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Sample records for adjacent arctic ocean

  1. Diversity and Distribution of Marine Microbial Eukaryotes in the Arctic Ocean and Adjacent Seas†‡

    PubMed Central

    Lovejoy, C.; Massana, R.; Pedrós-Alió, C.

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed microbial eukaryote diversity in perennially cold arctic marine waters by using 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. Samples were collected during concurrent oceanographic missions to opposite sides of the Arctic Ocean Basin and encompassed five distinct water masses. Two deep water Arctic Ocean sites and the convergence of the Greenland, Norwegian, and Barents Seas were sampled from 28 August to 2 September 2002. An additional sample was obtained from the Beaufort Sea (Canada) in early October 2002. The ribotypes were diverse, with different communities among sites and between the upper mixed layer and just below the halocline. Eukaryotes from the remote Canada Basin contained new phylotypes belonging to the radiolarian orders Acantharea, Polycystinea, and Taxopodida. A novel group within the photosynthetic stramenopiles was also identified. One sample closest to the interior of the Canada Basin yielded only four major taxa, and all but two of the sequences recovered belonged to the polar diatom Fragilariopsis and a radiolarian. Overall, 42% of the sequences were <98% similar to any sequences in GenBank. Moreover, 15% of these were <95% similar to previously recovered sequences, which is indicative of endemic or undersampled taxa in the North Polar environment. The cold, stable Arctic Ocean is a threatened environment, and climate change could result in significant loss of global microbial biodiversity. PMID:16672445

  2. Diversity and distribution of marine microbial eukaryotes in the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Lovejoy, C; Massana, R; Pedrós-Alió, C

    2006-05-01

    We analyzed microbial eukaryote diversity in perennially cold arctic marine waters by using 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. Samples were collected during concurrent oceanographic missions to opposite sides of the Arctic Ocean Basin and encompassed five distinct water masses. Two deep water Arctic Ocean sites and the convergence of the Greenland, Norwegian, and Barents Seas were sampled from 28 August to 2 September 2002. An additional sample was obtained from the Beaufort Sea (Canada) in early October 2002. The ribotypes were diverse, with different communities among sites and between the upper mixed layer and just below the halocline. Eukaryotes from the remote Canada Basin contained new phylotypes belonging to the radiolarian orders Acantharea, Polycystinea, and Taxopodida. A novel group within the photosynthetic stramenopiles was also identified. One sample closest to the interior of the Canada Basin yielded only four major taxa, and all but two of the sequences recovered belonged to the polar diatom Fragilariopsis and a radiolarian. Overall, 42% of the sequences were <98% similar to any sequences in GenBank. Moreover, 15% of these were <95% similar to previously recovered sequences, which is indicative of endemic or undersampled taxa in the North Polar environment. The cold, stable Arctic Ocean is a threatened environment, and climate change could result in significant loss of global microbial biodiversity. PMID:16672445

  3. Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth's four major oceans, covering 14x10(exp 6) sq km located entirely within the Arctic Circle (66 deg 33 min N). It is a major player in the climate of the north polar region and has a variable sea ice cover that tends to increase its sensitivity to climate change. Its temperature, salinity, and ice cover have all undergone changes in the past several decades, although it is uncertain whether these predominantly reflect long-term trends, oscillations within the system, or natural variability. Major changes include a warming and expansion of the Atlantic layer, at depths of 200-900 m, a warming of the upper ocean in the Beaufort Sea, a considerable thinning (perhaps as high as 40%) of the sea ice cover, a lesser and uneven retreat of the ice cover (averaging approximately 3% per decade), and a mixed pattern of salinity increases and decreases.

  4. The North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) cart site begins operation: Collaboration with SHEBA and FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, D. B.; Church, H.; Ivey, M.; Yellowhorse, L.; Zirzow, J.; Widener, K. B.; Rhodes, P.; Turney, C.; Koontz, A.; Stamnes, K.; Storvold, R.; Eide, H. A.; Utley, P.; Eagan, R.; Cook, D.; Hart, D.; Wesely, M.

    2000-04-04

    Since the 1997 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting, the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site has come into being. Much has happened even since the 1998 Science Team Meeting at which this paper was presented. To maximize its usefulness, this paper has been updated to include developments through July 1998.

  5. Integrating surface and mantle constraints for palaeo-ocean evolution: a tour of the Arctic and adjacent regions (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, Grace E.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonic reconstructions heavily rely on absolute motions derived from hotspot trails or palaeomagnetic data and ocean-floor magnetic anomaies and fracture-zone geometries to constrain the detailed history of ocean basins. However, as oceanic lithosphere is progressively recycled into the mantle, kinematic data regarding the history of these now extinct-oceans is lost. In order to better understand their evolution, novel workflows, which integrate a wide range of complementary yet independent geological and geophysical datasets from both the surface and deep mantle, must be utilised. In particular, the emergence of time-dependent, semi or self-consistent geodynamic models of ever-increasing temporal and spatial resolution are revealing some critical constraints on the evolution and fate of oceanic slabs. The tectonic evolution of the circum-Arctic is no exception; since the breakup of Pangea, this enigmatic region has seen major plate reorganizations and the opening and closure of several ocean basins. At the surface, a myriad of potential kinematic scenarios including polarity, timing, geometry and location of subduction have emerged, including for systems along continental margins and intra-oceanic settings. Furthermore, recent work has reignited a debate about the origins of 'anchor' slabs, such as the Farallon and Mongol-Okhotsk slabs, which have been used to refine absolute plate motions. Moving to the mantle, seismic tomography models reveal a region peppered with inferred slabs, however assumptions about their affinities and subduction location, timing, geometry and polarity are often made in isolation. Here, by integrating regional plate reconstructions with insights from seismic tomography, satellite derived gravity gradients, slab sinking rates and geochemistry, I explore some Mesozoic examples from the palaeo-Arctic, northern Panthalassa and western margin of North America, including evidence for a discrete and previously undescribed slab under

  6. Studying ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard Ice Breaker Healey and its United Nations Convention Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) cruises has produced new synoptic data from samples collected in the Arctic Ocean and insights into the patterns and extent of ocean acidification. This framework of foundational geochemical information will help inform our understanding of potential risks to Arctic resources due to ocean acidification.

  7. The Arctic Ocean Boundary Current along the Eurasian slope and the adjacent Lomonosov Ridge: Water mass properties, transports and transformations from moored instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodgate, Rebecca A.; Aagaard, Knut; Muench, Robin D.; Gunn, John; Björk, Göran; Rudels, Bert; Roach, A. T.; Schauer, Ursula

    2001-08-01

    Year-long (summer 1995 to 1996) time series of temperature, salinity and current velocity from three slope sites spanning the junction of the Lomonosov Ridge with the Eurasian continent are used to quantify the water properties, transformations and transport of the boundary current of the Arctic Ocean. The mean flow is cyclonic, weak (1 to 5 cm s -1), predominantly aligned along isobaths and has an equivalent barotropic structure in the vertical. We estimate the transport of the boundary current in the Eurasian Basin to be 5±1 Sv. About half of this flow is diverted north along the Eurasian Basin side of the Lomonosov Ridge. The warm waters (>1.4°C) of the Atlantic layer are also found on the Canadian Basin side of the ridge south of 86.5°N, but not north of this latitude. This suggests that the Atlantic layer crosses the ridge at various latitudes south of 86.5°N and flows southward along the Canadian Basin side of the ridge. Temperature and salinity records indicate a small (0.02 Sv), episodic flow of Canadian Basin deep water into the Eurasian Basin at ˜1700 m, providing a possible source for an anomalous eddy observed in the Amundsen Basin in 1996. There is also a similar flow of Eurasian Basin deep water into the Canadian Basin. Both flows probably pass through a gap in the Lomonosov Ridge at 80.4°N. A cooling and freshening of the Atlantic layer, observed at all three moorings, is attributed to changes (in temperature and salinity and/or volume) in the outflow from the Barents Sea the previous winter, possibly caused by an observed increased flow of ice from the Arctic Ocean into the Barents Sea. The change in water properties, which advects at ˜5 cm s -1 along the southern edge of the Eurasian Basin, also strengthens the cold halocline layer and increases the stability of the upper ocean. This suggests a feedback in which ice exported from the Arctic Ocean into the Barents Sea promotes ice growth elsewhere in the Arctic Ocean. The strongest currents

  8. Ocean acidification in the Western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, W.; Chen, B.; Chen, L.

    2011-12-01

    We report carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification status in the western Arctic Ocean from 65-88οN based on data collected in summer 2008 and 2010. In the marginal seas, surface waters have high pH and high carbonate saturation state (Ω) due to intensive biological uptake of CO2. In the southern Canada Basin, surface waters have low pH and low Ω due to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 and sea-ice melt. In the northern Arctic Ocean basin, there is no serious ocean acidification in surface water due to heavy ice-coverage but pH and Ω in the subsurface waters at the oxygen minimum and nutrient maximum zone (at 100-150 m) are low due mostly to respiration-derived CO2 and an increased biological production and export in surface waters. Such multitude responses of ocean carbonate chemistry (northern vs. southern basin, basins vs. margins, and surface vs. subsurface) to climate changes are unique to the Arctic Ocean system. We will explore biogeochemical control mechanisms on carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean environments in the context of recent warming and sea-ice retreat.

  9. Episodic fresh surface waters in the Eocene Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brinkhuis, H.; Schouten, S.; Collinson, M.E.; Sluijs, A.; Damste, J.S.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Huber, M.; Cronin, T. M.; Onodera, J.; Takahashi, K.; Bujak, J.P.; Stein, R.; Van Der Burgh, J.; Eldrett, J.S.; Harding, I.C.; Lotter, A.F.; Sangiorgi, F.; Cittert, H.V.K.V.; De Leeuw, J. W.; Matthiessen, J.; Backman, J.; Moran, K.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested, on the basis of modern hydrology and fully coupled palaeoclimate simulations, that the warm greenhouse conditions that characterized the early Palaeogene period (55-45 Myr ago) probably induced an intensified hydrological cycle with precipitation exceeding evaporation at high latitudes. Little field evidence, however, has been available to constrain oceanic conditions in the Arctic during this period. Here we analyse Palaeogene sediments obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition, showing that large quantities of the free-floating fern Azolla grew and reproduced in the Arctic Ocean by the onset of the middle Eocene epoch (???50 Myr ago). The Azolla and accompanying abundant freshwater organic and siliceous microfossils indicate an episodic freshening of Arctic surface waters during an ???800,000-year interval. The abundant remains of Azolla that characterize basal middle Eocene marine deposits of all Nordic seas probably represent transported assemblages resulting from freshwater spills from the Arctic Ocean that reached as far south as the North Sea. The termination of the Azolla phase in the Arctic coincides with a local sea surface temperature rise from ???10??C to 13??C, pointing to simultaneous increases in salt and heat supply owing to the influx of waters from adjacent oceans. We suggest that onset and termination of the Azolla phase depended on the degree of oceanic exchange between Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways.

    PubMed

    Morison, James; Kwok, Ron; Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Alkire, Matt; Rigor, Ignatius; Andersen, Roger; Steele, Mike

    2012-01-04

    Freshening in the Canada basin of the Arctic Ocean began in the 1990s and continued to at least the end of 2008. By then, the Arctic Ocean might have gained four times as much fresh water as comprised the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s, raising the spectre of slowing global ocean circulation. Freshening has been attributed to increased sea ice melting and contributions from runoff, but a leading explanation has been a strengthening of the Beaufort High--a characteristic peak in sea level atmospheric pressure--which tends to accelerate an anticyclonic (clockwise) wind pattern causing convergence of fresh surface water. Limited observations have made this explanation difficult to verify, and observations of increasing freshwater content under a weakened Beaufort High suggest that other factors must be affecting freshwater content. Here we use observations to show that during a time of record reductions in ice extent from 2005 to 2008, the dominant freshwater content changes were an increase in the Canada basin balanced by a decrease in the Eurasian basin. Observations are drawn from satellite data (sea surface height and ocean-bottom pressure) and in situ data. The freshwater changes were due to a cyclonic (anticlockwise) shift in the ocean pathway of Eurasian runoff forced by strengthening of the west-to-east Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation characterized by an increased Arctic Oscillation index. Our results confirm that runoff is an important influence on the Arctic Ocean and establish that the spatial and temporal manifestations of the runoff pathways are modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, rather than the strength of the wind-driven Beaufort Gyre circulation.

  11. Oceanic basins in prehistory of the evolution of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, V. E.; Filatova, N. I.

    2010-06-01

    During geodynamic reconstruction of the Late Mezozoic-Cenozoic evolution of the Arctic Ocean, a problem arises: did this ocean originate as a legacy structure of ancient basins, or did it evolve independently? Solution of this problem requires finding indicators of older oceanic basins within the limits of the Arctic Region. The Arctic Region has structural-material complexes of several ancient oceans, namely, Mesoproterozoic, Late Neoproterozoic, Paleozoic (Caledonian and Hercynian), Middle Paleozoic-Late Jurassic, and those of the Arctic Ocean, including the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Canadian, the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene Podvodnikov-Makarov, and the Cenozoic Eurasian basins. The appearances of all these oceans were determined by a complex of global geodynamical factors, which were principally changed in time, and, as a result of this, location and configuration of newly opened oceans, as well as ones of adjacent continents, which varied from stage to stage. By the end of the Paleozoic, fragments of the crust corresponding to Precambrian and Caledonian oceans were transported during plate-tectonic motions from southern and near equatorial latitudes to moderately high and arctic ones, and, finally, became parts of the Pangea II supercontinent. The Arctic Ocean that appeared after the Pangea II breakup (being a part of the Atlantic Ocean) has no direct either genetic or spatial relation with more ancient oceans.

  12. The Arctic Ocean carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGilchrist, G. A.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.; Tsubouchi, T.; Bacon, S.; Torres-Valdés, S.; Azetsu-Scott, K.

    2014-04-01

    We present observation based estimates of the transport of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) across the four main Arctic Ocean gateways (Davis Strait, Fram Strait, Barents Sea Opening and Bering Strait). Combining a recently derived velocity field at these boundaries with measurements of DIC, we calculated a net summertime pan-Arctic export of 231±49 Tg C yr-1. On an annual basis, we estimate that at least 166±60 Tg C yr-1 of this is due to uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere, although time-dependent changes in carbon storage are not quantified. To further understand the region's role as a carbon sink, we calculated the volume-conserved net DIC transport from beneath a prescribed mixed layer depth of 50 m, referred to as ‘interior transport', revealing an export of 61±23 Tg C yr-1. Applying a carbon framework to infer the sources of interior transport implied that this export is primarily due to the sinking and remineralisation of organic matter, highlighting the importance of the biological pump. Furthermore, we qualitatively show that the present day Arctic Ocean is accumulating anthropogenic carbon beneath the mixed layer, imported in Atlantic Water.

  13. The contiguous domains of Arctic Ocean advection: Trails of life and death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, P.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Slagstad, D.; Drinkwater, K. F.; Hopcroft, R. R.; Moore, S. E.; Ellingsen, I.; Nelson, R. J.; Carmack, E.; Popova, E.; Berge, J.

    2015-12-01

    The central Arctic Ocean is not isolated, but tightly connected to the northern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Advection of nutrient-, detritus- and plankton-rich waters into the Arctic Ocean forms lengthy contiguous domains that connect subarctic with the arctic biota, supporting both primary production and higher trophic level consumers. In turn, the Arctic influences the physical, chemical and biological oceanography of adjacent subarctic waters through southward fluxes. However, exports of biomass out of the Arctic Ocean into both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are thought to be far smaller than the northward influx. Thus, Arctic Ocean ecosystems are net biomass beneficiaries through advection. The biotic impact of Atlantic- and Pacific-origin taxa in arctic waters depends on the total supply of allochthonously-produced biomass, their ability to survive as adults and their (unsuccessful) reproduction in the new environment. Thus, advective transport can be thought of as trails of life and death in the Arctic Ocean. Through direct and indirect (mammal stomachs, models) observations this overview presents information about the advection and fate of zooplankton in the Arctic Ocean, now and in the future. The main zooplankton organisms subjected to advection into and inside the Arctic Ocean are (a) oceanic expatriates of boreal Atlantic and Pacific origin, (b) oceanic Arctic residents and (c) neritic Arctic expatriates. As compared to the Pacific gateway the advective supply of zooplankton biomass through the Atlantic gateways is 2-3 times higher. Advection characterises how the main planktonic organisms interact along the contiguous domains and shows how the subarctic production regimes fuel life in the Arctic Ocean. The main differences in the advective regimes through the Pacific and Atlantic gateways are presented. The Arctic Ocean is, at least in some regions, a net heterotrophic ocean that - during the foreseeable global warming trend - will more and more rely

  14. Ice-Free Arctic Ocean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The current warming trends in the Arctic may shove the Arctic system into a seasonally ice-free state not seen for more than one million years, according to a new report. The melting is accelerating, and researchers were unable to identify any natural processes that might slow the deicing of the Arctic. "What really makes the Arctic different from…

  15. An overview of Arctic Ocean acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, Dan

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a review of the underwater acoustics of the Arctic Ocean. It discusses the main features of the underwater acoustic environment and how they are so strongly affected by the presence of ice cover. The paper also discusses the history of Arctic Ocean acoustics research, how the motivation was originally military in character during the Cold War and how it changed to being driven by environmental considerations today. Originally, the physics of the Arctic Ocean was studied in order to predict its acoustic properties, and now acoustic techniques are used to help understand its physical environment.

  16. Arctic Ocean Paleoceanography and Future IODP Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ruediger

    2015-04-01

    Although the Arctic Ocean is a major player in the global climate/earth system, this region is one of the last major physiographic provinces on Earth where the short- and long-term geological history is still poorly known. This lack in knowledge is mainly due to the major technological/logistical problems in operating within the permanently ice-covered Arctic region which makes it difficult to retrieve long and undisturbed sediment cores. Prior to 2004, in the central Arctic Ocean piston and gravity coring was mainly restricted to obtaining near-surface sediments, i.e., only the upper 15 m could be sampled. Thus, all studies were restricted to the late Pliocene/Quaternary time interval, with a few exceptions. These include the four short cores obtained by gravity coring from drifting ice floes over the Alpha Ridge, where older pre-Neogene organic-carbon-rich muds and laminated biosiliceous oozes were sampled. Continuous central Arctic Ocean sedimentary records, allowing a development of chronologic sequences of climate and environmental change through Cenozoic times and a comparison with global climate records, however, were missing prior to the IODP Expedition 302 (Arctic Ocean Coring Expedition - ACEX), the first scientific drilling in the central Arctic Ocean. By studying the unique ACEX sequence, a large number of scientific discoveries that describe previously unknown Arctic paleoenvironments, were obtained during the last decade (for most recent review and references see Stein et al., 2014). While these results from ACEX were unprecedented, key questions related to the climate history of the Arctic Ocean remain unanswered, in part because of poor core recovery, and in part because of the possible presence of a major mid-Cenozoic hiatus or interval of starved sedimentation within the ACEX record. In order to fill this gap in knowledge, international, multidisciplinary expeditions and projects for scientific drilling/coring in the Arctic Ocean are needed. Key

  17. Mean Dynamic Topography of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Sinead Louise; Mcadoo, David C.; Laxon, Seymour W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Yi, Donghui; Ridout, Andy; Giles, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    ICESat and Envisat altimetry data provide measurements of the instantaneous sea surface height (SSH) across the Arctic Ocean, using lead and open water elevation within the sea ice pack. First, these data were used to derive two independent mean sea surface (MSS) models by stacking and averaging along-track SSH profiles gathered between 2003 and 2009. The ICESat and Envisat MSS data were combined to construct the high-resolution ICEn MSS. Second, we estimate the 5.5-year mean dynamic topography (MDT) of the Arctic Ocean by differencing the ICEn MSS with the new GOCO02S geoid model, derived from GRACE and GOCE gravity. Using these satellite-only data we map the major features of Arctic Ocean dynamical height that are consistent with in situ observations, including the topographical highs and lows of the Beaufort and Greenland Gyres, respectively. Smaller-scale MDT structures remain largely unresolved due to uncertainties in the geoid at short wavelengths.

  18. Arctic pathways of Pacific Water: Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Karcher, Michael; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Gerdes, Rüdiger; de Cuevas, Beverly; Golubeva, Elena; Kauker, Frank; Nguyen, An T.; Platov, Gennady A.; Wadley, Martin; Watanabe, Eiji; Coward, Andrew C.; Nurser, A. J. George

    2016-01-01

    Pacific Water (PW) enters the Arctic Ocean through Bering Strait and brings in heat, fresh water, and nutrients from the northern Bering Sea. The circulation of PW in the central Arctic Ocean is only partially understood due to the lack of observations. In this paper, pathways of PW are investigated using simulations with six state-of-the art regional and global Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs). In the simulations, PW is tracked by a passive tracer, released in Bering Strait. Simulated PW spreads from the Bering Strait region in three major branches. One of them starts in the Barrow Canyon, bringing PW along the continental slope of Alaska into the Canadian Straits and then into Baffin Bay. The second begins in the vicinity of the Herald Canyon and transports PW along the continental slope of the East Siberian Sea into the Transpolar Drift, and then through Fram Strait and the Greenland Sea. The third branch begins near the Herald Shoal and the central Chukchi shelf and brings PW into the Beaufort Gyre. In the models, the wind, acting via Ekman pumping, drives the seasonal and interannual variability of PW in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The wind affects the simulated PW pathways by changing the vertical shear of the relative vorticity of the ocean flow in the Canada Basin.

  19. Arctic pathways of Pacific Water: Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison experiments

    PubMed Central

    Karcher, Michael; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Gerdes, Rüdiger; de Cuevas, Beverly; Golubeva, Elena; Kauker, Frank; Nguyen, An T.; Platov, Gennady A.; Wadley, Martin; Watanabe, Eiji; Coward, Andrew C.; Nurser, A. J. George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pacific Water (PW) enters the Arctic Ocean through Bering Strait and brings in heat, fresh water, and nutrients from the northern Bering Sea. The circulation of PW in the central Arctic Ocean is only partially understood due to the lack of observations. In this paper, pathways of PW are investigated using simulations with six state‐of‐the art regional and global Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs). In the simulations, PW is tracked by a passive tracer, released in Bering Strait. Simulated PW spreads from the Bering Strait region in three major branches. One of them starts in the Barrow Canyon, bringing PW along the continental slope of Alaska into the Canadian Straits and then into Baffin Bay. The second begins in the vicinity of the Herald Canyon and transports PW along the continental slope of the East Siberian Sea into the Transpolar Drift, and then through Fram Strait and the Greenland Sea. The third branch begins near the Herald Shoal and the central Chukchi shelf and brings PW into the Beaufort Gyre. In the models, the wind, acting via Ekman pumping, drives the seasonal and interannual variability of PW in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The wind affects the simulated PW pathways by changing the vertical shear of the relative vorticity of the ocean flow in the Canada Basin.

  20. The Arctic Ocean's seasonal cycle must change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, James; Ding, Yanni

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses anticipated changes to the seasonal cycle of the Arctic Ocean along with Arctic surface climate due to the reduction of seasonal sea ice cover expected in the 21st century. Net surface shortwave radiation is a function of surface reflectivity and atmospheric transparency as well as solar declination. Recent observational studies and modeling results presented here strongly suggest that this excess heat in the summer is currently being stored locally in the form of ocean warming and sea ice melt. This heat is lost in winter/spring through surface loss through longwave and turbulent processes causing ocean cooling and the refreezing of sea ice. A striking feature of Arctic climate during the 20th century has been the enhanced warming experienced during winter in response to increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gasses. The amplitude of the seasonal cycle of surface air temperature is declining by gradually warming winter temperatures relative to summer temperatures. Bintanja and van der Linden (2013) show this process will eventually cause the 30C seasonal change in air temperature to reduce by half as seasonal sea ice disappears. The much weaker seasonal cycle of ocean temperature, which is controlled by the need to store excess surface heat seasonally, is also going to be affected by the loss of sea ice but in quite different ways. In particular the ocean will need to compensate for the loss of seasonal heat storage by the ice pack. This study examines consequences for the Arctic Ocean stratification and circulation in a suite of CMIP5 models under future emissions scenarios relative to their performance during the 20th century and to explore a range of model ocean responses to declining sea ice cover on the Arctic Ocean.

