets related to mitochondria, which were significantly more highly expressed in the mediastinal than in the subcutaneous depot (P<0.01). No significant changes in UCP1 gene expression were observed in the subcutaneous or mediastinal depots following lowering of body temperature during surgery. UCP1 messenger RNA levels in the mediastinal depot were lower than those in murine BAT and white adipose tissue. In some mediastinal adipose tissue biopsies, a small number of multilocular adipocytes that stained positively for UCP1 were observed. Adipocytes were significantly smaller in the mediastinal than the

  9. Effect of carbohydrate intake on de novo lipogenesis in human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Chascione, C.; Elwyn, D.H.; Davila, M.; Gil, K.M.; Askanazi, J.; Kinney, J.M. )

    1987-12-01

    Rates of synthesis, from ({sup 14}C)glucose, of fatty acids (de novo lipogenesis) and glycerol (triglyceride synthesis) were measured in biopsies of adipose tissue from nutritionally depleted patients given low- or high-carbohydrate intravenous nutrition. Simultaneously, energy expenditure and whole-body lipogenesis were measured by indirect calorimetry. Rates of whole-body lipogenesis were zero on the low-carbohydrate diet and averaged 1.6 g{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}day{sup {minus}1} on the high-carbohydrate diet. In vitro rates of triglyceride synthesis increased 3-fold going from the low to the high intake; rates of fatty acid synthesis increased {approximately}80-fold. In vitro, lipogenesis accounted for <0.1% of triglyceride synthesis on the low intake and 4% on the high intake. On the high-carbohydrate intake, in vitro rates of triglyceride synthesis accounted for 61% of the rates of unidirectional triglyceride synthesis measured by indirect calorimetry. In vitro rates of lipogenesis accounted for 7% of whole-body lipogenesis. Discrepancies between in vitro rates of fatty acid synthesis from glucose, compared with acetate and citrate, as reported by others, suggest that in depleted patients on hypercaloric high-carbohydrate diets, adipose tissue may account for up to 40% of whole-body lipogenesis.

  10. Osteopontin deletion prevents the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis via impaired adipose tissue matrix remodeling and reduced inflammation and fibrosis in adipose tissue and liver in mice.

    PubMed

    Lancha, Andoni; Rodríguez, Amaia; Catalán, Victoria; Becerril, Sara; Sáinz, Neira; Ramírez, Beatriz; Burrell, María A; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional extracellular matrix (ECM) protein involved in multiple physiological processes. OPN expression is dramatically increased in visceral adipose tissue in obesity and the lack of OPN protects against the development of insulin resistance and inflammation in mice. We sought to unravel the potential mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of the absence of OPN. We analyzed the effect of the lack of OPN in the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) using OPN-KO mice. OPN expression was upregulated in epididymal white adipose tissue (EWAT) and liver in wild type (WT) mice with HFD. OPN-KO mice had higher insulin sensitivity, lower body weight and fat mass with reduced adipose tissue ECM remodeling and reduced adipocyte size than WT mice under a HFD. Reduced MMP2 and MMP9 activity was involved in the decreased ECM remodeling. Crown-like structure number in EWAT as well as F4/80-positive cells and Emr1 expression in EWAT and liver increased with HFD, while OPN-deficiency blunted the increase. Moreover, our data show for the first time that OPN-KO under a HFD mice display reduced fibrosis in adipose tissue and liver, as well as reduced oxidative stress in adipose tissue. Gene expression of collagens Col1a1, Col6a1 and Col6a3 in EWAT and liver, as well as the profibrotic cytokine Tgfb1 in EWAT were increased with HFD, while OPN-deficiency prevented this increase. OPN deficiency prevented hepatic steatosis via reduction in the expression of molecules involved in the onset of fat accumulation such as Pparg, Srebf1, Fasn, Mogat1, Dgat2 and Cidec. Furthermore, OPN-KO mice exhibited higher body temperature and improved BAT function. The present data reveal novel mechanisms of OPN in the development of obesity, pointing out the inhibition of OPN as a promising target for the treatment of obesity and fatty liver.

  11. Pharmacological and nutritional agents promoting browning of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Bonet, M Luisa; Oliver, Paula; Palou, Andreu

    2013-05-01

    The role of brown adipose tissue in the regulation of energy balance and maintenance of body weight is well known in rodents. Recently, interest in this tissue has re-emerged due to the realization of active brown-like adipose tissue in adult humans and inducible brown-like adipocytes in white adipose tissue depots in response to appropriate stimuli ("browning process"). Brown-like adipocytes that appear in white fat depots have been called "brite" (from brown-in-white) or "beige" adipocytes and have characteristics similar to brown adipocytes, in particular the capacity for uncoupled respiration. There is controversy as to the origin of these brite/beige adipocytes, but regardless of this, induction of the browning of white fat represents an attractive potential strategy for the management and treatment of obesity and related complications. Here, the different physiological, pharmacological and dietary determinants that have been linked to white-to-brown fat remodeling and the molecular mechanisms involved are reviewed in detail. In the light of available data, interesting therapeutic perspectives can be expected from the use of specific drugs or food compounds able to induce a program of brown fat differentiation including uncoupling protein 1 expression and enhancing oxidative metabolism in white adipose cells. However, additional research is needed, mainly focused on the physiological relevance of browning and its dietary control, where the use of ferrets and other non-rodent animal models with a more similar adipose tissue organization and metabolism to humans could be of much help. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brown and White Fat: From Signaling to Disease.

  12. Exercise Effects on White Adipose Tissue: Beiging and Metabolic Adaptations.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kristin I; Middelbeek, Roeland J W; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2015-07-01

    Regular physical activity and exercise training have long been known to cause adaptations to white adipose tissue (WAT), including decreases in cell size and lipid content and increases in mitochondrial proteins. In this article, we discuss recent studies that have investigated the effects of exercise training on mitochondrial function, the "beiging" of WAT, regulation of adipokines, metabolic effects of trained adipose tissue on systemic metabolism, and depot-specific responses to exercise training. The major WAT depots in the body are found in the visceral cavity (vWAT) and subcutaneously (scWAT). In rodent models, exercise training increases mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in both these adipose tissue depots. Exercise training also increases expression of the brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in both adipose tissue depots, although these effects are much more pronounced in scWAT. Consistent with the increase in UCP1, exercise training increases the presence of brown-like adipocytes in scWAT, also known as browning or beiging. Training results in changes in the gene expression of thousands of scWAT genes and an altered adipokine profile in both scWAT and vWAT. Transplantation of trained scWAT in sedentary recipient mice results in striking improvements in skeletal muscle glucose uptake and whole-body metabolic homeostasis. Human and rodent exercise studies have indicated that exercise training can alter circulating adipokine concentration as well as adipokine expression in adipose tissue. Thus, the profound changes to WAT in response to exercise training may be part of the mechanism by which exercise improves whole-body metabolic health.

  13. Caspase Induction and BCL2 Inhibition in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tinahones, Francisco José; Coín Aragüez, Leticia; Murri, Mora; Oliva Olivera, Wilfredo; Mayas Torres, María Dolores; Barbarroja, Nuria; Gomez Huelgas, Ricardo; Malagón, Maria M.; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cell death determines the onset of obesity and associated insulin resistance. Here, we analyze the relationship among obesity, adipose tissue apoptosis, and insulin signaling. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The expression levels of initiator (CASP8/9) and effector (CASP3/7) caspases as well as antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma (BCL)2 and inflammatory markers were assessed in visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue from patients with different degrees of obesity and without insulin resistance or diabetes. Adipose tissue explants from lean subjects were cultured with TNF-α or IL-6, and the expression of apoptotic and insulin signaling components was analyzed and compared with basal expression levels in morbidly obese subjects. RESULTS SAT and VAT exhibited increased CASP3/7 and CASP8/9 expression levels and decreased BCL2 expression with BMI increase. These changes were accompanied by increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels and macrophage infiltration markers. In obese subjects, CASP3/7 activation and BCL2 downregulation correlated with the IRS-1/2–expression levels. Expression levels of caspases, BCL2, p21, p53, IRS-1/2, GLUT4, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and leukocyte antigen-related phosphatase in TNF-α– or IL-6–treated explants from lean subjects were comparable with those found in adipose tissue samples from morbidly obese subjects. These insulin component expression levels were reverted with CASP3/7 inhibition in these TNF-α– or IL-6–treated explants. CONCLUSIONS Body fat mass increase is associated with CASP3/7 and BCL2 expression in adipose tissue. Moreover, this proapoptotic state correlated with insulin signaling, suggesting its potential contribution to the development of insulin resistance. PMID:23193206

  14. Flow cytometry on the stromal-vascular fraction of white adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue contains cell types other than adipocytes that may contribute to complications linked to obesity. For example, macrophages have been shown to infiltrate adipose tissue in response to a high-fat diet. Isolation of the stromal-vascular fraction of adipose tissue allows one to use flow c...

  15. Association between subcutaneous white adipose tissue and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but the distribution of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in adipose tissue is not known. Objectives: To determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons an...

  16. Gene expression profiling in developing pig adipose tissue: non-secreted regulatory proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of many genes encoding secreted and non-secreted factors have been studied in human and rodent adipose tissue with cDNA microarrays, but few such studies in adipose tissue from growing pigs have been reported. Total RNA was collected at slaughter from outer subcutaneous adipose tissue...

  17. Adipose tissue and metabolic syndrome: too much, too little or neither.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Scott M

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome. Recent research suggests that excess adipose tissue plays an important role in development of the syndrome. On the other hand, persons with a deficiency of adipose tissue (e.g. lipodystrophy) also manifest the metabolic syndrome. In some animal models, expansion of adipose tissue pools mitigates adverse metabolic components (e.g. insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidemia). Hence, there are conflicting data as to whether adipose tissue worsens the metabolic syndrome or protects against it. This conflict may relate partly to locations of adipose tissue pools. For instance, lower body adipose tissue may be protective whereas upper body adipose tissue may promote the syndrome. One view holds that in either case, the accumulation of ectopic fat in muscle and liver is the driving factor underlying the syndrome. If so, there may be some link between adipose tissue fat and ectopic fat. But the mechanisms underlying this connection are not clear. A stronger association appears to exist between excessive caloric intake and ectopic fat accumulation. Adipose tissue may act as a buffer to reduce the impact of excess energy consumption by fat storage; but once a constant weight has been achieved, it is unclear whether adipose tissue influences levels of ectopic fat. Another mechanism whereby adipose tissue could worsen the metabolic syndrome is through release of adipokines. This is an intriguing mechanism, but the impact of adipokines on metabolic syndrome risk factors is uncertain. Thus, many potential connections between adipose tissue and metabolic syndrome remain to unravelled.

  18. The effect of insulin on porcine adipose tissue lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, H J

    1989-01-01

    1. This laboratory and others have not been able to demonstrate consistent insulin stimulation of glucose incorporation into lipid by porcine adipose tissue in vitro. 2. A multiplicity of tissue handling procedures, additions to the incubation medium, and pig size (age) did not allow the expression of a consistent and substantial insulin stimulation. 3. It is suggested that the twofold or greater stimulation of glucose metabolism observed occasionally in this laboratory results from pig genetics, husbandry, or seasonal effects. PMID:2514071

  19. The effect of insulin on porcine adipose tissue lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, H J

    1989-01-01

    1. This laboratory and others have not been able to demonstrate consistent insulin stimulation of glucose incorporation into lipid by porcine adipose tissue in vitro. 2. A multiplicity of tissue handling procedures, additions to the incubation medium, and pig size (age) did not allow the expression of a consistent and substantial insulin stimulation. 3. It is suggested that the twofold or greater stimulation of glucose metabolism observed occasionally in this laboratory results from pig genetics, husbandry, or seasonal effects.

  20. The sexually dimorphic role of adipose and adipocyte estrogen receptors in modulating adipose tissue expansion, inflammation, and fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our data demonstrate that estrogens, estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), and estrogen receptor-ßeta (ERßeta) regulate adipose tissue distribution, inflammation, fibrosis, and glucose homeostasis, by determining that alphaERKO mice have increased adipose tissue inflammation and fibrosis prior to obesi...

  1. Undernutrition and stage of gestation influence fetal adipose tissue gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Jacqueline M.; Milne, John S.; Aitken, Raymond P.; Redmer, Dale A.; Reynolds, Lawrence P.; Luther, Justin S.; Horgan, GW; Adam, Clare L.

    2015-01-01

    Low birthweight is a risk factor for neonatal mortality and adverse metabolic health, both associated with inadequate prenatal adipose tissue development. Here we investigated the impact of maternal undernutrition on expression of genes regulating fetal perirenal adipose tissue (PAT) development and function at gestation days 89 and 130 (term=145d). Singleton fetuses were taken from adolescent ewes fed control (C) intake to maintain adiposity throughout pregnancy or undernourished (UN) to maintain conception weight but deplete maternal reserves (n=7/group). Fetal weight was independent of maternal intake at day 89 but by day 130 fetuses from UN dams were 17% lighter with lower PAT mass containing fewer unilocular adipocytes. Relative PAT expression of IGF1, IGF2, IGF2R and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARG) mRNA was lower in UN than in C, predominantly at day 89. Independent of maternal nutrition, PAT gene expression of PPARG, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hormone sensitive lipase, leptin, uncoupling protein-1 and prolactin receptor increased and IGF1, IGF2, IGF1R, IGF2R decreased between 89 and 130 days. Fatty acid synthase and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNAs were not influenced by nutrition or stage of pregnancy. Females had greater LPL and leptin mRNA than males, and LPL, leptin and PPARG mRNAs were decreased by UN at day 89 in females only. PAT gene expression correlations with PAT mass were stronger at day 89 than day 130. These data suggest that key genes regulating adipose tissue development and function are active from mid-gestation when they are sensitive to maternal undernutrition. This leads to reduced fetal adiposity by late pregnancy. PMID:25917833

  2. White adipose tissue genome wide-expression profiling and adipocyte metabolic functions after soy protein consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    Frigolet, Maria E; Torres, Nimbe; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Rangel, Claudia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Tovar, Armando R

    2011-02-01

    Obesity is associated with an increase in adipose tissue mass due to an imbalance between high dietary energy intake and low physical activity; however, the type of dietary protein may contribute to its development. The aim of the present work was to study the effect of soy protein versus casein on white adipose tissue genome profiling, and the metabolic functions of adipocytes in rats with diet-induced obesity. The results showed that rats fed a Soy Protein High-Fat (Soy HF) diet gained less weight and had lower serum leptin concentration than rats fed a Casein High-Fat (Cas HF) diet, despite similar energy intake. Histological studies indicated that rats fed the Soy HF diet had significantly smaller adipocytes than those fed the Cas HF diet, and this was associated with a lower triglyceride/DNA content. Fatty acid synthesis in isolated adipocytes was reduced by the amount of fat consumed but not by the type of protein ingested. Expression of genes of fatty acid oxidation increased in adipose tissue of rats fed Soy diets; microarray analysis revealed that Soy protein consumption modified the expression of 90 genes involved in metabolic functions and inflammatory response in adipose tissue. Network analysis showed that the expression of leptin was regulated by the type of dietary protein and it was identified as a central regulator of the expression of lipid metabolism genes in adipose tissue. Thus, soy maintains the size and metabolic functions of adipose tissue through biochemical adaptations, adipokine secretion, and global changes in gene expression.

