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Sample records for adirondack mountains ny

  1. Paleomagnetism and Monazite Dating of Grenville Rocks, Adirondack Mountains, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L.; McEnroe, S.; Jercinovic, M.

    2003-12-01

    Paleomagnetic studies on three rock units from the Adirondack Highlands, New York State yield stable magnetic directions. Electron microprobe monazite geochronology suggests a strong ca. 1050 Ma signature, corresponding to Ottawan granulite-facies metamorphism. Remnants of older (ca. 1130-1190 Ma) monazite, consistent with early-Grenville tectonomagmatic events are also documented. There is no evidence of younger (<1050 Ma) events with the exception of partial alteration (with Ca-enrichment) of some monazite. Sillimanite-microcline gneisses (gms) of the far-western Highlands, associated with negative aeromagnetic anomalies, exhibit strong stable magnetization dominated by titanohematite with abundant exsolutions of ilmenite, pyrophanite, rutile and spinel. Mean magnetic directions for 14 sites are I-62.8, D=289.2 and a-95=7.6. Sampled in the central Highlands is the post-orogenic fayalite ferro-hedenbergite Wanakena Granite. Samples contain magnetite with ilmenite oxy-exsolution, occurring as discrete grains and inclusions in silicates. Directions from the Wanakena are steeply negative with westerly declinations (I=-76.4, D=296.7, a-95=4.4, N=7). The Marcy meta-anorthosite was sampled in the central and eastern Highlands, although many of these sites proved unstable. Stable results were combined with unpublished data from Rob Hargraves for 13 sites (I=-64.4, D=286.2, a-95=9.1). Over half of the anorthosites and one gms site have normal directions; all Wanakena sites are reversed. Combined anorthosites and gms units give a pole position of 20S/151E; the Wanakena pole is at -29S/132E. Both poles fall in the southern extent of the Grenville loop. The thermodynamically constrained equilibrium phase diagram for ilm-hem predicts that very fine exsolution, most likely responsible for the stable magnetization of the gms rocks, starts to form around 390C, well below the conditions of granulite grade metamorphism. The abundant lamellae provide a stable NRM through the

  2. PALEOCOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF RECENT LAKE ACIDIFICATION IN THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS, NY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paleoecological analysis of the sediment record of 12 Adirondack lakes reveals that the 8 clearwater lakes with current pH<5.5 and alkalinity <10 ueq 1-1 have acidified recently. he onset of this acidification occurred between 1920 and 1970. oss of alkalinity, based on quantitati...

  3. Paleoecological investigation of recent lake acidification in the Adirondack Mountains, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, D.F.; Binford, M.W.; Furlong, E.T.; Hites, R.A.; Mitchell, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Paleoecological analysis of the sediment record of 12 Adirondack lakes reveals that the 8 clearwater lakes with current pH<5.5 and alkalinity <10 microeq/l have acidified recently. The onset of the acidification occurred between 1920 and 1970. Loss of alkalinity, based on quantitative analysis of diatom assemblages, ranged from 2 to 35 microeq/l. The acidification trends are substantiated by several lines of evidence including stratigraphies of diatom, chrysophyte, chironomid, and cladoceran remains, Ca:Ti and Mn:Ti ratios, sequentially extracted forms of Al, and historical fish data. Acidification trends appear to be continuing in some lakes, despite reductions in atmospheric sulfur loading that began in the early 1970s. The primary cause of the acidification trend is clearly increased atmospheric deposition of strong acids derived from the combustion of fossil fuels. Natural processes and watershed disturbances cannot account for the changes in water chemistry that have occurred, but they may play a role. Sediment core profiles of Pb, Cu, V, Zn, S, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, magnetic particles, and coal and oil soot provide a clear record of increased atmospheric input of materials associated with the combustion of fossil fuels beginning in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

  4. Contemporary doming of the Adirondack mountains: Further evidence from releveling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isachsen, Y.W.

    1981-01-01

    The Adirondack Mountains constitute an anomalously large, domical uplift on the Appalachian foreland. The dome has a NNE-SSW axis about 190 km long, and an east-west dimension of about 140 km. It has a structural relief of at least 1600 m, and a local topographic relief of up to 1200 m. First-order leveling in 1955, and again in 1973 along a north-south line at the eastern margin of the Adirondack shows an uplift rate of 2.2 mm/yr at the latitude of the center of the dome and a subsidence rate of 2.8 mm/yr at the northern end of the line near the Canadian border. The net amount of arching along this releveled line is 9 cm ?? 2 cm (Isachsen, 1975). To test the idea that this arching represented an "edge effect" of contemporary doming of the Adirondacks as a whole, the National Geodetic Survey was encouraged to relevel a 1931 north-south line between Utica and Fort Covington (near the Canadian border) which crosses the center of the dome. The releveling showed that the mountain mass is undergoing contemporary domical uplift at a rate which reaches 3.7 mm/yr near the center of the dome (compare with 1 mm/yr for the Swiss Alps). Three other releveled lines in the area support this conclusion. ?? 1981.

  5. Post-granulite facies fluid infiltration in the Adirondack Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.; Valley, J.W.

    1988-06-01

    Granulite facies lithologies from the Adirondack Mountains of New York contain alteration assemblages composed dominantly of calcite +/- chlorite +/- sericite. These assemblages document fluid infiltration at middle to upper crustal levels. Cathodoluminescence of samples from the Marcy anorthosite massif indicates that the late fluid infiltration is more widespread than initially indicated by transmitted-light petrography alone. Samples that appear unaltered in transmitted light show extensive anastomosing veins of calcite (< 0.05 mm wide) along grain boundaries, in crosscutting fractures, and along mineral cleavages. The presence of the retrograde calcite documents paleopermeability in crystalline rocks and is related to the formation of high-density CO/sub 2/-rich fluid inclusions. Recognition of this process has important implications for studies of granulite genesis and the geophysical properties of the crust.

  6. Structural and U/Pb chronology of superimposed folds, Adirondack Mountains: implications for the tectonic evolution of the Grenville Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, Timothy M.; Loring, David P.

    2001-10-01

    The Grenville Province of eastern Laurentia formed during Mesoproterozoic events that led to the formation of the supercontinent of Rodinia. Structural analysis and U-Pb geochronology of the Piseco antiform in the southern Adirondack Highlands part of the Grenville Province has shed new light on the geology and structural history of this orogen. An outcrop positioned on the northern limb of the Piseco antiform near Wells, NY, contains a major F 1 fold refolded by regional F 2 and F 3 axes. This is the first recognized large-scale F 1 fold in the Adirondack Highlands. Foliated leucocratic gneiss and deformed metagabbro dikes in the core of the antiform have yielded single-grain U-Pb zircon ages of 1172.4±2.2 and 1165.4±1.3 Ma, respectively. Discordant pegmatitic veins that crosscut the foliation in the metagabbro have yielded an estimated 207Pb/ 206Pb age of 1052.4 Ma. The geochronological data have several important implications. The 1172 Ma age of the Wells leucocratic gneiss is virtually identical with that of the syntectonic Hyde School gneiss, Rockport granite, and Wellesley granite from the Adirondack Lowlands and Frontenac terrane of the Central Metasedimentary Belt, thus extending the known distribution of magmas of this age to the southern Adirondack Highlands. We relate these syntectonic granitoids and F 1 folds to the suturing of the ca. 1350-1250 Ma Adirondack Highlands-Green Mountain arc to the composite arc terrane and Laurentia at 1220-1170 Ma. The 1165 Ma deformed metagabbro contains the S 2 but not the S 1 foliation, and we correlate the metagabbro with the ca. 1170-1125 Ma AMCG suite, interpreted to have formed in response to orogenic collapse and delamination following the collision. The Wells leucocratic gneiss and gabbro were folded by reclined isoclinal F 2 folds and upright F 3 folds, and cut by apparently undeformed ca. 1052.4 Ma pegmatitic dikes. Since the discordant pegmatites cut the S 1, S 2, and S 3 foliations which postdate the ca

  7. Nitrate trends in the Adirondack Mountains, Northeastern US, 1993-2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adirondack Mountains in New York State receive some of the highest rates of nitrogen deposition in the Northeastern U.S. Between 1993 and 2007, nitrogen deposition loads did not significantly change and average annual wet inorganic nitrogen deposition was 6 kg/ha (Figure 1)....

  8. Detailed studies of selected, well-exposed fracture zones in the Adirondack Mountains dome, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, R.W.; Isachsen, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    The Adirondack Mountains constitute a relatively young (Mesozoic, Cenozoic) dome on the craton. The dome is undergoing contemporary uplift, based on geodetic releveling, and is seismically active. The breached dome provides a very large window through Paleozoic cover and thus permits ground study of the fracture systems that characterize the seismogenic basement and influence the patterns of brittle deformation that are found in overlying Paleozoic rocks of the platform. The predominant fracture zones are linear valleys that trend NNE to NE, parallel to the long axis of the dome. The 36 field studies of the lineament segments discussed in this report suggest that the prominent NE to NNE fracture systems in the eastern Adirondacks are dominantly high angle faults down-stepped to the east, whereas those in the central Adirondacks are dominantly zero-displacement crackle zones. The origin of these features is related to the rapid uplift of the Adirondack dome. Similar features can be expected to be found in other areas of domal uplift or rapid regional uplift.

  9. Nitrogen biogeochemistry in the Adirondack Mountains of New York: hardwood ecosystems and associated surface waters.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Myron J; Driscoll, Charles T; Inamdar, Shreeram; McGee, Greg G; Mbila, Monday O; Raynal, Dudley J

    2003-01-01

    Studies on the nitrogen (N) biogeochemistry in Adirondack northern hardwood ecosystems were summarized. Specific focus was placed on results at the Huntington Forest (HFS), Pancake-Hall Creek (PHC), Woods Lake (WL), Ampersand (AMO), Catlin Lake (CLO) and Hennessy Mountain (HM). Nitrogen deposition generally decreased from west to east in the Adirondacks, and there have been no marked temporal changes in N deposition from 1978 through 1998. Second-growth western sites (WL, PHC) had higher soil solution NO(3-) concentrations and fluxes than the HFS site in the central Adirondacks. Of the two old-growth sites (AMO and CLO), AMO had substantially higher NO(3-) concentrations due to the relative dominance of sugar maple that produced litter with high N mineralization and nitrification rates. The importance of vegetation in affecting N losses was also shown for N-fixing alders in wetlands. The Adirondack Manipulation and Modeling Project (AMMP) included separate experimental N additions of (NH4)2SO4 at WL, PHC and HFS and HNO3 at WL and HFS. Patterns of N loss varied with site and form of N addition and most of the N input was retained. For 16 lake/watersheds no consistent changes in NO(3-) concentrations were found from 1982 to 1997. Simulations suggested that marked NO(3-) loss will only be manifested over extended periods. Studies at the Arbutus Watershed provided information on the role of biogeochemical and hydrological factors in affecting the spatial and temporal patterns of NO(3-) concentrations. The heterogeneous topography in the Adirondacks has generated diverse landscape features and patterns of connectivity that are especially important in regulating the temporal and spatial patterns of NO(3-) concentrations in surface waters. PMID:12667763

  10. Crustal structure of the western New England Appalachians and the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen; Luetgert, James H.

    1991-09-01

    We present an interpretation of the crustal velocity structure of the New England Appalachians and the Adirondack Mountains based on a seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection experiment in eastern North America extending from the Adirondacks in New York State through the northern Appalachians in Vermont and New Hampshire to central Maine. Modeling of the eastern portion of the profile within the New England Appalachians shows a subhorizontal layered crust with upper crustal velocities ranging from 5.5 to 6.2 km/s, a midcrustal velocity of 6.4 km/s, and a lower crustal velocity of approximately 6.8 km/s. Crustal thickness increases from 36 km beneath Maine to 40 km in Vermont. Little evidence is seen for structures at depth directly related to the White Mountains or the Green Mountains. A major lateral velocity change in the upper and mid crust occurs between the Appalachians and the Adirondacks. This boundary, projecting to the surface beneath the Champlain Valley, dips to the east beneath the Green Mountains and extends to a depth of ˜25 km below the eastern edge of the Connecticut Valley Synclinorium in Vermont. The Tahawus Complex, a series of strong horizontal reflections at 18-24 km depth beneath the Adirondack Highlands, is seen to dip eastward beneath Vermont. Upper crustal rocks in the Adirondack Mountains have Poisson's ratios of 0.28±0.01 that can be correlated with the Marcy Anorthosite. Pois son's ratios of 0.24±0.01 calculated for rocks of the Connecticut Valley Synclinorium indicate a siliceous upper crust in Vermont. The lower crust is considered to be best represented by intermediate to mafic granulites; a high Poisson's ratio (0.26-0.27) tends to support a mafic lower crust in the New England Appalachians. This seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection experiment provides further evidence for the obduction of the allochthonous western Appalachian units onto Grenvillian crust above a zone of detachment that penetrates at least to midcrustal

  11. Preservation of premetamorphic oxygen isotope ratios in granitic orthogneiss from the adirondack mountains, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, John M.; Valley, John W.

    1994-12-01

    The Adirondack Mountains, New York, expose a diverse group of Proterozoic igneous rocks that were metamorphosed to granulite facies conditions during the Ottawan phase of the Grenville orogeny. Oxygen isotope data for seventy whole rock samples of gabbroic to granitic meta-igneous rocks, primarily from the charnockite suites from the Tupper and Saranac sheets in the central Adirondacks, demonstrate a correlation between δ18Owr and major element composition within continuous, mappable, meta-plutonic units. No such relationship is seen among nonconsanguineous granitoids. Variations in mineral δ18O values and large differences in δ18O between rocks with nonconsanguineous protoliths but similar bulk composition demonstrate that these rocks were not infiltrated by, or isotopically equilibrated through, a pervasive metamorphic fluid. Values of δ18O for mineral separates preserve generally high temperature fractionations indicative of dominantly closed-system retrograde exchange. Values of δ18Owr in Adirondack orthogneisses were not significantly shifted during granulite facies metamorphism and were dominantly controlled by processes active during premetamorphic magmatism. Values of δ18Owr may thus serve as a petrogenetic indicator, allow discrimination of rock units, and serve as a source constraint for meta-igneous rocks. Fayalite meta-granites with low δ18Owr values can be discriminated from surrounding granitoids having high δ18Owr values. A record of assimilation in the evolution of differentiated granitic units is preserved. The preservation of primary igneous δ18Owr values in granulite facies orthogneiss imposes constraints on the synmetamorphic and postmetamorphic fluid history of the Adirondack Highlands. Oxygen isotopic compositions at the hand-sample scale have been preserved through granulite-facies metamorphism. Fluid absence or low fluid/rock ratios on a regional scale are indicated.

  12. Regional Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (RILWAS): Major findings for Adirondack and Blue Ridge Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Gherini, S.A.; Munson, R.K. ); Altwicker, E.; Clesceri, N. ); April, R. ); Chen, C.W. ); Cronan, C.S. ); Driscoll, C.T. ); Johannes, A.H. ); Newton, R.M.

    1989-12-01

    The primary objective of this investigation was to test the hydrologic and chemical theory developed during the Integrated Lake Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS). A secondary objective was to assess the distribution of fish species among lakes of varying water quality. A total of 24 lake-watershed systems across the Adirondacks served as stuey sites over a period of two years. The US Forest Service's, Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, with over 20 years of data, was used to test the ILWAS model on a Blue Ridge mountain stream. 122 refs., 123 figs., 46 tabs.

  13. Evidence for Differential Unroofing in the Adirondack Mountains, New York State, Determined by Apatite Fission-Track Thermochronology.

    PubMed

    Roden-Tice; Tice; Schofield

    2000-03-01

    Apatite fission-track ages of 168-83 Ma for 39 samples of Proterozoic crystalline rocks, three samples of Cambrian Potsdam sandstone, and one Cretaceous lamprophyre dike from the Adirondack Mountains in New York State indicate that unroofing in this region occurred from Late Jurassic through Early Cretaceous. Samples from the High Peaks section of the Adirondack massif yielded the oldest apatite fission-track ages (168-135 Ma), indicating that it was exhumed first. Unroofing along the northern, northwestern, and southwestern margins of the Adirondacks began slightly later, as shown by younger apatite fission-track ages (146-114 Ma) determined for these rocks. This delay in exhumation may have resulted from burial of the peripheral regions by sediment shed from the High Peaks. Apatite fission-track ages for samples from the southeastern Adirondacks are distinctly younger (112-83 Ma) than those determined for the rest of the Adirondack region. These younger apatite fission-track ages are from a section of the Adirondacks dissected by shear zones and post-Ordovician north-northeast-trending normal faults. Differential unroofing may have been accommodated by reactivation of the faults in a reverse sense of motion with maximum compressive stress, sigma1, oriented west-northwest. A change in the orientation of the post-Early Cretaceous paleostress field is supported by a change in the trend of Cretaceous lamprophyre dikes from east-west to west-northwest. PMID:10736267

  14. PIXE Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Josh; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Safiq, Alexandrea; Smith, Jeremy; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the samples and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The PIXE experiments were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. X-Ray energy spectra were measured with a silicon drift detector and analyzed with GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the aerosols. A broad range of elements from silicon to zinc were detected with significant sulfur concentrations measured for particulate matter between 0.25 and 0.5 μm in size. The PIXE analysis will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  15. PIXE Analysis of Aerosol and Soil Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Joshua; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of aerosol and soil samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the aerosol samples near Piseco Lake and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The soil samples were also collected at Piseco Lake and pressed into cylindrical pellets for experimentation. PIXE analysis of the aerosol and soil samples were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. There are higher concentrations of sulfur at smaller particle sizes (0.25-1 μm), suggesting that it could be suspended in the air for days and originate from sources very far away. Other elements with significant concentrations peak at larger particle sizes (1-4 μm) and are found in the soil samples, suggesting that these elements could originate in the soil. The PIXE analysis will be described and the resulting data will be presented.

  16. Bacterial diversity in Adirondack mountain lakes as revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hiorns, W D; Methé, B A; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S A; Zehr, J P

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial communities of seven lakes in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State were characterized by amplification and sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA. Analysis of over 100 partial sequences revealed a diverse collection of lineages, largely of the class Proteobacteria (19% alpha subdivision, 31% beta subdivision, and 9% gamma subdivision), the phylum Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides (15%), and the order Actinomycetales (18%). Additionally, a number of the sequences were similar to those of the order Verrucomicrobiales. However, few of the sequence types are closely related to those of characterized species. The relative contributions of the groups of sequences differed among the lakes, suggesting that bacterial population structure varies and that it may be possible to relate aquatic bacterial community structure to water chemistry. PMID:9212443

  17. Highly Polar Organic Compounds in Summer Cloud Water from Whiteface Mountain, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagona, J. A.; Dukett, J. E.; Mazurek, M.

    2010-12-01

    Highly polar organic compounds (HPOC) containing multiple oxygen atoms are of interest due to the aerosol direct and indirect effects and uncertainty they may contribute to climate forcing. Atmospheric HPOC exist as particulate or dissolved chemical species depending on relative humidity. HPOC solid mixtures are thought to scatter and absorb light due to particle size and color (white to yellow). Understanding the chemical composition of HPOC in cloud water (CW) is important for modeling and predicting the direct and indirect influences of this organic aerosol component on the climate system. In this initial study we present a detailed molecular examination of 10 CW samples. CW samples were collected in September 2009 using an automated CW collector at Whiteface Mountain (elevation 1483 m) in the Adirondack Mountains in upstate NY. We performed QA/QC experiments for the CW samples and analyzed the HPOC mixtures by ultratrace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Diacids such as oxalic acid and succinic acid were major components of the CW HPOC with concentrations on the order of 15 ng/mL. Substituted diacids, monoacids, and sugars also were present. We discuss the possible sources of these compounds in light of back-trajectory analysis.

  18. Atmospheric Science Research at the Whiteface Mountain Adirondack High Peaks Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, J. J.; Brandt, R. E.; Casson, P.; Demerjian, K. L.; Crandall, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Atmospheric Sciences Research Center established an atmospheric observatory at Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks in 1961. The current mountain top observatory building was built by the University at Albany in 1969-70 and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) began ozone measurements at this summit location in 1973. Those measurements continue to this day and constitute a valuable long term data record for tropospheric ozone in the northeastern U.S. The elevation of the summit is 1483 m above sea level, and is roughly 90 m above the tree line in this location. With a mean cloud base height of less than 1100 m at the summit, it is a prime location for cloud research. The research station headquarters, laboratories, offices, and a second measurement site are located at the Marble Mountain Lodge, perched on a shoulder northeast of the massif at an elevation of 604 m above sea level. Parameters measured at the site include meteorological variables, trace gases, precipitation chemistry, aerosol mass and components, and more. Precipitation and cloud chemistry has a long history at the lodge and summit locations, respectively, and continues to this day. Some data from the 40-year record will be shown in the presentation. In the late 1980's the summit site was outfitted with instrumentation to measure oxides of nitrogen and other ozone precursors. Measurements of many of these same parameters were added at the lodge site and continue to this day. In this poster we will give an overview of the Whiteface Mountain Observatory and its two measurement locations. We will highlight the parameters currently being measured at our sites, and indicate those measured by ASRC, as well as those measured by other organizations. We will also recap some of the historical activities and measurement programs that have taken place at the site, as alluded to above. Also included will be examples of the rich archive of trends data for gas phase species

  19. Effects of acidic deposition and soil acidification on sugar maple trees in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Timothy J.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Bailey, Scott W.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Beier, Colin M.; Weathers, K.C.; McPherson, G.T.; Bishop, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    We documented the effects of acidic atmospheric deposition and soil acidification on the canopy health, basal area increment, and regeneration of sugar maple (SM) trees across the Adirondack region of New York State, in the northeastern United States, where SM are plentiful but not well studied and where widespread depletion of soil calcium (Ca) has been documented. Sugar maple is a dominant canopy species in the Adirondack Mountain ecoregion, and it has a high demand for Ca. Trees in this region growing on soils with poor acid–base chemistry (low exchangeable Ca and % base saturation [BS]) that receive relatively high levels of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition exhibited a near absence of SM seedling regeneration and lower crown vigor compared with study plots with relatively high exchangeable Ca and BS and lower levels of acidic deposition. Basal area increment averaged over the 20th century was correlated (p < 0.1) with acid–base chemistry of the Oa, A, and upper B soil horizons. A lack of Adirondack SM regeneration, reduced canopy condition, and possibly decreased basal area growth over recent decades are associated with low concentrations of nutrient base cations in this region that has undergone soil Ca depletion from acidic deposition.

  20. Abundance of Alnus incana ssp. rugosa in Adirondack Mountain shrub wetlands and its influence on inorganic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, B D; Hurd, T M; Raynal, D J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the abundance of the nitrogen-fixing shrub, Alnus incana ssp. rugosa (speckled alder), in shrub wetlands of the Adirondack Mountain region of New York State and to determine whether its abundance affects the concentration or accumulation of inorganic nitrogen in wetland substrates. Alder/willow wetlands are the second most common wetland type in the Adirondack region. The Adirondack Park Agency's digital GIS database of wetland types was used to determine the areal extent of alder/willow wetlands in the Adirondacks. Randomly selected wetlands were sampled to determine the size and abundance of alder. Alder densities averaged approximately 7000 stems ha(-1) and alder was present in 75% of the wetlands. As an indication of short-term accumulation of NO(3-) and NH4(+) in wetland substrates, ion exchange resins were used to sample ground water in high and low alder density wetlands as well as from wetlands lacking alder and dominated by conifers. Additionally, NO(3-) and NH(4+) concentrations in ground water samples were measured. NH(4+) accumulation levels from exchange resins were low for all wetland types while groundwater NH(4+) concentration was highest in the low-density alder sites. Wetlands with high alder density had approximately six times higher NO(3-) accumulation than other wetlands. Substrate groundwater NO(3-) concentrations in wetlands of high-density alder exceeded by three times levels in low or no alder wetlands, showing the importance of alder to local N budgets. To assess the recovery of shrub wetlands from acidification, future studies should determine the fate of fixed N in wetland systems. PMID:12667762

  1. A comparison of the temporally integrated monitoring of ecosystems and Adirondack Long Term-Monitoring programs in the Adirondack Mountain region of New Yrok

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper compares lake chemistry in the Adirondack region of New York measured by the Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) and Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) programs by examining the data from six lakes common to both programs. Both programs were initi...

  2. Geologic controls on the sources of water to Lake George, Southeastern Adirondack Mountains of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Shuster, E.L.; LaFleur, R.G.; McCaffrey, R. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences); Boylen, C.W. . Rensselaer Fresh Water Inst.)

    1993-03-01

    Lake George is a long, deep, fault-bounded lake in the Adirondack Mountains, with relatively undeformed Paleozoic sediments in its valley floor and fractured high-grade meta-igneous and meta-sedimentary Proterozoic rocks in the drainage basins's upland. Overlying these rocks is a thin mantle of glacial deposits, consisting of sandy tills, kamic sands and glacio-lacustrine clays. Stratified ice-contact deposits and glacio-lacustrine deposits are generally restricted to the basins's lower elevations. The configuration of fractured bedrock and glacial overburden deposits of varying hydraulic conductivities suggests a variety of potential hydrogeologic flow routes, which can be generally categorized as reflect near-surface and deep groundwater flow systems. A hydrologic survey of the lake suggests that groundwater contributes approximately 20% to Lake George's annual hydrologic budget, with precipitation directly onto the lake's surface and tributary streamflow comprising the remaining 25% and 55%, respectively. Separating streamflow responses to precipitation by formal inversion into quick-, intermediate-, and slow-recession curves (originating from soils, unconsolidated surficial deposits, and fractured bedrock, respectively) suggests that as much as 40 to 50% of the tributary streamflow during the summer of 1988 originated from the slowest return route, a similar percentage has followed the intermediate route, and less than 10% of the streamflow originated as soil water ( runoff''). The flow-partitioning calculations typically suggest decay constants for these exponential recession curves on the order of 1, 10, and 100 days for the quick-, intermediate-, and slow-flow components to tributary streamflow, respectively.

  3. Geochemistry and origin of albite gneisses, northeastern Adirondack Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Philip R.; Olmsted, James F.

    1988-08-01

    Albite gneisses containing up to 8.7 percent Na2O and as little as 0.1% K2O comprise a significant part of the Proterozoic Lyon Mountain Gneiss in the Ausable Forks Quadrangle of the northeastern Adirondacks, New York State. Two distinct types of albite gneisses are present. One is a trondhjemitic leucogneiss (LAG) consisting principally of albite (Ab95 Ab98) and quartz with minor magnetite and, locally, minor amounts of amphibole or acmiterich pyroxene. LAG probably originated by metamorphism of a rhyolitie or rhyodacitic ash-flow tuff with A-type geochemical affinities, following post-depositional analcitization in a saline or saline-alkaline environment. The other type is a mafic albite gneiss (MAG) containing albite and pyroxene along with 0 45 percent quartz, minor amphibole, and titanite. MAG locally displays pinstripe banding and contains albite (Ab98) megacrysts up to 5 cm across. Its precursor may have been a sediment composed of diagenetic analcite or albite, dolomite, and quartz. Both types of albite gneiss are interlayered with granitic gneisses (LMG) of variable composition derived from less altered tuffs. A potassium-rich (up to 9.7% K2O) microcline gneiss facies may have had a protolith rich in diagenetic K feldspar. We propose that the albite gneisses and associated granitic gneisses are the granulite-facies metamorphic equivalent of a bimodal, dominantly felsic, volcanic suite with minor intercalated sediments, probably including evaporites. The volcanics were erupted in an anorogenic setting, such as an incipient or failed intracontinental rift. Deposition took place in a closed-basin, playa lake environment, where diagenetic alteration resulted in redistribution of the alkalis and strong oxidation.

  4. Homogeneous /sup 18/O enrichment of the Marcy Anorthosite Massif, Adirondack Mountains, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.; Valley, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Marcy Anorthosite Massif in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, is a composite intrusion that was metamorphosed to granulite facies at approx. 1.1 Ga. The massif is dominantly anorthosite but ranges from anorthosite (1-10% mafics) to oxide-rich pyroxenite layers (up to 98% mafics). In the St Regis Quad (SRQ) systematic variations in the percentage of mafics (POM) roughly parallel the foliation and increase toward the contacts (Davis, 1971). In 47 SRQ samples studied the POM varies from 2-25%; garnet ranges from 0-11%, pyroxene from <1-16% and oxides from <1-8%. Percent phenocrysts varies between 1-80. The Port Kent-Westport Unit (PKW) and an associated hybrid unit show significantly greater textural variability. The POM Varies from 1-50%; garnet ranges from 0-18%, pyroxene from 0-15%, oxides from 0-3% and phenocrysts vary from 0-80%. A total of 28 unaltered plagioclase phenocrysts have been analyzed for delta/sup 18/O: in 13 SRQ samples delta/sup 18/O = 9.0-9.8 (x=9.4. sigma=0.2) and in 15 samples from the PKW and hybrid units values of delta/sup 18/O=8.5-10.5 (x=9.5.sigma0.5). No correlations exist between the modal parameters and delta/sup 18/O. The results from SRQ demonstrate an extreme homogeneity suggesting for the first time a pristine magmatic character which is supported by the virtual absence of metasedimentary inclusions. This contrasts with PKW where inclusions are common and delta/sup 18/O values are more heterogeneous. Further analyses will evaluate the possibility of an anomalous source region as a cause of the /sup 18/O enrichment in the anorthosite.

  5. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols in the Adirondack Mountains using PIXE, SEM/EDX, and Micro-Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vineyard, M. F.; LaBrake, S. M.; Ali, S. F.; Nadareski, B. J.; Safiq, A. D.; Smith, J. W.; Yoskowitz, J. T.

    2015-05-01

    We are making detailed measurements of the composition of atmospheric aerosols collected in the Adirondack Mountains as a function of particle size using proton-induced X-ray emission, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These measurements provide valuable data to help identify the sources and understand the transport, transformation, and effects of airborne pollutants in upstate New York. Preliminary results indicate significant concentrations of sulfur in small particles that can travel great distances, and that this sulfur may be in the form of oxides that can contribute to acid rain.

  6. Post-metamorphic fluid infiltration into granulites from the Adirondack Mountains, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J.; Valley, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Post-metamorphic effects in the anorthosites of the Adirondacks, New York were described. Calcite-chlorite-sericite assemblages occur as veins, in disseminated form and as clots, and document retrograde fluid infiltration. These features are associated with late-state CO2-rich fluid inclusions. Stable isotope analyses of calcites indicates that the retrograde fluids interacted with meta-igneous and supracrustal lithologies, but the precise timing of the retrogression is as yet unknown.

  7. Post-metamorphic fluid infiltration into granulites from the Adirondack Mountains, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J.; Valley, John W.

    Post-metamorphic effects in the anorthosites of the Adirondacks, New York were described. Calcite-chlorite-sericite assemblages occur as veins, in disseminated form and as clots, and document retrograde fluid infiltration. These features are associated with late-state CO2-rich fluid inclusions. Stable isotope analyses of calcites indicates that the retrograde fluids interacted with meta-igneous and supracrustal lithologies, but the precise timing of the retrogression is as yet unknown.

  8. Deep crustal deformation by sheath folding in the Adirondack Mountains, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLelland, J. M.

    As described by McLelland and Isachsen, the southern half of the Adirondacks are underlain by major isoclinal (F sub 1) and open-upright (F sub 2) folds whose axes are parallel, trend approximately E-W, and plunge gently about the horizontal. These large structures are themselves folded by open upright folds trending NNE (F sub 3). It is pointed out that elongation lineations in these rocks are parallel to X of the finite strain ellipsoid developed during progressive rotational strain. The parallelism between F sub 1 and F sub 2 fold axes and elongation lineations led to the hypothesis that progressive rotational strain, with a west-directed tectonic transport, rotated earlier F sub 1-folds into parallelism with the evolving elongation lineation. Rotation is accomplished by ductile, passive flow of F sub 1-axes into extremely arcuate, E-W hinges. In order to test these hypotheses a number of large folds were mapped in the eastern Adirondacks. Other evidence supporting the existence of sheath folds in the Adirondacks is the presence, on a map scale, of synforms whose limbs pass through the vertical and into antiforms. This type of outcrop pattern is best explained by intersecting a horizontal plane with the double curvature of sheath folds. It is proposed that sheath folding is a common response of hot, ductile rocks to rotational strain at deep crustal levels. The recognition of sheath folds in the Adirondacks reconciles the E-W orientation of fold axes with an E-W elongation lineation.

  9. Deep crustal deformation by sheath folding in the Adirondack Mountains, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclelland, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    As described by McLelland and Isachsen, the southern half of the Adirondacks are underlain by major isoclinal (F sub 1) and open-upright (F sub 2) folds whose axes are parallel, trend approximately E-W, and plunge gently about the horizontal. These large structures are themselves folded by open upright folds trending NNE (F sub 3). It is pointed out that elongation lineations in these rocks are parallel to X of the finite strain ellipsoid developed during progressive rotational strain. The parallelism between F sub 1 and F sub 2 fold axes and elongation lineations led to the hypothesis that progressive rotational strain, with a west-directed tectonic transport, rotated earlier F sub 1-folds into parallelism with the evolving elongation lineation. Rotation is accomplished by ductile, passive flow of F sub 1-axes into extremely arcuate, E-W hinges. In order to test these hypotheses a number of large folds were mapped in the eastern Adirondacks. Other evidence supporting the existence of sheath folds in the Adirondacks is the presence, on a map scale, of synforms whose limbs pass through the vertical and into antiforms. This type of outcrop pattern is best explained by intersecting a horizontal plane with the double curvature of sheath folds. It is proposed that sheath folding is a common response of hot, ductile rocks to rotational strain at deep crustal levels. The recognition of sheath folds in the Adirondacks reconciles the E-W orientation of fold axes with an E-W elongation lineation.

  10. Preliminary Analysis of Borosilicate Minerals in Pegmatitic Leucosomes within Aluminous Granulites at Ledge Mountain, Central Adirondack Highlands, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, S. M.; Metzger, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    The borosilicates tourmaline and dumortierite have been identified by polarized light microscopy and electron microprobe analysis in anatectic abyssal-type pegmatites within aluminum-rich granulite-facies migmatites at Ledge Mountain, Central Adirondacks, New York. No other boron-bearing minerals are found in these rocks, and neither borosilicate has been found in the adjacent host gneiss. Tourmaline is ubiquitous in the granulite and upper amphibolite-facies metamorphic rocks of the Central Adirondacks. Dumortierite has been reported from pegmatites of the Batchellerville Province of the Southern Adirondacks, approximately 66 km to the southeast of Ledge Mountain, but not previously at this locality. The tourmaline is alkali dravite-schorl with Mg# = 0.49- 0.53. It is present as anhedral grains less than 2 mm wide intergrown with perthitic microcline and quartz, and as euhedral megacrysts several centimeters in diameter. The dumortierite is strongly pleochroic, ranging from deep indigo blue and violet to colorless. Two strikingly different habits of dumortierite coexist within centimeters of one another in the same sample: bundles of fine prisms less than a few tenths of a millimeter across, and larger granular intergrowths with quartz and chlorite. Apatite and xenotime are also present in both leucosomes and melanosomes, indicating phosphate-enrichment and yttrium in the granulites. According to experimentally determined fields of stability for boron-bearing minerals, the presence of tourmaline and dumortierite and absence of other boron-bearing minerals, especially prismatine, in the pegmatites is consistent with estimated metamorphic conditions of approximately 695-770°C and 7.4-8.2 kbar, as previously determined for this locality using garnet-biotite thermometry and GASP barometry (Boone, 1978). The presence of borosilicates in the leucosomes of these migmatites and the conspicuous lack of them in the paleosome may suggest destabilization of boron

  11. Forest Fire Derived Black Carbon in the Adirondack Mountains, NY, ~1745 to 1850 A.D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, L.; Khan, A. J.; Shareef, A.; Ahmed, T.

    2008-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a product of incomplete combustion, is ubiquitously present in our environment. The term BC and BC (elemental carbon) are often synonymously used. It absorbs solar radiation and causes heating of the atmosphere. Its presence in the atmosphere as fine particles has been linked to cardiac and pulmonary disease. It constitutes a significant portion of the organic matter. Long-term BC data, either in atmosphere or sediments is sparse. The sources of BC are forest fires, biomass burning, coal-, gasoline-, and diesel-combustion. Contributions from these sources have drastically changed over the last three centuries. Before ~1880, little fossil fuel was used in the United States. Hence BC was produced almost entirely from the biomass burning, either as a source of heat or forest fires. Contribution from forest fires must have dominated in the United States before human population reached a significant level. Lake sediments can be used to quantify BC emissions backward in time. Husain et al [JGR 113, D13102, doi:10.1029/2007JD009398, 2008] developed a new technique to calibrate the deposition of BC in to lake sediments, and used the BC measurements in individual sediment samples to determine atmospheric BC concentrations from ~1850 to 2005. In this work we have attempted to extend the measurements back to ~1745. Bottom sediment cores were collected from West Pine Pond (44°20'N, 74°25'W) using gravity coring, sliced into 1.25 or 2.5 cm sections, and freeze dried. The ages or the time of deposition of each section was determined using 210Pb dating technique. The 55- cm long core represented about 260 years or the 1745 to 2005 period. BC was separated from the sediments using a technique described by Husain et al [2008], and concentrations determined using the thermal optical method. The BC concentrations ranged from 0.2 to 3 mg g-1 dry weight of the sediment. The BC concentrations increased sharply around 1890 to 1902, reaching a level of 1.27 mg g-1, or about five times higher than that observed in 1854- 1865. Preliminary data shows only a small variation in the concentration from ~1745 to ~1845. So the level observed during the later period could be used to deduce an upper limit for BC concentrations resulting from forest fires in the United States. It should be recognized that these are long term averages and hence subject to large year to year variations. The appearance of anthropogenic BC component as a major source appears consistent with the population growth in the Eastern US. For example, the population of New York City in 1700, 1790, 1839, 1850, 1870, 1910 was 4937, 33131, 197112, 515547, 942292, 4766883, respectively. It is likely that population growth in the Eastern US followed similar or slower growth. We believe that a more detailed analysis of the lake sediment cores and our technique to determine atmospheric concentrations from sediment measurements can delineate contributions from various sources of BC over the last ~260 years.

  12. A monitor for continuous measurement of temperature, pH, and conductance of wet precipitation: Preliminary results from the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a continuous wet-only precipitation monitor designed by the U.S. Geological Survey to record variations in rainfall temperature, pH, and specific conductance at 1-min intervals over the course of storms. Initial sampling in the Adirondack Mountains showed that rainfall acidity varied over the course of summer storms, with low initial pH values increasing as storm intensity increased.This report describes a continuous wet-only precipitation monitor designed by the U.S. Geological Survey to record variations in rainfall temperature, pH, and specific conductance at 1-min intervals over the course of storms. Initial sampling in the Adirondack Mountains showed that rainfall acidity varied over the course of summer storms, with low initial pH values increasing as storm intensity increased.

  13. Crustal structure of the western New England Appalachians and the Adirondack Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, S.; Leutgert, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interpretation of the crustal velocity structure based on a seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection experiment in eastern North America extending from the Adirondacks in New York State through the northern Appalachians in Vermont and New Hampshire to central Maine. Modeling of the eastern portion of the profile within the New England Appalachians shows a subhorizontal layered crust with upper crustal velocities ranging from 5.5 to 6.2 km/s, a midcrustal velocity of 6.4 km/s, and a lower crustal velocity of approximately 6.8 km/s. Crustal thickness increases from 36 km beneath Maine to 40 km in Vermont. This experiment provides further evidence for the obduction of the allochthonous western Appalachian units onto Grenvillian crust above the azone of detachment that penetrates at least to midcrustal depths and was the locus of successive Paleozoic thrusting. -from Authors

  14. Evidence for multiple metamorphic events in the Adirondack Mountains, N. Y

    SciTech Connect

    McLelland, J.; Lochhead, A.; Vyhnal, C.

    1988-05-01

    Field evidence consisting of: (1) rotated, foliated xenoliths, (2) country rock foliation truncated by isoclinally folded igneous intrusions bearing granulite facies assemblages document one, or more, early dynamothermal event(s) of regional scale and high grade. Early metamorphism resulted in pronounced linear and planar fabric throughout the Adirondacks and preceded the emplacement of the anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite-alaskite (AMCA) suite which contains xenoliths of the metamorphosed rocks. Olivine metagabbros, believed to be approximately contemporaneous with the AMCA-suite, also crosscut and contain xenoliths of, strongly foliated metasediments. These intrusive rocks caused contact metamorphism in the metasediments which locally exhibit both anatectite and restite assemblages. Subsequently, this already complex framework underwent three phases of folding, including an early recumbent isoclinical event, and was metamorphosed to granulite facies P,T conditions. The age of the early metamorphism cannot yet be narrowly constrained, but isotopic results suggest that it may be as young as approx. 1200 Ma or older than approx. 1420 Ma. U-Pb zircon ages indicate emplacement of the AMCA-(metagabbro)-suite in the interval 1160-1130 Ma and place the peak of granulite facies metamorphism between 1070-1025 Ma. The anorogenic character of the AMCA-suite, and the occurrence of metadiabase dike swarms within it, are further evidence of the separate nature of the metamorphic events that precede and postdate AMCA emplacement.

  15. Middle Proterozoic emplacement and deformation of metanorthosite and related rocks in the northeastern Marcy massif, Adirondack Mountains, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Fakundiny, R.H. ); Muller, P.D. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Geologic mapping in the Elizabethtown and Mount Marcy 15 foot quadrangles in the northeastern Adirondack Mountains has shown that Middle Proterozoic anorthosite suite rocks of the Marcy massif were intruded in at least two temporally distinguishable episodes separated by a period of localized ductile shearing. Strain was concentrated in a 100 m to > 1 km thick zone consisting mainly of metamorphosed gabbroic anorthosite, ferrodiorite, and ferrosyenite gneiss with subordinate granite gneiss, calc-silicate gneiss, amphibolite, and marble. This zone of flat to steeply-dipping layered gneisses, designated the Elizabethtown ductile deformation zone (EDDZ) for exposures along Rt 9 south of Elizabethtown, appears to extend from Lake Champlain on the east to at least Lake Placid on the west. Its upper boundary is most clearly evident where it occurs in olivine metagabbro bodies of Jay and Iron Mountain. Massive metagabbro is sheared and recrystallized into amphibolite gneiss. The lower boundary of the zone is more difficult to map, but commonly lies within contaminated metamorphosed gabbroic anorthosite and ferrodiorite gneiss that characterize the margins of the massif in the area. Rocks of the EDDZ display pervasive mesoscopic S and LS fabrics, but exhibit totally recrystallized microtextures. Kinematic indicators such as winged porphyroclasts and S-C fabrics are sporadically developed and provide a regionally ambiguous sense of shear. The authors favor a regional extension origin for the fabrics. Mineral assemblages defining the EDDZ fabrics are consistent with granulite facies conditions during shear-zone development and suggest a lower crustal position. Mapping suggests that the younger anorthosite intrusions were mainly domical and generated a chaotic contact zone typified by block structure and dikes of ferrodiorite, ferromonzonite, and ferrosyenite.

  16. Applications of water-based magnetic gradiometry to assess the geometry and displacement for concealed faults in the southern Adirondack Mountains, New York, U.S.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, David W.; Chiarenzelli, Jeffrey R.; Hewitt, Elise M.; Valentino, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    An integrated magnetic gradiometry and structural analysis was conducted on three lakes in the southern Adirondacks Mountains, New York, in order to develop a geometric and kinematic model for concealed and long lived faults that transect the Proterozoic basement structures, offset Paleozoic strata to the south, and may be associated with the development of the post-Paleozoic cratonic dome (the Adirondack dome). Two lakes occur along the trace of two of the most prominent topographic lineaments that have been proposed to be faults in the southern Adirondack Mountains, and a third lake is located at the apparent fault intersection. Hinkley Lake occurs over the east-west trending lineament that corresponds to the trace of the Prospect fault. Indian Lake resides in a set of north-northeast trending pronounced lineaments that transect an anorthosite-cored structural dome and are inferred to be faults on the NYS geologic map. Piseco Lake is immediately adjacent to the intersection of the two proposed fault zones (Prospect and Indian Lake fault zones). Magnetic surveys were conducted on all three lakes, resulting in anomaly maps. Accompanying two dimensional geologic models for Hinkley and Piseco Lake were produced. At Piseco Lake, field evidence supports a brittle deformation history with sinistral-normal displacement. A similar deformation history is consistent with field data collected at Indian Lake. Correlation of the two dimensional magnetic models resulted in a sinistral, releasing-bend fault geometry beneath Piseco Lake, and the fault truncation of a granitic gneiss cored antiform for the subsurface geology of Hinkley Lake. The magnetic data and models suggest that Piseco Lake resides over a sinistral, pull-apart structure with sufficient throw to preserve the lowermost Paleozoic strata that once covered much of the Adirondack dome. This would account for both sinistral strike-slip and normal displacement on the interpreted faults, at Piseco and Indian Lakes, and

  17. Inner Adirondack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This close-up image taken by the microscopic imager onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed Adirondack after a portion of its surface was ground off by the rover's rock abrasion tool. The observed area is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  18. Dirty Adirondack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed Adirondack before the rover wiped off a portion of the rock's dust coating with a stainless steel brush located on its rock abrasion tool. Spirit cleaned off the rock in preparation for grinding into it to expose fresh rock underneath.

  19. 3. Photocopied June 1978 'ADIRONDACK VILLAGE.' ENGRAVING MADE IN 1859, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopied June 1978 'ADIRONDACK VILLAGE.' ENGRAVING MADE IN 1859, LOOKING DOWN MAIN STREET. SOURCE: BENSON LOSSING, THE HUDSON, FROM THE WILDERNESS TO THE SEA, TROY, NEW YORK, 1866, p. 27. - Adirondack Iron & Steel Company, New Furnace, Hudson River, Tahawus, Essex County, NY

  20. Not all Surface Waters show a Strong Relation between DOC and Hg Species: Results from an Adirondack Mountain Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. A.; Schelker, J.; Murray, K. R.; Brigham, M. E.; Aiken, G.