  1. Geological Structure and History of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Oleg; Morozov, Andrey; Shokalsky, Sergey; Sobolev, Nikolay; Kashubin, Sergey; Pospelov, Igor; Tolmacheva, Tatiana; Petrov, Eugeny

    2016-04-01

    New data on geological structure of the deep-water part of the Arctic Basin have been integrated in the joint project of Arctic states - the Atlas of maps of the Circumpolar Arctic. Geological (CGS, 2009) and potential field (NGS, 2009) maps were published as part of the Atlas; tectonic (Russia) and mineral resources (Norway) maps are being completed. The Arctic basement map is one of supplements to the tectonic map. It shows the Eurasian basin with oceanic crust and submerged margins of adjacent continents: the Barents-Kara, Amerasian ("Amerasian basin") and the Canada-Greenland. These margins are characterized by strained and thinned crust with the upper crust layer, almost extinct in places (South Barents and Makarov basins). In the Central Arctic elevations, seismic studies and investigation of seabed rock samples resulted in the identification of a craton with the Early Precambrian crust (near-polar part of the Lomonosov Ridge - Alpha-Mendeleev Rise). Its basement presumably consists of gneiss granite (2.6-2.2 Ga), and the cover is composed of Proterozoic quartzite sandstone and dolomite overlain with unconformity and break in sedimentation by Devonian-Triassic limestone with fauna and terrigenous rocks. The old crust is surrounded by accretion belts of Timanides and Grenvillides. Folded belts with the Late Precambrian crust are reworked by Caledonian-Ellesmerian and the Late Mesozoic movements. Structures of the South Anuy - Angayucham ophiolite suture reworked in the Early Cretaceous are separated from Mesozoides proper of the Pacific - Verkhoyansk-Kolyma and Koryak-Kamchatka belts. The complicated modern ensemble of structures of the basement and the continental frame of the Arctic Ocean was formed as a result of the conjugate evolution and interaction of the three major oceans of the Earth: Paleoasian, Paleoatlantic and Paleopacific.

  2. The Arctic Ocean Perennial Ice Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Cunningham, G. F.; Yueh, S.

    1998-01-01

    This study shows that: 1) the NSCAT backscatter fields provide an estimate of the PIZ coverage of the Arctic Ocean; and, 2) the decrease in PIZ area over the winter gives an indication of the PIZ area exported through Fram Strait.

  3. Early Tertiary climates of the Arctic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Marincovich, L.; Zinsmeister, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of Early Tertiary high latitude marine faunas (north of 65 N) is extremely limited. What published data that are available were based on small collections obtained during the early part of the 20th century. Recent work along the western part of the Arctic Ocean has greatly increased the knowledge of the composition of these faunas and climatic conditions of the high northern latitudes during the Early Tertiary. Early Eocene shallow marine faunas from the Eureka Sound Formation, Ellesmere Island (79/sup 0/ 30'N), together with similar aged faunas from Ocean Point, Alaska (72/sup 0/N) and Spitsbergen trough, Svalbard, (78/sup 0/N) indicate that temperature conditions prevailed in the high Arctic during the early Tertiary. These high latitude temperate conditions are also supported by the presence of a diverse terrestrial mammalian faunas (currently known only from Ellesmere Island) and floras. Preliminary comparisons of these faunas from the Arctic ocean with the diverse subtropical faunas from West Greenland (70/sup 0/N) indicates the presence of a major faunal discontinuity existed in the high northern latitudes during the early Tertiary. The cause of this faunal discontinuity is uncertain. It may be due to the presence of a physical barrier between the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic or it may reflect cooler climatic conditions north of 70 N.

  4. Ocean surface waves in an ice-free Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Guo

    2016-08-01

    The retreat of the Arctic ice edge implies that global ocean surface wave models have to be extended at high latitudes or even to cover the North Pole in the future. The obstacles for conventional latitude-longitude grid wave models to cover the whole Arctic are the polar problems associated with their Eulerian advection schemes, including the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) restriction on diminishing grid length towards the Pole, the singularity at the Pole and the invalid scalar assumption for vector components defined relative to the local east direction. A spherical multiple-cell (SMC) grid is designed to solve these problems. It relaxes the CFL restriction by merging the longitudinal cells towards the Poles. A round polar cell is used to remove the singularity of the differential equation at the Pole. A fixed reference direction is introduced to define vector components within a limited Arctic part in mitigation of the scalar assumption errors at high latitudes. The SMC grid has been implemented in the WAVEWATCH III model and validated with altimeter and buoy observations, except for the Arctic part, which could not be fully tested due to a lack of observations as the polar region is still covered by sea ice. Here, an idealised ice-free Arctic case is used to test the Arctic part and it is compared with a reference case with real ice coverage. The comparison indicates that swell wave energy will increase near the ice-free Arctic coastlines due to increased fetch. An expanded Arctic part is used for comparisons of the Arctic part with available satellite measurements. It also provides a direct model comparison between the two reference systems in their overlapping zone.

  5. The Cenozoic palaeoenvironment of the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, K.; Backman, J.; Brinkhuis, H.; Clemens, S.C.; Cronin, T.; Dickens, G.R.; Eynaud, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Jakobsson, M.; Jordan, R.W.; Kaminski, M.; King, J.; Koc, N.; Krylov, A.; Martinez, N.; Matthiessen, J.; McInroy, D.; Moore, T.C.; Onodera, J.; O'Regan, M.; Palike, H.; Rea, B.; Rio, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, D.C.; Stein, R.; St, John K.; Suto, I.; Suzuki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, M. E.; Yamamoto, M.; Farrell, J.; Frank, M.; Kubik, P.; Jokat, W.; Kristoffersen, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The history of the Arctic Ocean during the Cenozoic era (0-65 million years ago) is largely unknown from direct evidence. Here we present a Cenozoic palaeoceanographic record constructed from >400 m of sediment core from a recent drilling expedition to the Lomonosov ridge in the Arctic Ocean. Our record shows a palaeoenvironmental transition from a warm 'greenhouse' world, during the late Palaeocene and early Eocene epochs, to a colder 'icehouse' world influenced by sea ice and icebergs from the middle Eocene epoch to the present. For the most recent ???14 Myr, we find sedimentation rates of 1-2 cm per thousand years, in stark contrast to the substantially lower rates proposed in earlier studies; this record of the Neogene reveals cooling of the Arctic that was synchronous with the expansion of Greenland ice (???3.2 Myr ago) and East Antarctic ice (???14 Myr ago). We find evidence for the first occurrence of ice-rafted debris in the middle Eocene epoch (???45 Myr ago), some 35 Myr earlier than previously thought; fresh surface waters were present at ???49 Myr ago, before the onset of ice-rafted debris. Also, the temperatures of surface waters during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum (???55 Myr ago) appear to have been substantially warmer than previously estimated. The revised timing of the earliest Arctic cooling events coincides with those from Antarctica, supporting arguments for bipolar symmetry in climate change. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. The Cenozoic palaeoenvironment of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Moran, Kathryn; Backman, Jan; Brinkhuis, Henk; Clemens, Steven C; Cronin, Thomas; Dickens, Gerald R; Eynaud, Frédérique; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Jakobsson, Martin; Jordan, Richard W; Kaminski, Michael; King, John; Koc, Nalan; Krylov, Alexey; Martinez, Nahysa; Matthiessen, Jens; McInroy, David; Moore, Theodore C; Onodera, Jonaotaro; O'Regan, Matthew; Pälike, Heiko; Rea, Brice; Rio, Domenico; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Smith, David C; Stein, Ruediger; St John, Kristen; Suto, Itsuki; Suzuki, Noritoshi; Takahashi, Kozo; Watanabe, Mahito; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Farrell, John; Frank, Martin; Kubik, Peter; Jokat, Wilfried; Kristoffersen, Yngve

    2006-06-01

    The history of the Arctic Ocean during the Cenozoic era (0-65 million years ago) is largely unknown from direct evidence. Here we present a Cenozoic palaeoceanographic record constructed from >400 m of sediment core from a recent drilling expedition to the Lomonosov ridge in the Arctic Ocean. Our record shows a palaeoenvironmental transition from a warm 'greenhouse' world, during the late Palaeocene and early Eocene epochs, to a colder 'icehouse' world influenced by sea ice and icebergs from the middle Eocene epoch to the present. For the most recent approximately 14 Myr, we find sedimentation rates of 1-2 cm per thousand years, in stark contrast to the substantially lower rates proposed in earlier studies; this record of the Neogene reveals cooling of the Arctic that was synchronous with the expansion of Greenland ice (approximately 3.2 Myr ago) and East Antarctic ice (approximately 14 Myr ago). We find evidence for the first occurrence of ice-rafted debris in the middle Eocene epoch (approximately 45 Myr ago), some 35 Myr earlier than previously thought; fresh surface waters were present at approximately 49 Myr ago, before the onset of ice-rafted debris. Also, the temperatures of surface waters during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum (approximately 55 Myr ago) appear to have been substantially warmer than previously estimated. The revised timing of the earliest Arctic cooling events coincides with those from Antarctica, supporting arguments for bipolar symmetry in climate change.

  7. The surface Arctic Ocean: A dynamic reservoir of terrigenous dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansell, D. A.; Letscher, R. T.

    2012-04-01

    The upper mixed layer of the Arctic Ocean is a globally important sink for dissolved organic matter mobilized from adjacent continents, which in turn are subject to substantial changes with warming of the Arctic system. Understanding the dynamics and fate of this terrigenous material has become critical for our understanding the contributions of the Arctic to the global carbon cycle. Terrigenous dissolved organic carbon (tDOC) had long been viewed as highly conserved within the Arctic Ocean, yet only a fraction of that entering from the rivers survived for export to the North Atlantic. Extensive surveys of tDOC and other tracers between the shelves and the waters overlying the deep basins indicate that a large fraction of the tDOC is subject to slow mineralization. The extent of removal within the Arctic system depends then on the time scale for water mass retention; the longer the retention, the greater the remineralization within the Arctic. Remineralization of tDOC adds to the inorganic carbon inventory and seawater pCO2, thus impacting exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. This talk will begin with a global view of marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC), from which the context for tDOC in the Arctic Ocean will be established. The surface Arctic Ocean distribution of tDOC will be presented, along with consideration of its dynamics and export to the North Atlantic.

  8. Global View of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA researchers have new insights into the mysteries of Arctic sea ice, thanks to the unique abilities of Canada's Radarsat satellite. The Arctic is the smallest of the world's four oceans, but it may play a large role in helping scientists monitor Earth's climate shifts.

    Using Radarsat's special sensors to take images at night and to peer through clouds, NASA researchers can now see the complete ice cover of the Arctic. This allows tracking of any shifts and changes, in unprecedented detail, over the course of an entire winter. The radar-generated, high-resolution images are up to 100 times better than those taken by previous satellites.

    Using this new information, scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., can generate comprehensive maps of Arctic sea ice thickness for the first time. 'Before we knew only the extent of the ice cover,' said Dr. Ronald Kwok, JPL principal investigator of a project called Sea Ice Thickness Derived From High Resolution Radar Imagery. 'We also knew that the sea ice extent had decreased over the last 20 years, but we knew very little about ice thickness.'

    'Since sea ice is very thin, about 3 meters (10 feet) or less,'Kwok explained, 'it is very sensitive to climate change.'

    Until now, observations of polar sea ice thickness have been available for specific areas, but not for the entire polar region.

    The new radar mapping technique has also given scientists a close look at how the sea ice cover grows and contorts over time. 'Using this new data set, we have the first estimates of how much ice has been produced and where it formed during the winter. We have never been able to do this before, ' said Kwok. 'Through our radar maps of the Arctic Ocean, we can actually see ice breaking apart and thin ice growth in the new openings. '

    RADARSAT gives researchers a piece of the overall puzzle every three days by creating a complete image of the Arctic. NASA scientists then put those puzzle pieces

  9. The Cenozoic Arctic Ocean Unveiled through Scientific Ocean Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L.; Moran, K.; Backman, J.

    2007-12-01

    In late summer 2004, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) conducted one of the most transformational missions in the almost 40 year history of scientific ocean drilling: the Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX). This technically-challenging expedition recovered the first Cenozoic sediment record from the Arctic Ocean-extending previous records from ~1.5 Ma to an unprecedented ~56 Ma. Glimpses of the breadth of this transformation were even seen during ACEX when the massulae from fresh water ferns were found and the presence of Apectodinium augustum confirmed that the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was unexpectedly recovered. Soon after the expedition, when the cores were opened and analyzed, ice-rafted debris was found to have occurred much earlier than previously thought-in the Eocene in an environment of high organic carbon content. The initial analyses also revealed an extensive hiatus that occurred between several of the most spectacular sediment cores in terms of color, e.g. turquoise, and structure, starkly contrasting black and white crossbedding that is now dubbed the "zebra" core. The exciting early results attracted other investigators that expanded the scientific investigating team to more than 40 people. This, in turn, extended the analyses to include new studies that revealed surprisingly high Arctic Ocean surface water temperatures and a hydrologically active system during the PETM. Although the hiatus is a lost window in time for the Arctic paleoclimate record, it spawned other studies that integrated the regional tectonic history with ACEX results revealing a major oceanographic reorganization at 17.5 Ma-ventilation of the Arctic Ocean to the North Atlantic through the Fram Strait. In this overview, recent results from the large ACEX scientific "family" are summarized and include: a new age model; detailed analyses of the middle Eocene that document a unique brackish water environment; sea ice and iceberg history reconstructions and

  10. Diurnal tides in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalik, Z.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D numerical model with a space grid of about 14 km is applied to calculate diurnal tidal constituents K(1) and O(1) in the Arctic Ocean. Calculated corange and cotidal charts show that along the continental slope, local regions of increased sea level amplitude, highly variable phase and enhanced currents occur. It is shown that in these local regions, shelf waves (topographic waves) of tidal origin are generated. In the Arctic Ocean and Northern Atlantic Ocean more than 30 regions of enhanced currents are identified. To prove the near-resonant interaction of the diurnal tides with the local bottom topography, the natural periods of oscillations for all regions have been calculated. The flux of energy averaged over the tidal period depicts the gyres of semitrapped energy, suggesting that the shelf waves are partially trapped over the irregularities of the bottom topography. It is shown that the occurrence of near-resonance phenomenon changes the energy flow in the tidal waves. First, the flux of energy from the astronomical sources is amplified in the shelf wave regions, and afterwards the tidal energy is strongly dissipated in the same regions.

  11. Remote sensing of ocean color in the Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. G.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of the research are: to increase the understanding of biological production (and carbon fluxes) along the ice edge, in frontal regions, and in open water areas of the Arctic and the physical factors controlling that production through the use of satellite and aircraft remote sensing techniques; and to develop relationships between measured radiances from the Multichannel Aircraft Radiometer System (MARS) and the bio-optical properties of the water in the Arctic and adjacent seas. Several recent Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) studies in the Arctic have shown that, despite constraints imposed by cloud cover, satellite ocean color is a useful means of studying mesoscale physical and biological oceanographic phenomena at high latitudes. The imagery has provided detailed information on ice edge and frontal processes such as spring breakup and retreat of the ice edge, influence of ice on ice effects of stratification on phytoplankton production, river sediment transport, effects of spring runoff, water mass boundaries, circulation patterns, and eddy formation in Icelandic waters and in the Greenland, Barents, Norwegian, and Bering Seas.

  12. Subsurface plankton layers in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churnside, James H.; Marchbanks, Richard D.

    2015-06-01

    The first synoptic measurements of subsurface plankton layers were made in the western Arctic Ocean in July 2014 using airborne lidar. Layers were detected in open water and in pack ice where up to 90% of the surface was covered by ice. Layers under the ice were less prevalent, weaker, and shallower than those in open water. Layers were more prevalent in the Chukchi Sea than in the Beaufort Sea. Three quarters of the layers observed were thinner than 5 m. The presence of these layers, which are not adequately captured in satellite data, will influence primary productivity, secondary productivity, fisheries recruitment, and carbon export to the benthos.

  13. What Should Children Know about the Arctic Ocean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockard, James W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Lists essential information about the Arctic Ocean which should be taught in elementary social studies courses, and which teacher training programs should cover. Discusses popular misconceptions regarding the Arctic Ocean and factors, such as the coloration on maps and globes, which lead to these misconceptions. (LS)

  14. Consequences of Future Increased Arctic Runoff on Arctic Ocean Stratification, Circulation, and Sea Ice Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Nummelin, A.; Ilicak, M.; Smedsrud, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover depends strongly on the stratification of the underlying ocean, which itself depends on processes over a range of spatial scales, from circulation to shelf processes and vertical mixing. Also important for the stratification are the freshwater sources to the Arctic Ocean, including river runoff, low evaporation, and exchange with the Pacific Ocean. In the future, we expect even larger freshwater input as the global hydrological cycle accelerates, increasing high latitude precipitation and river runoff. Previous modelling studies show some robust responses to high latitude freshwater perturbations, including a strengthening of Arctic stratification and a weakening of the large-scale ocean circulation; some idealized modelling studies also document a stronger cyclonic circulation within the Arctic Ocean itself. Here, we adopt a more comprehensive modelling approach to better understand both the local processes and the broader linkages between the Arctic and surrounding oceans. We increase river runoff to the Arctic Ocean in a coupled ice--ocean general circulation model, and show contrasting responses in the polar and subpolar regions. Within the Arctic, the stratification strengthens, the halocline and Atlantic Water layer warm, and the cyclonic circulation spins up, in agreement with previous work. In the subpolar gyre region of the North Atlantic, the model simulates a colder and fresher water column with weaker barotropic circulation. In contrast to the estuarine circulation theory, the volume exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the surrounding oceans does not increase with increasing runoff. Changes in atmosphere-ocean heat exchange outside the sea ice-covered regions of the Arctic can influence the ocean-ice heat exchange within the Arctic. While these results are robust in our model, we require experiments with other model systems and more complete observational syntheses to better constrain the sensitivity of the climate system to

  15. Eocene Arctic Ocean and earth's Early Cenozoic climate

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Seasonal changes of the Arctic Ocean are an approximate microcosm of the present advanced interglacial climate of the Earth. A similar relationship has existed for several million years but was the Early Cenozoic Arctic Ocean an analog of Earth's climate, as well. Absence of polar ice during the Cretaceous is relatively well established. During the Cenozoic a worldwide decrease in mean annual ocean temperature resulted from such factors as altered oceanic circulation and lower atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels. Limited Arctic Ocean data for the middle or late Eocene indicate the presence of upwelling conditions and accompanying high productivity of diatoms, ebridians, silicoflagellates and archaeomonads. During this interval, some seasonality is suggested from the varve-like nature of a single sediment core. However, the absence of drop stones or any ice-rafted sediment supports the idea of an open water, ice-free central Arctic Ocean during this time. Latest Cretaceous Arctic Ocean sediment is interpreted to represent approximately the same conditions as those suggested for the Eocene and together with that data suggest that the central Arctic Ocean was ice-free during part if not all of the first 20 my of the Cenozoic. Sediment representing the succeeding 30 my has not been recovered but by latest Miocene or earl Pliocene, ice-rafted sediment was accumulating, both pack ice and icebergs covered the Arctic Ocean reflecting cyclic glacial climate.

  16. Microfaunal evidences for elevated pliocene temperatures in the arctic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Thomas M.; Whatley, Robin; Wood, Adrian; Tsukagoshi, Akira; Ikeya, Noriyuki; Brouwers, E. M.; Briggs, W. M.

    1993-04-01

    The migration of thermophilic marine Ostracoda into the Arctic Ocean during the Pliocene indicates that winter and summer ocean temperatures around Arctic margins were ≥ 0 °C and > 3 °C, respectively, and that ice-free conditions existed for most or all of the Arctic. By at least 3.5-3.0 Ma, probably earlier, the opening of the Bering Strait allowed marine organisms to migrate through the Arctic Ocean, mostly from the Pacific Ocean. Migrant taxa such as Cythere, Hemicythere, and Neomonoceratina are known from Pliocene deposits of Alaska and Canada as well as Neogene deposits of the North Pacific and Atlantic oceans. On the basis of ecological and Zoogeographic information on ostracode species from more than 800 modern "core top" samples for the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Arctic Oceans, we determined winter and summer temperature tolerances for migrant taxa to be at or above about 0 °C and 3 °C. This suggests ice-free summers, and probably, a perennially ice-free Arctic Ocean in some regions. Elevated water temperatures in the Arctic Ocean between 3.5 and 2.0 Ma is supported by evidence for late Pliocene increased meridional heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean.

  17. Arctic Ocean: hydrothermal activity on Gakkel Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise

    2004-03-01

    In the hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, sea water penetrates the fractured crust, becomes heated by its proximity to the hot magma, and returns to the sea floor as hot fluids enriched in various chemical elements. In contradiction to earlier results that predict diminishing hydrothermal activity with decreasing spreading rate, a survey of the ultra-slowly spreading Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) by Edmonds et al. and Michael et al. suggests that, instead of being rare, the hydrothermal activity is abundant--exceeding by at least a factor of two to three what would be expected by extrapolation from observation on faster spreading ridges. Here we use helium-3 (3He), a hydrothermal tracer, to show that this abundance of venting sites does not translate, as would be expected, into an anomalous hydrothermal 3He output from the ridge. Because of the wide implications of the submarine hydrothermal processes for mantle heat and mass fluxes to the ocean, these conflicting results call for clarification of the link between hydrothermal activity and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges.

  18. Consequences of future increased Arctic runoff on Arctic Ocean stratification, circulation, and sea ice cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nummelin, Aleksi; Ilicak, Mehmet; Li, Camille; Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean has important freshwater sources including river runoff, low evaporation, and exchange with the Pacific Ocean. In the future, we expect even larger freshwater input as the global hydrological cycle accelerates, increasing high-latitude precipitation, and river runoff. Previous modeling studies show some robust responses to high-latitude freshwater perturbations, including a strengthening of Arctic stratification and a weakening of the large-scale ocean circulation; some idealized modeling studies also document a stronger cyclonic circulation within the Arctic Ocean itself. With the broad range of scales and processes involved, the overall effect of increasing runoff requires an understanding of both the local processes and the broader linkages between the Arctic and surrounding oceans. Here we adopt a more comprehensive modeling approach by increasing river runoff to the Arctic Ocean in a coupled ice-ocean general circulation model, and show contrasting responses in the polar and subpolar regions. Within the Arctic, the stratification strengthens, the halocline and Atlantic Water layer warm, and the cyclonic circulation spins up, in agreement with previous work. In the subpolar North Atlantic, the model simulates a colder and fresher water column with weaker barotropic circulation. In contrast to the estuarine circulation theory, the volume exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the surrounding oceans does not increase with increasing runoff. While these results are robust in our model, we require experiments with other model systems and more complete observational syntheses to better constrain the sensitivity of the climate system to high-latitude freshwater perturbations.

  19. Fresh Water Content Variability in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Proshutinsky, Andrey

    2003-01-01

    Arctic Ocean model simulations have revealed that the Arctic Ocean has a basin wide oscillation with cyclonic and anticyclonic circulation anomalies (Arctic Ocean Oscillation; AOO) which has a prominent decadal variability. This study explores how the simulated AOO affects the Arctic Ocean stratification and its relationship to the sea ice cover variations. The simulation uses the Princeton Ocean Model coupled to sea ice. The surface forcing is based on NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis and its climatology, of which the latter is used to force the model spin-up phase. Our focus is to investigate the competition between ocean dynamics and ice formation/melt on the Arctic basin-wide fresh water balance. We find that changes in the Atlantic water inflow can explain almost all of the simulated fresh water anomalies in the main Arctic basin. The Atlantic water inflow anomalies are an essential part of AOO, which is the wind driven barotropic response to the Arctic Oscillation (AO). The baroclinic response to AO, such as Ekman pumping in the Beaufort Gyre, and ice meldfreeze anomalies in response to AO are less significant considering the whole Arctic fresh water balance.