  3. beta3-adrenoceptor agonist prevents alterations of muscle diacylglycerol and adipose tissue phospholipids induced by a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Darimont, Christian; Turini, Marco; Epitaux, Micheline; Zbinden, Irène; Richelle, Myriam; Montell, Eulàlia; Ferrer-Martinez, Andreu; Macé, Katherine

    2004-08-17

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet has been associated with alterations in lipid content and composition in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Administration of beta3-adrenoceptor (beta3-AR) agonists was recently reported to prevent insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet, such as the cafeteria diet. The objective of the present study was to determine whether a selective beta3-AR agonist (ZD7114) could prevent alterations of the lipid profile of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipids induced by a cafeteria diet. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a cafeteria diet were treated orally with either the beta3-AR agonist ZD7114 (1 mg/kg per day) or the vehicle for 60 days. Rats fed a chow diet were used as a reference group. In addition to the determination of body weight and insulin plasma level, lipid content and fatty acid composition in gastronemius and in epididymal adipose tissue were measured by gas-liquid chromatography, at the end of the study. RESULTS: In addition to higher body weights and plasma insulin concentrations, rats fed a cafeteria diet had greater triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation in skeletal muscle, contrary to animals fed a chow diet. As expected, ZD7114 treatment prevented the excessive weight gain and hyperinsulinemia induced by the cafeteria diet. Furthermore, in ZD7114 treated rats, intramyocellular DAG levels were lower and the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly arachidonic acid, in adipose tissue phospholipids was higher than in animals fed a cafeteria diet. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that activation of the beta3-AR was able to prevent lipid alterations in muscle and adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance induced by the cafeteria diet. These changes in intramyocellular DAG levels and adipose tissue PL composition may contribute to the improved insulin sensitivity associated with beta3-AR activation. PMID:15507149

  4. β3-adrenoceptor agonist prevents alterations of muscle diacylglycerol and adipose tissue phospholipids induced by a cafeteria diet

    PubMed Central

    Darimont, Christian; Turini, Marco; Epitaux, Micheline; Zbinden, Irène; Richelle, Myriam; Montell, Eulàlia; Ferrer-Martinez, Andreu; Macé, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet has been associated with alterations in lipid content and composition in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Administration of β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) agonists was recently reported to prevent insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet, such as the cafeteria diet. The objective of the present study was to determine whether a selective β3-AR agonist (ZD7114) could prevent alterations of the lipid profile of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipids induced by a cafeteria diet. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a cafeteria diet were treated orally with either the β3-AR agonist ZD7114 (1 mg/kg per day) or the vehicle for 60 days. Rats fed a chow diet were used as a reference group. In addition to the determination of body weight and insulin plasma level, lipid content and fatty acid composition in gastronemius and in epididymal adipose tissue were measured by gas-liquid chromatography, at the end of the study. Results In addition to higher body weights and plasma insulin concentrations, rats fed a cafeteria diet had greater triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation in skeletal muscle, contrary to animals fed a chow diet. As expected, ZD7114 treatment prevented the excessive weight gain and hyperinsulinemia induced by the cafeteria diet. Furthermore, in ZD7114 treated rats, intramyocellular DAG levels were lower and the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly arachidonic acid, in adipose tissue phospholipids was higher than in animals fed a cafeteria diet. Conclusions These results show that activation of the β3-AR was able to prevent lipid alterations in muscle and adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance induced by the cafeteria diet. These changes in intramyocellular DAG levels and adipose tissue PL composition may contribute to the improved insulin sensitivity associated with β3-AR activation. PMID:15507149

  5. Hyperglycemic Challenge and Distribution of Adipose Tissue in Obese Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Tanmay; Slaughter, Gymama; Ego-Osuala, Chimdi; Kochunov, Peter; Bastarrachea, Raul A.; Mattern, Vicki; Andrade, Marcia; Higgins, Paul B.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Voruganti, V. Saroja

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood glucose levels regulate the rate of insulin secretion, which is the body’s mechanism for preventing excessive elevation in blood glucose. Impaired glucose metabolism and insulin resistance have been linked to excess body fat composition. Here, we quantify abdominal muscle and abdominal adipose tissue compartments in a large nonhuman primate, the baboon, and investigate their relationship with serum glucose response to a hyperglycemic challenge. Methods Five female baboons were fasted for 16 hours prior to 90 minute body imaging experiment that consisted of a 20-min baseline, followed by a bolus infusion of glucose (500mg/kg). The blood glucose was sampled at regular intervals. The total volumes of the muscle, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue were measured. Results and discussion We found that adipose tissue composition predicted fluctuations in glucose responses to a hyperglycemic challenge of a non-human primate. Animals with higher visceral adiposity showed significantly reduced glucose elimination. The glucose responses were positively correlated with body weight, visceral and muscle fat (p < 0.005). Polynomial regression analysis showed that body weight, visceral and muscle were significant Conclusions These results reveal the similarity between humans and baboons with respect to glucose metabolism and strengthen the utility of baboon for biomedical research. PMID:25429366

  6. Panax red ginseng extract regulates energy expenditures by modulating PKA dependent lipid mobilization in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hae-Mi; Kang, Young-Ho; Yoo, Hanju; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Chang, Eun-Ju; Song, Youngsup

    2014-05-16

    Regulation of balance between lipid accumulation and energy consumption is a critical step for the maintenance of energy homeostasis. Here, we show that Panax red ginseng extract treatments increased energy expenditures and prevented mice from diet induced obesity. Panax red ginseng extracts strongly activated Hormone Specific Lipase (HSL) via Protein Kinase A (PKA). Since activation of HSL induces lipolysis in WAT and fatty acid oxidation in brown adipose tissue (BAT), these results suggest that Panax red ginseng extracts reduce HFD induced obesity by regulating lipid mobilization.

  7. Metabolic remodeling of white adipose tissue in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Timothy D.; Holden, Candice R.; Sansbury, Brian E.; Gibb, Andrew A.; Shah, Jasmit; Zafar, Nagma; Tang, Yunan; Hellmann, Jason; Rai, Shesh N.; Spite, Matthew; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism is a critical regulator of adiposity and whole body energy expenditure; however, metabolic changes that occur in white adipose tissue (WAT) with obesity remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to understand the metabolic and bioenergetic changes occurring in WAT with obesity. Wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) showed significant increases in whole body adiposity, had significantly lower V̇o2, V̇co2, and respiratory exchange ratios, and demonstrated worsened glucose and insulin tolerance compared with low-fat-fed mice. Metabolomic analysis of WAT showed marked changes in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, nucleotide, and energy metabolism. Tissue levels of succinate and malate were elevated, and metabolites that could enter the Krebs cycle via anaplerosis were mostly diminished in high-fat-fed mice, suggesting altered mitochondrial metabolism. Despite no change in basal oxygen consumption or mitochondrial DNA abundance, citrate synthase activity was decreased by more than 50%, and responses to FCCP were increased in WAT from mice fed a high-fat diet. Moreover, Pgc1a was downregulated and Cox7a1 upregulated after 6 wk of HFD. After 12 wk of high-fat diet, the abundance of several proteins in the mitochondrial respiratory chain or matrix was diminished. These changes were accompanied by increased Parkin and Pink1, decreased p62 and LC3-I, and ultrastructural changes suggestive of autophagy and mitochondrial remodeling. These studies demonstrate coordinated restructuring of metabolism and autophagy that could contribute to the hypertrophy and whitening of adipose tissue in obesity. PMID:24918202

  8. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Christoffersen, Christina; Goetze, Jens P

    2015-12-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs - NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism were quantified at 4-h intervals: in the diurnal study, mice were exposed to a period of 12 h light followed by 12 h darkness (n=52). In the circadian study, mice were kept in darkness for 24 h (n=47). Concomitant serum concentrations of free fatty acids, glycerol, triglycerides (TGs), and insulin were measured. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents showed reciprocal circadian profiles (P<0.0001). NPR-A mRNA contents followed a temporal pattern (P=0.01), peaking in the dark (active) period. In contrast, NPR-C mRNA was expressed in an antiphase manner with nadir in the active period (P=0.007). TG concentrations in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner.

  9. Fatty Infiltration of Skeletal Muscle: Mechanisms and Comparisons with Bone Marrow Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Mark W.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Frechette, Danielle M.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle and bone share common embryological origins from mesodermal cell populations and also display common growth trajectories early in life. Moreover, muscle and bone are both mechanoresponsive tissues, and the mass and strength of both tissues decline with age. The decline in muscle and bone strength that occurs with aging is accompanied in both cases by an accumulation of adipose tissue. In bone, adipocyte (AC) accumulation occurs in the marrow cavities of long bones and is known to increase with estrogen deficiency, mechanical unloading, and exposure to glucocorticoids. The factors leading to accumulation of intra- and intermuscular fat (myosteatosis) are less well understood, but recent evidence indicates that increases in intramuscular fat are associated with disuse, altered leptin signaling, sex steroid deficiency, and glucocorticoid treatment, factors that are also implicated in bone marrow adipogenesis. Importantly, accumulation of ACs in skeletal muscle and accumulation of intramyocellular lipid are linked to loss of muscle strength, reduced insulin sensitivity, and increased mortality among the elderly. Resistance exercise and whole body vibration can prevent fatty infiltration in skeletal muscle and also improve muscle strength. Therapeutic strategies to prevent myosteatosis may improve muscle function and reduce fall risk in the elderly, potentially impacting the incidence of bone fracture. PMID:27379021

  10. Fatty Infiltration of Skeletal Muscle: Mechanisms and Comparisons with Bone Marrow Adiposity.

    PubMed

    Hamrick, Mark W; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Frechette, Danielle M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle and bone share common embryological origins from mesodermal cell populations and also display common growth trajectories early in life. Moreover, muscle and bone are both mechanoresponsive tissues, and the mass and strength of both tissues decline with age. The decline in muscle and bone strength that occurs with aging is accompanied in both cases by an accumulation of adipose tissue. In bone, adipocyte (AC) accumulation occurs in the marrow cavities of long bones and is known to increase with estrogen deficiency, mechanical unloading, and exposure to glucocorticoids. The factors leading to accumulation of intra- and intermuscular fat (myosteatosis) are less well understood, but recent evidence indicates that increases in intramuscular fat are associated with disuse, altered leptin signaling, sex steroid deficiency, and glucocorticoid treatment, factors that are also implicated in bone marrow adipogenesis. Importantly, accumulation of ACs in skeletal muscle and accumulation of intramyocellular lipid are linked to loss of muscle strength, reduced insulin sensitivity, and increased mortality among the elderly. Resistance exercise and whole body vibration can prevent fatty infiltration in skeletal muscle and also improve muscle strength. Therapeutic strategies to prevent myosteatosis may improve muscle function and reduce fall risk in the elderly, potentially impacting the incidence of bone fracture. PMID:27379021

  11. Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness in Patients With Subclinical Hypothyroidism and the Relationship Thereof With Visceral Adipose Tissue Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Arpaci, Dilek; Gurkan Tocoglu, Aysel; Yilmaz, Sabiye; Korkmaz, Sumeyye; Ergenc, Hasan; Gunduz, Huseyin; Keser, Nurgul; Tamer, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is associated with cardiovascular metabolic syndromes, especially dislipidemia and abdominal obesity. Visceral abdominal adipose tissue (VAAT) and epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) have the same ontogenic origin and produce many proinflammatory and proatherogenic cytokines. We evaluated EAT and VAAT thickness in patients with SH. Methods Forty-one patients with SH and 35 controls were included in the study. Demographical and anthropometric features of both patients and controls were recorded. Thyroid and metabolic parameters were measured. EAT was measured using 2D-transthoracic echocardiography. Results The age and gender distributions were similar in the two groups (P = 0.998 and P = 0.121, respectively). Body mass index (BMI), fat mass, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), the WC/HC ratio, and the thicknesses of VAAT and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue were higher in the case group than the control group (all P values < 0.01). However, both groups had similar EAT thickness (P = 0.532), which was positively correlated with BMI, fat mass, WC, HC, VAAT thickness, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness, and serum triglyceride (TG) level (all P values < 0.01). We found no correlation between EAT thickness and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level, free thyroxine (FT4) level, or low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) level, and anti-TPO level (all P values > 0.05). We found no difference between the two groups in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level (P = 0.780), but the levels of LDL-C and TG differed significantly (P = 0.002 and P = 0.026, respectively). The serum TSH level was higher and the FT4 level was lower in the case than the control group (both P values <0.01). Conclusion Increased abdominal adipose tissue thickness in patients with SH is associated with atherosclerosis. To detemine the risk of atherosclerosis in such patients, EAT measurements are valuable; such assessment is simple to

  12. NAMPT-Mediated NAD(+) Biosynthesis in Adipocytes Regulates Adipose Tissue Function and Multi-organ Insulin Sensitivity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Stromsdorfer, Kelly L; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Yoon, Myeong Jin; Moseley, Anna C; Franczyk, Michael P; Kelly, Shannon C; Qi, Nathan; Imai, Shin-Ichiro; Yoshino, Jun

    2016-08-16

    Obesity is associated with adipose tissue dysfunction and multi-organ insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms of such obesity-associated systemic metabolic complications are not clear. Here, we characterized mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a rate-limiting NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme known to decrease in adipose tissue of obese and aged rodents and people. We found that adipocyte-specific Nampt knockout mice had severe insulin resistance in adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue dysfunction, manifested by increased plasma free fatty acid concentrations and decreased plasma concentrations of a major insulin-sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin. Loss of Nampt increased phosphorylation of CDK5 and PPARγ (serine-273) and decreased gene expression of obesity-linked phosphorylated PPARγ targets in adipose tissue. These deleterious alterations were normalized by administering rosiglitazone or a key NAD(+) intermediate, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). Collectively, our results provide important mechanistic and therapeutic insights into obesity-associated systemic metabolic derangements, particularly multi-organ insulin resistance.

  13. NAMPT-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis in adipocytes regulates adipose tissue function and multi-organ insulin sensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stromsdorfer, Kelly L.; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Yoon, Myeong Jin; Moseley, Anna C.; Franczyk, Michael P.; Kelly, Shannon C.; Qi, Nathan; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Yoshino, Jun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Obesity is associated with adipose tissue dysfunction and multi-organ insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms of such obesity-associated systemic metabolic complications are not clear. Here, we characterized mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a rate-limiting NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme known to decrease in adipose tissue of obese and aged rodents and people. We found that adipocyte-specific Nampt knockout mice had severe insulin resistance in adipose tissue, liver, and skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue dysfunction, manifested by increased plasma free fatty acids concentrations and decreased plasma concentrations of a major insulin-sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin. Loss of Nampt increased phosphorylation of CDK5 and PPARγ (serine-273) and decreased gene expression of obesity-linked phosphorylated PPARγ targets in adipose tissue. Remarkably, these deleterious alterations were normalized by administering rosiglitazone or a key NAD+ intermediate, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN). Collectively, our results provide important mechanistic and therapeutic insights into obesity-associated systemic metabolic derangements, particularly multi-organ insulin resistance. PMID:27498863

  14. Inorganic nitrate promotes the browning of white adipose tissue through the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J; Griffin, Julian L

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic nitrate was once considered an oxidation end product of nitric oxide metabolism with little biological activity. However, recent studies have demonstrated that dietary nitrate can modulate mitochondrial function in man and is effective in reversing features of the metabolic syndrome in mice. Using a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach, we mechanistically defined that nitrate not only increases the expression of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue but also induces the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes and proteins in white adipose tissue, substantially increasing oxygen consumption and fatty acid β-oxidation in adipocytes. Nitrate induces these phenotypic changes through a mechanism distinct from known physiological small molecule activators of browning, the recently identified nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. The nitrate-induced browning effect was enhanced in hypoxia, a serious comorbidity affecting white adipose tissue in obese individuals, and corrected impaired brown adipocyte-specific gene expression in white adipose tissue in a murine model of obesity. Because resulting beige/brite cells exhibit antiobesity and antidiabetic effects, nitrate may be an effective means of inducing the browning response in adipose tissue to treat the metabolic syndrome.