    2009-12-01

    Several recent papers have highlighted the strong statistical correlation between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and total dissolved mercury (THgd) and/or dissolved methyl Hg (MeHgd). These relations of organic carbon with Hg species are often even stronger when a measurement that reflects some fraction of the DOC is used such as UV absorbance at 254 nm or the hydrophobic acid fraction. These strong relations are not surprising given the pivotal role DOC plays in binding and transporting Hg, which is otherwise relatively insoluble in dilute waters. In this study, we show data collected monthly and during some storms and snowmelt over 2.5 years from the 65 km2 Fishing Brook watershed in the Adirondack Mountains of New York. This dataset is noteworthy because of a weak and statistically non-significant (p > 0.05) relationship between DOC and either of THgd or MeHgd over the entire study period. We believe that the lack of a strong DOC-Hg relation in Fishing Brook reflects the combined effects of the heterogeneous land cover and the presence of three ponds within the watershed. The watershed is dominantly (89.3%) hardwood and coniferous forest with 8% wetland area, and 2.7% open water. Despite the lack of a strong relation between DOC and Hg species across the annual hydrograph, the dataset shows strong within-season correlations that have different y-intercepts and slopes between the growing season (May 1 - Sept. 30) and dormant season (Oct. 1 - April 30), as well as strong, but seasonally varying DOC-Hg correlations at smaller spatial scales in data collected on several occasions in 10 sub-watersheds of Fishing Brook. We hypothesize that a combination of several factors can account for these annually weak, but seasonally and spatially strong DOC-Hg correlations: (1) seasonal variations in runoff generation processes from upland and wetland areas that may yield DOC with varying Hg-binding characteristics, (2) photo-induced losses of Hg species and DOC

  1. Adirondack Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit front hazard-identification camera after the rover's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday, Jan. 15, 2004. Engineers drove the rover approximately 3 meters (10 feet) from the Columbia Memorial Station toward the first rock target, seen in the foreground. The football-sized rock was dubbed Adirondack because of its mountain-shaped appearance. Scientists have begun using the microscopic imager instrument at the end of the rover's robotic arm to examine the rock and understand how it formed.

  2. Sensitivity of Stream Methyl Hg Concentrations to Environmental Change in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Nystrom, E.; Millard, G.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Adirondacks of New York have high levels of mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation as demonstrated by a region-wide fish consumption advisory for children and women who may become pregnant. The source of this Hg is atmospheric deposition that originates from regional, continental, and global emissions. Soils in the region have large Hg stores equivalent to several decades of atmospheric deposition suggesting that the processes controlling Hg transport from soils to surface waters may greatly affect Hg concentrations and loads in surface waters. Furthermore, Hg can be converted to its neuro-toxic methyl form (MeHg), particularly in riparian and wetland soils where biogeochemical conditions favor net methylation. We measured MeHg concentrations during 33 months at Fishing Brook, a 65 km2 catchment in the upper Hudson River basin in the Adirondacks. Seasonal variation in stream MeHg concentrations was more than tenfold, consistent with temperature-driven variation in net methylation rates in soils and sediment. These data also indicate greater than twofold annual variation in stream MeHg concentrations among the three monitored growing seasons. The driest growing season had the lowest MeHg concentrations, and these values were greater during the two wetter growing seasons. We hypothesize that contact of the riparian water table with abundant organic matter and MeHg stored in the shallowest soil horizons is a dominant control on MeHg transport to the stream. An empirical model was developed that accounted for 81% of the variation in stream MeHg concentrations. Water temperature and the length of time the simulated riparian water table remained in the shallow soil were key predictive variables, highlighting the sensitivity of MeHg to climatic variation. Future changes in other factors such as Hg emissions and deposition and acid deposition will likely also influence stream MeHg concentrations and loads. For example, lime application to an Adirondack stream to increase pH and

  3. Hydrologic analysis of two headwater lake basins of differing lake pH in the west-central Adirondack Mountains of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdoch, Peter S.; Peters, N.E.; Newton, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrologic analysis of two headwater lake basins in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, during 1980-81 indicates that the degree of neutralization of acid precipitation is controlled by the groundwater contribution to the lake. According to flow-duration analyses, daily mean outflow/unit area from the neutral lake (Panther Lake, pH 5-7) was more sustained and contained a higher percentage of groundwater than that of the acidic lake (Woods Lake, pH 4-5). Outflow recession rates and maximum base-flow rates, derived from individual recession curves, were 3.9 times and 1.5 times greater, respectively, in the neutral-lake basin than in the acidic-lake basin. Groundwater contribution to lake outflow was also calculated from a lake-water budget; the groundwater contribution to the neutral lake was about 10 times greater than that to the acidic lake. Thick sandy till forms the groundwater reservoir and the major recharge area in both basins but covers 8.5 times more area in the neutral-lake basin than in the acidic-lake basin. More groundwater storage within the neutral basin provides longer contact time with neutralizing minerals and more groundwater discharge. As a result, the neutral lake has relatively high pH and alkalinity, and more net cation transport. (USGS)

  4. The Carthage-Colton mylonite zone (Adirondack Mountains, New York): The site of a cryptic suture in the Grenville Orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Mezger, K.; Pluijm, B.A. van der; Essene, E.J.; Halliday, A.N. )

    1992-09-01

    U-Pb ages were determined on metamorphic sphenes and monazites from the Late Proterozoic Adirondack Highlands and Lowlands in the vicinity of the Carthage-Colton mylonite zone. Monazites were extracted from metapelites, and sphenes were separated from marbles, calc-silicate gneisses, and granite gneisses in order to determine the timing and the duration of metamorphism as well as the cooling histories for rocks on either side of the mylonite zone. Monazite ages from the Lowlands range from 1,171-1,137 Ma; sphene ages in the Lowlands range from 1,156-1,103 Ma, those from the Highlands immediately to the east of the mylonite zone range from 1,050-982 ma. The ages indicate that the last high-grade metamorphism in the Highlands is ca. 100 m.y. younger than in the Lowlands and that both terranes had separate cooling histories at least until ca. 1,000 Ma. Sphenes from within the Carthage-Colton mylonite zone yield ages of about 1,098 Ma, which are distinct from sphene ages on either side of the shear zone. The mineral ages, structures, and metamorphic histories suggests that the Carthage-Colton mylonite zone is a fundamental tectonic boundary within the Proterozoic Grenville Orogen of North America.

  5. Compositional controls on spinel clouding and garnet formation in plagioclase of olivine metagabbros, Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLelland, J.M.; Whitney, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Olivine metagabbros from the Adirondacks usually contain both clear and spinel-clouded plagioclase, as well as garnet. The latter occurs primarily as the outer rim of coronas surrounding olivine and pyroxene, and less commonly as lamellae or isolated grains within plagioclase. The formation of garnet and metamorphic spinel is dependent upon the anorthite content of the plagioclase. Plagioclase more sodic than An38??2 does not exhibit spinel clouding, and garnet rarely occurs in contact with plagioclase more albitic than An36??4. As a result of these compositional controls, the distribution of spinel and garnet mimics and visually enhances original igneous zoning in plagioclase. Most features of the arrangement of clear (unclouded) plagioclase, including the shells or moats of clear plagioclase which frequently occur inside the garnet rims of coronas, can be explained on the basis of igneous zoning. The form and distribution of the clear zones may also be affected by the metamorphic reactions which have produced the coronas, and by redistribution of plagioclase in response to local volume changes during metamorphism. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Acid-base characteristics of the Grass Pond watershed in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, USA: interactions among soil, vegetation and surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEathron, K. M.; Mitchell, M. J.; Zhang, L.

    2013-07-01

    Grass Pond watershed is located within the southwestern Adirondack Mountain region of New York State, USA. This region receives some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in North America and is particularly sensitive to acidic inputs due to many of its soils having shallow depths and being generally base poor. Differences in soil chemistry and tree species between seven subwatersheds were examined in relation to acid-base characteristics of the seven major streams that drain into Grass Pond. Mineral soil pH, stream water BCS (base-cation surplus) and pH exhibited a positive correlation with sugar maple basal area (p = 0.055; 0.48 and 0.39, respectively). Black cherry basal area was inversely correlated with stream water BCS, ANC (acid neutralizing capacity)c and NO3- (p = 0.23; 0.24 and 0.20, respectively). Sugar maple basal areas were positively associated with watershed characteristics associated with the neutralization of atmospheric acidic inputs while in contrast, black cherry basal areas showed opposite relationships to these same watershed characteristics. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that black cherry had a distinctive relationship with forest floor chemistry apart from the other tree species, specifically a strong positive association with forest floor NH4, while sugar maple had a distinctive relationship with stream chemistry variables, specifically a strong positive association with stream water ANCc, BCS and pH. Our results provide evidence that sugar maple is acid-intolerant or calciphilic tree species and also demonstrate that black cherry is likely an acid-tolerant tree species.

  7. Acid-base characteristics of the Grass Pond watershed in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, USA: interactions between soil, vegetation and surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEathron, K. M.; Mitchell, M. J.; Zhang, L.

    2012-09-01

    Grass Pond watershed is located within the Southwestern Adirondack Mountain region of New York State, USA. This region receives some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in North America and is particularly sensitive to acidic inputs due to many of its soils having shallow depths and being generally base-poor. Differences in soil chemistry and tree species between seven subwatersheds were examined in relation to acid-base characteristics of the seven major streams that drain into Grass Pond. Mineral soil pH, stream water BCS and pH exhibited a positive correlation with sugar maple basal area (p = 0.055; 0.48 and 0.39, respectively). Black cherry basal area was inversely correlated with stream water BCS, ANCc and NO3- (p = 0.23; 0.24 and 0.20, respectively). Sugar maple basal areas were positively correlated with watershed characteristics associated with the neutralization of atmospheric acidic inputs while in contrast, black cherry basal areas showed opposite relationships to these same watershed characteristics. Canonical Correspondence Analysis indicated that black cherry had a distinctive relationship with forest floor chemistry apart from the other tree species, specifically a strong positive association with forest floor NH4 while sugar maple had a distinctive relationship with stream chemistry variables, specifically a strong positive association with stream water ANCc, BCS and pH. Our results provide evidence that sugar maple is acid-intolerant or calciphilic tree species and also demonstrate that black cherry is likely an acid-tolerant tree species.

  8. Effects of acid deposition on dissolution of carbonate stone during summer storms in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, 1987-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of a long-term research program designed to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone. Acidic deposition accelerates the dissolution of carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. Sequential sampling of runoff from carbonate-stone (marble) and glass (reference) microcatchments in the Adirondack Mountains in New York State provided a detailed record of the episodic fluctuations in rain rate and runoff chemistry during individual summer storms. Rain rate and chemical concentrations from carbonate-stone and glass runoff fluctuated three to tenfold during storms. Net calcium-ion concentrations from the carbonatestone runoff, a measure of stone dissolution, typically fluctuated twofold during these storms. High net sulfate and net calcium concentrations in the first effective runoff at the start of a storm indicated that atmospheric pollutants deposited on the stone surface during dry periods formed calcium sulfate minerals, an important process in carbonate stone dissolution. Dissolution of the carbonate stone generally increased up to twofold during coincident episodes of low rain rate (less than 5 millimeters per hour) and decreased rainfall (glass runoff) pH (less than 4.0); episodes of high rain rate (cloudbursts) were coincident with a rapid increase in rainfall pH and also a rapid decrease in the dissolution of carbonate-stone. During a storm, it seems the most important factors causing increased dissolution of carbonate stone are coincident periods of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. Dissolution of the carbonate stone decreased slightly as the rain rate exceeded about 5 millimeters per hour, probably in response to rapidly increasing rainfall pH during episodes of high rain rate and shorter contact time between the runoff and the stone surface. High runoff rates resulting from cloudbursts remove calcium sulfate minerals formed during dry periods prior to storms and also remove dissolution products formed in large

  9. USE OF A LUMPED MODEL (MAGIC) TO BOUND THE ESTIMATION OF POTENTIAL FUTURE EFFECTS OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN DEPOSITION ON LAKE CHEMISTRY IN THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching of atmospherically deposited nitrogen from forested watersheds can acidify lakes and streams. Using a modified version of the Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments, we made computer simulations of such effects for 36 lake catchments in the Adirondack Mount...

  10. Target loads of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition for protection of acid sensitive aquatic resources in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, T.J.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; McDonnell, T.C.; Herlihy, A.T.; Burns, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic watershed acid-base chemistry model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC) was used to calculate target loads (TLs) of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition expected to be protective of aquatic health in lakes in the Adirondack ecoregion of New York. The TLs were calculated for two future dates (2050 and 2100) and three levels of protection against lake acidification (acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 0, 20, and 50 eq L -1). Regional sulfur and nitrogen deposition estimates were combined with TLs to calculate exceedances. Target load results, and associated exceedances, were extrapolated to the regional population of Adirondack lakes. About 30% of Adirondack lakes had simulated TL of sulfur deposition less than 50 meq m -2 yr to protect lake ANC to 50 eq L -1. About 600 Adirondack lakes receive ambient sulfur deposition that is above this TL, in some cases by more than a factor of 2. Some critical criteria threshold values were simulated to be unobtainable in some lakes even if sulfur deposition was to be decreased to zero and held at zero until the specified endpoint year. We also summarize important lessons for the use of target loads in the management of acid-impacted aquatic ecosystems, such as those in North America, Europe, and Asia. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Children's Camps in the Adirondacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Hallie E.

    2003-01-01

    In the late 19th century, camps in the Adirondacks responded to concerns that the American character was softening. Much camping philosophy came from the progressive movement in education. Aspects of Indian culture were adopted because they seemed to fit naturally in the Adirondacks, and children loved them. Adirondack camps have always been…

  12. Adirondack's Inner Self

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This spectrum - the first taken of a rock on another planet - reveals the different iron-containing minerals that makeup the martian rock dubbed Adirondack. It shows that Adirondack is a type of volcanic rock known as basalt. Specifically, the rock is what is called olivine basalt because in addition to magnetite and pyroxene, two key ingredients of basalt, it contains a mineral called olivine. This data was acquired by Spirit's Moessbauer spectrometer before the rover developed communication problems with Earth on the 18th martian day, or sol, of its mission.

  13. Experimental examination of two-pyroxene graphical thermometers using natural pyroxenes with application to metaigneous pyroxenes from the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabelek, P. I.; Lindsley, D. H.; Bohlen, S. R.

    1987-09-01

    Clinopyroxene with exsolved orthopyroxene and coexisting orthopyroxene with exsolved clinopyroxene (inverted pigeonite) in metaigneous rocks from the Adirondacks, New York, were experimentally homogenized at temperatures near those inferred for their original crystallization. The purposes were several: (1) to test the graphical two-pyroxene geothermometer of Lindsley (1983); (2) to test the hypothesis of Bohlen and Essene (1978) that these were originally igneous pyroxenes; and (3) to test whether modal recombination of complexly exsolved pyroxenes yields realistic compositions. Experiments on Fe-rich compositions at 930° and 870° C (1 GPa) are compatible with the graphical thermometer of Lindsley (1983); however, this graphical thermometer yields apparent temperatures approximately 50° C too high for experiments at 1050° C and 1100° C (0 MPa). This suggests that at intermediate Mg/Fe the augite isotherms for these temperatures lie at lower wollastonite compositions than shown by Lindsley. The results are, however, in good agreement with isotherms derived from the solution model of Davidson (1985). When these isotherms are applied to a variety of terrestrial and lunar igneous rocks and the metaigneous rocks from the Adirondacks, temperatures given by augite and pigeonite compositions from coexisting pairs are similar. Comparison of the experimentally homogenized compositions with modally recombined compositions of Bohlen and Essene (1978) show that discrepancies between augite and pigeonite temperatures may nevertheless arise if pyroxene grains formed by granular exsolution are not correctly reintegrated.

  14. Steep oxygen-isotope gradients at marble—metagranite contacts in the northwest Adirondack Mountains, New York, USA: products of fluid-hosted diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Ian; Valley, John W.

    1991-10-01

    Steep gradients in oxygen-isotope ratios are recorded from two contacts between Grenville marbles (calcite δ 18O = 21-24%) and metamorphosed granitic intrusives (whole rock δ 18O = 11-12%) in the northwest Adirondacks. Oxygen- and carbon-isotope fractionations between coexisting minerals in the marbles and the metagranites are consistent with isotopic equilibration at peak metamorphic temperatures. The δ 18O profiles are sigmoidal with inflection points at the contacts, and are developed over 5-6 m. Quantitative fluid infiltration-diffusion modeling suggests that the isotopic gradients are best explained as the result of fluid-hosted diffusion. For porosities of 10 -3 to 10 -6, the profiles could have formed in 10 3-10 7 years via an interconnected grain boundary fluid. The granites were probably emplaced at shallow crustal levels prior to the regional Grenville metamorphism, and isotopic exchange is most likely to have occurred at that time. Contact metamorphism at these localities involved devolatilisation of the marbles, and the time estimates may reflect the periods over which fluid-producing reactions took place and an enhanced porosity was maintained. In the marbles, there is a progressive increase in the percentage of diopside and K-feldspar at the expense of phlogopite and tremolite towards the metagranites. These mineralogical changes probably occurred due to the temperature increase associated with granite intrusion and diffusion of H 2O from the granite. The two localities lie on either side of the regional-metamorphic amphibolite- to granulite-facies transition. The preservation of isotopic profiles formed during contact metamorphism suggests that there was little pervasive fluid flow at this crustal level during the regional metamorphism, or at any time thereafter. Steep isotopic gradients are present at orthogneiss-marble contacts elsewhere in the Adirondacks, suggesting that this conclusion may be generally applicable to this terrain.

  15. Adirondack's True Self

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a cleaned off portion of the rock dubbed Adirondack. In preparation for grinding into the rock, Spirit wiped off a fine coat of dust with a brush located on its rock abrasion tool. Scientists plan to analyze the newly-exposed patch of rock with the rover's suite of science instruments, both before and after the top layer is removed.

  16. Acidification in the Adirondacks: Defining the Biota in trophic Levels of 30 Chemically Diverse Acid-Impacted Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adirondack Mountains in New York State have a varied surficial geology and chemically diverse surface waters that are among the most impacted by acid deposition in the U.S. No single Adirondack investigation has been comprehensive in defining the effects of acidification on ...

  17. American Fisheries Society 136th Annual Meeting Lake Placid, NY 10-14 September, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Einhouse, D.; Walsh, M.G.; Keeler, S.; Long, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The New York Chapter of the American Fisheries Society and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation invite you to experience the beauty of New York's famous Adirondack Park as the American Fisheries Society (AFS) convenes its 136th Annual Meeting in the legendary Olympic Village of Lake Placid, NY, 10-14 September 2006. Our meeting theme "Fish in the Balance" will explore the interrelation between fish, aquatic habitats, and man, highlighting the challenges facing aquatic resource professionals and the methods that have been employed to resolve conflicts between those that use or have an interest in our aquatic resources. As fragile as it is beautiful, the Adirondack Region is the perfect location to explore this theme. Bordered by Mirror Lake and its namesake, Lake Placid, the Village of Lake Placid has small town charm, but all of the conveniences that a big city would provide. Whether its reliving the magic of the 1980 hockey team's "Miracle on Ice" at the Lake Placid Olympic Center, getting a panoramic view of the Adirondack high peaks from the top of the 90 meter ski jumps, fishing or kayaking in adjacent Mirror Lake, hiking a mountain trail, or enjoying a quiet dinner or shopping excursion in the various shops and restaurants that line Main Street, Lake Placid has something for everyone.

  18. Composition and petrogenesis of oxide-, apatite-rich gabbronorites associated with Proterozoic anorthosite massifs: examples from the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLelland, James; Ashwal, Lewis; Moore, Laura

    1994-03-01

    Mafic dikes and sheets rich in Fe, Ti-oxides and apatite are commonly associated with Proterozoic massif anorthosites and are referred to as oxide-apatite gabbronorites (OAGN). Within the Adirondacks, field evidence indicates that during middle to late stages of anorthositic evolution, these bodies were emplaced as magmas with unspecified liquid-crystal ratios. Sixty whole rock analyses of Adirondack OAGN and related rocks define continuous oxide trends on Harker variation diagrams (SiO2=37 54%). Similar trends exist for Sr, Y, Nb, Zr, and REE and together suggest a common origin via fractional crystallization. A representative parental magma (plagioclase-rich crystal mush) has been chosen from this suite, and successive daughter magmas have been produced by removal of minerals with compositions corresponding to those determined in actual rocks. Least squares, mass balance calculations of major element trends indicate that removal of intermediate plagioclase (˜An40 50) plus lesser amounts of pyroxene account for the compositional variation of this suite and produce very low sums of the squares of the residuals (R2 s>0.25). The extracted mineral phases correspond volumetrically and compositionally to those of the anorthositic suite, and the model succeeds in accounting for the observed OAGN trends. The major element model is utilized to calculate trace elejent concentrations for successive magmas, and these agree closely with observation. We conclude that, beginning with a plagioclase-rich crystal mush, the extraction of intermediate plagioclase (˜An40 50) drives residual magmas to increasingly Fe-, Ti-, and P-rich and SiO2-poor conditions characteristic of Fenner-type fractionation. The crystallization sequence is plagioclase→plagioclase+orthopyroxene→plagioclase+orthopyroxene (pigeonite)+augite. Fe, Ti-oxides begin to crystallize near the end of the sequence and are followed by apatite and fayalitic olivine which appears in place of pigeonite. Augitic

  19. Adirondack's Finer Side

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This close-up look at the martian rock dubbed Adirondack was captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's microscopic imager before Spirit stopped communicating with Earth on the 18th martian day, or sol, of its mission. The rock's smooth and pitted surface is revealed in this first-ever microscopic image of a rock on another planet. The examined patch of rock is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across; features within the rock as small as 1/10 of a millimeter (.04 inch) can be detected. The rover's shadow appears at the bottom of the image.

  20. Hydrometeorological and climatological conditions associated with flash flooding in the Catskill Mountains, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, N. G.; Quiring, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Flash flooding is a concern in watersheds of the New York City Water Supply System, as the turbidity associated with rapid flooding is unacceptable in an unfiltered water supply. Previous studies suggest that flash flooding will occur more frequently in this region in a changing climate. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the conditions associated with flash flooding are important for effective watershed management. Seven flash floods were identified in the hydrologic record for the Neversink River near Claryville, NY from 1 April 1987 through 15 July 2014. Case studies using Weather Prediction Center forecast maps, National Centers for Environmental Prediction/ National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis daily composites, and co-operative station data were used to characterize each event. Forecast maps indicate synoptic-scale frontal activity concurrent with all flash flood events. The four winter flash flood peaks are associated with rain on existing snowpack, with anomalously warm 1000 mb temperatures and anomalously high precipitation rates. The three summer flash flood peaks are associated with convective activity, high precipitation rates, anomalously warm 1000 mb temperatures, and southerly winds. NCEP/NCAR climate composites for winter and summer flash flood events are consistent with the case studies presented. The frequency of these broad-scale conditions suggest that localized effects of the basin conditions separate flash flood events from other high discharge events. Recognizing these conditions in the context of climate predictions is useful for effective and proactive water management in the region to maintain an unfiltered water supply for the greater New York City area.

  1. CASTNet mountain acid deposition monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Bowser, J.J.; Anderson, J.B.; Edgerton, E.S.; Mohnen, V.; Baumgardener, R.

    1994-12-31

    Concern over the influence of air pollution on forest decline has led the USEPA to establish the Mountain Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (MADMP) to quantify total deposition at high altitudes, i.e., above cloud base. Clouds can be a major source of atmospheric deposition to sensitive, mountain ecosystems. This program is a part of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), a national assessment of the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act. The objectives of MADMP are to estimate total deposition, measure cloud chemistry, and characterize spacial and temporal trends at four selected high altitude sites in the Eastern US. Four MADMP sites have been established for the 1994 field season: Clingman`s Dome, Great Smoky Mountain Nat. Park, TN; Slide Mountain, Catskill State Park, NY; Whiteface Mountain, Adirondack State Park, NY; and Whitetop Mountain, Mt. Rogers Nat`l Recreational Area, VA. An automated cloud collection system will be utilized in combination with continuous measurements of cloud liquid water content in order to estimate cloudwater deposition. Other relevant data will include continuous meteorological measurements, ozone and sulfur dioxide concentrations, wet deposition from rainfall analysis, and dry deposition from filter pack analysis. Quality assurance and quality control measures will be employed to maximize accuracy and precision.

  2. Adirondack Under the Microscope-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This overhead look at the martian rock dubbed Adirondack was captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera. It shows the approximate region where the rover's microscopic imager began its first close-up inspection.

  3. A new species of Lepidocyrtus (Collembola, Entomobryidae) from the Börzsöny Mountains, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The genus Lepidocyrtus was previously represented by 17 species in Hungary, including four species with locus typicus in this country. Opportunistic sampling in mid-mountain grassland and forest habitats resulted in records of several species from the L. lignorum group and allowed to describe the new species L. traseri sp. nov. The L. lignorum group, established and named after the eponymic species, is composed by a total of 11 species. The main characteristics shared by every species in this group are the dorsal body macrochaetotaxy R0R1R2/00/0101+3 and the presence of scales on the antennae and legs. The new species is close to L. lignorum (Fabricius, 1793) and L. violaceus (Geoffroy, 1762) but differs from them by the color pattern, number of interocular scales, type of labral papillae and the number of inner setae on the manubrial plate. An identification key is given for differentiating all species of this group. PMID:27615681

  4. Spirit Takes a Turn for Adirondack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This rear hazard-identification camera image looks back at the circular tracks made in the martian soil when the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove about 3 meters (10 feet) toward the mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack, Spirit's first rock target. Spirit made a series of arcing turns totaling approximately 1 meter (3 feet). It then turned in place and made a series of short, straightforward movements totaling approximately 2 meters (6.5 feet). The drive took about 30 minutes to complete, including time stopped to take images. The two rocks in the upper left corner of the image are called 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi.' In the upper right corner is a portion of the lander, now known as the Columbia Memorial Station.

  5. Spatial patterns in forest composition and standing dead red spruce in montane forests of the Adirondacks and northern Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Craig, B W; Friedland, A J

    1991-08-01

    The decline of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) in montane forests of the northeastern United States has been previously reported. The objective of this study was to assess spatial patterns, if any, in standing dead red spruce stems in the Adirondacks of New York and northern Appalachians of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. A stratified random sample of 19 mountains along a west to east transect in the Adirondacks and the northern Appalachians showed that the live basal area of all species was highest in the White Mountains (34.6 m(2) ha(-1)) and lowest in the Adirondack Mountains (23.7 m(2) ha(-1)) in the Green Mountains was significantly lower than in any other region. Intact standing dead red spruce in the Adirondack and Green Mountains (30%) was significantly higher than that in the three eastern clusters (14%). The amount of intact standing dead red spruce trees increased with elevation in only the western part of the region. With the exception of the Adirondacks, there was a greater average percent dead red spruce on the west side than on the east side of each mountain. The sum of standing dead for other tree species (average 13%) showed no statistically significant patterns with region, elevation or aspect, and was significantly lower than the amount of total dead red spruce (average 42%). The standing dead red spruce patterns we observed cannot be associated with any specific causal factors at this time. PMID:24233751

  6. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  7. Exploratory Study of an Active Landslide in the Adirondacks Using Applied Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, K. W.; Sherrod, L. A.; Kozlowski, A.; Bird, B.; Swiontek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Residents of Keene Valley, NY face a serious natural hazard in the form of a landslide on Porter Mountain in the High-Peaks region of the Adirondack Mountains. The slide initiated in early May 2011 as a result of the melting of heavy snowpack and the onset of abnormally excessive April rain on the mountain slopes. Spanning 82 acres, this is the largest documented landslide in New York state history. Although it is advancing slowly, with downslope soil movement rates between 15 and 60 cm per day, the slide has proven to be destructive. At the time of this study, shifting soils had caused one house to be condemned due to the unstable ground under the foundation. At the same time, three other houses were in immediate danger. The destructive nature of this landslide speaks to the importance of understanding the distribution and character of glacial sediments deposited on the steep slopes during deglaciation of the region, and the interaction of a complex groundwater system. In order to understand the framework and mechanisms of the current landslide and to aid in predicting the potential for other slides in the area, geophysical methods were employed. Geophysical surveys and corresponding subsurface imaging were used to examine the amount of sediment present and the stratigraphy of the shallow subsurface. The bedrock in this area is believed to be anorthosite which underlies a surficial lithology of glacial sediments. Depth to the bedrock was measured at 76 m in a borehole at the base of the slide. However, in a well near the top of the slide, depth to bedrock was measured at 6 m, with some exposures of bedrock visible at the surface. To delineate three-dimensional trends of the bedrock in the subsurface, several of the geophysical surveys followed the surface exposures of bedrock to a depth where these features were no longer detectable. Nineteen resistivity surveys were implemented to map the subsurface glacial features and depth to bedrock using a MPT DAS-1

  8. Wolf restoration to the Adirondacks: the advantages and disadvantages of public participation in the decision

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2000-01-01

    The first time I ever saw a wolf in New York State's Adirondack Mountains was in 1956. It was a brush wolf, or coyote (Canis latrans), not a real wolf, but to an eager young wildlife student this distinction meant little. The presence of this large deer-killing canid let my fresh imagination view the Adirondacks as a real northern wilderness. Since then I have spent the last 40 years studying the real wolf: the gray wolf (Canis lupus). Although inhabiting nearby Quebec and Ontario, the gray wolf still has not made its way back to the Adirondacks as it has to Wisconsin, Michigan, and Montana. Those three states had the critical advantages of a nearby reservoir population of wolves and wilderness corridors through which dispersers from the reservoirs could immigrate. The Adirondacks, on the other hand, are geographically more similar to the greater Yellowstone area in that they are separated from any wolf reservoir by long distances and intensively human-developed areas aversive to wolves from the reservoir populations. If wolves are to return to the Adirondacks, they almost certainly will have to be reintroduced, as they were to Yellowstone National Park. Wolf reintroduction, as distinct from natural recovery, is an especially contentious issue, for it entails dramatic, deliberate action that must be open to public scrutiny, thorough discussion and review, and highly polarized debate. This is as it should be because once a wolf population is reintroduced to an area, it must be managed forever. There is no turning back. The wolf was once eradicated not just from the Adirondacks but from almost all of the 48 contiguous states. That feat was accomplished by a primarily pioneering society that applied itself endlessly to the task, armed with poison. We can never return to those days, so once the wolf is reintroduced successfully, it will almost certainly be here to stay.

  9. Adirondack tourism: perceived consequences of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, W.C.

    1984-03-01

    This report seeks to place in perspective the perceived effects of acid precipitation on the tourist industry in the Adirondacks. The 9375-square mile park is host to almost nine million tourists annually, not including seasonal residents. Since the park was established almost 100 years ago, there have been many changes in tourist characteristics, available recreational facilities, kinds of activities, accessibility of the area, and land use and resource management policies. The tourist industry has been influenced by both controllable and uncontrollable factors. At present the overwhelming majority of recreational opportunities and natural resources important to the Adirondack tourist industry are relatively unaffected by acid precipitation. Fishing, a significant component of the tourist industry, is the most vulnerable, but any presumed adverse economic effect has to be weighed against the location of the impacted waters, total Adirondack fishing habitat, substitution available, habitat usage, fisherman characteristics, resource management, and the declining importance of fishing as an Adirondack recreational attraction. Concern is expressed as to whether present minimal acidification impacts are the precursor of major future impacts on Adirondack terrestrial and aquatic environments, and ultimately tourism. Tourism in the Adirondacks is increasing, while many other regional employment sectors are declining. It is becoming a more stable multiseason industry. Its future growth and character will be affected by government, private organization, business community, and resident controversies regarding land use and resource management attitudes, policies, budgets, and regulations. The acid precipitation issue is only one of many related controversies. 65 references, 2 figures.

  10. Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Above the forest: the alpine tundra; Solar energy, water, wind and soil in mountains; Mountain weather; Mountain building and plate tectonics; Mountain walls: forming, changing, and disappearing; Living high: mountain ecosystems; Distribution of mountain plants and animals; On foot in the mountains: how to hike and backpack; Ranges and peaks of the world. Map and guidebook sources, natural history and mountain adventure trips, mountain environmental education centers and programs, and sources of information on trails for the handicapped are included.

  11. Decline of red spruce in the Adirondacks, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.T.; Siccama, T.G.; Johnson, A.H.; Breisch, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-two stands in the spruce-fir forests of Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks, originally sampled from 1964-66, were resurveyed in 1982. From 10-25 Bitterlich points were used in each stand in 1982 to obtain an estimate of basal area per hectare. Data were summarized for low elevation (<900m) and high elevation (> or = 900m) forests. Red spruce declined by 40-60% in basal area for the low elevation forests and by 60-70% above 900m. Balsam fir decreased by 35% at high elevations, due to natural disturbance in several of the stands, but was unchanged when only undisturbed stands were considered. The decline of red spruce accounted for about three quarters of the total decrease in basal area for both the high- and low-elevation forests. Spruce seedling frequency for the high-elevation sample decreased by 80%, but was unchanged below 900m. The pattern of spruce decline in the Adirondacks is similar to findings for New England. The cause of the decline is speculative at the time.

  12. Oxygen isotope evidence for shallow emplacement of Adirondack anorthosite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valley, J.W.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic analysis of wollastonites from the Willsboro Mine, Adirondack Mountains, New York reveals a 400-ft wide zone of 18O depletion at anorthosite contacts. Values of ??18O vary more sharply with distance and are lower (to -1.3) than any yet reported for a granulite fades terrain. Exchange with circulating hot meteoric water best explains these results and implies that the anorthosite was emplaced at relatively shallow depths, <10 km, in marked contrast to the depth of granulite fades metamorphism (23 km). These 18O depletions offer the first strong evidence for shallow emplacement of anorthosite within the Grenville Province and suggest that regional metamorphism was a later and tectonically distinct event. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Photosynthetic and Growth Response of Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) Mature Trees and Seedlings to Calcium, Magnesium, and Nitrogen Additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA

    PubMed Central

    Momen, Bahram; Behling, Shawna J.; Lawrence, Greg B.; Sullivan, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg) to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max) and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max), apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe), and light compensation point (LCP). To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the forest floor

  14. Photosynthetic and Growth Response of Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) Mature Trees and Seedlings to Calcium, Magnesium, and Nitrogen Additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA.

    PubMed

    Momen, Bahram; Behling, Shawna J; Lawrence, Greg B; Sullivan, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg) to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max) and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max), apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe), and light compensation point (LCP). To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the forest floor

  15. Photosynthetic and growth response of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) mature trees and seedlings to calcium, magnesium, and nitrogen additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Momen, Bahram; Behling, Shawna J; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Sullivan, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg) to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max) and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max), apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe), and light compensation point (LCP). To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the

  16. A Discussion of the Area Method for Hydrograph Separation, Case Study in the Adirondacks, New York State (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutras, B. A.; Romanowicz, E. A.

    2004-05-01

    Many hydrology texts refer to the area method for estimating the end of surface runoff after the peak discharge in storm hydrographs. This method is used to aid in separating base flow from surface runoff in stream flow during storm events. The area method assumes that the duration of surface runoff after peak discharge is a function of the area of the drainage basin. The duration of surface runoff in days is equal to the area of the drainage basin (sq. miles) raised to the 0.2 power. References to the type of watersheds for which this relationship is true are vague. The method is assumed to be applicable for large watersheds. In our poster we report the results of a study to test the validity of this relationship. Five nested watersheds (2.1 to 19.2 sq. km) were selected in the Adirondack Mountains near Jay, NY (USA). Stage was monitored every 15-minutes using a 1500 mm capacitance rod at the mouth of each watershed. The capacitance rods were installed in stilling wells adjacent to the natural channel. Select storm hydrographs were picked for hydrograph separation during the fall 2003. Preliminary results indicate that the area method is a reasonable predictor of the duration of runoff in these watersheds. Our original intent in pursuing this investigation was to determine how changes in the relationship between drainage area and runoff duration could be attributed to different properties of the watershed. We hypothesized that we would observe a different relationship. The difference could be attributed to differences in our watersheds and the ordinal watersheds from which the relationship was derived. However, in investigating the literature we could find no references that give any information on the original watersheds. This would appear to be a serious handicap for an often-cited method.

  17. EPISODIC ACIDIFICATION OF ADIRONDACK LAKES DURING SNOWMELT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maximum values of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in Adirondack, New York lake outlets generally occur during summer and autumn. During spring snowmelt, transport of acidic water through acid-sensitive watersheds causes depression of upper lake water ANC. n some systems lake out...

  18. Learning Resources at Adirondack Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Connie

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Scoville Learning Center at Adirondack Community College (Queensbury, New York). Discusses the layout and functions of the building's three floors and learning-resources services, including staff, library instruction seminars, the online catalog, outreach, equipment, computer labs, and future plans. (AEF)

  19. The St. Lawrence University Adirondack Semester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Baylor; Alexander, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This article features St. Lawrence University's Adirondack Semester, a small program, with enrollment limited to twelve students. The participants of the program are composed of a small group of students with shared interests and serious purpose, living harmoniously and mostly free from the temptations and distractions of the larger world,…

  20. Episodic acidification of Adirondack lakes during snowmelt

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, D.A.; Driscoll, C.T.; Van Dreason, R.; Yatsko, C.P.

    1990-07-01

    Maximum values of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in Adirondack, New York lake outlets generally occur during summer and autumn. During spring snowmelt, transport of acidic water through acid-sensitive watersheds causes depression of upper lake water ANC. In some systems lake outlet ANC reaches negative values. The authors examined outlet water chemistry from II Adirondack lakes during 1986 and 1987 snowmelts. In these lakes, SO concentrations were diluted during snowmelt and did not depress ANC. For lakes with high baseline ANC values, springtime ANC depressions were primarily accompanied by basic cation dilution. For lakes with low baseline ANC, No increases dominated ANC depressions. Lakes with intermediate baseline ANC were affected by both processes and exhibited larger ANC depressions. Ammonium dilution only affected wetland systems. A model predicting a linear relationship between outlet water ANC minima and autumn ANC was inappropriate. To assess watershed response to episodic acidification, hydrologic flow paths must be considered. (Copyright (c) 1990 by the American Geophysical Union.)

  1. Adirondack Post-Drill (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool to drill into the rock. Debris from the use of the tool is visible to the left of the hole.

  2. Fluid-absent metamorphism in the Adirondacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, J. W.

    Results on late Proterozoic metamorphism of granulite in the Adirondacks are presented. There more than 20,000 sq km of rock are at granulite facies. Low water fugacites are implied by orthopyroxene bearing assemblages and by stability of k'spar-plag-quartz assemblages. After mentioning the popular concept of infiltration of carbon dioxide into Precambrian rocks and attendent generation of granulite facies assemblages, several features of Adirondack rocks pertinent to carbon dioxide and water during their metamorphism are summarized: wollastonite occurs in the western lowlands; contact metamorphism by anorthosite preceeding granulite metamorphism is indicated by oxygen isotopes. Oxygen fugacity lies below that of the QFM buffer; total P sub water + P sub carbon dioxide determined from monticellite bearing assemblages are much less than P sub total (7 to 7.6 kb). These and other features indicate close spatial association of high- and low-P sub carbon dioxide assemblages and that a vapor phase was not present during metamorphism. Thus Adirondack rocks were not infiltrated by carbon dioxide vapor. Their metamorphism, at 625 to 775 C, occurred either when the protoliths were relatively dry or after dessication occurred by removal of a partial melt phase.

  3. Fluid-absent metamorphism in the Adirondacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Results on late Proterozoic metamorphism of granulite in the Adirondacks are presented. There more than 20,000 sq km of rock are at granulite facies. Low water fugacites are implied by orthopyroxene bearing assemblages and by stability of k'spar-plag-quartz assemblages. After mentioning the popular concept of infiltration of carbon dioxide into Precambrian rocks and attendent generation of granulite facies assemblages, several features of Adirondack rocks pertinent to carbon dioxide and water during their metamorphism are summarized: wollastonite occurs in the western lowlands; contact metamorphism by anorthosite preceeding granulite metamorphism is indicated by oxygen isotopes. Oxygen fugacity lies below that of the QFM buffer; total P sub water + P sub carbon dioxide determined from monticellite bearing assemblages are much less than P sub total (7 to 7.6 kb). These and other features indicate close spatial association of high- and low-P sub carbon dioxide assemblages and that a vapor phase was not present during metamorphism. Thus Adirondack rocks were not infiltrated by carbon dioxide vapor. Their metamorphism, at 625 to 775 C, occurred either when the protoliths were relatively dry or after dessication occurred by removal of a partial melt phase.

  4. Total Mercury and Methylmercury Dynamics; stream export in an upland forested watershed in the Adirondack region of New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleton, W.; Vidon, P.; Mitchell, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although levels of mercury and acid rain deposition have greatly declined in recent years due to legislation controls on industry emissions, their legacy has had a lasting effect on the Adirondack region of New York State. This historical mercury deposition is of concern because of the high chance for methylmercury production and export to occur. The impact of forested uplands on methylmercury export remains poorly understood in relation to other ecosystems. Research indicates that sulfate dynamics play a large role in regulating the production of methylmercury in the presence of inorganic mercury; however the relationship between methylmercury production and nitrate availability at various times of the year is less understood, yet, hypothesized to potentially impact sulfate reduction and ultimately methylmercury production in a variety of ecosystems. In this study, mercury and water quality (including sulfate and nitrate) will be monitored in spring, summer and fall of 2012 at 7 locations in Arbutus Watershed, Adirondacks, NY. Proxies (UV absorbance, Fluorescence indices) for total mercury and methylmercury will be utilized to predict export. The main objectives of this research are to determine the relevance of forested uplands in methylmercury export, as well as gain further understanding of mercury dynamics and associated proxies in relation to nitrate and sulfate availability. Photo courtesy of the Adirondack Ecological Center

  5. Interpretation of gravity anomalies in the northwest Adirondack lowlands, northern New York

    SciTech Connect

    Revetta, F.A.; O'Brian, B. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Twelve hundred gravity measurements were made in the Adirondack Highlands and northwest Adirondack Lowlands, New York between 44[degree]15 minutes and 44[degree]30 minutes N. Latitude and 75[degree]00 minutes W. Longitude. A Bouguer gravity map constructed from the gravity measurements includes the Carthage-Colton Mylonite Zone, a major structural boundary between the highlands and lowlands. The gravity map indicates the gravity contours trend parallel to the CCMZ along most of its length however in some areas the contours cross the boundary. No clear-cut relationships exists between the CCMZ and gravity contours. The Bouguer gravity map shows several prominent gravity anomalies which correlate with the geology seismicity and mineral deposits in the area. Gravity lows of 20 to 30 g.u. are centered over the Gouverneur, Hyde and Payne Lake Alaskite gneiss bodies. A gravity high of 20 g.u. occurs over the Pleasant Lake gabbro pluton. Gravity highs of 35 and 100 g.u. occur over the Sylvia Lake Zinc District and marble just north of the district. A gravity high at Russell, N.Y. coincides with a cluster of nine earthquake epicenters. Finally a steep gravity gradient separates high density rocks from lower density rocks along the Black Lake fault. Two-dimensional computer modeling of the geologic features is underway and quantitative models of the structures will be presented.

  6. Agreement Between the Faculty Association of Adirondack Community College and the Board of Trustees of Adirondack Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adirondack Community Coll., Glen Falls, NY.

    This agreement between the Board of Trustees of Adirondack Community College and the faculty association of Adirondack Community Colleges covers the period from September 1, 1972 until August 31, 1974. Articles in the agreement cover recognition, dues deduction, negotiation procedure, academic freedom, professional meetings, initial employment,…

  7. Gaseous mercury fluxes from the forest floor of the Adirondacks.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun-Deok; Holsen, Thomas M

    2009-02-01

    The flux of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from the forest floor of the Adirondack Mountains in New York (USA) was measured numerous times throughout 2005 and 2006 using a polycarbonate dynamic flux chamber (DFC). The Hg flux ranged between -2.5 and 27.2 ng m(-2) h(-1) and was positively correlated with temperature and solar radiation. The measured Hg emission flux was highest in spring, and summer, and lowest in winter. During leaf-off periods, the Hg emission flux was highly dependent on solar radiation and less dependent on temperature. During leaf-on periods, the Hg emission flux was fairly constant because the forest canopy was shading the forest floor. Two empirical models were developed to estimate yearly Hg(0) emissions, one for the leaf-off period and one for the leaf-on period. Using the U.S. EPA's CASTNET meteorological data, the cumulative estimated emission flux was approx. 7.0 microg Hg(0) m(-2) year(-1). PMID:18922608

  8. Use of stream chemistry for monitoring acidic deposition effects in the Adirondack region of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Momen, B.; Roy, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH were measured weekly from October 1991 through September 2001 in three streams in the western Adirondack Mountain region of New York to identify trends in stream chemistry that might be related to changes in acidic deposition. A decreasing trend in atmospheric deposition of SO42- was observed within the region over the 10-yr period, although most of the decrease occurred between 1991 and 1995. Both ANC and pH were inversely related to flow in all streams; therefore, a trend analysis was conducted on (i) the measured values of ANC and pH and (ii) the residuals of the concentration-discharge relations. In Buck Creek, ANC increased significantly (p 0.10). In Bald Mountain Brook, ANC and residuals of ANC increased significantly (p < 0.01), although the trend was diatonic-a distinct decrease from 1991 to 1996 was followed by a distinct increase from 1996 to 2001. In Fly Pond outlet, ANC and residuals of ANC increased over the study period (p < 0.01), although the trend of the residuals resulted largely from an abrupt increase in 1997. In general, the trends observed in the three streams are similar to results presented for Adirondack lakes in a previous study, and are consistent with the declining trend in atmospheric deposition for this region, although the observed trends in ANC and pH in streams could not be directly attributed to the trends in acidic deposition.