  20. Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA)

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A.; Moritz, R.; Untersteiner, N.; Randall, D.A.; McPhee, M.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction of the ocean and the atmosphere is a key to understanding and ultimately predicting global climate. Our present understanding is that Arctic air-sea-ice processes influence global climate by modifying the surface albedo and the global thermohaline circulation. Although the sensitivity of global climate to processes occuring in the Arctic Ocean is widely acknowledged, there is great uncertainty about the magnitude and overall effect. To improve our knowledge of Arctic and global climate requires multivariate data sets of two kinds: An accurate climatology, including monthly mean values and variances for the major quantities that characterize the Arctic air-sea-ice system; and, Detailed process-oriented data sets that document the simultaneous temporal variations of the coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system on time scales of hours to a year. To address these issues, a program, Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) that will combine in situ observations, satellite remote sensing, analysis and modeling has been proposed. To achieve the overall scientific goals of SHEBA, the following specific issues will be addressed: Surface heat and mass budget; Arctic clouds; Upper ocean interactions; and, Coupled sensitivity of ice, atmosphere and ocean. To meet the goals and scientific objectives of SHEBA will require the following components: a one-year filed program over the Arctic Ocean pack ice, a satellite remote sensing component, and a modeling component.

  1. Arctic Ocean freshwater content changes and their causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V.; Polyakov, I. V.; Alexeev, V.; Belchansky, G. I.; Dmitrenko, I. A.; Kirillov, S.; Korablev, A.; Steele, M.; Timokhov, L. A.; Yashayaev, I.

    2006-12-01

    Recent observations show dramatic changes of the Arctic atmosphere-ice-ocean system. Here we demonstrate, through the analysis of a vast collection of previously unsynthesized observational data, that over the 20th century the central Arctic Ocean became increasingly saltier whereas long-term freshwater content (FWC) trends over the Siberian shelf show general freshening tendency. These FWC trends are modulated by strong decadal and multidecadal fluctuations with sustained and widespread spatiotemporal patterns. Associated with the multidecadal variability, the FWC record shows two periods in the 1920-30s and in recent decades when the central Arctic Ocean was saltier and two periods in the earlier century and in the 1940-70s when it was fresher. The FWC anomalies excited on arctic shelves (including anomalies resulting from river discharge inputs) and those caused by net atmospheric precipitation were too small to trigger long-term FWC variations in the central Arctic Ocean; to the contrary, they act to moderate the observed long-term central- basin FWC changes. Variability of the intermediate Atlantic Water did not have strong impact on changes of the upper Arctic Ocean water masses. Ice-ocean interactions were the key processes in shaping long-term upper Arctic Ocean FWC changes. The combined effect of ice production and melt resulted in a cumulative loss of 15 thousand cubic km of fresh water over the last 21 years. Strength of the outflow of the arctic waters (not FWC anomalies) dominates the supply of Arctic fresh water to sub-polar basins. Finally, since the high- latitude fresh water plays a crucial role in establishing and regulating global thermohaline circulation, the multi- decadal fluctuations of the freshwater content discussed here should be considered when assessing long-term climate change and variability.

  2. Fe-Mn nodules of the Mendeleev Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevskaya, E. S.; Skolotnev, S. G.

    2015-10-01

    The results of study of Fe-Mn crusts from the Mendeleev Ridge in the Arctic Ocean sampled with manipulators from a submarine are presented. In almost all the samples, the ore phase is significantly enriched in some valuable trace elements (Ni, Co, Cu, etc.), the contents of which exceed those in ores from the pelagic zones of other oceans. The high ore potential of the Arctic pelagic zone is stated and substantiated.

  3. Arctic ocean sediment texture and the Pleistocene climate cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Morris, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Arctic Ocean sediment texture accurately reflects the Plio-Pleistocene climate cycle. The precision of paleoclimate interpretation is improved when deglaciation is recognized as a distinct climate stage, overlapping both glacial and interglacial stages, and for the later Pleistocene, perhaps never completed. Oxygen isotope stratigraphy and foraminifera productivity are out of phase but can be understood in the context of the transitional nature of the glacial, deglacial and interglacial climate stages of the Arctic Ocean.

  4. Late Cretaceous seasonal ocean variability from the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew; Kemp, Alan E S; Pike, Jennifer

    2009-07-01

    The modern Arctic Ocean is regarded as a barometer of global change and amplifier of global warming and therefore records of past Arctic change are critical for palaeoclimate reconstruction. Little is known of the state of the Arctic Ocean in the greenhouse period of the Late Cretaceous epoch (65-99 million years ago), yet records from such times may yield important clues to Arctic Ocean behaviour in near-future warmer climates. Here we present a seasonally resolved Cretaceous sedimentary record from the Alpha ridge of the Arctic Ocean. This palaeo-sediment trap provides new insight into the workings of the Cretaceous marine biological carbon pump. Seasonal primary production was dominated by diatom algae but was not related to upwelling as was previously hypothesized. Rather, production occurred within a stratified water column, involving specially adapted species in blooms resembling those of the modern North Pacific subtropical gyre, or those indicated for the Mediterranean sapropels. With increased CO(2) levels and warming currently driving increased stratification in the global ocean, this style of production that is adapted to stratification may become more widespread. Our evidence for seasonal diatom production and flux testify to an ice-free summer, but thin accumulations of terrigenous sediment within the diatom ooze are consistent with the presence of intermittent sea ice in the winter, supporting a wide body of evidence for low temperatures in the Late Cretaceous Arctic Ocean, rather than recent suggestions of a 15 degrees C mean annual temperature at this time.

  5. Diversity of planktonic microorganisms in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Potvin, Marianne; Lovejoy, Connie

    2015-12-01

    The present paper begins by reviewing recent developments in our understanding of the diversity of planktonic microorganisms in the Arctic Ocean, taking into account recent data from high throughput sequencing techniques. This data has enabled deeper analysis of the many thousands of different microorganisms present in natural samples. The Arctic Ocean is similar to the other oceans in terms of the abundance and general composition of microbial communities. However, some traits are unique. For example, there are essentially no cyanobacteria in the Arctic and their ecological role seems to be taken up by picoeukaryotic algae. Recent comparisons of the bacterial communities from the two Polar oceans with those from temperate waters showed that Polar communities were closer to each other than to the lower latitude ones. However, they only shared about 15% of the taxa. Newer data considerably increases the coverage of Arctic sites sampled and indicates that bacterial communities in the Arctic vary significantly across regions and seasons. In particular several recent cruises have provided access to the Arctic Ocean during the winter, the least known season and we review two instances of active microbes during the winter. First a bloom of Thaumarchaeota that may have been based on the use of urea as a source of carbon and reducing power, and second the increase in picoeukaryotic algae as soon as light reaches the ocean in February. Both examples show that there is considerable microbial activity during the Polar winter.

  6. Deep Arctic Ocean warming during the last glacial cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Farmer, J.; Bauch, H.A.; Spielhagen, R.F.; Jakobsson, M.; Nilsson, J.; Briggs, W.M.; Stepanova, A.

    2012-01-01

    In the Arctic Ocean, the cold and relatively fresh water beneath the sea ice is separated from the underlying warmer and saltier Atlantic Layer by a halocline. Ongoing sea ice loss and warming in the Arctic Ocean have demonstrated the instability of the halocline, with implications for further sea ice loss. The stability of the halocline through past climate variations is unclear. Here we estimate intermediate water temperatures over the past 50,000 years from the Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca values of ostracods from 31 Arctic sediment cores. From about 50 to 11 kyr ago, the central Arctic Basin from 1,000 to 2,500 m was occupied by a water mass we call Glacial Arctic Intermediate Water. This water mass was 1–2 °C warmer than modern Arctic Intermediate Water, with temperatures peaking during or just before millennial-scale Heinrich cold events and the Younger Dryas cold interval. We use numerical modelling to show that the intermediate depth warming could result from the expected decrease in the flux of fresh water to the Arctic Ocean during glacial conditions, which would cause the halocline to deepen and push the warm Atlantic Layer into intermediate depths. Although not modelled, the reduced formation of cold, deep waters due to the exposure of the Arctic continental shelf could also contribute to the intermediate depth warming.

  7. Arctic Ocean basin liquid freshwater storage trend 1992-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, B.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Schauer, U.; Toole, J. M.; Krishfield, R. A.; Pisarev, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Su, J.

    2014-02-01

    Freshwater in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the regional ocean circulation, sea ice, and global climate. From salinity observed by a variety of platforms, we are able, for the first time, to estimate a statistically reliable liquid freshwater trend from monthly gridded fields over all upper Arctic Ocean basins. From 1992 to 2012 this trend was 600±300 km3 yr-1. A numerical model agrees very well with the observed freshwater changes. A decrease in salinity made up about two thirds of the freshwater trend and a thickening of the upper layer up to one third. The Arctic Ocean Oscillation index, a measure for the regional wind stress curl, correlated well with our freshwater time series. No clear relation to Arctic Oscillation or Arctic Dipole indices could be found. Following other observational studies, an increased Bering Strait freshwater import to the Arctic Ocean, a decreased Davis Strait export, and enhanced net sea ice melt could have played an important role in the freshwater trend we observed.

  8. Probable rift origin of Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tailleur, Irvin L.

    1973-01-01

    Formation of the Canada basin by post-Triassic rifting seems the most workable and logical hypothesis on the basis of available information. Speculated counterclockwise rotation of the Alaska-Chukchi continental edge best rationalizes the complex geology of northern Alaska, whereas the assumption that a single continental block was present before the Jurassic makes the best palinspastic fit for Arctic America. The Arctic Ocean is the focus of present-day spreading and probably was the focus of earlier stages of spreading in which spread of the Canada basin would have been an initial stage. Spread of the Canada basin is probable if the Atlantic formed by sea-floor spreading, because analogies between the Arctic and Atlantic edges indicate a common origin for the ocean basins. Late Cretaceous and younger deflections of the Cordillera in the Arctic and diabasic emplacements in the northern Arctic Islands may reflect later stages of spreading. Pre-Mesozoic plate tectonism may be represented by the widespread Proterozoic diabasic emplacements in the Canadian Arctic and by the Franklinian-lnnuitian tract, where the volcanogenic rocks and deformation resulted not from a classical eugeosyncline-miogeosyncline couple, but from the junction of a mid-Paleozoic continental edge and another plate on closure of a pre-Arctic Ocean.

  9. Probable rift origin of the Canada basin, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tailleur, Irvin L.

    1973-01-01

    Formation of the Canada basin by post-Triassic rifting seems the most workable and logical hypothesis with information available. Speculated counterclockwise rotation of the Alaska-Chukchi continental edge best rationalizes the complex geology of northern Alaska, whereas a single continental block before the Jurassic makes the best palinspastic fit for Arctic America. The Arctic Ocean is the focus of present-day spreading and probably was the focus of earlier stages of spreading in which spread of the Canada basin would be an initial stage. If the Atlantic formed by seafloor spreading, spread of the Canada basin is probable because analogies between the Arctic and Atlantic edges indicate a common origin for the ocean basins. Late Cretaceous and younger deflections of the Cordillera in the Arctic and diabasic emplacements in the northern Arctic Islands may reflect later stages of spreading. Pre-Mesozoic plate tectonism may be represented by the widespread Proterozoic diabasic emplacements in the Canadian Arctic and by the Franklinian-Innuitian tract where the volcanogenic rocks and deformation resulted not from a classical eugeosyncline-miogeosyncline couple but from the junction of a mid-Paleozoic continental edge and another plate on closure of a pre-Arctic Ocean.

  10. Mapping the Surficial Geology of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, D. C.; Jakobsson, M.; Gebhardt, C.; Mayer, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Surficial geologic mapping of the Arctic Ocean was undertaken to provide a basis for understanding different geologic environments in this polar setting. Mapping was based on data acquired from numerous icebreaker and submarine missions to the polar region. The intent was to create a geologic layer overlying the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean. Analysis of subbottom profiler and multibeam bathymetric data in conjunction with sediment cores and the regional morphology rendered from the IBCAO data were used to map different surficial geologic units. For a relatively small ocean basin, the Arctic Ocean reveals a plethora of margin and basin types reflecting both the complex tectonic origins of the basin and its diverse sedimentation history. Broad and narrow shelves were subjected to a complex ice-margin history in the Quaternary, and bear the sediment types and morphological features as a result. Some shelfal areas are heavily influenced by rivers. Extensive deep water ridges and plateaus are isolated from coastal input and have a long history of hemipelagic deposition. An active spreading ridge and regions of recent volcanism have volcani-clastic and heavily altered sediments. Some regions of the Arctic Ocean are proposed to have been influenced by bolide impact. The flanks of the basins demonstrate complex sedimentation patterns resulting from mass failures and ice-margin outflow. The deep basins of the Arctic Ocean are filled with turbidites resulting from these mass-flows and are interbedded with hemiplegic deposits.

  11. Riverine source of Arctic Ocean mercury inferred from atmospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jenny A.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Soerensen, Anne L.; Amos, Helen M.; Steffen, Alexandra; Sunderland, Elsie M.

    2012-07-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that accumulates in aquatic food webs. Human activities, including industry and mining, have increased inorganic mercury inputs to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Methylation of this mercury generates methylmercury, and is thus a public health concern. Marine methylmercury is a particular concern in the Arctic, where indigenous peoples rely heavily on marine-based diets. In the summer, atmospheric inorganic mercury concentrations peak in the Arctic, whereas they reach a minimum in the northern mid-latitudes. Here, we use a global three-dimensional ocean-atmosphere model to examine the cause of this Arctic summertime maximum. According to our simulations, circumpolar rivers deliver large quantities of mercury to the Arctic Ocean during summer; the subsequent evasion of this riverine mercury to the atmosphere can explain the summertime peak in atmospheric mercury levels. We infer that rivers are the dominant source of mercury to the Arctic Ocean on an annual basis. Our simulations suggest that Arctic Ocean mercury concentrations could be highly sensitive to climate-induced changes in river flow, and to increases in the mobility of mercury in soils, for example as a result of permafrost thaw and forest fires.

  12. Seasonal Changes in the Marine Production Cycles in Response to Changes in Arctic Sea Ice and Upper Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitz, Y. H.; Ashjian, C. J.; Campbell, R. G.; Steele, M.; Zhang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Significant seasonal changes in arctic sea ice have been observed in recent years, characterized by unprecedented summer melt-back. As summer sea ice extent shrinks to record low levels, the peripheral seas of the Arctic Ocean are exposed much earlier to atmospheric surface heat flux, resulting in longer and warmer summers with more oceanic heat absorption. The changing seasonality in the arctic ice/ocean system will alter the timing, magnitude, duration, and pattern of marine production cycles by disrupting key trophic linkages and feedbacks in planktonic food webs. We are using a coupled pan-arctic Biology/Ice/Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (BIOMAS) to investigate the changes in the patterns of seasonality in the arctic physical and biological system. Focus on specific regions of the Arctic, such as the Chukchi Sea, the Beaufort Sea and the adjacent central Arctic, reveals that changes in the timing of the spring bloom, its duration and the response of the secondary producers vary regionally. The major changes are, however, characterized by an earlier phytoplankton bloom and a slight increase of the biomass. In addition, the largest response in the secondary producers is seen in the magnitude of the microzooplankton concentration as well as in the period (early summer to late fall) over which the microzooplankton is present.

  13. Research Spotlight: No tipping point for Arctic Ocean ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Declines in the summer sea ice extent have led to concerns within the scientific community that the Arctic Ocean may be nearing a tipping point, beyond which the sea ice cap could not recover. In such a scenario, greenhouse gases in the atmosphere trap outgoing radiation, and as the Sun beats down 24 hours a day during the Arctic summer, temperatures rise and melt what remains of the polar sea ice cap. The Arctic Ocean, now less reflective, would absorb more of the Sun’s warmth, a feedback loop that would keep the ocean ice free. However, new research by Tietsche et al. suggests that even if the Arctic Ocean sees an ice-free summer, it would not lead to catastrophic runaway ice melt. The researchers, using a general circulation model of the global ocean and the atmosphere, found that Arctic sea ice recovers within 2 years of an imposed ice-free summer to the conditions dictated by general climate conditions during that time. Furthermore, they found that this quick recovery occurs whether the ice-free summer is triggered in 2000 or in 2060, when global temperatures are predicted to be 2°C warmer. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL045698, 2011)

  14. Pliocene palaeoceanography of the Arctic Ocean and subarctic seas.

    PubMed

    Matthiessen, Jens; Knies, Jochen; Vogt, Christoph; Stein, Ruediger

    2009-01-13

    The Pliocene is important in the geological evolution of the high northern latitudes. It marks the transition from restricted local- to extensive regional-scale glaciations on the circum-Arctic continents between 3.6 and 2.4Ma. Since the Arctic Ocean is an almost land-locked basin, tectonic activity and sea-level fluctuations controlled the geometry of ocean gateways and continental drainage systems, and exerted a major influence on the formation of continental ice sheets, the distribution of river run-off, and the circulation and water mass characteristics in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of a water mass exchange restricted to the Bering and Fram Straits on the oceanography is unknown, but modelling experiments suggest that this must have influenced the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Cold conditions associated with perennial sea-ice cover might have prevailed in the central Arctic Ocean throughout the Pliocene, whereas colder periods alternated with warmer seasonally ice-free periods in the marginal areas. The most pronounced oceanographic change occurred in the Mid-Pliocene when the circulation through the Bering Strait reversed and low-salinity waters increasingly flowed from the North Pacific into the Arctic Ocean. The excess freshwater supply might have facilitated sea-ice formation and contributed to a decrease in the Atlantic overturning circulation. PMID:18926969

  15. Biogeochemical Tracers in Arctic Rivers: Linking the Pan-Arctic Watershed to the Arctic Ocean (the PARTNERS project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R. M.; Peterson, B. J.; McClelland, J. W.

    2002-12-01

    The Arctic is undergoing unusual and apparently progressive changes in the land, ocean, and atmospheric components of the hydrologic cycle that could have long-term consequences for both local and global climate. Understanding sources and fates of river discharge is important because rivers make an enormous contribution to the freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean, presently accounting for 50 to 60 percent of all freshwater inputs. The overall objective of the PARTNERS project is to use river water chemistry as a means to study the origins and fates of continental runoff. Through a collaboration among Russian, Canadian, Germany, and U.S. scientists, we have compiled and evaluated existing biogeochemical data sets for large arctic rivers. Our synthesis of nutrient and sediment data sets has revealed large gaps and uncertainties in biogeochemical fluxes, so in the next phase of the project we will be collecting and analyzing new samples from the six largest arctic rivers (Yenisey, Lena, Ob', Mackenzie, Yukon, Kolyma). Samples will be analyzed for a wide range of constituents, focusing on compounds that can be used as tracers of river water in the Arctic Ocean or that give clues about watershed sources or processes. Sampling will occur several times per year for four years (2003-2007). This multinational, multidisciplinary project will greatly improve our understanding of land-ocean linkage in the pan-Arctic watershed.

  16. Expanded record of Quaternary oceanographic change: Amerasian Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ishman, S.E.; Polyak, L.V.; Poore, R.Z.

    1996-01-01

    Four sediment cores collected from the Northwind and Mendeleyev ridges, Arctic Ocean, from 1089 m to 1909 m water depth, provide an oceanographic record extending back into the Matuyama reversed polarity chron. Benthic foraminiferal analyses show four prominent assemblage zones: Bolivina arctica, Cassidulina teretis, Bulimina aculeata, and Oridorsalis tener from the upper Matuyama reversed polarity chronozone through the Brunhes normal polarity chronozone. These assemblage zones represent depth-dependent benthic foraminiferal biofacies changes associated with oceanographic events that occurred in the Amerasian basin at ??? 780 and 300 ka, and indicate oceanographic influence from the North Atlantic. Recognition of these benthic assemblage zones in Arctic cores from the Alpha Ridge indicates that the benthic foraminiferal zonations in intermediate to deep water (>1000 m) Arctic cores may be more useful than preexisting lithostratigraphic zonations and should provide important information pertaining to the Quaternary paleoceanographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean.

  17. Predicting the Arctic Ocean Environment in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Popova, Ekaterina; Yool, Andrew; Nurser, George

    2015-04-01

    Recent environmental changes in the Arctic have clearly demonstrated that climate change is faster and more vigorously in the Polar Regions than anywhere else. Significantly, change in the Arctic Ocean (AO) environment presents a variety of impacts, from ecological to social-economic and political. Mitigation of this change and adaptation to it requires detailed and robust environmental predictions. Here we present a detailed projection of ocean circulation and sea ice from the present until 2099, based on an eddy-permitting high-resolution global simulation of the NEMO ¼ degree ocean model. The model is forced at the surface with HadGEM2-ES atmosphere model output from the UK Met. Office IPCC Assessment Report 5 (AR5) Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario. The HadGEM2-ES simulations span 1860-2099 and are one of an ensemble of runs performed for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) and IPCC AR5. Between 2000-2009 and 2090-2099 the AO experiences a significant warming, with sea surface temperature increasing on average by about 4° C, particularly in the Barents and Kara Seas, and in the Greenland Sea and Hudson Bay. By the end of the simulation, Arctic sea ice has an average annual thickness of less than 10 cm in the central AO, and less than 0.5 m in the East-Siberian Sea and Canadian Archipelago, and disappears entirely during the Arctic summer. In summer, opening of large areas of the Arctic Ocean to the wind and surface waves leads to the Arctic pack ice cover evolving into the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ). In winter, sea ice persists until the 2030s; then it sharply declines and disappears from the Central Arctic Ocean by the end of the 21st century, with MIZ provinces remaining in winter along the Siberian, Alaskan coasts and in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Analysis of the AO circulation reveals evidence of (i) the reversal of the Arctic boundary currents in the Canadian Basin, from a weak cyclonic current in 2040-2049 to

  18. Increasing presence of Arctic Ocean deep waters in the Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somavilla Cabrillo, Raquel; Schauer, Ursula; Budeus, Gedeon

    2013-04-01

    Deep convection has been known to provide the coldest and freshest waters to the deep Greenland Sea, whose properties are balanced with the advection of warmer and saltier waters from the deep Arctic Ocean. However, during the last three decades, deep convection has come to a halt in the Greenland Sea. As previously reported and updated in this work through the analysis of the free available hydrographic data in the central Greenland Sea and in the Arctic Ocean from 1950 to 2010 (Pangaea and ICES data bases), as a consequence of this, two major hydrographic changes are observed: (1) the appearance and deepening of an intermediate temperature maximum and (2) a continuous warming and saltening of the deep Greenland Sea. The origin of both findings is found in the advection of Arctic Ocean deep waters from the Amerasian and Eurasian basins, respectively, into the central Greenland Sea. Associated to the first, a temperature increase of 0.35° C from 1993 to 2009 is observed at 1700 m. Below 2000 m, the temperature and salinity have increased at a mean rate of 0.136° C/decade and 0.01decade-1 in the last three decades. Overall, the stop of deep convection and the advection of Arctic Ocean deep waters result among the highest deep warming and saltening trends of the World Ocean in the Greenland Sea. In addition to the described update of the state of these changes, two new accomplishments are fulfilled in this study. First, in absence of deep convection, the continuous changing of the thermohaline properties of the deep Greenland Sea requires exchanges with adjacent ocean basins. This scenario enables us the estimation of the necessary transports from the deep Arctic to explain the observed changes. A transport of Eurasian Basin Deep Water of 0.31±0.04 Sv is obtained. Secondly, the warming and saltening of the deep Greenland Sea contributes, as any other ocean basin, to the World Ocean heat content and sea level rise. The estimation of these contributions shows larger

  19. Modern benthic foraminifer distribution in the Amerasian Basin, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ishman, S.E.; Foley, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 38 box cores were collected from the Amerasian Basin, Arctic Ocean during the U.S. Geological Survey 1992 (PI92-AR) and 1993 (PI93-AR) Arctic Cruises aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker Polar Star. In addition, the cruises collected geophysical data, piston cores and hydrographic data to address the geologic and oceanographic history of the western Arctic Ocean. This paper reports the results of the quantitative analyses of benthic foraminifer distribution data of the total (live + dead) assemblages derived from 22 box core-top samples. The results show that a distinct depth distribution of three dominant benthic foraminifer assemblages, the Textularia spp. - Spiroplectammina biformis, Cassidulina teretis and Oridorsalis tener - Eponides tumidulus Biofacies are strongly controlled by the dominant water masses within the Canada Basin: the Arctic Surface Water, Arctic Intermediate Water and Canada Basin Deep Water. The faunal distributions and their oceanographic associations in the Canada Basin are consistent with observations of benthic foraminifer distributions from other regions within the Arctic Ocean.