  15. Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species on Insulin Resistance in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Obesity resulting from the delivery of an excess amount of energy to adipose tissue from glucose or free fatty acids is associated with insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as contributors to both the onset and the progression of insulin resistance. ROS can be generated by overloading the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system, and also by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (NOX) produced by either adipocytes, which only produce NOX4, or by macrophages, which produce mainly NOX2. The source of the ROS might differ in the early, intermediate and late stages of obesity, switching from NOX4-dependence in the early phases to NOX2-dependence, in the intermediate phase, and transiting to mitochondria-dependence later in the time course of obesity. Thus, depending on the stage of obesity, ROS can be generated by three distinct mechanisms: i.e., NOX4, NOX2, and mitochondria. In this review, we will discuss whether NOX4-, NOX2-, and/or mitochondria-derived ROS is/are causal in the onset of adipocyte insulin resistance as obesity progresses. Moreover, we will review the pathophysiological roles of NOX4, NOX2, and mitochondria-derived ROS on adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:27352152

  16. Obesity alters adipose tissue macrophage iron content and tissue iron distribution.

    PubMed

    Orr, Jeb S; Kennedy, Arion; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Webb, Corey D; Fordahl, Steve C; Erikson, Keith M; Zhang, Yaofang; Etzerodt, Anders; Moestrup, Søren K; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2014-02-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion is accompanied by the infiltration and accumulation of AT macrophages (ATMs), as well as a shift in ATM polarization. Several studies have implicated recruited M1 ATMs in the metabolic consequences of obesity; however, little is known regarding the role of alternatively activated resident M2 ATMs in AT homeostasis or how their function is altered in obesity. Herein, we report the discovery of a population of alternatively activated ATMs with elevated cellular iron content and an iron-recycling gene expression profile. These iron-rich ATMs are referred to as MFe(hi), and the remaining ATMs are referred to as MFe(lo). In lean mice, ~25% of the ATMs are MFe(hi); this percentage decreases in obesity owing to the recruitment of MFe(lo) macrophages. Similar to MFe(lo) cells, MFe(hi) ATMs undergo an inflammatory shift in obesity. In vivo, obesity reduces the iron content of MFe(hi) ATMs and the gene expression of iron importers as well as the iron exporter, ferroportin, suggesting an impaired ability to handle iron. In vitro, exposure of primary peritoneal macrophages to saturated fatty acids also alters iron metabolism gene expression. Finally, the impaired MFe(hi) iron handling coincides with adipocyte iron overload in obese mice. In conclusion, in obesity, iron distribution is altered both at the cellular and tissue levels, with AT playing a predominant role in this change. An increased availability of fatty acids during obesity may contribute to the observed changes in MFe(hi) ATM phenotype and their reduced capacity to handle iron.

  17. Effects of Berberine on Adipose Tissues and Kidney Function in 3T3-L1 Cells and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Aya; Dong, Shi-Fen; Negishi, Hiroko; Yasui, Naomi; Sun, Jian-Ning; Ikeda, Katsumi

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of berberine on adipose tissues, as well as its effect on renal injury in 3T3-L1 cells and spontaneously hypertensive rats. 3T3-L1 cells were cultured and treated with berberine (5-20 pM) from days 3 to 8. Berberine added to the cultured medium could significantly down-regulate transcription factors, including CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein a, and peroxisome pro liferator-activated receptor y, and suppress peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor target genes, such as adipocyte fatty acid binding protein and fatty acid synthase, and inhibit 3T3-Ll fibroblast differentiation to adipocytes. Male spontaneously hypertensive rats received either 150 mg/day of berberine or saline orally for 8 weeks. Compared with the control, berberine-treated rats exhibited significant reductions in body weight gain (p < 0.05), as well as retroperitoneal and mesenteric adipose tissues (p < 0.05). Berberine-treated rats significantly decreased urinary albumin excretion, a marker of renal injury (p < 0.05). Long-term treatment with berberine decreased the adipose tissues weight and attenuated renal injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Based on these results, berberine has an important role in regulating adipose tissues. These results suggest the protective effect of berberine on metabolic syndrome related diseases, such as renal injury.

  18. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) deficiencies affect expression of lipolytic activities in mouse adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Morak, Maria; Schmidinger, Hannes; Riesenhuber, Gernot; Rechberger, Gerald N; Kollroser, Manfred; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Kronenberg, Florian; Hermetter, Albin

    2012-12-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are key enzymes involved in intracellular degradation of triacylglycerols. It was the aim of this study to elucidate how the deficiency in one of these proteins affects the residual lipolytic proteome in adipose tissue. For this purpose, we compared the lipase patterns of brown and white adipose tissue from ATGL (-/-) and HSL (-/-) mice using differential activity-based gel electrophoresis. This method is based on activity-recognition probes possessing the same substrate analogous structure but carrying different fluorophores for specific detection of the enzyme patterns of two different tissues in one electrophoresis gel. We found that ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue had a profound effect on the expression levels of other lipolytic and esterolytic enzymes in this tissue, whereas HSL-deficiency hardly showed any effect in brown adipose tissue. Neither ATGL- nor HSL-deficiency greatly influenced the lipase patterns in white adipose tissue. Enzyme activities of mouse tissues on acylglycerol substrates were analyzed as well, showing that ATGL-and HSL-deficiencies can be compensated for at least in part by other enzymes. The proteins that responded to ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue were overexpressed and their activities on acylglycerols were analyzed. Among these enzymes, Es1, Es10, and Es31-like represent lipase candidates as they catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain acylglycerols.

  19. Molecular characterization of adipose tissue in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Emeli M; Fainberg, Hernan P; Choong, Siew S; Giles, Thomas C; Sells, James; May, Sean; Stansfield, Fiona J; Allen, William R; Emes, Richard D; Mostyn, Alison; Mongan, Nigel P; Yon, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) is a dynamic and flexible organ with regulatory roles in physiological functions including metabolism, reproduction and inflammation; secreted adipokines, including leptin, and fatty acids facilitate many of these roles. The African elephant (Loxodonta africana) is experiencing serious challenges to optimal reproduction in captivity. The physiological and molecular basis of this impaired fertility remains unknown. AT production of leptin is a crucial molecular link between nutritional status, adiposity and fertility in many species. We propose that leptin has a similar function in the African elephant. African elephant visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT) was obtained from both sexes and a range of ages including females with known pregnancy status. RNA was extracted and histological sections created and analyzed by microarray, PCR and immunohistochemistry respectively. Gas-chromatography was used to determine the fatty acid composition of AT. Microarray expression profiling was used to compare gene expression profiles of AT from pre-pubertal versus reproductively competent adult African elephants. This study demonstrates, for the first time, leptin mRNA and protein expression in African elephant AT. The derived protein sequence of the elephant leptin protein was exploited to determine its relationship within the class I helical cytokine superfamily, which indicates that elephant leptin is most closely related to the leptin orthologs of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit), Lepus oiostolus (woolly hare), and members of the Ochotonidae (Pika). Immunohistological analysis identified considerable leptin staining within the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Significant differences in fatty acid profiles between pregnant and non-pregnant animals were revealed, most notably a reduction in both linoleic and α linoleic acid in pregnant animals. This report forms the basis for future studies to address the effect of nutrient composition and body

  20. Molecular Characterization of Adipose Tissue in the African Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Siew S.; Giles, Thomas C.; Sells, James; May, Sean; Stansfield, Fiona J.; Allen, William R.; Emes, Richard D.; Mostyn, Alison; Mongan, Nigel P.; Yon, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) is a dynamic and flexible organ with regulatory roles in physiological functions including metabolism, reproduction and inflammation; secreted adipokines, including leptin, and fatty acids facilitate many of these roles. The African elephant (Loxodonta africana) is experiencing serious challenges to optimal reproduction in captivity. The physiological and molecular basis of this impaired fertility remains unknown. AT production of leptin is a crucial molecular link between nutritional status, adiposity and fertility in many species. We propose that leptin has a similar function in the African elephant. African elephant visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT) was obtained from both sexes and a range of ages including females with known pregnancy status. RNA was extracted and histological sections created and analyzed by microarray, PCR and immunohistochemistry respectively. Gas-chromatography was used to determine the fatty acid composition of AT. Microarray expression profiling was used to compare gene expression profiles of AT from pre-pubertal versus reproductively competent adult African elephants. This study demonstrates, for the first time, leptin mRNA and protein expression in African elephant AT. The derived protein sequence of the elephant leptin protein was exploited to determine its relationship within the class I helical cytokine superfamily, which indicates that elephant leptin is most closely related to the leptin orthologs of Oryctolagus cuniculus (European rabbit), Lepus oiostolus (woolly hare), and members of the Ochotonidae (Pika). Immunohistological analysis identified considerable leptin staining within the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Significant differences in fatty acid profiles between pregnant and non-pregnant animals were revealed, most notably a reduction in both linoleic and α linoleic acid in pregnant animals. This report forms the basis for future studies to address the effect of nutrient composition and body

  1. Brown adipose tissue development and metabolism in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Smith, S B; Carstens, G E; Randel, R D; Mersmann, H J; Lunt, D K

    2004-03-01

    We conducted several experiments to better understand the relationship between brown adipose tissue (BAT) metabolism and thermogenesis. In Exp. 1, we examined perirenal (brown) and sternum s.c. adipose tissue in 14 Wagyu x Angus neonates infused with norepinephrine (NE). Perirenal adipocytes contained numerous large mitochondria with well-differentiated cristae; sternum s.c. adipocytes contained a few, small mitochondria, with poorly developed cristae. Lipogenesis from acetate was high in BAT but barely detectable in sternum s.c. adipose tissue. In Exp. 2, we compared perirenal and tailhead adipose tissues between NE-infused Angus (n = 6) and Brahman (n = 7) newborn calves. Brahman BAT contained two-to-three times as many total beta-receptors as Angus BAT. The mitochondrial UCP1:28S rRNA ratio was greater in Brahman BAT than in BAT from Angus calves. Lipogenesis from acetate and glucose again was high, but lipogenesis from palmitate was barely detectable. Tail-head s.c. adipose tissue from both breed types contained adipocytes with distinct brown adipocyte morphology. In Exp. 3, three fetuses of each breed type were taken at 96, 48, 24, 14, and 6 d before expected parturition, and at parturition. Lipogenesis from acetate and glucose in vitro decreased 97% during the last 96 d of gestation in both breed types, whereas the UCP1 gene expression tripled during gestation in both breed types. At birth, palmitate esterification was twice as high in Angus than in Brahman BAT and was at least 100-fold higher than in BAT from NE-infused calves from Exp. 2. Uncoupling protein-1 mRNA was readily detectable in tailhead s.c. adipose tissue in all fetal samples. In Exp. 4, male Brahman and Angus calves (n = 5 to 7 per group) were assigned to 1) newborn treatment (15 h of age), 2) 48 h of warm exposure (22 degrees C) starting at 15 h of age, or 3) 48 h of cold exposure (4 degrees C) starting at 15 h of age. Brahman BAT adipocytes shrank with cold exposure, whereas Angus BAT

  2. Adiposity-Dependent Regulatory Effects on Multi-tissue Transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Glastonbury, Craig A; Viñuela, Ana; Buil, Alfonso; Halldorsson, Gisli H; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Helgason, Hannes; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Spector, Tim D; Small, Kerrin S

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic that is causally associated with a range of diseases, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, at the population-level. However, there is marked heterogeneity in obesity-related outcomes among individuals. This might reflect genotype-dependent responses to adiposity. Given that adiposity, measured by BMI, is associated with widespread changes in gene expression and regulatory variants mediate the majority of known complex trait loci, we sought to identify gene-by-BMI (G × BMI) interactions on the regulation of gene expression in a multi-tissue RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) dataset from the TwinsUK cohort (n = 856). At a false discovery rate of 5%, we identified 16 cis G × BMI interactions (top cis interaction: CHURC1, rs7143432, p = 2.0 × 10(-12)) and one variant regulating 53 genes in trans (top trans interaction: ZNF423, rs3851570, p = 8.2 × 10(-13)), all in adipose tissue. The interactions were adipose-specific and enriched for variants overlapping adipocyte enhancers, and regulated genes were enriched for metabolic and inflammatory processes. We replicated a subset of the interactions in an independent adipose RNA-seq dataset (deCODE genetics, n = 754). We also confirmed the interactions with an alternate measure of obesity, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived visceral-fat-volume measurements, in a subset of TwinsUK individuals (n = 682). The identified G × BMI regulatory effects demonstrate the dynamic nature of gene regulation and reveal a functional mechanism underlying the heterogeneous response to obesity. Additionally, we have provided a web browser allowing interactive exploration of the dataset, including of association between expression, BMI, and G × BMI regulatory effects in four tissues. PMID:27588447

  3. Abalation of ghrelin receptor reduces adiposity and improves insulin sensitivity during aging by regulating fat metabolism in white and brown adipose tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aging is associated with increased adiposity in white adipose tissues and impaired thermogenesis in brown adipose tissues; both contribute to increased incidences of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that promotes adiposity. In this study, we show ...

  4. Ontogenetic development of adipose tissue in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin; Ji, Hong; Li, Chao; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Yifei; Yu, Ping

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the adipose tissue development process during the early stages of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) development, samples were collected from fertilized eggs to 30 days post-fertilization (dpf) of fish. Paraffin and frozen sections were taken to observe the characteristics of adipocytes in vivo by different staining methods, including hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Oil red O, and BODIPY. The expression of lipogenesis-related genes of the samples at different time points was detected by real-time qPCR. In addition, protein expression level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ (PPAR γ) was detected by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the neutral lipid droplets accumulated first in the hepatocytes of 14-dpf fish larvae, and visceral adipocytes appeared around the hepatopancreas on 16 dpf. As grass carp grew, the adipocytes increased in number and spread to other tissues. In 20-dpf fish larvae, the intestine was observed to be covered by adipose tissue. However, there was no significant change in the average size (30.40-40.01 μm) of adipocytes during this period. Accordingly, the gene expression level of PPAR γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins α (C/EBP α) was significantly elevated after fertilization for 12 days (p < 0.05), but C/EBP α declined at 20 dpf. Expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) increased from 2 to 16 dpf and then declined. In addition, immunoreaction of PPAR γ was positive on hepatocytes after fertilization for 15 days. These results implied that the early developmental stage of adipose tissue is caused by active recruitment of adipocytes as opposed to hypertrophy of the cell. In addition, our study indicated that lipogenesis-related genes might regulate the ongoing development of adipose tissue.

  5. [The adipose tissue as a regulatory center of the metabolism].