  9. Eskers as an aid to the understanding of deglaciation in the Northern Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.S. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Eskers in the Northern Adirondack Mountains of New York State have been examined in order to gain a better understanding of their origin, their relationship to other glacial landforms, and to determine the relative timing of their formation. Ultimately, it is hoped that eskers can be used to construct a model of the former ice sheet for the region. Cross sections and longitudinal profiles were constructed to give a better understanding of esker form. Subsequent fieldwork was designed to confirm and compliment these morphometric analyses. The sedimentology of an esker and adjacent fan was logged and interpreted. The spatial relations between the eskers, fans, and delta complexes were identified. Results indicate that the eskers of the Northern Adirondack Mountains formed at different stages in the retreat of the ice sheet and are not related to an integrated subglacial drainage system. The presence of a lacustrine fan at the south end of the St. Regis Esker indicates that a glacial lake was present at the ice sheet margin and delimits an ice marginal position. The morphology and distribution of eskers may be useful as an indicator in the timing of continental deglaciation of northern New York State. Research for this project was funded by a University of Dayton Research Council Grant to D. Pair.

  10. Preorogenic history of the Adirondacks as an elsonian anorogenic caldera complex

    SciTech Connect

    McLelland, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Adirondack Highlands are characterized by the close association of a distinctive trinity of metaigneous rocks: (1) anorthosites, (2) mangeritic and quartz mangeritic gneisses that tend to envelop the anorthosites, and (3) alaskitic and trondjhemitic gneisses many of which represent metamorphosed volcanic material. All rocks within the province exhibit high concentrations of iron (FeO/FeO + MgO approx. 0.8), and both titaniferous and non-titaniferous iron oxide deposits occur. The mangeritic rocks are alkaline to peralkaline while the alaskitic gneisses are meta- to peraluminous. A/CNK, KN/C, as well as oxides vs SiO/sub 2/ plots yield patterns identical to those cited by J. L. Anderson (1983) as diagnostic of Proterozoic anorogenic plutonism. Within North American this plutonism corresponds to the Elsonian magmatic event with most ages falling between 1.5 - 1.3 b.y. This belt is characterized by high-level anorogenic bimodal magmatism developed in caldera complexes with zoned magma chambers and widespread rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs. Examples of this activity are found in the St. Francois Mountains, Missouri; the Wolf River batholith, Wisconsin; and the Nain Province. The Adirondacks lie along this trend and exhibit the same bulk chemistry and chemical variation as the other complexes. In addition they show enrichment in halogens (esp. F), REE, Zr, and other trace elements associated with calderas. Fayalite and ferroaugite are widely developed. These similarities strongly suggest that prior to the Grenville Orogeny, the Adirondacks consisted of bimodal caldera complexes which were part of the Elsonian anorogenic magmatism extending across North America.

  11. MANGANESE BIOGEOCHEMISTRY IN A SMALL ADIRONDACK FORESTED LAKE WATERSHED.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.

    1986-01-01

    In September and October 1981, manganese (Mn) concentrations and pH were intensively monitored in a small forested lake watershed in the west-central Adirondack Mountains, New York, during two large acidic storms (each approximately 5 cm rainfall, pH 4. 61 and 4. 15). The data were evaluated to identify biogeochemical pathways of Mn and to assess how these pathways are altered by acidic atmospheric inputs. Concentrations of Mn averaged 1. 1 mu g/L in precipitation and increased to 107 mu g/L in canopy throughfall, the enrichment reflecting active biological cycling of Mn. Rain pH and throughfall Mn were negatively correlated, suggesting that foliar leaching of Mn was enhanced by rainfall acidity. The pulse-like input of Mn to the forest floor in the high initial concentrations in throughfall (approximately 1000 mu g/L) did not affect Mn concentrations in soil water ( less than 20 mu g/L) or groundwater (usually less than 40 mu g/L), which varied little with time. In the inlet stream, Mn concentrations remained constant at 48 mu g/L as discharge varied from 1. 1 to 96 L/s. Manganese was retained in the vegetative cycle and regulated in the stream by adsorption in the soil organic horizon. The higher Mn levels in the stream may be linked to its high acidity (pH 4. 2-4. 3). Mixing of Mn-rich stream water with neutral lake water (pH 7. 0) caused precipitation of Mn and deposition in lake sediment.

  12. Geochemical affinities of a Late Precambrian basaltic dike, Adirondack Lowlands, Northern New York

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, R.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Late Precambrian rifting and the opening of the Iapetus Ocean basin have produced a series of NE-trending basaltic dikes in the Adirondack Lowlands of New York. Twelve samples were taken from the largest of these dikes, a 14 km long body, in order to study the chemical variability along and across strike and to characterize the source region. The dike consists of an assemblage of plagioclase, Ti-rich clinopyroxene, magnetite/ilmenite and a hydrated phase that was probably olivine. All analyzed samples contain normative olivine, and most contain normative nepheline, indicative of alkalic affinities. Chemical variations are relatively minor, with generally as much variation occurring across strike (max. width 10m) as along strike. SiO[sub 2] varies from 43.9--45.0 wt%; TiO[sub 2]: 4.8--5.1 wt%; P[sub 2]O[sub 5]: 0.8--1.1 wt%; Ni: 55--79 ppm; Sr:P 300--600 ppm; Rb: 35--66 ppm; Y/Nb = 1.1; Zr/Nb = 8. Chondrite normalized REE patterns show strong LREE enrichment. Tectonic discrimination plots (Zr--Ti/100--Y[star]) are indicative of within plate magmatism, and plots of Y/nb vs. Zr/Nb suggest an enriched, OIB-type mantle plume source. Trace element characteristics suggest a genetic correlation with Late Precambrian, rift related magmas of the Ottawa Graben and of the eastern Adirondack Mountains and western Vermont.

  13. The Grenville Orogenic Cycle (ca. 1350-1000 Ma): an Adirondack perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLelland, James; Daly, J. Stephen; McLelland, Jonathan M.

    1996-11-01

    The Adirondack Mountains are characterized by three major events that took place during the interval ca. 1350-1000 Ma. The earliest of these is the arc-related Elzevirian Orogeny (ca. 1350-1185 Ma) during which substantial volumes of juvenile calc-alkaline crust were added to the Adirondacks as well as to the northwest segment of the Central Metasedimentary Belt. Data from the southwestern United States as well as from Ireland and Baltica indicate that Elzevirian magmatism and orogeny were of global dimensions. Within the southwestern sector of the Grenville Province, the Elzevirian Orogeny culminated at ca. 1185 Ma when accretion of all outboard terranes was completed. Compressional orogeny related to this convergence resulted in overthickened crust and lithosphere which subsequently delaminated giving rise to orogen collapse and AMCG magmatism that swept southeastward from the Frontenac Terrane into the Adirondack Highlands during the interval ca. 1180-1130 Ma. Localized compressional events within neighboring parts of the Grenville Province emphasize the continued existence of contraction during this interval, although crustal extension caused local in sedimentary basins in which were deposited the Flinton and the St. Boniface Groups. The Adirondacks have not yet provided any record of events within the interval ca. 1125-1100 Ma, although there is evidence of contraction elsewhere in the southwestern Grenville Province at that time. At 1100-1090 Ma the northern Adirondack Highlands were invaded by mildly A-type hornblende granites (Hawkeye suite) that are interpreted to be the result of local crustal thinning contemporaneous with rifting and mafic magmatism taking place in the Midcontinent rift. Immediately following, at ca. 1090 Ma, the global-scale continental collision of the Ottawan Orogeny was initiated. Strong convergence, deformation, and metamorphism continued to at least ca. 1070 Ma, and rocks older than this are profoundly affected by this event

  14. Leaf litter decomposition in three Adirondack lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Quinby, H.L.; Hendrey, G.R.; Hoogendyk, C.G.

    1983-04-01

    Decomposition of terrestrial leaf litter in three Adirondack lakes with water pH values approximately 5, 6, and 7 was studied. Litter bags containing leaves of American beech, sugar maple, red maple, leather leaf, and red spruce were placed in the lakes. Samples were removed periodically over a 3-year period and analyzed for loss in weight, changes in leaf surface area, carbon, nitrogen, and bacterial populations. The rate of decomposition of litter depended on the leaf species tested as well as on the lake water in which they were incubated. Of the five leaf species tested, red maple decomposed much faster and red spruce more slowly, i.e., red maple > sugar maple > beech > leather leaf > red spruce. Further, the data indicated that the rate of decomposition of the leaves differed among the lakes in the order Woods (pH approx. 5) < Sagamore (pH approx. 6) < Panther (pH approx. 7), and that the microbial colonization of some leaf species was affected. Accumulations of leaf litter in acid lakes due to reduction in microbial decomposition may affect nutrient recycling in lake ecosystems. 8 references, 4 tables.

  15. Simulation of growth of Adirondack conifers in relation to global climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.; Raynal, D.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Several conifer species grown in plantations in the southeastern Adirondack mountains of New York were chosen to model tree growth. In the models, annual xylem growth was decomposed into several components that reflect various intrinsic or extrinsic factors. Growth signals indicative of climatic effects were used to construct response functions using both multivariate analysis and Kalman filter methods. Two models were used to simulate tree growth response to future CO[sub 2]-induced climate change projected by GCMs. The comparable results of both models indicate that different conifer species have individualistic growth responses to future climatic change. The response behaviors of trees are affected greatly by local stand conditions. The results suggest possible changes in future growth and distributions of naturally occurring conifers in this region.

  16. Hypothetical assessment of regional liming costs for the Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C. ); Britt, D.L.; Steiner, A.J. ); Callaway, J.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Previous studies of lake liming costs in the Adirondacks have developed methods for predicting liming costs for individual lakes and reported these costs both for representative and specific lakes in the region. This study develops a method for estimating lake liming costs for a large number of lakes. The specific objectives of this study consisted of developing a methodology for predicting regional lake liming costs that can be extended to other regions in the United States; developing total and marginal cost (i.e., supply) curves for liming and restocking lakes in the Adirondacks Lake region; and assessing the sensitivity of the total cost and supply curves in the Adirondack Lakes region to alternative selection criteria. Lake liming and restocking costs were estimated using a version of the DeAcid model, modified specifically for this study. 2 figs.

  17. Blue Mountain Lake, New York, earthquake of October 7, 1983.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wendt, G.

    1984-01-01

    The October 7 earthquake near Blue Mountain Lake in the central Adirondack Mountains registered a preliminary Richter magnitude of 5.2. It was widely felt throughout the Northeastern United States and Canada and occurred in an area that has been periodically shaken by earthquakes throughout recorded history. Since 1737, at least 346 felt earthquakes have occurred in New York; an earthquake of similar magnitude last shook the Blue Mountain Lake area on June 9, 1975.    

  18. ESTIMATES OF CLOUD WATER DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM SITES IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY, Whitetop Mountain, VA, and Clingrnan's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). ...

  19. Acid Rain Effects on Adirondack Streams - Results from the 2003-05 Western Adirondack Stream Survey (the WASS Project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Roy, Karen M.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, Howard A.; Passy, Sophia I.; Bode, Robert W.; Capone, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally lakes have been the focus of acid rain assessments in the Adirondack region of New York. However, there is a growing recognition of the importance of streams as environmental indicators. Streams, like lakes, also provide important aquatic habitat, but streams more closely reflect acid rain effects on soils and forests and are more prone to acidification than lakes. Therefore, a large-scale assessment of streams was undertaken in the drainage basins of the Oswegatchie and Black Rivers; an area of 4,585 km2 in the western Adirondack region where acid rain levels tend to be highest in New York State.

  20. Condition of Education in the Adirondack Blue Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This document profiles education in the Adirondack Park area of upstate New York. The introduction describes the Adironack Blue Line area, its school districts, and its revenues for school funding. Elementary and secondary education are described in terms of attendance rates, pupil-teacher ratio, teacher turnover rate, and median teacher salaries…

  1. VALUATION OF NATURAL RESOURCE IMPROVEMENTS IN THE ADIRONDACKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The benefits of improving natural resources in the Adirondacks are estimated to be between $336 million and $1.1 billion per year (2003$), according to a new study by Resources for the Future. The five-year study, supported by an EPA grant, estimates New Yorkers willingness-to-...

  2. Increases in dissolved organic carbon accelerate loss of toxic Al in Adirondack lakes recovering from acidification.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Dukett, James E; Houck, Nathan; Snyder, Phil; Capone, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Increasing pH and decreasing Al in surface waters recovering from acidification have been accompanied by increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and associated organic acids that partially offset pH increases and complicate assessments of recovery from acidification. To better understand the processes of recovery, monthly chemistry from 42 lakes in the Adirondack region, NY, collected from 1994 to 2011, were used to (1) evaluate long-term changes in DOC and associated strongly acidic organic acids and (2) use the base-cation surplus (BCS) as a chemical index to assess the effects of increasing DOC concentrations on the Al chemistry of these lakes. Over the study period, the BCS increased (p < 0.01) and concentrations of toxic inorganic monomeric Al (IMAl) decreased (p < 0.01). The decreases in IMAl were greater than expected from the increases in the BCS. Higher DOC concentrations that increased organic complexation of Al resulted in a decrease in the IMAl fraction of total monomeric Al from 57% in 1994 to 23% in 2011. Increasing DOC concentrations have accelerated recovery in terms of decreasing toxic Al beyond that directly accomplished by reducing atmospheric deposition of strong mineral acids. PMID:23751119

  3. Increases in dissolved organic carbon accelerate loss of toxic Al in Adirondack lakes recovering from acidification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Dukett, James E; Houck, Nathan; Snyder, Phillip; Capone, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing pH and decreasing Al in surface waters recovering from acidification have been accompanied by increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and associated organic acids that partially offset pH increases and complicate assessments of recovery from acidification. To better understand the processes of recovery, monthly chemistry from 42 lakes in the Adirondack region, NY, collected from 1994 to 2011, were used to (1) evaluate long-term changes in DOC and associated strongly acidic organic acids and (2) use the base-cation surplus (BCS) as a chemical index to assess the effects of increasing DOC concentrations on the Al chemistry of these lakes. Over the study period, the BCS increased (p < 0.01) and concentrations of toxic inorganic monomeric Al (IMAl) decreased (p < 0.01). The decreases in IMAl were greater than expected from the increases in the BCS. Higher DOC concentrations that increased organic complexation of Al resulted in a decrease in the IMAl fraction of total monomeric Al from 57% in 1994 to 23% in 2011. Increasing DOC concentrations have accelerated recovery in terms of decreasing toxic Al beyond that directly accomplished by reducing atmospheric deposition of strong mineral acids.

  4. Quantifying Hydrologic Parameters in Basin-Scale Ecosystem Research: the Adirondack Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, E. A.; Mihuc, T. B.; Woodcock, T.

    2005-05-01

    How does one quantify hydrologic processes related to open channel flow and basin drainage at spatial and temporal scales suitable for ecosystem research? This is a very important question as more and more research brings together the disciplines of hydrology and ecology. Differences in the types of parameters measured, spatial and temporal variations of these parameters and the nature of field procedures between hydrological and ecological research results in different scales of study. Linkages between hydrology, geomorphology and ecology are easily identified. Ecological communities in streams are affected in part by the following stream characteristics: depth, water velocity, ponding and water quality. These stream characteristics are affected by processes or characteristics occurring at very different scales (e.g. bedrock, soils, soil depth, stream bed material, channel morphology, vegetation, topography, and climate). How do we apply these different processes and scales to extrapolate hydrologic data from specific points to a basin scale? As part of an NSF funded research project (DEB 022165) to study the effects of land use policy on hydrologic, ecologic and water quality indicators of watershed integrity we instrumented 22 basins in the eastern Adirondack Mountains (New York) to monitor water stage, water temperature and air temperature. Stage recorders with temperature sensors were installed in stilling wells adjacent to natural stream channels. Stage-discharge rating curves were developed for each site to estimate stream discharge as a function of stage. Streams in the Adirondacks tend to very flashy due to low infiltration capacity in the drainage basins. Consequently, streams respond quickly to storm events, making it difficult to quantify discharges at peak flows. The rating curves are better at predicting base flow discharge, however, there is insufficient data to estimate peak discharge from stage data. In this presentation we will discuss the issue

  5. Acidification in the Adirondacks: defining the biota in trophic levels of 30 chemically diverse acid-impacted lakes.

    PubMed

    Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A; Boylen, Charles W; Eichler, Lawrence W; Harrison, James P; Sutherland, James W; Shaw, William; Daniels, Robert A; Charles, Donald F; Acker, Frank W; Sullivan, Timothy J; Momen, Bahram; Bukaveckas, Paul

    2010-08-01

    The Adirondack Mountains in New York State have a varied surficial geology and chemically diverse surface waters that are among the most impacted by acid deposition in the U.S. No single Adirondack investigation has been comprehensive in defining the effects of acidification on species diversity, from bacteria through fish, essential for understanding the full impact of acidification on biota. Baseline midsummer chemistry and community composition are presented for a group of chemically diverse Adirondack lakes. Species richness of all trophic levels except bacteria is significantly correlated with lake acid-base chemistry. The loss of taxa observed per unit pH was similar: bacterial genera (2.50), bacterial classes (1.43), phytoplankton (3.97), rotifers (3.56), crustaceans (1.75), macrophytes (3.96), and fish (3.72). Specific pH criteria were applied to the communities to define and identify acid-tolerant (pH<5.0), acid-resistant (pH 5.0-5.6), and acid-sensitive (pH>5.6) species which could serve as indicators. Acid-tolerant and acid-sensitive categories are at end-points along the pH scale, significantly different at P<0.05; the acid-resistant category is the range of pH between these end-points, where community changes continually occur as the ecosystem moves in one direction or another. The biota acid tolerance classification (batc) system described herein provides a clear distinction between the taxonomic groups identified in these subcategories and can be used to evaluate the impact of acid deposition on different trophic levels of biological communities. PMID:20614900

  6. SEASONAL AND LONG-TERM TEMPORAL PATTERNS IN THE CHEMISTRY OF ADIRONDACK LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is considerable interest in the recovery of surface waters from acidification by acidic deposition. he Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) program was established in 1982 to evaluate changes in the chemistry of 17 Adirondack lakes. he objectives of this paper are to: 1) ...

  7. VARIATION IN ADIRONDACK, NEW YORK, LAKEWATER CHEMISTRY AS A FUNCTION OF SURFACE AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from a recent survey conducted by the Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation were used to evaluate the influence of lake surface area on the acid-base status of lakes in Adirondack State Park, New York. cid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the small lakes (<4 ha) occurred more fre...

  8. Long-term changes (1930-32 to 1984) in the acid-base status of forest soils in the Adirondacks of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine if Adirondack forest soil acid-base status changed over several decades by comparing soil pH and available lime measured in 1930-32 by Heimburger (1934) to measurements of soils resampled in 1984 and analyzed using original methods. In 1984, 18 sites mapped by Heimburger in a mixed deciduous-coniferous experimental forest near Newcomb (N.Y.) were relocated by surveying from existing markers. 50 additional sites were relocated throughout the Adirondacks from Heimburger's descriptions. Oe, Oa, E, B, and C horizons were collected and analyzed for available lime by Heimburger's method. Organic horizon pH was measured by quinhydrone electrode. The original methods were checked for the introduction of error and bias. Data from 48 sites were stratified by confidence of site relocation in 1984 and compared between 1930-32 and 1984 using the student's t-test. The pH of initially moderately acid organic horizons decreased significantly while the pH of originally strongly acid organic horizons did not change significantly. On average, the available lime of upper horizons (Oe, Oa, E) decreased significantly while that of lower horizons (B,C) did not change significantly.

  9. The role of synmetamorphic igneous rocks in the metamorphism and partial melting of metasediments, Northwest Adirondacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Roger E.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    1985-08-01

    Field and petrologic studies along the Adirondack Lowlands — Highlands boundary near Harrisville, NY, indicate that heat from the synmetamorphic intrusion of the Diana syenite complex (intrusion temperature of ˜1,050° C) played a major role in the local metamorphic thermal regime and was responsible for extensive partial melting of adjacent metasedimentary units (Major Paragneiss of Engel and Engel). Metamorphic temperatures inferred from two — feldspar and spinel — quartz assemblages decrease from 850 950° C along the Diana — metasediment contact to 650 700° C, 2 3 km away from the contact. Metamorphic pressures are 7±0.5 kb as determined from coexisting plagioclase — garnet — sillimanite — quartz, kyanite — sillimanite, and garnet — rutile — ilmenite — sillimanite — quartz (GRAIL). In the paragneiss, migmatites consisting of quartz — microcline perthite — sodic plagioclase leucosomes are generally concordant with the melanosome consisting of biotite — sillimanite — garnet — spinel — plagioclase ±corundum±cordierite. Qualitatively the amount of partial melt and occurrences of corundum-bearing assemblages decrease away from the Diana contact. Activity of H2O inferred from coexisting biotite — sillimanite — quartz — garnet — K-feldspar ranges from 0.01 to 0.17 and is five to ten times lower in corundum-bearing rocks. Melting proceeded via vapor-absent reactions involving biotite in response to localized heating by synmetamorphic intrusion of magma. This unusually preserved, synmetamorphic contact aureole in a regional granulite terrane supports the concept that granulites owe their origin to magma intrusion and/or the ponding of magmas at the base of the crust.

  10. Relationships between surface sediment diatom assemblages and lakewater characteristics in Adirondack Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, D.F.

    1985-06-01

    Relationships between surface sediment diatom assemblages and lakewater characteristics were studied in 38 lakes in the Adirondack Mountains of northern New York. Most of the lakes are dilute, poorly buffered, and oligotrophic to mesotrophic. The diatom flora typical for circumneutral to acidic lakes. The purposes of this study were to identify the environmental factors most strongly related to the distributions of diatom taxa and the overall composition of diatom assemblages, and to derive equations to infer lakewater pH from diatom assemblage data. Relationships between diatom assemblages and environmental gradients were analyzed using reciprocal averaging ordination (RA). Correlations between Ra axis 1 and pH-related factors were strong. Correlations were weaker (but still statistically significant) with elevation, epilimnion temperature, and concentrations of SO/sub 4/, Cl, and Si. Total P, chlorophyll a, water color, and mean depth were not important in explaining differences among assemblages. Predictive equations were derived for inferring lakewater pH from diatom assemblage data. Agreement between predicted and measured pH was very good. These predictive relationships can be used to interpret stratigraphic diatom assemblages to reconstruct lake pH histories.

  11. Acid lake in N.Y. gets relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A pond in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State has received a second soothing dose of baking soda. The 21 tons of sodium bicarbonate should moderate the pond's acidic conditions, lethal to fish and other forms of life.Wolf Pond, 25 miles (40 km) north of Saranac Lake, has developed an extremely low pH (4.5) because of acid rain and the runoff of acidic surface water, combined with very little outflow. The pond was first treated with sodium bicarbonate by t h e New York Department of Environmental Conservation in 1984; afterward the pH rose to about 6.2. Fish stocked by local residents have continued to live in the pond, despite the eventual rebound in its acidity.

  12. Seasonal variations in atmospheric SOx and NOy species in the adirondacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Thomas J.; Mclaren, Scott E.; Kadlecek, John A.

    This paper reports the results of over 2 years of measurements of several of the species comprising atmospheric SOx (= SO2+ SO42-) and NOy (= NO+ NO2 + PAN + HNO3+ NO3-+ organicnitrates + HONO + 2 N2O5 …) at Whiteface Mountain, New York. Continuous real-time measurements of SO 2 and total gaseous NOy provided data for about 50% and 65% of the period, respectively, and 122 filter pack samples were obtained for HNO 3, SO 2 and aerosol SO 42-, NO 3-, H + and NH 4+. Concentrations of SO 2 and NOy were greatest in winter, whereas concentrations of the reaction products SO 42- and HNO 3were greatest in summer. The seasonal variation in SO 42- was considerably more pronounced than that of HNO 3and the high concentrations of SO 42- aerosol present in summer were also relatively more acidic than SO 42- aerosol in other seasons. As a result, SO 42- aerosol was the predominant acidic species present in summer, HNO 3was predominant in other seasons. Aerosol NO 3- concentrations were low in all seasons and appeared unrelated to simultaneous NOy and HNO 3concentrations. These data are consistent with seasonal variations in photochemical oxidation rates and with existing data on seasonal variations in precipitation composition. The results of this study suggest that emission reductions targeted at the summer season might be a cost-effective way to reduce deposition of S species, but would not be similarly cost-effective in reducing deposition of N species. kwAcid deposition, seasonal variation, sulfate, nitrate, nitric acid, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrogen peroxide, ozone, air pollution, Adirondack Mountains

  13. Diatom diversity in chronically versus episodically acidified adirondack streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passy, S.I.; Ciugulea, I.; Lawrence, G.B.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between algal species richness and diversity, and pH is controversial. Furthermore, it is still unknown how episodic stream acidification following atmospheric deposition affects species richness and diversity. Here we analyzed water chemistry and diatom epiphyton dynamics and showed their contrasting behavior in chronically vs. episodically acidic streams in the Adirondack region. Species richness and diversity were significantly higher in the chronically acidic brown water stream, where organic acidity was significantly higher and the ratio of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum significantly lower. Conversely, in the episodically acidic clear water stream, the inorganic acidity and pH were significantly higher and the diatom communities were very species-poor. This suggests that episodic acidification in the Adirondacks may be more stressful for stream biota than chronic acidity. Strong negative linear relationships between species diversity, Eunotia exigua, and dissolved organic carbon against pH were revealed after the influence of non-linear temporal trends was partialled out using a novel way of temporal modeling. ?? 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Adirondack lakes survey: An interpretive analysis of fish communities and water chemistry, 1984--1987

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.P. , Raleigh, NC ); Gherini, S.A.; Munson, R.K. ); Christensen, S.W. ); Driscoll, C.T. ); Gallagher, J. ); Newton, R.M. ); Reckhow, K.H. ); Schofield, C.L. (Co

    1990-01-01

    The Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC) was formed as a cooperative effort of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation to better characterize the chemical and biological status of Adirondack lakes. Between 1984 and 1987, the ALSC surveyed 1469 lakes within the Adirondack ecological zone. As a follow-up to the survey, the ALSC sponsored a series of interpretive analyses of the ALSC data base. The primary objectives of these analyses were as follows: Evaluate the influence of mineral acids (from acidic deposition) and nonmineral acids (natural organic acids) on lake pH levels; classify Adirondack lakes according to lake and watershed features expected to influence their responsiveness to changes in acidic deposition; evaluate the sensitivity of Adirondack lakes to changes in environmental conditions, such as changes in mineral acids or dissolved organic carbon concentrations; identify lake characteristics important in explaining the observed present-day status of fish communities in Adirondack lakes, in particular the relative importance of lake acidity; evaluate changes that have occurred over time in Adirondack fish communities and probable causes for these trends by using the available historical data on fish communities in the Adirondacks and the ALSC data base; and determine the degree to which the existing fish resource might be at risk from continued acidic deposition, or might recover if acidity levels were reduced. The basic approach examined relationships observed in the ALSC data base among watershed characteristics, lake chemistry, and fish status. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  15. Modeling and Mapping of Atmospheric Mercury Deposition in Adirondack Park, New York

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xue; Driscoll, Charles T.; Huang, Jiaoyan; Holsen, Thomas M.; Blackwell, Bradley D.

    2013-01-01

    The Adirondacks of New York State, USA is a region that is sensitive to atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition. In this study, we estimated atmospheric Hg deposition to the Adirondacks using a new scheme that combined numerical modeling and limited experimental data. The majority of the land cover in the Adirondacks is forested with 47% of the total area deciduous, 20% coniferous and 10% mixed. We used litterfall plus throughfall deposition as the total atmospheric Hg deposition to coniferous and deciduous forests during the leaf-on period, and wet Hg deposition plus modeled atmospheric dry Hg deposition as the total Hg deposition to the deciduous forest during the leaf-off period and for the non-forested areas year-around. To estimate atmospheric dry Hg deposition we used the Big Leaf model. The average atmospheric Hg deposition to the Adirondacks was estimated as 17.4 g m yr with a range of −3.7–46.0 g m yr. Atmospheric Hg dry deposition (370 kg yr) was found to be more important than wet deposition (210 kg yr) to the entire Adirondacks (2.4 million ha). The spatial pattern showed a large variation in atmospheric Hg deposition with scattered areas in the eastern Adirondacks having total Hg deposition greater than 30 μg m−2 yr−1, while the southwestern and the northern areas received Hg deposition ranging from 25–30 μg m−2 yr−1. PMID:23536871

  16. Non-primary layering in some Adirondack orthogneisses

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.; McLelland, J.; Ritter, A. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Metamorphic, as opposed to primary, layering has been shown to be important in many tectonites. Within orthogneisses additional types of non-primary layering are common and have important genetic implications. Here the authors cite three Adirondack examples. (1) Hyde School Gneiss of the Adirondack Lowlands contains semi-continuous layers of foliated amphibolite arranged parallel to contacts and early foliation and disrupted by pegmatitic, alaskitic, and tonalitic host rock. Layering appears to be the result of penetration of amphibolite by granitoid magma first along extensional fractures and then parallel to foliation. Intrusion is envisaged to take place in active shear zones initially occupied by foliated amphibolite that is subsequently penetrated parallel to foliation by granitoids. (2) South of Elizabethtown foliated, isoclinally folded gabbroic anorthosite is well layered with garnetiferous amphibolite, quartz-feldspar gneiss, and calcsilicate. Because of rock composition, the layering cannot be due to metavolcanic sequences nor can disruption be attributed to partial melting. A satisfactory interpretation is that gabbroic anorthosite intruded mafic and carbonate-rich rocks in lit-par-lit fashion. (3) North of Speculator a garnetiferous amphibolite/gabbro has been intruded by granite now containing xenoliths, some with ophitic opx. Much of the layering in the granite consists of clots of plagioclase, garnet, pyroxene (chloritized) arranged in parallel. These are interpreted as small xenoliths of garnetiferous amphibolite/gabbro entrained into the granitic magma and strung out in the direction of flow. These examples provide further evidence that layering can develop during magmatic emplacement and need not represent primary stratification. Assignment of a primary origin to such layering necessarily results in misinterpretation of geologic history.

  17. Nitrogen solutes in an Adirondack forested watershed: Importance of dissolved organic nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHale, M.R.; Mitchell, M.J.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Cirmo, C.P.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) dynamics were evaluated from 1 June 1995 through 31 May 1996 within the Arbutus Lake watershed in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, U.S.A. At the Arbutus Lake outlet dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), NO3/- and NH4/+ contributed 61%, 33%, and 6% respectively, to the total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) flux (259 mol ha-1 yr-1). At the lake inlet DON, NO3/-, and NH4/+ constituted 36%, 61%, and 3% respectively, of TDN flux (349 mol ha-1 yr-1). Differences between the factors that control DON, NO3/-, and NH4+ stream water concentrations were evaluated using two methods for estimating annual N flux at the lake inlet. Using biweekly sampling NO3/- and NH4/+ flux was 10 and 4 mol ha-1 yr-1 respectively, less than flux estimates using biweekly plus storm and snowmelt sampling. DON flux was 18 mol ha-1 yr-1 greater using only biweekly sampling. These differences are probably not of ecological significance relative to the total flux of N from the watershed (349 mol ha-1 yr-1). Dissolved organic N concentrations were positively related to discharge during both the dormant (R2 = 0.31; P<0.01) and growing season (R2= 0.09; P<0.01). There was no significant relationship between NO3/- concentration and discharge during the dormant season, but a significant negative relationship was found during the growing season (R2 = 0.29; P<0.01). Biotic controls in the growing season appeared to have had a larger impact on stream water NO3- concentrations than on DON concentrations. Arbutus Lake had a major impact on stream water N concentrations of the four landscape positions sampled, suggesting the need to quantify within lake processes to interpret N solute losses and patterns in watershed-lake systems.

  18. An empirical approach to modeling methylmercury concentrations in an Adirondack stream watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Wolock, David M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Riva-Murray, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Inverse empirical models can inform and improve more complex process-based models by quantifying the principal factors that control water quality variation. Here we developed a multiple regression model that explains 81% of the variation in filtered methylmercury (FMeHg) concentrations in Fishing Brook, a fourth-order stream in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, a known “hot spot” of Hg bioaccumulation. This model builds on previous observations that wetland-dominated riparian areas are the principal source of MeHg to this stream and were based on 43 samples collected during a 33 month period in 2007–2009. Explanatory variables include those that represent the effects of water temperature, streamflow, and modeled riparian water table depth on seasonal and annual patterns of FMeHg concentrations. An additional variable represents the effects of an upstream pond on decreasing FMeHg concentrations. Model results suggest that temperature-driven effects on net Hg methylation rates are the principal control on annual FMeHg concentration patterns. Additionally, streamflow dilutes FMeHg concentrations during the cold dormant season. The model further indicates that depth and persistence of the riparian water table as simulated by TOPMODEL are dominant controls on FMeHg concentration patterns during the warm growing season, especially evident when concentrations during the dry summer of 2007 were less than half of those in the wetter summers of 2008 and 2009. This modeling approach may help identify the principal factors that control variation in surface water FMeHg concentrations in other settings, which can guide the appropriate application of process-based models.

  19. An empirical approach to modeling methylmercury concentrations in an Adirondack stream watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Wolock, David M.; Bradley, Paul M.; Riva-Murray, Karen

    2014-10-01

    Inverse empirical models can inform and improve more complex process-based models by quantifying the principal factors that control water quality variation. Here we developed a multiple regression model that explains 81% of the variation in filtered methylmercury (FMeHg) concentrations in Fishing Brook, a fourth-order stream in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, a known "hot spot" of Hg bioaccumulation. This model builds on previous observations that wetland-dominated riparian areas are the principal source of MeHg to this stream and were based on 43 samples collected during a 33 month period in 2007-2009. Explanatory variables include those that represent the effects of water temperature, streamflow, and modeled riparian water table depth on seasonal and annual patterns of FMeHg concentrations. An additional variable represents the effects of an upstream pond on decreasing FMeHg concentrations. Model results suggest that temperature-driven effects on net Hg methylation rates are the principal control on annual FMeHg concentration patterns. Additionally, streamflow dilutes FMeHg concentrations during the cold dormant season. The model further indicates that depth and persistence of the riparian water table as simulated by TOPMODEL are dominant controls on FMeHg concentration patterns during the warm growing season, especially evident when concentrations during the dry summer of 2007 were less than half of those in the wetter summers of 2008 and 2009. This modeling approach may help identify the principal factors that control variation in surface water FMeHg concentrations in other settings, which can guide the appropriate application of process-based models.

  20. Implications for Ecosystem Services of Watershed Processes that affect the Transport and Transformations of Mercury in an Adirondack Stream Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Bradley, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a potent neurotoxin that can affect the health of humans and wildlife through the ingestion of methyl Hg. Mercury contamination of ecosystems originates from human activities such as mining, coal burning and other industrial emissions, and the use of Hg-containing products. Natural sources such as volcanic and geothermal emissions and the weathering of Hg-bearing minerals also contribute to Hg contamination, but are believed to be minor sources in most ecosystems. Various ecosystem disturbances including fires, forest harvesting, and the submergence of land by impoundment may also contribute to Hg ecosystem contamination by mobilizing stores that have previously originated from the sources described above. Mercury from a mix of regional and global emissions sources is transported in the atmosphere to remote landscapes that are distant from local emissions sources. The Adirondacks of New York State is a forested, mountainous region characterized by abundant lakes and streams, and is distant from local emissions sources. Recreational fishing, wildlife viewing, hiking, and hunting are valued ecosystem services in this region. Here, we report on the relevance to ecosystem services of findings based on five years of Hg data collection of stream water, groundwater, invertebrates, and fish in the upper Hudson River basin in the central part of the Adirondack region. The New York State Dept. of Health has issued fish consumption advisories for the entire Adirondacks based on elevated levels previously measured in lakes and rivers of this region. Our work seeks improved understanding and models of the landscape sources and watershed processes that control the transformation of Hg to its methyl form (MeHg), the transport of MeHg to streams, and bioaccumulation of MeHg in aquatic food webs. Mean annual atmospheric Hg deposition was 6.3 μg/m2/yr during 2007-09, compared to mean annual filtered total Hg stream yields of 1.66 μg/m2/yr and filtered MeHg stream

  1. High frequency (1-100 HZ) noise and signal recorded at different depths in a mine, northwest Adirondacks, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, Noël; Carter, Jerry A.; Pomeroy, Paul W.; Sutton, George H.; Chael, Eric P.; Leahy, Patrick J.

    Seismograms of noise recorded simultaneously at the surface and at two subsurface stations (335m and 945m below surface level) show that high frequency (1-100 Hz) background noise is reduced at the subsurface stations. Seismometers at all three stations are well coupled to hard crystalline bedrock. Most of the noise reduction occurs between the surface and 335m depth. Between 1 and 3 Hz, seismic noise correlates well with wind speed at all levels. Above 3 Hz, wind speed up to 8 m/sec does not influence high frequency noise levels at 335m or 945m depths. At the surface, however, high frequency noise is associated with wind speeds in excess of 2 m/s. A site resonance is characteristic of the surface spectra, but is not characteristic of the subsurface sites. Spectral signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios, measured for S-waves from a regional earthquake (Δ = 530 km, mb = 4.1), are roughly equal from 1-10 Hz at all depths. Above 10 Hz, however, S/N is greater at the subsurface stations with S/N greater than 1 up to 30 Hz for the surface station, ≈ 50 Hz for the 335m station, and ≈ 70 Hz for the 945m station. Results indicate the advantage of employing high frequency sensors sufficiently below the surface to reduce the level of noise and to improve the S/N ratio in the high frequency range. Such an advantage could be critically important for nuclear test detection and discrimination.

  2. High frequency (1-100 Hz) noise and signal recorded at different depths in a mine, northwest Adirondacks, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Barstow, N.; Carter, J.A.; Pomeroy, P.W.; Sutton, G.H. ); Chael, E.P.; Leahy, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Seismograms of noise recorded simultaneously at the surface and at two subsurface stations (335m and 945m below surface level) show that high frequency (1-100 Hz) background noise is reduced at the subsurface stations. Seismometers at all three stations are well coupled to hard crystalline bedrock. Most of the noise reduction occurs between the surface and 335m depth. Between 1 and 3 Hz, seismic noise correlates well with wind speed at all levels. Above 3 Hz, wind speed up to 8 m/sec does not influence high frequency noise levels at 335m or 945m depths. At the surface, however, high frequency noise is associated with wind speeds in excess of 2 m/s. A site resonance is characteristic of the surface spectra, but is not characteristic of the subsurface sites. Spectral signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios, measured for S-waves from a regional earthquake ({Delta} = 530 km, m{sub b} = 4.1), are roughly equal from 1-10 Hz at all depths. Above 10 Hz, however, S/N is greater at the subsurface stations with S/N greater than 1 up to 30 Hz for the surface station, {approx} 50 Hz for the 335m station, and {approx} 70 Hz for the 945m station. Results indicate the advantage of employing high frequency sensors sufficiently below the surface to reduce the level of noise and to improve the S/N ratio in the high frequency range. Such an advantage could be critically important for nuclear test detection and discrimination.

  3. Developing institutions for regional land-use planning and control: the Adirondack experience. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    This article deals with the institutional structure of the most-significant regional land-use planning and control institution that has been created to date in New York State - i.e., the Adirondack Park Agency. In recent years a fairly substantial volume of literature has been generated about the Adirondack Park Agency and land-use controls in the Adirondacks. Much of that literature has focused on the substance of the land-use controls created in the Adirondack context and the types of legal issues likely to be confronted in the administration of those controls. The Adirondack Park Agency is examined here in terms of its structure as a land-use planning and control institution in order to identify those aspects of its structure that enhance or hinder the fulfillment of the purposes for which it was created - and to assess the importance of the Agency's institutional structure to its continued existence as a viable planning and regulatory entity. From this examination, it is hoped useful information will be provided to other efforts to establish viable regional land-use planning and control institutions.

  4. Nitrate formation in acid forest soils from the Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, T.M.; Kreitinger, J.P.; Alexander, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nitrate formation in three forest soils from the Adirondacks region of New York was studied in the laboratory. The organic and surface mineral layers of the soils has pH values ranging from 3.6 to 4.1. Nitrate was formed when the soils were treated with artificial rain at pH 3.5, 4.1, or 5.6. Compared to simulated rain at pH 5.6, simulated rain at pH 3.5 enhanced nitrate formation in one soil and inhibited it in two other soils. The rate of nitrate accumulation was about 10 times higher in the organic horizon than in the mineral horizon, and nitrate formation was not enhanced by ammonium additions. Nitrate formation in soil suspensions was dependent on the amount of soil in the suspension, and none was formed if little soil was present. Ammonium did not enhance nitrate production in the suspensions. It is suggested that nitrate formation in these acid soils is not limited by the ammonium supply. 19 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Atmospheric mercury (Hg) in the Adirondacks: Concentrations and sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun-Deok Choi; Thomas M. Holsen; Philip K. Hopke

    2008-08-15

    Hourly averaged gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) concentrations and hourly integrated reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and particulate Hg (HgP) concentrations in the ambient air were measured at Huntington Forest in the Adirondacks, New York from June 2006 to May 2007. The average concentrations of GEM, RGM, and HgP were 1.4 {+-} 0.4 ng m{sup -3}, 1.8 {+-} 2.2 pg m{sup -3}, and 3.2 {+-} 3.7 pg m{sup -3}, respectively. RGM represents <3.5% of total atmospheric Hg or total gaseous Hg (TGM: GEM + RGM) and HgP represents <3.0% of the total atmospheric Hg. The highest mean concentrations of GEM, RGM, and HgP were measured during winter and summer whereas the lowest mean concentrations were measured during spring and fall. Significant diurnal patterns were apparent in warm seasons for all species whereas diurnal patterns were weak in cold seasons. RGM was better correlated with ozone concentration and temperature in both warm than the other species. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis was applied to identify possible Hg sources. This method identified areas in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, Indiana, and Missouri, which coincided well with sources reported in a 2002 U.S. mercury emissions inventory. 51 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Parasites of two native fishes in adjacent Adirondack lakes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Eric F; Whipps, Christopher M

    2013-08-01

    This survey of parasites in 2 adjacent lakes is the first of its kind in the Adirondack Park of New York State. Wolf Lake is designated as a heritage lake whereas nearby Deer Lake is limnologically similar but has at least 5 introduced fish species. Both lakes have 2 native species, i.e., white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus), which were the focus of this study. Parasite communities of both hosts were surveyed and compared between each lake and were statistically evaluated for differences in species similarity, prevalence, mean intensity, and mean abundance. Between lakes, white suckers had significant differences in the prevalence of 4 parasite species (Myxobolus sp. 2, Myxobolus bibulatus, Octospinifer macilentis, and Pomphorhynchus bulbocoli) and mean abundances of 4 parasites (neascus larvae, Octospinifer macilentis, Pomphorhynchus bulbocoli, and Glaridacris confusus). Redbreast sunfish had significant differences in the prevalence of 3 species (Myxobolus uvuliferis, a coccidian species, and Spinitectus carolini) and differences in parasite mean abundance of 5 species (neascus larvae, Clinostomum marginatum , Leptorhynchoides thecatus, Spinitectus carolini, and Eustrongylides sp.). Differences in component communities between lakes were found and, although the exact causes cannot be determined by this study, we speculate on several possible explanations. PMID:23384764

  7. Modeling and mapping of atmospheric mercury deposition in adirondack park, new york.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue; Driscoll, Charles T; Huang, Jiaoyan; Holsen, Thomas M; Blackwell, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    The Adirondacks of New York State, USA is a region that is sensitive to atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition. In this study, we estimated atmospheric Hg deposition to the Adirondacks using a new scheme that combined numerical modeling and limited experimental data. The majority of the land cover in the Adirondacks is forested with 47% of the total area deciduous, 20% coniferous and 10% mixed. We used litterfall plus throughfall deposition as the total atmospheric Hg deposition to coniferous and deciduous forests during the leaf-on period, and wet Hg deposition plus modeled atmospheric dry Hg deposition as the total Hg deposition to the deciduous forest during the leaf-off period and for the non-forested areas year-around. To estimate atmospheric dry Hg deposition we used the Big Leaf model. The average atmospheric Hg deposition to the Adirondacks was estimated as 17.4 [Formula: see text]g m[Formula: see text] yr[Formula: see text] with a range of -3.7-46.0 [Formula: see text]g m[Formula: see text] yr[Formula: see text]. Atmospheric Hg dry deposition (370 kg yr[Formula: see text]) was found to be more important than wet deposition (210 kg yr[Formula: see text]) to the entire Adirondacks (2.4 million ha). The spatial pattern showed a large variation in atmospheric Hg deposition with scattered areas in the eastern Adirondacks having total Hg deposition greater than 30 μg m(-2) yr(-1), while the southwestern and the northern areas received Hg deposition ranging from 25-30 μg m(-2) yr(-1). PMID:23536871

  8. Atmospheric mercury (Hg) in the Adirondacks: concentrations and sources.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun-Deok; Holsen, Thomas M; Hopke, Philip K

    2008-08-01

    Hourly averaged gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) concentrations and hourly integrated reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and particulate Hg (Hg(p)) concentrations in the ambient air were measured at Huntington Forest in the Adirondacks, New York from June 2006 to May 2007. The average concentrations of GEM, RGM, and Hg(p) were 1.4 +/- 0.4 ng m(-3), 1.8 +/- 2.2 pg m(-3), and 3.2 +/- 3.7 pg m(-3), respectively. RGM represents < 3.5% of total atmospheric Hg or total gaseous Hg (TGM: GEM + RGM) and Hg(p) represents < 3.0% of the total atmospheric Hg. The highest mean concentrations of GEM, RGM, and Hg(p) were measured during winter and summer whereas the lowest mean concentrations were measured during spring and fall. Significant diurnal patterns were apparent in warm seasons for all species whereas diurnal patterns were weak in cold seasons. RGM was better correlated with ozone concentration and temperature in both warm (rho (RGM - ozone) = 0.57, p < 0.001; rho (RGM - temperature) = 0.62, p < 0.001) and cold seasons (rho (RGM - ozone) = 0.48, p = 0.002; rho (RGM - temperature) = 0.54, p = 0.011) than the other species. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis was applied to identify possible Hg sources. This method identified areas in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, Indiana, and Missouri, which coincided well with sources reported in a 2002 U.S. mercury emissions inventory. PMID:18754488

  9. Wetland vegetation responses to liming an Adirondack watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Mackun, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    Watershed liming as a long-term mitigation strategy to neutralize lake acidity, from increasing acid deposition, was initiated in North America at Woods Lake in the west central Adirondack region of New York. In October 1989, a dose of 10 MT lime (83.5% CaCO[sub 3]) ha[sup [minus]1] was aerially applied to 48% of the watershed. The wetlands adjacent to Woods Lake showed two distinct community types: one dominated by Chamaedaphne calyculata, and one dominated by graminoids and other herbaceous species. Within two years, liming did not alter the structure of either community type, and changed the cover or frequency of only 6 of 64 individual taxa. Most of these changes occurred in the herbaceous community type. The only strong positive response to liming was a nearly threefold increase in cover of the rhizomatous sedge Cladium mariscoides. The cover of Carex interior and Sphagnum spp. benefited from lime addition, while cover of Drosera intermedia and Muhlenbergia uniflora, and frequency of Hypericum canadense responded negatively to lime. Liming influenced the competitive release of only three taxa, all forbs with small growth forms. The tissue chemistry of foliage and twigs of Myrica gale, Chamaedaphne calyculata, and Carex stricta in the Chamaedaphne calyculata community type clearly illustrated species-specific patterns of nutrient accumulation and allocation both before and after liming. Concentrations of 17 of 20 elements responded to liming, although the responses varied among species and plant parts. Carex foliage was least responsive to liming, and Chamaedaphne twigs were most responsive. Elemental changes in plant tissues will be reflected in litter and many influence long-term nutrient dynamics in the wetland community.