  20. Arctic Ocean freshwater as a trigger for abrupt climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Raymond; Condron, Alan; Coletti, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    The cause of the Younger Dryas cooling remains unresolved despite decades of debate. Current arguments focus on either freshwater from Glacial Lake Agassiz drainage through the St Lawrence or the MacKenzie river systems. High resolution ocean modeling suggests that freshwater delivered to the North Atlantic from the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait would have had more of an impact on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) than freshwater from the St Lawrence. This has been interpreted as an argument for a MacKenzie River /Lake Agassiz freshwater source. However, it is important to note that although the modeling identifies Fram Strait as the optimum location for delivery of freshwater to disrupt the AMOC, this does not mean the freshwater source came from Lake Agassiz. Another potential source of freshwater is the Arctic Ocean ice cover itself. During the LGM, ice cover was extremely thick - many tens of meters in the Canada Basin (at least), resulting in a hiatus in sediment deposition there. Extreme ice thickness was related to a stagnant circulation, very low temperatures and continuous accumulation of snow on top of a base of sea-ice. This resulted in a large accumulation of freshwater in the Arctic Basin. As sea-level rose and a more modern circulation regime became established in the Arctic, this freshwater was released from the Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait, leading to extensive sea-ice formation in the North Atlantic (Greenland Sea) and a major reduction in the AMOC. Here we present new model results and a review of the paleoceanographic evidence to support this hypothesis. The bottom line is that the Arctic Ocean was likely a major player in causing abrupt climate change in the past, via its influence on the AMOC. Although we focus here on the Younger Dryas, the Arctic Ocean has been repeatedly isolated from the world ocean during glacial periods of the past. When these periods of isolation ended, it is probable that there were significant

  1. Arctic Ocean Gravity Field Derived From ERS-1 Satellite Altimetry.

    PubMed

    Laxon, S; McAdoo, D

    1994-07-29

    The derivation of a marine gravity field from satellite altimetry over permanently ice-covered regions of the Arctic Ocean provides much new geophysical information about the structure and development of the Arctic sea floor. The Arctic Ocean, because of its remote location and perpetual ice cover, remains from a tectonic point of view the most poorly understood ocean basin on Earth. A gravity field has been derived with data from the ERS-1 radar altimeter, including permanently ice-covered regions. The gravity field described here clearly delineates sections of the Arctic Basin margin along with the tips of the Lomonosov and Arctic mid-ocean ridges. Several important tectonic features of the Amerasia Basin are clearly expressed in this gravity field. These include the Mendeleev Ridge; the Northwind Ridge; details of the Chukchi Borderland; and a north-south trending, linear feature in the middle of the Canada Basin that apparently represents an extinct spreading center that "died" in the Mesozoic. Some tectonic models of the Canada Basin have proposed such a failed spreading center, but its actual existence and location were heretofore unknown.

  2. Sea-ice distribution in the modern Arctic Ocean: Biomarker records from trans-Arctic Ocean surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiaotong; Fahl, Kirsten; Müller, Juliane; Stein, Ruediger

    2015-04-01

    Records of the spatial and temporal variability of Arctic Ocean sea ice are of significance for understanding the causes of the dramatic decrease in Arctic sea-ice cover of recent years. In this context, the newly developed sea-ice proxy IP25, a mono-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid alkene with 25 carbon atoms biosynthesized specifically by sea-ice associated diatoms and only found in Arctic and sub-Arctic marine sediments, has been used to reconstruct the recent spatial sea-ice distribution. The phytoplankton biomarkers 24S-brassicasterol and dinosterol were determined alongside IP25 to distinguish ice-free or permanent ice conditions, and to estimate the sea-ice conditions semi-quantitatively by means of the phytoplankton-IP25 index (PIP25). Within our study, for the first time a comprehensive data set of these biomarkers was produced using fresh and deep-frozen surface sediment samples from the Central Arctic Ocean proper (>80°N latitude) characterised by a permanent ice cover today and recently obtained surface sediment samples from the Chukchi Plateau/Basin partly covered by perennial sea ice. In addition, published and new data from other Arctic and sub-Arctic regions were added to generate overview distribution maps of IP25 and phytoplankton biomarkers across major parts of the modern Arctic Ocean. These comprehensive biomarker data indicate perennial sea-ice cover in the Central Arctic, ice-free conditions in the Barents Sea and variable sea-ice situations in other marginal seas. The low but more than zero values of biomarkers in the Central Arctic supported the low in-situ productivity there. The PIP25 index values reflect modern sea-ice conditions better than IP25 alone and show a positive correlation with spring/summer sea ice. When calculating and interpreting PIP25 index as a (semi-quantitative) proxy for reconstructions of present and past Arctic sea-ice conditions from different Arctic/sub-Arctic areas, information of the source of

  3. Overarching perspectives of contemporary and future ecosystems in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic region has a number of specific characteristics that provide the region an exceptional global position. It comprises 5% of the earth surface, 1% of world ocean volume, 3% of world ocean area, 25% of world continental shelf, 35% of world coastline, 11% of global river runoff and 20 of worlds 100 longest rivers. The Arctic region encompasses only 0.05% of the global population, but 22% undiscovered petroleum, 15% of global petroleum production, many metals and non-metals resources and support major global fisheries (60 and 80°N). In times of increasing resource demand and limitation the world focuses increasingly onto the Arctic Ocean (AO) and adjacent regions. This development is emphasised by the recent awareness of rapid climate change in the AO, the most significant on the globe, and has resulted in increased attention to the oceanography of the high north. The loss of Arctic sea ice has emerged as a leading signal of global warming. It is taking place at a rate 2-3 times faster than global rates and sea-ice cover has decreased more than 10% per decade, while sea-ice volume may have been reduced by minimum 40% over the last 30 years (Meier et al., 2014). The reduction of ice cover and thickness makes the region available for commercial interest. The region drives also critical effects on the biophysical, political and economic system of the Northern Hemisphere (e.g., Grambling, 2015). These striking changes in physical forcing have left marine ecological footprints of climate change in the Arctic ecosystem (Wassmann et al., 2011). However, predicting the future of the pan-Arctic ecosystem remains a challenge not only because of the ever-accelerating nature of both physical and biological alterations, but also because of lack of marine ecological knowledge, that is staggering for the majority of regions (except the Barents, Chukchi and Beaufort seas).

  4. Central American paleogeography controlled Pliocene Arctic Ocean molluscan migrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marincovich, Louie, Jr.

    2000-06-01

    The Pliocene interchange of North Pacific and North Atlantic marine faunas via the Arctic Ocean was long thought to have been a single episode of faunal exchange between the northern oceans that took place as soon as the Bering Strait first opened. New evidence implies that there were two northern migration events instead of one, and that the second phase of migration was much later than the first. The migration of Atlantic-Arctic mollusks into the Bering Sea and North Pacific when the Bering Strait first opened at 4.8 5.5 Ma constituted the initial phase of this interchange, but the abrupt appearance of North Pacific mollusks in the North Atlantic at 3.6 Ma postdated the first opening of the Bering Strait by 1.2 1.9 m.y. This second phase of trans-Arctic migration was also coeval with shoaling of the Central American seaway between North and South America. This late Pliocene trans-Arctic migration of North Pacific mollusks is evidence for the reversal of marine flow to northward through the Bering Strait, which was one consequence of the reorganization of Northern Hemisphere ocean circulation caused by substantial closure of the Central American seaway. This inferred causal link between the histories of the Beringian and Panamanian ocean gateways is in agreement with ocean circulation models.

  5. Arctic-COLORS (Coastal Land Ocean Interactions in the Arctic) - a NASA field campaign scoping study to examine land-ocean interactions in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernes, P.; Tzortziou, M.; Salisbury, J.; Mannino, A.; Matrai, P.; Friedrichs, M. A.; Del Castillo, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic region is warming faster than anywhere else on the planet, triggering rapid social and economic changes and impacting both terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Yet our understanding of critical processes and interactions along the Arctic land-ocean interface is limited. Arctic-COLORS is a Field Campaign Scoping Study funded by NASA's Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Program that aims to improve understanding and prediction of land-ocean interactions in a rapidly changing Arctic coastal zone, and assess vulnerability, response, feedbacks and resilience of coastal ecosystems, communities and natural resources to current and future pressures. Specific science objectives include: - Quantify lateral fluxes to the arctic inner shelf from (i) rivers and (ii) the outer shelf/basin that affect biology, biodiversity, biogeochemistry (i.e. organic matter, nutrients, suspended sediment), and the processing rates of these constituents in coastal waters. - Evaluate the impact of the thawing of Arctic permafrost within the river basins on coastal biology, biodiversity and biogeochemistry, including various rates of community production and the role these may play in the health of regional economies. - Assess the impact of changing Arctic landfast ice and coastal sea ice dynamics. - Establish a baseline for comparison to future change, and use state-of-the-art models to assess impacts of environmental change on coastal biology, biodiversity and biogeochemistry. A key component of Arctic-COLORS will be the integration of satellite and field observations with coupled physical-biogeochemical models for predicting impacts of future pressures on Arctic, coastal ocean, biological processes and biogeochemical cycles. Through interagency and international collaborations, and through the organization of dedicated workshops, town hall meetings and presentations at international conferences, the scoping study engages the broader scientific community and invites participation of

  6. FRAM - FRontiers in Arctic marine Monitoring: Permanent Observations in a Gateway to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwedel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to understand the complex interactions of biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes in the ocean is still limited by the lack of integrative and interdisciplinary observation infrastructures. The main purpose of the open-ocean infrastructure FRAM (FRontiers in Arctic marine Monitoring) is permanent presence at sea, from surface to depth, for the provision of near real-time data on climate variability and ecosystem change in an Arctic marine environment. The Alfred-Wegener-Institut I Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung (AWI), together with partner institutes in Germany and Europe, aims at providing such infrastructure for the polar ocean as a major contribution to international efforts towards comprehensive Global Earth Observation. The FRAM Ocean Observing System targets the gateway between the North Atlantic and the Central Arctic, representing a highly climate-sensitive and rapidly changing region of the Earth system. It will serve national and international tasks towards a better understanding of the effects of change in ocean circulation, water mass properties and sea-ice retreat on Arctic marine ecosystems and their main functions and services. FRAM integrates and develops already existing observatories, i.e. the oceanographic mooring array HAFOS (Hybrid Arctic/Antarctic Float Observing System) and the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site HAUSGARTEN. It will implement existing and next-generation sensors and observatory platforms, allowing synchronous observation of relevant ocean variables, as well as the study of physical, chemical and biological processes in the water column and at the seafloor. Experimental and event-triggered platforms will complement observational platforms. Products of the infrastructure are continuous long-term data with appropriate resolution in space and time, as well as ground-truthing information for ocean models and remote sensing.

  7. The changing seasonal cycle of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, J.; Ding, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The seasonal cycle of Arctic Ocean temperature is weak due to the insulating and light scattering effects of sea ice cover and the moderating influence of the seasonal storage and release of heat through ice melting and freezing. The retreat of sea ice and other changes in recent decades is already warming surface air temperatures in winter. We our analysis of future change with an examination of the dominant processes in the seasonal response of the Arctic Ocean and sea ice to surface forcing as they appear in historical simulations of 14 CMIP5 climate models. In both models and observations the seasonal heat budget is dominated by a local balance between net surface heating and storage in the heat content of the ocean and in melting/freezing of sea ice. Observations suggest ocean heat storage is more important than sea ice melt, while in most models sea ice melt dominates. The dominant balance in the seasonal freshwater budget is the exchange of freshwater between the liquid ocean and sea ice. At its peak this rate of exchange exceeds 2Sv. The appearance of sea ice and also ocean stratification in both the heat and freshwater budgets provides two links between the budgets and two mechanisms for feedback. Our analysis of the seasonal cycle in the coming centuries suggests that the loss of sea ice will dramatically increase the amplitude of the seasonal cycle of sea surface temperature in the Arctic Ocean. Depending on the rate of growth of atmospheric greenhouse gases the seasonal range in Arctic sea surface temperature may exceed 10°C by year 2300, greatly increasing the stratification of the summer mixed layer.

  8. Ventilation of the Miocene Arctic Ocean: An idealized model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Bijoy; Nilsson, Johan; Nycander, Jonas; Jakobsson, Martin; Döös, Kristofer

    2010-11-01

    A model study of an idealized early Miocene Arctic Ocean has been undertaken. The work is motivated by the first drill core retrieved from the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean, which suggests a transition from anoxic to oxic condition during the early Miocene, a feature presumably related to the opening of the Fram Strait. Here, the ventilation in a semienclosed basin, connected with the ocean through a strait with a sill, is examined using an ocean circulation model that includes a passive age tracer. In particular, we investigate how the ventilation depends on strait geometry, freshwater influx, and surface wind stress. We find that the turnover time, characterizing the bulk ventilation rate, is primarily controlled by the strait width and the wind stress. Generally, the oldest water in the basin is encountered near the sill depth, but wind forcing displaces the oldest water downward. For narrow straits, the turnover time gives an upper bound on the mean age of the basin water. The results have implications when translating local oxygen conditions, recorded in the sediment sequence from the Lomonosov Ridge, to basin-scale circulation patterns. Further, the results indicate that the early Miocene Arctic Ocean became well ventilated when the Fram Strait reached a width of about 100 km.

  9. Ocean farfield response to projected Arctic sea ice loss.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, Markus; Deser, Clara; Tomas, Robert

    2016-04-01

    An ensemble of 20 fully coupled CESM simulations is used to elucidate the ocean's role in shaping the global climate response to projected Arctic sea ice loss. The ensemble allows us to separate unambiguously between internal variability and forced changes. Thus, it is possible to identify the oceanic processes by which sea ice induced changes in Arctic and North Pacific sea level pressure are transmitted across the world ocean. Of particular interest is the Kelvin wave train that connects the North Atlantic with the equatorial Pacific. Within 10 years after the loss of sea ice the oceanic signal arrives in the Pacific and leads to a slow and steady deepening of the equatorial thermocline and, after another 5 decades, the subtropical thermocline. This suggests that the current Arctic sea ice loss already set into motion changes in tropical Pacific climate that will be felt several decades from now. We will dicuss these ocean induced changes in the mean climate as well as ENSO and explore possibilities of observational verification.

  10. Protactinium-231 and thorium-230 abundances and high scavenging rates in the western arctic ocean

    PubMed

    Edmonds; Moran; Hoff; Smith; Edwards

    1998-04-17

    The Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, largely ice covered and isolated from deep contact with the more dynamic Eurasian Basin by the Lomonosov Ridge, has historically been considered an area of low productivity and particle flux and sluggish circulation. High-sensitivity mass-spectrometric measurements of the naturally occurring radionuclides protactinium-231 and thorium-230 in the deep Canada Basin and on the adjacent shelf indicate high particle fluxes and scavenging rates in this region. The thorium-232 data suggest that offshore advection of particulate material from the shelves contributes to scavenging of reactive materials in areas of permanent ice cover.

  11. Protactinium-231 and thorium-230 abundances and high scavenging rates in the western arctic ocean

    PubMed

    Edmonds; Moran; Hoff; Smith; Edwards

    1998-04-17

    The Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, largely ice covered and isolated from deep contact with the more dynamic Eurasian Basin by the Lomonosov Ridge, has historically been considered an area of low productivity and particle flux and sluggish circulation. High-sensitivity mass-spectrometric measurements of the naturally occurring radionuclides protactinium-231 and thorium-230 in the deep Canada Basin and on the adjacent shelf indicate high particle fluxes and scavenging rates in this region. The thorium-232 data suggest that offshore advection of particulate material from the shelves contributes to scavenging of reactive materials in areas of permanent ice cover. PMID:9545211

  12. Observations of Air-Ice and Air-Ocean Interactions During Arctic Freeze-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, O. P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Surface energy fluxes are key to the annual summer melt and autumn freeze-up of Arctic sea ice, but are strongly modulated by interactions between atmospheric, ocean, and sea-ice processes. This presentation will examine direct observations of energy fluxes during autumn freeze-up from three recent field programs: the international Arctic Clouds in Summer Experiment (ACSE) on board the R/V Oden in 2014, the Japanese MR14-05 cruise of the R/V Mirai in 2014, and the ONR-funded Sea State cruise of the R/V Sikuliaq in 2015. The R/V Oden obtained measurements in open water and multi-year ice north of the New Siberian Islands, the R/V Mirai's measurements were at a fixed point near the ice edge in the western Canada Basin, and the measurements from the Sikuliaq were obtained at the advancing ice edge in the Canada Basin/Beaufort Sea. Though measurement types varied, all three cruises made atmospheric measurements with radiosondes and remote sensing at high temporal resolution, obtained measurements or estimates of all terms in the surface energy budget equation, obtained upper-ocean thermodynamic measurements with frequent CTDs, and were able to characterize the evolving air-ocean and air-ice interfaces. The 2014 cruises document processes producing autumnal heat loss in the upper ocean just before and at the very incipient stages of ice formation, while the third cruise documented processes responsible for ice formation during the main freeze-up period. Ocean freeze-up was observed when the near-surface ocean temperature had reached its freezing point and energy loss to the atmosphere continued (Fig. 1). This important loss of energy to the atmosphere from the ocean mixed layer was modulated by a number of local and regional atmospheric processes and some ocean processes, producing significant variability. The different energy budgets over the existing sea ice and adjacent open water also played a major role in the freeze-up processes. This presentation will attempt to

  13. Continental Margins of the Arctic Ocean: Implications for Law of the Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, David

    2016-04-01

    A coastal State must define the outer edge of its continental margin in order to be entitled to extend the outer limits of its continental shelf beyond 200 M, according to article 76 of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. The article prescribes the methods with which to make this definition and includes such metrics as water depth, seafloor gradient and thickness of sediment. Note the distinction between the "outer edge of the continental margin", which is the extent of the margin after application of the formula of article 76, and the "outer limit of the continental shelf", which is the limit after constraint criteria of article 76 are applied. For a relatively small ocean basin, the Arctic Ocean reveals a plethora of continental margin types reflecting both its complex tectonic origins and its diverse sedimentation history. These factors play important roles in determining the extended continental shelves of Arctic coastal States. This study highlights the critical factors that might determine the outer edge of continental margins in the Arctic Ocean as prescribed by article 76. Norway is the only Arctic coastal State that has had recommendations rendered by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS). Russia and Denmark (Greenland) have made submissions to the CLCS to support their extended continental shelves in the Arctic and are awaiting recommendations. Canada has yet to make its submission and the US has not yet ratified the Convention. The various criteria that each coastal State has utilized or potentially can utilize to determine the outer edge of the continental margin are considered. Important criteria in the Arctic include, 1) morphological continuity of undersea features, such as the various ridges and spurs, with the landmass, 2) the tectonic origins and geologic affinities with the adjacent land masses of the margins and various ridges, 3) sedimentary processes, particularly along continental slopes, and 4) thickness and

  14. New view on tectonic structure of Siberian Sector of the Amerasian Basin (Arctic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, Yu. I.

    2014-05-01

    In 2012, JSC Sevmorgeo with assistance of several research institutions of Federal Agency of Mineral Resources (Rosnedra) and Ministry of Defense carried out a unique set of offshore seismic and geological studies in the Mendeleev Rise area and adjacent areas of the Amerasia Basin. Two specially re-equipped icebreakers ("Kapitan Dranitsin" and "Dixon") were used in this campaign. The main results of the expedition were 5315 km of multichannel seismic profiles both with long and short streamers (4500 m and 600 m, respectively), 480 km long refraction profile crossing Mendeleev Rise. Seismic acquisition with short streamers was accompanied by deployment of sonobuoys. Geological studies included deep-water drilling and sea-bottom sampling by dredge, gravity corer, grab and by specially equipped research submarine. The newly acquired geological and geophysical data allowed for the following conclusions: 1. The Mendeleev Rise, the adjacent Lomonosov Ridge and Chukchi Plateau are the direct continuations of the East Siberian Sea tectonic structures. It is confirmed by direct tracking of some morphostructures, faults, gravity and magnetic anomalies from the shelf to deep-water highs. 2. The East Arctic Shelf and the adjacent Arctic Ocean represent offshore extent of the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma crustal domain constituted by a mosaic of separate blocks of the Pre-Cambrian basement (Okhotsk, Omulevka, Omolon, Wrangel-Gerald and Central Arctic) and Late Mesozoic orogens. This area differs significantly from the Ellesmerian crustal domain located to the east (including the Northwind Ridge, which coincides with inferred eastern boundary of the Mesozoides). The Central Arctic domain includes structures of the Mendeleev Ridge and the Chukchi Plateau. Western boundary of this block is inferred along the Spur of Geophysicists, which separates the Podvodnikov Basin into two unequal parts with different basement structure. From the south, southwest and west, the Central Arctic domain is

  15. Evaluation of Arctic Sea Ice Thickness Simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Mark; Proshuntinsky, Andrew; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Nguyen, An T.; Lindsay, Ron; Haas, Christian; Zhang, Jinlun; Diansky, Nikolay; Kwok, Ron; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Hakkinen, Sirpa; Ashik, Igor; De Cuevas, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004-2008); airborne electromagnetic measurements (2001-2009); ice draft data from moored instruments in Fram Strait, the Greenland Sea, and the Beaufort Sea (1992-2008) and from submarines (1975-2000); and drill hole data from the Arctic basin, Laptev, and East Siberian marginal seas (1982-1986) and coastal stations (1998-2009). Despite an assessment of six models that differ in numerical methods, resolution, domain, forcing, and boundary conditions, the models generally overestimate the thickness of measured ice thinner than approximately 2 mand underestimate the thickness of ice measured thicker than about approximately 2m. In the regions of flat immobile landfast ice (shallow Siberian Seas with depths less than 25-30 m), the models generally overestimate both the total observed sea ice thickness and rates of September and October ice growth from observations by more than 4 times and more than one standard deviation, respectively. The models do not reproduce conditions of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which drifts, generating ridges of increasing ice thickness, in addition to thermodynamic ice growth. Considering all observational data sets, the better correlations and smaller differences from observations are from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II and Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System models.