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Alaniz, Miriam H; Takada, Julie; Alonso-Vale, Maria Isabel C; Lima, Fabio Bessa

    2006-04-01

    The recent progress in the research about the metabolic properties of the adipose tissue and the discovery of its ability to produce hormones that are very active in pathophysiologic as well as physiologic processes is rebuilding the concepts about its biology. Its involvement in conditions like obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis, dislipidemias and chronic and acute inflammatory processes indicate that the understanding of its functional capacities may contribute to improve the prognosis of those diseases whose prevalence increased in a preoccupying manner. Here we review some functional aspects of adipocytes, such as the metabolism, its influence on energy homeostasis, its endocrine ability and the adipogenesis, i.e., the potential of pre-adipocytes present in adipose tissue stroma to differentiate into new adipocytes and regenerate the tissue. In addition, we are including some studies on the relationship between the adipose tissue and the pineal gland, a new and poorly known, although, as will be seen, very promising aspect of adipocyte physiology together with its possible favorable repercussions to the therapy of the obesity related diseases.

  6. Yin and Yang of hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling in regulating white adipose tissue metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Thomas; Buettner, Christoph

    2011-09-01

    Fatty acids released from white adipose tissue (WAT) provide important energy substrates during fasting. However, uncontrolled fatty acid release from WAT during non-fasting states causes lipotoxicity and promotes inflammation and insulin resistance, which can lead to and worsen type 2 diabetes (DM2). WAT is also a source for insulin sensitizing fatty acids such as palmitoleate produced during de novo lipogenesis. Insulin and leptin are two major hormonal adiposity signals that control energy homeostasis through signaling in the central nervous system. Both hormones have been implicated to regulate both WAT lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis through the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in an opposing fashion independent of their respective peripheral receptors. Here, we review the current literature on brain leptin and insulin action in regulating WAT metabolism and discuss potential mechanisms and neuro-anatomical substrates that could explain the opposing effects of central leptin and insulin. Finally, we discuss the role of impaired hypothalamic control of WAT metabolism in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, metabolic inflexibility and type 2 diabetes. PMID:21713385

  7. Maternal Obesity in Sheep Increases Fatty Acid Synthesis, Upregulates Nutrient Transporters, and Increases Adiposity in Adult Male Offspring after a Feeding Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Long, Nathan M.; Rule, Daniel C.; Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Ford, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obesity in women is increasing worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in adipose tissue metabolism and function in adult male offspring from obese and control fed mothers subjected to an ad libitum feeding challenge. We developed a model in which obese ewes were fed 150% of feed provided for controls from 60 days before mating to term. All ewes were fed to requirements during lactation. After weaning, F1 male offspring were fed only to maintenance requirements until adulthood (control = 7, obese = 6), when they were fed ad libitum for 12 weeks with intake monitored. At the end of the feeding challenge offspring were given an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT), necropsied, and adipose tissue collected. During the feeding trial F1obese males consumed more (P < 0.01), gained more weight (P < 0.01) and became heavier (P < 0.05) than F1control males. During IVGTT, Obese F1 offspring were hyperglycemic and hypoinsulinemic (P < 0.01) compared to F1 control F1. At necropsy perirenal and omental adipose depots weights were 47% and 58% greater respectively and subcutaneous fat thickness 41% greater in F1obese vs F1control males (P < 0.05). Adipocyte diameters were greater (P ≤ 0.04) in perirenal, omental and subcutaneous adipose depots in F1obese males (11, 8 and 7% increase vs. control, respectively). When adipose tissue was incubated for 2 hrs with C-14 labeled acetate, subcutaneous, perirenal, and omental adipose tissue of F1 obese males exhibited greater incorporation (290, 83, and 90% increase vs. control, respectively P < 0.05) of acetate into lipids. Expression of fatty acid transporting, binding, and syntheses mRNA and protein was increased (P < 0.05) compared to F1 control offspring. Maternal obesity increased appetite and adiposity associated with increased adipocyte diameters and increased fatty acid synthesis in over-nourished adult male offspring. PMID:25875659

  8. Adipose tissue development in extramuscular and intramuscular depots in meat animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cellular and metabolic aspects of developing intramuscular adipose tissue and other adipose tissue depots have been studied including examination of the expression of a number of genes. Depot dependent or depot “marker” genes such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase and leptin for subcutaneous adipose ti...

  9. Six Tissue Transcriptomics Reveals Specific Immune Suppression in Spleen by Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Britt G.; Peris, Eduard; Nookaew, Intawat; Grahnemo, Louise; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Jansson, John-Olov; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are suggested to modulate immune function, but the effects of dietary fatty acids composition on gene expression patterns in immune organs have not been fully characterized. In the current study we investigated how dietary fatty acids composition affects the total transcriptome profile, and especially, immune related genes in two immune organs, spleen (SPL) and bone marrow cells (BMC). Four tissues with metabolic function, skeletal muscle (SKM), white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT), and liver (LIV), were investigated as a comparison. Following 8 weeks on low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S), or HFD rich in PUFA (HFD-P), tissue transcriptomics were analyzed by microarray and metabolic health assessed by fasting blood glucose level, HOMA-IR index, oral glucose tolerance test as well as quantification of crown-like structures in WAT. HFD-P corrected the metabolic phenotype induced by HFD-S. Interestingly, SKM and BMC were relatively inert to the diets, whereas the two adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) were mainly affected by HFD per se (both HFD-S and HFD-P). In particular, WAT gene expression was driven closer to that of the immune organs SPL and BMC by HFDs. The LIV exhibited different responses to both of the HFDs. Surprisingly, the spleen showed a major response to HFD-P (82 genes differed from LFD, mostly immune genes), while it was not affected at all by HFD-S (0 genes differed from LFD). In conclusion, the quantity and composition of dietary fatty acids affected the transcriptome in distinct manners in different organs. Remarkably, dietary PUFA, but not saturated fat, prompted a specific regulation of immune related genes in the spleen, opening the possibility that PUFA can regulate immune function by influencing gene expression in this organ. PMID:27166587

  10. Heterogeneity of white adipose tissue: molecular basis and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Kelvin H M; Lam, Karen S L; Xu, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a highly heterogeneous endocrine organ. The heterogeneity among different anatomical depots stems from their intrinsic differences in cellular and physiological properties, including developmental origin, adipogenic and proliferative capacity, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, hormonal control, thermogenic ability and vascularization. Additional factors that influence adipose tissue heterogeneity are genetic predisposition, environment, gender and age. Under obese condition, these depot-specific differences translate into specific fat distribution patterns, which are closely associated with differential cardiometabolic risks. For instance, individuals with central obesity are more susceptible to developing diabetes and cardiovascular complications, whereas those with peripheral obesity are more metabolically healthy. This review summarizes the clinical and mechanistic evidence for the depot-specific differences that give rise to different metabolic consequences, and provides therapeutic insights for targeted treatment of obesity. PMID:26964831

  11. Brown adipose tissue: physiological function and evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Oelkrug, R; Polymeropoulos, E T; Jastroch, M

    2015-08-01

    In modern eutherian (placental) mammals, brown adipose tissue (BAT) evolved as a specialized thermogenic organ that is responsible for adaptive non-shivering thermogenesis (NST). For NST, energy metabolism of BAT mitochondria is increased by activation of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which dissipates the proton motive force as heat. Despite the presence of UCP1 orthologues prior to the divergence of teleost fish and mammalian lineages, UCP1's significance for thermogenic adipose tissue emerged at later evolutionary stages. Recent studies on the presence of BAT in metatherians (marsupials) and eutherians of the afrotherian clade provide novel insights into the evolution of adaptive NST in mammals. In particular studies on the 'protoendothermic' lesser hedgehog tenrec (Afrotheria) suggest an evolutionary scenario linking BAT to the onset of eutherian endothermy. Here, we review the physiological function and distribution of BAT in an evolutionary context by focusing on the latest research on phylogenetically distinct species.

  12. A role of active brown adipose tissue in cancer cachexia?

    PubMed Central

    Beijer, Emiel; Schoenmakers, Janna; Vijgen, Guy; Kessels, Fons; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Schrauwen, Patrick; Wouters, Miel; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter; Teule, Jaap; Brans, Boudewijn

    2012-01-01

    Until a few years ago, adult humans were not thought to have brown adipose tissue (BAT). Now, this is a rapidly evolving field of research with perspectives in metabolic syndromes such as obesity and new therapies targeting its bio-energetic pathways. White, brown and so-called brite adipose fat seem to be able to trans-differentiate into each other, emphasizing the dynamic nature of fat tissue for metabolism. Human and animal data in cancer cachexia to date provide some evidence for BAT activation, but its quantitative impact on energy expenditure and weight loss is controversial. Prospective clinical studies can address the potential role of BAT in cancer cachexia using 18F-fluoro- deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scanning, with careful consideration of co-factors such as diet, exposure to the cold, physical activity and body mass index, that all seem to act on BAT recruitment and activity. PMID:25992201

  13. Levels of chlordane, oxychlordane, and nonachlor in human adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Yukio; Tomokuni, Katsumaro )

    1991-08-01

    Chlordane was used as a termiticide for more than twenty years in Japan. Chlordane is stable in the environment such as sediment and its bioaccumulation in some species of bacteria, freshwater invertebrates, and marine fish is large. Many researches were done to elucidate the levels of chlordane and/or its metabolite oxychlordane in human adipose tissues. A comprehensive review concerning chlordane was recently provided by USEPA. On the other hand, Japan authorities banned the use of chlordane in September 1986. In the last paper, the authors reported that both water and sediment of the rivers around Saga city were slightly contaminated with chlordane. In the present study, they investigated the levels of chlordane, oxychlordane and nonachlor in human adipose tissues.

  14. Heterogeneity of white adipose tissue: molecular basis and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Kelvin H M; Lam, Karen S L; Xu, Aimin

    2016-03-11

    Adipose tissue is a highly heterogeneous endocrine organ. The heterogeneity among different anatomical depots stems from their intrinsic differences in cellular and physiological properties, including developmental origin, adipogenic and proliferative capacity, glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, hormonal control, thermogenic ability and vascularization. Additional factors that influence adipose tissue heterogeneity are genetic predisposition, environment, gender and age. Under obese condition, these depot-specific differences translate into specific fat distribution patterns, which are closely associated with differential cardiometabolic risks. For instance, individuals with central obesity are more susceptible to developing diabetes and cardiovascular complications, whereas those with peripheral obesity are more metabolically healthy. This review summarizes the clinical and mechanistic evidence for the depot-specific differences that give rise to different metabolic consequences, and provides therapeutic insights for targeted treatment of obesity.

  15. Prolactin (PRL) in adipose tissue: regulation and functions.

    PubMed

    Ben-Jonathan, Nira; Hugo, Eric

    2015-01-01

    New information concerning the effects of prolactin (PRL) on metabolic processes warrants reevaluation of its overall metabolic actions. PRL affects metabolic homeostasis by regulating key enzymes and transporters associated with glucose and lipid metabolism in several target organs. In the lactating mammary gland, PRL increases the production of milk proteins, lactose, and lipids. In adipose tissue, PRL generally suppresses lipid storage and adipokine release and affect adipogenesis. A specific case is made for PRL in the human breast and adipose tissues, where it acts as a circulating hormone and an autocrine/paracrine factor. Although its overall effects on body composition are both modest and species-specific, PRL may be involved in the manifestation of insulin resistance.

  16. Fully automated adipose tissue measurement on abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Sussman, Daniel L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Obesity has become widespread in America and has been associated as a risk factor for many illnesses. Adipose tissue (AT) content, especially visceral AT (VAT), is an important indicator for risks of many disorders, including heart disease and diabetes. Measuring adipose tissue (AT) with traditional means is often unreliable and inaccurate. CT provides a means to measure AT accurately and consistently. We present a fully automated method to segment and measure abdominal AT in CT. Our method integrates image preprocessing which attempts to correct for image artifacts and inhomogeneities. We use fuzzy cmeans to cluster AT regions and active contour models to separate subcutaneous and visceral AT. We tested our method on 50 abdominal CT scans and evaluated the correlations between several measurements.

  17. Technical note: Alternatives to reduce adipose tissue sampling bias.

    PubMed

    Cruz, G D; Wang, Y; Fadel, J G

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which nutritional and pharmaceutical factors can manipulate adipose tissue growth and development in production animals has direct and indirect effects in the profitability of an enterprise. Adipocyte cellularity (number and size) is a key biological response that is commonly measured in animal science research. The variability and sampling of adipocyte cellularity within a muscle has been addressed in previous studies, but no attempt to critically investigate these issues has been proposed in the literature. The present study evaluated 2 sampling techniques (random and systematic) in an attempt to minimize sampling bias and to determine the minimum number of samples from 1 to 15 needed to represent the overall adipose tissue in the muscle. Both sampling procedures were applied on adipose tissue samples dissected from 30 longissimus muscles from cattle finished either on grass or grain. Briefly, adipose tissue samples were fixed with osmium tetroxide, and size and number of adipocytes were determined by a Coulter Counter. These results were then fit in a finite mixture model to obtain distribution parameters of each sample. To evaluate the benefits of increasing number of samples and the advantage of the new sampling technique, the concept of acceptance ratio was used; simply stated, the higher the acceptance ratio, the better the representation of the overall population. As expected, a great improvement on the estimation of the overall adipocyte cellularity parameters was observed using both sampling techniques when sample size number increased from 1 to 15 samples, considering both techniques' acceptance ratio increased from approximately 3 to 25%. When comparing sampling techniques, the systematic procedure slightly improved parameters estimation. The results suggest that more detailed research using other sampling techniques may provide better estimates for minimum sampling.

  18. An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vernia, Santiago; Edwards, Yvonne JK; Han, Myoung Sook; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17672.001 PMID:27635635

  19. Positive Association Between Adipose Tissue and Bone Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Berg, R M; Wallaschofski, H; Nauck, M; Rettig, R; Markus, M R P; Laqua, R; Friedrich, N; Hannemann, A

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is often considered to have a protective effect against osteoporosis. On the other hand, several recent studies suggest that adipose tissue may have detrimental effects on bone quality. We therefore aimed to investigate the associations between body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), visceral adipose tissue (VAT) or abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), and bone stiffness. The study involved 2685 German adults aged 20-79 years, who participated in either the second follow-up of the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-2) or the baseline examination of the SHIP-Trend cohort. VAT and abdominal SAT were quantified by magnetic resonance imaging. Bone stiffness was assessed by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) at the heel (Achilles InSight, GE Healthcare). The individual risk for osteoporotic fractures was determined based on the QUS-derived stiffness index and classified in low, medium, and high risk. Linear regression models, adjusted for sex, age, physical activity, smoking status, risky alcohol consumption, diabetes, and height (in models with VAT or abdominal SAT as exposure), revealed positive associations between BMI, WC, VAT or abdominal SAT, and the QUS variables broadband-ultrasound attenuation or stiffness index. Moreover, BMI was positively associated with speed of sound. Our study shows that all anthropometric measures including BMI and, WC as well as abdominal fat volume are positively associated with bone stiffness in the general population. As potential predictors of bone stiffness, VAT and abdominal SAT are not superior to easily available measures like BMI or WC.

  20. Deep sequencing of the transcriptome reveals inflammatory features of porcine visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Anan; Guo, Yanqin; Tan, Ya; Tang, Guoqing; Mai, Miaomiao; Liu, Haifeng; Xiao, Jian; Li, Mingzhou; Li, Xuewei

    2013-01-01

    Functional differences in the different types of adipose tissue and the impact of their dysfunction on metabolism are associated with the regional distribution of adipose depots. Here we show a genome-wide comparison between the transcriptomes of one source of subcutaneous and two sources of visceral adipose tissue in the pig using an RNA-seq approach. We obtained ~32.3 million unique mapped reads which covered ~80.2% of the current annotated transcripts across these three sources of adipose tissue. We identified various genes differentially expressed between subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, which are potentially associated with the inflammatory features of visceral adipose tissue. These results are of benefit for understanding the phenotypic, metabolic and functional differences between different types of adipose tissue that are deposited in different body sites.