  10. Mafic rocks of the Adirondack Highlands: One suite or many

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, P.R. . New York State Museum)

    1993-03-01

    Mafic rocks in the granulite facies terrane of the Adirondack Highlands form at least 3 and possibly as many as 6 groups, based on field, petrographic, and geochemical criteria. Most abundant is the olivine metagabbro-amphibolite group (OMA), equivalent to the mafic suite'' of Olson (J. Petrol. 33:471, 1992). OMA occurs in irregular to tabular bodies, locally with intrusive relations, in all major rock types in the E and central Highlands. OMA is strongly olivine normative and forms a continuous differentiation series (Olson, 1992). Plagioclase-two pyroxene-garnet granulites (PGG) form dikes up to several m wide, in anorthositic host rocks. PGG are ferrogabbroic or ferrodioritic and approximately silica saturated. Two subgroups differ sharply in Mg, P, and trace elements. Ferrodiorite and monzodiorite gneisses (FMG), quartz normative and commonly migmatitic, occur in several large bodies in the NE Highlands and as extensive thin sheets in the W and SE Highlands, in association with anorthositic rocks. Three subgroups are distinguishable using Mg/Fe ratios and trace elements. Major element least-squares modeling suggests that both PGG and FMG could be derived by fractionation of gabbroic anorthosite liquids. A differentiation series is not evident, however, and both trace element (Ba, Rb, Sr, Zr and REE) data and normative plagioclase (An [>=] plag. in anorthosite) indicate a more complex origin. One subgroup of FMG may be early cumulates of the mangerite-charnockite suite. The chemistry of OMA, PGG, and FMG reflects their evolved nature and cannot be readily interpreted in terms of magma sources.

  11. An Empirical Approach to Modeling Methylmercury Concentrations in an Adirondack Stream Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. A.; Nystrom, E.; Wolock, D.; Bradley, P. M.; Riva Murray, K.

    2013-12-01

    Existing process-based models have provided only a limited ability to predict variation in methylmercury concentrations in surface waters, suggesting a need for simple data-based inverse modeling approaches to better explain this variation. Here, we used a multiple regression approach to develop a model that explains about 81% of the variation in filtered methylmercury (FMeHg) concentrations in Fishing Brook, a 4th-order stream in the headwaters of the Hudson River basin in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a known hot spot of Hg bioaccumulation. Previous work in the study basin indicated that riparian wetland soils are the dominant source of MeHg to this stream. The model, based on 43 stream samples collected during a 33-mo period during 2007-09, included variables that represent the influence of seasonal temperature, streamflow, and modeled riparian water table depth on seasonal and annual patterns of FMeHg concentrations. An additional variable was added to the model to represent the effects of a pond on decreasing FMeHg concentrations immediately upstream of the sampling site. The model suggests that seasonal temperature variation is a principal control on annual patterns of FMeHg concentrations, most likely the result of temperature-driven effects on the rates of net methylation and mobilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Additionally, streamflow has a dilution effect on FMeHg concentrations, which is most evident during the dormant season (Nov. through Apr.). A valuable insight provided by this modeling approach is that the connection of the riparian water table to the principal source of MeHg and DOC in the shallow (upper 500 mm) riparian soil and the persistence of that connection are the dominant controls on FMeHg concentration patterns during the growing season (May - Oct.). This was especially evident during the dry summer of 2007 when FMeHg concentrations were less than half those of the wetter summers of 2008 and 2009. The approach used in

  12. Dissolved Organic Matter Characteristics Control Filtered Total Mercury Concentrations in an Adirondack River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. A.; Aiken, G.; Bradley, P. M.; Journey, C.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays important roles in the transport and biogeochemical processes that affect mercury (Hg) cycling in the environment. Previous investigations have shown strong correlations between DOC and Hg concentrations in surface waters. Commonly, other DOC-related measures such as ultraviolet absorbance (UV254), and hydrophobic acid content (HPOA) show even stronger positive correlations with Hg in waters indicating the importance of the more aromatic fraction of DOC in Hg cycling. Finally, in-situ optical sensor-derived DOC concentrations have proven useful as inexpensive proxies for estimating Hg concentrations in some surface waters. Here, we describe results from the 493 km2 Upper Hudson River basin in the Adirondack Mountains of New York in which stream water samples were collected for filtered total Hg (FTHg) concentrations, DOC concentrations, UV254, HPOA, and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA, derived from the absorbance and DOC measurements) at two temporal and spatial scales during 2006-09: (1) biweekly to monthly in a 66 km2 basin, and (2) seasonally at 27 synoptic sites distributed across the larger Upper Hudson basin. These results indicate that SUVA values are more strongly correlated with FTHg concentrations than are those of DOC concentrations, especially during summer. The presence of numerous open water bodies in this basin appears to greatly affect DOC and FTHg concentrations and SUVA values as reflected by data collected upstream and downstream of ponds and lakes. Multivariate regression models developed to examine the landscape factors that control spatial variation in SUVA values among synoptic sites indicate that open water area is inversely correlated with these values, reflecting autochthonous carbon sources in lakes/ponds that are more aliphatic in character than that found in streams. In contrast, metrics such as percent riparian area that reflect the influence of soils with high organic carbon content are

  13. Characteristics and significance of two pre-late-Wisconsinan weathering profiles (Adirondacks, USA and Miramichi Highlands, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Mireille; Jolicoeur, Serge; Pierre, Guillaume

    1995-04-01

    The properties of two weathering profiles developed from granitic rocks and covered by deposits of Wisconsinan age were studied in order to characterize saprolites and non saprolite residuum of the glaciated area of northeastern North America. The Warrensburg profile (Adirondacks, New York) is more than 9 m thick and formed on a hornblende granitic gneiss. Total chemical analysis of the sandy saprolite shows slight losses compared to bedrock. Kaolinite is the main weathering product in the < 2 μm fraction, and vermiculite and gibbsite are present. Biotite is altered to kaolinite locally. Hornblende is the most altered mineral and is pseudomorphed by vermiculite. There is 4% of kaolinite and 1.5% of gibbsite in the fine fraction ( < 63 μm) of the saprolite. The Big Bald Mountain profile (Miramichi Highlands, New-Brunswick) is 2 m deep and has developed on a biotite granite. Tors, weathering pits and gruss more than 20 m deep in an alveole at the foot of the mountain were reported. The sandy residuum shows limited geochemical and mineralogic evolution. Most primary minerals appear fresh, biotite and plagioclase being slightly altered. Smectite, chlorite and vermiculite sometimes interstratified with mica, are the dominant clay minerals of the fine fraction, but kaolinite and gibbsite are also present. The two profiles have limited mineralogic evolution even though kaolinite and gibbsite occur in small amounts. Their characteristics do not indicate climatic conditions different from those of the present, thus their age is within the limits of the Plio-Pleistocene. The temperate conditions and the quick drainage of these porous materials can explain the observed properties and their thickness. Saprolites are witnesses of an important process in relief evolution, yet they are overlooked factors in the analysis of landform evolution of formerly glaciated areas. Thorough analysis of weathering profiles is needed in these areas since it can give valuable information on

  14. How much acidification has occurred in Adirondack region lakes (New York, USA) since preindustrial times

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, B.F.; Smol, J.P.; Kingston, J.C.; Charles, D.F.; Birks, H.J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Preindustrial and present-day lake water pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), total monomeric aluminum Al(sub m), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were inferred from the species composition of diatom and chrysophyte microfossils in the tops (present-day inferences) and bottoms (pre-1850 inferences) of sediment cores collected from a statistically selected set of Adirondack lakes. Results from the study lakes were extrapolated to a predefined target population of 675 low-alkalinity Adirondack region lakes. Estimates of preindustrial to present-day changes in lake water chemistry show that approximately 25-35% of the target population has acidified. The magnitude of acidification was greatest in the low-alkalinity lakes of the southwestern Adirondacks, an area with little geological ability to neutralize acidic deposition and receives the highest annual average rainfall in the region. The authors estimate that approximately 80% of the target population lakes with present-day measured pH = or < 5.2 and 30-45% of lakes with pH between 5.2 and 6.0 have undergone large declines in pH and ANC, and concomitant increases in Al(sub m). Estimated changes in (DOC) were small and show no consistent pattern in the acidified lakes. The study provides the first statistically based regional evaluation of the extent of lake acidification in the Adirondacks.

  15. A STUDY OF HIGHER EDUCATION POSSIBILITIES FOR THE ADIRONDACK LAKES REGION, NEW YORK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HARRIS, NORMAN C.; RUSSEL, JOHN H.

    SEVERAL PROPOSALS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES ARE DISCUSSED. FACTORS ARE PRESENTED WHICH RULE OUT A LOCAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOR THE ADIRONDACK LAKES REGION AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A BRANCH OF THE CANTON AGRICULTURAL-TECHNICAL COLLEGE IN THE LAKES AREA. CONSIDERATION SHOULD BE GIVEN, THOUGH, TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A COMMUNITY COLLEGE IN OR NEAR…

  16. Factors Enhancing the Teaching of Information Literacy to Adirondack Community College Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joyce

    This study examines the status of information literacy skills among the faculty of Adirondack Community College (ACC) in New York, and describes factors that enhance these skills. Three primary questions posed by the study are: (1) what information literacy skills do faculty have now?; (2) what factors strengthen the teaching of information…

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on regionalization of aquatic impacts using the Adirondacks as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, N.S.; Olson, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Alternative approaches to applying aquatic data from specific sites and surveys to additional areas within a region or to broader regions for analysis and assessment were examined. Studies conducted within the Adirondack Region of New York provided the principal information base for evaluating regional extrapolation. Primary data bases for the Adirondacks were reviewed and statistical and process modeling approaches were discussed as methodologies for regionalization. Small working groups of data analysts and modelers developed approaches moving toward regional extrapolation of Adirondack data sets, based on either estimating current impacts or predicting future impacts. This report outlines suggested approaches, recommendations for future research, and existing data needs. The discussions emphasized (1) the lack of information on the extent and mechanics of aquatic impacts in the Adirondack Region and across the United States as a whole, (2) the need for increased information exchanges, and (3) the need to develop modeling approaches for regionalization. Recommended approaches included the development of a classification system for surface waters and watersheds, based on select criteria and the development of second generation models which would incorporate select features from both simple and complex models.

  18. An Adirondack Watershed Data Base: Attribute and mapping information for regional acidic deposition studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.E.; Olson, R.J.; Gruendling, G.K.; Bogucki, D.J.; Malanchuk, J.L.; Durfee, R.C.; Turner, R.S.; Adams, K.B.; Wilson, D.L.; Coleman, P.R.

    1988-12-01

    The Adirondack Watershed Data Base (AWDB) provides a means to test hypotheses concerning the relative importance of various watershed attributes that may contribute to increased acidification of Adirondack surface waters. The AWDB is a valuable resource for the study of other ecological phenomena. The AWDB consists of digital watershed boundaries and digital geographic data, stored within a geographic information system, and watershed/lake attribute data stored in a data management system (SAS) for 463 Adirondack headwater lakes. Attributes include watershed morphology, physiography, bedrock, soils, land cover, wetlands, disturbances (e.g., cabins, fire, and logging), beaver activity, precipitation, and atmospheric deposition. Over 600 variables are available for each watershed. These data can be combined with water chemistry data and fish community status for regional-scale examinations of watershed attributes that may account for variability and change in water chemistry and fish populations in the Adirondacks. This report describes the design of the AWDB, documents sources and history of the data; defines the format of the AWDB contents; and characterizes the data using summary statistics, frequency bar charts, and other graphics. In addition, it provides information necessary for researchers using the data base on their own computer systems. 37 refs., 42 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Fish population losses from Adirondack lakes: The role of surface water acidity and acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.P. ); Warren-Hicks, W.J. ); Gallagher, J. ); Christensen, S.W. )

    1993-04-01

    Within the United States, the Adirondack region of New York State has the largest percentage of waters that are acidic and classified as deposition dominated. Thus, the Adirondacks have been the focus of much of the debate regarding the extent and magnitude of effects to date from acidic deposition. Completion of the Adirondack Lakes Survey in 1987, a survey of 1,469 lakes, in combination with the relatively extensive historical record on fish communities in the region, provided the opportunity for a thorough evaluation of changes in Adirondack fish communities over the last 50-60 years, and the degree to which these changes may have resulted from changes in surface water acid-base chemistry. Results indicate that 16-19% of the lakes with adequate historical data appeared to have lost one or more fish populations as a result of acidification. Brook trout and acid-sensitive minnows had experienced the most widespread effects, with losses in 11-19% of the lakes. Fish species occurring in lower elevation and larger lakes such as bass and brown trout, experienced little or no effects. Lakes judged to have lost fish populations to acidification had significantly lower pH and higher concentrations of inorganic aluminum and occurred at higher elevations than other lakes. No other lake characteristics showed consistent associations with fish population losses. Acidification is not the only factor, nor even the dominant factor affecting Adirondack fish communities, however. Other causes of fish loses include lake reclamation, changes in stocking policy, and the introduction (or invasion) of competitors or predators.

  20. Influence of natural acidity and fisheries management activities upon the status of Adirondack fish populations

    SciTech Connect

    Retzsch, W.C.; Everett, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Acidification and the disappearance of fish from some Adirondack waters does not appear to be caused solely by acid rain. Acidification is a natural process under certain conditions and precipitation acidified by industrial emissions appears to be only one of many possible causes of pond, lake and stream acidification. Factors other than acid precipitation can cause acidification or reduce fish stocks. As a result of glaciation, northern New York State has hundreds of glacial ponds and lakes, most of which are dystrophic or oligotrophic. Many such waters are located in the western and central portions of the Adirondacks, an area frequently cited as exhibiting the most pronounced effects of acid rain. It is widely recognized that natural unpolluted bogs and peat deposits result in low pH environments. Seasonal and weather conditions also appear to have a substantial effect upon the acidity of peat-bog outflows. An evaluation of recent survey data on critically acidified Adirondack waters indicates that of 192 waters with values less than pH 5.0, approximately 61 percent appear to be directly influenced by natural bog conditions and an additional 14 percent are probably influenced. A review of historical and recent survey data suggest that significant factors, such as natural causes of acidification, low oxygen concentrations, high CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S concentrations, and extreme temperatures may have been ignored or underestimated in evaluating the cause of acidification and fish disappearances in some Adirondack waters. Another factor responsible for the current status of fish stocks in the Adirondacks involves past and present fishery resource management activities.

  1. Mercury methylation in Sphagnum moss mats and its association with sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acidic Adirondack forest lake wetland.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ri-Qing; Adatto, Isaac; Montesdeoca, Mario R; Driscoll, Charles T; Hines, Mark E; Barkay, Tamar

    2010-12-01

    Processes leading to the bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in northern wetlands are largely unknown. We have studied various ecological niches within a remote, acidic forested lake ecosystem in the southwestern Adirondacks, NY, to discover that mats comprised of Sphagnum moss were a hot spot for mercury (Hg) and MeHg accumulation (190.5 and 18.6 ng g⁻¹ dw, respectively). Furthermore, significantly higher potential methylation rates were measured in Sphagnum mats as compared with other sites within Sunday Lake's ecosystem. Although MPN estimates showed a low biomass of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), 2.8 × 10⁴ cells mL⁻¹ in mat samples, evidence consisting of (1) a twofold stimulation of potential methylation by the addition of sulfate, (2) a significant decrease in Hg methylation in the presence of the sulfate reduction inhibitor molybdate, and (3) presence of dsrAB-like genes in mat DNA extracts, suggested that SRB were involved in Hg methylation. Sequencing of dsrB genes indicated that novel SRB, incomplete oxidizers including Desulfobulbus spp. and Desulfovibrio spp., and syntrophs dominated the sulfate-reducing guild in the Sphagnum moss mat. Sphagnum, a bryophyte dominating boreal peatlands, and its associated microbial communities appear to play an important role in the production and accumulation of MeHg in high-latitude ecosystems. PMID:20955196

  2. Ny-Alesund Geodetic Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sieber, Moritz

    2013-01-01

    In 2012 the 20-m telescope at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, operated by the Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA), took part in 163 out of 168 scheduled sessions of the IVS program. Since spring, all data was transferred by network, and the receiver monitoring computer was replaced by a bus-coupler. In autumn, the NMA received building permission for a new observatory from the Governor of Svalbard. The bidding process and first construction work for the infrastructure will start in 2013.

  3. Seasonal variations in atmospheric chemistry in the Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J.; Tanner, R.L.; McLaren, S.E.; DuBois, M.V.

    1985-03-01

    The results of continuous real-time measurements of aerosol composition, HNO/sub 3/, and SO/sub 2/, performed at the summit of Whiteface Mountain, New York, during 1984 are reported. The purpose was to shed light on the seasonal variation in atmospheric acidity in this ecologically sensitive area. 13 refs., 5 figs. (ACR)

  4. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...

  5. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...

  6. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...

  7. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...

  8. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7... LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock... Light 348° true to the southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d)...

  9. LANDSAT applications by the Adirondack Park Agency for land cover analyses and forest cover change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banta, J. S.; Curran, R. P.

    1981-01-01

    The New York State Adirondack Park Agency is using LANDSAT imagery to provide current, consistent parkwide data on forest cover, forest change and other land cover characteristics for the Adirondack Park, an area of 9,375 sq. miles (24,280 sq km). Boundaries of the study area were digitized and the data were enhanced and geographically rectified. A classification scheme was devised which emphasized the basic land cover types of the Park: hardwoods, spruce-fir, pine, wet conifer, brushland, grassland, agricultural areas, exposed earth, urban areas, and water bodies. Cover type classifications for disturbed forest land were also chosen: cut hardwoods, regenerating hardwoods, and cut spruce fir. Field verification of 1978 classification revealed an accurate differentiation of forest types within types and between nonforested/forested areas. The classification accurately detects forest land disturbances; however, it is not always descriptive of the level of disturbance.

  10. Focal mechanisms of small earthquakes and the stress field in the western Quebec Adirondack region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Zhu, Pei-Ding

    1989-09-01

    Focal mechanisms were determined for 42 small earthquakes (1.4 < M < 3.4) that occurred in the Adirondacks-western Quebec seismic region. The analysis demonstrates the variability of the focal mechanisms and suggests that the region can be divided into two subprovinces with distinctive seismotectonic regimes: (1) in the Adirondacks, the focal mechanisms are mostly strike-slip with a comparatively smaller thrust component and indicate NNE compression: (2) in the western Quebec seismic region, the stress field is more heterogeneous and is dominated by two directions (NE and NW) of horizontal compression. This variable pattern suggests that the seismicity and stress field are controlled by regional plate stresses but are affected by local structures and/or by the predominant orientation of preexisting faults.

  11. Variation in Adirondack, New York, lakewater chemistry as function of surface area

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J. ); Kugler, D.L.; Johnson, C.B.; Rosenbaum, B.J. ); Small, M.J. ); Landers, D.H. ); Overton, W.S. ); Kretser, W.A.; Gallagher, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Data from a recent survey conducted by the Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation were used to evaluate the influence of lake surface area on the acid-base status of lakes in Adirondack State Park, New York. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the small lakes (<4 ha) occurred more frequently at extreme values (>200, <0 {mu}eq L{sup {minus}1}), whereas larger lakes tended to be intermediate in ANC. Consequently, acidic (ANC {le} 0) and low-pH lakes were typically small. The small lakes also exhibited lower Ca{sup 2+} concentration and higher dissolved organic carbon than did larger lakes. Lakes {ge} 4 ha were only half as likely to be acidic as were lakes {ge} 1 ha in area. These data illustrate the dependence of lake chemistry on lake surface area and the importance of the lower lake area limit for a statistical survey of lakewater chemistry.

  12. Trace gas and aerosol measurements at Whiteface Mountain, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J.

    1985-09-01

    This report presents the results of a 12-month program of atmospheric chemical measurements performed at Whiteface Mountain, New York. The purpose of this program was to study the concentrations and seasonal variability of several atmospheric chemical species which are of importance in the acid deposition issue. Whiteface Mountain (WFM) was chosen as the site of these measurements because it lies in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, one of the areas considered susceptible to ecological damage from acid deposition. These measurements were the first long term study of atmospheric chemistry in the Adirondacks. Continuous real-time measurements of SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ were made with commercial instruments modified for increased sensitivity and stability, and aerosol composition, HNO/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/ were measured with a three-stage filter pack. The main conclusions of this work are (1) that concentrations of gaseous SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ are highest in the winter months, whereas their oxidation products SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and HNO/sub 3/ were highest in summer; (2) that aerosol acidity is closely associated with SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, aerosol NO/sub 3//sup -/ concentrations being very low in all seasons; (3) and that the relative importance of aerosol acidity and HNO/sub 3/ vary with season, because the strong seasonal variation in SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ results in a very strong seasonal variation in aerosol acidity.

  13. Habitat suitability for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) reproduction in Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Carl L.

    1993-04-01

    The relationships between habitat characteristics and reproductive status of Adirondack brook trout populations were examined utilizing the Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation data base, which includes physical, chemical, and biological data for 1469 lakes. The only variables strongly related to brook trout natural reproduction were indices of groundwater influence on surface water chemistry, specifically silica and sodium concentrations. This finding supports the hypothesis that lake spawning populations of brook trout are strongly dependent on groundwater seepage for successful reproduction. Spawning habitat in small headwater lakes impounded by beaver activity may be degraded as a result of siltation of nearshore zones and diminished groundwater seepage. Adirondack lakes situated in thick-till basins receive proportionally greater groundwater input than thin-till lake types and thick-till lakes also had the highest proportion of self-sustaining brook trout populations. Acidification is most pronounced in thin-till basins, which also exhibited a low frequency of self-sustaining brook trout populations. Although brook trout fisheries may be maintained in acidic lakes by liming and stocking, the establishment of self-sustaining brook trout populations is not a likely outcome of these management practices. Additionally, there appears to be limited potential for restoration of lake spawning brook trout populations in currently acidic, fishless lakes should acidic inputs decline as a result of reductions in acid-forming emissions.

  14. Fluid heterogeneity during granulite facies metamorphism in the Adirondacks: stable isotope evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valley, J.W.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The preservation of premetamorphic, whole-rock oxygen isotope ratios in Adirondack metasediments shows that neither these rocks nor adjacent anorthosites and gneisses have been penetrated by large amounts of externally derived, hot CO2-H2O fluids during granulite facies metamorphism. This conclusion is supported by calculations of the effect of fluid volatilization and exchange and is also independently supported by petrologic and phase equilibria considerations. The data suggest that these rocks were not an open system during metamorphism; that fluid/rock ratios were in many instances between 0.0 and 0.1; that externally derived fluids, as well as fluids derived by metamorphic volatilization, rose along localized channels and were not pervasive; and thus that no single generalization can be applied to metamorphic fluid conditions in the Adirondacks. Analyses of 3 to 4 coexisting minerals from Adirondack marbles show that isotopic equilibrium was attained at the peak of granulite and upper amphibolite facies metamorphism. Thus the isotopic compositions of metamorphic fluids can be inferred from analyses of carbonates and fluid budgets can be constructed. Carbonates from the granulite facies are on average, isotopically similar to those from lower grade or unmetamorphosed limestones of the same age showing that no large isotopic shifts accompanied high grade metamorphism. Equilibrium calculations indicate that small decreases in ??18O, averaging 1 permil, result from volatilization reactions for Adirondack rock compositions. Additional small differences between amphibolite and granulite facies marbles are due to systematic lithologie differences. The range of Adirondack carbonate ??18O values (12.3 to 27.2) can be explained by the highly variable isotopic compositions of unmetamorphosed limestones in conjunction with minor 18O and 13C depletions caused by metamorphic volatilization suggesting that many (and possibly most) marbles have closely preserved their

  15. Fish population losses from Adirondack Lakes: The role of surface water acidity and acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Joan P.; Warren-Hicks, William J.; Gallagher, James; Christensen, Sigurd W.

    1993-04-01

    Changes over time in the species composition of fish communities in Adirondack lakes were assessed to determine (1) the approximate numbers offish populations that have been lost and (2) the degree to which fish population losses may have resulted from surface water acidification and acidic deposition. Information on the present-day status offish communities was obtained by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation, which surveyed 1469 Adirondack lakes in 1984-1987 (53% of the total ponded waters in the Adirondack ecological zone). Two hundred and ninety-five of these lakes had been surveyed in 1929-1934 during the first statewide biological survey; 720 had been surveyed in one or more years prior to 1970. Sixteen to 19% of the lakes with adequate historical data appeared to have lost one or more fish populations as a result of acidification. Brook trout and acid-sensitive minnow species had experienced the most widespread effects. Populations of brook trout and acid-sensitive minnows had been lost apparently as a result of acidification from 11% and 19%, respectively, of the lakes with confirmed historical occurrence of these taxa. By contrast, fish species that tend to occur primarily in lower elevation and larger lakes, such as largemouth and smallmouth bass and brown trout, have experienced little to no documented adverse effects. Lakes that were judged to have lost fish populations as a result of acidification had significantly lower; pH and, in most cases, also had higher estimated concentrations of inorganic aluminum and occurred at higher elevations than did lakes with the fish species still present. No other lake characteristics were consistently associated with fish population losses attributed to acidification. The exact numbers and proportions of fish populations affected could not be determined because of limitations on the quantity and quality of historical data. Lakes for which we had adequate historical data to assess long-term trends in fish

  16. Tuberculosis, the Adirondacks, and coming of age for thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J A

    1991-10-01

    "The Captain of all these men of death," wrote John Bunyan in 1680, "that came against him to take him away, was the Consumption, for it was that that brought him down to the grave." Until the twentieth century tuberculosis, or the Consumption, was the foremost cause of death among adults. It had not been recognized as a specific infectious process until 1882. The sanatorium movement for segregation and treatment of tuberculous patients originated in the late nineteenth century. Locations in the mountains were thought to be especially favorable, for the sake of fresh air, sunshine, and the aromas of pine and spruce. Long before the epidemic of lung cancer, or the possibilities of correction for cardiac disease, development of thoracic surgery was closely intertwined with the history of the sanatoriums. All of them had disappeared, however, soon after the middle of the twentieth century. PMID:1929650

  17. Modeled effects of soil acidification on long-term ecological and economic outcomes for managed forests in the Adirondack region (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caputo, Jesse PhD.; Beier, Colin M.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Lawrence, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is among the most ecologically and economically important tree species in North America, and its growth and regeneration is often the focus of silvicultural practices in northern hardwood forests. A key stressor for sugar maple (SM) is acid rain, which depletes base cations from poorly-buffered forest soils and has been associated with much lower SM vigor, growth, and recruitment. However, the potential interactions between forest management and soil acidification – and their implications for the sustainability of SM and its economic and cultural benefits – have not been investigated. In this study, we simulated the development of 50 extant SM stands in the western Adirondack region of NY (USA) for 100 years under different soil chemical conditions and silvicultural prescriptions. We found that interactions between management prescription and soil base saturation will strongly shape the ability to maintain SM in managed forests. Below 12% base saturation, SM did not regenerate sufficiently after harvest and was replaced mainly by red maple (Acer rubrum) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia). Loss of SM on acid-impaired sites was predicted regardless of whether the shelterwood or diameter-limit prescriptions were used. On soils with sufficient base saturation, models predicted that SM will regenerate after harvest and be sustained for future rotations. We then estimated how these different post-harvest outcomes, mediated by acid impairment of forest soils, would affect the potential monetary value of ecosystem services provided by SM forests. Model simulations indicated that a management strategy focused on syrup production – although not feasible across the vast areas where acid impairment has occurred – may generate the greatest economic return. Although pollution from acid rain is declining, its long-term legacy in forest soils will shape future options for sustainable forestry and ecosystem stewardship in the northern

  18. Modeled effects of soil acidification on long-term ecological and economic outcomes for managed forests in the Adirondack region (USA).

    PubMed

    Caputo, Jesse; Beier, Colin M; Sullivan, Timothy J; Lawrence, Gregory B

    2016-09-15

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is among the most ecologically and economically important tree species in North America, and its growth and regeneration is often the focus of silvicultural practices in northern hardwood forests. A key stressor for sugar maple (SM) is acid rain, which depletes base cations from poorly-buffered forest soils and has been associated with much lower SM vigor, growth, and recruitment. However, the potential interactions between forest management and soil acidification - and their implications for the sustainability of SM and its economic and cultural benefits - have not been investigated. In this study, we simulated the development of 50 extant SM stands in the western Adirondack region of NY (USA) for 100years under different soil chemical conditions and silvicultural prescriptions. We found that interactions between management prescription and soil base saturation will strongly shape the ability to maintain SM in managed forests. Below 12% base saturation, SM did not regenerate sufficiently after harvest and was replaced mainly by red maple (Acer rubrum) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia). Loss of SM on acid-impaired sites was predicted regardless of whether the shelterwood or diameter-limit prescriptions were used. On soils with sufficient base saturation, models predicted that SM will regenerate after harvest and be sustained for future rotations. We then estimated how these different post-harvest outcomes, mediated by acid impairment of forest soils, would affect the potential monetary value of ecosystem services provided by SM forests. Model simulations indicated that a management strategy focused on syrup production - although not feasible across the vast areas where acid impairment has occurred - may generate the greatest economic return. Although pollution from acid rain is declining, its long-term legacy in forest soils will shape future options for sustainable forestry and ecosystem stewardship in the northern hardwood

  19. 49 CFR 372.201 - Albany, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Albany, N.Y., within which transportation by motor vehicle, in interstate or foreign commerce, not under... combined areas defined in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, and (e) All of any municipality...

  20. Analysis of the mineral acid-base components of acid-neutralizing capacity in Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, R. K.; Gherini, S. A.

    1993-04-01

    Mineral acids and bases influence pH largely through their effects on acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). This influence becomes particularly significant as ANC approaches zero. Analysis of data collected by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC) from 1469 lakes throughout the Adirondack region indicates that variations in ANC in these lakes correlate well with base cation concentrations (CB), but not with the sum of mineral acid anion concentrations (CA). This is because (CA) is relatively constant across the Adirondacks, whereas CB varies widely. Processes that supply base cations to solution are ion-specific. Sodium and silica concentrations are well correlated, indicating a common source, mineral weathering. Calcium and magnesium also covary but do not correlate well with silica. This indicates that ion exchange is a significant source of these cations in the absence of carbonate minerals. Iron and manganese concentrations are elevated in the lower waters of some lakes due to reducing conditions. This leads to an ephemeral increase in CB and ANC. When the lakes mix and oxic conditions are restored, these ions largely precipitate from solution. Sulfate is the dominant mineral acid anion in ALSC lakes. Sulfate concentrations are lowest in seepage lakes, commonly about 40 μeq/L less than in drainage lakes. This is due in part to the longer hydraulic detention time in seepage lakes, which allows slow sulfate reduction reactions more time to decrease lake sulfate concentration. Nitrate typically influences ANC during events such as snowmelt. Chloride concentrations are generally low, except in lakes impacted by road salt.

  1. Chronic and episodic acidification of Adirondack streams from acid rain in 2003-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Roy, K.M.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, H.A.; Capone, S.B.; Sutherland, J.W.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. A.; Boylen, C.W.

    2008-01-01

    Limited information is available on streams in the Adirondack region of New York, although streams are more prone to acidification than the more studied Adirondack lakes. A stream assessment was therefore undertaken in the Oswegatchie and Black River drainages; an area of 4585 km2 in the western part of the Adirondack region. Acidification was evaluated with the newly developed base-cation surplus (BCS) and the conventional acid-neutralizing capacity by Gran titration (ANCG). During the survey when stream water was most acidic (March 2004), 105 of 188 streams (56%) were acidified based on the criterion of BCS < 0 ??eq L-1, whereas 29% were acidified based on an ANCG value < 0 ??eq L-1. During the survey when stream water was least acidic (August 2003), 15 of 129 streams (12%) were acidified based on the criterion of BCS < 0 ??eq L-1, whereas 5% were acidified based on ANCG value < 0 ??eq L -1. The contribution of acidic deposition to stream acidification was greater than that of strongly acidic organic acids in each of the surveys by factors ranging from approximately 2 to 5, but was greatest during spring snowmelt and least during elevated base flow in August. During snowmelt, the percentage attributable to acidic deposition was 81%, whereas during the October 2003 survey, when dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were highest, this percentage was 66%. The total length of stream reaches estimated to be prone to acidification was 718 km out of a total of 1237 km of stream reaches that were assessed. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  2. Episodic acidification and associated fish and benthic invertebrate responses of four adirondack headwater streams. Methods report

    SciTech Connect

    Kretser, W.A.; Simonin, H.A.; Bath, D.W.; Gallagher, J.; Olson, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    Four low order Adirondack streams were investigated from September 1988 through June 1990 to examine the effects of hydrologic events in relation to stream chemistry and associated biological communities. The four streams were monitored continuously for pH, specific conductivity, temperatures, flow and water quality using a variety of instrumentation and procedures. During base flow and hydrologic events, weekly water samples were collected manually. Assessment of the biological communities in response to changes in water chemistry involved a number of standard fisheries techniques including electroshocking for population estimates, in situ bioassay experiments and radio tagging experiments.

  3. Empirical Relationships Between Watershed Attributes and Headwater Lake Chemistry in the Adirondack Region

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    Surface water acidification may be caused or influenced by both natural watershed processes and anthropogenic actions. Empirical models and observational data can be useful for identifying watershed attributes or processes that require further research or that should be considered in the development of process models. This study focuses on the Adirondack region of New York and has two purposes: to (1) develop empirical models that can be used to assess the chemical status of lakes for which no chemistry data exist and (2) determine on a regional scale watershed attributes that account for variability in lake pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). Headwater lakes, rather than lakes linked to upstream lakes, were selected for initial analysis. The Adirondacks Watershed Data Base (AWDB), part of the Acid Deposition Data Network maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), integrates data on physiography, bedrock, soils, land cover, wetlands, disturbances, beaver activity, land use, and atmospheric deposition with the water chemistry and morphology for the watersheds of 463 headwater lakes. The AWD8 facilitates both geographic display and statistical analysis of the data. The report, An Adirondack Watershed Data Base: Attribute and Mapping Information for Regional Acidic Deposition Studies (ORNL/TM--10144), describes the AWDB. Both bivariate (correlations and Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests) and multivariate analyses were performed. Fifty-seven watershed attributes were selected as input variables to multiple linear regression and discriminant analysis. For model development -200 lakes for which pH and ANC data exist were randomly subdivided into a specification and a verification data set. Several indices were used to select models for predicting lake pH (31 variables) and ANC (27 variables). Twenty-five variables are common to the pH and ANC models: four lake morphology, nine soil/geology, eight land cover, three disturbance, and one watershed aspect. An

  4. Moderate pressure metamorphism and anatexis due to anorthosite intrusion, western Adirondack Highlands, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florence, F. P.; Darling, R. S.; Orrell, S. E.

    1995-10-01

    Garnet-sillimanite-biotite gneiss near Port Leyden, in the western Adirondack Highlands, New York, contains mineral assemblages and textures that formed during high temperature metamorphism and anatexis at mid-crustal pressures. Evidence for melting includes thin, plagioclase-rich veins, sieve textures in biotite, and the presence of small, euhedral garnet neoblasts. Hercynite-silicate equilibria in combination with the solidus for biotite dehydration melting indicate metamorphic pressure was between 4 and 6.4 kbar at the temperature of melting (ca. 735° C). The gneiss is intruded by a small, discordant Fe-Ti oxide-apatite (nelsonite) dike. Reported field occurrences of nelsonite demonstrate its common association with anorthosite plutons. Although no anorthosite bodies are exposed in the Port Leyden region, the presence of nelsonite is evidence of anorthositic magmatism in the western Adirondacks. Post-intrusion metamorphism has caused partial apatite recrystallization and produced a weak foliated texture in the dike. U-Pb ages from zircon and monazite from both the gneiss and the nelsonite dike indicate that these rocks experienced a complex, polymetamorphic history that we interpret to reflect two thermal episodes. An older event is recorded by discordant zircons in the gneiss, which indicate a minimum age of 1129±6 Ma. A linear best fit to the data yields an upper intercept at 1166±53 Ma. This range of ages coincides with anorthosite-suite magmatism in the Adirondacks. A minimum zircon age of 1104±3 Ma was obtained from the nelsonite dike. Lead-loss or late zircon crystallization at about 1020 Ma affected the U-Pb systematics of zircon in the dike. Monazite ages from both rocks also indicate high temperature metamorphism (>700° C) between 1040 and 960 Ma. The older zircon ages and textural relations in the metapelite are viewed as evidence for anatexis at ca. 1150 Ma, and the presence of nelsonite suggests that the intrusion of anorthosite was coincident

  5. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  6. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  7. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  8. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  9. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the Shinnecock Inlet East Breakwater Light to Shinnecock... southernmost extremity of the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  10. Christmas Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Christmas Mountains     View Larger Image ... New Brunswick. Located above image center are the Christmas Mountains, a region of old-growth forest nestled in a remote wilderness. Within ...

  11. Regional application of the PnET-BGC model to assess historical acidification of Adirondack lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jing; Driscoll, Charles T.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Cosby, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    The Adirondack region of New York has high inputs of acidic deposition and large numbers of acidic lakes. The biogeochemical model, PnET-BGC, was applied to 44 statistically representative Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) lake watersheds in the Adirondacks. Model simulations help provide an understanding of historical effects of acidic deposition on soils and lake waters. Model simulations indicate that median annual concentrations of SO42- and NO3- in the 44 EMAP lakes were 15.9 μeq/L and 3.8 μeq/L, respectively, in 1850, compared to the median current measured values of 88.8 μeq/L and 20.0 μeq/L. Simulated median values of pH, acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), and soil percent base saturation were 6.63, 67.7 μeq/L, and 12.3%, respectively, in 1850, compared to the median current measured values of 5.95, 27.8 μeq/L, and 7.9%. The estimated historical surface water acidification was greatest in lakes having low ANC below values of 100 μeq/L. This pattern of historical acidification is in agreement with a previous paleolimnological investigation.

  12. Using Satellite Imagery to Assess Large-Scale Habitat Characteristics of Adirondack Park, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClain, Bobbi J.; Porter, William F.

    2000-11-01

    Satellite imagery is a useful tool for large-scale habitat analysis; however, its limitations need to be tested. We tested these limitations by varying the methods of a habitat evaluation for white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) in the Adirondack Park, New York, USA, utilizing harvest data to create and validate the assessment models. We used two classified images, one with a large minimum mapping unit but high accuracy and one with no minimum mapping unit but slightly lower accuracy, to test the sensitivity of the evaluation to these differences. We tested the utility of two methods of assessment, habitat suitability index modeling, and pattern recognition modeling. We varied the scale at which the models were applied by using five separate sizes of analysis windows. Results showed that the presence of a large minimum mapping unit eliminates important details of the habitat. Window size is relatively unimportant if the data are averaged to a large resolution (i.e., township), but if the data are used at the smaller resolution, then the window size is an important consideration. In the Adirondacks, the proportion of hardwood and softwood in an area is most important to the spatial dynamics of deer populations. The low occurrence of open area in all parts of the park either limits the effect of this cover type on the population or limits our ability to detect the effect. The arrangement and interspersion of cover types were not significant to deer populations.

  13. Using satellite imagery to assess large-scale habitat characteristics of adirondack park, new york, USA.

    PubMed

    McClain, B J; Porter, W F

    2000-11-01

    Satellite imagery is a useful tool for large-scale habitat analysis; however, its limitations need to be tested. We tested these limitations by varying the methods of a habitat evaluation for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the Adirondack Park, New York, USA, utilizing harvest data to create and validate the assessment models. We used two classified images, one with a large minimum mapping unit but high accuracy and one with no minimum mapping unit but slightly lower accuracy, to test the sensitivity of the evaluation to these differences. We tested the utility of two methods of assessment, habitat suitability index modeling, and pattern recognition modeling. We varied the scale at which the models were applied by using five separate sizes of analysis windows. Results showed that the presence of a large minimum mapping unit eliminates important details of the habitat. Window size is relatively unimportant if the data are averaged to a large resolution (i.e., township), but if the data are used at the smaller resolution, then the window size is an important consideration. In the Adirondacks, the proportion of hardwood and softwood in an area is most important to the spatial dynamics of deer populations. The low occurrence of open area in all parts of the park either limits the effect of this cover type on the population or limits our ability to detect the effect. The arrangement and interspersion of cover types were not significant to deer populations. PMID:10982732

  14. Crustal structure of the Adirondacks determined from broadband teleseismic waveform modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Thomas J.

    1987-06-01

    Broadband receiver functions developed from teleseismic P waveforms recorded on the midperiod passband of the Department of Energy's Regional Seismic Test Network station RSNY are analyzed to examine the crustal structure beneath the Adirondack Highlands of upstate New York. Radial receiver functions are inverted in the time domain to determine the vertical shear velocity structure at four distinct back azimuths. Lateral changes in structure are identified by examining azimuthal variations in the vertical structure. Southeast of RSNY, our model consists of a thick crust, including a broad crust-mantle transition. The most prominent structure is a high-velocity zone (shear velocity >4.0 km/s) between 18 and 26 km depth which overlies a lower crust of low average shear velocity (< 3.7 km/s). The extent of the high-velocity zone correlates in depth with a highly reflective zone in Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling profiles SE of RSNY, while the deep low-velocity zone may be correlated with a broad electrical conductivity anomaly in the Adirondacks. This general structure is also seen SW of RSNY, but is more difficult to document at NW and NE azimuths.

  15. Spatial patterns of mercury in biota of Adirondack, New York lakes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue; Driscoll, Charles T; Montesdeoca, Mario; Evers, David; Duron, Melissa; Williams, Kate; Schoch, Nina; Kamman, Neil C

    2011-10-01

    We studied the spatial distribution patterns of mercury (Hg) in lake water, littoral sediments, zooplankton, crayfish, fish, and common loons in 44 lakes of the Adirondacks of New York State, USA, a region that has been characterized as a "biological Hg hotspot". Our study confirmed this pattern, finding that a substantial fraction of the lakes studied had fish and loon samples exceeding established criteria for human and wildlife health. Factors accounting for the spatial variability of Hg in lake water and biota were lake chemistry (pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), percent carbon in sediments), biology (taxa presence, trophic status) and landscape characteristics (land cover class, lake elevation). Hg concentrations in zooplankton, fish and common loons were negatively associated with the lake water acid-base status (pH, ANC). Bioaccumulation factors (BAF) for methyl Hg (MeHg) increased from crayfish (mean log(10) BAF = 5.7), to zooplankton (5.9), to prey fish (6.2), to larger fish (6.3), to common loons (7.2). MeHg BAF values in zooplankton, crayfish, and fish (yellow perch equivalent) all increased with increasing lake elevation. Our findings support the hypothesis that bioaccumulation of MeHg at the base of the food chain is an important controller of Hg concentrations in taxa at higher trophic levels. The characteristics of Adirondack lake-watersheds (sensitivity to acidic deposition; significant forest and wetland land cover; and low nutrient inputs) contribute to elevated Hg concentrations in aquatic biota. PMID:21691858

  16. Changes in the chemistry of acidified Adirondack streams from the early 1980s to 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Simonin, H.A.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Roy, K.M.; Capone, S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Lakes in the Adirondack region of New York have partially recovered in response to declining deposition, but information on stream recovery is limited. Here we report results of Adirondack stream monitoring from the early 1980s to 2008. Despite a 50% reduction in atmospheric deposition of sulfur, overall increases in pH of only 0.28 and ANC of 13 μeq L-1 were observed in 12 streams over 23 years, although greater changes did occur in streams with lower initial ANC, as expected. In the North Tributary of Buck Creek with high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, SO(4)(2-) concentrations decreased from 1999 to 2008 at a rate of 2.0 μmol L-1 y-1, whereas in the neighboring South Tributary with low DOC concentrations, the decrease was only 0.73 μmol L-1 y-1. Ca2+ leaching decreased in the North Tributary due to the SO(4)(2-) decrease, but this was partially offset by an increase in Ca2+ leaching from increased DOC concentrations.