  16. Reconstructing late Quaternary deep-water masses in the eastern Arctic Ocean using benthonic Ostracoda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, R. Ll; Whatley, R.C.; Cronin, T. M.; Dowsett, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of Ostracoda in three long cores from the deep eastern Arctic Ocean was studied to determine the palaeoceanographical history of the Eurasian Basin during the late Quaternary. The samples for this study were obtained from the Lomonosov Ridge, Morris Jesup Rise and Yermak Plateau during the Arctic 91 expedition. Ostracoda previously studied in coretops at the same sites as the present study have shown that individual species have a strong association with different water masses and bathymetry. Throughout the late Quaternary, cores exhibit ostracod-rich layers separated by barren intervals. On the basis of biostratigraphical, isotopic and palaeomagnetic data the fossiliferous levels are interpreted as representing interglacial stages. The twenty most significant species were selected for subsequent quantitative investigation using Cluster and Factor analyses, in order to determine similarity and variance between the assemblages. An additional statistical method employing Modern Analogues and the Squared Chord Distance dissimilarity coefficient was utilized to compare the present late Quaternary fossil samples with a modern Arctic database. The results reveal a major faunal division within the Arctic Ocean Deep Water (AODW). Highly abundant and diverse assemblages within the cores were found to group and have good analogues with the Recent bathyal depth (1000-2500 m) upper AODW assemblages. Conversely, assemblages with low abundance and diversity correlate well with abyssal depth (> 3000 m) lower AODW assemblages. The palaeoceanographical history is complicated by the influence of adjacent water masses such as Canada Basin Deep Water (CBDW), Greenland Sea Deep Water (GSDW) and most importantly, Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW), which all had an influence on the ostracod assemblages during the late Quaternary. An enhanced flow of warm saline AIW into the Eurasian Basin results in species-rich upper AODW assemblages having good analogues down to 2750 m

  17. Arctic Ocean outflow shelves in the changing Arctic: A review and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Christine; Hamilton, Jim; Hansen, Edmond; Barber, David; Reigstad, Marit; Iacozza, John; Seuthe, Lena; Niemi, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade or so, international research efforts, many of which were part of the International Polar Year, have accrued our understanding of the Arctic outflow shelves. The Arctic outflow shelves, namely the East Greenland Shelf (EGS) and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), serve as conduits through which Arctic sea ice and waters and their properties are exported to the North Atlantic. These shelves play an important role in thermohaline circulation and global circulation patterns, while being influenced by basin-scale and regional changes taking place in the Arctic. Here, we synthesize the current knowledge on key forcings of primary production and ecosystem processes on the outflow shelves, as they influence their structure and functionalities and, consequently their role in Arctic Ocean productivity and global biogeochemical cycles. For the CAA, a fresh outlook on interannual and decadal physical and biological time-series reveals recent changes in productivity patterns, while an extensive analysis of sea ice conditions over the past 33 years (1980-2012) demonstrates significant declines in multi-year ice and a redistribution of ice types. For the EGS, our analysis shows that sea ice export strongly contributes to structuring spatially diverse productivity regimes. Despite the large heterogeneity in physical and biological processes within and between the outflow shelves, a conceptual model of productivity regimes is proposed, helping identify general productivity patterns and key forcings. The different productivity regimes are expected to respond differently to current and future Arctic change, providing a useful basis upon which to develop predictive scenarios of future productivity states. Current primary production estimates for both outflow shelves very likely underestimate their contribution to total Arctic production.

  18. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi

  19. Assimilation impacts on Arctic Ocean circulation, heat and freshwater budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Hao; Mugford, Ruth I.; Haines, Keith; Smith, Gregory C.

    We investigate the Arctic basin circulation, freshwater content (FWC) and heat budget by using a high-resolution global coupled ice-ocean model implemented with a state-of-the-art data assimilation scheme. We demonstrate that, despite a very sparse dataset, by assimilating hydrographic data in and near the Arctic basin, the initial warm bias and drift in the control run is successfully corrected, reproducing a much more realistic vertical and horizontal structure to the cyclonic boundary current carrying the Atlantic Water (AW) along the Siberian shelves in the reanalysis run. The Beaufort Gyre structure and FWC and variability are also more accurately reproduced. Small but important changes in the strait exchange flows are found which lead to more balanced budgets in the reanalysis run. Assimilation fluxes dominate the basin budgets over the first 10 years (P1: 1987-1996) of the reanalysis for both heat and FWC, after which the drifting Arctic upper water properties have been restored to realistic values. For the later period (P2: 1997-2004), the Arctic heat budget is almost balanced without assimilation contributions, while the freshwater budget shows reduced assimilation contributions compensating largely for surface salinity damping, which was extremely strong in this run. A downward trend in freshwater export at the Canadian Straits and Fram Strait is found in period P2, associated with Beaufort Gyre recharge. A detailed comparison with observations and previous model studies at the individual Arctic straits is also included.

  20. Calcareous microfossil-based orbital cyclostratigraphy in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, Rachel E.; DeNinno, Lauren H.; Cronin, Thomas M.

    2016-10-01

    Microfaunal and geochemical proxies from marine sediment records from central Arctic Ocean (CAO) submarine ridges suggest a close relationship over the last 550 thousand years (kyr) between orbital-scale climatic oscillations, sea-ice cover, marine biological productivity and other parameters. Multiple paleoclimate proxies record glacial to interglacial cycles. To understand the climate-cryosphere-productivity relationship, we examined the cyclostratigraphy of calcareous microfossils and constructed a composite Arctic Paleoclimate Index (API) "stack" from benthic foraminiferal and ostracode density from 14 sediment cores. Following the hypothesis that API is driven mainly by changes in sea-ice related productivity, the API stack shows the Arctic experienced a series of highly productive interglacials and interstadials every ∼20 kyr. These periods signify minimal ice shelf and sea-ice cover and maximum marine productivity. Rapid transitions in productivity are seen during shifts from interglacial to glacial climate states. Discrepancies between the Arctic API curves and various global climatic, sea-level and ice-volume curves suggest abrupt growth and decay of Arctic ice shelves related to climatic and sea level oscillations.

  1. AMAP Assessment 2013: Arctic Ocean acidification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2013-01-01

    . It includes extensive background data and references to the scientific literature, and details the sources for figures reproduced in the overview report. Whereas the Summary for Policy-makers report contains recommendations that focus mainly on policy-relevant actions concerned with addressing the consequences of AOA, the conclusions and recommendations presented in this report also cover issues of a more scientific nature, such as proposals for filling gaps in knowledge, and recommendations relevant to future monitoring and research work. The AOA assessment was conducted between 2010 and 2013 by an international group of over 60 experts. Lead authors were selected based on an open nomination process coordinated by AMAP. A similar process was used to select international experts who independently reviewed this report. Information contained in this report is fully references and based on first and foremost peer-reviewed and published results of research and monitoring undertaken since 2006. It also incorporates some new (unpublished) information from monitoring and research conducted according to well-established and documented national and international standards of quality assurance/quality control protocols. Care has been taken to ensure that no critical probability statements are based on non-peer-reviewed materials. Access to reliable and up-to-date information is essential for the development of science-based decision-making regarding ongoing changes in the Arctic and their global implications. The AOA assessment summary reports and films have therefore been developed specifically for policy-makers, summarizing the main findings of the AOA assessment. The AOA lead authors have confirmed that both this report and its derivative products accurately and fully reflect their scientific assessment. The AOA reports and the films are freely available from the AMAP Secretariat and on the AMAP website: www.amap.no, and their use for educational purposes is encouraged

  2. Oceanic periglacial in the evolution of the Arctic marine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Matishov, G.G.

    1996-12-31

    A study of the Arctic marine and land environment and biota is connected with the analysis of the global climatic changes and the general history of Arctic and subarctic ecological systems. Ancient glaciation not only influenced the geomorphology of landscapes, physical and chemical properties of the ocean and its seas, but also caused the global change of the morphoclimatic zonality in the ocean as a whole. Submarine and subaqual hydrological, geomorphological and biological processes on the shelves of polar and temperate latitudes had intensified especially during the melting of continental glaciers. The study of the periglacial problem consists, as a whole, in the research of the geological and biological phenomena which take place in the pelagial and the benthal outside the ice sheets and are connected with them by causal, spatial and temporal relations.

  3. Arctic Marine Boundary Layer Ozone and Mercury Depletion: a view from the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Dramatic depletion of ozone (O3) and gaseous elementary mercury (GEM) from the marine boundary layer during the spring in Polar Regions is known to be driven by bromine atoms originating from activation of seasalt bromide. Almost all surface based measurements have been made at coastal observatories, but most of the active processing of the air is believed to occur near or at the surface of the Arctic Ocean itself. A major objective of the OASIS (Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice and Snow) program during the International Polar Year (IPY) was therefore to make observations directly over the frozen Arctic Ocean. In the context of the OASIS-CANADA program, sponsored by the Canadian Federal Program Office of the IPY, several ocean bound projects were joined Including the French TARA expedition (2006-2008), the CFL campaign on the Canadian ice breaker CCGS Amundsen (February-April 2008), the COBRA campaign over the Hudson Bay near Kuujjuaraapik/Whapmagoostui, Quebec (February-March 2008) and the ASCOS campaign on the Swedish polar class ice breaker the Oden to the North Pole (August-September 2008). In this presentation I will summarize the observations and explore what has been learned regarding the drivers for the depletion process, such as the influence of the ambient temperature, the nature of the underlying surface, and the atmospheric stability. An important question is whether depletion in progress was observed, rather than the arrival of previously depleted air, as is generally the case at Arctic coastal observatories.

  4. The velocity and mixing time scale of the Arctic Ocean Boundary Current estimated with transient tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauldin, A.; Schlosser, P.; Newton, R.; Smethie, W. M.; Bayer, R.; Rhein, M.; Jones, E. Peter

    2010-08-01

    The Arctic Ocean Boundary Current (AOBC) is a persistent, large-scale feature of Arctic circulation that transports water of Atlantic origin around the Eurasian and Canadian Basins. Despite its importance as a link between North Atlantic sea surface temperature and the heat budget of the Arctic Ocean, elements of the pathways of the AOBC are still not well understood. Here we use transient tracer data collected during the 1990s at 22 locations to calculate the velocity and mixing time scale of the AOBC. The apparent spreading velocity derived from correlating 3H-3He ages in the Barents Sea branch water (BSBW) with the distance from its entry point at the Santa Anna Trough is 0.9 cm s-1. To correct this apparent velocity for the effects of mixing along the pathway, the AOBC is modeled as a leaky pipe, and 3H-3He and chlorofluorocarbon data are used to calculate the parameters of its transit time distribution function. The modeled velocity of the AOBC is 2.5 ± 0.5 cm s-1, and the time scale for mixing of waters between the core of the boundary current and the adjacent water masses is 5-10 years. These results imply that the advective time for transport around the perimeter of the Arctic Ocean from the Santa Anna Trough to the southern Canada Basin (approximately 6000 km) is 7.5 years, and the amplitude of a temperature anomaly or salinity anomaly in BSBW should decrease by 50%-75% along this path.

  5. High temperatures in the Late Cretaceous Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jenkyns, Hugh C; Forster, Astrid; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2004-12-16

    To understand the climate dynamics of the warm, equable greenhouse world of the Late Cretaceous period, it is important to determine polar palaeotemperatures. The early palaeoceanographic history of the Arctic Ocean has, however, remained largely unknown, because the sea floor and underlying deposits are usually inaccessible beneath a cover of floating ice. A shallow piston core taken from a drifting ice island in 1970 fortuitously retrieved unconsolidated Upper Cretaceous organic-rich sediment from Alpha ridge, a submarine elevated feature of probable oceanic origin. A lack of carbonate in the sediments from this core has prevented the use of traditional oxygen-isotope palaeothermometry. Here we determine Arctic palaeotemperatures from these Upper Cretaceous deposits using TEX86, a new palaeothermometer that is based on the composition of membrane lipids derived from a ubiquitous component of marine plankton, Crenarchaeota. From these analyses we infer an average sea surface temperature of approximately 15 degrees C for the Arctic Ocean about 70 million years ago. This calibration point implies an Equator-to-pole gradient in sea surface temperatures of approximately 15 degrees C during this interval and, by extrapolation, we suggest that polar waters were generally warmer than 20 degrees C during the middle Cretaceous (approximately 90 million years ago).

  6. The Arctic Ocean ice balance - A Kalman smoother estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D. R.; Rothrock, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The methodology of Kalman filtering and smoothing is used to integrate a 7-year time series of buoy-derived ice motion fields and satellite passive microwave observations. The result is a record of the concentrations of open water, first-year ice, and multiyear ice that we believe is better than the estimates based on the microwave data alone. The Kalman procedure interprets the evolution of the ice cover in terms of advection, melt, growth, ridging, and aging of first-year into multiyear ice. Generally, the regions along the coasts of Alaska and Siberia and the area just north of Fram Strait are sources of first-year ice, with the rest of the Arctic Ocean acting as a sink for first-year ice via ridging and aging. All the Arctic Ocean except for the Beaufort and Chukchi seas is a source of multiyear ice, with the Chukchi being the only internal multiyear ice sink. Export through Fram Strait is a major ice sink, but we find only about two-thirds the export and greater interannual variation than found in previous studies. There is no discernible trend in the area of multiyear ice in the Arctic Ocean during the 7 years.

  7. Digital depth horizon compilations of the Alaskan North Slope and adjacent Arctic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, Richard W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Data have been digitized and combined to create four detailed depth horizon grids spanning the Alaskan North Slope and adjacent offshore areas. These map horizon compilations were created to aid in petroleum system modeling and related studies. Topography/bathymetry is extracted from a recent Arctic compilation of global onshore DEM and satellite altimetry and ship soundings offshore. The Lower Cretaceous Unconformity (LCU), the top of the Triassic Shublik Formation, and the pre-Carboniferous acoustic basement horizon grids are created from numerous seismic studies, drill hole information, and interpolation. These horizons were selected because they mark critical times in the geologic evolution of the region as it relates to petroleum. The various horizons clearly show the major tectonic elements of this region including the Brooks Range, Colville Trough, Barrow Arch, Hanna Trough, Chukchi Platform, Nuwuk Basin, Kaktovik Basin, and Canada Basin. The gridded data are available in a variety of data formats for use in regional studies.

  8. Critical Metals In Western Arctic Ocean Ferromanganese Mineral Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. R.; Spinardi, F.; Conrad, T. A.; Conrad, J. E.; Genetti, J.

    2013-12-01

    Little exploration for minerals has occurred in the Arctic Ocean due to ice cover and the remote location. Small deposits of seafloor massive sulfides that are rich in copper and zinc occur on Gakkel Ridge, which extends from Greenland to the Laptev Sea, and on Kolbeinsey and Mohns ridges, both located between Greenland and mainland Europe. However, rocks were recently collected by dredge along the western margin of the Canada Basin as part of the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) program north of Alaska. Sample sites include steep escarpments on the Chukchi Borderland, a newly discovered seamount informally named Healy seamount, the southern part of Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge, and several basement outcrops in Nautilus Basin. These dredge hauls yielded three types of metal-rich mineralized deposits: ferromanganese crusts, ferromanganese nodules, and hydrothermal iron and manganese deposits. Chemical analyses of 43 crust and nodule samples show high contents of many critical metals needed for high-technology, green-technology, and energy and military applications, including cobalt (to 0.3 wt.%), vanadium (to 0.12 wt.%), zirconium (to 459 grams/tonne=ppm), molybdenum (to 453 g/t), the rare-earth elements (including scandium and yttrium; yttrium to 229 g/t), lithium (to 205 g/t), tungsten (to 64 g/t), and gallium (to 26 g/t). The metal contents of these Arctic Ocean crusts and nodules are comparable to those found throughout the global ocean, however, these Arctic Ocean samples are the first that have been found to be enriched in rare metal scandium. The metal contents of these samples indicate a diagenetic component. Crusts typically form by precipitation of metal oxides solely from seawater (hydrogenetic) onto rock surfaces producing a pavement, whereas nodules form by accretion of metal oxides, from both seawater and pore waters (diagenetic), around a nucleus on the surface of soft sediment. The best evidence for this diagenetic input to the crusts is that crusts

  9. Arctic Ocean Freshwater: How Robust are Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, A.; Aksenov, Y.; deCuevas, B. A.; deSteur, L.; Haekkinen, S.; Hansen, E.; Herbaut, C.; Houssais, M.-N.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Lique, C.; Nguyen, A.; Pemberton, P.; Worthen, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic freshwater (FW) has been the focus of many modeling studies, due to the potential impact of Arctic FW on the deep water formation in the North Atlantic. A comparison of the hindcasts from ten ocean-sea ice models shows that the simulation of the Arctic FW budget is quite different in the investigated models. While they agree on the general sink and source terms of the Arctic FW budget, the long-term means as well as the variability of the FW export vary among models. The best model-to-model agreement is found for the interannual and seasonal variability of the solid FW export and the solid FW storage, which also agree well with observations. For the interannual and seasonal variability of the liquid FW export, the agreement among models is better for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) than for Fram Strait. The reason for this is that models are more consistent in simulating volume flux anomalies than salinity anomalies and volume-flux anomalies dominate the liquid FW export variability in the CAA but not in Fram Strait. The seasonal cycle of the liquid FW export generally shows a better agreement among models than the interannual variability, and compared to observations the models capture the seasonality of the liquid FW export rather well. In order to improve future simulations of the Arctic FW budget, the simulation of the salinity field needs to be improved, so that model results on the variability of the liquid FW export and storage become more robust.

  10. Arctic Ocean freshwater: How robust are model simulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, A.; Aksenov, Y.; de Cuevas, B. A.; de Steur, L.; Häkkinen, S.; Hansen, E.; Herbaut, C.; Houssais, M.-N.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Lique, C.; Nguyen, A.; Pemberton, P.; Worthen, D.; Zhang, J.

    The Arctic freshwater (FW) has been the focus of many modeling studies, due to the potential impact of Arctic FW on the deep water formation in the North Atlantic. A comparison of the hindcasts from ten ocean-sea ice models shows that the simulation of the Arctic FW budget is quite different in the investigated models. While they agree on the general sink and source terms of the Arctic FW budget, the long-term means as well as the variability of the FW export vary among models. The best model-to-model agreement is found for the interannual and seasonal variability of the solid FW export and the solid FW storage, which also agree well with observations. For the interannual and seasonal variability of the liquid FW export, the agreement among models is better for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) than for Fram Strait. The reason for this is that models are more consistent in simulating volume flux anomalies than salinity anomalies and volume-flux anomalies dominate the liquid FW export variability in the CAA but not in Fram Strait. The seasonal cycle of the liquid FW export generally shows a better agreement among models than the interannual variability, and compared to observations the models capture the seasonality of the liquid FW export rather well. In order to improve future simulations of the Arctic FW budget, the simulation of the salinity field needs to be improved, so that model results on the variability of the liquid FW export and storage become more robust.

  11. Downscaling ocean conditions with application to the Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf and adjacent deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katavouta, Anna; Thompson, Keith R.

    2016-08-01

    The overall goal is to downscale ocean conditions predicted by an existing global prediction system and evaluate the results using observations from the Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf and adjacent deep ocean. The first step is to develop a one-way nested regional model and evaluate its predictions using observations from multiple sources including satellite-borne sensors of surface temperature and sea level, CTDs, Argo floats and moored current meters. It is shown that the regional model predicts more realistic fields than the global system on the shelf because it has higher resolution and includes tides that are absent from the global system. However, in deep water the regional model misplaces deep ocean eddies and meanders associated with the Gulf Stream. This is not because the regional model's dynamics are flawed but rather is the result of internally generated variability in deep water that leads to decoupling of the regional model from the global system. To overcome this problem, the next step is to spectrally nudge the regional model to the large scales (length scales > 90 km) of the global system. It is shown this leads to more realistic predictions off the shelf. Wavenumber spectra show that even though spectral nudging constrains the large scales, it does not suppress the variability on small scales; on the contrary, it favours the formation of eddies with length scales below the cutoff wavelength of the spectral nudging.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Salinity and Dissolved Oxygen at Perdido Bay and Adjacent Coastal Ocean

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC), a numerical estuarine and coastal ocean circulation hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate the distribution of the salinity, temperature, nutrients and dissolved oxygen (DO) in Perdido Bay and adjacent Gulf of Mexico. External forcing fa...

  13. Aragonite undersaturation in the Arctic Ocean: effects of ocean acidification and sea ice melt.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Kawai, Michiyo; McLaughlin, Fiona A; Carmack, Eddy C; Nishino, Shigeto; Shimada, Koji

    2009-11-20

    The increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions and attendant increase in ocean acidification and sea ice melt act together to decrease the saturation state of calcium carbonate in the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean. In 2008, surface waters were undersaturated with respect to aragonite, a relatively soluble form of calcium carbonate found in plankton and invertebrates. Undersaturation was found to be a direct consequence of the recent extensive melting of sea ice in the Canada Basin. In addition, the retreat of the ice edge well past the shelf-break has produced conditions favorable to enhanced upwelling of subsurface, aragonite-undersaturated water onto the Arctic continental shelf. Undersaturation will affect both planktonic and benthic calcifying biota and therefore the composition of the Arctic ecosystem.

  14. [Spectral features analysis of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean].

    PubMed

    Ke, Chang-qing; Xie, Hong-jie; Lei, Rui-bo; Li, Qun; Sun, Bo

    2012-04-01

    Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an important role in the global climate change, and its quick change and impact are the scientists' focus all over the world. The spectra of different kinds of sea ice were measured with portable ASD FieldSpec 3 spectrometer during the long-term ice station of the 4th Chinese national Arctic Expedition in 2010, and the spectral features were analyzed systematically. The results indicated that the reflectance of sea ice covered by snow is the highest one, naked sea ice the second, and melted sea ice the lowest. Peak and valley characteristics of spectrum curves of sea ice covered by thick snow, thin snow, wet snow and snow crystal are very significant, and the reflectance basically decreases with the wavelength increasing. The rules of reflectance change with wavelength of natural sea ice, white ice and blue ice are basically same, the reflectance of them is medium, and that of grey ice is far lower than natural sea ice, white ice and blue ice. It is very significant for scientific research to analyze the spectral features of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and to implement the quantitative remote sensing of sea ice, and to further analyze its response to the global warming.

  15. Petroleum prospectivity of the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, A.; Hart, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Reconnaissance seismic reflection data indicate that Canada Basin is a remnant of the Amerasia Basin of the Arctic Ocean that lies south of the Alpha-Mendeleev Large Igneous Province, which was constructed on the northern part of the Amerasia Basin between about 127 and 89-75 Ma. Canada Basin is filled with Early Jurassic to Holocene detritus from the Mackenzie River system, which drains the northern third of interior North America, with sizable contributions from Alaska and Northwest Canada. Except for the absence of a salt- and shale-bearing mobile substrate Canada Basin is analogous to the Mississippi Delta and the western Gulf of Mexico. Canada Basin contains about 7 to >14 km of sediment beneath the Mackenzie Prodelta on the southeast, 6 to 7 km of sediment beneath the abyssal plain on the west, and roughly 5 or 6 million cubic km of sediment. About three fourths of the basin fill generates low amplitude seismic reflections, interpreted to represent hemiplegic deposits, and a fourth of the fill generates interbedded lenses to extensive layers of moderate to high amplitude reflections interpreted to represent unconfined turbidite and amalgamated channel deposits. Extrapolation from Arctic Alaska and Northwest Canada suggests that three fourths of the section in Canada Basin may contain intervals of hydrocarbon source rocks and the apparent age of the basin suggests that it contains three of the six stratigraphic intervals that together provided >90?? of the World's discovered reserves of oil and gas.. Worldwide heat flow averages suggest that about two thirds of Canada Basin lies in the oil or gas window. At least five types of structural or stratigraphic features of local to regional occurrence offer exploration targets in Canada Basin. These consist of 1) a belt of late Eocene to Miocene shale-cored detachment folds containing with at least two anticlines that are capped by beds with bright spots, 2) numerous moderate to high amplitude reflection packets

  16. Biodiversity of the Arctic Ocean in the Face of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Węsławski, Jan Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Global climate changes which has been observed over the recent years affects organisms occurring in the Arctic seas and the functioning of the whole maritime ecosystems there. The research note presents and briefly analyses the biological diversity of the Arctic Ocean and the most important factors which change the relations between organisms and the environment in the Arctic.

  17. Biodiversity of the Arctic Ocean in the Face of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Węsławski, Jan Marcin

    2011-01-01

    Global climate changes which has been observed over the recent years affects organisms occurring in the Arctic seas and the functioning of the whole maritime ecosystems there. The research note presents and briefly analyses the biological diversity of the Arctic Ocean and the most important factors which change the relations between organisms and the environment in the Arctic

  18. Proxy Constraints on a Warm, Fresh Late Cretaceous Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Super, J. R.; Li, H.; Pagani, M.; Chin, K.