  1. How selected tissues of lactating holstein cows respond to dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Beate; Angulo, Joaquin; Olivera, Martha; Nuernberg, Gerd; Nuernberg, Karin

    2013-04-01

    The effect of a 10-week supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids [via sunflower oil/DHA-rich algae (SUNA) or linseed oil/DHA-rich algae (LINA) enriched diets] versus saturated fatty acids (SAT) of lactating German Holstein dairy cows in mid-lactation on expression patterns of lipid metabolism-associated genes and gene products in hepatic, longissimus muscle and subcutaneous/perirenal/omental adipose tissue was assessed. Most pronounced transcriptomic responses to dietary PUFA were obtained in hepatic [down-regulated ACACA (FC = 0.83, SUNA; FC = 0.86, LINA), FADS1 (FC = 0.60, SUNA; FC = 0.72, LINA), FADS2 (FC = 0.64, SUNA; FC = 0.79, LINA), FASN (FC = 0.64, SUNA; FC = 0.72, LINA), SCD (FC = 0.37, SUNA; FC = 0.47, LINA) and SREBF1 (FC = 0.79, SUNA, LINA) expression] and omental adipose [up-regulated ACACA (FC = 1.58, SUNA; FC = 1.22, LINA), ADFP (FC = 1.33, SUNA; FC = 1.32, LINA), CEBPA (FC = 1.75, SUNA; FC = 1.40, LINA), FASN (FC = 1.57, SUNA; FC = 1.21, LINA), LPL (FC = 1.50, SUNA; FC = 1.20, LINA), PPARG (FC = 1.36, SUNA; FC = 1.12, LINA), SCD (FC = 1.41, SUNA; FC = 1.17, LINA) and SREBF1 (FC = 1.56, SUNA; FC = 1.18, LINA) expression] tissue. Interestingly, gene/gene product associations were comparatively low in hepatic and omental adipose tissue compared with longissimus muscle, perirenal adipose and subcutaneous adipose tissue, indicating matches only in regard to minor concentrations of SCD product 18:1c9, FADS1 product 20:4n-6 and FADS2 product 18:3n-6 in hepatic tissue, and higher concentrations of ACACA and FASN gene products 12:0 and 14:0 and SCD product 18:2c9,t11 in omental adipose tissue. Whereas all analyzed tissues accumulated dietary PUFA and their ruminally generated biohydrogenation products, tissue-divergent preferences for certain fatty acids were identified. This descriptive study reports tissue-divergent effects of dietary PUFA and outlines the significance of a PUFA intervention

  2. How selected tissues of lactating holstein cows respond to dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Beate; Angulo, Joaquin; Olivera, Martha; Nuernberg, Gerd; Nuernberg, Karin

    2013-04-01

    The effect of a 10-week supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids [via sunflower oil/DHA-rich algae (SUNA) or linseed oil/DHA-rich algae (LINA) enriched diets] versus saturated fatty acids (SAT) of lactating German Holstein dairy cows in mid-lactation on expression patterns of lipid metabolism-associated genes and gene products in hepatic, longissimus muscle and subcutaneous/perirenal/omental adipose tissue was assessed. Most pronounced transcriptomic responses to dietary PUFA were obtained in hepatic [down-regulated ACACA (FC = 0.83, SUNA; FC = 0.86, LINA), FADS1 (FC = 0.60, SUNA; FC = 0.72, LINA), FADS2 (FC = 0.64, SUNA; FC = 0.79, LINA), FASN (FC = 0.64, SUNA; FC = 0.72, LINA), SCD (FC = 0.37, SUNA; FC = 0.47, LINA) and SREBF1 (FC = 0.79, SUNA, LINA) expression] and omental adipose [up-regulated ACACA (FC = 1.58, SUNA; FC = 1.22, LINA), ADFP (FC = 1.33, SUNA; FC = 1.32, LINA), CEBPA (FC = 1.75, SUNA; FC = 1.40, LINA), FASN (FC = 1.57, SUNA; FC = 1.21, LINA), LPL (FC = 1.50, SUNA; FC = 1.20, LINA), PPARG (FC = 1.36, SUNA; FC = 1.12, LINA), SCD (FC = 1.41, SUNA; FC = 1.17, LINA) and SREBF1 (FC = 1.56, SUNA; FC = 1.18, LINA) expression] tissue. Interestingly, gene/gene product associations were comparatively low in hepatic and omental adipose tissue compared with longissimus muscle, perirenal adipose and subcutaneous adipose tissue, indicating matches only in regard to minor concentrations of SCD product 18:1c9, FADS1 product 20:4n-6 and FADS2 product 18:3n-6 in hepatic tissue, and higher concentrations of ACACA and FASN gene products 12:0 and 14:0 and SCD product 18:2c9,t11 in omental adipose tissue. Whereas all analyzed tissues accumulated dietary PUFA and their ruminally generated biohydrogenation products, tissue-divergent preferences for certain fatty acids were identified. This descriptive study reports tissue-divergent effects of dietary PUFA and outlines the significance of a PUFA intervention

  3. Effect of sex and age on bovine muscle and adipose fatty acid composition and stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Bartoň, L; Bureš, D; Kott, T; Rehák, D

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of sex and slaughter age on the fatty acid (FA) composition and stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene expression in muscle and adipose tissue. Twenty-four Charolais × Simmental crossbred bulls and heifers were raised under similar conditions and slaughtered at 14 or 18 months of age. The total amount of FA in muscle increased markedly in older animals with higher contents of monounsaturated FA (MUFA) in heifers than bulls. The proportions of MUFA and desaturation indices were higher in heifers, whereas polyunsaturated FA were higher in bulls in both muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue. The results of this study demonstrated sex-dependent differences in the FA composition of muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue from cattle slaughtered at different ages. The expression of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene was higher in the adipose tissue of heifers compared to bulls, and its variation partly contributed to sex- and age-differences in the FA composition of bovine adipose tissue.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Human Tissue-Engineered Adipose Substitutes.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Maryse; Aubin, Kim; Lagueux, Jean; Audet, Pierre; Auger, Michèle; Fortin, Marc-André; Fradette, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) substitutes are being developed to answer the strong demand in reconstructive surgery. To facilitate the validation of their functional performance in vivo, and to avoid resorting to excessive number of animals, it is crucial at this stage to develop biomedical imaging methodologies, enabling the follow-up of reconstructed AT substitutes. Until now, biomedical imaging of AT substitutes has scarcely been reported in the literature. Therefore, the optimal parameters enabling good resolution, appropriate contrast, and graft delineation, as well as blood perfusion validation, must be studied and reported. In this study, human adipose substitutes produced from adipose-derived stem/stromal cells using the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering were implanted into athymic mice. The fate of the reconstructed AT substitutes implanted in vivo was successfully followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is the imaging modality of choice for visualizing soft ATs. T1-weighted images allowed clear delineation of the grafts, followed by volume integration. The magnetic resonance (MR) signal of reconstructed AT was studied in vitro by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). This confirmed the presence of a strong triglyceride peak of short longitudinal proton relaxation time (T1) values (200 ± 53 ms) in reconstructed AT substitutes (total T1=813 ± 76 ms), which establishes a clear signal difference between adjacent muscle, connective tissue, and native fat (total T1 ~300 ms). Graft volume retention was followed up to 6 weeks after implantation, revealing a gradual resorption rate averaging at 44% of initial substitute's volume. In addition, vascular perfusion measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI confirmed the graft's vascularization postimplantation (14 and 21 days after grafting). Histological analysis of the grafted tissues revealed the persistence of numerous adipocytes without evidence of cysts or tissue necrosis. This study

  5. Hypothalamus-adipose tissue crosstalk: neuropeptide Y and the regulation of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an orexigenic neuropeptide that plays a role in regulating adiposity by promoting energy storage in white adipose tissue and inhibiting brown adipose tissue activation in mammals. This review describes mechanisms underlying NPY's effects on adipose tissue energy metabolism, with an emphasis on cellular proliferation, adipogenesis, lipid deposition, and lipolysis in white adipose tissue, and brown fat activation and thermogenesis. In general, NPY promotes adipocyte differentiation and lipid accumulation, leading to energy storage in adipose tissue, with effects mediated mainly through NPY receptor sub-types 1 and 2. This review highlights hypothalamus-sympathetic nervous system-adipose tissue innervation and adipose tissue-hypothalamus feedback loops as pathways underlying these effects. Potential sources of NPY that mediate adipose effects include the bloodstream, sympathetic nerve terminals that innervate the adipose tissue, as well as adipose tissue-derived cells. Understanding the role of central vs. peripherally-derived NPY in whole-body energy balance could shed light on mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of obesity. This information may provide some insight into searching for alternative therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases.

  6. Regulation of lipid flux between liver and adipose tissue during transient hepatic steatosis in carnitine-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Degrace, Pascal; Demizieux, Laurent; Du, Zhen-Yu; Gresti, Joseph; Caverot, Laurent; Djaouti, Louiza; Jourdan, Tony; Moindrot, Bastien; Guilland, Jean-Claude; Hocquette, Jean-François; Clouet, Pierre

    2007-07-20

    Rats with carnitine deficiency due to trimethylhydrazinium propionate (mildronate) administered at 80 mg/100 g body weight per day for 10 days developed liver steatosis only upon fasting. This study aimed to determine whether the transient steatosis resulted from triglyceride accumulation due to the amount of fatty acids preserved through impaired fatty acid oxidation and/or from up-regulation of lipid exchange between liver and adipose tissue. In liver, mildronate decreased the carnitine content by approximately 13-fold and, in fasted rats, lowered the palmitate oxidation rate by 50% in the perfused organ, increased 9-fold the triglyceride content, and doubled the hepatic very low density lipoprotein secretion rate. Concomitantly, triglyceridemia was 13-fold greater than in controls. Hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I activity and palmitate oxidation capacities measured in vitro were increased after treatment. Gene expression of hepatic proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride formation, and lipid uptake were all increased and were associated with increased hepatic free fatty acid content in treated rats. In periepididymal adipose tissue, mildronate markedly increased lipoprotein lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase activities in fed and fasted rats, respectively. On refeeding, carnitine-depleted rats exhibited a rapid decrease in blood triglycerides and free fatty acids, then after approximately 2 h, a marked drop of liver triglycerides and a progressive decrease in liver free fatty acids. Data show that up-regulation of liver activities, peripheral lipolysis, and lipoprotein lipase activity were likely essential factors for excess fat deposit and release alternately occurring in liver and adipose tissue of carnitine-depleted rats during the fed/fasted transition.

  7. High-fat diet induces changes in adipose tissue trans-4-oxo-2-nonenal and trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels in a depot-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Long, Eric K; Olson, Dalay M; Bernlohr, David A

    2013-10-01

    Protein carbonylation is the covalent modification of proteins by α,β-unsaturated aldehydes produced by nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The most widely studied aldehyde product of lipid peroxidation, trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), is associated with obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction and has demonstrated reactivity toward key proteins involved in cellular function. However, 4-HNE is only one of many lipid peroxidation products and the lipid aldehyde profile in adipose tissue has not been characterized. To further understand the role of oxidative stress in obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction, a novel LC-MS/MS method was developed to evaluate aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation and applied to the analysis of adipose tissue. 4-HNE and trans-4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE) were the most abundant aldehydes present in adipose tissue. In high fat-fed C57Bl/6J and ob/ob mice the levels of lipid peroxidation products were increased 5- to 11-fold in epididymal adipose, unchanged in brown adipose, but decreased in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Epididymal adipose tissue of high fat-fed mice also exhibited increased levels of proteins modified by 4-HNE and 4-ONE, whereas subcutaneous adipose tissue levels of these modifications were decreased. High fat feeding of C57Bl/6J mice resulted in decreased expression of a number of genes linked to antioxidant biology selectively in epididymal adipose tissue. Moreover, TNFα treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in decreased expression of GSTA4, GPx4, and Prdx3 while upregulating the expression of SOD2. These results suggest that inflammatory cytokines selectively downregulate antioxidant gene expression in visceral adipose tissue, resulting in elevated lipid aldehydes and increased protein carbonylation.

  8. High Fat Diet Induces Changes in Adipose Tissue trans-4-Oxo-2-Nonenal and trans-4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal Levels in a Depot-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Long, Eric K.; Olson, Dalay M.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is the covalent modification of proteins by α,β-unsaturated aldehydes produced by non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The most widely studied aldehyde product of lipid peroxidation, trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), is associated with obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction and has demonstrated reactivity toward key proteins involved in cellular function. However, 4-HNE is only one of many lipid peroxidation products and the lipid aldehyde profile in adipose tissue has not been characterized. To further understand the role of oxidative stress in obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction, a novel LC-MS/MS method was developed to evaluate aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation and applied to the analysis of adipose tissue. 4-HNE and trans-4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE) were the most abundant aldehydes present in adipose tissue. In high fat fed C57Bl/6J and ob/ob mice the levels of lipid peroxidation products were increased 5–11 fold in epididymal adipose, unchanged in brown adipose but decreased in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Epididymal adipose tissue of high fat fed mice also exhibited increased levels of proteins modified by 4-HNE and 4-ONE while subcutaneous adipose tissue levels of these modifications were decreased. High fat feeding of C57Bl/6J mice resulted in decreased expression of a number of genes linked to antioxidant biology selectively in epididymal adipose tissue. Moreover, TNFα treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in decreased expression of GSTA4, GPx4, and Prdx3 while up regulating the expression of SOD2. These results suggest that inflammatory cytokines selectively down regulate antioxidant gene expression in visceral adipose tissue resulting in elevated lipid aldehydes and increased protein carbonylation. PMID:23726997

  9. Laser light propagation in adipose tissue and laser effects on adipose cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efraín; Rebolledo, Aldo; Gutierrez, Oscar; Criollo, William; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, José; Ramírez, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Recently Neira et al. have presented a new liposuction technique that demonstrated the movement of fat from inside to outside of the cell, using a low-level laser device during a liposuction procedure with Ultrawet solution. The clinical observations, allowed this new surgical development, started a set of physical, histological and pharmacological studies aimed to determine the mechanisms involved in the observed fat mobilization concomitant to external laser application in liposuction procedures. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, studies show that the cellular arrangement of normal adipose tissue changes when laser light from a diode laser: 10 mW, 635 nm is applied. Laser exposures longer than 6 minutes cause the total destruction of the adipocyte panicles. Detailed observation of the adipose cells show that by short irradiation times (less than four minutes) the cell membrane exhibits dark zones, that collapse by longer laser exposures. Optical measurements show that effective penetration length depends on the laser intensity. Moreover, the light scattering is enhanced by diffraction and subsequent interference effects, and the tumescent solution produces a clearing of the tissue optical medium. Finally, isolate adipose cell observation show that fat release from adipocytes is a concomitant effect between the tumescent solution (adrenaline) and laser light, revealing a synergism which conduces to the aperture, and maybe the disruption, of the cell membrane. All these studies were consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from inside the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides a strong modification of the cellular membranes.