  17. The origin of garnet in the anorthosite-charnockite suite of the Adirondacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLelland, J.M.; Whitney, P.R.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed analysis of textural and chemical criteria in rocks of the anorthosite-charnockite suite of the Adirondack Highlands suggests that development of garnet in silica-saturated rocks of the suite occurs according to the reaction: {Mathematical expression}, where ?? is a function of the distribution of Fe and Mg between the several coexisting ferromagnesian phases. Depending upon the relative amounts of Fe and Mg present, quartz may be either a reactant or a product. Using an aluminum-fixed reference frame, this reaction can be restated in terms of a set of balanced partial reactions describing the processes occurring in spatially separated domains within the rock. The fact that garnet invariably replaces plagioclase as opposed to the other reactant phases indicates that the aluminum-fixed model is valid as a first approximation. This reaction is univariant and produces unzoned garnet. It differs from a similar equation proposed by de Waard (1965) for the origin of garnet in Adirondack metabasic rocks, i.e. 6 Orthopyroxene+2 Anorthite = Clinopyroxene+Garnet+2 Quartz, the principle difference being that iron oxides (ilmenite and/or magnetite) are essential reactant phases in the present reactions. The product assemblage (garnet+clinopyroxene+plagioclase ?? orthopyroxene ?? quartz) is characteristic of the clinopyroxene-almandine subfacies of the granulite facies. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  18. AN EVALUATION OF PROCESSES REGULATING SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL PATTERNS IN LAKE SULFATE IN THE ADIRONDACK REGION OF NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1970 and 1990, there have been significant decreases in sulfate (SO4^2-) concentrations in surface waters across the northeastern U.S. The 37 Direct/Delayed Response Program (DDRP) watersheds in the Adirondacks receive elevated level...

  19. Appalachian Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Appalachian Mountains     View Larger Image Multi-angle views of the Appalachian Mountains, March 6, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... from Lake Ontario to northern Georgia, and spanning the Appalachian Mountains. The three images to the right are also in true-color, ...

  20. The Influence of Speckled Alder on Nitrogen Accumulation in Adirondack Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiernan, B. D.; Hurd, T. M.; Raynal, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    Shrub-dominated wetlands of the Adirondacks typically support vigorous populations of nitrogen-fixing speckled alder Alnus incana (L.) Moench var. americana Regel), and are the second most abundant wetland type in the Adirondack region. In symbiotic association with an actinomycete of the genus Frankia, this shrub fixes 37-43 kg N/ha/yr in monotypic stands. This study was undertaken to quantify the abundance of alder in wetlands typed as "Scrub-shrub 1" (SS1; known as alder/willow wetlands) in the National Wetlands Inventory, and to determine the accumulation of nitrate and ammonium in alder wetland substrates. Twenty wetlands from the Oswegatchie-Black (OB) and Upper Hudson (UH) watersheds were randomly selected using the Adirondack Park Agency's GIS data base which includes wetland cover types assigned using remotely sensed data. Wetlands designated as "SS1" (scrub-shrub vegetation) and "SS1/EM1" (scrub-shrub with emergent herbaceous vegetation) were included in the sample. Six wetlands varying in alder abundance were chosen to estimate N accumulation in the substrate, with measurement of dissolved inorganic N in groundwater and ion exchange resin extracts. In the OB watershed, A. incana averaged 30 % of total shrub density in SS1 wetlands and 36 % in SS1/EM1 wetlands. Alder accounted for 49 % of all stems in UH SS1 wetlands, 28 % in the SS1/EM1 wetlands and in total accounted for 35 % of all stems in this study. Nitrate in IER extracts and groundwater was significantly higher in high-density alder wetlands (p < 0.05). Eight of the 20 wetlands included in this study were estimated to have less than 3,000 alder stems/ha, and five were estimated to have greater than 10,000 stems/ha. The other seven wetlands averaged 6,000 stems/ha. At nine sites, foliar N equaled or exceeded estimated atmospheric deposition (~10 kg/ha/yr), and was likely derived from N fixation. We conclude that 50 % of the SS1/EM1 wetlands and at least 75 % of the SS1 wetlands in these watersheds

  1. 49 CFR 372.235 - New York, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false New York, NY. 372.235 Section 372.235... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.235 New York, NY. The zone adjacent to, and commercially a part of, New York, NY, within which transportation by motor vehicle, in interstate or...

  2. 49 CFR 372.235 - New York, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false New York, NY. 372.235 Section 372.235... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.235 New York, NY. The zone adjacent to, and commercially a part of, New York, NY, within which transportation by motor vehicle, in interstate or...

  3. Psychosocial needs of cancer patients living in the Adirondacks: a needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Riley-Clark, Alison; Pieper, Barbara B

    2014-01-01

    As the national conversation on solutions to healthcare factors such as affordability and access is likely to intensify, health inequities continue to persist in rural areas. National studies suggest a growing, aging, rural population impacting the revenues of local healthcare facilities, as well as contributing to complexity of care. This paper examines factors influencing the health of rural citizens in upstate New York and offers the results of an initial needs assessment looking at the psychosocial healthcare needs of cancer patients living in the Adirondack Park region. Patients were surveyed regarding their perceptions of psychosocial needs and experiences as a cancer patient. Psychosocial factors while acknowledged as important influences on recovery and healing remain an underdeveloped intervention toward improving the quality of cancer care. Recommendations are made based on the results to enhance the quality of life for this vulnerable population. PMID:26021132

  4. Potential yields of wells in unconsolidated aquifers in upstate New York-- Adirondack sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bugliosi, Edward F.; Trudell, Ruth A.; Casey, George D.

    1988-01-01

    This map shows the location and potential well yield from unconsolidated aquifers in the Adirondack region at a 1:250,000 scale. It also delineates segments of aquifers that are heavily used by community water systems and designated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation as ' Primary Water Supply ' aquifers and cites published reports that give detailed information on each area. Most aquifers were deposited in low-lying areas such as valleys or plains during deglaciation of the region. Thick, permeable, well-sorted sand and gravel deposits generally yield large quantities of water, greater than 100 gal/min. Thin sand, sand and gravel deposits, or thicker gravel units have a large content of silt and fine sand, yield moderate amounts of water, 10 to 100 gal/min. Wells dug in till and those drilled in bedrock commonly yield less than 10 gal/min. (USGS)

  5. Factors affecting acid neutralizing capacity in the Adirondack region of New York: a solute mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mari; Mitchell, Myron J; Driscoll, Charles T; Roy, Karen M

    2005-06-01

    High rates of acidic deposition in the Adirondack region of New York have accelerated acidification of soils and surface waters. Annual input-output budgets for major solutes and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) were estimated for 43 drainage lake-watersheds in the Adirondacks from 1998 to 2000. Sulfate was the predominant anion on an equivalent basis in both precipitation and drainage export. Calcium ion had the largest cation drainage export, followed by Mg2+. While these watersheds showed net nitrogen (N) retention, the drainage losses of SO4(2-), Cl-, base cations, and ANC exceeded their respective inputs from precipitation. Land cover (forest type and wetlands) affected the export of SO4(2-), N solutes, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The relationships of solute export with elevation (negative for base cations and Cl-, positive for NO3- and H+) suggest the importance of the concomitant changes of biotic and abiotic watershed characteristics associated with elevational gradients. The surface water ANC increased with the sum of base cations and was greatest in the lakes with watersheds characterized by thick deposits of glacial till. The surface water ANC was also higher in the lake-watersheds with lower DOC export. Some variation in lake ANC was associated with variability in acidic deposition. Using a classification system previously developed for Adirondack lakes on the basis primarily of surficial geology, lake-watersheds were grouped into five classes. The calculated ANC fluxes based on the major sinks and sources of ANC were comparable with measured ANC for the thick-till (I) and the medium-till lake-watersheds with low DOC (II). The calculated ANC was overestimated for the medium-till with high DOC (III) and the thin-till with high DOC (V) lake-watersheds, suggesting the importance of naturally occurring organic acids as an ANC sink, which was not included in the calculations. The lower calculated estimates than the measured ANC for the thin-till lake

  6. A generalized garnet-forming reaction for metaigneous rocks in the Adirondacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLelland, J.M.; Whitney, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    A generalized reaction is presented to account for garnet formation in a variety of Adirondack metaigneous rocks. This reaction, which is the sum of five partial reactions written in aluminum-fixed frames of reference, is given by: 4(y+1+w)Anorthite+4 k(y+1+2 w)Olivine +4(1-k)(y+1+2 w)Fe-oxide+(8(y+1) -4 k(y+1+2 w))Orthopyroxene = 2(y+1)Garnet +2(y+1+2 w)Clinopyroxene+4 wSpinel where y is a function of plagioclase composition, k refers to the relative amounts of olivine and Fe-oxide participating in the reaction, and w is a measure of silicon mobility. When mass balanced for Mg and Fe, this reaction is found to be consistent with analyzed mineral compositions in a wide range of Adirondack metaigneous rocks. The reaction applies equally well whether the garnets were formed directly from the rectants given above or went through an intermadiate stage involving the formation of spinel, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene. The actual reactions which have produced garnet in both undersaturated and quartz-bearing rocks are special cases of the above general reaction. The most important special cases appear to be those in which the reactants include either olivine alone (k=1) or Fe-oxide alone (k=0). Silicon is relatively immobile (w =2) in olivine bearing, magnesium-rich rocks (k???1), and this correlates with the increased intensity in spinel clouding of plagioclase in these rocks. Silicon mobility apparently increases in the more iron-rich rocks, which also tend to contain clear or lightly clouded plagioclase. In all the rocks studied the most common composition of metamorphic plagioclase is close to An33 (i.e., y=1). Plagioclase of lower anorthite content may be too sodic to participate in garnet formation at the P-T conditions involved. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Empirical relationships between watershed attributes and headwater lake chemistry in the Adirondack region

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Christensen, S.W.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S.; Malanchuk, J.L.

    1986-12-01

    This study focuses on the Adirondack region of New York and has two purposes: to (1) develop empirical models that can be used to assess the chemical status of lakes for which no chemistry data exist and (2) determine on a regional scale watershed attributes that account for variability in lake pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). Headwater lakes, rather than lakes linked to upstream lakes, were selected for initial analysis. Both bivariate (correlations and Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests) and multivariate analyses were performed. Fifty-seven watershed attributes were selected as input variables to multiple linear regression and discriminant analysis. For model development approx.200 lakes for which pH and ANC data exist were randomly subdivided into a specification and a verification data set. Several indices were used to select models for predicting lake pH (31 variables) and ANC (27 variables). Twenty-five variables are common to the pH and ANC models: four lake morphology, nine soil/geology, eight land cover, three disturbance, and one watershed aspect. An atmospheric input variable (H/sup +/ or NO/sub 3//sup -/) explains the greatest amount of variation in the dependent variable (pH and ANC) for both models. The percentage of watershed in conifers is the next strongest predictor variable. For all headwater lakes in the Adirondacks, approx.60% of the lakes are estimated to have an ANC less than or equal to50 ..mu..eq/L, and 40% of the lakes have a pH less than or equal to5.5, levels believed to be detrimental to some fish species.

  8. Impact of Canadian wildfire smoke on air quality at two rural sites in NY State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Husain, Liaquat; Roychowdhury, Utpal K.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    2011-04-01

    We report high concentrations of black carbon aerosols (BC), present at two rural sites in New York during the last week in May 2010, that are linked to wildfire activity. At Mayville BC from wood smoke was recorded for a total of 20 h from three separate episodes, mean concentration was 1400 ng m -3. These three short events contributed 13% of the BC burden during the month of May. At Whiteface Mountain high concentrations of BC, carbon monoxide gas (CO), and fine particulate matter mass (PM 2.5) are reported from a heavy smoke event that impacted the Adirondack region of the State on May 31, 2010. PM 2.5 mass recorded at the Lodge site (600 m above mean sea level) was 150 μg m -3 at 8:30 am EST and the 24-h mean was almost twice the USEPA limits while CO concentration exceeded 1000 ppb and BC concentration reached 9600 ng m -3. The event was delayed several hours at the Summit site (1500 m above mean sea level) but at 5:45 pm BC concentration reached 1600 ng m -3 and CO was 317 ppbv. Detailed temporal profiles and correlations are presented.

  9. Acid-rain related reconnaissance of water, rock, soil, and sediment chemistry in the Adirondacks during Fall, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This study suggests strongly that inorganic chemical processes, with sulfate and nitrate input from atmospheric deposition and the absence of buffering from carbonate rock, cannot simply account for either the pH or the aluminum concentrations observed in Adirondack surface waters. Instead, organic acids originating from water flow through organic soil layers and wetlands are indicated as possible causes of increased acidity and aluminum concentrations. There are also indications that sulfides in bedrock and the sulfur utilized by vegetation may be important surface-water sulfate sources. Further, in part of the Adirondacks, weathering of calcium-containing non-carbonate aluminosilicate bedrock apparently keeps surface water from reaching ''critical'' acidity levels. Also, appreciable concentrations of heavy metals and persistent insecticides associated with the organic material in some soils and sediments. If mobilized into the food chain, these materials could be causing adverse ecological effects usually attributed to acid precipitation. Recommendations are included for further studies. 13 figs., 29 tabs. (PSB)

  10. Concentration and flux of solutes from snow and forest floor during snowmelt in the West-Central Adirondack region of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rascher, C.M.; Driscoll, C.T.; Peters, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    Decreases in pH and increases in the concentration of Al and NO3- have been observed in surface waters draining acid-sensitive regions in the northeastern U.S. during spring snowmelt. To assess the source of this acidity, we evaluated solute concentrations in snowpack, and in meltwater collected from snow and forest floor lysimeters in the west-central Adirondack Mountains of New York during the spring snowmelt period, 29 March through 15 April 1984. During the initial phase of snowmelt, ions were preferentially leached from the snowpack resulting in elevated concentrations in snowmelt water (e.g. H+ = 140 ??eq.l-1; NO42- = 123 ??eq.l-1; SO3- = 160 ??eq.l-1). Solute concentrations decreased dramatically within a few days of the initial melt (< 50 ??eq.l-1). The concentrations of SO42- and NO3- in snowpack and snowmelt water were similar, whereas NO-3 in the forest floor leachate was at least two times the concentration of SO42-. Study results suggest that the forest floor was a sink for snowmelt inputs of alkalinity, and a net source of H+, NO3-, dissolved organic carbon, K+ and Al inputs to the mineral soil. The forest floor was relatively conservative with respect to snowmelt inputs of Ca2+, SO42- and Cl-. These results indicate that mineralization of N, followed by nitrification in the forest floor may be an important process contributing to elevated concentrations of H+ and NO3- in streams during the snowmelt period. ?? 1987 Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  11. Chloride cycling in two forested lake watersheds in the west-central Adirondack Mountains, New York, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.

    1991-01-01

    The chemistry of precipitation, throughfall, soil water, ground water, and surface water was evaluated in two forested lake-watersheds over a 4-yr period to assess factors controlling C1- cycling. Results indicate that C1- cycling in these watersheds is more complex than the generally held view of the rapid transport of atmospherically derived C1- through the ecosystem. The annual throughfall Cl- flux for individual species in the northern hardwood forest was 2 to 5 times that of precipitation (56 eq ha-1), whereas the Na+ throughfall flux, in general, was similar to the precipitation flux. Concentrations of soil-water Cl- sampled from ceramic tension lysimeters at 20 cm below land surface generally exceeded the Na+ concentrations and averaged 31 ??eq L-1, the highest of any waters sampled in the watersheds, except throughfall under red spruce which averaged 34 ??eq L-1. Chloride was concentrated prior to storms and mobilized rapidly during storms as suggested by increases in streamwater Cl- concentrations with increasing flow. Major sources of Cl- in both watersheds are the forest floor and hornblende weathering in the soils and till. In the Panther Lake watershed, which contains mainly thick deposits of till( > 3 m), hornblende weathering results in a net Cl- flux 3 times greater than that in the Woods Lake watershed, which contains mainly thin deposits of till. The estimated accumulation rate of Cl- in the biomass of the two watersheds was comparable to the precipitation Cl- flux.The chemistry of precipitation, throughfall, soil water, ground water, and surface water was evaluated in two forested lake-watersheds over a 4-yr period to assess factors controlling Cl- cycling. Results indicate that Cl- cycling in these watersheds is more complex than the generally held view of the rapid transport of atmospherically derived Cl- through the excosystem. The annual throughfall Cl- flux for individual species in the northern hardwood forest was 2 to 5 times that of precipitation (56 eq ha-1), whereas the Na+ throughfall flux, in general, was similar to the precipitation flux. Concentrations of soil-water Cl- sampled from ceramic tension lysimeters at 20 cm below land surface generally exceeded the Na+ concentrations and averaged 31 ??eq L-1, the highest of any waters sampled in the watersheds, except throughfall under red spruce which averaged 34 ??eq L-1. Chloride was concentrated prior to storms and mobilized rapidly during storms as suggested by increases in streamwater Cl- concentrations with increasing flow. Major sources of Cl- in both watersheds are the forest floor and hornblende weathering in the soils and till. In the Panther Lake watershed, which contains mainly thick deposits of till (> 3 m), hornblende weathering results in a net Cl- flux 3 times greater than that in the Woods Lake watershed, which contains mainly thin deposits of till. The estimated accumulation rate of Cl- in the biomass of the two watersheds was comparable to the precipitation Cl- flux.

  12. EEI contests N.Y. concerns with allowance trading scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1993-07-07

    A utility industry analyst has challenged charges that sulfur dioxide emissions allowance trading may be environmentally damaging, citing studies showing no harmful increases in acid deposition due to simulated interstate allowance transactions. Contrary to allegations by New York state officials, John Kinsman of the Edison Electric Institute said existing studies indicate the Adirondacks and other sensitive Northeast ecosystems actually may benefit from SO{sub 2} emissions allowance trading. In particular, studies done by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program suggest allowance trading could marginally reduce acid deposition in the Adirondacks below levels already expected under the federal SO{sub 2} emissions reduction program for utilities, said Kinsman, an environmental scientists at EEI.

  13. Hydrology of a Riparian Wetland in the Adirondacks of New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R. M.; Hodo, R. M.; Pufall, A.

    2001-12-01

    A riparian wetland in the Sunday Lake watershed located in the western Adirondack region of New York State was instrumented as part of a study of mercury in Adirondack wetlands, lakes and terrestrial systems. Multiple arrays of shallow groundwater piezometers were installed adjacent to the inlet stream and along the shore of Sunday Lake. Four dataloggers equipped with pressure transducers continuously monitor groundwater stage at 4 of the piezometers and surface water stage at 3 gage stations. In addition, rainfall (tipping bucket), air temperature and water temperature (thermisters) are also monitored at these sites. Water samples are taken monthly from all piezometers and surface waters and analyzed for major ion chemistry as well as 18O and deuterium. Head measurements show that the riparian wetlands discharge water to the streams from surrounding areas of stratified drift throughout most of the year. During baseflow periods in the growing season, water levels in piezometers display a daily oscillation in stage of as much as 3 cm due to evapotranspiration. During hydrologic events the groundwater flow system in the riparian wetland can be reversed with water from the stream flowing into the groundwater system. Groundwater hydrographs show a rapid rise in stage associated with rapid infiltration from rainfall or snowmelt events. This is immediately followed by a rapid decline and then a slow rise. The slow rise appears to be due to infiltration of stream water into the groundwater during peak stream flow. The peak in the stream hydrograph occurs well after (10-12 hrs) the initial rise in groundwater stage. The reversal of hydraulic gradient during the peak stream flow extends completely across the riparian wetland and a rise in groundwater stage due to stream infiltration has been detected in piezometers located as far as 30 meters from the stream. The shallow riparian groundwater, like the surface waters, is chemically dilute (specific conductance <40 μ S

  14. Stone Mountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This color image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the part of the rock outcrop dubbed Stone Mountain at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Scientists are examining Stone Mountain with the instruments on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' in search of clues about the composition of the rock outcrop. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A Patch of Stone (Figure credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS)

    The colorless square in this color image of the martian rock formation called Stone Mountain is one portion of the rock being analyzed with tools on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The square area is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. Stone Mountain is located within the rock outcrop on Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  15. Mountain research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The newly incorporated International Mountain Society (IMS) will in May begin publication of an interdisciplinary scientific journal, Mountain Research and Development. The quarterly will be copublished with the United National University; additional support will come from UNESCO.A primary objective of IMS is to ‘help solve mountain land-use problems by developing a foundation of scientific and technical knowledge on which to base management decisions,’ according to Jack D. Ives, president of the Boulder-based organization. ‘The Society is strongly committed to the belief that a rational worldwide approach to mountain problems must involve a wide range of disciplines in the natural and human sciences, medicine, architecture, engineering, and technology.’

  16. U-Pb zircon geochronology and evolution of some Adirondack meta-igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclelland, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    An update was presented of the recent U-Pb isotope geochronology and models for evolution of some of the meta-igneous rocks of the Adirondacks, New York. Uranium-lead zircon data from charnockites and mangerites and on baddeleyite from anorthosite suggest that the emplacement of these rocks into a stable crust took place in the range 1160 to 1130 Ma. Granulite facies metamorphism was approximately 1050 Ma as indicated by metamorphic zircon and sphene ages of the anorthosite and by development of magmatitic alaskitic gneiss. The concentric isotherms that are observed in this area are due to later doming. However, an older contact metamorphic aureole associated with anorthosite intrusion is observed where wollastonite develops in metacarbonates. Zenoliths found in the anorthosite indicate a metamorphic event prior to anorthosite emplacement. The most probable mechanism for anorthosite genesis is thought to be ponding of gabbroic magmas at the Moho. The emplacement of the anorogenic anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite suite was apparently bracketed by compressional orogenies.

  17. Long-term pCO2 trends in Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, David A.; Gudasz, Cristian

    2016-05-01

    Lakes are globally significant sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, there are few temporally resolved records of lake CO2 concentrations and long-term patterns are poorly characterized. We evaluated annual trends in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) based on chemical measurements from 31 Adirondack Lakes taken monthly over an 18 year period. All lakes were supersaturated with CO2 and were sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. There were significant pCO2 trends in 29% of lakes. The median magnitude of significant positive trends was 32.1 µatm yr-1. Overall, 52% of lakes had pCO2 trends greater than those reported for the atmosphere and ocean. Significant trends in lake pCO2 were attributable to regional recovery from acid deposition and changing patterns of ice cover. These results illustrate that lake pCO2 can respond rapidly to environmental change, but the lack of significant trend in 71% of lakes indicates substantial lake-to-lake variation in magnitude of response.

  18. Late Quaternary history of the southwestern St. Lawrence Lowlands and adjacent Adirondack Highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Pair, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The reconstruction of Late Wisconsinan ice retreat, proglacial lakes, and Champlain Sea history from the northwest Adirondack slope and adjacent St. Lawrence Lowlands is critical to the synthesis of a regional picture of deglacial events in the eastern Great Lakes region. Unfortunately, these same areas are well known for their limited exposures, landforms covered by thick forest, large tracts of land inaccessible to detailed field mapping, and the overall paucity of glacial materials preserved on upland surfaces. Despite these limitations, a model which utilizes multiple and field-truthed evidence has been used to designate areas where ice border deposits indicate a substantial recessional position. It employs the following criteria in this analysis: sedimentology and morphostratigraphy of morainal landform segments and related sediments; orientation and continuity of ice border drainage channels; and the relationship of ice borders and drainage systems to well documented local and regional water bodies which accompanied ice retreat. The results of this approach have provided a unique regional picture of deglaciation. Despite the inherent limitations of working in upland areas to reconstruct glacial events, detailed morphostratigraphic correlations based on multiple lines of evidence can yield important information. The positions of five former ice borders have been reconstructed from the available data. These ice margins correspond closely with those documented previously by others adjoining areas. This type of study, utilizing multiple and field-truthed lines of evidence, constitutes a tangible step towards understanding the nature and history of ice retreat along this portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  19. Chemical variations within a metagabbro, N. W. Adirondack lowlands, N. Y

    SciTech Connect

    Von Derau, G.D. Jr.; Van Brocklin, M.F. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    A metagabbro located in the N.W. Adirondack lowlands has been examined in order to study the chemical changes that occur from the edge of the body into the core. Samples were collected from within a mine adit starting near the contact of the country rock and going into the metagabbro for a distance of 65 feet. The country rock contains an assemblage of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, quartz, biotite, apatite and magnetite. The metagabbro contains an assemblage of plagioclase, hornblende, clinopyroxene, biotite, quartz, sphene, apatite and opaques. Chemical data show a decrease of SiO[sub 2] and K[sub 2]O from the edge of the metagabbro towards the center, and an increase in CaO, Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3], MgO, TiO[sub 2], P[sub 2]O[sub 5], Ni, V, and Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], and Na[sub 2]O content remain nearly constant. Hand samples stained with sodium cobaltinitrite also reflect decreasing K[sub 2]O towards the core of the body. These chemical gradations may be due to metasomatism, assimilation of country rock or true compositional zoning during crystallization of an alkali-rich gabbro.

  20. Hydraulic and biochemical gradients limit wetland mercury supply to an Adirondack stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Burns, Douglas A.; Harvey, Judson; Journey, Celeste A.; Brigham, Mark E.; Murray, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Net fluxes (change between upstream and downstream margins) for water, methylmercury (MeHg), total mercury (THg), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and chloride (Cl) were assessed twice in an Adirondack stream reach (Sixmile Brook, USA), to test the hypothesized importance of wetland-stream hydraulic and chemical gradients as fundamental controls on fluvial mercury (Hg) supply. The 500 m study reach represented less than 4% of total upstream basin area. During a snowmelt high-flow event in May 2009 surface water, DOC, and chloride fluxes increased by 7.1±1.3%, 8.0±1.3%, and 9.0±1.3%, respectively, within the reach, demonstrating that the adjacent wetlands are important sources of water and solutes to the stream. However, shallow groundwater Hg concentrations lower than in the surface water limited groundwater-surface water Hg exchange and no significant changes in Hg (filtered MeHg and THg) fluxes were observed within the reach despite the favorable hydraulic gradient. In August 2009, the lack of significant wetland-stream hydraulic gradient resulted in no net flux of water or solutes (MeHg, THg, DOC, or Cl) within the reach. The results are consistent with the wetland-Hg-source hypothesis and indicate that hydraulic and chemical gradient (direction and magnitude) interactions are fundamental controls on the supply of wetland Hg to the stream.

  1. Assessment of the economic magnitude of environmental damage from acid precipitation in the Adirondacks

    SciTech Connect

    Menz, F.C.; Mullen, J.K.

    1983-05-01

    This research represents one of a few initial attempts to quantify economic damages resulting from increased acidification of lakes and ponds ostensibly due to acidic deposition. The focus of this research is the loss in economic welfare resulting from diminished recreational angling opportunities within the Adirondack fishery. An amended travel-cost model was applied to a survey of licensed anglers in New York State to determine the economic value of the fishery prior to the general acknowledgement of widespread acidification damages. Data pertaining to those water bodies that have become acidified were used together with the parameters of the empirical model to generate the change in visitation and economic value resulting from increased acidification. Annual losses in economic value due to the acidification-related reduction in recreational angling opportunities were estimated to be in the range of $1.6 to 3.2 million. These estimates should be interpreted as a lower bound of the actual social losses incurred annually from acidification damages to this freshwater ecosystem. 6 references.

  2. U-Pb zircon geochronology and evolution of some Adirondack meta-igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLelland, J. M.

    An update was presented of the recent U-Pb isotope geochronology and models for evolution of some of the meta-igneous rocks of the Adirondacks, New York. Uranium-lead zircon data from charnockites and mangerites and on baddeleyite from anorthosite suggest that the emplacement of these rocks into a stable crust took place in the range 1160 to 1130 Ma. Granulite facies metamorphism was approximately 1050 Ma as indicated by metamorphic zircon and sphene ages of the anorthosite and by development of magmatitic alaskitic gneiss. The concentric isotherms that are observed in this area are due to later doming. However, an older contact metamorphic aureole associated with anorthosite intrusion is observed where wollastonite develops in metacarbonates. Zenoliths found in the anorthosite indicate a metamorphic event prior to anorthosite emplacement. The most probable mechanism for anorthosite genesis is thought to be ponding of gabbroic magmas at the Moho. The emplacement of the anorogenic anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite suite was apparently bracketed by compressional orogenies.

  3. Surficial geologic controls on the sensitivity of two Adirondack lakes to acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, R.M.; April, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Lakes in two watersheds located in the western Adirondacks have responded differently to similar inputs of acid precipitation. The sensitivities of these two lakes to acidification result from differences in the surficial geology of their watersheds. Woods Lake (pH 4.4-5.1) watershed is composed of dominantly thin till (< 3 m) and bedrock with a thin veneer of aeolian silt in the soil horizons. Panther Lake (pH 5-7.5) watershed is covered wtih predominantly thick till (> 3 m). The hydrologic and physical properties of the surficial materials determine the flow paths along which water flows in its journey to the lake. The thin till and aeolian silt in Woods Lake watershed forces most of the water to flow through the upper soil horizons whereas in Panther Lake watershed the thick and more permeable till allows much deeper ground water flow. Acid water moving along the ground water flow path is neutralized by mineral weathering and cation exchange reactions. In Panther Lake watershed sufficient water moves along this flow path to keep the lake waters neutral most of the year.

  4. Taconic deformation and metasomatism in Proterozoic rocks of the easternmost Adirondacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, P. R.; Davin, M. T.

    1987-06-01

    Proterozoic gneiss exposed in readcuts between Fort Ann and Whitehall, New York, is close to the Precambrian/Paleozoic unconformity. It exhibits several features not previously described in Adirondack rocks. These (features include (1) extensive slickensides (azimuth 120° 150°, plunge 0° 30°, southeast-over-northwest sense of movement) on preexisting foliation surfaces; (2) coexistence of calcite marbles that contain granulite facies mineral assemblages with dolomite marbles that contain dolomite, quartz, microcline, and serpentine in unreacted mutual contact; (3) ferroan dolomite that fills veins, faults, and fractures and occurs in thin, foliation-parallel lamellae in gneiss; and (4) minerals of probable low-temperature origin (adularia, celadonite, and cherty silica) that fill veins and interstitial spaces in gneiss and marbles. We suggest that these features can best be explained by minor rotational shear deformation during the Taconic orogeny, accompanied by local metasomatism caused by Mg-rich connate brines expelled from Cambrian Ordovician sedimentary rocks by overriding Taconic thrust slices.

  5. Chemistry and transport of soluble humic substances in forested watersheds of the Adirondack Park, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronan, C.S.; Aiken, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted in conjunction with the Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) to examine the chemistry and leaching patterns of soluble humic substances in forested watersheds of the Adirondack region. During the summer growing season, mean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the ILWAS watersheds ranged from 21-32 mg C l-1 in O/A horizon leachates, from 5-7 mg C l-1 in B horizon leachates, from 2-4 mg C l-1 in groundwater solutions, from 6-8 mg C l-1 in first order streams, from 3-8 mg C l-1 in lake inlets, and from 2-7 mg C l-1 in lake outlets. During the winter, mean DOC concentrations dropped significantly in the upper soil profile. Soil solutions from mixed and coniferous stands contained as much as twice the DOC concentration of lysimeter samples from hardwood stands. Results of DOC fractionation analysis showed that hydrophobia and hydrophilic acids dominate the organic solute composition of natural waters in these watersheds. Charge balance and titration results indicated that the general acid-base characteristics of the dissolved humic mixture in these natural waters can be accounted for by a model organic acid having an averagepKa of 3.85, an average charge density of 4-5 ??eq mg-1 C at ambient pH, and a total of 6-7 meq COOH per gram carbon. ?? 1985.

  6. Development of LANDSAT Derived Forest Cover Information for Integration into Adirondack Park GIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, R. P.; Banta, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Based upon observed changes in timber harvest practices partially attributable to forest biomass removable for energy supply purposes, the Adirondack Park Agency began in 1979 a multi-year project to implement a digital geographic information system (GIS). An initial developmental task was an inventory of forest cover information and analysis of forest resource change and availability. While developing the GIS, a pilot project was undertaken to evaluate the usefulness of LANDSAT derived land cover information for this purpose, and to explore the integration of LANDSAT data into the GIS. The prototype LANDSAT analysis project involved: (1) the use of both recent and historic data to derive land cover information for two dates; and (2) comparison of land cover over time to determine quantitative and geographic changes. The "recent data," 1978 full foliage data over portions of four LANDSAT scenes, was classified, using ground truth derived training samples in various forested and non-forested categories. Forested categories include the following: northern hardwoods, pine, spruce-fir, and pine plantation, while nonforested categories include wet-conifer, pasture, grassland, urban, exposed soil, agriculture, and water.

  7. Chemistry and transport of soluble humic substances in forested watersheds of the Adirondack Park, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronan, Christopher S.; Aiken, George R.

    1985-08-01

    Studies were conducted in conjunction with the Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) to examine the chemistry and leaching patterns of soluble humic substances in forested watersheds of the Adirondack region. During the summer growing season, mean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the ILWAS watersheds ranged from 21-32 mg C l-1 in O/A horizon leachates, from 5-7 mg C l-1 in B horizon leachates, from 2-4 mg C l-1 in groundwater solutions, from 6-8 mg C l-1 in first order streams, from 3-8 mg C l-1 in lake inlets, and from 2-7 mg C l-1 in lake outlets. During the winter, mean DOC concentrations dropped significantly in the upper soil profile. Soil solutions from mixed and coniferous stands contained as much as twice the DOC concentration of lysimeter samples from hardwood stands. Results of DOC fractionation analysis showed that hydrophobia and hydrophilic acids dominate the organic solute composition of natural waters in these watersheds. Charge balance and titration results indicated that the general acid-base characteristics of the dissolved humic mixture in these natural waters can be accounted for by a model organic acid having an averagepKa of 3.85, an average charge density of 4-5 μeq mg-1 C at ambient pH, and a total of 6-7 meq COOH per gram carbon.

  8. Juvenile Middle Proterozoic crust in the Adirondack Highlands, Grenville province, northeastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, J.S. ); McLelland, J.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Nd isotope data indicate that minimal amounts of significantly older crust have contributed to the genesis of the oldest (ca. 1.3-13.5 Ga) plutons in the Adirondack Highlands. These are magmatic arc tonalites with positive initial {epsilon}{sub Nd} values and Sm-Nd depleted mantle model ages (t{sub DM}) that are within 70 m.y. of the time of their crystallization. Granitoids of the anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite suite, dated at 1,156-1,134 Ma, as well as the 1,100-1,050 Ma plutons, associated with the Ottawan phase of the Grenvillian orogenic cycle, also have positive initial {epsilon}{sub Nd} values and t{sub DM} ages similar to the tonalites. Derivation of both groups of granitoids by crustal melting of the magmatic arc is consistent with the available isotopic and geochemical data. Juvenile late Middle Proterozoic crust that formed during or just prior to the Grenville cycle appears to dominate the southwestern Grenville province as well as the Grenville inliers to the south. In contrast, most of the contiguous Grenville province in Canada comprises largely reworked older crust.

  9. Sedimentology of basal Potsdam sandstone in Adirondack border region, New York, southeastern Ontario, and southwestern Quebec

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, L.E.; Johnson, G.D.

    1986-05-01

    Field evidence supports the relatively widespread presence of nonmarine facies within the basal Potsdam formation of the Adirondack border areas of northern New York, southeastern Ontario, and southwestern Quebec. Detailed observations of areal extent, analysis of sedimentary structures and paleocurrent directions, and petrographic studies have been combined with the paleomagnetic determination of the temporal relationships of these strata to establish depositional patterns and facies trends within basal Potsdam units. Four distinct nonmarine lithofacies have been identified: massive matrix-supported conglomerate, stratified framework-supported conglomerate, conglomerate-arkose, and pebble conglomerate-arkose fining-upward sequences, interpreted to represent debris flows, proximal gravelly braided-stream deposits, intermediate to distal gravelly braided-stream deposits, and proximal sandy braided-stream deposits, respectively. Facies of eolian or possibly tidal, and shallow marine origin have also been identified at the base of the Potsdam sequence. Most basal Potsdam sediments are compositionally and texturally immature, derived directly from the crystalline detritus of the extensively weathered Precambrian surface and regoliths that may have locally developed on the craton. The desert-like environment of the Precambrian surface allowed for rapid transport and deposition of relatively unweathered sediments and the subsequent construction of a braided alluvial plain system. Field relations and evidence derived from consideration of the paleomagnetic properties in five localities of fine-grained alluvium suggest that terrestrial Potsdam deposition in the Early and Middle Cambrian largely preceded the marine transgression that deposited the thick, shallow marine units typifying most of the Potsdam sequence.

  10. HAER NY,55GRO,1 (sheet 3 of 3) AveryBartholomew Patent Railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HAER NY,55-GRO,1- (sheet 3 of 3) - Avery-Bartholomew Patent Railroad Iron Bridge, Town park south of Route 222, west of Owasco Inlet (moved from Elm Street Extension spanning Fall Creek, Nubia, NY), Groton, Tompkins County, NY

  11. HAER NY,55GRO,1 (sheet 2 of 3) AveryBartholomew Patent Railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HAER NY,55-GRO,1- (sheet 2 of 3) - Avery-Bartholomew Patent Railroad Iron Bridge, Town park south of Route 222, west of Owasco Inlet (moved from Elm Street Extension spanning Fall Creek, Nubia, NY), Groton, Tompkins County, NY

  12. HAER NY,55GRO,1 (sheet 1 of 3) AveryBartholomew Patent Railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HAER NY,55-GRO,1- (sheet 1 of 3) - Avery-Bartholomew Patent Railroad Iron Bridge, Town park south of Route 222, west of Owasco Inlet (moved from Elm Street Extension spanning Fall Creek, Nubia, NY), Groton, Tompkins County, NY

  13. Caucasus Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Often regarded as the southeastern border of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains can be seen here stretching from the Black Sea (left) to the Caspian Sea (right). The mountain range spans 700 miles (1125 km), crossing the countries of Russian Federation, Georgia, and Azerbaijan from left to right respectively. With a snowline of approximately 11,000 feet and peaks such as Mt. Elbrus, that reach 15,000 feet, much of the snow visible in this image is present year round. Also visible in this image are apparent phytoplankton blooms in the Caspian Sea, marked by blue-green swirls.

  14. NY-ESO-1 specific antibody and cellular responses in melanoma patients primed with NY-ESO-1 protein in ISCOMATRIX and boosted with recombinant NY-ESO-1 fowlpox virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Li; Dawoodji, Amina; Tarlton, Andrea; Gnjatic, Sacha; Tajar, Abdelouahid; Karydis, Ioannis; Browning, Judy; Pratap, Sarah; Verfaille, Christian; Venhaus, Ralph R; Pan, Linda; Altman, Douglas G; Cebon, Jonathan S; Old, Lloyd L; Nathan, Paul; Ottensmeier, Christian; Middleton, Mark; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-15

    Vaccination strategies based on repeated injections of NY-ESO-1 protein formulated in ISCOMATRIX particles (NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX) have shown to elicit combined NY-ESO-1 specific antibody and T cell responses. However, it remains unclear whether heterologous prime-boost strategies based on the combination with NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX with different NY-ESO-1 boosting reagents could be used to increase NY-ESO-1 CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cell responses. To address this question, we carried out a randomized clinical trial in 39 high-risk, resected melanoma patients vaccinated with NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX, and then boosted with repeated injections of either recombinant fowlpox virus encoding full length NY-ESO-1 (rF-NY-ESO-1) (Arm A) or NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX alone (Arm B). We have comprehensively analyzed NY-ESO-1 specific T cells and B cells response in all patients before and after vaccination for a total of seven time points per patient. NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX alone elicited a strong NY-ESO-1 specific CD4(+) T cell and antibody response, which was maintained by both regiments at similar levels. However, CD8(+) T cell responses were significantly boosted in 3 out of 18 patients in Arm A after the first rF-NY-ESO-1 injection and such responses were maintained until the end of the trial, while no patients in Arm B showed similar CD8(+) T cell responses. In addition, our results clearly identified immunodominant regions in the NY-ESO-1 protein: NY-ESO-179-102 and NY-ESO-1115-138 for CD4+ T cells and NY-ESO-185-108 for CD8+ T cells in a large proportion of vaccinated patients. These regions of NY-ESO-1 protein should be considered in future clinical trials as immunodominant epitopes. PMID:25081390

  15. 33 CFR 110.136 - Lake Champlain, NY and VT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Champlain, NY and VT. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.136 Lake Champlain, NY and VT. (a) Burlington Harbor... North American Datum 83. (2) No vessel greater than 35 feet in length may use this anchorage and...

  16. 77 FR 22530 - Safety Zone; Fireworks, Hudson River, Rhinecliff, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not plan now to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fireworks, Hudson River, Rhinecliff, NY..., NY for a fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and...

  17. 33 CFR 110.59 - Eastern Long Island, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eastern Long Island, NY. 110.59 Section 110.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.59 Eastern Long Island, NY. (a) Huntington...

  18. 33 CFR 110.59 - Eastern Long Island, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eastern Long Island, NY. 110.59 Section 110.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.59 Eastern Long Island, NY. (a) Huntington...

  19. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  20. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  1. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84b Section 110.84b Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as...

  2. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84b Section 110.84b Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as...

  3. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Explosives Anchorage A. Inside the south...

  4. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  5. 33 CFR 110.136 - Lake Champlain, NY and VT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Champlain, NY and VT. 110.136 Section 110.136 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.136 Lake Champlain, NY and VT. (a) Burlington...

  6. 46 CFR 7.30 - New York Harbor, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false New York Harbor, NY. 7.30 Section 7.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.30 New York Harbor, NY. A line drawn from East Rockaway Inlet Breakwater Light to Ambrose...

  7. 46 CFR 7.30 - New York Harbor, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false New York Harbor, NY. 7.30 Section 7.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.30 New York Harbor, NY. A line drawn from East Rockaway Inlet Breakwater Light to Ambrose...

  8. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  9. A New Twist on the Seasonality of Nitrate Retention and Release in Adirondack Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. B.; Ross, D. S.; Sutherland, J. W.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S.; Boylen, C.

    2004-12-01

    Release of nitrate to surface waters in the Northeast has a distinct seasonality that is generally explained by high retention from plant uptake during the growing season, and low retention during the non-growing season, when biological demand is low and soil- water flux is elevated in the absence of transpiration. In the Adirondack region of New York, the highest rates of release, which consistently occur during spring snowmelt, are considered to be the result of nitrate accumulation in the soil and snowpack over the winter. This explanation implies that plants out compete nitrifying bacteria for available ammonium during the growing season. Biweekly and automated high-flow sampling over five years in two tributaries of Buck Creek, in the western Adirondacks, however, has revealed inconsistencies with the conventional view of nitrate retention and release. Although low concentrations of nitrate were measured in stream water during the growing season, concentrations were lowest each year in mid October (near the completion of leaf drop) in the North tributary, and were either the lowest or second lowest each year in mid October in the South tributary. Furthermore, concentrations of nitrate in both watersheds remained elevated throughout the snowmelt periods despite sustained high flows. For example, the concentration in the South tributary on April 9th, 2001, (the initial stage of snowmelt) was 76 micromoles per liter, and on April 24th (following two of the three largest flow events over the 5 years of sampling), was 82 micromoles per liter. Flushing of nitrate stored in the soil over the winter would result in a peak concentration in the stream that would be followed by a rapid decrease. To explain these results we hypothesize a three-way competition that includes heterotrophic non-nitrifying bacteria, as well as plants and autotrophic nitrifying bacteria. Leaf drop in the fall provides a large input of labile carbon with a high C to N ratio (>20) that favors

  10. Magnificent Mountains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Heather

    2004-01-01

    One way to increase awareness of endangered national heritage is to teach youth the importance of the land through the study of selected works of art. This article describes a lesson, in which students will study the work of Thomas Moran and create a mountain range collage. A short biography of Thomas Moran is included.