    2015-12-01

    The warm Late Cretaceous is thought to have been characterized by open Arctic Ocean temperatures upwards of 15°C (Jenkyns et al., 2004). The high temperatures and low equator-to-pole temperature gradient have proven difficult to reproduce in paleoclimate models, with the role of the atmospheric hydrologic cycle in heat transport being particularly uncertain. Here, sediments, coprolites and fish teeth of Santonian-Campanian age from two high-latitude mixed terrestrial and marine sections on Devon Island in the Canadian High Arctic (Chin et al., 2008) were analyzed using a suite of organic and inorganic proxies to evaluate the temperature and salinity of Arctic seawater. Surface temperature estimates were derived from TEX86 estimates of near-shore, shallow (~100 meters depth) marine sediments (Witkowski et al., 2011) and MBT-CBT estimates from terrestrial intervals and both suggest mean annual temperatures of ~20°C, consistent with previous estimates considering the more southerly location of Devon Island. The oxygen isotope composition of non-diagenetic phosphate from vertebrate coprolites and bony fish teeth were then measured, giving values ranging from +13‰ to +19‰. Assuming the TEX86 temperatures are valid and using the temperature calibration of Puceat 2010, the δ18O values of coprolites imply Arctic Ocean seawater δ18O values between -4‰ and -10‰, implying very fresh conditions. Lastly, the δD of precipitation will be estimated from the hydrogen isotope composition of higher plant leaf waxes (C-25, C-27, C-29 and C-31 n-alkanes) from both terrestrial and marine intervals. Data are used to model the salinity of seawater and the meteoric relationship between δD and δ18O, thereby helping to evaluate the northern high-latitude meteoric water line of the Late Cretaceous.

  19. Modeling of the Arctic boundary layer: Comparisons with measurements from the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996

    SciTech Connect

    ReVelle, D.O.; Nilsson, E.D.; Kulmala, M.

    1997-08-01

    During the recent 3 month Arctic Ocean Expedition (AOE-96) to the North Pole during the summer of 1996 an enormous amount of data collected on the Arctic planetary boundary layer. In preparation for the expedition, the authors have developed an expanded and quite flexible 1-D computer code based on the successful work of ReVelle and of ReVelle and Coulter on modeling of boundary layer ``bursting``. This new code, BLMARC (Boundary Layer, Mixing, Aerosols, Radiation and Clouds), explicitly includes the physical and chemical effects due to the presence of clouds, aerosols and associated air chemistry. Using data from AOE-96 and the model BLMARC, the authors have begun a systematic effort to compare observations of the high Arctic boundary layer against numerical modeling results. The preliminary results for case963 and case964 are quite promising. The second period exhibits what appears to be bursting effects in the temperature, the winds and in the aerosol concentration and the modeling efforts have shown a similar set of features as well. Current work also includes model experiments with BLMARC on the aerosol nucleation and growth in the Arctic PBL and cloud and fog formation.

  20. The early Miocene onset of a ventilated circulation regime in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Martin; Backman, Jan; Rudels, Bert; Nycander, Jonas; Frank, Martin; Mayer, Larry; Jokat, Wilfried; Sangiorgi, Francesca; O'Regan, Matthew; Brinkhuis, Henk; King, John; Moran, Kathryn

    2007-06-21

    Deep-water formation in the northern North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic Ocean is a key driver of the global thermohaline circulation and hence also of global climate. Deciphering the history of the circulation regime in the Arctic Ocean has long been prevented by the lack of data from cores of Cenozoic sediments from the Arctic's deep-sea floor. Similarly, the timing of the opening of a connection between the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean, permitting deep-water exchange, has been poorly constrained. This situation changed when the first drill cores were recovered from the central Arctic Ocean. Here we use these cores to show that the transition from poorly oxygenated to fully oxygenated ('ventilated') conditions in the Arctic Ocean occurred during the later part of early Miocene times. We attribute this pronounced change in ventilation regime to the opening of the Fram Strait. A palaeo-geographic and palaeo-bathymetric reconstruction of the Arctic Ocean, together with a physical oceanographic analysis of the evolving strait and sill conditions in the Fram Strait, suggests that the Arctic Ocean went from an oxygen-poor 'lake stage', to a transitional 'estuarine sea' phase with variable ventilation, and finally to the fully ventilated 'ocean' phase 17.5 Myr ago. The timing of this palaeo-oceanographic change coincides with the onset of the middle Miocene climatic optimum, although it remains unclear if there is a causal relationship between these two events.

  1. The early Miocene onset of a ventilated circulation regime in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Martin; Backman, Jan; Rudels, Bert; Nycander, Jonas; Frank, Martin; Mayer, Larry; Jokat, Wilfried; Sangiorgi, Francesca; O'Regan, Matthew; Brinkhuis, Henk; King, John; Moran, Kathryn

    2007-06-21

    Deep-water formation in the northern North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic Ocean is a key driver of the global thermohaline circulation and hence also of global climate. Deciphering the history of the circulation regime in the Arctic Ocean has long been prevented by the lack of data from cores of Cenozoic sediments from the Arctic's deep-sea floor. Similarly, the timing of the opening of a connection between the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean, permitting deep-water exchange, has been poorly constrained. This situation changed when the first drill cores were recovered from the central Arctic Ocean. Here we use these cores to show that the transition from poorly oxygenated to fully oxygenated ('ventilated') conditions in the Arctic Ocean occurred during the later part of early Miocene times. We attribute this pronounced change in ventilation regime to the opening of the Fram Strait. A palaeo-geographic and palaeo-bathymetric reconstruction of the Arctic Ocean, together with a physical oceanographic analysis of the evolving strait and sill conditions in the Fram Strait, suggests that the Arctic Ocean went from an oxygen-poor 'lake stage', to a transitional 'estuarine sea' phase with variable ventilation, and finally to the fully ventilated 'ocean' phase 17.5 Myr ago. The timing of this palaeo-oceanographic change coincides with the onset of the middle Miocene climatic optimum, although it remains unclear if there is a causal relationship between these two events. PMID:17581581

  2. Western Arctic Ocean temperature variability during the last 8000 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farmer, Jesse R.; Cronin, Thomas M.; De Vernal, Anne; Dwyer, Gary S.; Keigwin, Loyd D.; Thunell, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    We reconstructed subsurface (∼200–400 m) ocean temperature and sea-ice cover in the Canada Basin, western Arctic Ocean from foraminiferal δ18O, ostracode Mg/Ca ratios, and dinocyst assemblages from two sediment core records covering the last 8000 years. Results show mean temperature varied from −1 to 0.5°C and −0.5 to 1.5°C at 203 and 369 m water depths, respectively. Centennial-scale warm periods in subsurface temperature records correspond to reductions in summer sea-ice cover inferred from dinocyst assemblages around 6.5 ka, 3.5 ka, 1.8 ka and during the 15th century Common Era. These changes may reflect centennial changes in the temperature and/or strength of inflowing Atlantic Layer water originating in the eastern Arctic Ocean. By comparison, the 0.5 to 0.7°C warm temperature anomaly identified in oceanographic records from the Atlantic Layer of the Canada Basin exceeded reconstructed Atlantic Layer temperatures for the last 1200 years by about 0.5°C.

  3. Ancient, highly heterogeneous mantle beneath Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Snow, Jonathan E; Hellebrand, Eric; Brügmann, Gerhard; von der Handt, Anette; Büchl, Anette; Hofmann, Albrecht W

    2008-03-20

    The Earth's mantle beneath ocean ridges is widely thought to be depleted by previous melt extraction, but well homogenized by convective stirring. This inference of homogeneity has been complicated by the occurrence of portions enriched in incompatible elements. Here we show that some refractory abyssal peridotites from the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge (Arctic Ocean) have very depleted 187Os/188Os ratios with model ages up to 2 billion years, implying the long-term preservation of refractory domains in the asthenospheric mantle rather than their erasure by mantle convection. The refractory domains would not be sampled by mid-ocean-ridge basalts because they contribute little to the genesis of magmas. We thus suggest that the upwelling mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is highly heterogeneous, which makes it difficult to constrain its composition by mid-ocean-ridge basalts alone. Furthermore, the existence of ancient domains in oceanic mantle suggests that using osmium model ages to constrain the evolution of continental lithosphere should be approached with caution.

  4. Mercury distribution and transport across the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere interface in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Chaulk, Amanda; Stern, Gary A; Armstrong, Debbie; Barber, David G; Wang, Feiyue

    2011-03-01

    The Arctic sea-ice environment has been undergoing dramatic changes in the past decades; to which extent this will affect the deposition, fate, and effects of chemical contaminants remains virtually unknown. Here, we report the first study on the distribution and transport of mercury (Hg) across the ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere interface in the Southern Beaufort Sea of the Arctic Ocean. Despite being sampled at different sites under various atmospheric and snow cover conditions, Hg concentrations in first-year ice cores were generally low and varied within a remarkably narrow range (0.5-4 ng L(-1)), with the highest concentration always in the surface granular ice layer which is characterized by enriched particle and brine pocket concentration. Atmospheric Hg depletion events appeared not to be an important factor in determining Hg concentrations in sea ice except for frost flowers and in the melt season when snowpack Hg leaches into the sea ice. The multiyear ice core showed a unique cyclic feature in the Hg profile with multiple peaks potentially corresponding to each ice growing/melting season. The highest Hg concentrations (up to 70 ng L(-1)) were found in sea-ice brine and decrease as the melt season progresses. As brine is the primary habitat for microbial communities responsible for sustaining the food web in the Arctic Ocean, the high and seasonally changing Hg concentrations in brine and its potential transformation may have a major impact on Hg uptake in Arctic marine ecosystems under a changing climate.

  5. Global and regional drivers of nutrient supply, primary production and CO2 drawdown in the changing Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Jean-Éric; Anderson, Leif G.; Matrai, Patricia; Coupel, Pierre; Bélanger, Simon; Michel, Christine; Reigstad, Marit

    2015-12-01

    scale. While CO2 intake by the Arctic Ocean should respond positively to reduced sea-ice extent, which facilitates air-sea exchange, the negative influence of rising temperatures and runoff on CO2 solubility might counteract the positive effect of modest PP increases in seasonally open waters. Overall, this review shows that local changes in light availability resulting from reduced sea-ice is only one factor in the intricate web of local and remote drivers of PP and CO2 drawdown in the Arctic Ocean. Understanding and predicting change requires an integrated biogeochemical approach that connects the small Arctic Ocean to adjacent ones and adequately resolves vertical nutrient supply processes at regional and local scales.

  6. The emergence of modern sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Knies, Jochen; Cabedo-Sanz, Patricia; Belt, Simon T; Baranwal, Soma; Fietz, Susanne; Rosell-Melé, Antoni

    2014-11-28

    Arctic sea ice coverage is shrinking in response to global climate change and summer ice-free conditions in the Arctic Ocean are predicted by the end of the century. The validity of this prediction could potentially be tested through the reconstruction of the climate of the Pliocene epoch (5.33-2.58 million years ago), an analogue of a future warmer Earth. Here we show that, in the Eurasian sector of the Arctic Ocean, ice-free conditions prevailed in the early Pliocene until sea ice expanded from the central Arctic Ocean for the first time ca. 4 million years ago. Amplified by a rise in topography in several regions of the Arctic and enhanced freshening of the Arctic Ocean, sea ice expanded progressively in response to positive ice-albedo feedback mechanisms. Sea ice reached its modern winter maximum extension for the first time during the culmination of the Northern Hemisphere glaciation, ca. 2.6 million years ago.

  7. Smallest algae thrive as the Arctic Ocean freshens.

    PubMed

    Li, William K W; McLaughlin, Fiona A; Lovejoy, Connie; Carmack, Eddy C

    2009-10-23

    As climate changes and the upper Arctic Ocean receives more heat and fresh water, it becomes more difficult for mixing processes to deliver nutrients from depth to the surface for phytoplankton growth. Competitive advantage will presumably accrue to small cells because they are more effective in acquiring nutrients and less susceptible to gravitational settling than large cells. Since 2004, we have discerned an increase in the smallest algae and bacteria along with a concomitant decrease in somewhat larger algae. If this trend toward a community of smaller cells is sustained, it may lead to reduced biological production at higher trophic levels. PMID:19900890

  8. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    years of SMOS data acquisitions. The second is the modification of the filtering criterion to account for the statistical distributions of SSS at each ocean grid point. This allows retrieving a value of SSS which is less affected by outliers originated from RFI and other effects. We will provide an assessment of the quality of these new SSS products in the Arctic, as well as illustrate the potential of these maps to monitor the main river discharges to the Arctic Ocean. [1] Font, J.; Camps, A.; Borges, A.; Martín-Neira, M.; Boutin, J.; Reul, N.; Kerr, Y.; Hahne, A. & Mecklenburg, S. SMOS: The Challenging Sea Surface Salinity Measurement From Space Proceedings of the IEEE, 2010, 98, 649 -665

  9. Arctic Ocean sea ice drift origin derived from artificial radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Cámara-Mor, P; Masqué, P; Garcia-Orellana, J; Cochran, J K; Mas, J L; Chamizo, E; Hanfland, C

    2010-07-15

    Since the 1950s, nuclear weapon testing and releases from the nuclear industry have introduced anthropogenic radionuclides into the sea, and in many instances their ultimate fate are the bottom sediments. The Arctic Ocean is one of the most polluted in this respect, because, in addition to global fallout, it is impacted by regional fallout from nuclear weapon testing, and indirectly by releases from nuclear reprocessing facilities and nuclear accidents. Sea-ice formed in the shallow continental shelves incorporate sediments with variable concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides that are transported through the Arctic Ocean and are finally released in the melting areas. In this work, we present the results of anthropogenic radionuclide analyses of sea-ice sediments (SIS) collected on five cruises from different Arctic regions and combine them with a database including prior measurements of these radionuclides in SIS. The distribution of (137)Cs and (239,240)Pu activities and the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in SIS showed geographical differences, in agreement with the two main sea ice drift patterns derived from the mean field of sea-ice motion, the Transpolar Drift and Beaufort Gyre, with the Fram Strait as the main ablation area. A direct comparison of data measured in SIS samples against those reported for the potential source regions permits identification of the regions from which sea ice incorporates sediments. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in SIS may be used to discern the origin of sea ice from the Kara-Laptev Sea and the Alaskan shelf. However, if the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio is similar to global fallout, it does not provide a unique diagnostic indicator of the source area, and in such cases, the source of SIS can be constrained with a combination of the (137)Cs and (239,240)Pu activities. Therefore, these anthropogenic radionuclides can be used in many instances to determine the geographical source area of sea-ice.

  10. The Biological Pump in the Cryopelagic Arctic Ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honjo, S.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2010-12-01

    Time-Series Sediment Trap data from the Arctic Ocean provides insight into oceanic uptake of CO2 in the cryopelagic ocean. One trap was tethered to an Ice Ocean Environmental Buoy at 200 m and drifted 1810 km within the Canada Basin from 79N, 132E to 77N, 131E in 1996-7. Another TS-trap, moored at 120 m, covered 2724 km from 75N, 142E to 80N 156E in 1997-8, traversed the cryopelagic basin and the hemipelagic Chukchi Rise. The 3rd TS-trap was moored at 3067 m in 2004-5 in the Canada Abyssal Plain in 3824 m beneath the cryopelagic drift route of the 120 m trap. These three TS-traps intercepted settling particles in 21 increments over 17 days for a total of 357 days each. The annual export flux of FCorg (POC) was 7 mmolC m-2yr-1, and the ballast particle fluxes, FCinorg (CaCO3) and FSibio (bio-opal), were 2 mmolC and 0.3 mmolSi m-2yr-1 in the 200m trap. Notably these export fluxes were a few orders of magnitude smaller than global epipelagic fluxes where the biological pump represents an essential vehicle for carbon export to depth. However, the annual primary production in the cryopelagic Canada Basin is 2 to 5 molC m-2yr-1 and is equivalent to that in the oligotrophic tropical gyre such as the Western Pacific Warm Pool where the FCorg, Cinorg and FSibio are a few orders of magnitude larger than those in the cryopelagic Canada Basin where the biological pump is essentially ineffective, primarily due to the deficiency of ballast particles in the upper layer. Thus, primary production POC is remineralized or turned into DOC within the surface layer instead of being quickly removed to deep waters. Total dry flux in the 3067 m trap was an order of magnitude larger than in the 120 and 200 m traps. In particular, lithogenic particle flux (FAl) and FCorg were about 18 and 2 times larger than in the upper ocean traps respectively. The Δ14C at 120 m indicated that the POC was mostly autochthonous. In contrast, the POC exported to 3067 m had an apparent 14C age of 1900 years

  11. Pathways of Atlantic Waters into the Arctic Ocean: Eddy-permitting ocean and sea ice simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wekerle, Claudia; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Danilov, Sergey; Jung, Thomas; Kanzow, Torsten; Schauer, Ursula; Timmermann, Ralph; Wang, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Fram Strait is the only deep gateway connecting the central Arctic with the North Atlantic. Boundary currents on each side are responsible for the exchange of water masses between the Arctic and North Atlantic. The East Greenland Current (EGC) carries fresh and cold Arctic waters and sea ice southward, whereas the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) carries warm Atlantic Waters (AW) into the Arctic Ocean. The complex topography in Fram Strait leads to a branching of the northward flowing WSC, with one branch recirculating between 78°N and 81°N which then joins the EGC. To date, the dynamics as well as the precise location of this recirculation are unclear. The goal of this research project is to quantify the amount and variability of AW which recirculates immediately in Fram Strait, and to investigate the role of atmospheric forcing and oceanic meso-scale eddies for the recirculation. We use simulations carried out with a global configuration of the Finite Element Sea ice-Ocean Model (FESOM) at eddy-permitting scales. The advantage of this model is the finite element discretization of the governing equations, which allows us to locally refine the mesh in areas of interest and keep it coarse in other parts of the global oceans without the need for traditional nesting. Here we will show the first results of the model validation. The model has ~9 km resolution in the Nordic Seas and Fram Strait and 1 deg south of 50°N. We assess the model capabilities in simulating the ocean circulation in the Nordic Seas and Fram Strait by comparing with the available observational data, e.g. with data from the Fram Strait oceanographic mooring array. The ocean volume and heat transport from the Atlantic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and at the Fram Strait are analyzed. Our results show that the model can capture some of the observed key ocean properties in our region of interest, while some tuning is required to further improve the model. In the next phase of this project we will focus

  12. Early ice retreat and ocean warming may induce copepod biogeographic boundary shifts in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhixuan; Ji, Rubao; Campbell, Robert G.; Ashjian, Carin J.; Zhang, Jinlun

    2016-08-01

    Early ice retreat and ocean warming are changing various facets of the Arctic marine ecosystem, including the biogeographic distribution of marine organisms. Here an endemic copepod species, Calanus glacialis, was used as a model organism, to understand how and why Arctic marine environmental changes may induce biogeographic boundary shifts. A copepod individual-based model was coupled to an ice-ocean-ecosystem model to simulate temperature- and food-dependent copepod life history development. Numerical experiments were conducted for two contrasting years: a relatively cold and normal sea ice year (2001) and a well-known warm year with early ice retreat (2007). Model results agreed with commonly known biogeographic distributions of C. glacialis, which is a shelf/slope species and cannot colonize the vast majority of the central Arctic basins. Individuals along the northern boundaries of this species' distribution were most susceptible to reproduction timing and early food availability (released sea ice algae). In the Beaufort, Chukchi, East Siberian, and Laptev Seas where severe ocean warming and loss of sea ice occurred in summer 2007, relatively early ice retreat, elevated ocean temperature (about 1-2°C higher than 2001), increased phytoplankton food, and prolonged growth season created favorable conditions for C. glacialis development and caused a remarkable poleward expansion of its distribution. From a pan-Arctic perspective, despite the great heterogeneity in the temperature and food regimes, common biogeographic zones were identified from model simulations, thus allowing a better characterization of habitats and prediction of potential future biogeographic boundary shifts.

  13. Deep water masses and sediments are main compartments for polychlorinated biphenyls in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sobek, Anna; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2014-06-17

    There is a wealth of studies of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in surface water and biota of the Arctic Ocean. Still, there are no observation-based assessments of PCB distribution and inventories in and between the major Arctic Ocean compartments. Here, the first water column distribution of PCBs in the central Arctic Ocean basins (Nansen, Amundsen, and Makarov) is presented, demonstrating nutrient-like vertical profiles with 5-10 times higher concentrations in the intermediate and deep water masses than in surface waters. The consistent vertical profiles in all three Arctic Ocean basins likely reflect buildup of PCBs transported from the shelf seas and from dissolution and/or mineralization of settling particles. Combined with measurement data on PCBs in other Arctic Ocean compartments collected over the past decade, the total Arctic Ocean inventory of ∑7PCB was estimated to 182 ± 40 t (±1 standard error of the mean), with sediments (144 ± 40 t), intermediate (5 ± 1 t) and deep water masses (30 ± 2 t) storing 98% of the PCBs in the Arctic Ocean. Further, we used hydrographic and carbon cycle parametrizations to assess the main pathways of PCBs into and out of the Arctic Ocean during the 20th century. River discharge appeared to be the major pathway for PCBs into the Arctic Ocean with 115 ± 11 t, followed by ocean currents (52 ± 17 t) and net atmospheric deposition (30 ± 28 t). Ocean currents provided the only important pathway out of the Arctic Ocean, with an estimated cumulative flux of 22 ± 10 t. The observation-based inventory of ∑7PCB of 182 ± 40 t is consistent with the contemporary inventory based on cumulative fluxes for ∑7PCB of 173 ± 36 t. Information on the concentration and distribution of PCBs in the deeper compartments of the Arctic Ocean improves our understanding of the large-scale fate of POPs in the Arctic and may also provide a means to test and improve models used to assess the fate of organic pollutants in the Arctic. PMID

  14. Deep water masses and sediments are main compartments for polychlorinated biphenyls in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sobek, Anna; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2014-06-17

    There is a wealth of studies of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in surface water and biota of the Arctic Ocean. Still, there are no observation-based assessments of PCB distribution and inventories in and between the major Arctic Ocean compartments. Here, the first water column distribution of PCBs in the central Arctic Ocean basins (Nansen, Amundsen, and Makarov) is presented, demonstrating nutrient-like vertical profiles with 5-10 times higher concentrations in the intermediate and deep water masses than in surface waters. The consistent vertical profiles in all three Arctic Ocean basins likely reflect buildup of PCBs transported from the shelf seas and from dissolution and/or mineralization of settling particles. Combined with measurement data on PCBs in other Arctic Ocean compartments collected over the past decade, the total Arctic Ocean inventory of ∑7PCB was estimated to 182 ± 40 t (±1 standard error of the mean), with sediments (144 ± 40 t), intermediate (5 ± 1 t) and deep water masses (30 ± 2 t) storing 98% of the PCBs in the Arctic Ocean. Further, we used hydrographic and carbon cycle parametrizations to assess the main pathways of PCBs into and out of the Arctic Ocean during the 20th century. River discharge appeared to be the major pathway for PCBs into the Arctic Ocean with 115 ± 11 t, followed by ocean currents (52 ± 17 t) and net atmospheric deposition (30 ± 28 t). Ocean currents provided the only important pathway out of the Arctic Ocean, with an estimated cumulative flux of 22 ± 10 t. The observation-based inventory of ∑7PCB of 182 ± 40 t is consistent with the contemporary inventory based on cumulative fluxes for ∑7PCB of 173 ± 36 t. Information on the concentration and distribution of PCBs in the deeper compartments of the Arctic Ocean improves our understanding of the large-scale fate of POPs in the Arctic and may also provide a means to test and improve models used to assess the fate of organic pollutants in the Arctic.

  15. Winter bloom of a rare betaproteobacterium in the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Zeder, Michael; Harding, Tommy; Pernthaler, Jakob; Lovejoy, Connie; Bertilsson, Stefan; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Extremely low abundance microorganisms (members of the “rare biosphere”) are believed to include dormant taxa, which can sporadically become abundant following environmental triggers. Yet, microbial transitions from rare to abundant have seldom been captured in situ, and it is uncertain how widespread these transitions are. A bloom of a single ribotype (≥99% similarity in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene) of a widespread betaproteobacterium (Janthinobacterium sp.) occurred over 2 weeks in Arctic marine waters. The Janthinobacterium population was not detected microscopically in situ in January and early February, but suddenly appeared in the water column thereafter, eventually accounting for up to 20% of bacterial cells in mid February. During the bloom, this bacterium was detected at open water sites up to 50 km apart, being abundant down to more than 300 m. This event is one of the largest monospecific bacterial blooms reported in polar oceans. It is also remarkable because Betaproteobacteria are typically found only in low abundance in marine environments. In particular, Janthinobacterium were known from non-marine habitats and had previously been detected only in the rare biosphere of seawater samples, including the polar oceans. The Arctic Janthinobacterium formed mucilagenous monolayer aggregates after short (ca. 8 h) incubations, suggesting that biofilm formation may play a role in maintaining rare bacteria in pelagic marine environments. The spontaneous mass occurrence of this opportunistic rare taxon in polar waters during the energy-limited season extends current knowledge of how and when microbial transitions between rare and abundant occur in the ocean. PMID:25191307

  16. Meet the Arctic Benthos. Arctic Ocean Exploration--Grades 7-8. Benthic Invertebrate Groups in the Deep Arctic Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    This activity introduces students to major groups of invertebrates that have been found in other polar ocean expeditions and acquaints them with the feeding habits of these animals as a basis for making inferences about benthic communities and their connection to other components of the Artic Ocean ecosystem. The activity provides learning…

  17. ACEX: A First Look at Arctic Ocean Cenozoic History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, K.; Backman, J.