  10. Adipose-derived stromal cells mediate in vivo adipogenesis, angiogenesis and inflammation in decellularized adipose tissue bioscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Han, Tim Tian Y; Toutounji, Sandra; Amsden, Brian G; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-12-01

    Decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) has shown promise as an adipogenic bioscaffold for soft tissue augmentation and reconstruction. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of allogeneic adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) on in vivo fat regeneration in DAT bioscaffolds using an immunocompetent rat model. ASC seeding significantly enhanced angiogenesis and adipogenesis, with cell tracking studies indicating that the newly-forming tissues were host-derived. Incorporating ASCs also mediated the inflammatory response and promoted a more constructive macrophage phenotype. A fraction of the CD163(+) macrophages in the implants expressed adipogenic markers, with higher levels of this "adipocyte-like" phenotype in proximity to the developing adipose tissues. Our results indicate that the combination of ASCs and adipose extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an inductive microenvironment for adipose regeneration mediated by infiltrating host cell populations. The DAT scaffolds are a useful tissue-specific model system for investigating the mechanisms of in vivo adipogenesis that may help to develop a better understanding of this complex process in the context of both regeneration and disease. Overall, combining adipose-derived matrices with ASCs is a highly promising approach for the in situ regeneration of host-derived adipose tissue.

  11. Adipose-derived stromal cells mediate in vivo adipogenesis, angiogenesis and inflammation in decellularized adipose tissue bioscaffolds.

    PubMed

    Han, Tim Tian Y; Toutounji, Sandra; Amsden, Brian G; Flynn, Lauren E

    2015-12-01

    Decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) has shown promise as an adipogenic bioscaffold for soft tissue augmentation and reconstruction. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of allogeneic adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) on in vivo fat regeneration in DAT bioscaffolds using an immunocompetent rat model. ASC seeding significantly enhanced angiogenesis and adipogenesis, with cell tracking studies indicating that the newly-forming tissues were host-derived. Incorporating ASCs also mediated the inflammatory response and promoted a more constructive macrophage phenotype. A fraction of the CD163(+) macrophages in the implants expressed adipogenic markers, with higher levels of this "adipocyte-like" phenotype in proximity to the developing adipose tissues. Our results indicate that the combination of ASCs and adipose extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an inductive microenvironment for adipose regeneration mediated by infiltrating host cell populations. The DAT scaffolds are a useful tissue-specific model system for investigating the mechanisms of in vivo adipogenesis that may help to develop a better understanding of this complex process in the context of both regeneration and disease. Overall, combining adipose-derived matrices with ASCs is a highly promising approach for the in situ regeneration of host-derived adipose tissue. PMID:26360790

  12. Human tissue lipids: occurrence of fatty acid isomers from dietary hydrogenated oils.

    PubMed

    Ohlrogge, J B; Emken, E A; Gulley, R M

    1981-08-01

    Hydrogenation of vegetable oils produces fatty acids with unusual structures having trans double bonds and double bonds in new positions of the acyl chain. This study was designed to determine which of these fatty acid isomers are incorporated or accumulated in humans during long-term dietary consumption of hydrogenated fats. The double bond position and configuration of the octadecenoate fraction of total lipids extracted from human heart, brain, liver, aorta, and adipose tissue were determined. The level of trans octadecenoate in the tissues as determined by both direct gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) and by GLC after silver nitrate thin-layer chromatography ranged between 0.4 and 5.0%, with an average of 2.7%. Tissues were found to contain trans-octadecenoic isomers having double bonds between the 6 and 15 positions, whereas cis double bonds were found to occur between the 6 and 14 positions. The distribution of double bonds in adipose tissue correlated very closely with the composition of dietary hydrogenated fat. Thus, essentially all of the unusual octadecenoic fatty acid isomers that are produced during vegetable oil hydrogenation are incorporated into human tissue. However, in contrast to results of short-term (1-6 months) feeding studies of animals, our results suggest that long-term (20-60 years) consumption of hydrogenated fats by humans does not lead to substantial preferential accumulation of positional isomers in human tissue total lipids.

  13. Increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression levels in visceral adipose tissue, and serum CCL2 and interleukin-6 levels during visceral adipose tissue accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yogarajah, Thaneswary; Bee, Yvonne-Tee Get; Noordin, Rahmah; Yin, Khoo Boon

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in visceral adipose tissue, as well as serum adipokine levels, in Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were fed either a normal (control rats) or excessive (experimental rats) intake of food for 8 or 16 weeks, then sacrificed, at which time visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, as well as blood samples, were collected. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PPARs in the visceral adipose tissues were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. In addition, the levels of adipokines in the serum samples were determined using commercial ELISA kits. The results revealed that at 8 weeks, the mass of subcutaneous adipose tissue was higher than that of the visceral adipose tissue in the experimental rats, but the reverse occurred at 16 weeks. Furthermore, at 16 weeks the experimental rats exhibited an upregulation of PPARγ mRNA and protein expression levels in the visceral adipose tissues, and significant increases in the serum levels of CCL2 and interleukin (IL)-6 were observed, compared with those measured at 8 weeks. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the PPARγ expression level was likely correlated with serum levels of CCL2 and IL-6, molecules that may facilitate visceral adipose tissue accumulation. In addition, the levels of the two adipokines in the serum may be useful as surrogate biomarkers for the expression levels of PPARγ in accumulated visceral adipose tissues.

  14. Regulation of glucose homoeostasis by brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Vivian; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has emerged as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. Activation of BAT in human beings could also have beneficial metabolic effects that might resolve common complications of obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, by ameliorating the glucolipotoxic pathological changes that underlie the development of peripheral insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion due to pancreatic β-cell failure. Evidence from rodent models suggests that BAT activation improves glucose homoeostasis through several mechanisms, which could point to new strategies to optimise stimulation of BAT in human beings and reverse insulin resistance in peripheral tissues.

  15. Adjustment of directly measured adipose tissue volume in infants

    PubMed Central

    Gale, C; Santhakumaran, S; Wells, J C K; Modi, N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Direct measurement of adipose tissue (AT) using magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used to characterise infant body composition. Optimal techniques for adjusting direct measures of infant AT remain to be determined. Objectives: To explore the relationships between body size and direct measures of total and regional AT, the relationship between AT depots representing the metabolic load of adiposity and to determine optimal methods of adjusting adiposity in early life. Design: Analysis of regional AT volume (ATV) measured using magnetic resonance imaging in longitudinal and cross-sectional studies. Subjects: Healthy term infants; 244 in the first month (1–31 days), 72 in early infancy (42–91 days). Methods: The statistical validity of commonly used indices adjusting adiposity for body size was examined. Valid indices, defined as mathematical independence of the index from its denominator, to adjust ATV for body size and metabolic load of adiposity were determined using log-log regression analysis. Results: Indices commonly used to adjust ATV are significantly correlated with body size. Most regional AT depots are optimally adjusted using the index ATV/(height)3 in the first month and ATV/(height)2 in early infancy. Using these indices, height accounts for<2% of the variation in the index for almost all AT depots. Internal abdominal (IA) ATV was optimally adjusted for subcutaneous abdominal (SCA) ATV by calculating IA/SCA0.6. Conclusions: Statistically optimal indices for adjusting directly measured ATV for body size are ATV/height3 in the neonatal period and ATV/height2 in early infancy. The ratio IA/SCA ATV remains significantly correlated with SCA in both the neonatal period and early infancy; the index IA/SCA0.6 is statistically optimal at both of these ages. PMID:24662695

  16. Expression of ceramide-metabolising enzymes in subcutaneous and intra-abdominal human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammation and increased ceramide concentrations characterise adipose tissue of obese women with high liver fat content compared to equally obese women with normal liver fat content. The present study characterises enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism in subcutaneous and intra-abdominal adipose tissue. Methods Pathways leading to increased ceramide concentrations in inflamed versus non-inflamed adipose tissue were investigated by quantifying expression levels of key enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism. Sphingomyelinases (sphingomyelin phosphodiesterases SMPD1-3) were investigated further using immunohistochemistry to establish their location within adipose tissue, and their mRNA expression levels were determined in subcutaneous and intra-abdominal adipose tissue from both non-obese and obese subject. Results Gene expression levels of sphingomyelinases, enzymes that hydrolyse sphingomyelin to ceramide, rather than enzymes involved in de novo ceramide synthesis, were higher in inflamed compared to non-inflamed adipose tissue of obese women (with high and normal liver fat contents respectively). Sphingomyelinases were localised to both macrophages and adipocytes, but also to blood vessels and to extracellular regions surrounding vessels within adipose tissue. Expression levels of SMPD3 mRNA correlated significantly with concentrations of different ceramides and sphingomyelins. In both non-obese and obese subjects SMPD3 mRNA levels were higher in the more inflamed intra-abdominal compared to the subcutaneous adipose tissue depot. Conclusions Generation of ceramides within adipose tissue as a result of sphingomyelinase action may contribute to inflammation in human adipose tissue. PMID:22974251

  17. Sucrose Counteracts the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Fish Oil in Adipose Tissue and Increases Obesity Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tao; Liaset, Bjørn; Hao, Qin; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Fjære, Even; Ngo, Ha Thi; Lillefosse, Haldis Haukås; Ringholm, Stine; Sonne, Si Brask; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Pilegaard, Henriette; Frøyland, Livar; Kristiansen, Karsten; Madsen, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) are reported to protect against high fat diet-induced obesity and inflammation in adipose tissue. Here we aimed to investigate if the amount of sucrose in the background diet influences the ability of n-3 PUFAs to protect against diet-induced obesity, adipose tissue inflammation and glucose intolerance. Methodology/Principal Findings We fed C57BL/6J mice a protein- (casein) or sucrose-based high fat diet supplemented with fish oil or corn oil for 9 weeks. Irrespective of the fatty acid source, mice fed diets rich in sucrose became obese whereas mice fed high protein diets remained lean. Inclusion of sucrose in the diet also counteracted the well-known anti-inflammatory effect of fish oil in adipose tissue, but did not impair the ability of fish oil to prevent accumulation of fat in the liver. Calculation of HOMA-IR indicated that mice fed high levels of proteins remained insulin sensitive, whereas insulin sensitivity was reduced in the obese mice fed sucrose irrespectively of the fat source. We show that a high fat diet decreased glucose tolerance in the mice independently of both obesity and dietary levels of n-3 PUFAs and sucrose. Of note, increasing the protein∶sucrose ratio in high fat diets decreased energy efficiency irrespective of fat source. This was accompanied by increased expression of Ppargc1a (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, gamma, coactivator 1 alpha) and increased gluconeogenesis in the fed state. Conclusions/Significance The background diet influence the ability of n-3 PUFAs to protect against development of obesity, glucose intolerance and adipose tissue inflammation. High levels of dietary sucrose counteract the anti-inflammatory effect of fish oil in adipose tissue and increases obesity development in mice. PMID:21738749

  18. The role of GH in adipose tissue: lessons from adipose-specific GH receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Funk, Kevin; Gosney, Elahu S; Jara, Adam; Kelder, Bruce; Wang, Xinyue; Kutz, Laura; Troike, Katie; Lozier, Nicholas; Mikula, Vincent; Lubbers, Ellen R; Zhang, Han; Vesel, Clare; Junnila, Riia K; Frank, Stuart J; Masternak, Michal M; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J

    2013-03-01

    GH receptor (GHR) gene-disrupted mice (GHR-/-) have provided countless discoveries as to the numerous actions of GH. Many of these discoveries highlight the importance of GH in adipose tissue. For example GHR-/- mice are insulin sensitive yet obese with preferential enlargement of the sc adipose depot. GHR-/- mice also have elevated levels of leptin, resistin, and adiponectin, compared with controls leading some to suggest that GH may negatively regulate certain adipokines. To help clarify the role that GH exerts specifically on adipose tissue in vivo, we selectively disrupted GHR in adipose tissue to produce Fat GHR Knockout (FaGHRKO) mice. Surprisingly, FaGHRKOs shared only a few characteristics with global GHR-/- mice. Like the GHR-/- mice, FaGHRKO mice are obese with increased total body fat and increased adipocyte size. However, FaGHRKO mice have increases in all adipose depots with no improvements in measures of glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, resistin and adiponectin levels in FaGHRKO mice are similar to controls (or slightly decreased) unlike the increased levels found in GHR-/- mice, suggesting that GH does not regulate these adipokines directly in adipose tissue in vivo. Other features of FaGHRKO mice include decreased levels of adipsin, a near-normal GH/IGF-1 axis, and minimal changes to a large assortment of circulating factors that were measured such as IGF-binding proteins. In conclusion, specific removal of GHR in adipose tissue is sufficient to increase adipose tissue and decrease circulating adipsin. However, removal of GHR in adipose tissue alone is not sufficient to increase levels of resistin or adiponectin and does not alter glucose metabolism. PMID:23349524

  19. Central Nervous System Regulation of Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Madden, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermogenesis, the production of heat energy, in brown adipose tissue is a significant component of the homeostatic repertoire to maintain body temperature during the challenge of low environmental temperature in many species from mouse to man and plays a key role in elevating body temperature during the febrile response to infection. The sympathetic neural outflow determining brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is regulated by neural networks in the CNS which increase BAT sympathetic nerve activity in response to cutaneous and deep body thermoreceptor signals. Many behavioral states, including wakefulness, immunologic responses, and stress, are characterized by elevations in core body temperature to which central command-driven BAT activation makes a significant contribution. Since energy consumption during BAT thermogenesis involves oxidation of lipid and glucose fuel molecules, the CNS network driving cold-defensive and behavioral state-related BAT activation is strongly influenced by signals reflecting the short and long-term availability of the fuel molecules essential for BAT metabolism and, in turn, the regulation of BAT thermogenesis in response to metabolic signals can contribute to energy balance, regulation of body adipose stores and glucose utilization. This review summarizes our understanding of the functional organization and neurochemical influences within the CNS networks that modulate the level of BAT sympathetic nerve activity to produce the thermoregulatory and metabolic alterations in BAT thermogenesis and BAT energy expenditure that contribute to overall energy homeostasis and the autonomic support of behavior. PMID:25428857

  20. Mechanobiology and Mechanotherapy of Adipose Tissue-Effect of Mechanical Force on Fat Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Our bodies are subjected to various mechanical forces, which in turn affect both the structure and function of our bodies. In particular, these mechanical forces play an important role in tissue growth and regeneration. Adipocytes and adipose-derived stem cells are both mechanosensitive and mechanoresponsive. The aim of this review is to summarize the relationship between mechanobiology and adipogenesis. PubMed was used to search for articles using the following keywords: mechanobiology, adipogenesis, adipose-derived stem cells, and cytoskeleton. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that adipogenesis is strongly promoted/inhibited by various internal and external mechanical forces, and that these effects are mediated by changes in the cytoskeleton of adipose-derived stem cells and/or various signaling pathways. Thus, adipose tissue engineering could be enhanced by the careful application of mechanical forces. It was shown recently that mature adipose tissue regenerates in an adipose tissue-engineering chamber. This observation has great potential for the reconstruction of soft tissue deficiencies, but the mechanisms behind it remain to be elucidated. On the basis of our understanding of mechanobiology, we hypothesize that the chamber removes mechanical force on the fat that normally impose high cytoskeletal tension. The reduction in tension in adipose stem cells triggers their differentiation into adipocytes. The improvement in our understanding of the relationship between mechanobiology and adipogenesis means that in the near future, we may be able to increase or decrease body fat, as needed in the clinic, by controlling the tension that is loaded onto fat. PMID:26894003

  1. Mechanobiology and Mechanotherapy of Adipose Tissue-Effect of Mechanical Force on Fat Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Ogawa, Rei

    2015-12-01

    Our bodies are subjected to various mechanical forces, which in turn affect both the structure and function of our bodies. In particular, these mechanical forces play an important role in tissue growth and regeneration. Adipocytes and adipose-derived stem cells are both mechanosensitive and mechanoresponsive. The aim of this review is to summarize the relationship between mechanobiology and adipogenesis. PubMed was used to search for articles using the following keywords: mechanobiology, adipogenesis, adipose-derived stem cells, and cytoskeleton. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that adipogenesis is strongly promoted/inhibited by various internal and external mechanical forces, and that these effects are mediated by changes in the cytoskeleton of adipose-derived stem cells and/or various signaling pathways. Thus, adipose tissue engineering could be enhanced by the careful application of mechanical forces. It was shown recently that mature adipose tissue regenerates in an adipose tissue-engineering chamber. This observation has great potential for the reconstruction of soft tissue deficiencies, but the mechanisms behind it remain to be elucidated. On the basis of our understanding of mechanobiology, we hypothesize that the chamber removes mechanical force on the fat that normally impose high cytoskeletal tension. The reduction in tension in adipose stem cells triggers their differentiation into adipocytes. The improvement in our understanding of the relationship between mechanobiology and adipogenesis means that in the near future, we may be able to increase or decrease body fat, as needed in the clinic, by controlling the tension that is loaded onto fat.