  11. Comanagement of wildlife corridors: the case for citizen participation in the Algonquin to Adirondack proposal.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca; Harris, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    The debate between top-down and bottom-up planning has recently re-emerged in environmental management. Many commentators agree on the merits of comanagement, in which affected citizens and professional managers share responsibility for planning. Nevertheless, the manifold advantages of comanagement have not always been fully appreciated in environmental planning. For example, a group representing NGOs and academic institutions recently proposed an ecological corridor linking Algonquin Provincial Park in southern Ontario to the Adirondack Park in northern New York. This corridor, known as A2A, was designed to encourage the migration of wolves and other wildlife between the parks. Much of the land in A2A is private property. A survey of households, randomly scattered throughout the United States portion of the corridor, revealed that affected landowners had little knowledge of the proposal and no contact with its advocates. Many respondents were farmers who utilized land for livelihood. Other landowners enjoyed property for a variety of recreational purposes. Regardless of use, survey participants placed high value on the importance of conserving biological diversity. They also expressed great distrust toward restrictions that might be placed on their activities. In general, respondents felt very unsure about A2A, and they were uncertain about personal involvement in the planning process. Certain landowners indicated a willingness to have their land be included in an ecological corridor, despite not knowing about it before the survey was administered. These results suggest that A2A proponents have little to lose and much to gain by disseminating information locally and by embracing comanagement for further formulation of this plan. PMID:15627463

  12. Hydrogeologic controls of surface-water chemistry in the Adirondack region of New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Driscoll, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    Relationships between surface-water discharge, water chemistry, and watershed geology were investigated to evaluate factors affecting the sensitivity of drainage waters in the Adirondack region of New York to acidification by atmospheric deposition. Instantaneous discharge per unit area was derived from relationships between flow and staff-gage readings at 10 drainage basins throughout the region. The average chemical composition of the waters was assessed from monthly samples collected from July 1982 through July 1984. The ratio of flow at the 50-percent exceedence level to the flow at the 95-percent exceedence level of flow duration was negatively correlated with mean values of alkalinity or acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), sum of basic cations (SBC), and dissolved silica, for basins containing predominantly aluminosilicate minerals and little or no carbonate-bearing minerals. Low ratios are indicative of systems in which flow is predominately derived from surface- and ground-water storage, whereas high ratios are characteristic of watersheds with variable flow that is largely derived from surface runoff. In an evaluation of two representative surface-water sites, concentrations of ANC, SBC, and dissolved silica, derived primarily from soil mineral weathering reactions. decreased with increasing flow. Furthermore, the ANC was highest at low flow when the percentage of streamflow derived from ground water was maximum. As flow increased, the ANC decreased because the contribution of dilute surface runoff and lateral flow through the shallow acidic soil horizons to total flow increased. Basins having relatively high ground-water contributions to total flow, in general, have large deposits of thick till or stratified drift. A major factor controlling the sensitivity of these streams and lakes to acidification is the relative contribution of ground water to total discharge. ?? 1987 Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  13. Charnockites and granites of the western Adirondacks, New York, USA: a differentiated A-type suite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    Granitic rocks in the west-central Adirondack Highlands of New York State include both relatively homogeneous charnockitic and hornblende granitic gneisses (CG), that occur in thick stratiform bodies and elliptical domes, and heterogeneous leucogneisses (LG), that commonly are interlayered with metasedimentary rocks. Major- and trace-element geochemical analyses were obtained for 115 samples, including both types of granitoids. Data for CG fail to show the presence of more than one distinct group based on composition. Most of the variance within the CG sample population is consistent with magmatic differentiation combined with incomplete separation of early crystals of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, and pyroxenes or amphibole from the residual liquid. Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca, P, Sr, Ba, and Zr decrease with increasing silica, while Rb and K increase. Within CG, the distinction between charnockitic (orthopyroxene-bearing) and granitic gneisses is correlated with bulk chemistry. The charnockites are consistently more mafic than the hornblende granitic gneisses, although forming a continuum with them. The leucogneisses, while generally more felsic than the charnockites and granitic gneisses, are otherwise geochemically similar to them. The data are consistent with the LG suite being an evolved extrusive equivalent of the intrusive CG suite. Both CG and LG suites are metaluminous to mildly peraluminous and display an A-type geochemical signature, enriched in Fe, K, Ce, Y, Nb, Zr, and Ga and depleted in Ca, Mg, and Sr relative to I- and S-type granites. Rare earth element patterns show moderate LREE enrichment and a negative Eu anomaly throughout the suite. The geochemical data suggest an origin by partial melting of biotite- and plagioclase-rich crustal rocks. Emplacement occurred in an anorogenic or post-collisional tectonic setting, probably at relatively shallow depths. Deformation and granulite-facies metamorphism with some partial melting followed during the Ottawan phase

  14. Importance of within-lake processes in affecting the dynamics of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic and inorganic nitrogen in an Adirondack forested lake/watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P.-G.; Mitchell, M. J.; McHale, P. J.; Driscoll, C. T.; McHale, M. R.; Inamdar, S.; Park, J.-H.

    2015-10-01

    Lakes nested in forested watersheds play important roles in mediating the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic matter. We compared long-term patterns of concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in the Arbutus Lake Watershed to evaluate how a lake nested in a forested watershed affects the dynamics of DOC and DON in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, USA. We observed no significant long-term changes of concentrations and fluxes of DOC and DON in the Lake outlet since 1983 and 1994, respectively. However, the temporal patterns of DOC and DON concentrations in the Lake inlet showed significant seasonality such as increases during the vegetation-growing season along with notable decreases in the dormant season. A comparison of mass-balances between inlet and outlet for the period from 2000 to 2009 suggested that the Lake was a sink of DOC (mean of influx minus outflux: +1140 mol C ha-1 yr-1). In contrast, the difference of discharge-weighted DON concentrations (mean of inlet minus outlet: -1.0 μmol N L-1) between inlet and outlet was much smaller than the discharge-weighted DOC concentrations (average of inlet minus outlet: +87 μmol C L-1). DON fluxes showed considerable variation among years (mean of influx minus outflux: +8 mol N ha-1 yr-1; range of differences: -15 to 27 mol N ha-1 yr-1). DON exhibited low % retention ((influx - outflux) / influx) (mean: 6.9 %, range: -34.8 to +31.2) compared to DOC (mean: 30.1 %, range: +9.2 to +44.1). The resultant increase of DON within the lake was closely linked with a net decrease of DIN through monthly Pearson correlation analysis, suggesting the importance of biotic factors in mediating a lake DON dynamics. Our results show different relative retentions of DOC compared with DON, along with a larger retention of DIN than DON, suggesting that DOC and DON might display substantially different biogeochemical

  15. Importance of within-lake processes in affecting the dynamics of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic and inorganic nitrogen in an Adirondack forested lake/watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Phil-Goo; Mitchell, Myron J.; McHale, Patrick J.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Inamdar, Shreeram; Park, Ji-Hyung

    2016-05-01

    Lakes nested in forested watersheds play an important role in mediating the concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic matter. We compared long-term patterns of concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic (DON) and inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in aquatic ecosystems of the Arbutus Lake watershed to evaluate how a lake nested in a forested watershed affects the sources (e.g., production) and sinks (e.g., retention) of DOC and DON in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, USA. We observed no significant long-term changes of DOC and DON in the lake outlet since 1983 and 1994, respectively. However, the temporal patterns of DOC and DON concentrations in the lake inlet showed significant seasonality such as increases during the vegetation-growing season along with notable decreases in the dormant season. A comparison of mass balances between inlet and outlet for the period from 2000 to 2009 suggested that the lake was a sink of DOC (mean of influx minus outflux: +1140 mol C ha-1 yr-1). In contrast, the difference of discharge-weighted DON concentrations (mean of inlet minus outlet: -1.0 µmol N L-1) between inlet and outlet was much smaller than the discharge-weighted DOC concentrations (average of inlet minus outlet: + 87 µmol C L-1). DON fluxes showed considerable variation among years (mean of influx minus outflux: +8 mol N ha-1 yr-1; range of differences: -15 to 27 mol N ha-1 yr-1). DON exhibited low percent retention ((influx-outflux)/influx) (mean: 6.9 %, range: -34.8 to +31.2) compared to DOC (mean: 30.1 %, range: +9.2 to +44.1). The resultant increase of DON within the lake was closely linked with a net decrease of DIN through monthly Pearson correlation analysis, suggesting the importance of biotic factors in mediating lake DON dynamics. Our results show different relative retentions of DOC compared with DON, along with a larger retention of DIN than DON, suggesting that DOC and DON might display substantially different

  16. Comparison of MAGIC and Diatom paleolimnological model hindcasts of lakewater acidification in the Adirondack region of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Bernert, J.A.; Eliers, J.M. ); Jenne, E.A. ); Cosby, B.J. . School of Forestry and Environmental Studies); Charles, D.F.; Selle, A.R. . Environmental Research Lab.)

    1991-03-01

    Thirty-three lakes that had been statistically selected as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's Eastern Lake Survey and Direct Delayed Response Project (DDRP) were used to compare the MAGIC (watershed) and Diatom (paleolimnological) models. The study lakes represented a well-defined group of Adirondack lakes, each larger than 4 ha in area and having acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) <400 {mu}eq L{sup {minus}1}. The study first compared current and pre-industrial (before 1850) pH and ANC estimates from Diatom and MAGIC as they were calibrated in the preceding Paleocological Investigation of Recent Lake Acidification (PIRLA) and DDRP studies, respectively. Initially, the comparison of hindcasts of pre-industrial chemistry was confounded by seasonal and methodological differences in lake chemistry data used in calibration of the model. Although certain differences proved to be of little significance for comparison, MAGIC did predict significantly higher pre-industrial ANC and pH values than did Diatom, using calibrations in the preceding studies. Both models suggest acidification of low ANC Adirondack region lakes since preindustrial times, but differ primarily in that MAGIC inferred greater acidification and that acidification has occurred in all lakes in the comparison, whereas Diatom inferred that acidification has been restricted to low ANC lakes (

  17. Pre-Grenvillian history of the Adirondacks as an anorogenic, bimodal caldera complex of mid-Proterozoic age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLelland, James M.

    1986-03-01

    The Adirondack highlands are characterized by the coexistence of a distinctive trinity of metaigneous rocks indicative of anorogenic or mild rift-related magmatism: (1) anorthosites and anorthositic gabbros; (2) mangerites, charnockites, and hornblende granites; and (3) alaskitic gneisses. This association, which is referred to as the AMCAL suite, is characterized by high FeO/(FeO + MgO) ratios, chemical trends that range from mildly alkaline to subalkaline and peraluminous, and high concentrations of halogens and rare-earth elements (REE) together with anhydrous assemblages. Outcrop patterns show that the least silicic members of the AMCAL suite tend to occur at structurally low positions, such as anticlinal cores, whereas more silicic members occupy structurally higher positions, such as the flanks of anticlines. It is inferred that this configuration is inherited from relatively high-level, zoned, and bimodal magma chambers cored by mafic rocks successively enveloped by mangeritic, chamockitic, and granitic magmas. Alaskitic gneisses are believed to represent metamorphosed rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs and their subvolcanic equivalents. Geochronologic data suggest an emplacement age of about 1300 Ma for the AMCAL suite and support the inference that prior to the Grenville orogeny, the Adirondacks evolved as part of the belt of mid-Proterozoic, anorogenic and rift-related magmatism that traverses North America and extends into northern Europe.

  18. Sustainability and economics: The Adirondack Park experience, a forest economic-ecological model, and solar energy policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Jon David

    The long-term sustainability of human communities will depend on our relationship with regional environments, our maintenance of renewable resources, and our successful disengagement from nonrenewable energy dependence. This dissertation investigates sustainability at these three levels, following a critical analysis of sustainability and economics. At the regional environment level, the Adirondack Park of New York State is analyzed as a potential model of sustainable development. A set of initial and ongoing conditions are presented that both emerge from and support a model of sustainability in the Adirondacks. From these conditions, a clearer picture emerges of the definition of regional sustainability, consequences of its adoption, and lessons from its application. Next, an economic-ecological model of the northern hardwood forest ecosystem is developed. The model integrates economic theory and intertemporal ecological concepts, linking current harvest decisions with future forest growth, financial value, and ecosystem stability. The results indicate very different economic and ecological outcomes by varying opportunity cost and ecosystem recovery assumptions, and suggest a positive benefit to ecological recovery in the forest rotation decision of the profit maximizing manager. The last section investigates the motives, economics, and international development implications of renewable energy (specifically photovoltaic technology) in rural electrification and technology transfer, drawing on research in the Dominican Republic. The implications of subsidizing a photovoltaic market versus investing in basic research are explored.

  19. Age, field, and petrological relationships of the Hyde School Gneiss, Adirondack lowlands, New York: Criteria for an intrusive igneous origin

    SciTech Connect

    McLelland, J. ); Perham, A. ); Chiarenzelli, J.

    1992-01-01

    Alaskitic and tonalitic rocks constituting Hyde School Gneiss (HSG) occur in 14 domical bodies in the Adirondack lowlands. Recent models have interpreted these bodies as metamorphosed rhyolitic and dacitic ash-flow deposits forming the basal member of a regional stratigraphic package. In contrast, this paper presents criteria and evidence for an intrusive origin for HSG. Field evidence includes intrusion breccias and complex crosscutting relationships involving mafic layers resembling synplutonic dikes. Petrologic constraints supporting an intrusive origin include: (1) the common occurrence of quartz-mesoperthite hypersolvus assemblages; (2) magmatic features in tonalitic, trondhjemitic, and alaskitic facies, (3) local occurrences of orthopyroxene in all facies of HSG; and (4) the development of marginal garnet-sillimanite gneiss with corundum-spinel-garnet-sillimanite assemblages yielding paleotemperatures of 780-810C and interpreted as restite remaining after anatexis of country rock metapelite by intrusions of hypersolvus granitoids. U-Pb zircon ages reported here suggest that the majority of the HSG was intruded at ca. 1230 Ma, contemporaneous with high-grade metamorphic activity in the Adirondacks and elsewhere in the SW sector of the Grenville Province. Geochronological evidence from a leucogranitic rock crosscutting metasediments on Wellesley Island suggest that these metasediments are older than 1416 {plus minus} 5 Ma.

  20. Responses of 20 lake-watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to historical and potential future acidic deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingtao; Driscoll, Charles T; Sullivan, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    Critical loads (CLs) and dynamic critical loads (DCLs) are important tools to guide the protection of ecosystems from air pollution. In order to quantify decreases in acidic deposition necessary to protect sensitive aquatic species, we calculated CLs and DCLs of sulfate (SO4(2-))+nitrate (NO3-) for 20 lake-watersheds from the Adirondack region of New York using the dynamic model, PnET-BGC. We evaluated lake water chemistry and fish and total zooplankton species richness in response to historical acidic deposition and under future deposition scenarios. The model performed well in simulating measured chemistry of Adirondack lakes. Current deposition of SO4(2-)+NO3-, calcium (Ca2+) weathering rate and lake acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in 1850 were related to the extent of historical acidification (1850-2008). Changes in lake Al3+ concentrations since the onset of acidic deposition were also related to Ca2+ weathering rate and ANC in 1850. Lake ANC and fish and total zooplankton species richness were projected to increase under hypothetical decreases in future deposition. However, model projections suggest that lake ecosystems will not achieve complete chemical and biological recovery in the future. PMID:25544337

  1. Calcium Sulfate in Atacama Desert Basalt: A Possible Analog for Bright Material in Adirondack Basalt, Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Amundson, R.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Ming, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Atacama Desert in northern Chile is one of the driest deserts on Earth (< 2mm/y). The hyper-arid conditions allow extraordinary accumulations of sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates in Atacama soils. Examining salt accumulations in the Atacama may assist understanding salt accumulations on Mars. Recent work examining sulfate soils on basalt parent material observed white material in the interior vesicles of surface basalt. This is strikingly similar to the bright-white material present in veins and vesicles of the Adirondack basalt rocks at Gusev Crater which are presumed to consist of S, Cl, and/or Br. The abundance of soil gypsum/anhydrite in the area of the Atacama basalt suggested that the white material consisted of calcium sulfate (Ca-SO4) which was later confirmed by SEM/EDS analysis. This work examines the Ca-SO4 of Atacama basalt in an effort to provide insight into the possible nature of the bright material in the Adirondack basalt of Gusev Crater. The objectives of this work are to (i) discuss variations in Ca-SO4 crystal morphology in the vesicles and (ii) examine the Ca-SO4 interaction(s) with the basalt interior.

  2. EPISODIC ACIDIFICATION AND ASSOCIATED FISH AND BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE RESPONSES OF FOUR ADIRONDACK HEADWATER STREAMS: AN INTERIM REPORT OF THE EPISODIC RESPONSE PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Episodic Response Project (ERP) through cooperation with Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation, Pennsylvania State University, and the U.S. Geological Survey initiated field work in the autumn of 1988 to examine the effects of acidic deposition on aquatic ecosystems. u...

  3. REGIONAL APPLICATION OF A BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODEL (PNET-BGC) TO THE ADIRONDACK REGION OF NEW YORK: RESPONES TO CURRENT AND FUTURE CHANGES IN ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the response of soil and surface waters to changes in atmospheric deposition is critical for guiding future legislation on air pollutants. In this study, the regional response of soil and surface waters in 37 lake watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to c...

  4. [Mountain sickness].

    PubMed

    Bultas, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mountaineering brings many health risks, one of which is mountain sickness. Its mildest form - acute mountain sickness - is mainly characterized by subjective symptoms (headache, loss of appetite, insomnia, weakness, nausea and rarely also vomiting). Advanced and life-threatening forms are characterized by tissue edema - cerebral or pulmonary high altitude edema. The common denominator of these acute forms is the low oxygen tension leading to hypoxemia and tissue ischemia. Sum of maladaptive or adaptive processes can modify the clinical picture. Underlying mechanisms of the chronic forms of pulmonary disease are the adaptation processes - pulmonary hypertension and polycythemia leading to heart failure.The only causal therapeutic intervention is to restore adequate oxygen tension, descend to lower altitudes or oxygen therapy. Pharmacotherapy has only a supportive effect. The prophylaxis includes stimulation of the respiratory center by carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (acetazolamide) antiedematous treatment with glucocorticoids (dexamethasone), increase lymphatic drainage of the lungs and brain by β2-agonists (salmeterol) or mitigation of pulmonary hypertension by calcium channel blockers or phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (sildenafil or tadalafil). PMID:26750624

  5. Estimates of cloud water deposition at Mountain Acid Deposition Program sites in the Appalachian Mountains.

    PubMed

    Baumgardner, Ralph E; Isil, Selma S; Lavery, Thomas F; Rogers, Christopher M; Mohnen, Volker A

    2003-03-01

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high-elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY; Whitetop Mountain, VA; and Clingman's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). This paper provides a summary of cloud water chemistry, cloud liquid water content, cloud frequency, estimates of cloud water deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species, and estimates of total deposition of sulfur and nitrogen at these sites. Other cloud studies in the Appalachians and their comparison to MADPro are also summarized. Whiteface Mountain exhibited the lowest mean and median concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen ions in cloud water, while Clingman's Dome exhibited the highest mean and median concentrations. This geographic gradient is partly an effect of the different meteorological conditions experienced at northern versus southern sites in addition to the difference in pollution content of air masses reaching the sites. All sites measured seasonal cloud water deposition rates of SO4(2-) greater than 50 kg/ha and NO3(-) rates of greater than 25 kg/ha. These high-elevation sites experienced additional deposition loading of SO4(2-) and NO3(-) on the order of 6-20 times greater compared with lower elevation Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) sites. Approximately 80-90% of this extra loading is from cloud deposition. PMID:12661689

  6. RenewableNY - An Industrial Energy Conservation Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Lubarr, Tzipora

    2009-09-30

    The New York Industrial Retention Network (NYIRN) manages the RenewableNY program to assist industrial companies in New York City to implement energy efficiency projects. RenewableNY provides companies with project management assistance and grants to identify opportunities for energy savings and implement energy efficiency projects. The program helps companies identify energy efficient projects, complete an energy audit, and connect with energy contractors who install renewable energy and energy efficient equipment. It also provides grants to help cover the costs of installation for new systems and equipment. RenewableNY demonstrates that a small grant program that also provides project management assistance can incentivize companies to implement energy efficiency projects that might otherwise be avoided. Estimated savings through RenewableNY include 324,500 kWh saved through efficiency installations, 158 kW of solar energy systems installed, and 945 thm of gas avoided.

  7. 75 FR 54419 - Environmental Impact Statement: Queens County, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Queens County, NY AGENCY: Federal Highway... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed Bridge Rehabilitation and Interchange Improvements Project... considered will not have a significant impact on the environment. To address these bridge conditions,...

  8. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84b Section 110... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude...

  9. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84b Section 110.84b Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat...

  10. 33 CFR 110.84b - Buffalo, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo, N.Y. 110.84b Section 110... REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.84b Buffalo, N.Y. The area within the Port of Buffalo known as Port of Buffalo Small Boat Harbor commencing at a point on shore at latitude 42°51′05″ N., longitude...

  11. Trends in summer chemistry linked to productivity in lakes recovering from acid deposition in the Adirondack region of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Momen, B.; Lawrence, G.B.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. A.; Sutherland, J.W.; Eichler, L.W.; Harrison, J.P.; Boylen, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Adirondack Effects Assessment Program (AEAP) to evaluate and monitor the status of biological communities in lakes in the Adirondack region of New York that have been adversely affected by acid deposition. This program includes chemical analysis of 30 lakes, sampled two to three times each summer. Results of trends analysis for lake chemistry and chlorophyll a (chlor a) are presented for 1994 to 2003, and a general comparison is made with recent results of the Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) Program, which included chemical analysis of all but two of these lakes (plus an additional 24 lakes) monthly, year-round for 1992-2004. Increases in pH were found in 25 of the 30 AEAP lakes (P < 0.05) and increases in acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) were found in 12 of the 30 lakes (P < 0.05). Concentrations of both SO 42- and Mg 2+ decreased in 11 lakes (P < 0.05), whereas concentrations of NO 3- decreased in 20 lakes (P < 0.05). Concentrations of NH 4+ decreased in 10 lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and in three other lakes based on P < 0.1. Concentrations of inorganic and organic monomeric aluminum generally were below the reporting limit of 1.5 ??mol L-1, but decreases were detected in four and five lakes, respectively (P < 0.1). Concentrations of chlor a increased in seven lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and two lakes at a significance level of P < 0.1. A significant inverse correlation was also found between chlor a and NO 3- concentrations in nine lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and two lakes at a significance level of P < 0.1. Results of AEAP analysis of lake chemistry were similar to those of the ALTM Program, although decreases in SO 42- concentrations were more evident in the year-round ALTM record. Overall, the results suggest (a) a degree of chemical recovery from acidification during the summer, (b) an increase in phytoplankton productivity, and (c) a decreasing trend in

  12. 2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE SEEN THROUGH SWITCHYARD IN BACKGROUND. 165MM LENS. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  13. A preliminary synthesis of structural, stratigraphic, and magnetic data from part of the northwest Adirondacks, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foose, M.P.; Brown, C. Ervin

    1976-01-01

    Synthesis of recent work in the NW Adirondacks, New York allows the development of a coherent geologic picture. Mapping of the Precambrian rock units enables the recognition of four major units which are, from bottom to top, 1) Granitic Gneiss (alaskite), 2) Lower Marble, 3) Major Gneiss, and 4) Upper Marble. Additionally, lenses of amphibolite and granite occur as intrusives within this succession. These rock units have been complexly deformed by three major folding episodes, and by two distinctly different styles of faulting. The result has been to produce large northeast-southwest trending dome and basin structures. Patterns of magnetic intensity closely parallel distribution of rock units and provide additional information for a structural and stratigraphic synthesis-.

  14. Development of a total maximum daily load (TMDL) for acid-impaired lakes in the Adirondack region of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraei, Habibollah; Driscoll, Charles T.; Selvendiran, Pranesh; DePinto, Joseph V.; Bloomfield, Jay; Quinn, Scott; Rowell, H. Chandler

    2014-10-01

    Acidic deposition has impaired acid-sensitive surface waters in the Adirondack region of New York by decreasing pH and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). In spite of air quality programs over past decades, 128 lakes in the Adirondacks were classified as “impaired” under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act in 2010 due to elevated acidity. The biogeochemical model, PnET-BGC, was used to relate decreases in atmospheric sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition to changes in lake water chemistry. The model was calibrated and confirmed using observed soil and lake water chemistry data and then was applied to calculate the maximum atmospheric deposition that the impaired lakes can receive while still achieving ANC targets. Two targets of ANC were used to characterize the recovery of acid-impaired lakes: 11 and 20 μeq L-1. Of the 128 acid-impaired lakes, 97 currently have ANC values below the target value of 20 μeq L-1 and 83 are below 11 μeq L-1. This study indicates that a moderate control scenario (i.e., 60% decrease from the current atmospheric S load) is projected to recover the ANC of lakes at a mean rate of 0.18 and 0.05 μeq L-1 yr-1 during the periods 2022-2050 and 2050-2200, respectively. The total maximum daily load (TMDL) of acidity corresponding to this moderate control scenario was estimated to be 7.9 meq S m-2 yr-1 which includes a 10% margin of safety.

  15. Specific ultra-violet absorbance as an indicator measurement of merucry sources in an Adirondack River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aiken, George R.; Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Schelker, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The Adirondack region of New York has been identified as a hot spot where high methylmercury concentrations are found in surface waters and biota, yet mercury (Hg) concentrations vary widely in this region. We collected stream and groundwater samples for Hg and organic carbon analyses across the upper Hudson River, a 493 km2 basin in the central Adirondacks to evaluate and model the sources of variation in filtered total Hg (FTHg) concentrations. Variability in FTHg concentrations during the growing seasons (May-Oct) of 2007-2009 in Fishing Brook, a 66-km2 sub-basin, was better explained by specific ultra-violet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), a measure of organic carbon aromaticity, than by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, a commonly used Hg indicator. SUVA254 was a stronger predictor of FTHg concentrations during the growing season than during the dormant season. Multiple linear regression models that included SUVA254 values and DOC concentrations could explain 75 % of the variation in FTHg concentrations on an annual basis and 84 % during the growing season. A multiple linear regression landscape modeling approach applied to 27 synoptic sites across the upper Hudson basin found that higher SUVA254 values are associated with gentler slopes, and greater riparian area, and lower SUVA254 values are associated with an increasing influence of open water. We hypothesize that the strong Hg?SUVA254 relation in this basin reflects distinct patterns of FTHg and SUVA254 that are characteristic of source areas that control the mobilization of Hg to surface waters, and that the seasonal influence of these source areas varies in this heterogeneous basin landscape.

  16. Effect of whole catchment liming on the episodic acidification of two adirondack streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, R.M.; Burns, D.A.; Blette, V.L.; Driscoll, C.T.

    1996-01-01

    During the fall of 1989 7.7Mg/ha of calcium carbonate was applied on two tributary catchments (40 ha and 60 ha) to Woods Lake, a small (25 ha) acidic headwater lake in the western Adirondack region of New York. Stream-water chemistry in both catchment tributaries responded immediately. Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) increased by more than 200 ??eq/L in one of the streams and more than 1000 ??eq/L in the other, from pre-liming values which ranged from -25 to +40 ??eq/L. The increase in ANC was primarily due to increases in dissolved Ca2+ concentrations. Most of the initial response of the streams was due to the dissolution of calcite that fell directly into the stream channels and adjacent wetlands. A small beaver impoundment and associated wetlands were probably responsible for the greater response observed in one of the streams. After the liming of subcatchmentIV (60 ha), Ca2+ concentrations increased with increasing stream discharge in the stream during fall rain events, suggesting a contribution from calcite dissolved within the soil and transported to the stream by surface runoff or shallow interflow. Concentrations of other ions not associated with the calcite (e.g. Na+) decreased during fall rain events, presumably due to mixing of solute-rich base flow with more dilute shallow interflow. The strong relation between changes in Ca2+ and changes in NO3- concentrations during spring snowmelt, (r2 = 0.93, slope = 0.96, on an equivalent basis) suggests that both solutes had a common source in the organic horizon of the soil. Increases in NO3- concentrations during snowmelt were balanced by increases in Ca2+ that was released either directly from the calcite or from exchange sites, mitigating episodic acidification of the stream. However, high ambient NO3- concentrations and relatively low ambient Ca2+ concentrations in the stream during the spring caused the stream to become acidic despite the CaCO3 treatment. In stream WO2 (40ha), Ca2+ concentrations were much

  17. Mercury deposition in the Adirondacks: A comparison between precipitation and throughfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyun-Deok; Sharac, Timothy J.; Holsen, Thomas M.

    The volume-weighted mean (VWM) Hg concentrations and the total cumulative fluxes in deciduous throughfall (6.6 ng L -1 and 12.0 μg m -2, respectively) were statistically higher than in precipitation (4.9 ng L -1 and 11.6 μg m -2, respectively) during 2 years of sampling at the Huntington Wildlife Forest in Newcomb, NY. Seasonally, the VWM Hg concentrations and the Hg fluxes in both precipitation and throughfall were lowest in winter and highest in summer. Due to the wash-off of dry deposition and foliar leaching, concentrations in throughfall were almost 50% higher than those in precipitation during the leaf-on period, while concentrations in throughfall were slightly higher than (or similar to) those in precipitation during the leaf-off period. During the 2 years of sampling, the total deposited cumulative flux in precipitation and deciduous throughfall were very similar (11.6 μg Hg m -2 and 12.0 μg Hg m -2, respectively), because the higher concentrations in throughfall were offset by smaller throughfall depths. Meteorological analysis indicated that the precipitation events resulting in the highest Hg fluxes were associated with trajectories that passed through regions of Midwest where major Hg sources including coal/oil-fired power plants and waste incinerators are located.

  18. 11. OFF SITE, VIEW SHOWING 'OWEGO BRIDGE CO OWEGO, N.Y.' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. OFF SITE, VIEW SHOWING 'OWEGO BRIDGE CO OWEGO, N.Y.' ON PLAQUE REMOVED FROM NORTH PORTAL - Hegeman-Hill Street Bridge, Spanning Batten Kill, .65 mile West of Greenwich, Easton, Washington County, NY

  19. 76 FR 31679 - Saratoga and North Creek Railway, LLC-Operation Exemption-Warren County, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Delaware & Hudson Railway Company, Inc. d/b/a Canadian Pacific (CP). Saratoga also states that the subject..., d/b/a Canadian Pacific, in which Saratoga seeks an exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from CP... miles of operating rights for the purpose of interchange with CP between Adirondack Branch milepost...

  20. Influence of organic acids on the pH and acid-neutralizing capacity of Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, R. K.; Gherini, S. A.

    1993-04-01

    Past approaches for evaluating the effects of organic acids on the acid-base characteristics of surface waters have typically treated them solely as weak acids. Analysis of data collected by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC) from 1469 lakes throughout the Adirondack region shows that this approach is not valid. While the data indicate that natural organics contain a continuum of acid functional groups, many of which display weak acid characteristics, a significant fraction of the organic acid is strong (pKa < 3). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contributes 4.5-5 μeq/mg DOC of strong acid to solution. The associated anions make a negative contribution to Gran acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). Because organic anions can produce negative Gran ANC values, the common practice of considering negative values of Gran ANC evidence of acidification solely by mineral acids is not valid. The strength of organic acids also influences the observed deviation between Gran ANC values and ANC values calculated as the difference between base cation and mineral acid anion concentrations (CB - CA). Ninety percent of the deviation is due to the presence of strong organics while the remaining 10% is due to DOC-induced curvature in the F1 Gran function. Organic acids can also strongly influence pH. Their largest effects were found in the 0-50 μeq/L Gran ANC range where they depressed pH by up to 1.5 units. In addition, a method for predicting changes in pH in response to changes in mineral acidity, DOC, or both without having to rely on inferred thermodynamic constants and the uncertainties associated with them has been developed. Using the predictive method, the response of representative lakes from four sensitive lake classes to a 15-μeq/L decrease in mineral acidity ranged from +0.17 to +0.38 pH units. If concurrent increases in DOC are considered, the pH changes would be even smaller.

  1. Mercury Inputs, Outputs, Cycling, and Ambient Concentrations under the Forest Canopy in the Adirondacks of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H.; Holsen, T.

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated mercury inputs, outputs, cycling, and the interactions between deposition, emissions and atmospheric conditions in the Huntington Forest of the Adirondacks, New York. Continuous speciated mercury concentrations of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and particulate Bound Hg (PBM) were made from June 2006 to May 2007. The average concentrations of GEM, RGM, and PBM were 1.4 ± 0.4 ng m-3, 1.8 ± 2.2 pg m-3, and 3.2 ± 3.7 pg m-3, respectively. A hybrid receptor modeling technique (potential source contribution function (PSCF)) was used with the speciated Hg concentrations to identify possible Hg sources. Major Hg sources that have a potential to contribute high Hg concentrations observed in the Adirondacks were found to be Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, Indiana, and Missouri. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) total Hg concentration in throughfall (Dec. 2004 to Dec. 2006) (6.6 ng L-1) was higher than in precipitation (4.9 ng L-1), while the total cumulative Hg flux in throughfall (12.0 µg m-2) was similar to precipitation (11.6 µg m-2). The emission flux of GEM from the forest floor measured using a polycarbonate dynamic flux chamber (DFC) was highest in spring, and summer, and lowest in winter. The yearly estimated Hg inputs into the forest canopy include throughfall (6.5 g m-2 year-1), litterfall (18.3 g m-2 year-1), and dry deposition during leaf-off periods (0.4g m-2 year-1). The yearly estimated Hg outputs from the forest canopy include emission from the forest floor (7.0g m-2 year-1), soil water (0.6 g m-2 year-1), and Hg loss via evaporation or overland flow during snow melt (1.0 g m-2 year-1). Litterfall represented the most significant input of Hg to this forest ecosystem. Based on this mass balance, 16.6 g m-2 of Hg is accumulating in the forest floor every year.

  2. Long-term recovery of lakes in the Adirondack region of New York to decreases in acidic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Kristin; Driscoll, Charles; Lynch, Jason; Newcomb, Dani; Roy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    After years of adverse impacts to the acid-sensitive ecosystems of the eastern United States, the Acid Rain Program and Nitrogen Budget Program were developed to control sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and nitrogen oxide (NO x) emissions through market-based cap and trade systems. We used data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program's National Trends Network (NTN) and the U.S. EPA Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) program to evaluate the response of lake-watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to changes in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides resulting from the Acid Rain Program and the Nitrogen Budget Program. TIME is a long-term monitoring program designed to sample statistically selected subpopulations of lakes and streams across the eastern U.S. to quantify regional trends in surface water chemistry due to changes in atmospheric deposition. Decreases in wet sulfate deposition for the TIME lake-watersheds from 1991 to 2007 (-1.04 meq m -2-yr) generally corresponded with decreases in estimated lake sulfate flux (-1.46 ± 0.72 meq m -2-yr), suggesting declines in lake sulfate were largely driven by decreases in atmospheric deposition. Decreases in lake sulfate and to a lesser extent nitrate have generally coincided with increases in acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting in shifts in lakes among ANC sensitivity classes. The percentage of acidic Adirondack lakes (ANC <0 μeq L -1) decreased from 15.5% (284 lakes) to 8.3% (152 lakes) since the implementation of the Acid Rain Program and the Nitrogen Budget Program. Two measures of ANC were considered in our analysis: ANC determined directly by Gran plot analysis (ANC G) and ANC calculated by major ion chemistry (ANC calc = CB - CA). While these two metrics should theoretically show similar responses, ANC calc (+2.03 μeq L -1-yr) increased at more than twice the rate as ANC G (+0.76 μeq L -1-yr). This discrepancy has important implications for assessments of lake recovery

  3. 77 FR 69915 - New York Disaster Number NY-00130

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00130 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of New... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  4. 76 FR 55721 - New York Disaster #NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of New York (FEMA... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  5. 76 FR 63700 - New York Disaster Number NY-00110

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00110 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of New..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  6. 76 FR 18289 - New York Disaster Number NY-00102

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... the following areas as adversely affected by the disaster. Primary Counties: Columbia, Dutchess, Kings... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00102 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public...

  7. 76 FR 58329 - New York Disaster Number NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of New... 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small...

  8. 76 FR 58558 - New York Disaster Number NY-00109

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... following areas as adversely affected by the disaster. Primary Counties: Columbia, Putnam, Washington. All... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00109 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public...

  9. 77 FR 18103 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Piseco, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... rulemaking (NPRM) to establish Class E airspace 700 feet above the surface, at Piseco, NY (76 FR 77451.... 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory...

  10. 77 FR 68195 - New York Disaster Number NY-00130

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00130 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... INFORMATION CONTACT: A Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  11. 77 FR 74907 - New York Disaster Number NY-00130

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00130 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4.... Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth,...

  12. 78 FR 43063 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Arthur Kill, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard... District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the Arthur Kill AK Railroad Bridge across Arthur Kill, mile 11.6, between Staten Island, New York and Elizabeth,...

  13. 78 FR 66265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... operations (78 FR 56610) is currently in effect. During ongoing rehabilitation of the bridge the contractor... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY... operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York....

  14. 78 FR 37456 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY AGENCY... the Long Beach Bridge, mile 4.7, across Reynolds Channel at Nassau, New York. Under this temporary... a.m. on June 30, 2013, with a rain date of June 30, 2013 and July 1, 2013. Reynolds Creek...

  15. 77 FR 37316 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY AGENCY... the Long Beach Bridge, mile 4.7, across Reynolds Channel, at Nassau, New York. This temporary... Operations, telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Long Beach Bridge, across Reynolds...

  16. 78 FR 26508 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Nassau, NY AGENCY... the Long Beach Bridge, mile 4.7, across Reynolds Channel at Nassau, New York. Under this temporary... position between 9 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. on July 12, 2013. Reynolds Creek has commercial and...

  17. 76 FR 35937 - New York Disaster #NY-00105

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office U.S. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00105 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY.../12/2012. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  18. Rapid variability of the EXor star NY Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Arkharov, A. A.; Efimova, N.; Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Di Paola, A.; Larionov, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a rapid brightness variability of the classical EXor star NY Ori observed with the AZT24 1m IR telescope (Campo Imperatore, Italy), as a part of our program EXORCISM (EXOR OptiCal and Infrared Systematic Monitoring - Antoniucci et al. 2013 PPVI; Lorenzetti et al. 2009 ApJ 693, 1056).

  19. Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY

    SciTech Connect

    Wellington, Andre

    2014-03-31

    The Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (Interoperability Project) was awarded to Con Edison in 2009. The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited Demand Response resources to integrate more effectively with electric delivery companies and regional transmission organizations.

  20. No Retreat: Lorna Peterson--University at Buffalo, NY

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    When Clark Atlanta University announced in 2003 it would close its library school, Lorna Peterson, a library educator at the University at Buffalo, NY, mounted a campaign to save the program, which has graduated more black library leaders than any other. "I did not want this to happen without a fight. It cannot be said that librarians, Friends of…

  1. 78 FR 52423 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Plattsburgh, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Plattsburgh International Airport, Plattsburgh, NY (78 FR 26557). Interested parties were invited to... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p....

  2. 78 FR 27031 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kingston, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kingston, NY AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E Airspace...

  3. 78 FR 7848 - New York Disaster Number NY-00130

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00130 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5.... Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth,...

  4. 76 FR 56860 - New York Disaster Number NY-00109

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00109 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of NEW YORK, dated 08/31/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  5. 76 FR 63699 - New York Disaster Number NY-00113

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00113 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/23/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 09/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  6. 75 FR 41558 - New York Disaster Number NY-00089

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00089 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-1899-DR), dated 04/16/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 04/16/2010, is hereby amended to...

  7. 76 FR 59176 - New York Disaster Number NY-00110

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00110 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/13/ 2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Incident Period: 09... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated...

  8. 75 FR 21371 - New York Disaster # NY-00089

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00089 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New York (FEMA- 1899-DR), dated 04/16/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding....

  9. 77 FR 67857 - New York Disaster # NY-00131

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00131 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New York (FEMA- 4085-DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/27..., Nassau, New York, Queens, Richmond, Rockland, Suffolk, Westchester. The Interest Rates are: Percent...

  10. 76 FR 59178 - New York Disaster Number NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/ 2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26/2011 through... the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011 is hereby amended...

  11. 76 FR 64420 - New York Disaster Number NY-00113

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00113 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4031-DR). dated 09/23/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 09/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  12. 77 FR 76587 - New York Disaster Number NY-00131

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00131 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of New York (FEMA--4085--DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 11/03/2012, is hereby amended to include...

  13. 78 FR 20370 - New York Disaster Number NY-00130

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00130 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... York (FEMA-4085-DR), dated 10/30/ 2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/27/2012 through... The President's Major Disaster Declaration For The State Of New York, dated 10/30/2012 is...

  14. 76 FR 56856 - New York Disaster Number NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/ 2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26/2011 and... disaster declaration ] for the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011 is hereby amended to include...

  15. 77 FR 64372 - New York Disaster #NY-00126

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00126 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of New York dated 10/10... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Sullivan. Contiguous Counties: New York:...

  16. 76 FR 68804 - New York Disaster Number NY-00113

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00113 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/23/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 09/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  17. 77 FR 71666 - New York Disaster Number NY-00130

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00130 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... York (FEMA-4085-DR), dated 10/30/ 2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/27/2012 through... the President's major disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated 10/30/2012 is...

  18. 76 FR 56852 - New York Disaster Number NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/ 2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26/2011 and...: The notice of the President's major disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated...

  19. 76 FR 61775 - New York Disaster #NY-00113

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00113 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New York (FEMA- 4031-DR), dated 09/23/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee....

  20. 78 FR 47817 - New York Disaster Number NY-00136

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00136 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of New York (FEMA--4129--DR), dated 07/12/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 07/12/2013, is hereby amended to...

  1. 77 FR 70203 - New York Disaster Number NY-00131

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00131 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4085-DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of NEW YORK, dated 11/03/2012, is hereby amended to include...

  2. 76 FR 59177 - New York Disaster #NY-00110

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00110 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of New York (FEMA... Injury Loans Only): New York: Chemung, Cortland, Greene, Herkimer, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida,...

  3. 76 FR 56857 - New York Disaster Number NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated08/31/ 2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26/2011 and... disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011 is hereby amended to include the...

  4. 76 FR 58328 - New York Disaster Number NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6... York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/ 2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26/2011 through... the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011 is hereby amended...

  5. 76 FR 66111 - New York Disaster Number NY-00113

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00113 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/23/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 09/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  6. 78 FR 44187 - New York Disaster # NY-00136

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00136 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New York (FEMA- 4129-DR), dated 07/12/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding....

  7. 76 FR 55721 - New York Disaster #NY-00109

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00109 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New York (FEMA- 4020-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26..., Clinton, Delaware, Dutchess, Essex, Greene, Montgomery, Nassau, New York, Queens, Rensselaer,...

  8. 76 FR 61130 - New York Disaster Number NY-00110

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00110 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/13/ 2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. ] Incident Period: 09... INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated...

  9. 76 FR 40767 - New York Disaster Number NY-00105

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00105 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-1993-DR), dated 06/10/2011 . Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding... major disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated...

  10. 75 FR 41558 - New York Disaster Number NY-00089

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00089 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-1899-DR), dated 04/16/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 04/16/2010, is hereby amended to...

  11. 76 FR 58559 - New York Disaster Number NY-00109

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00109 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  12. 76 FR 64420 - NEW YORK Disaster Number NY-00110

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION NEW YORK Disaster Number NY-00110 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5... York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/13/ 2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Incident Period: 09... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of NEW YORK, dated...

  13. 76 FR 55153 - New York Disaster #NY-00104

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00104 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of New York dated 08/26.... Contiguous Counties: New York: Essex, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, Madison, Oswego, Otsego, Saint...

  14. 76 FR 59766 - New York Disaster Number NY-00110

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00110 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/13/ 2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Incident Period: 09...: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated 09/13/2011...

  15. 75 FR 22167 - New York Disaster #NY-00087

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00087 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of New York dated 04/19... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Suffolk. Contiguous Counties: New...

  16. 77 FR 67858 - New York Disaster #NY-00130

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00130 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of NEW YORK (FEMA... Economic Injury Loans): Bronx, Kings, Nassau, New York, Queens, Richmond, Suffolk. Contiguous...

  17. 76 FR 62131 - New York Disaster Number NY-00113

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00113 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... only for the State of New York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/23/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 09/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  18. 76 FR 67245 - New York Disaster Number NY-00113

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00113 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/23/2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 09/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  19. 76 FR 67245 - New York Disaster Number NY-00110

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00110 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6... York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/13/ 2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Incident Period: 09... INFORMATION: The notice of the Presidential disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated...

  20. 78 FR 48537 - New York Disaster # NY-00135

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00135 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of New York dated 08/02... Counties: New York: Chenango, Cortland, Fulton, Hamilton, Lewis, Onondaga, Oswego, Otsego, Saint...

  1. 76 FR 13698 - New York Disaster Number NY-00102

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00102 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of New York (FEMA--1957--DR), dated 02/18/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 02/18/2011, is hereby amended to...

  2. 76 FR 56853 - New York Disaster Number NY-00109

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00109 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011, is hereby amended to...

  3. 76 FR 11553 - New York Disaster #NY-00102

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00102 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New York (FEMA- 1957-DR), dated 02/18/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and...

  4. 76 FR 68804 - New York Disaster Number NY-00110

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00110 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... York (FEMA-4031-DR), dated 09/13/ 2011. Incident: Remnants of Tropical Storm Lee. Incident Period: 09... INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated...

  5. 78 FR 26100 - New York Disaster #NY-00134

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00134 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New York FEMA-- 4111--DR), dated 04/23/2013. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and...

  6. 76 FR 56855 - New York Disaster Number NY-00109

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00109 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  7. 76 FR 68803 - New York Disaster Number NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 8... York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/ 2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26/2011 through... the President's major disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011 is...

  8. 78 FR 15109 - New York Disaster Number NY-00130

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00130 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 6... York (FEMA-4085-DR), dated 10/30/ 2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/27/2012 through... the President's major disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated 10/30/2012 is...

  9. 78 FR 47816 - New York Disaster Number NY-00136

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00136 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4129-DR), dated 07/12/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of NEW YORK, dated 07/12/2013, is hereby amended to...

  10. 76 FR 58557 - New York Disaster Number NY-00109

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00109 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  11. 77 FR 71666 - New York Disaster Number NY-00131

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00131 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4085-DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 11/03/2012, is hereby amended to...

  12. 76 FR 56856 - New York Disaster Number NY-00108

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00108 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/ 2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/26/2011 and... disaster declaration for the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011 is hereby amended to include the...

  13. 76 FR 59178 - New York Disaster Number NY-00109

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster Number NY-00109 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 7... Only for the State of New York (FEMA-4020-DR), dated 08/31/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New York, dated 08/31/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  14. 78 FR 34893 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY... operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. This..., to facilitate electrical and structural rehabilitation at the bridge. DATES: This deviation...

  15. 78 FR 56609 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Channel, Lawrence, NY'', in the Federal Register (78 FR 34893). The temporary deviation concerned was for... FR 34893) the draw of the Atlantic Beach Bridge at mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel was required to... Coast Guard is canceling the temporary deviation from the regulations published on June 11, 2013, (78...

  16. 78 FR 56610 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY... operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. This..., to facilitate electrical and structural rehabilitation at the bridge. DATES: This deviation...