    2004-12-01

    The first Integrated Ocean Drilling Program mission specificplatform expedition (ACEX - Arctic Coring Expedition) drilled and recovered core from five holes at four sites through Cenozoic sediments draping the crest of the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean. Coring continued into the underlying Cretaceous sedimentary bedrock. Sites are located only a few nautical miles apart along a single seismic line (AWI-91090), showing an identical and coherent Cenozoic seismostratigraphy. Preliminary results from shipboard investigations of core-catcher-based bio- and lithostratigraphy, pore water analyses and core logger data describe a thick (~160 m) middle Miocene through Pleistocene sequence that shows large amplitude, cyclic variability in the density, magnetic susceptibility and acoustic velocity of the sediments. Sediments are largely carbonate free. Pleistocene sedimentation rates are close to 3 cm/ka, whereas Pliocene sediments are by-and-large missing. A sharp change in physical properties at ~200 m defines the transition into a 200+ m thick Paleogene sequence that is initially dominated by large numbers of dinoflagellate cysts. The early Miocene, Oligocene and late Eocene appear to be largely missing in a hiatus. However, a 32 m thick interval separates the overlying middle Miocene from the underlying middle Eocene and presumably preserves some of the early Neogene and late Paleogene sections. Dinoflagellate cysts, diatoms, ebridians and silicoflagellates are common to abundant in the middle Eocene section, which bottoms in a spectacular layer showing massive occurrences of glochidia and massulae (megaspores) of the freshwater hydropterid fern Azolla (duckweed) at the early/middle Eocene boundary (~306 m), suggesting strongly reduced surface water salinity or perhaps even a brief episode of fresh water conditions at the surface. Biosilica is not present prior to the late early Eocene (~320 m). The (sub-) tropical dinoflagellate species Apectodinium augustum

  18. Perfluoroalkyl acids in the Atlantic and Canadian Arctic Oceans.

    PubMed

    Benskin, Jonathan P; Muir, Derek C G; Scott, Brian F; Spencer, Christine; De Silva, Amila O; Kylin, Henrik; Martin, Jonathan W; Morris, Adam; Lohmann, Rainer; Tomy, Gregg; Rosenberg, Bruno; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    We report here on the spatial distribution of C(4), C(6), and C(8) perfluoroalkyl sulfonates, C(6)-C(14) perfluoroalkyl carboxylates, and perfluorooctanesulfonamide in the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, including previously unstudied coastal waters of North and South America, and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) were typically the dominant perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in Atlantic water. In the midnorthwest Atlantic/Gulf Stream, sum PFAA concentrations (∑PFAAs) were low (77-190 pg/L) but increased rapidly upon crossing into U.S. coastal water (up to 5800 pg/L near Rhode Island). ∑PFAAs in the northeast Atlantic were highest north of the Canary Islands (280-980 pg/L) and decreased with latitude. In the South Atlantic, concentrations increased near Rio de la Plata (Argentina/Uruguay; 350-540 pg/L ∑PFAAs), possibly attributable to insecticides containing N-ethyl perfluorooctanesulfonamide, or proximity to Montevideo and Buenos Aires. In all other southern hemisphere locations, ∑PFAAs were <210 pg/L. PFOA/PFOS ratios were typically ≥1 in the northern hemisphere, ∼1 near the equator, and ≤1 in the southern hemisphere. In the Canadian Arctic, ∑PFAAs ranged from 40 to 250 pg/L, with perfluoroheptanoate, PFOA, and PFOS among the PFAAs detected at the highest concentrations. PFOA/PFOS ratios (typically ≫1) decreased from Baffin Bay to the Amundsen Gulf, possibly attributable to increased atmospheric inputs. These data help validate global emissions models and contribute to understanding of long-range transport pathways and sources of PFAAs to remote regions. PMID:22548373

  19. Circulation in Vilkitsky Canyon in the eastern Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janout, Markus; Hölemann, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The eastern Arctic Ocean is characterized by steep continental slopes and vast shallow shelf seas that receive a large amount of riverine freshwater from some of the largest rivers on earth. The northwestern Laptev Sea is of particular interest, as it is a freshwater transport pathway for a swift surface-intensified current from the Kara Sea toward the Arctic Basin, as was recently highlighted by high-resolution model studies. The region features complex bathymetry including a narrow strait and a large submarine canyon, strong tides, polynyas and severe sea ice conditions throughout much of the year. A year-long mooring record as well as detailed hydrographic shipboard measurements resulted from summer expeditions to the area in 2013 and 2014, and now provide a detailed picture of the region's water properties and circulation. The hydrography is characterized by riverine Kara Sea freshwater near the surface in the southern part of the canyon, while warmer (~0°C) saline Atlantic-derived waters dominate throughout the canyon at depths >150m. Cold shelf-modified waters near the freezing point are found along the canyon edges. The mean flow at the 300 m-deep mooring location near the southern edge of the canyon is swift (30 cm/s) and oriented eastward near the surface as suggested by numerical models, while the deeper flow follows the canyon topography towards the north-east. Wind-driven deviations from the mean flow coincide with sudden changes in temperature and salinity. This study characterizes the general circulation in Vilkitsky Canyon and investigates its potential as a conduit for upwelling of Atlantic-derived waters from the Arctic Basin to the Laptev Sea shelf.

  20. The role of sea ice in shaping recent Arctic Ocean freshwater content changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, I. V.

    2006-12-01

    Over the past several decades, the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions have undergone substantial changes. Available records point to the fact that over the 20th century the central Arctic Ocean became increasingly saltier. These freshwater content (FWC) trends are modulated by strong decadal and multidecadal fluctuations with sustained and widespread spatiotemporal patterns. Ice-ocean interactions were the key processes in shaping long-term upper Arctic Ocean FWC changes. Ice production was the dominant contributor to the salinification over the recent decades; ice melting was the major moderator of the observed salinification of the upper Arctic Ocean. Their combined effect resulted in a cumulative loss of 15 thousand cubic km of fresh water over the last 21 years. Strength of the outflow of the arctic fresh water and ice dominates the supply of Arctic fresh water to sub-polar basins. This enhanced high-latitude forcing should be considered when assessing long-term climate change and variability in the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions.

  1. Searching for the Lost Jurassic and Cretaceous Ocean Basins of the Circum-Arctic Linking Plate Models and Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, G. E.; Müller, R.

    2012-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of the circum-Arctic since the breakup of Pangea involves the opening and closing of ocean basins including the Oimyakon, Angayucham, South Anuyi, Amerasia and Eurasia basins. The time-dependent configurations and kinematic history of the basins, adjacent continental terranes, and subduction zones involved are not well understood, and many published tectonic models for particular regions are inconsistent with models for adjacent areas. The age, location, geometry and convergence rates of the subduction zones associated with these ancient ocean basins since at least the Late Jurassic have implications for mantle structure, which can be used as an additional constraint for building plate and plate boundary models. Here we integrate an analysis of both surface and deep mantle observations back to 200 Ma. Based on a digitized set of tectonic features with time-dependent rotational histories we present a refined plate model with topologically closed plate polygons for the circum-Arctic with particular focus on the northern Pacific, Siberian and Alaskan margins (Fig 1). We correlate the location, geometry and timing of subduction zones with associated seismic velocities anomalies from global P and S wave tomography models across different depths. We design a plate model that best matches slabs imaged in seismic tomography in an iterative fashion. This match depends on a combination of relative and absolute plate motions. Therefore we test two end-member absolute plate motion models, evaluating a paleomagnetic model and a model based on hotspot tracks and large igneous provinces. This method provides a novel approach to deciphering the Arctic tectonic history in a global context. Fig 1:Plate reconstruction at 200Ma and 140Ma, visualized using GPlates software. Present-day topography raster (ETOPO2) segmented into major tectonic elements of the circum-Arctic. Plate boundaries delineated in black and selected subduction and arc features labeled in

  2. Physical characteristics of summer sea ice across the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, W. B.; Gow, A. J.; Meese, D. A.; Bosworth, H. W.; Reimnitz, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sea ice characteristics were investigated during July and August on the 1994 transect across the Arctic Ocean. Properties examined from ice cores included salinity, temperature, and ice structure. Salinities measured near zero at the surface, increasing to 3-4‰ at the ice-water interface. Ice crystal texture was dominated by columnar ice, comprising 90% of the ice sampled. Surface albedos of various ice types, measured with radiometers, showed integrated shortwave albedos of 0.1 to 0.3 for melt ponds, 0.5 for bare, discolored ice, and 0.6 to 0.8 for a deteriorated surface or snow-covered ice. Aerial photography was utilized to document the distribution of open melt ponds, which decreased from 12% coverage of the ice surface in late July at 76°N to almost none in mid-August at 88°N. Most melt ponds were shallow, and depth bore no relationship to size. Sediment was pervasive from the southern Chukchi Sea to the north pole, occurring in bands or patches. It was absent in the Eurasian Arctic, where it had been observed on earlier expeditions. Calculations of reverse trajectories of the sediment-bearing floes suggest that the southernmost sediment was entrained during ice formation in the Beaufort Sea while more northerly samples probably originated in the East Siberian Sea, some as far west as the New Siberian Islands.

  3. Ocean currents shape the microbiome of Arctic marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Leila J; Coffin, Richard B; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Greinert, Jens; Treude, Tina; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2013-04-01

    Prokaryote communities were investigated on the seasonally stratified Alaska Beaufort Shelf (ABS). Water and sediment directly underlying water with origin in the Arctic, Pacific or Atlantic oceans were analyzed by pyrosequencing and length heterogeneity-PCR in conjunction with physicochemical and geographic distance data to determine what features structure ABS microbiomes. Distinct bacterial communities were evident in all water masses. Alphaproteobacteria explained similarity in Arctic surface water and Pacific derived water. Deltaproteobacteria were abundant in Atlantic origin water and drove similarity among samples. Most archaeal sequences in water were related to unclassified marine Euryarchaeota. Sediment communities influenced by Pacific and Atlantic water were distinct from each other and pelagic communities. Firmicutes and Chloroflexi were abundant in sediment, although their distribution varied in Atlantic and Pacific influenced sites. Thermoprotei dominated archaea in Pacific influenced sediments and Methanomicrobia dominated in methane-containing Atlantic influenced sediments. Length heterogeneity-PCR data from this study were analyzed with data from methane-containing sediments in other regions. Pacific influenced ABS sediments clustered with Pacific sites from New Zealand and Chilean coastal margins. Atlantic influenced ABS sediments formed another distinct cluster. Density and salinity were significant structuring features on pelagic communities. Porosity co-varied with benthic community structure across sites and methane did not. This study indicates that the origin of water overlying sediments shapes benthic communities locally and globally and that hydrography exerts greater influence on microbial community structure than the availability of methane.

  4. Characterizing the eddy field in the Arctic Ocean halocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mengnan; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Cole, Sylvia; Krishfield, Richard; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Toole, John

    2014-12-01

    Ice-Tethered Profilers (ITP), deployed in the Arctic Ocean between 2004 and 2013, have provided detailed temperature and salinity measurements of an assortment of halocline eddies. A total of 127 mesoscale eddies have been detected, 95% of which were anticyclones, the majority of which had anomalously cold cores. These cold-core anticyclonic eddies were observed in the Beaufort Gyre region (Canadian water eddies) and the vicinity of the Transpolar Drift Stream (Eurasian water eddies). An Arctic-wide calculation of the first baroclinic Rossby deformation radius Rd has been made using ITP data coupled with climatology; Rd ˜ 13 km in the Canadian water and ˜8 km in the Eurasian water. The observed eddies are found to have scales comparable to Rd. Halocline eddies are in cyclogeostrophic balance and can be described by a Rankine vortex with maximum azimuthal speeds between 0.05 and 0.4 m/s. The relationship between radius and thickness for the eddies is consistent with adjustment to the ambient stratification. Eddies may be divided into four groups, each characterized by distinct core depths and core temperature and salinity properties, suggesting multiple source regions and enabling speculation of varying formation mechanisms.

  5. Physical characteristics of summer sea ice across the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, W. B.; Gow, A.J.; Meese, D.A.; Bosworth, H.W.; Reimnitz, E.

    1999-01-01

    Sea ice characteristics were investigated during July and August on the 1994 transect across the Arctic Ocean. Properties examined from ice cores included salinity, temperature, and ice structure. Salinities measured near zero at the surface, increasing to 3-4??? at the ice-water interface. Ice crystal texture was dominated by columnar ice, comprising 90% of the ice sampled. Surface albedos of various ice types, measured with radiometers, showed integrated shortwave albedos of 0.1 to 0.3 for melt ponds, 0.5 for bare, discolored ice, and 0.6 to 0.8 for a deteriorated surface or snow-covered ice. Aerial photography was utilized to document the distribution of open melt ponds, which decreased from 12% coverage of the ice surface in late July at 76??N to almost none in mid-August at 88??N. Most melt ponds were shallow, and depth bore no relationship to size. Sediment was pervasive from the southern Chukchi Sea to the north pole, occurring in bands or patches. It was absent in the Eurasian Arctic, where it had been observed on earlier expeditions. Calculations of reverse trajectories of the sediment-bearing floes suggest that the southernmost sediment was entrained during ice formation in the Beaufort Sea while more northerly samples probably originated in the East Siberian Sea, some as far west as the New Siberian Islands.

  6. Vertical diffusivity of the Western Arctic Ocean halocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, William J.; Stanton, Timothy P.

    2014-08-01

    A nearly year-long series of upper ocean temperature, conductivity, and temperature microstructure profiles were collected from an ice camp drifting in the Beaufort Gyre as part of the 1997-1998 Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Experiment (SHEBA). Geographically, the record includes portions over the deep Canada Basin and the steep bathymetry of the Chukchi Borderlands region. Hydrographically, the record includes "cool," Pacific-origin haloclines, which contain a variety of subsurface temperature maxima, and cold haloclines typical of the Eurasian Basins. We present estimates of the vertical turbulent diffusivity derived from the dissipation rate of thermal variance and calculations of the associated vertical heat fluxes. We find that vertical diffusion proceeds at molecular rates in the deep basins and away from topographic features. While still relatively small, diffusivity is enhanced by 1 order of magnitude near and above the Chukchi Borderlands. The enhanced diffusivity is correlated to an increase in water column strain variance above the Borderlands, providing a linkage between bathymetry, internal wave activity and turbulence. The Chukchi Borderlands play a significant role in heat transport in the Western Arctic. They are a pathway for horizontal heat transport and a hot spot for vertical heat transport. Vertical fluxes make a substantial contribution to the energy balance of the sea ice cover in this region. Heat fluxes between the halocline and underlying Atlantic Water are shown to be small and lacking vertical connection near surface waters.

  7. Future scientific drilling in the Arctic Ocean: Key objectives, areas, and strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R.; Coakley, B.; Mikkelsen, N.; O'Regan, M.; Ruppel, C.

    2012-04-01

    In spite of the critical role of the Arctic Ocean in climate evolution, our understanding of the short- and long-term paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic history through late Mesozoic-Cenozoic times, as well as its plate-tectonic evolution, remains behind that from the other world's oceans. This lack of knowledge is mainly caused by the major technological/logistic problems in reaching this permanently ice-covered region with normal research vessels and in retrieving long and undisturbed sediment cores. With the Arctic Coring Expedition - ACEX (or IODP Expedition 302), the first Mission Specific Platform (MSP) expedition within IODP, a new era in Arctic research began (Backman, Moran, Mayer, McInroy et al., 2006). ACEX proved that, with an intensive ice-management strategy, successful scientific drilling in the permanently ice-covered central Arctic Ocean is possible. ACEX is certainly a milestone in Arctic Ocean research, but - of course - further drilling activities are needed in this poorly studied ocean. Furthermore, despite the success of ACEX fundamental questions related to the long- and short-term climate history of the Arctic Ocean during Mesozoic-Cenozoic times remain unanswered. This is partly due to poor core recovery during ACEX and, especially, because of a major mid-Cenozoic hiatus in this single record. Since ACEX, a series of workshops were held to develop a scientific drilling strategy for investigating the tectonic and paleoceanographic history of the Arctic Ocean and its role in influencing the global climate system: - "Arctic Ocean History: From Speculation to Reality" (Bremerhaven/Germany, November 2008); - "Overcoming barriers to Arctic Ocean scientific drilling: the site survey challenge" (Copenhagen/Denmark, November 2011); - Circum-Arctic shelf/upper continental slope scientific drilling workshop on "Catching Climate Change in Progress" (San Francisco/USA, December 2011); - "Coordinated Scientific Drilling in the Beaufort Sea: Addressing

  8. Levoglucosan indicates high levels of biomass burning aerosols over oceans from the Arctic to Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Xie, Z.; Wang, X.; Kang, H.; Zhang, P.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning discharges numerous kinds of gases and aerosols, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), black carbon (BC), alcohols, organic acids and persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and is known to affect air quality, global carbon cycle, and climate. However, the extent to which biomass burning gases/aerosols are present on a global scale, especially in the marine atmosphere, is poorly understood. Here we measure levoglucosan, a superior molecular tracer of biomass burning aerosols because of its single source, in marine air from the Arctic Ocean through the North and South Pacific Ocean to coastal Antarctica during burning season. Levoglucosan was found to be present in all regions at ng/m3 levels. As a whole, levoglucosan concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere were comparable to those in the Northern Hemisphere. Marine air in the mid-latitudes (30°-60° N and S) has the highest levoglucosan loading due to the emission from adjacent lands. Air over the Arctic Ocean which affected by biomass burning in the east Siberia has intermediate loading. Equatorial latitudes is the main source of biomass burning emissions, however, levoglucosan is in relatively low level. Large amount of precipitation and high hydroxyl radical concentration in this region cause more deposition and degradation of levoglucosan during transport. Previous studies were debatable on the influence of biomass burning on the Antarctic because of uncertain source of BC. Here via levoglucosan, it is proved that although far away from emission sources, the Antarctic is still affected by biomass burning aerosols which may be derived from South America. Biomass burning has a significant impact on mercury (Hg) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in marine aerosols from pole to pole, with more contribution to WSOC in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere.

  9. Exploring the role of shelf sediments in the Arctic Ocean in determining the Arctic contamination potential of neutral organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James M; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Meyer, Torsten; Brown, Trevor N; Wania, Frank

    2013-01-15

    The main objective of this study was to model the contribution of shelf sediments in the Arctic Ocean to the total mass of neutral organic contaminants accumulated in the Arctic environment using a standardized emission scenario for sets of hypothetical chemicals and realistic emission estimates (1930-2100) for polychlorinated biphenyl congener 153 (PCB-153). Shelf sediments in the Arctic Ocean are shown to be important reservoirs for neutral organic chemicals across a wide range of partitioning properties, increasing the total mass in the surface compartments of the Arctic environment by up to 3.5-fold compared to simulations excluding this compartment. The relative change in total mass for hydrophobic organic chemicals with log air-water partition coefficients ≥0 was greater than for chemicals with properties similar to typical POPs. The long-term simulation of PCB-153 generated modeled concentrations in shelf sediments in reasonable agreement with available monitoring data and illustrate that the relative importance of shelf sediments in the Arctic Ocean for influencing surface ocean concentrations (and therefore exposure via the pelagic food web) is most pronounced once primary emissions are exhausted and secondary sources dominate. Additional monitoring and modeling work to better characterize the role of shelf sediments for contaminant fate is recommended.

  10. Methyl iodine over oceans from the Arctic Ocean to the maritime Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qihou; Xie, Zhouqing; Wang, Xinming; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    Studies about methyl iodide (CH3I), an important atmospheric iodine species over oceans, had been conducted in some maritime regions, but the understanding of the spatial distribution of CH3I on a global scale is still limited. In this study, we reports atmospheric CH3I over oceans during the Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Research Expeditions. CH3I varied considerably with the range of 0.17 to 2.9 pptv with absent of ship emission. The concentration of CH3I generally decreased with increasing latitudes, except for higher levels in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere than in the low latitudes. For sea areas, the Norwegian Sea had the highest CH3I concentrations with a median of 0.91 pptv, while the Central Arctic Ocean had the lowest concentrations with all values below 0.5 pptv. CH3I concentration over oceans was affected by many parameters, including sea surface temperature, salinity, dissolved organic carbon, biogenic emissions and input from continents, with distinctive dominant factor in different regions, indicating complex biogeochemical processes of CH3I on a global scale.

  11. Methyl iodine over oceans from the Arctic Ocean to the maritime Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qihou; Xie, Zhouqing; Wang, Xinming; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Studies about methyl iodide (CH3I), an important atmospheric iodine species over oceans, had been conducted in some maritime regions, but the understanding of the spatial distribution of CH3I on a global scale is still limited. In this study, we reports atmospheric CH3I over oceans during the Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Research Expeditions. CH3I varied considerably with the range of 0.17 to 2.9 pptv with absent of ship emission. The concentration of CH3I generally decreased with increasing latitudes, except for higher levels in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere than in the low latitudes. For sea areas, the Norwegian Sea had the highest CH3I concentrations with a median of 0.91 pptv, while the Central Arctic Ocean had the lowest concentrations with all values below 0.5 pptv. CH3I concentration over oceans was affected by many parameters, including sea surface temperature, salinity, dissolved organic carbon, biogenic emissions and input from continents, with distinctive dominant factor in different regions, indicating complex biogeochemical processes of CH3I on a global scale. PMID:27184471

  12. Methyl iodine over oceans from the Arctic Ocean to the maritime Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qihou; Xie, Zhouqing; Wang, Xinming; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-05-17

    Studies about methyl iodide (CH3I), an important atmospheric iodine species over oceans, had been conducted in some maritime regions, but the understanding of the spatial distribution of CH3I on a global scale is still limited. In this study, we reports atmospheric CH3I over oceans during the Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Research Expeditions. CH3I varied considerably with the range of 0.17 to 2.9 pptv with absent of ship emission. The concentration of CH3I generally decreased with increasing latitudes, except for higher levels in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere than in the low latitudes. For sea areas, the Norwegian Sea had the highest CH3I concentrations with a median of 0.91 pptv, while the Central Arctic Ocean had the lowest concentrations with all values below 0.5 pptv. CH3I concentration over oceans was affected by many parameters, including sea surface temperature, salinity, dissolved organic carbon, biogenic emissions and input from continents, with distinctive dominant factor in different regions, indicating complex biogeochemical processes of CH3I on a global scale.