  2. n3 PUFAs do not affect adipose tissue inflammation in overweight to moderately obese men and women.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Mario; Kuzma, Jessica N; Hagman, Derek K; van Yserloo, Brian; Matthys, Colleen C; Callahan, Holly S; Weigle, David S

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have indicated that omega-3 (n3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) decrease adipose tissue inflammation in rodents and in morbidly obese humans. We investigated whether a diet rich in n3 PUFAs from both marine and plant sources reduces adipose tissue and systemic inflammation in overweight to moderately obese adults. We conducted a randomized, single-blind, parallel-design, placebo-controlled feeding trial. Healthy men and women with a body mass index between 28 and 33 kg/m(2) consumed a diet rich in n3 PUFAs (3.5% of energy intake; n = 11) from plant and marine sources or a control diet (0.5% of energy intake from n3 PUFAs; n = 13). These diets were consumed for 14 wk (ad libitum for 12 wk). All foods were provided for the entire study period. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue and fasting plasma were collected after the first 2 wk with the control diet and again at the end of the 14-wk dietary period. The primary outcome of this ex post analysis was the adipose tissue gene expression of 13 key mediators of inflammation. Adipose tissue gene expression of inflammatory mediators did not differ between the 2 groups, after adjustment for weight change. Furthermore, none of the 5 plasma markers of systemic inflammation differed significantly as an effect of diet treatment. We conclude that a relatively high dose of n3 PUFAs from plant and marine sources did not significantly lower adipose tissue or systemic inflammation in overweight to moderately obese healthy men and women over 14 wk.

  3. Phenotypical heterogeneity linked to adipose tissue dysfunction in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barchetta, Ilaria; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria; Di Martino, Michele; Cimini, Flavia Agata; Bertoccini, Laura; Polimeni, Licia; Catalano, Carlo; Fraioli, Antonio; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Morini, Sergio; Baroni, Marco Giorgio; Cavallo, Maria Gisella

    2016-10-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation leads to increased free fatty acid (FFA) efflux and ectopic fat deposition, but whether AT dysfunction drives selective fat accumulation in specific sites remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between AT dysfunction, hepatic/pancreatic fat fraction (HFF, PFF) and the associated metabolic phenotype in patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Sixty-five consecutive T2D patients were recruited at the Diabetes Centre of Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. The study population underwent clinical examination and blood sampling for routine biochemistry and calculation of insulin secretion [homoeostasis model assessment of insulin secretion (HOMA-β%)] and insulin-resistance [homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and adipose tissue insulin resistance (ADIPO-IR)] indexes. Subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral (VAT) AT area, HFF and PFF were determined by magnetic resonance. Some 55.4% of T2D patients had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); they were significantly younger and more insulin-resistant than non-NAFLD subjects. ADIPO-IR was the main determinant of HFF independently of age, sex, HOMA-IR, VAT, SAT and predicted severe NAFLD with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC)=0.796 (95% confidence interval: 0.65-0.94, P=0.001). PFF was independently associated with increased total adiposity but did not correlate with AT dysfunction, insulin resistance and secretion or NAFLD. The ADIPO-IR index was capable of predicting NAFLD independently of all confounders, whereas it did not seem to be related to intrapancreatic fat deposition; unlike HFF, higher PFF was not associated with relevant alterations in the metabolic profile. In conclusion, the presence and severity of AT dysfunction may drive ectopic fat accumulation towards specific targets, such as VAT and liver, therefore evaluation of AT dysfunction may contribute to the identification of different

  4. Regional differences in perivascular adipose tissue impacting vascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ortega, Marta; Somoza, Beatriz; Huang, Yu; Gollasch, Maik; Fernández-Alfonso, Maria S

    2015-07-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) releases several important vasoactive factors with physiological and pathophysiological paracrine effects. A large body of evidence suggests regional phenotypic and functional differences among PVAT depots, depending on the specific vascular bed or different regions in the vascular bed where the PVAT is located. These non-uniform and separate PVATs exert various paracrine effects on vascular structure and function that largely impact disease states, such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, or insulin resistance. This emerging view of PVAT function requires considering heterogeneous PVAT as a specialized organ that can differentially regulate vascular function depending on its anatomical location. In this context, the adipose-vascular axis may represent a novel target for pharmacological intervention in vasculopathy in cardiometabolic disorders.

  5. Estradiol effects on subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis in premenopausal women are adipose tissue depot specific and treatment dependent.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Kathleen M; Cooper, Elizabeth E; Raymer, Dustin K; Hickner, Robert C

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen has direct effects within adipose tissue and has been implicated in regional adiposity; however, the influence of estrogen on in vivo lipolysis is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of local 17β-estradiol (E(2)) on subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) lipolysis in premenopausal women. In vivo lipolysis (dialysate glycerol) was measured in 17 women (age 27.4 ± 2.0 yr, BMI 29.7 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)) via microdialysis of abdominal (AB) and gluteal (GL) SAT. Glycerol was measured at baseline and during acute interventions to increase lipolysis including local perfusion of isoproterenol (ISO, β-adrenergic agonist, 1.0 μmol/l), phentolamine (PHEN, α-adrenergic antagonist, 0.1 mmol/l), and submaximal exercise (60% Vo(2peak), 30 min); all with and without coperfusion of E(2) (500 nmol/l). E(2) coperfusion blunted the lipolytic response to ISO in AB (E(2) 196 ± 31%, control 258 ± 26%, P = 0.003) but not in GL (E(2) 113 ± 14%, control 111 ± 12%, P = 0.43) adipose tissue. At rest, perfusion of PHEN with ISO did not change dialysate glycerol. Submaximal exercise during ISO + PHEN increased dialysate glycerol in the AB (56 ± 9%) and GL (62 ± 12%) regions. Probes perfused with E(2) during exercise and ISO + PHEN had an increased lipolytic response in AB (90 ± 9%, P = 0.007) but a lower response in GL (35 ± 7%, P = 0.05) SAT compared with no-E(2) conditions. E(2) effects on lipolysis are region specific and may work through both adrenergic and adrenergic-independent mechanisms to potentiate and/or blunt SAT lipolysis in premenopausal women. PMID:23531620

  6. Diversity of lipid mediators in human adipose tissue depots

    PubMed Central

    Clària, Joan; Nguyen, Binh T.; Madenci, Arin L.; Ozaki, C. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a heterogeneous organ with remarkable variations in fat cell metabolism depending on the anatomical location. However, the pattern and distribution of bioactive lipid mediators between different fat depots and their relationships in complex diseases have not been investigated. Using LC-MS/MS-based metabolo-lipidomics, here we report that human subcutaneous (SC) adipose tissues possess a range of specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) including resolvin (Rv) D1, RvD2, protectin (PD) 1, lipoxin (LX) A4, and the monohydroxy biosynthetic pathway markers of RvD1 and PD1 (17-HDHA), RvE1 (18-HEPE), and maresin 1 (14-HDHA). The “classic” eicosanoids prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGD2, PGF2α, leukotriene (LT) B4, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), 12-HETE, and 15-HETE were also identified in SC fat. SC fat from patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) exhibited a marked deficit in PD1 and 17-HDHA levels. Compared with SC, perivascular adipose tissue displayed higher SPM levels, suggesting an enhanced resolution capacity in this fat depot. In addition, augmented levels of eicosanoids and SPM were observed in SC fat surrounding foot wounds. Notably, the profile of SC PGF2α differed significantly when patients were grouped by body mass index (BMI). In the case of peri-wound SC fat, BMI negatively correlated with PGE2. In this tissue, proresolving mediators RvD2 and LXA4 were identified in lower levels than the proinflammatory LTB4. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a diverse distribution of bioactive lipid mediators depending on the localization of human fat depots and uncover a specific SPM pattern closely associated with PVD. PMID:23364264

  7. The effect of diabetes on the wound healing potential of adipose-tissue derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Min; Kim, Yun Ho; Jun, Young Joon; Yoo, Gyeol; Rhie, Jong Won

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether diabetes mellitus affects the wound-healing-promoting potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells, we designed a wound-healing model using diabetic mice. We compared the degree of wound healing between wounds treated with normal adipose tissue-derived stem cells and wounds treated with diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells. We evaluated the wound-healing rate, the epithelial tongue distance, the area of granulation tissue, the number of capillary and the number of Ki-67-stained cells. The wound-healing rate was significantly higher in the normal adipose tissue-derived stem cells group than in the diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells group; it was also significantly higher in the normal adipose tissue-derived stem cells group than in the control group. Although the diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells group showed a better wound-healing rate than the control group, the difference was not statistically significant. Similar trends were observed for the other parameters examined: re-epithelisation and keratinocyte proliferation; granulation tissue formation; and dermal regeneration. However, with regard to the number of capillary, diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells retained their ability to promote neovasculisation and angiogenesis. These results reflect the general impairment of the therapeutic potential of diabetic adipose tissue-derived stem cells in vivo.

  8. Effect of propylene glycol on adipose tissue mobilization in postpartum over-conditioned Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Bjerre-Harpøth, V; Storm, A C; Eslamizad, M; Kuhla, B; Larsen, M

    2015-12-01

    Our objective was to investigate the quantitative and qualitative effects of propylene glycol (PG) allocation on postpartum adipose tissue mobilization in over-conditioned Holstein cows. Nine ruminally cannulated and arterially catheterized cows were, at parturition, randomly assigned to a ruminal pulse dose of either 500g of tap water (n=4) or 500g of PG (n=5) once a day. The PG was given with the morning feeding for 4 wk postpartum (treatment period), followed by a 4-wk follow-up period. All cows were fed the same prepartum and postpartum diets. At -16 (±3), 4 (±0), 15 (±1) and 29 (±2) days in milk (DIM), body composition was determined using the deuterium oxide dilution technique, liver and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were collected, and mammary gland nutrient uptake was measured. Weekly blood samples were obtained during the experiment and daily blood samples were taken from -7 to 7 DIM. Postpartum feed intake and milk yield was not affected by PG allocation. The body content of lipid was not affected by treatment, but tended to decrease from 4 to 29 DIM with both treatments. Except for the first week postpartum, no difference in plasma nonesterified fatty acids concentration was noted between treatments in the treatment period. Yet, PG allocation resulted in decreased plasma concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and increased plasma concentrations of glucose. In the follow-up period, plasma concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids, glucose, and BHB did not differ between treatments. Additionally, the change in abundance of proteins in adipose tissue biopsies from prepartum to 4 DIM was not affected by treatment. In conclusion, the different variables to assess body fat mobilization were concurrent and showed that a 4-wk postpartum PG allocation had limited effect on adipose tissue mobilization. The main effect was an enhanced glucogenic status with PG. No carry-over effect of PG allocation was recorded for production or plasma metabolites

  9. Two types of brown adipose tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    During the last years the existence of metabolically active brown adipose tissue in adult humans has been widely accepted by the research community. Its unique ability to dissipate chemical energy stored in triglycerides as heat makes it an attractive target for new drugs against obesity and its related diseases. Hence the tissue is now subject to intense research, the hypothesis being that an expansion and/or activation of the tissue is associated with a healthy metabolic phenotype. Animal studies provide evidence for the existence of at least two types of brown adipocytes. Apart from the classical brown adipocyte that is found primarily in the interscapular region where it constitutes a thermogenic organ, a second type of brown adipocyte, the so-called beige adipocyte, can appear within white adipose tissue depots. The fact that the two cell types develop from different precursors suggests that they might be recruited and stimulated by different cues and therefore represent two distinct targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this commentary is to discuss recent work addressing the question whether also humans possess two types of brown adipocytes and to highlight some issues when looking for molecular markers for such cells.

  10. Regulation of lypolysis in white adipose tissues of lean and obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Bairras, C; Mauriege, P; Bukowiecki, L; Atgie, C

    2007-12-01

    Obese Zucker rat is often used as a model of genetic obesity to understand the mechanism of the development of obesity. In the present work, in order to better understand the regulation of lipolysis in the Zucker rat, the lipolytic activities of adipocytes isolated from different adipose depots of lean and obese Zucker rats, in the basal state or after catecholamine stimulation have been measured. The obese Zucker rat presents hyperinsulinemia without hyperglycemia and with elevated plasma free fatty acids, suggesting a dyslipidemia. Morphological studies of three adipose deposits show a marked hypertrophic and hyperplastic type of obesity, much pronounced in the subcutaneous depot. In the current study we show that the basal lipolytic rate is higher in adipocytes from each deposit of obese rats (when results are corrected for cell surface area). This finding, associated with the increase of all deposits, could contribute to the elevated plasma FFA observed. Investigation of the responsiveness of dibutyril cAMP (DBcAMP) points out that the defect in the NE responsiveness is essentially located at post-receptor level. Nevertheless, a receptor defect could not be excluded as suggested by a decrease of the beta-ARs observed in all deposits. Our study points out that the lipolytic resistance to catecholamines in adipose tissue of obese Zucker rats appears to counteract the increase in the lipolytic rate, in order to moderate the increase in plasma FFA levels that may contribute to the hyperinsulinemia observed, characteristic of an insulino-resistant state.