  17. 75 FR 65391 - New York Disaster #NY-00093

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New York Disaster NY-00093 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...-line winds. Incident Period: 09/16/2010. Effective Date: 10/14/2010. Physical Loan Application...

  18. 78 FR 72003 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Olean, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Cattaraugus County-Olean Airport, Olean, NY. (78 FR 52115). Interested parties were invited to participate in... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p....

  19. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of bacteria carried by ticks. ... Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii (R. Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks. The ...

  20. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... Acute mountain sickness is caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes. The faster you ...

  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a ...

  2. Origin of biotite-hornblende-garnet coronas between oxides and plagioclase in olivine metagabbros, Adirondack region, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.; McLelland, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Complex multivariant reactions involving Fe-Ti oxide minerals, plagioclase and olivine have produced coronas of biotite, hornblende and garnet between ilmenite and plagioclase in Adirondack olivine metagabbros. Both the biotite (6-10% TiO2) and the hornblende (3-6% TiO2) are exceptionally Titanium-rich. The garnet is nearly identical in composition to the garnet in coronas around olivine in the same rocks. The coronas form in two stages: (a) Plagioclase+Fe-Ti Oxides+Olivine+water =Hornblende+Spinel+Orthopyroxene??Biotite +more-sodic Plagioclase (b) Hornblende+Orthopyroxene??Spinel+Plagioclase =Garnet+Clinopyroxene+more-sodic Plagioclase The Orthopyroxene and part of the clinopyroxene form adjacent to olivine. Both reactions are linked by exchange of Mg2+ and Fe2+ with the reactions forming pyroxene and garnet coronas around olivine in the same rocks. The reactions occur under granulite fades metamorphic conditions, either during isobaric cooling or with increasing pressure at high temperature. ?? 1983 Springer-Verlag.

  3. An evaluation of processes regulating spatial and temporal patterns in lake sulfate in the Adirondack region of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Limin; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2004-09-01

    As a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1970 and 1990, there have been significant decreases in sulfate (SO42-) concentrations in surface waters across the northeastern United States. The 37 Direct/Delayed Response Program (DDRP) watersheds in the Adirondacks receive elevated levels of atmospheric S deposition and showed considerable variability in lake SO42- concentrations. In response to decreases in atmospheric S deposition, these sites have generally exhibited relatively uniform decreases in surface water SO42- concentrations. In this study, an integrated biogeochemical model (PnET-BGC) was used to simulate the response of lake SO42- concentrations at these DDRP sites to recent changes in atmospheric S deposition. Using default parameters and algorithms, the model underpredicted lake SO42- concentrations at sites with high SO42- concentrations and overpredicted at sites with low SO42- concentrations. Initial predictions of lake SO42- were relatively uniform across the region. Initial model simulations also underpredicted decreases in lake SO42- concentrations from 1984 to 2001. We identified seven hypotheses that might explain the discrepancies between model predictions and the measured data. Model inputs, parameters, and algorithms were modified to help test these hypotheses and better understand factors that control spatial and temporal patterns in lake SO42- in this acid-sensitive region.

  4. Polar cloud observatory at Ny-Ålesund in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi; Takano, Toshiaki; Shiobara, Masataka; Okamoto, Hajime; Koike, Makoto; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    . Degradation of transmission power was monitored and sensitivity of receiving system was derived with estimating antenna gain by using radio wave absorber and considering antenna geometry of two antenna system. In order to estimate final results, altitude dependent detection limit curve was also calculated. Original intensity data in real time and calibrated radar reflectivity data are archived on "Arctic Data archive System (ADS)". Other collocated observations were made with fog monitor (particle size distribution), MPS (particle image) for continuous measurements at Zeppelin Mountain, 450 m height a. s. l., and tethered balloon for intense observing period. From these measurements together with aerosol and meteorological monitoring made by collaborating institutes (Stockholm University, University of Florence, AWI, NILU, NCAR and NPI) microphysics of low level cloud and aerosol-cloud interactions are discussed. Ground based remote sensors provide a powerful validation for satellite cloud observations. Radar reflectivity (dBZ) by FALCON-A was compared with that by CPR on CloudSAT during several overpasses around Ny-Ålesund, and though some difference due to the different vertical resolution was seen, overall agreement was confirmed. We are planning to establish Ny-Ålesund observatory as the super site for validation for EarthCARE (JAXA-ESA) mission.

  5. Modeling a High Resolution Stream Chloride Time Series from the Biscuit Brook Catchment, Catskills, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S. B.; Walter, M. T.; Harpold, A. A.

    2006-12-01

    Compelling work by Kirchner and colleagues (e.g., Kirchner et al., 2001, J. of Hydro., 254:81-100) suggests that lengthy, high resolution chloride time series can reveal the underlying travel time distribution of water in a catchment. However, few data sets of suitable length or sampling frequency have been available for assessment. Our analysis of a ten-year, weekly stream chloride time series data set for the steep, forested Biscuit Brook catchment in the Catskill Mountains of NY resulted in a 1/f spectral density plot. We used a lumped, two reservoir model with an upper reservoir representing quickflow and a lower reservoir representing base flow to reasonably replicate stream flow and stream chloride concentrations. A spectral analysis of the modeled daily chloride signal also resulted in a 1/f spectral density plot. This suggests that in some systems a 1/f signature can result from processes other than superposition of lateral chemical transport pathways, as has been previously hypothesized by other researchers. In this case, it appears that a long-term periodicity established by seasonal moisture deficits combines with shorter wavelength variations from rainfall inputs to create a 1/f spectral density for chloride concentration.

  6. Results of the NY-Alesund ozone measurements intercomparison NAOMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrecht, W.; Gross, M.; McGee, T.; Neuber, R.; Gathen, P. V. D.; Wahl, P.; Klein, U.; Langer, J.

    1998-01-01

    Worldwide, about ten Differential Absorption Lidars are used for long-term monitoring of stratospheric ozone. These systems are an important component of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change. Although DIALs are self-calibrating in principle, regular intercomparisons with other ozone-lidars, microwave radiometers or ozone-sondes are highly desirable to ensure high data quality at a well known level. The Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) validation policy suggests that such intercomparisons be "blind", meaning all participants submit their data to an impartial referee, without seeing results from the other participants. Here we report on the "blind" intercomparison taking place from January 20th to February 10th 1998 at Ny-Alesund, Spitsbergen (78.92 deg N, 11.95 deg E). Participating groups were from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Potsdam, operating the NDSC DIAL system at Ny-Alesund, from the University of Bremen operating the NDSC microwave radiometer for ozone profiling at Ny-Alesund, and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center group with the "NDSC travelling standard" STROZ-LITE. The first author acted as the impartial referee. Also used for the intercomparison were data from ECC-6A/Vaisala RS80 ozone sondes routinely launched at Ny-Alesund by the AWI group. A 1% KI solution (3 ml) and the 1986 ECC pump correction (1.092 at 5 hPa) are used. The ECC-data were available to all participants during the campaign and thus were not "blind". Table 1 summarizes the expected performance of the instruments participating in the ozone intercomparison reported in this paper.

  7. Effects of flow releases on macroinvertebrate assemblages in the Indian and Hudson Rivers in the Adirondack Mountains of Northern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Smith, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of flow releases (daily during spring and four times weekly during summer) from a small impoundment on macroinvertebrate assemblages in the lower Indian River and upper Hudson River of northern New York were assessed during the summers of 2005 and 2006. Community indices, feeding guilds, dominant species and Bray—Curtis similarities at three sites on the Indian River, below a regulated impoundment, were compared with those at four control sites on the Cedar River, below a run-of-the-river impoundment of comparable size. The same indices at four less-likely affected sites on the Hudson River, below the mouth of the Indian River, were compared with those at an upstream control site on the Hudson River. Results show that the function and apparent health of macroinvertebrate communities were generally unaffected by atypical flow regimes and/or altered water quality at study reaches downstream from both dams in the Indian, Cedar and Hudson Rivers. The lentic nature of releases from both impoundments, however, produced significant changes in the structure of assemblages at Indian and Cedar River sites immediately downstream from both dams, moderate effects at two Indian River sites 2.4 and 4.0 km downstream from its dam, little or no effect at three Cedar River sites 7.2-34.2 km downstream from its dam, and no effect at any Hudson River site. Bray—Curtis similarities indicate that assemblages did not differ significantly among sites within similar impact categories. The paucity of scrapers at all Indian River sites, and the predominance of filter-feeding Simulium gouldingi and Pisidium compressum immediately below Abanakee dam, show that only minor differences in dominant species and trophic structure of macroinvertebrate communities occurred at affected sites in the Indian River compared to the Cedar River. Thus, flow releases had only a small, localized effect on macroinvertebrate communities in the Indian River.

  8. Effects of recreational flow releases on natural resources of the Indian and Hudson Rivers in the Central Adirondack Mountains, New York, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Mulvihill, C.I.; Ernst, A.G.; Boisvert, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and Cornell University carried out a cooperative 2-year study from the fall of 2004 through the fall of 2006 to characterize the potential effects of recreational-flow releases from Lake Abanakee on natural resources in the Indian and Hudson Rivers. Researchers gathered baseline information on hydrology, temperature, habitat, nearshore wetlands, and macroinvertebrate and fish communities and assessed the behavior and thermoregulation of stocked brown trout in study reaches from both rivers and from a control river. The effects of recreational-flow releases (releases) were assessed by comparing data from affected reaches with data from the same reaches during nonrelease days, control reaches in a nearby run-of-the-river system (the Cedar River), and one reach in the Hudson River upstream from the confluence with the Indian River. A streamgage downstream from Lake Abanakee transmitted data by satellite from November 2004 to November 2006; these data were used as the basis for developing a rating curve that was used to estimate discharges for the study period. River habitat at most study reaches was delineated by using Global Positioning System and ArcMap software on a handheld computer, and wetlands were mapped by ground-based measurements of length, width, and areal density. River temperature in the Indian and Hudson Rivers was monitored continuously at eight sites during June through September of 2005 and 2006; temperature was mapped in 2005 by remote imaging made possible through collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology. Fish communities at all study reaches were surveyed and characterized through quantitative, nearshore electrofishing surveys. Macroinvertebrate communities in all study reaches were sampled using the traveling-kick method and characterized using standard indices. Radio telemetry was used to track the movement and persistence of stocked brown trout (implanted with temperature-sensitive transmitters) in the Indian and Hudson Rivers during the summer of 2005 and in all three rivers during the summer of 2006. The releases had little effect on river temperatures, but increased discharges by about one order of magnitude. Regardless of the releases, river temperatures at all study sites commonly exceeded the threshold known to be stressful to brown trout. At most sites, mean and median water temperatures on release days were not significantly different, or slightly lower, than water temperatures on nonrelease days. Most differences were very small and, thus, were probably not biologically meaningful. The releases generally increased the total surface area of fast-water habitat (rapids, runs, and riffles) and decreased the total surface area of slow-water habitat (pools, glides, backwater areas, and side channels). The total surface areas of wetlands bordering the Indian River were substantially smaller than the surface areas bordering the Cedar River; however, no channel geomorphology or watershed soil and topographic data were assessed to determine whether the releases or other factors were mainly responsible for observed differences. Results from surveys of resident biota indicate that the releases generally had a limited effect on fish and macroinvertebrate communities in the Indian River and had no effect on communities in the Hudson River. Compared to fish data from Cedar River control sites, the impoundment appeared to reduce total density, biomass, and richness in the Indian River at the first site downstream from Lake Abanakee, moderately reduce the indexes at the other two sites on the Indian River, and slightly reduce the indexes at the first Hudson River site downstream from the confluence with the Indian River. The densities of individual fish populations at all Indian River sites were also reduced, but related effects on fish populations in the Hudson River were less evident. Altho

  9. Hydrologic data from the integrated lake-watershed acidification study in the west-central Adirondack Mountains, New York : October 1977 through January 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Murdoch, P.S.; Dalton, F.N.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrologic data were collected from three forested headwater lake watersheds in Herkimer and Hamilton Counties from October 1977 through early January 1982 as part of the Integrated Lake-Watersheds Acidification Study (ILWAS). ILWAS was established in 1977 to determine why these lakes differ in pH when all receive equal amounts of acidic atmospheric deposition. Woods Lake is acidic (pH ranges from 4 to 5), Panther Lake is neutral (pH ranges from 5 to 7.5), and Sagamore Lake is intermediate (pH ranges from 5 to 6). The data tabulated herein include discharge at the three lake outlets and in a tributary to each lake; lake-water stage at each lake; chemical quality of lake water, including total concentrations of zinc, iron, manganese, and lead, at each lake outlet and at Lost Brook (a tributary to Sagamore Lake); groundwater stage from 29 wells; major ion concentrations of groundwater from 22 of these wells; temperature of soil from three depths at one site in each watershed; soil-moisture tension at three depths at eight sites - four in the neutral-lake basin, three in the acidic-lake basin , and one in the intermediate-lake basin; and average snowpack depths and water equivalents at approximately 20 snow-course sites in each basin for three sampling periods during the 1979-80 winter. (USGS)

  10. Hydrogeologic comparison of an acidic-lake basin with a neutral-lake basin in the West-Central Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    1985-01-01

    Two small headwater lake basins that receive similar amounts of acidic atmospheric deposition have significantly different lake outflow pH values; pH at Panther Lake (neutral) ranges from about 4.7 to 7; that at Woods Lake (acidic) ranges from about 4.3 to 5. A hydrologic analysis, which included monthly water budgets, hydrograph analysis, examination of flow duration and runoff recession curves, calculation of ground-water storage, and an analysis of lateral flow capacity of the soil, indicates that differences in lakewater pH can be attributed to differences in the ground-water contribution to the lakes. A larger percentage of the water discharged from the neutral lake is derived from ground water than that from the acidic lake. Ground water has a higher pH resulting from a sufficiently long residence time for neutralizing chemical reactions to occur with the till. The difference in ground-water contribution is attributed to a more extensive distribution of thick till (<3m) in the neutral-lake basin than in the acidic-lake basin; average thickness of till in the neutral-lake basin is 24m whereas that in the other is 2.3m. During the snowmelt period, as much as three months of accumulated precipitation may be released within two weeks causing the lateral flow capacity of the deeper mineral soil to be exceeded in the neutral-lake basin. This excess water moves over and through the shallow acidic soil horizons and causes the lakewater pH to decrease during snowmelt.Two small headwater lake basins that receive similar amounts of acidic atmospheric deposition have significantly different lake outflow pH values; pH at Panther Lake (neutral) ranges from about 4. 7 to 7; that at Woods Lake (acidic) ranges from about 4. 3 to 5. A hydrologic analysis, which included monthly water budgets, hydrograph analysis, examination of flow duration and runoff recession curves, calculation of ground-water storage, and an analysis of lateral flow capacity of the soil, indicates that differences in lakewater pH can be attributed to differences in the ground-water contribution to the lakes. A larger percentage of the water discharged from the neutral lake is derived from ground water than that from the acidic lake. Ground water has a higher pH resulting from a sufficiently long residence time for neutralizing chemical reactions to occur with the till.

  11. Data-collection methods and quality-assurance/quality-control procedures used in the study of episodic stream acidification and its effect on fish and aquatic invertebrates in four Catskill Mountain streams, New York, 1988-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ranalli, Anthony J.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Horan-Ross, Debra; Allen, Ronald V.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a 20-month study during 1988-90 to evaluate the effects of episodic acidification on fish and aquatic invertebrates in pristine headwater streams in the Catskill Mountains of New York. The study was part of the Episodic Response Project, a regional survey of episodic acidification by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and was carried out simultaneously with other studies in the Adirondack Mountains of New York by the Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation and in central Pennsylvania by Pennsylvania State University. This report summarizes the methods used, describes the sampling sites, and presents the data collected from October 1, 1988 through May 30, 1990 at four headwater watersheds (Biscuit Brook, East Branch Neversink River, Black Brook, and High Falls Brook). The study entailed (1) monitoring the quantity and chemical quality of atmospheric deposition and the quality of discharge of streams, and (2) experiments to determine the effect of stream-water-quality changes on fish and invertebrate populations.

  12. Geochemical studies of mafic and other low silica, Precambrian intrusive rocks in the Adirondack lowlands, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Antibus, J.; Carl, J.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Mafic metaigneous rocks in the Adirondack Lowlands include gabbros, amphibolites and diorites that are associated with, and hard to distinguish from, a host of dark colored, low-silica, alkali feldspar-bearing rocks that include syenogabbros, syenites and monzonites. All rocks intrude metasedimentary and metavolcanic host rocks and occur as isolated, pre- to syn-metamorphic bodies, generally with elongate, sheet-like form. Some occur within or marginal to deformation zones. Lacking are the massive igneous complexes of the Highlands where anorthosites, charnockites and mangerites comprise a common field association. Amphibolites vary from mappable sheets that are hundreds of meters thick to thin (<1 m) layers within the host gneisses. Gabbros and diorites vary from circular to oval-shaped bodies, generally <2 km across, that may be infolded with the host rocks. Pervasive shear in Lowland granitic rocks (Hyde School Gneiss) that resulted in major sheath folds, as proposed by Tewksbury, extends into the mafic bodies whose margins show strong gneissic textures and grain size reduction, but the cores are less deformed. The Balmat gabbro varies inwardly and systematically from monzonitic to gabbroic composition in decreasing Si, Na, K, Rb, Zr and Ba, and in increasing Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, P, Sr, Cr, V and Ni content. Y/Nb ratios remain constant at 3-4. Among explanations of assimilation and metasomatism, the authors tentatively prefer an hypothesis of exclusion of alkali material during crystallization of mafic magma. Calc alkali and low potassium tholeiites are indicated in plots of the Balmat and other mafic bodies on Ti/100-Zr-Yx3 and Ti-Zr discrimination diagrams, although there is much scatter of data. Within-plate basalts are lacking, and ocean floor basalts are indicated for some amphibolites.

  13. Winter-time climatic control on dissolved organic carbon export and surface water chemistry in an Adirondack forested watershed.

    PubMed

    Park, Il-Hyung; Mitchell, Myron J; Driscoll, Charles T

    2005-09-15

    Although most of forested watersheds in temperate and boreal regions are snow-covered for a substantial portion of the year, responses of biogeochemical processes under the snow pack to climatic fluctuations are poorly understood. We investigated responses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and surface water chemistry in stream and lake discharge waters draining the Arbutus Lake Watershed in the Adirondacks of New York State to climatic fluctuations during the snow-covered months from December through April. Interannual variability in stream discharge corresponded to changes in air temperature and snow pack depth across the winter months. Concentrations of DOC in stream water draining a subcatchment showed immediate positive responses to rising temperatures and subsequent increases in runoff during most snowmelt events. Increases in DOC concentrations usually coincided with decreases in pH and increases in total aluminum (Al) concentrations, while the correlations between concentrations of DOC and SO4(2-) or base cations were negative. Although changes in air temperature, snow pack depth, and runoff were all significantly correlated with stream water concentrations of major solutes, stepwise linear regression found that runoff was the best predictor of solute concentrations. Results of stepwise linear regression with long-term monthly monitoring data collected at the lake outlet showed weaker but still consistent climatic effects on interannual variations in concentrations of DOC and other solutes. Over the 17 winter periods from December 1983 through April 2000, changes in seasonal average concentrations of DOC, H+, and Al in lake discharge generally corresponded to interannual variations in temperature, precipitation, and runoff, while SO4(2-) and base cations displayed an opposite trend. The results suggest that snowmelt-mediated DOC responses to temperature fluctuations during the winter months might offset increases in the surface water pH caused by decreasing

  14. Vaccination with NY-ESO-1 overlapping peptides mixed with Picibanil OK-432 and montanide ISA-51 in patients with cancers expressing the NY-ESO-1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hisashi; Isobe, Midori; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Mizote, Yu; Eikawa, Shingo; Sato, Eiichi; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Yamasaki, Makoto; Miyata, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Udono, Heiichiro; Seto, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Pan, Linda; Venhaus, Ralph; Oka, Mikio; Doki, Yuichiro; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a clinical trial of an NY-ESO-1 cancer vaccine using 4 synthetic overlapping long peptides (OLP; peptides #1, 79-108; #2, 100-129; #3, 121-150; and #4, 142-173) that include a highly immunogenic region of the NY-ESO-1 molecule. Nine patients were immunized with 0.25 mg each of three 30-mer and a 32-mer long NY-ESO-1 OLP mixed with 0.2 KE Picibanil OK-432 and 1.25 mL Montanide ISA-51. The primary endpoints of this study were safety and NY-ESO-1 immune responses. Five to 18 injections of the NY-ESO-1 OLP vaccine were well tolerated. Vaccine-related adverse events observed were fever and injection site reaction (grade 1 and 2). Two patients showed stable disease after vaccination. An NY-ESO-1-specific humoral immune response was observed in all patients and an antibody against peptide #3 (121-150) was detected firstly and strongly after vaccination. NY-ESO-1 CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses were elicited in these patients and their epitopes were identified. Using a multifunctional cytokine assay, the number of single or double cytokine-producing cells was increased in NY-ESO-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells after vaccination. Multiple cytokine-producing cells were observed in PD-1 (-) and PD-1 (+) CD4 T cells. In conclusion, our study indicated that the NY-ESO-1 OLP vaccine mixed with Picibanil OK-432 and Montanide ISA-51 was well tolerated and elicited NY-ESO-1-specific humoral and CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in immunized patients. PMID:24509171

  15. Identifying Common Patterns in Diverse Systems: Effects of Exurban Development on Birds of the Adirondack Park and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennon, Michale J.; Kretser, Heidi E.; Hilty, Jodi A.

    2015-02-01

    We examined the impacts of exurban development on bird communities in Essex County, New York and Madison County, Montana by comparing differences in abundance of songbirds between subdivisions and control sites in both regions. We hypothesized that impacts to bird communities would be greater in the relatively homogeneous, closed canopy Adirondack forest of northern New York State than they would be in the more naturally heterogeneous grasslands interspersed with trees and shrubs of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. We examined birds in five functional groups expected to be responsive to exurban development, and determined relative abundance within subdivisions and control sites across these two distinct regions. We found little support for our hypothesis. For birds in the area-sensitive, low nesting, and Neotropical migrant functional groups, relative abundance was lower in subdivisions in the Adirondacks and in Madison County, while relative abundance of edge specialists was greater in subdivisions in both regions. The direction and magnitude of change in the avian communities between subdivisions and controls was similar in both regions for all guilds except microhabitat specialists. These similarities across diverse ecosystems suggest that the ecological context of the encompassing region may be less important than other elements in shaping avian communities in exurban systems. This finding suggests that humans and their specific behaviors and activities in exurban areas may be underappreciated but potentially important drivers of change in these regions.

  16. Identifying common patterns in diverse systems: effects of exurban development on birds of the Adirondack Park and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA.

    PubMed

    Glennon, Michale J; Kretser, Heidi E; Hilty, Jodi A

    2015-02-01

    We examined the impacts of exurban development on bird communities in Essex County, New York and Madison County, Montana by comparing differences in abundance of songbirds between subdivisions and control sites in both regions. We hypothesized that impacts to bird communities would be greater in the relatively homogeneous, closed canopy Adirondack forest of northern New York State than they would be in the more naturally heterogeneous grasslands interspersed with trees and shrubs of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. We examined birds in five functional groups expected to be responsive to exurban development, and determined relative abundance within subdivisions and control sites across these two distinct regions. We found little support for our hypothesis. For birds in the area-sensitive, low nesting, and Neotropical migrant functional groups, relative abundance was lower in subdivisions in the Adirondacks and in Madison County, while relative abundance of edge specialists was greater in subdivisions in both regions. The direction and magnitude of change in the avian communities between subdivisions and controls was similar in both regions for all guilds except microhabitat specialists. These similarities across diverse ecosystems suggest that the ecological context of the encompassing region may be less important than other elements in shaping avian communities in exurban systems. This finding suggests that humans and their specific behaviors and activities in exurban areas may be underappreciated but potentially important drivers of change in these regions. PMID:25421994

  17. The Influences of Climate, Landcover, and In-lake Processes on Nitrogen Solutes and Dissolved Organic Carbon in Small Lake-Watersheds on the Southwestern Adirondack Region of New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, M.; Mitchell, M. J.; Driscoll, C. T.; Kretser, W.; Roy, K. M.

    2001-05-01

    In the Adirondack region of New York where soils and surface waters have been found to be highly sensitive to acidic deposition, precipitation concentrations of nitrate have not declined. In order to understand the responses of lake-watersheds to nitrogen deposition in the Adirondack region and to identify effective approaches to deal with potential problems associated with high N deposition, the factors regulating nitrogen solutes in discharge from lake-watersheds are being evaluated. In the present analysis, nitrogen solutes and dissolved organic carbon in two small lake-watersheds were examined from 1999 to 2000 to assess the influences of climate, land cover, and in-lake processes on these solutes in the southwestern part of the Adirondack region where wet deposition of nitrate and nitrate concentrations in surface waters were higher than in other parts of the Adirondacks. The interrelationships among nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic nitrogen, and dissolved organic carbon were evaluated to assist in characterizing the influences of the above factors.

  18. 77 FR 52058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Museum of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr... Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr., Hamilton, NY...

  19. 76 FR 48178 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Colgate University, 13 Oak Dr., Hamilton, NY 13346.... Jordan Kerber, Longyear Museum of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,...

  20. Increased NY-ESO-1 expression and reduced infiltrating CD3+ T cells in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Muzikansky, Alona; Kalil, Jorge; Festa-Neto, Cyro; Duncan, Lyn M

    2015-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen aberrantly expressed in melanomas, which may serve as a robust and specific target in immunotherapy. NY-ESO-1 antigen expression, tumor features, and the immune profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were assessed in primary cutaneous melanoma. NY-ESO-1 protein was detected in 20% of invasive melanomas (16/79), rarely in in situ melanoma (1/10) and not in benign nevi (0/20). Marked intratumoral heterogeneity of NY-ESO-1 protein expression was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression was associated with increased primary tumor thickness (P = 0.007) and inversely correlated with superficial spreading melanoma (P < 0.02). NY-ESO-1 expression was also associated with reduced numbers and density of CD3+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P = 0.017). When NY-ESO-1 protein was expressed, CD3+ T cells were less diffusely infiltrating the tumor and were more often arranged in small clusters (P = 0.010) or as isolated cells (P = 0.002) than in large clusters of more than five lymphocytes. No correlation of NY-ESO-1 expression with gender, age, tumor site, ulceration, lymph node sentinel status, or survival was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression in melanoma was associated with tumor progression, including increased tumor thickness, and with reduced tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. PMID:25954764

  1. MARBLE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, Mary M.; Hale, William N.

    1984-01-01

    The Marble Mountain Wilderness is located in the north-central Klamath Mountains of northern California. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral investigations indicate that the wilderness has areas of probable and substantiated resource potential for placer gold, for chromite, and for marble. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

  2. Mountaineering fatalities on Denali.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Campbell, Aaron D; Dow, Jennifer; Grissom, Colin K

    2008-01-01

    Mount McKinley, or Denali, is the tallest mountain in North America and attracts over 1,000 climbers annually from around the world. Since Denali is located within a national park, the National Park Service (NPS) manages mountaineering activities and attempts to maintain a balance of an adventurous experience while promoting safety. We retrospectively reviewed the fatalities on Denali from 1903 to 2006 to assist the NPS, medical personnel, and mountaineers improve safety and reduce fatalities on the mountain. Historical records and the NPS climber database were reviewed. Demographics, mechanisms, and circumstances surrounding each fatality were examined. Fatality rates and odds ratios for country of origin were calculated. From 1903 through the end of the 2006 climbing season, 96 individuals died on Denali. The fatality rate is declining and is 3.08/1,000 summit attempts. Of the 96 deaths, 92% were male, 51% occurred on the West Buttress route, and 45% were due to injuries sustained from falls. Sixty-one percent occurred on the descent and the largest number of deaths in 1 year occurred in 1992. Climbers from Asia had the highest odds of dying on the mountain. Fatalities were decreased by 53% after a NPS registration system was established in 1995. Although mountaineering remains a high-risk activity, safety on Denali is improving. Certain groups have a significantly higher chance of dying. Registration systems and screening methods provide ways to target at-risk groups and improve safety on high altitude mountains such as Denali. PMID:18331224

  3. Flow and chloride transport in the tidal Hudson River, NY

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, Lawrence A.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; de Vries, M. Peter

    1994-01-01

    A one-dimensional dynamic-flow model and a one-dimensional solute-transport model were used to evaluate the effects of hypothetical public-supply water withdrawals on saltwater intrusion in a 133-mile reach of the tidal Hudson River between Green Island dam, near Troy, N.Y., and Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. Regression techniques were used in analyses of current and extreme historical conditions, and numerical models were used to investigate the effect of various water withdrawals. Of four withdrawal scenarios investigated, simulations of a 27-day period during which discharges at Green Island dam averaged 7,090 ft3/s indicate that increasing the present Chelsea pumping-station withdrawal rate of 100 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) to 300 Mgal/d would have the least effect on upstream saltwater movement. A 90-day simulation, during which discharges at Green Island dam averaged 25,200 ft3/s, indicates that withdrawals of 1,940 Mgal/d at Chelsea would not measurably increase chloride concentrations at Chelsea under normal tidal and meteorological conditions, but withdrawals of twice that rate (3,880 Mgal/d) could increase the chloride concentration at Chelsea to 250 mg/L.

  4. 78 FR 56607 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Regulations; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY,'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 31454). We received no... Green Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard amends the..., mile 152.7, between Troy and Green Island, New York. The owner of the bridge, New York State...

  5. 33 CFR 207.600 - Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.600 Section 207.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a)-(b) (c) No vessel shall moor or anchor...

  6. 33 CFR 207.580 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.580 Section 207.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.580 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.;...

  7. 33 CFR 207.580 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.580 Section 207.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.580 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.;...

  8. 33 CFR 207.600 - Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.600 Section 207.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a)-(b) (c) No vessel shall moor or anchor...

  9. 33 CFR 207.600 - Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rochester (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.600 Section 207.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... (Charlotte) Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a)-(b) (c) No vessel shall moor or anchor...

  10. Alignment between the Science Curriculum and Assessment in Selected NY State Regents Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiufeng; Fulmer, Gavin

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on an analysis of alignment between NY state core curricula and NY Regents tests in physics and chemistry. Both the curriculum and test were represented by a two dimensional table consisting of topics and cognitive demands. The cell values of the table were numbers of major understandings in the curriculum and points of test…

  11. 33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... River South of the Troy Locks, NY. 165.165 Section 165.165 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.165 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. (b) Definitions. The...

  12. 75 FR 38710 - Special Local Regulation, Fran Schnarr Open Water Championships, Huntington Bay, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Championships, Huntington Bay, NY'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 13454). The Coast Guard received no comments...-2009-0520) in the Federal Register (74 FR 51243). The notice proposed a regulated area encompassing 100... Bay, NY in the Federal Register (75 FR 13454). This notice proposes a 100 yard regulated area...

  13. NY-ESO-1-specific immunological pressure and escape in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    von Boehmer, Lotta; Mattle, Muriel; Bode, Peter; Landshammer, Alexandro; Schäfer, Carolin; Nuber, Natko; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd; Moch, Holger; Schäfer, Niklaus; Jäger, Elke; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-01-01

    During cancer progression, malignant cells may evade immunosurveillance. However, evidence for immunological escape in humans is scarce. We report here the clinical course of a melanoma patient whose initial tumor was positive for the antigens NY-ESO-1, MAGE-C1, and Melan-A. Upon immunization with a recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox NY-ESO-1 construct, the patient experienced a mixed clinical response and spreading of the NY-ESO-1 epitopes in the CD4+ T cell compartment. After NY-ESO-1 protein + CpG immunization, the patient's anti-NY-ESO-1 IgG response increased. Over the following years, progressing lesions were resected and found to be NY-ESO-1-negative while being positive for MAGE-C1, Melan-A, and MHC-I. The fatal, inoperable brain metastasis was analyzed after his death and also proved to be NY-ESO-1-negative, while being positive for MAGE-C1 and Melan-A, as well as MHC-I. We propose that cancer control and cancer escape in this patient were governed by NY-ESO-1-specific immunological pressure. Our findings provide evidence for the existence of immunoediting and immunoescape in this cancer patient. PMID:23882157

  14. 76 FR 60962 - Noise Exposure Map Update for Buffalo Niagara International Airport, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Country Road, Suite 446, Garden City, NY 11530, Telephone (516) 227-3815. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This... Country Road, Suite 446, Garden City, 14225. Monday-Friday--9 a.m.-4 NY 11530. Monday-Friday--9 a.m.-4...

  15. 33 CFR 207.580 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.580 Section 207.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.580 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.;...

  16. Mountain-Top Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cussen, John P.

    1976-01-01

    Described is the Talcott Mountain Science Center for Student Involvement, Inc., near Hartford, Connecticut, and the programs in natural science offered at the facility and by center personnel in local schools. (SL)

  17. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... If you have fluid in your lungs (pulmonary edema), treatment may include: Oxygen A high blood pressure ...

  18. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  19. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.590 Section 207.590 Navigation and Navigable... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal... immediately to the Black Rock Lock, foot of Bridge Street, Buffalo, N.Y., telephone 876-5454. (k) Ferry...

  20. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.590 Section 207.590 Navigation and Navigable... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal... immediately to the Black Rock Lock, foot of Bridge Street, Buffalo, N.Y., telephone 876-5454. (k) Ferry...

  1. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.590 Section 207.590 Navigation and Navigable... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal... immediately to the Black Rock Lock, foot of Bridge Street, Buffalo, N.Y., telephone 876-5454. (k) Ferry...

  2. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.590 Section 207.590 Navigation and Navigable... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal... immediately to the Black Rock Lock, foot of Bridge Street, Buffalo, N.Y., telephone 876-5454. (k) Ferry...

  3. 33 CFR 207.590 - Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. 207.590 Section 207.590 Navigation and Navigable... Black Rock Canal and Lock at Buffalo, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation. (a) The term “canal... immediately to the Black Rock Lock, foot of Bridge Street, Buffalo, N.Y., telephone 876-5454. (k) Ferry...

  4. 33 CFR 165.159 - Safety Zone: New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY. 165.159 Section 165.159 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.159 Safety Zone: New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY. (a) Location. The following waters of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY are designated a...

  5. 75 FR 3249 - Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, a Subsidiary of Wyeth, Currently Known as Pfizer, Rouses Point, NY; Wyeth...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, a Subsidiary of Wyeth, Currently Known as Pfizer, Rouses Point, NY; Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, a Subsidiary of Wyeth, Currently Known as Pfizer, Chazy, NY; Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, a Subsidiary of Wyeth, Currently Known as Pfizer, Plattsburgh, NY;...

  6. The application of an integrated biogeochemical model (PnET-BGC) to five forested watersheds in the Adirondack and Catskill regions of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, L.; Driscoll, C.T.; Gbondo-Tugbawa, S.; Mitchell, M.J.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    PnET-BGC is an integrated biogeochemical model formulated to simulate the response of soil and surface waters in northern forest ecosystems to changes in atmospheric deposition and land disturbances. In this study, the model was applied to five intensive study sites in the Adirondack and Catskill regions of New York. Four were in the Adirondacks: Constable Pond, an acid-sensitive watershed; Arbutus Pond, a relatively insensitive watershed; West Pond, an acid-sensitive watershed with extensive wetland coverage; and Willy's Pond, an acid-sensitive watershed with a mature forest. The fifth was Catskills: Biscuit Brook, an acid-sensitive watershed. Results indicated model-simulated surface water chemistry generally agreed with the measured data at all five sites. Model-simulated internal fluxes of major elements at the Arbutus watershed compared well with previously published measured values. In addition, based on the simulated fluxes, element and acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) budgets were developed for each site. Sulphur budgets at each site indicated little retention of inputs of sulphur. The sites also showed considerable variability in retention of NO3-. Land-disturbance history and in-lake processes were found to be important in regulating the output of NO3- via surface waters. Deposition inputs of base cations were generally similar at these sites. Various rates of base cation outputs reflected differences in rates of base cation supply at these sites. Atmospheric deposition was found to be the largest source of acidity, and cation exchange, mineral weathering and in-lake processes served as sources of ANC. ?? 2004 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  7. Spectroscopy and Photometry of the Earth Grazer 2002 NY40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Howell, E. S.; Bus, S. J.; Hicks, M.; Reach, W. T.; Jarrett, T. H.; Binzel, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    The near Earth asteroid 2002 NY40 was discovered on July 14, 2002 by the LINEAR survey. The object was predicted to make a close pass by the Earth on August 18, which led to observations at a large range of wavelengths, including radar. The combination of visible and near infrared spectroscopy/spectrophotometry gives some indication of the composition. Thermal emission in the 3 micron spectral region gives constraints on the albedo, which is consistent with the spectral type and with the available size from the radar measurements. The lightcurve was well measured by a large number of observers, which helps to determine the rotation phase of the observations at the various wavelengths. The favorable observing conditions and rapid dissemination of the astrometry have led to a good physical characterization of this object, which is relatively rare for a newly discovered near Earth asteroid. The data sets reported in this abstract are shown.

  8. Spectroscopy and Photometry of the Earth Grazer 2002 NY40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Howell, E. S.; Bus, S. J.; Hicks, M.; Reach, W. T.; Jarrett, T. H.; Binzel, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    The near-Earth asteroid 2002 NY40 was discovered on July 14, 2002 by the LINEAR survey. The object was predicted to make a close pass by the Earth on August 18, which led to observations at a large range of wavelengths, including radar. The combination of visible and near-infrared spectroscopy/spectrophotometry gives some indication of the composition. Thermal emission in the 3-4m spectral region gives constraints on the albedo, which is consistent with the spectral type and with the available size from the radar measurements. The lightcurve was well measured by a large number of observers, which helps to determine the rotation phase of the observations at the various wavelengths. The favorable observing conditions and rapid dissemination of the astrometry have led to a good physical characterization of this object which is relatively rare for a newly discovered near-Earth asteroid.

  9. Acclimatization in the Adirondacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley, Sylvia

    1981-01-01

    A one-week introduction to winter camping and recreational skills was offered by a physical education department. Learning to cope individually and as a group with the winter environment was the course objective. Snow-shoeing and map reading were among the skills to be mastered. (JN)

  10. T cells targeting NY-ESO-1 demonstrate efficacy against disseminated neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nathan; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Barrett, David M.; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Jakobsen, Bent; Martinez, Daniel; Pawel, Bruce; June, Carl H.; Kalos, Michael D.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is expressed by many solid tumors and has limited expression by mature somatic tissues, making it a highly attractive target for tumor immunotherapy. Targeting NY-ESO-1 using engineered T cells has demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of some adult tumors. Neuroblastoma is a significant cause of cancer mortality in children, and is a tumor type shown to be responsive to immunotherapies. We evaluated a large panel of primarily resected neuroblastoma samples and demonstrated that 23% express NY-ESO-1. After confirming antigen-specific activity of T cells genetically engineered to express an NY-ESO-1 directed high-affinity transgenic T cell receptor in vitro, we performed xenograft mouse studies assessing the efficacy of NY-ESO-1-targeted T cells in both localized and disseminated models of neuroblastoma. Disease responses were monitored by tumor volume measurement and in vivo bioluminescence. After delivery of NY-ESO-1 transgenic TCR T cells, we observed significant delay of tumor progression in mice bearing localized and disseminated neuroblastoma, as well as enhanced animal survival. These data demonstrate that NY-ESO-1 is an antigen target in neuroblastoma and that targeted T cells represent a potential therapeutic option for patients with neuroblastoma. PMID:26942053

  11. A novel human-derived antibody against NY-ESO-1 improves the efficacy of chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anurag; Nuber, Natko; Esslinger, Christoph; Wittenbrink, Mareike; Treder, Martin; Landshammer, Alexandro; Noguchi, Takuro; Kelly, Marcus; Gnjatic, Sacha; Ritter, Erika; von Boehmer, Lotta; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Shiku, Hiroshi; Old, Lloyd; Ritter, Gerd; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether antibodies against intracellular tumor-associated antigens support tumor-specific immunity when administered together with a treatment that destroys the tumor. We propose that released antigens form immune complexes with the antibodies, which are then efficiently taken up by dendritic cells. We cloned the first human monoclonal antibodies against the Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen, NY-ESO-1. We tested whether the monoclonal anti-NY-ESO-1 antibody (12D7) facilitates cross-presentation of a NY-ESO-1-derived epitope by dendritic cells to human CD8+ T cells, and whether this results in the maturation of dendritic cells in vitro. We investigated the efficacy of 12D7 in combination with chemotherapy using BALB/c mice bearing syngeneic CT26 tumors that express intracellular NY-ESO-1. Human dendritic cells that were incubated with NY-ESO-1:12D7 immune complexes efficiently stimulated NY-ESO-1157–165/HLA-A2-specific human CD8+ T cells to produce interferon-γ, whereas NY-ESO-1 alone did not. Furthermore, the incubation of dendritic cells with NY-ESO-1:12D7 immune complexes resulted in the maturation of dendritic cells. Treatment of BALB/c mice that bear CT26/NY-ESO-1 tumors with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus 12D7 was significantly more effective than chemotherapy alone. We propose systemic injection of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens plus a treatment that promotes the local release of those antigens resulting in immune complex formation as a novel therapeutic modality for cancer. PMID:23390374

  12. A novel human-derived antibody against NY-ESO-1 improves the efficacy of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anurag; Nuber, Natko; Esslinger, Christoph; Wittenbrink, Mareike; Treder, Martin; Landshammer, Alexandro; Noguchi, Takuro; Kelly, Marcus; Gnjatic, Sacha; Ritter, Erika; von Boehmer, Lotta; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Shiku, Hiroshi; Old, Lloyd; Ritter, Gerd; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether antibodies against intracellular tumor-associated antigens support tumor-specific immunity when administered together with a treatment that destroys the tumor. We propose that released antigens form immune complexes with the antibodies, which are then efficiently taken up by dendritic cells. We cloned the first human monoclonal antibodies against the Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen, NY-ESO-1. We tested whether the monoclonal anti-NY-ESO-1 antibody (12D7) facilitates cross-presentation of a NY-ESO-1-derived epitope by dendritic cells to human CD8+ T cells, and whether this results in the maturation of dendritic cells in vitro. We investigated the efficacy of 12D7 in combination with chemotherapy using BALB/c mice bearing syngeneic CT26 tumors that express intracellular NY-ESO-1. Human dendritic cells that were incubated with NY-ESO-1:12D7 immune complexes efficiently stimulated NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A2-specific human CD8+ T cells to produce interferon-γ, whereas NY-ESO-1 alone did not. Furthermore, the incubation of dendritic cells with NY-ESO-1:12D7 immune complexes resulted in the maturation of dendritic cells. Treatment of BALB/c mice that bear CT26/NY-ESO-1 tumors with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus 12D7 was significantly more effective than chemotherapy alone. We propose systemic injection of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens plus a treatment that promotes the local release of those antigens resulting in immune complex formation as a novel therapeutic modality for cancer. PMID:23390374

  13. 77 FR 13592 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources... Comments and Motions To Intervene On February 24, 2012, AER NY-Gen, LLC (transferor), Eagle Creek Hydro...' Contact: Transferor: Mr. Joseph Klimaszewski, AER NY- Gen, LLC, P.O. Box 876, East Aurora, NY 14052,...

  14. 22. Jet Lowe, Photographer, June, 1978. WHEELHOUSE, MCINTYRE IRON WORKS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Jet Lowe, Photographer, June, 1978. WHEELHOUSE, MCINTYRE IRON WORKS, TAILRACE, SOUTHEAST VIEW, RIVERSIDE WALL. - Adirondack Iron & Steel Company, New Furnace, Hudson River, Tahawus, Essex County, NY

  15. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  16. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shervais, John

    2012-01-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  17. Climatic control of nitrate loss from forested watersheds in the northeast United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, M.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; Kahl, J.S.; Likens, G.E.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Pardo, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    Increased losses of nitrate from watersheds may accelerate the depletion of nutrient cations and affect the acidification and trophic status of surface waters. Patterns of nitrate concentrations and losses were evaluated in four forested watersheds (East Bear Brook Watershed, Lead Mountain, ME; Watershed 6, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, White Mountains, NH; Arbutus Watershed, Huntington Forest, Adirondack Mountains, NY; Biscuit Brook, Catskill Mountains, NY) located across the northeastern United States. A synchronous pattern was observed in nitrate concentrations of drainage waters from these four sites from 1983 through 1993. Most notably, high concentrations and high drainage water losses followed an anomalous cold period (mean daily temperature -11.4 to -16 ??C in December 1989) for all four sites. After high nitrate losses during the snowmelt of 1990, nitrate concentrations and fluxes decreased at all sites. These results suggest that climatic variation can have a major effect on nitrogen flux and cycling and may influence temporal patterns of nitrate loss in a region.

  18. 75 FR 7030 - Dawson Metal Company, Inc., Industrial Division, Jamestown, NY; Notice of Affirmative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Dawson Metal Company, Inc., Industrial Division, Jamestown, NY; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated...

  19. 75 FR 15739 - International Business Machines Corporation: Armonk, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines Corporation: Armonk, NY; Notice of... Business Machines Corporation, Armonk, New York. The petitioning group of workers is covered by...

  20. 77 FR 58439 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Northeast Corridor Between Washington, DC, New York, NY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Environmental Impact Statement for the Northeast Corridor Between Washington, DC, New York, NY and Boston, MA AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

  1. Alignment Between the Science Curriculum and Assessment in Selected NY State Regents Exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Fulmer, Gavin

    2008-08-01

    This article reports on an analysis of alignment between NY state core curricula and NY Regents tests in physics and chemistry. Both the curriculum and test were represented by a two dimensional table consisting of topics and cognitive demands. The cell values of the table were numbers of major understandings in the curriculum and points of test items in the test. The Porter alignment index was computed for each test. It was found that, overall, there was a high alignment between the NY core curriculum and the NY Regents test, and the alignment remained fairly stable from test to test. However, there were considerable discrepancies in emphases on different cognitive levels and topics between the core curriculum and the test. Issues related to the nature of alignment, and the nature and validity of content standards were raised, and implications for science curriculum and instructions were also discussed.