  11. The contribution of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase in tissue macrophages to adipose tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kwon, H-J; Kim, S-N; Kim, Y-A; Lee, Y-H

    2016-01-01

    Cellular plasticity in adipose tissue involves adipocyte death, its clearance, and de novo adipogenesis, enabling homeostatic turnover and adaptation to metabolic challenges; however, mechanisms regulating these serial events are not fully understood. The present study investigated the roles of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (Alox15) in the clearance of dying adipocytes by adipose tissue macrophages. First, upregulation of Alox15 expression and apoptotic adipocyte death in gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) were characterized during adipose tissue remodeling induced by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Next, an in vitro reconstruction of adipose tissue macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes recapitulated adipocyte clearance by macrophages and demonstrated that macrophages co-cultured with apoptotic adipocytes increased the expression of efferocytosis-related genes. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of Alox15 diminished the levels of adipocyte clearance by macrophages in a co-culture system. Gene expression profiling of macrophages isolated from gWAT of Alox15 knockout (KO) mice demonstrated distinct phenotypes, especially downregulation of genes involved in lipid uptake and metabolism compared to wild-type mice. Finally, in vivo β3-adrenergic stimulation in Alox15 KO mice failed to recruit crown-like structures, a macrophage network clearing dying adipocytes in gWAT. Consequently, in Alox15 KO mice, proliferation/differentiation of adipocyte progenitors and β3-adrenergic remodeling of gWAT were impaired compared to wild-type control mice. Collectively, our data established a pivotal role of Alox15 in the resolution of adipocyte death and in adipose tissue remodeling. PMID:27362803

  12. Lipid content in hepatic and gonadal adipose tissue parallel aortic cholesterol accumulation in mice fed diets with different omega-6 PUFA to EPA plus DHA ratios

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diets with low omega (u)-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ratios have been shown to decrease aortic cholesterol accumulation and have been suggested to promote weight loss. The involvement of the liver and gonadal adipose tissue (GAT...

  13. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 promotes brown adipose tissue thermogenesis via repressing glucocorticoid activation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Chen, Yi; Serag, Sara; Lavery, Gareth G; Gygi, Steve P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-08-15

    Brown adipocytes display phenotypic plasticity, as they can switch between the active states of fatty acid oxidation and energy dissipation versus a more dormant state. Cold exposure or β-adrenergic stimulation favors the active thermogenic state, whereas sympathetic denervation or glucocorticoid administration promotes more lipid accumulation. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these switches is incomplete. Here we found that LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1), a histone demethylase, regulates brown adipocyte metabolism in two ways. On the one hand, LSD1 associates with PRDM16 to repress expression of white fat-selective genes. On the other hand, LSD1 represses HSD11B1 (hydroxysteroid 11-β-dehydrogenase isozyme 1), a key glucocorticoid-activating enzyme, independently from PRDM16. Adipose-specific ablation of LSD1 impaired mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation capacity of the brown adipose tissue, reduced whole-body energy expenditure, and increased fat deposition, which can be significantly alleviated by simultaneously deleting HSD11B1. These findings establish a novel regulatory pathway connecting histone modification and hormone activation with mitochondrial oxidative capacity and whole-body energy homeostasis. PMID:27566776

  14. Laminin α4 deficient mice exhibit decreased capacity for adipose tissue expansion and weight gain.

    PubMed

    Vaicik, Marcella K; Thyboll Kortesmaa, Jill; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Kortesmaa, Jarkko; Soininen, Raija; Bergström, Göran; Ohlsson, Claes; Chong, Li Yen; Rozell, Björn; Emont, Margo; Cohen, Ronald N; Brey, Eric M; Tryggvason, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic that contributes to the increasing medical burdens related to type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adipose tissue expansion could lead to therapeutics that eliminate or reduce obesity-associated morbidity and mortality. The extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to regulate the development and function of numerous tissues and organs. However, there is little understanding of its function in adipose tissue. In this manuscript we describe the role of laminin α4, a specialized ECM protein surrounding adipocytes, on weight gain and adipose tissue function. Adipose tissue accumulation, lipogenesis, and structure were examined in mice with a null mutation of the laminin α4 gene (Lama4-/-) and compared to wild-type (Lama4+/+) control animals. Lama4-/- mice exhibited reduced weight gain in response to both age and high fat diet. Interestingly, the mice had decreased adipose tissue mass and altered lipogenesis in a depot-specific manner. In particular, epididymal adipose tissue mass was specifically decreased in knock-out mice, and there was also a defect in lipogenesis in this depot as well. In contrast, no such differences were observed in subcutaneous adipose tissue at 14 weeks. The results suggest that laminin α4 influences adipose tissue structure and function in a depot-specific manner. Alterations in laminin composition offers insight into the roll the ECM potentially plays in modulating cellular behavior in adipose tissue expansion.

  15. Brown Adipose Tissue Transplantation Reverses Obesity in Ob/Ob Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomeng; Wang, Siping; You, Yilin; Meng, Minghui; Zheng, Zongji; Dong, Meng; Lin, Jun; Zhao, Qianwei; Zhang, Chuanhai; Yuan, Xiaoxue; Hu, Tao; Liu, Lieqin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Dehua; Zhan, Jicheng; Jong Lee, Hyuek; Speakman, John R; Jin, Wanzhu

    2015-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that brown adipose tissue (BAT) transplantation enhances whole-body energy metabolism in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. However, it remains unclear whether BAT also has such beneficial effects on genetically obese mice. To address this issue, we transplanted BAT from C57/BL6 mice into the dorsal subcutaneous region of age- and sex-matched leptin deficient Ob/Ob mice. Interestingly, BAT transplantation led to a significant reduction of body weight gain with increased oxygen consumption and decreased total body fat mass, resulting in improvement of insulin resistance and liver steatosis. In addition, BAT transplantation increased the level of circulating adiponectin, whereas it reduced the levels of circulating free T3 and T4, which regulate thyroid hormone sensitivity in peripheral tissues. BAT transplantation also increased β3-adrenergic receptor and fatty acid oxidation related gene expression in subcutaneous and epididymal (EP) white adipose tissue. Accordingly, BAT transplantation increased whole-body thermogenesis. Taken together our results demonstrate that BAT transplantation may reduce obesity and its related diseases by activating endogenous BAT.

  16. Transcriptome profile analysis of adipose tissues from fat and short-tailed sheep.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Guangxian; Xu, Xiaochun; Geng, Rongqing; Zhou, Jiping; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Zhaoxia; Chen, Yulin

    2014-10-10

    Recent studies in domestic animals have used RNA-seq to explore the transcriptome of different tissues in a limited number of individuals. In the present study, de novo transcriptome sequencing was used to compare sheep adipose tissue transcriptome profiles between a fat-tailed breed (Kazak sheep; KS) and a short-tailed (Tibetan sheep; TS). The RNA-seq data from these two groups revealed that 646 genes were differentially expressed between the KS and TS groups, including 280 up-regulated and 366 down-regulated genes. We identified genes relevant to fat metabolism in adipose tissues, including two top genes with the largest fold change (NELL1 and FMO3). Pathway analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes between the KS and TS breeds belong to fatty acid metabolism relevant pathways (e.g. fat digestion and absorption, glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism) and cell junction-related pathways (e.g. cell adhesion molecules) which contribute to fat deposition. This work highlighted potential genes and gene networks that affect fat deposition and meat quality in sheep. PMID:25088569

  17. Circadian variations in gene expression in rat abdominal adipose tissue and relationship to physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Siddharth; Xue, Bai; Jusko, William J.; DuBois, Debra C.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms occur in all levels of organization from expression of genes to complex physiological processes. Although much is known about the mechanism of the central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the regulation of clocks present in peripheral tissues as well as the genes regulated by those clocks is still unclear. In this study, the circadian regulation of gene expression was examined in rat adipose tissue. A rich time series involving 54 animals euthanized at 18 time points within the 24-h cycle (12:12 h light-dark) was performed. mRNA expression was examined with Affymetrix gene array chips and quantitative real-time PCR, along with selected physiological measurements. Transcription factors involved in the regulation of central rhythms were examined, and 13 showed circadian oscillations. Mining of microarray data identified 190 probe sets that showed robust circadian oscillations. Circadian regulated probe sets were further parsed into seven distinct temporal clusters, with >70% of the genes showing maximum expression during the active/dark period. These genes were grouped into eight functional categories, which were examined within the context of their temporal expression. Circadian oscillations were also observed in plasma leptin, corticosterone, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and LDL cholesterol. Circadian oscillation in these physiological measurements along with the functional categorization of these genes suggests an important role for circadian rhythms in controlling various functions in white adipose tissue including adipogenesis, energy metabolism, and immune regulation. PMID:20682845

  18. Chronic glucocorticoid exposure-induced epididymal adiposity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in white adipose tissue of male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Han, Guoquan; Chen, Daiwen

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged and excessive glucocorticoids (GC) exposure resulted from Cushing's syndrome or GC therapy develops central obesity. Moreover, mitochondria are crucial in adipose energy homeostasis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to chronic GC exposure-induced epididymal adiposity in the present study. A total of thirty-six 5-week-old male C57BL/6J mice (∼20 g) were administrated with 100 µg/ml corticosterone (CORT) or vehicle through drinking water for 4 weeks. Chronic CORT exposure mildly decreased body weight without altering food and water intake in mice. The epididymal fat accumulation was increased, but adipocyte size was decreased by CORT. CORT also increased plasma CORT, insulin, leptin, and fibroblast growth factor 21 concentrations as measured by RIA or ELISA. Interestingly, CORT increased plasma levels of triacylglycerols and nonesterified fatty acids, and up-regulated the expression of both lipolytic and lipogenic genes as determined by real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, CORT impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function in epididymal WAT. The reactive oxygen species production was increased and the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes were reduced by CORT treatment as well. Taken together, these findings reveal that chronic CORT administration-induced epididymal adiposity is, at least in part, associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse epididymal white adipose tissue. PMID:25389775

  19. Chronic Glucocorticoid Exposure-Induced Epididymal Adiposity Is Associated with Mitochondrial Dysfunction in White Adipose Tissue of Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Han, Guoquan; Chen, Daiwen

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged and excessive glucocorticoids (GC) exposure resulted from Cushing's syndrome or GC therapy develops central obesity. Moreover, mitochondria are crucial in adipose energy homeostasis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to chronic GC exposure-induced epididymal adiposity in the present study. A total of thirty-six 5-week-old male C57BL/6J mice (∼20 g) were administrated with 100 µg/ml corticosterone (CORT) or vehicle through drinking water for 4 weeks. Chronic CORT exposure mildly decreased body weight without altering food and water intake in mice. The epididymal fat accumulation was increased, but adipocyte size was decreased by CORT. CORT also increased plasma CORT, insulin, leptin, and fibroblast growth factor 21 concentrations as measured by RIA or ELISA. Interestingly, CORT increased plasma levels of triacylglycerols and nonesterified fatty acids, and up-regulated the expression of both lipolytic and lipogenic genes as determined by real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, CORT impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative function in epididymal WAT. The reactive oxygen species production was increased and the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes were reduced by CORT treatment as well. Taken together, these findings reveal that chronic CORT administration-induced epididymal adiposity is, at least in part, associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse epididymal white adipose tissue. PMID:25389775

  20. Intermuscular Adipose Tissue and Metabolic Associations in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Lewis, Cora E.; Kotler, Donald P.; Punyanitya, Mark; Bacchetti, Peter; Shlipak, Michael G.; Grunfeld, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) is associated with metabolic abnormalities similar to those associated with visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Increased IMAT has been found in obese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women. We hypothesized that IMAT, like VAT, would be similar or increased in HIV-infected persons compared with healthy controls, despite decreases in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) found in HIV infection. In the second FRAM (Study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV infection) exam, we studied 425 HIV-infected subjects and 211 controls (from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study) who had regional AT and skeletal muscle (SM) measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multivariable linear regression identified factors associated with IMAT and its association with metabolites. Total IMAT was 51% lower in HIV-infected participants compared with controls (P = 0.003). The HIV effect was attenuated after multivariable adjustment (to −28%, P < 0.0001 in men and −3.6%, P = 0.70 in women). Higher quantities of leg SAT, upper-trunk SAT, and VAT were associated with higher IMAT in HIV-infected participants, with weaker associations in controls. Stavudine use was associated with lower IMAT and SAT, but showed little relationship with VAT. In multivariable analyses, regional IMAT was associated with insulin resistance and triglycerides (TGs). Contrary to expectation, IMAT is not increased in HIV infection; after controlling for demographics, lifestyle, VAT, SAT, and SM, HIV+ men have lower IMAT compared with controls, whereas values for women are similar. Stavudine exposure is associated with both decreased IMAT and SAT, suggesting that IMAT shares cellular origins with SAT. PMID:20539305

  1. Iron homeostasis: a new job for macrophages in adipose tissue?

    PubMed

    Hubler, Merla J; Peterson, Kristin R; Hasty, Alyssa H

    2015-02-01

    Elevated serum ferritin and increased cellular iron concentrations are risk factors for diabetes; however, the etiology of this association is unclear. Metabolic tissues such as pancreas, liver, and adipose tissue (AT), as well as the immune cells resident in these tissues, may be involved. Recent studies demonstrate that the polarization status of macrophages has important relevance to their iron-handling capabilities. Furthermore, a subset of macrophages in AT have elevated iron concentrations and a gene expression profile indicative of iron handling, a capacity diminished in obesity. Because iron overload in adipocytes increases systemic insulin resistance, iron handling by AT macrophages may have relevance not only to adipocyte iron stores but also to local and systemic insulin sensitivity.

  2. Iron homeostasis: a new job for macrophages in adipose tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Merla J.; Peterson, Kristin R.; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum ferritin and increased cellular iron concentrations are risk factors for diabetes; however, the etiology of this association is unclear. Metabolic tissues such as pancreas, liver, and adipose tissue (AT), as well as the immune cells resident in these tissues, may be involved. Recent studies demonstrate that the polarization status of macrophages has important relevance to their iron handling capabilities. Furthermore, a subset of macrophages in AT have elevated iron concentrations and a gene expression profile indicative of iron handling, a capacity diminished in obesity. Because iron overload in adipocytes increases systemic insulin resistance, iron handling by AT macrophages may have relevance not only to adipocyte iron stores but also to local and systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:25600948

  3. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Marissa J; White, Thomas A; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M; Verzosa, Grace C; Stout, Michael B; Mazula, Daniel L; Palmer, Allyson K; Baker, Darren J; Jensen, Michael D; Torbenson, Michael S; Miller, Jordan D; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M; Kirkland, James L; LeBrasseur, Nathan K

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16(INK4a) promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. PMID:26983960

  4. Characterization of microRNA expression in bovine adipose tissues: a potential regulatory mechanism of subcutaneous adipose tissue development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a family of small non-coding RNA molecules, appear to regulate animal lipid metabolism and preadipocyte conversion to form lipid-assimilating adipocytes (i.e. adipogenesis). However, no miRNA to date has been reported to modulate adipogenesis and lipid deposition in beef cattle. Results The expression patterns of 89 miRNAs including four bovine specific miRNAs in subcutaneous adipose tissues from three groups of crossbred steers differing in backfat thickness were compared using qRT-PCR analysis. Eighty-six miRNAs were detectable in all samples, with 42 miRNAs differing among crossbreds (P < 0.05) and 15 miRNAs differentially expressed between tissues with high and low backfat thickness (P < 0.05). The expression levels of 18 miRNAs were correlated with backfat thickness (P < 0.05). The miRNA most differentially expressed and the most strongly associated with backfat thickness was miR-378, with a 1.99-fold increase in high backfat thickness tissues (r = 0.72). Conclusions MiRNA expression patterns differed significantly in response to host genetic components. Approximately 20% of the miRNAs in this study were identified as being correlated with backfat thickness. This result suggests that miRNAs may play a regulatory role in white adipose tissue development in beef animals. PMID:20423511

  5. A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for use in whole human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Haim, Yulia; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Bashari, Dana; Rudich, Assaf

    2013-11-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) has become a central method when studying in vivo protein-DNA interactions, with the major challenge being the hope to capture "authentic" interactions. While ChIP protocols have been optimized for use with specific cell types and tissues including adipose tissue-derived cells, a working ChIP protocol addressing the challenges imposed by fresh whole human