  2. 76 FR 4078 - Television Broadcasting Services; North Pole and Plattsburgh, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; North Pole and Plattsburgh, NY AGENCY: Federal... CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. For the reasons discussed in the preamble,...

  3. 76 FR 8654 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... the Troy Locks, NY'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 76943). We received no comments on the proposed... property, and facilitate the reasonable demands of commerce. This action will impose restrictions...

  4. 33 CFR 207.60 - Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level. 207.60 Section 207.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.60 Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level. (a) Whenever the elevation...

  5. Yucca Mountain tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This is a compilation of petrographic slides detailing the microstructure and petrographic character of the tuff deposits associated with the Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. It describes crystal structures, clay alterations, and mineral associations. The paper contains a description of the petrographic thin-sections but contains no narrative or conclusions of what the slides suggest with regards to the facility.

  6. DOE's Yucca Mountain Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States with a particular focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository site. Intended for readers who do not have a technical background, the booklet discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. An…

  7. The Strongest Mountain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monnes, Colleen

    2004-01-01

    The article describes an activity for the author's fifth-grade students called "build the strongest mountain." To them, it was not a lesson--it was a challenge. To the author, it was an activity that turned a run-of-the-mill Earth science unit into a terrific opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge of erosion and develop…

  8. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  9. Collision and mountain building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial, chronological, and genetic relationships of recent (Late Alpine) collisions to mountain building are considered at three levels of scale: (i) in separate zones of the Arabian-Caucasus segment of the Alpine-Himalayan Orogenic Belt, (ii) throughout the central segment of this belt from the Alps to the Himalalayas, and (iii) in Central Asia and other mountain belts of continents. Three stages of mountain building are distinguished at all three levels. The first stage starts with widespread collision and similar plate interactions from the end of the Eocene to the middle Miocene and is expressed in the formation of uplifts, commonly no higher than the moderately elevated level in regions that concentrate deformations of transverse shortening induced by compression. The second short stage, which embraces the Pliocene-Quaternary and occasionally the end of the Miocene, differs in general, though differentiated in the value and intensification of vertical movements, when the height of mountains increases by 2-3 times. Elevations are spread over certain platform territories and even frameworks of rift zones. This is related not so much to the intensity of compression and shortening as to the compositional transformation of the upper mantle and the lower crust, leading to their decompaction. Comparison with the Hercynian and Caledonian orogenic stages shows that the second phase, predetermined by widespread collision, reflects a more important geodynamic event expressed in a change of the global plate interaction system and its deep-seated sources.

  10. Rocky Mountain Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutkiewicz, Jody Steiner, Ed.

    This publication features articles detailing the state of educational programs in the Rocky Mountain area. The articles address: 1) the impact of physical geography on culture, education, and lifestyle; 2) the education of migrant and/or agricultural workers and their children; 3) educational needs of children in rural areas; 4) outdoor education;…

  11. The Mountaineer Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no…

  12. [Mountaineering and altitude sickness].

    PubMed

    Maggiorini, M

    2001-06-01

    Almost every second trekker or climber develops two to three symptoms of the high altitude illness after a rapid ascent (> 300 m/day) to an altitude above 4000 m. We distinguish two forms of high altitude illness, a cerebral form called acute mountain sickness and a pulmonary form called high altitude pulmonary edema. Essentially, acute mountain sickness is self-limiting and benign. Its symptoms are mild to moderate headache, loss of appetite, nausea, dizziness and insomnia. Nausea rarely progresses to vomiting, but if it does, this may anticipate a progression of the disease into the severe form of acute mountain sickness, called high altitude cerebral edema. Symptoms and signs of high altitude cerebral edema are severe headache, which is not relieved by acetaminophen, loss of movement coordination, ataxia and mental deterioration ending in coma. The mechanisms leading to acute mountain sickness are not very well understood; the loss of cerebral autoregulation and a vasogenic type of cerebral edema are being discussed. High altitude pulmonary edema presents in roughly twenty percent of the cases with mild symptoms of acute mountain sickness or even without any symptoms at all. Symptoms associated with high altitude pulmonary edema are incapacitating fatigue, chest tightness, dyspnoe at the minimal effort that advances to dyspnoe at rest and orthopnoe, and a dry non-productive cough that progresses to cough with pink frothy sputum due to hemoptysis. The hallmark of high altitude pulmonary edema is an exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Successful prophylaxis and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema using nifedipine, a pulmonary vasodilator, indicates that pulmonary hypertension is crucial for the development of high altitude pulmonary edema. The primary treatment of high altitude illness consists in improving hypoxemia and acclimatization. For prophylaxis a slow ascent at a rate of 300 m/day is recommended, if symptoms persist, acetazolamide at a

  13. Digital mountains: toward development and environment protection in mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaobo

    2007-06-01

    Former studies on mountain system are focused on the department or subject characters, i.e. different department and branches of learning carry out researches only for their individual purposes and with individual characters of the subject of interests. As a whole, their investigation is lacking of comprehensive study in combination with global environment. Ecological environment in mountain regions is vulnerable to the disturbance of human activities. Therefore, it is a key issue to coordinate economic development and environment protection in mountain regions. On the other hand, a lot of work is ongoing on mountain sciences, especially depending on the application of RS and GIS. Moreover, the development of the Digital Earth (DE) provides a clue to re-understand mountains. These are the background of the emergence of the Digital Mountains (DM). One of the purposes of the DM is integrating spatial related data and information about mountains. Moreover, the DM is a viewpoint and methodology of understanding and quantifying mountains holistically. The concept of the DM is that, the spatial and temporal data related to mountain regions are stored and managed in computers; moreover, manipulating, analyzing, modeling, simulating and sharing of the mountain information are implemented by utilizing technologies of RS, GIS, GPS, Geo-informatic Tupu, computer, virtual reality (VR), 3D simulation, massive storage, mutual operation and network communication. The DM aims at advancing mountain sciences and sustainable mountain development. The DM is used to providing information and method for coordinating the mountain regions development and environment protection. The fundamental work of the DM is the design of the scientific architecture. Furthermore, construct and develop massive databases of mountains are the important steps these days.

  14. Sediment chemistries and chironomid deformities in the Buffalo River (NY)

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, K.M.; Diggins, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    The authors examined the surficial sediment chemistry (heavy metals) and the frequency of chironomid (Diptera) larvae mouthpart deformities from multiple PONAR grabs samples at each of 20 sites along the Buffalo River (NY) area of concern (AOC). Because of the potential for patchy invertebrate distribution and high variance in sediment chemistry, repeated spatial and temporal sampling is important to obtain a better integrated picture of contamination in rivers. The findings suggest that the Buffalo River has one of the highest percentages of deformed chironomids in AOC`s of the Great Lakes basin. One river site that was traditionally thought to be a chemical hot spot was less contaminated than another downstream section. At another site, sediment concentrations for V., Mn and AS appeared to be strongly associated with the proximity of combined sewer overflows from a region which is primarily residential. Interestingly, a demonstration project of the US Army Corps of Engineers, during which three types of dredges were used to carefully remove upper sediments from two different short reaches along the river, seemed to have no significant impact on proximate sediment chemistries or biota.

  15. Status of the spruce; Fir cooperative research program

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, G.D.; Zarnoch, S.J.; Arre, T. ); Eager, C. ); Mohnen, V. ); MedLarz, S. )

    1987-01-01

    Aside from the mixed conifer forest in the San Bernadino National Forest near the Los Angeles Basin, the only significant visible decline and mortality of a U.S. forest possibly caused by regional air pollution is found in the high elevation spruce/fir forests of the Appalachians (VA, NC, TN, W VA), Adirondacks (NY), Green Mountains (VT), and the White Mountains (NH). In January, most of the scientists that have or are currently studying Spruce-Fir conditions met in Philadelphia. They came to a consensus on the regional condition of the Spruce-Fir forests. The results of that meeting are summarized.

  16. Formation of Fe/mg Smectite Under Acidic Conditions from Synthetic Adirondack Basaltic Glass: an Analog to Fe/mg Smectite Formation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Peretyazhko, T.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    Smectite has been detected as layered material hundreds of meters thick, in intracrater depositional fans, in plains sediments, and deposits at depth on Mars. If early Mars hosted a dense CO2 atmosphere, then extensive carbonate should have formed in the neutral/alkaline conditions expected for smectite formation. However, large carbonate deposits on Mars have not been discovered. Instead of neutral to moderately alkaline conditions, early Mars may have experienced mildly acidic conditions that allowed for Fe/Mg smectite formation but prevented widespread carbonate formation. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that Fe(II)/Mg saponite and nontronite can form in mildly acidic solutions (e.g., pH 4). Synthetic basaltic glass (< 53 microns) of Adirondack rock class composition was exposed to pH 4 (acetic acid buffer) and N2 purged (anoxic) solutions amended with 0 and 10 mM Mg or Fe(II). Basaltic glass in these solutions was heated to 200 C in batch reactors for 1, 7, and 14 days. X-ray diffraction analysis of reacted materials detected the presence of phyllosilicates as indicated by a approx. 15.03-15.23Angstroms (001) peak. Smectite was confirmed as the phyllosilicate after treatments with glycerol and KCl and heating to 550 C. Trioctahedral saponite was confirmed by the presence of a 4.58 to 4.63 Angstroms (02l) and 1.54Angstroms (060) peaks. Saponite concentration was highest, as indicated by XRD peak intensity, in the 10 mM Mg treatment followed by the 0 mM and then 10 mM Fe(II) treatments. This order of sapontite concentration suggests that Fe(II) additions may have a role in slowing the kinetics of saponite formation relative to the other treatments. Nontronite synthesis was attempted by exposing Adirondack basaltic glass to pH 4 oxic solutions (without N2 purge) at 200 C for 14 days. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that mixtures of trioctahedral (saponite) and dioctahedral (nontronite) may have formed in these experiments based on the 02l and 060

  17. Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite under acidic conditions from synthetic Adirondack Basaltic Glass: An Analog to Fe/Mg Smectite Formation on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, B.; Peretyazhko, T.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Smectite has been detected as layered material hundreds of meters thick, in intracrater depositional fans, in plains sediments, and deposits at depth on Mars. If early Mars hosted a dense CO2 atmosphere, then extensive carbonate should have formed in the neutral/alkaline conditions expected for smectite formation. However, large carbonate deposits on Mars have not been discovered. Instead of neutral to moderately alkaline conditions, early Mars may have experienced mildly acidic conditions that allowed for Fe/Mg smectite formation but prevented widespread carbonate formation. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that Fe(II)/Mg-saponite and nontronite can form in mildly acidic solutions (e.g., pH 4). Synthetic basaltic glass (< 53 μm) of Adirondack rock class composition was exposed to pH 4 (acetic acid buffer) and N2 purged (anoxic) solutions amended with 0 and 10 mM Mg or Fe(II). Basaltic glass in these solutions was heated to 200ºC in batch reactors for 1, 7, and 14 days. X-ray diffraction analysis of reacted materials detected the presence of phyllosilicates as indicated by a ~15.03-15.23Ǻ (001) peak. Smectite was confirmed as the phyllosilicate after treatments with glycerol and KCl and heating to 550°C. Trioctahedral saponite was confirmed by the presence of a 4.58 to 4.63 Ǻ (02l) and 1.54Ǻ (060) peaks. Saponite concentration was highest, as indicated by XRD peak intensity, in the 10 mM Mg treatment followed by the 0 mM and then 10 mM Fe(II) treatments. This order of sapontite concentration suggests that Fe(II) additions may have a role in slowing the kinetics of saponite formation relative to the other treatments. Nontronite synthesis was attempted by exposing Adirondack basaltic glass to pH 4 oxic solutions (without N2 purge) at 200ºC for 14 days. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that mixtures of trioctahedral (saponite) and dioctahedral (nontronite) may have formed in these experiments based on the 02l and 060 peaks. Mössbauer analysis

  18. Geomorphologic mapping in the Ny Ålesund area (Svalbard Island, Norway) for the analysis of geomorphologic effects on rock slopes induced by glacier retreat in climate sensitive High Arctic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccadei, Enrico; Piacentini, Tommaso; Casacchia, Ruggero; Sparapani, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    The geomorphological effects of glacial retreat, rapidly changing Arctic environments and consequent local temporary permafrost melting are several types of glacial and periglacial landforms (pingos, solifluction, drumlins, etc.) but also debris and rock falls, alluvial fan and glacial outwash development and scarp/slopes retreat and evolution. In this work we have realized a geomorphologic map of rockfalls, landslides, alluvial fans and the slopes and scarps of steep mountainsides in the Ny Ålesund area (Svalbard Island, Norway) focused on the analysis of rock falls as geomorphological effects of glacier retreat, permafrost degradation and higher temperatures on slope processes. The investigation is based on geological and geomorphological field survey, and remote sensing and aerial photo interpretation, The Ny Ålesund area landscape is characterized by rugged non-vegetated mountains only partially covered by glaciers, with steep flanks and rock scarps; the scarps are formed by different types of rocks (intrusive and effusive igneous rocks, marine sedimentary rocks); this landscape is highly affected by debris and rock falls (from scarps and slopes) forming wide talus slopes and by alluvial fan and fluvial outwash (from glaciers), which make the surface sedimentary cover of the island together with rock glaciers and moraine deposits and locally fluvial deposits. The work is focused on the comprehension of the role of different factors in inducing rock falls, alluvial fans, slope/scarps evolution in high geomorphological sensitivity environments (i.e. glacial, periglacial or mountain) including: orography, lithology, rock fracturation, morphostructural setting, meteorological context. The conclusions focus on the possible geomorphological hazards affecting the Ny Ålesund area.

  19. Yucca Mountain Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Rod

    1997-06-09

    The Department of Energy project to determine if the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is suitable for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste reached a major milestone in late April when a 25-foot-diameter tunnel boring machine ``holed through'' completing a five-mile-long, horseshoe-shaped excavation through the mountain. When the cutting-head of the giant machine broke through to daylight at the tunnel's south portal, it ended a 2 1/2-year excavation through the mountain that was completed ahead of schedule and with an outstanding safety record. Video of the event was transmitted live by satellite to Washington, DC, where it was watched by Secretary of Energy Frederico Pena and other high-level DOE officials, signifying the importance of the project's mission to find a repository for high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel produced by nuclear power plants. This critical undertaking is being performed by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The tunnel is the major feature of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), which serves as an underground laboratory for engineers and scientists to help determine if Yucca Mountain is suitable to serve as a repository for the safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Morrison Knudsen's Environmental/Government Group is providing design and construction-management services on the project. The MK team is performing final design for the ESF and viability assessment design for the underground waste repository that will be built only if the site is found suitable for such a mission. In fact, if at anytime during the ESF phase, the site is found unsuitable, the studies will be stopped and the site restored to its natural state.

  20. Comprehensive sediment quality of the NY/NJ harbor estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; O`Connor, J.

    1995-12-31

    The New York/New Jersey Harbor estuary is in the center of the most populated and industrialized area in the US. It provides habitat and sanctuary for many fish, shellfish, and birds, Years of accumulated and recent toxics contamination, primarily in sediments, has resulted in fishing bans, consumption advisories and controversy regarding disposal of dredge spoils. As part of a Management Plan for the Harbor, a strategy to manage the contaminated sediments was a necessity. Existing contaminant data for the Harbor was not sufficient to develop this strategy. The existing data had several shortcomings: biased collection locations precluded determination of areal estimates of contamination; conclusions regarding biological effects could not be made, because toxicity, chemistry and benthos usually were not determined concurrently, and large areas of the system lacked information. Additionally, datasets from the Harbor could not be aggregated, either due to incompatible gear or methods or lack of documentation as to procedures employed. To address these shortcomings, EPA Region 2, in partnership with the NY/NJ Harbor Estuary Program, NOAA and EMAP, designed a two-year program to characterize surficial sediment quality in the Harbor system. This program provides information on the extent and magnitude of sediment degradation throughout the system and within specific sub-basins. The characterization is based on the EMAP probability-based approach for describing ecological condition. Synoptic measurements of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages, toxicity and chemistry were made at 168 stations in 6 sub-basins, along with water column profiles. Areal estimates of conditions were made for each sub-basin and for the Harbor as a whole. The authors will present an overview of the current status of surficial sediment contamination, toxicity and benthic macroinvertebrate conditions in the Harbor.

  1. Strategy for monitoring T cell responses to NY-ESO-1 in patients with any HLA class I allele.

    PubMed

    Gnjatic, S; Nagata, Y; Jager, E; Stockert, E; Shankara, S; Roberts, B L; Mazzara, G P; Lee, S Y; Dunbar, P R; Dupont, B; Cerundolo, V; Ritter, G; Chen, Y T; Knuth, A; Old, L J

    2000-09-26

    NY-ESO-1 elicits frequent antibody responses in cancer patients, accompanied by strong CD8(+) T cell responses against HLA-A2-restricted epitopes. To broaden the range of cancer patients who can be assessed for immunity to NY-ESO-1, a general method was devised to detect T cell reactivity independent of prior characterization of epitopes. A recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the full cDNA sequence of NY-ESO-1 was used to transduce CD8-depleted peripheral blood lymphocytes as antigen-presenting cells. These modified antigen-presenting cells were then used to restimulate memory effector cells against NY-ESO-1 from the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Specific CD8(+) T cells thus sensitized were assayed on autologous B cell targets infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus encoding NY-ESO-1. Strong polyclonal responses were observed against NY-ESO-1 in antibody-positive patients, regardless of their HLA profile. Because the vectors do not cross-react immunologically, only responses to NY-ESO-1 were detected. The approach described here allows monitoring of CD8(+) T cell responses to NY-ESO-1 in the context of various HLA alleles and has led to the definition of NY-ESO-1 peptides presented by HLA-Cw3 and HLA-Cw6 molecules. PMID:11005863

  2. Patient-centred mountain medicine.

    PubMed

    Szawarski, Piotr; Hillebrandt, David

    2016-08-01

    Venturing into the mountains, doctors have accompanied expeditions to provide routine care to the teams, undertake research and occasionally take on a rescue role. The role of doctors practicing mountain medicine is evolving. Public health issues involving concepts of health and safety have become necessary with the coming of commercial and youth expeditions. Increasingly individuals with a disability or a medical diagnosis choose to ascend to high altitudes. Doctors become involved in assessment of risk and providing advice for such individuals. The field of mountain medicine is perhaps unique in that acceptance of risk is part of the ethos of climbing and adventure. The pursuit of mountaineering goals may represent the ultimate conquest of a disability. Knowledge of mountain environment is essential in facilitating mountain ascents for those who choose to undertake them, in spite of a disability or medical condition. PMID:27234206

  3. High precision cell slicing by harmonically actuated ultra-sharp SixNy blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hwapyeong; Li, Tao; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.; Park, Jaesung

    2015-02-01

    We describe a micro-knife system with an ultra-sharp blade that is harmonically actuated by lead zirconate titanate (PZT). In particular, harmonic actuation along its cutting direction is demonstrated to provide clean and sharp cut lines for hepatocytes. Such performance is not provided by ordinary ultrasonic actuation. The blade is 500 nm-thick silicon nitride (SixNy); it can cut a single cell. Finite element analysis and measurements of displacement around resonant frequencies were used to optimize the dimensions, driving frequency and voltage. To evaluate the cutting precision, commercial scalpels and the SixNy blade without and with harmonic actuation were compared. When used to cut primary hepatocytes in a mono-layer, a commercial stainless scalpel burst cells, and the SixNy blade without harmonic actuation cut cells with a wide and ragged line. However, due to the controlled ultrasonic mode shape, operating frequency, high frequency and low applied power, the SixNy blade with harmonic actuation at 1Vpp and 70.1 kHz provided a clean and sharp cut line which was as narrow as 2 µm. The SixNy blade with harmonic actuation has potential applications as a tool for minimally invasive surgery.

  4. Spontaneous CD8 T cell responses against the melanocyte differentiation antigen RAB38/NY-MEL-1 in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Walton, Senta M; Gerlinger, Marco; de la Rosa, Olga; Nuber, Natko; Knights, Ashley; Gati, Asma; Laumer, Monika; Strauss, Laura; Exner, Carolin; Schäfer, Niklaus; Urosevic, Mirjana; Dummer, Reinhard; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Mackensen, Andreas; Jaeger, Elke; Lévy, Frédéric; Knuth, Alexander; Jäger, Dirk; Zippelius, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    The melanocyte differentiation Ag RAB38/NY-MEL-1 was identified by serological expression cloning (SEREX) and is expressed in the vast majority of melanoma lesions. The immunogenicity of RAB38/NY-MEL-1 has been corroborated previously by the frequent occurrence of specific Ab responses in melanoma patients. To elucidate potential CD8 T cell responses, we applied in vitro sensitization with overlapping peptides spanning the RAB38/NY-MEL-1 protein sequence and the reverse immunology approach. The identified peptide RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58) exhibited a marked response in ELISPOT assays after in vitro sensitization of CD8 T cells from HLA-A *0201(+) melanoma patients. In vitro digestion assays using purified proteasomes provided evidence of natural processing of RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58) peptide. Accordingly, monoclonal RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58)-specific T cell populations were capable of specifically recognizing HLA-A2(+) melanoma cell lines expressing RAB38/NY-MEL-1. Applying fluorescent HLA-A2/RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58) multimeric constructs, we were able to document a spontaneously developed memory/effector CD8 T cell response against this peptide in a melanoma patient. To elucidate the Ag-processing pathway, we demonstrate that RAB38/NY-MEL-1(50-58) is produced efficiently by the standard proteasome and the immunoproteasome. In addition to the identification of a RAB38/NY-MEL-1-derived immunogenic CD8 T cell epitope, this study is instrumental for both the onset and monitoring of future RAB38/NY-MEL-1-based vaccination trials. PMID:17114498

  5. Application of the PnET-BGC - An integrated biogeochemical model - To assess the surface water ANC recovery in the Adirondack region of New York under three multi-pollutant proposals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2009-11-01

    SummaryWe applied an integrated biogeochemical model PnET-BGC to predict the response of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in lakes - a measure of the ability of water to neutralize inputs of strong acid - from 2001 to 2050 in the Adirondack region of New York, USA under three multi-pollutant proposal scenarios. Through model predictions, we assessed the impacts of these proposals on ecosystem recovery for research and policy initiatives. Our analysis indicated that the predicted recovery rates of surface water ANC obtained from the PnET-BGC model show low spatial autocorrelation. Predicted recovery rates are also closely related with the percentage of watershed areas of coniferous vegetation and deciduous vegetation, elevation and lake area, which turn out not to be significantly different from each other over the entire period of future scenarios (2001-2050). We applied a Geographic Weighted Regression model (GWR) to study the spatial patterns of predicted lake ANC in the Adirondacks through 2050 due to its high spatial autocorrelation. These results showed that lake depth and square of elevation can explain 40% of variation in the predicted ANC, which is 26% more variation than explained by the non-spatial Ordinary Least-Squares Regression (OLS). Our calculations also suggest that even under the Carper Bill, the most aggressive air pollutant control scenario considered, not all Adirondack lakes will recover (i.e., ANC > 50 μeq/L) from elevated acidic deposition by 2050. The research provides a basis for more informed emission controls and land use/land cover (LULC) policy-making in the north-eastern USA and elsewhere.

  6. Nobel Prize centenary: Robert Bárány and the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christophe; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-11-01

    The hundredth anniversary of Robert Bárány's Nobel Prize in Medicine offers the opportunity to highlight the importance of his discoveries on the physiology and pathophysiology of the vestibular organs. Bárány developed the method of caloric vestibular stimulation that revolutionized the investigation of the semicircular canals and that is still widely used today. Caloric vestibular stimulation launched experimental vestibular research that was relevant to comprehend the evolution of human locomotion, and Bárány's tests continue to be used in neuroscience to understand the influence of vestibular signals on bodily perceptions, cognition and emotions. Only during the last 20 years has caloric vestibular stimulation been merged with brain imaging to localize the human vestibular cortex. PMID:25517362

  7. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mountain Sickness, and Headache Print Email Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... entering your e-mail address below. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache David W. Dodick, MD, FAHS, ...

  8. Human impacts to mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2006-09-01

    Mountain streams are here defined as channel networks within mountainous regions of the world. This definition encompasses tremendous diversity of physical and biological conditions, as well as history of land use. Human effects on mountain streams may result from activities undertaken within the stream channel that directly alter channel geometry, the dynamics of water and sediment movement, contaminants in the stream, or aquatic and riparian communities. Examples include channelization, construction of grade-control structures or check dams, removal of beavers, and placer mining. Human effects can also result from activities within the watershed that indirectly affect streams by altering the movement of water, sediment, and contaminants into the channel. Deforestation, cropping, grazing, land drainage, and urbanization are among the land uses that indirectly alter stream processes. An overview of the relative intensity of human impacts to mountain streams is provided by a table summarizing human effects on each of the major mountainous regions with respect to five categories: flow regulation, biotic integrity, water pollution, channel alteration, and land use. This table indicates that very few mountains have streams not at least moderately affected by land use. The least affected mountainous regions are those at very high or very low latitudes, although our scientific ignorance of conditions in low-latitude mountains in particular means that streams in these mountains might be more altered than is widely recognized. Four case studies from northern Sweden (arctic region), Colorado Front Range (semiarid temperate region), Swiss Alps (humid temperate region), and Papua New Guinea (humid tropics) are also used to explore in detail the history and effects on rivers of human activities in mountainous regions. The overview and case studies indicate that mountain streams must be managed with particular attention to upstream/downstream connections, hillslope

  9. Gallium nitride surface protection during RTA annealing with a GaOxNy cap-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalfaoui, Wahid; Oheix, T.; Cayrel, F.; Benoit, R.; Yvon, A.; Collard, E.; Alquier, D.

    2016-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is generally considered a good candidate for power electronic devices such as Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs). Nevertheless, GaN has a strong sensitivity to high temperature treatments and a cap-layer is mandatory to protect the material surface during annealing at high temperature such as post-implantation treatments. In this work, an oxidized gallium nitride layer (GaOxNy) was generated with Oxford PECVD equipment using a N2O plasma treatment to protect the GaN surface during a rapid thermal annealing (RTA), in the range of 1000 °C-1150 °C for a few minutes. Before annealing, c-TLM patterns were processed on the GaOxNy/GaN sample to characterize its sheet resistance. After the N2O plasma treatment, the sample exhibited lower sheet resistance, indicating a better n-type conduction of the GaOxNy layer due to an excess of free carriers, compared to the as-grown GaN layer. The GaOxNy/GaN surface was then annealed at 1150 °C for 3 min and observed through AFM imaging. The surface exhibited a good quality with a low roughness, nevertheless, a low density of small hexagonal pits appeared after annealing. Finally, studies to determine an efficient etching process of the GaOxNy cap-layer were conducted using both chemical and physical approaches. We observed that efficient etching of the layer was achieved using a heated hydrofluoridric acid (HF 25%) solution. To conclude, GaOxNy has proved to be an efficient cap-layer for GaN protection at high temperature.

  10. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  11. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  12. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  13. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  14. 77 FR 63874 - Birds Eye Foods, LLC; Fulton, NY Plant; A Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Pinnacle Foods Group LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... the Federal Register on January 12, 2012 (77 FR 1951). At the request of the State Workforce Office... Employment and Training Administration Birds Eye Foods, LLC; Fulton, NY Plant; A Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of... December 21, 2011, applicable to workers and former workers of Birds Eye Foods, LLC, Fulton, NY Plant,...

  15. NY-ESO-1–specific immunological pressure and escape in a patient with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    von Boehmer, Lotta; Mattle, Muriel; Bode, Peter; Landshammer, Alexandro; Schäfer, Carolin; Nuber, Natko; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd; Moch, Holger; Schäfer, Niklaus; Jäger, Elke; Knuth, Alexander; van den Broek, Maries

    2013-01-01

    During cancer progression, malignant cells may evade immunosurveillance. However, evidence for immunological escape in humans is scarce. We report here the clinical course of a melanoma patient whose initial tumor was positive for the antigens NY-ESO-1, MAGE-C1, and Melan-A. Upon immunization with a recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox NY-ESO-1 construct, the patient experienced a mixed clinical response and spreading of the NY-ESO-1 epitopes in the CD4+ T cell compartment. After NY-ESO-1 protein + CpG immunization, the patient’s anti-NY-ESO-1 IgG response increased. Over the following years, progressing lesions were resected and found to be NY-ESO-1-negative while being positive for MAGE-C1, Melan-A, and MHC-I. The fatal, inoperable brain metastasis was analyzed after his death and also proved to be NY-ESO-1-negative, while being positive for MAGE-C1 and Melan-A, as well as MHC-I. We propose that cancer control and cancer escape in this patient were governed by NY-ESO-1-specific immunological pressure. Our findings provide evidence for the existence of immunoediting and immunoescape in this cancer patient. PMID:23882157

  16. 77 FR 9227 - AP Gas & Electric (NY), LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission AP Gas & Electric (NY), LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding of AP Gas & Electric (NY), LLC's application for market-based rate...

  17. 75 FR 19644 - West Oaks Energy NY/NE, LP; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission West Oaks Energy NY/NE, LP; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of West Oaks Energy NY/NE LP's application for...

  18. 77 FR 63290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 121-Albany, NY; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Albany Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 121--Albany, NY; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Albany Molecular Research, Inc., Subzone 121A, (Pharmaceutical Chemicals Production), Rensselaer, NY Albany Molecular Research, Inc....

  19. 78 FR 38310 - Kiwi Energy NY LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kiwi Energy NY LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate... notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of Kiwi Energy NY LLC's application for market-based...

  20. 75 FR 35016 - EDF Industrial Power Services (NY), LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission EDF Industrial Power Services (NY), LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of EDF Industrial Power Services (NY), LLC's application...Library system by clicking on the appropriate link in the above list. They are also available for...

  1. 76 FR 25300 - Foreign-Trade Zone 141-Rochester, NY; Application for Manufacturing Authority, Firth Rixson, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 141--Rochester, NY; Application for Manufacturing Authority, Firth Rixson, Inc. d/b/a Firth Rixson Monroe (Aircraft Turbine Components), Rochester, NY A request has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade...

  2. SP mountain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawson, R. F.; Hamilton, R. E.; Liskow, C. L.; Dias, A. R.; Jackson, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of synthetic aperture radar data of SP Mountain was undertaken to demonstrate the use of digital image processing techniques to aid in geologic interpretation of SAR data. These data were collected with the ERIM X- and L-band airborne SAR using like- and cross-polarizations. The resulting signal films were used to produce computer compatible tapes, from which four-channel imagery was generated. Slant range-to-ground range and range-azimuth-scale corrections were made in order to facilitate image registration; intensity corrections were also made. Manual interpretation of the imagery showed that L-band represented the geology of the area better than X-band. Several differences between the various images were also noted. Further digital analysis of the corrected data was done for enhancement purposes. This analysis included application of an MSS differencing routine and development of a routine for removal of relief displacement. It was found that accurate registration of the SAR channels is critical to the effectiveness of the differencing routine. Use of the relief displacement algorithm on the SP Mountain data demonstrated the feasibility of the technique.

  3. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2003-08-05

    This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

  4. 75 FR 27332 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC; Eagle Creek Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources... Comments and Motions To Intervene May 7, 2010. On April 30, 2010, AER NY-Gen, LLC (transferor) and Eagle.... Joseph Klimaszewski, AER NY- Gen, LLC, 613 Plank Road, Forestburgh, New York, 12777; phone (845)...

  5. Geology at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    Both advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Critics believe that there is sufficient geological evidence to rule the site unsuitable for further investigation. Some advocates claim that there is insufficient data and that investigations are incomplete, while others claim that the site is free of major obstacles. We have expanded our efforts to include both the critical evaluations of existing geological and geochemical data and the collection of field data and samples for the purpose of preparing scientific papers for submittal to journals. Summaries of the critical reviews are presented in this paper.

  6. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  7. 78 FR 33972 - Safety Zone; RXR Sea Faire Celebration Fireworks, Glen Cove, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; RXR Sea Faire Celebration Fireworks, Glen... Cove, NY for a fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect spectators...

  8. 75 FR 51167 - Northfield Bancorp, Inc., Staten Island, NY; Approval of Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Northfield Bancorp, Inc., Staten Island, NY; Approval of Conversion Application Notice is hereby given that on August 9, 2010, the Office of Thrift Supervision approved the... 1600, Jersey City, NJ 07311. Dated: August 10, 2010. By the Office of Thrift Supervision. Sandra...

  9. 75 FR 65523 - Dawson Metal Company, Inc., Industrial Division, Jamestown, NY; Notice of Negative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... on February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7030). The workers are engaged in employment related to precision sheet... Employment and Training Administration Dawson Metal Company, Inc., Industrial Division, Jamestown, NY; Notice... for workers and former workers of Dawson Metal Company, Inc., Industrial Division, Jamestown, New...

  10. 78 FR 31454 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Sec. Section Symbol U.S.C. United States... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... Green Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The...

  11. 75 FR 7044 - Samuel Aaron, Inc., Long Island City, NY; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-16

    ... Employment and Training Administration Samuel Aaron, Inc., Long Island City, NY; Notice of Negative... the Federal Register on January 25, 2010 (75 FR 3932). Pursuant to 29 CFR 90.18(c) reconsideration may... reconsideration of the decision. The TAA petition filed on behalf of workers at Samuel Aaron, Inc., Long...

  12. 78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone'' in the Federal Register (77 FR... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Proposed...

  13. 33 CFR 165.T01-0727 - Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (NAD 83). (b) Regulations. (1) The general regulations contained in 33 CFR 165.13 apply. (2) All... requirements through VTS measures, as per 33 CFR 161.11. (9) Suspension of enforcement: the Captain of the Port... Kill, NY and NJ. 165.T01-0727 Section 165.T01-0727 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  14. 33 CFR 165.T01-0727 - Regulated Navigation Area; Arthur Kill, NY and NJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (NAD 83). (b) Regulations. (1) The general regulations contained in 33 CFR 165.13 apply. (2) All... requirements through VTS measures, as per 33 CFR 161.11. (9) Suspension of enforcement: the Captain of the Port... Kill, NY and NJ. 165.T01-0727 Section 165.T01-0727 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  15. 75 FR 33329 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Lovelock Cave, Churchill County, NV. This... representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Lovelock Cave, Churchill County, NV. The remains... occupation of the cave, circa 2500-1500 B.C. The morphology of the remains is consistent with an...

  16. FIELD PERFORMANCE OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY WOODSTOVES IN GLEN FALLS, NY, 1988-89 - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of particulate emission trends for three models of catalytic and two models of non- catalytic woodstoves under in-home burning conditions during the 1988-89 heating season in Glens Falls, NY. he results (averaging 9.4 g/h and 9.4 g/kg) sh...

  17. 77 FR 42640 - Safety Zone; Can-Am Festival Fireworks, Black River Bay, Sackets Harbor, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... Waterways Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716- 843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarine... Sackets ] Harbor, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that fireworks launched proximate...

  18. 77 FR 49730 - Safety Zone; Antique Boat Show, Niagara River, Grand Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Safety Zone; Antique Boat Show, Niagara River, Grand Island, NY in the Federal Register (77 FR 13516). We... Mercurio, Chief of Waterway Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716-843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing or submitting material to...

  19. 76 FR 20530 - Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo... temporary safety zone in the Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY for the Boom Days Fireworks. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from Doug's Dive, the NFTA small boat harbor and a portion of the...

  20. 77 FR 42644 - Safety Zone; Canal Fest of the Tonawandas, Erie Canal, Tonawanda, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... Waterways Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716- 843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarine... Tonawanda, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that fireworks launched proximate to...

  1. 77 FR 30451 - Safety Zone; Olcott Fireworks, Lake Ontario, Olcott, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716-843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg.mil... near Olcott, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that fireworks launched proximate...

  2. 77 FR 39411 - Safety Zone; Village of Sackets Harbor, Lake Ontario, Sackets Harbor, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... Sector Buffalo; telephone 716- 843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg.mil . If you have questions... be held on Lake Ontario in Sackets Harbor, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that... Buffalo has determined that this temporary safety zone is necessary to ensure the safety of spectators...

  3. 77 FR 38492 - Safety Zone; Olcott Fireworks, Lake Ontario, Olcott, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information On... Fireworks, Lake Ontario, Olcott, NY in the Federal Register (77 FR 30451). We received no letters commenting... Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716- 843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg.mil . If you...

  4. 77 FR 39406 - Safety Zone; Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks, Port Bay, Wolcott, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and.... Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716- 843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg.mil . If you... display will be held on Port Bay near Wolcott, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined...

  5. 77 FR 38488 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ...-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal..., St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY in the Federal Register (77 FR 30443). We received no letters..., call or email LT Christopher Mercurio, Chief of Waterway Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector...

  6. 77 FR 39408 - Safety Zone; Buffalo July 4th Fireworks, Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Buffalo July 4th Fireworks, Lake Erie, Buffalo, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...

  7. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT: GENERAL MAIL AND VEHICLE MAINTENANCE FACILITY, UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE, BUFFALO, NY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) summarized here was conducted at a U.S.Postal Service (USPS) Facility in Buffalo, NY. The PPOA documented and quantified waste generation at the General Mail Facility (GMF) where mail is processed, and at the Vehicle Maintena...

  8. 76 FR 51885 - Safety Zone; Thunder on Niagara, Niagara River, North Tonawanda, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on Niagara River, North Tonawanda, NY. This temporary safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Niagara River during the Thunder on Niagara powerboat races. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and vessels from the hazards associated with powerboat...

  9. Exploring Management Options for Increasing Corn Land on NY Farms Affected by Rising Corn Prices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New York dairy farms use their most fertile land to produce corn silage, an important component of their production system. Increasing demand for corn by ethanol producers is driving up corn grain prices. This is introducing a major shift into the NY dairy farm system by prompting farmers to place m...

  10. Enhanced poly gate critical dimension control by using a SiOxNy ARC film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencher, Christopher; Chu, Tony; Tan, Way Tat; Zou, Gang; Lin, Qunying; Yi, Xu; Dong, Wang Xu; Wen, Ma Wei

    1997-08-01

    In this study, a silicon oxy-nitride (SiOxNy) film deposited using the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method has been developed and applied to improve poly-gate level resist line CD control. The desired optical properties of a SiOxNy anti-reflective coating (ARC) film and its optimum thickness were targeted by using a photolithography simulator. A process matrix study has led to the identification of an optimized SiOxNy film Dielectric ARC deposition process for i-line photolithography applications. Using the optimized SiOxNy film as the ARC, significant improvements, compared to the standard and top ARC techniques, have been achieved, including 5 times reduction in does to clear swing ratio and complete elimination of reflection induced photoresist notching and necking effects. Moreover, a 2500 wafer marathon run demonstrated that the refractive index, extinction coefficient and thickness of this film can be controlled to +/- 0.04, +/- 0.03 and +/- 12A, respectively and that the particle performance is excellent.

  11. 78 FR 25008 - Safety Zone; Fairfield Estates Fireworks Display, Atlantic Ocean, Sagaponack, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We..., Atlantic Ocean, Sagaponack, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking....

  12. 78 FR 41844 - Safety Zone; Fairfield Estates Fireworks Display, Atlantic Ocean, Sagaponack, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History... FR 25008). No public comments were received. There were no requests received for a public meeting and..., Atlantic Ocean, Sagaponack, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The...

  13. 78 FR 7394 - Foreign-Trade Zone 121-Albany, NY; Authorization of Production Activity; Albany Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 63290, 10/16/2012). The FTZ Board has... Molecular Research, Inc.; Subzone 121A (Pharmaceutical Chemicals Production); Rensselaer, NY On September 26, 2012, Albany Molecular Research, Inc., submitted a notification of proposed production activity to...

  14. 77 FR 51614 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Niagara County, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ..., Niagara County, N.Y. The line traverses United States Postal Service Zip Code 14305. CSXT has certified... by a state or local government entity acting on behalf of such user) regarding cessation of service... petition filed with the Board should be sent to CSXT's representative: Louis E. Gitomer, Law Offices...

  15. 77 FR 73648 - Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice of Availability of Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Albany Engineering Corporation; Notice...

  16. 77 FR 834 - Noise Exposure Map Update for Albany International Airport, Albany, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Update for Albany International Airport, Albany, NY... Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the updated noise exposure maps submitted by the Albany... exposure maps is December 19, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Suki Gill,...

  17. ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY BEHAVIOR AT DIFFERENT ALTITUDES AT NY-ALESUND DURING SPRING 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intensive field measurements of atmospheric mercury and related species were carried out in Ny Alesund, Spitsbergen during the spring of 2003 at two altitudes. Measurements were made at the Italian research station Dirigibile Italia (12m a.s.l.) and on the top of Zeppelin Mountai...

  18. 33 CFR 165.166 - Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone: Macy's July 4th Fireworks, East River, NY. 165.166 Section 165.166 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation...

  19. 33 CFR 165.172 - Safety Zone; Underwater Hazard, Gravesend Bay, Brooklyn, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; Underwater Hazard, Gravesend Bay, Brooklyn, NY. 165.172 Section 165.172 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated...

  20. 33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 165.165 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. (b) Definitions. The following... operations are not authorized to transit that portion of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when...

  1. 33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 165.165 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. (b) Definitions. The following... operations are not authorized to transit that portion of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when...

  2. 75 FR 38714 - Safety Zone; Macy's Fourth of July Fireworks Display, Hudson River, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ..., Hudson River, New York, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of the Hudson River for the Macy's... traffic from a portion of the Hudson River during the event. DATES: This rule is effective from 7 p.m....

  3. 33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 165.165 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. (b) Definitions. The following... operations are not authorized to transit that portion of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when...

  4. 77 FR 55265 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Northeast Corridor Between Washington, DC, New York, NY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... Washington, DC, New York, NY, and Boston, MA AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), U.S. Department... potential passenger rail improvements between Washington, DC, New York City, and Boston, MA was published in... and Boston, Massachusetts, FRA has decided to extend the formal comment period until Friday,...

  5. SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF METHYLENE CHLORIDE EMISSIONS FROM EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, ROCHESTER, NY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of potential control technologies for methylene chloride (also known as dichloromethane or DCM) emission sources at Eastman Kodak Company's Kodak Park facility in Rochester, NY. DCM is a solvent used by Kodak in the manufacture of cellulo...

  6. 75 FR 31511 - Oneida Financial Corp., Oneida, NY; Approval of Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Oneida Financial Corp., Oneida, NY; Approval of Conversion Application... Oneida Financial, MHC and Oneida Savings Bank, Oneida, New York, to convert to the stock form of... 20552, and the OTS Northeast Regional Office, Harborside Financial Center Plaza Five, Suite 1600,...

  7. 77 FR 5743 - Special Anchorage Areas; Port of New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public...) disestablish the western special anchorage area in Sheepshead Bay, NY; and (4) disestablish the Captain of the... vessels and dinghies to New York City property by disestablishing the western special anchorage area...

  8. 75 FR 33327 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from the Allred Bluff and Salts Bluff Rockshelters... assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional...

  9. 75 FR 33329 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from the cemetery at Kienuka, Niagara... assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional...

  10. 75 FR 36110 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Broward and Levy Counties, FL, and an unknown... assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional...

  11. NATURAL BIODEGRADATION OF NTBE ON A SITE ON LONG ISLAND, NY: SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-00170 Kolhatkar, R., Wilson*, J.T., and Hinshalwood, G. "Natural Biodegradation of NTBE on a Site on Long Island, NY." In: 6th Intl. In-Situ and On-Site Symposium on Bioremediation of MTBE, Alcohols, and Ethers, Battelle, The Si...

  12. 78 FR 52115 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Olean, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Olean, NY, as the Olean Non-Directional Beacon (NDB)...

  13. 76 FR 43712 - Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The American Museum of Natural History... human remains may contact the American Museum of Natural History. Repatriation of the human remains...

  14. 78 FR 13811 - Safety Zone; Underwater Escape Event, Seaport, East River, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... Federal Register on November 9, 2011 (76 FR 69614). ] Table 1 1. Merlini Underwater Escape Launch site... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Underwater Escape Event, Seaport, East River, NY AGENCY... escape artist event and associated pyrotechnics display. During the enforcement period, no person...

  15. 77 FR 43167 - Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking COTP... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Electric Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall... Zone; Electronic Zoo Fireworks, East River, Randall's Island, NY. (a) Regulated Area. The...

  16. Contribution of Cultural Eutrophication to Marsh Loss in Jamaica Bay (NY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Loss of salt marsh area in the Jamaica Bay Estuary (NY) has accelerated in recent years, with loss rates as high as 45 acres per year. A contributing factor to this acceleration is likely cultural eutrophication due to over 6 decades of sewage effluent inputs. We examined marsh...

  17. 78 FR 50102 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Rochester Museum & Science Center, Rochester, NY... has completed an inventory of associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of associated funerary objects under...

  18. 76 FR 43259 - Foreign-Trade Zone 109-Watertown, NY, Application for Manufacturing Authority, North American...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ..., North American Tapes, LLC, (Textile Athletic Tape), Watertown, NY A request has been submitted to the...) with textile backing material for the U.S. market and export. The manufacturing process under FTZ... textile fabrics (duty rates: 10.5, 14.9%). The facility can produce up to 12.5 million square meters...

  19. 75 FR 1660 - Disaster Declaration # 12006 and # 12007; New York Disaster # NY-00086

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Disaster Declaration 12006 and 12007; New York Disaster NY-00086 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... for Public Assistance Only for the State of New York (FEMA-- 1869--DR), dated 12/31/2009....

  20. 33 CFR 165.170 - Safety Zone: Triathlon, Ulster Landing, Hudson River, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 CFR 165.23 apply. (2) No vessels will be allowed to transit the safety zone without the permission... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: Triathlon, Ulster... § 165.170 Safety Zone: Triathlon, Ulster Landing, Hudson River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The...