  13. Methyl iodine over oceans from the Arctic Ocean to the maritime Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qihou; Xie, Zhouqing; Wang, Xinming; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Studies about methyl iodide (CH3I), an important atmospheric iodine species over oceans, had been conducted in some maritime regions, but the understanding of the spatial distribution of CH3I on a global scale is still limited. In this study, we reports atmospheric CH3I over oceans during the Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Research Expeditions. CH3I varied considerably with the range of 0.17 to 2.9 pptv with absent of ship emission. The concentration of CH3I generally decreased with increasing latitudes, except for higher levels in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere than in the low latitudes. For sea areas, the Norwegian Sea had the highest CH3I concentrations with a median of 0.91 pptv, while the Central Arctic Ocean had the lowest concentrations with all values below 0.5 pptv. CH3I concentration over oceans was affected by many parameters, including sea surface temperature, salinity, dissolved organic carbon, biogenic emissions and input from continents, with distinctive dominant factor in different regions, indicating complex biogeochemical processes of CH3I on a global scale. PMID:27184471

  14. A Coupled Ice--Ocean Finite--Element Model of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, N.

    2002-05-01

    A coupled ice-ocean finite-element model of the Arctic Ocean is proposed for the Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project (AOMIP) studies. The model is based on the system of primitive equations for ocean. Sea ice dynamics are based upon the cavitating fluid solution described by Flato and Hibler (1990, 1992). The sea ice component of the model is driven by the heat, momentum, and freshwater fluxes provided at the upper and lower ice boundaries. Vertical water turbulence is parameterized by the generalized Prandtl theory for the vertical turbulent diffusion/momentum exchange coefficient. Model domain covers area north of 65o N. Equations are solved on a rotated coordinate system with the North Pole located at 0o N and 180o W. Horizontal model resolution is 1o and the model has 16 vertical levels. The model numerics is based on the finite-element (FE) spatial approximations. Time approximation is made by the time-splitting scheme with a special treatment for nonlinear sea ice rheology. Temperature, salinity and momentum advection is approximated by the FE upwind scheme with no crosswind diffusion created by Hughes and Brooks, 1979. For the sea ice mass and concentration transports the FE analog of the first order directed differences scheme was developed. The integral function of the model is the sea level elevation, which is determined by an implicit time scheme using Generalized Minimal Residual Method (Saad and Schultz, 1986). Major model results and some considerations for the model intercomparison methodology will be discussed.

  15. Chapter 49: A first look at the petroleum geology of the Lomonosov Ridge microcontinent, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, T.E.; Grantz, A.; Pitman, J.K.; Brown, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Lomonosov microcontinent is an elongated continental fragment that transects the Arctic Ocean between North America and Siberia via the North Pole. Although it lies beneath polar pack ice, the geological framework of the microcontinent is inferred from sparse seismic reflection data, a few cores, potential field data and the geology of its conjugate margin in the Barents-Kara Shelf. Petroleum systems inferred to be potentially active are comparable to those sourced by condensed Triassic and Jurassic marine shale of the Barents Platform and by condensed Jurassic and (or) Cretaceous shale probably present in the adjacent Amerasia Basin. Cenozoic deposits are known to contain rich petroleum source rocks but are too thermally immature to have generated petroleum. For the 2008 USGS Circum Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), the microcontinent was divided into shelf and slope assessment units (AUs) at the tectonic hinge line along the Amerasia Basin margin. A low to moderate probability of accumulation in the slope AU yielded fully risked mean estimates of 123 MMBO oil and 740 BCF gas. For the shelf AU, no quantitative assessment was made because the probability of petroleum accumulations of the 50 MMBOE minimum size was estimated to be less than 10% owing to rift-related uplift, erosion and faulting. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  16. Taking a bottom-to-sky [open quotes]slice[close quotes] of the Arctic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.

    1994-12-23

    This article discusses a Canadian-USA scientific expedition to study the Amerasian basin, comprising 2/3 of the Arctic Ocean, the world's least studied. Since the oceans remote location makes it particularly sensitive to indications of global climate change, a baseline of data is critical. Among the areas researched and discussed in this article are the following: the warm water layers in the intermediate space of the Arctic ocean; the albedo of the ocean; cloud cover; air pollution; plants and animals; cores of ocean bottom sediments. 2 figs.

  17. Impacts of ocean acidification on sediment processes in shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gazeau, Frédéric; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Pozzato, Lara; Middelburg, Jack J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer waters, acidification rates in these areas are faster than those in sub-tropical regions. The present study investigates the effects of ocean acidification on sediment composition, processes and sediment-water fluxes in an Arctic coastal system. Undisturbed sediment cores, exempt of large dwelling organisms, were collected, incubated for a period of 14 days, and subject to a gradient of pCO2 covering the range of values projected for the end of the century. On five occasions during the experimental period, the sediment cores were isolated for flux measurements (oxygen, alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and silicate). At the end of the experimental period, denitrification rates were measured and sediment samples were taken at several depth intervals for solid-phase analyses. Most of the parameters and processes (i.e. mineralization, denitrification) investigated showed no relationship with the overlying seawater pH, suggesting that ocean acidification will have limited impacts on the microbial activity and associated sediment-water fluxes on Arctic shelves, in the absence of active bio-irrigating organisms. Only following a pH decrease of 1 pH unit, not foreseen in the coming 300 years, significant enhancements of calcium carbonate dissolution and anammox rates were observed. Longer-term experiments on different sediment types are still required to confirm the limited impact of ocean acidification on shallow Arctic sediment processes as observed in this study. PMID:24718610

  18. Impacts of ocean acidification on sediment processes in shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gazeau, Frédéric; van Rijswijk, Pieter; Pozzato, Lara; Middelburg, Jack J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important roles of shallow-water sediments in global biogeochemical cycling, the effects of ocean acidification on sedimentary processes have received relatively little attention. As high-latitude cold waters can absorb more CO2 and usually have a lower buffering capacity than warmer waters, acidification rates in these areas are faster than those in sub-tropical regions. The present study investigates the effects of ocean acidification on sediment composition, processes and sediment-water fluxes in an Arctic coastal system. Undisturbed sediment cores, exempt of large dwelling organisms, were collected, incubated for a period of 14 days, and subject to a gradient of pCO2 covering the range of values projected for the end of the century. On five occasions during the experimental period, the sediment cores were isolated for flux measurements (oxygen, alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and silicate). At the end of the experimental period, denitrification rates were measured and sediment samples were taken at several depth intervals for solid-phase analyses. Most of the parameters and processes (i.e. mineralization, denitrification) investigated showed no relationship with the overlying seawater pH, suggesting that ocean acidification will have limited impacts on the microbial activity and associated sediment-water fluxes on Arctic shelves, in the absence of active bio-irrigating organisms. Only following a pH decrease of 1 pH unit, not foreseen in the coming 300 years, significant enhancements of calcium carbonate dissolution and anammox rates were observed. Longer-term experiments on different sediment types are still required to confirm the limited impact of ocean acidification on shallow Arctic sediment processes as observed in this study.

  19. First evaluation of MyOcean altimetric data in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.

    2012-01-01

    The MyOcean V2 preliminary (V2p) data set of weekly gridded sea level anomaly (SLA) maps from 1993 to 2009 over the Arctic region is evaluated against existing altimetric data sets and tide gauge data. Compared with DUACS V3.0.0 (Data Unification and Altimeter Combination System) data set, MyOcean V2p data set improves spatial coverage and quality as well as maximum temporal correlation coefficient between altimetry and tide gauge data. The estimated amplitude of sea level annual signal and linear sea level trend from MyOcean data set are evaluated against altimetry from DUACS and RADS (Radar Altimeter Database System), the SODA (Simple Ocean Data Assimilation) ocean reanalysis and tide gauge data sets from PSMSL (Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level). The results show that the MyOcean data set fits in-situ measurements better than DUACS data set with respect to amplitude of annual signal and linear sea level trend. However, the MyOcean V2p data set exhibits an unrealistic large linear sea level trend compared with that from other data sources.

  20. Dredged bedrock samples from the Amerasia Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, K. J.; Mukasa, S. B.; O'Brien, T. M.; Mayer, L. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2013-12-01

    Between 2008-2012, as part of the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf project in the Amerasia Basin, Arctic Ocean, 17 dredges were successfully collected sampling the first rock outcrops in the Chukchi Borderland and surrounding regions for the purpose of describing the geologic nature of the bathymetric features in this area. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that the specimens were collected from submarine rock exposures and were not samples of ice rafted debris, common in the ice covered waters of the Arctic Ocean. Using the USCGC Healy, each dredge was collected along very steep slopes (>35 degrees) measured with high resolution multibeam swath bathymety data. Each haul yielded samples of similar lithologies and identical metamorphic grade with manganese crusts on the surfaces exposed to seawater and fresh surfaces where the rocks were broken from outcrop. High tension pulls on the dredge line also indicated sampling of bedrock exposures. Dredged samples from a normal fault scarp in the central Chukchi Borderland consisted of Silurian (c. 430 Ma) orthogneisses that intruded older (c. 487-500 Ma) gabbros and luecogranties that were all metamorphosed to amphibolite grade (Brumley et al., 2011). Samples from the northern Northwind Ridge consisted of metasediments (greenschist facies) interpreted to have been deposited in a proximal arc setting with detrital zircon U-Pb age peaks at 434, 980 Ma with lesser peaks between 500-600, 1100-2000 Ma, and rare 2800 Ma grains (Brumley et al, 2010). Other dredges in the region of the Northwind Ridge yielded deformed and metamorphosed calcareous sandstones and low-grade phyllites (O'Brien et al., 2013). Taken together these rocks indicate a relationship to the Pearya Terrane of northern Ellesmere Island and S.W. Svalbard that were thought to represent a Cambro-Ordovician volcanic arc terrane that was involved in Caledonian orogenesis (Brumley et al., 2011). These findings constrain plate tectonic reconstruction models and bring

  1. Arctic Lena Trough -- NOT a Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.; Handt, A. V.; Nauret, F.; Gao, Y.; Feig, S.; Jovanovic, Z.

    2005-12-01

    The North American-Eurasian plate boundary traverses the Atlantic and Arctic oceans. Over most of that length, it is a Mid-Ocean Ridge that spreads between about 23 mm/yr (MAR) and 10 mm/yr (Gakkel Ridge) full rate. The northern MAR and the Gakkel ridge are connected by a deep linear feature called Lena Trough. Until about 10 million years ago, Lena Trough was not an oceanic domain at all, but a continental shear zone through a narrow isthmus of continental crust that connected the American and Eurasian plates. Its opening was, significantly, the most recent and final event in the separation of the North American from the Eurasian continent, and opened the gateway for deep water circulation between the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. Models for the tectonic configuration of Lena Trough have until now differed only in the number and length of fracture zones and spreading segments thought to be present. Lena Trough is a deep fault-bounded basin with depths of 3800-4200m, and irregular, steep valley sides that are oblique to the spreading direction. Basement horst structures outcrop as sigmoidal ridges with steeply dipping sides project out of the valley floor, but these are not traceable to any parallel structures on either side. Ridge-orthogonal topography is simply absent (ie no segments trending parallel nor fracture zones perpendicular to Gakkel Ridge). Most faults trend approximately SSE-NNW, an obliquity with respect to Gakkel Ridge (SW-NE) of about 55 degrees. The basement ridges are composed nearly entirely of mantle peridotite, as are the valley walls. Only at the northern and southern extremities of Lena Trough do basalts appear at all. The Northern basalts show strong chemical affinities to those of Gakkel Ridge, and can be considered a part of the Gakkel volcanic system. The rare southernmost basalts, however, are quite unique. They are alkali basalts with K2O up to 2 weight percent, highly incompaitble element enriched and occupy a corner of isotope

  2. Ecology of the rare microbial biosphere of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Galand, Pierre E; Casamayor, Emilio O; Kirchman, David L; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-12-29

    Understanding the role of microbes in the oceans has focused on taxa that occur in high abundance; yet most of the marine microbial diversity is largely determined by a long tail of low-abundance taxa. This rare biosphere may have a cosmopolitan distribution because of high dispersal and low loss rates, and possibly represents a source of phylotypes that become abundant when environmental conditions change. However, the true ecological role of rare marine microorganisms is still not known. Here, we use pyrosequencing to describe the structure and composition of the rare biosphere and to test whether it represents cosmopolitan taxa or whether, similar to abundant phylotypes, the rare community has a biogeography. Our examination of 740,353 16S rRNA gene sequences from 32 bacterial and archaeal communities from various locations of the Arctic Ocean showed that rare phylotypes did not have a cosmopolitan distribution but, rather, followed patterns similar to those of the most abundant members of the community and of the entire community. The abundance distributions of rare and abundant phylotypes were different, following a log-series and log-normal model, respectively, and the taxonomic composition of the rare biosphere was similar to the composition of the abundant phylotypes. We conclude that the rare biosphere has a biogeography and that its tremendous diversity is most likely subjected to ecological processes such as selection, speciation, and extinction.

  3. Ecology of the rare microbial biosphere of the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Galand, Pierre E.; Casamayor, Emilio O.; Kirchman, David L.; Lovejoy, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the role of microbes in the oceans has focused on taxa that occur in high abundance; yet most of the marine microbial diversity is largely determined by a long tail of low-abundance taxa. This rare biosphere may have a cosmopolitan distribution because of high dispersal and low loss rates, and possibly represents a source of phylotypes that become abundant when environmental conditions change. However, the true ecological role of rare marine microorganisms is still not known. Here, we use pyrosequencing to describe the structure and composition of the rare biosphere and to test whether it represents cosmopolitan taxa or whether, similar to abundant phylotypes, the rare community has a biogeography. Our examination of 740,353 16S rRNA gene sequences from 32 bacterial and archaeal communities from various locations of the Arctic Ocean showed that rare phylotypes did not have a cosmopolitan distribution but, rather, followed patterns similar to those of the most abundant members of the community and of the entire community. The abundance distributions of rare and abundant phylotypes were different, following a log-series and log-normal model, respectively, and the taxonomic composition of the rare biosphere was similar to the composition of the abundant phylotypes. We conclude that the rare biosphere has a biogeography and that its tremendous diversity is most likely subjected to ecological processes such as selection, speciation, and extinction. PMID:20018741

  4. Upper Arctic Ocean velocity structure from in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recinos, Beatriz; Rabe, Benjamin; Schauer, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    The gross circulation of the upper and intermediate layers of the Arctic Ocean has been inferred from water mass properties: the mixed layer, containing fresh water from the shelf seas, travels from Siberia towards the Atlantic sector, and the saline and warm layer of Atlantic origin below, follows cyclonic pathways along topographic features. Direct observations of the flow below the sea ice are, however, sparse and difficult to obtain. This research presents the analysis of a unique time series/section of in situ velocity measurements obtained by a drifting ice-tethered platform in the Transpolar Drift near the North Pole. Two instruments were used to obtain in situ measurements of velocity, temperature, salinity and pressure: an Ice-tethered Acoustic Current profiler (ITAC) and an Ice-tethered Profiler (ITP). Both systems were deployed in the Amundsen basin, during the Arctic Ocean expedition ARK XXII/2 of the German Research Vessel Polarstern in September 2007. The systems transmitted profile data from the 14th of September to the 29th of November 2007 and covered a maximum depth range of 23 to 400 m. The results are compared to observations by a shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) from the 2011 Polarstern expedition ARK-XXVI/3, and wind and ice concentration from satellite reanalysis products. The data set allows an overview of the upper and intermediate circulation along the Lomonosov Ridge. Near-surface velocity and ice drift obtained by the ITAC unit are consistent with the Transpolar Drift Current. Ekman transports calculated from the observed ice drift and assumed ice-ocean drag behaviour suggest that Ekman dynamics influenced velocities at depths greater than the Ekman layer. Direct velocity observations in combination with water mass analyses from the temperature and salinity data, suggest the existence of a current along the Eurasian side of the Lomonosov Ridge within the warm Atlantic layer below the cold halocline. At those depths

  5. Evidence for an ice shelf covering the central Arctic Ocean during the penultimate glaciation.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Martin; Nilsson, Johan; Anderson, Leif; Backman, Jan; Björk, Göran; Cronin, Thomas M; Kirchner, Nina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Mayer, Larry; Noormets, Riko; O'Regan, Matthew; Stranne, Christian; Ananiev, Roman; Barrientos Macho, Natalia; Cherniykh, Denis; Coxall, Helen; Eriksson, Björn; Flodén, Tom; Gemery, Laura; Gustafsson, Örjan; Jerram, Kevin; Johansson, Carina; Khortov, Alexey; Mohammad, Rezwan; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis of a km-thick ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean during peak glacial conditions was proposed nearly half a century ago. Floating ice shelves preserve few direct traces after their disappearance, making reconstructions difficult. Seafloor imprints of ice shelves should, however, exist where ice grounded along their flow paths. Here we present new evidence of ice-shelf groundings on bathymetric highs in the central Arctic Ocean, resurrecting the concept of an ice shelf extending over the entire central Arctic Ocean during at least one previous ice age. New and previously mapped glacial landforms together reveal flow of a spatially coherent, in some regions >1-km thick, central Arctic Ocean ice shelf dated to marine isotope stage 6 (∼ 140 ka). Bathymetric highs were likely critical in the ice-shelf development by acting as pinning points where stabilizing ice rises formed, thereby providing sufficient back stress to allow ice shelf thickening. PMID:26778247

  6. Recent Arctic Ocean sea ice loss triggers novel fall phytoplankton blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardyna, Mathieu; Babin, Marcel; Gosselin, Michel; Devred, Emmanuel; Rainville, Luc; Tremblay, Jean-Éric

    2014-09-01

    Recent receding of the ice pack allows more sunlight to penetrate into the Arctic Ocean, enhancing productivity of a single annual phytoplankton bloom. Increasing river runoff may, however, enhance the yet pronounced upper ocean stratification and prevent any significant wind-driven vertical mixing and upward supply of nutrients, counteracting the additional light available to phytoplankton. Vertical mixing of the upper ocean is the key process that will determine the fate of marine Arctic ecosystems. Here we reveal an unexpected consequence of the Arctic ice loss: regions are now developing a second bloom in the fall, which coincides with delayed freezeup and increased exposure of the sea surface to wind stress. This implies that wind-driven vertical mixing during fall is indeed significant, at least enough to promote further primary production. The Arctic Ocean seems to be experiencing a fundamental shift from a polar to a temperate mode, which is likely to alter the marine ecosystem.

  7. Evidence for an ice shelf covering the central Arctic Ocean during the penultimate glaciation

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Martin; Nilsson, Johan; Anderson, Leif; Backman, Jan; Björk, Göran; Cronin, Thomas M.; Kirchner, Nina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Mayer, Larry; Noormets, Riko; O'Regan, Matthew; Stranne, Christian; Ananiev, Roman; Barrientos Macho, Natalia; Cherniykh, Denis; Coxall, Helen; Eriksson, Björn; Flodén, Tom; Gemery, Laura; Gustafsson, Örjan; Jerram, Kevin; Johansson, Carina; Khortov, Alexey; Mohammad, Rezwan; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis of a km-thick ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean during peak glacial conditions was proposed nearly half a century ago. Floating ice shelves preserve few direct traces after their disappearance, making reconstructions difficult. Seafloor imprints of ice shelves should, however, exist where ice grounded along their flow paths. Here we present new evidence of ice-shelf groundings on bathymetric highs in the central Arctic Ocean, resurrecting the concept of an ice shelf extending over the entire central Arctic Ocean during at least one previous ice age. New and previously mapped glacial landforms together reveal flow of a spatially coherent, in some regions >1-km thick, central Arctic Ocean ice shelf dated to marine isotope stage 6 (∼140 ka). Bathymetric highs were likely critical in the ice-shelf development by acting as pinning points where stabilizing ice rises formed, thereby providing sufficient back stress to allow ice shelf thickening. PMID:26778247

  8. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the Arctic Ocean Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. Of particular interest is the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish (M...

  9. Evidence for an ice shelf covering the central Arctic Ocean during the penultimate glaciation.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Martin; Nilsson, Johan; Anderson, Leif; Backman, Jan; Björk, Göran; Cronin, Thomas M; Kirchner, Nina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Mayer, Larry; Noormets, Riko; O'Regan, Matthew; Stranne, Christian; Ananiev, Roman; Barrientos Macho, Natalia; Cherniykh, Denis; Coxall, Helen; Eriksson, Björn; Flodén, Tom; Gemery, Laura; Gustafsson, Örjan; Jerram, Kevin; Johansson, Carina; Khortov, Alexey; Mohammad, Rezwan; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-01-18

    The hypothesis of a km-thick ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean during peak glacial conditions was proposed nearly half a century ago. Floating ice shelves preserve few direct traces after their disappearance, making reconstructions difficult. Seafloor imprints of ice shelves should, however, exist where ice grounded along their flow paths. Here we present new evidence of ice-shelf groundings on bathymetric highs in the central Arctic Ocean, resurrecting the concept of an ice shelf extending over the entire central Arctic Ocean during at least one previous ice age. New and previously mapped glacial landforms together reveal flow of a spatially coherent, in some regions >1-km thick, central Arctic Ocean ice shelf dated to marine isotope stage 6 (∼ 140 ka). Bathymetric highs were likely critical in the ice-shelf development by acting as pinning points where stabilizing ice rises formed, thereby providing sufficient back stress to allow ice shelf thickening.

  10. Evidence for an ice shelf covering the central Arctic Ocean during the penultimate glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jakobsson, Martin; Nilsson, Johan; Anderson, Leif G.; Backman, Jan; Bjork, Goran; Cronin, Thomas M.; Kirchner, Nina; Koshurnikov, Andrey; Mayer, Larry; Noormets, Riko; O'Regan, Matthew; Stranne, Christian; Ananiev, Roman; Macho, Natalia Barrientos; Cherniykh, Dennis; Coxall, Helen; Eriksson, Bjorn; Floden, Tom; Gemery, Laura; Gustafsson, Orjan; Jerram, Kevin; Johansson, Carina; Khortov, Alexey; Mohammad, Rezwan; Semiletov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis of a km-thick ice shelf covering the entire Arctic Ocean during peak glacial conditions was proposed nearly half a century ago. Floating ice shelves preserve few direct traces after their disappearance, making reconstructions difficult. Seafloor imprints of ice shelves should, however, exist where ice grounded along their flow paths. Here we present new evidence of ice-shelf groundings on bathymetric highs in the central Arctic Ocean, resurrecting the concept of an ice shelf extending over the entire central Arctic Ocean during at least one previous ice age. New and previously mapped glacial landforms together reveal flow of a spatially coherent, in some regions >1-km thick, central Arctic Ocean ice shelf dated to marine isotope stage 6 (~140 ka). Bathymetric highs were likely critical in the ice-shelf development by acting as pinning points where stabilizing ice rises formed, thereby providing sufficient back stress to allow ice shelf thickening.

  11. Recent Changes in Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Motion Associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.

    1999-01-01

    Examination of a new ice motion dataset of the Arctic Ocean over a recent eighteen year period (1978-1996) reveals patterns of variability that can be linked directly to the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  12. Retention of ice-associated amphipods: possible consequences for an ice-free Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Berge, J; Varpe, O; Moline, M A; Wold, A; Renaud, P E; Daase, M; Falk-Petersen, S

    2012-12-23

    Recent studies predict that the Arctic Ocean will have ice-free summers within the next 30 years. This poses a significant challenge for the marine organisms associated with the Arctic sea ice, such as marine mammals and, not least, the ice-associated crustaceans generally considered to spend their entire life on the underside of the Arctic sea ice. Based upon unique samples collected within the Arctic Ocean during the polar night, we provide a new conceptual understanding of an intimate connection between these under-ice crustaceans and the deep Arctic Ocean currents. We suggest that downwards vertical migrations, followed by polewards transport in deep ocean currents, are an adaptive trait of ice fauna that both increases survival during ice-free periods of the year and enables re-colonization of sea ice when they ascend within the Arctic Ocean. From an evolutionary perspective, this may have been an adaptation allowing success in a seasonally ice-covered Arctic. Our findings may ultimately change the perception of ice fauna as a biota imminently threatened by the predicted disappearance of perennial sea ice.

  13. Arctic ocean water mass distribution and particle flux from dissolved 10Be and 9Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Porcelli, D.; Andersson, P.; Halliday, A. N.; Kubik, P. W.; Hattendorf, B.; Guenther, D.

    2003-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean basin is confined by landmasses similar to the Mediterranean. There is only little deep water formed seasonally on the shelves of the Arctic Ocean despite the low temperatures. This is due to a freshwater lid at the surface which originates from the Arctic rivers. The deeper Arctic Ocean water masses can thus only be renewed at comparatively low rates via the only deep connection to the Atlantic Ocean, the Fram Strait. At the same time the biogenic particulate fluxes in the central Arctic Ocean are very low due to perennial sea ice cover and detrital particle fluxes from either eolian or riverine sources are also very low. We will present the first combined dissolved 10Be (cosmogenic) and ^9Be (continental sources) depth profiles from water samples of the major deep basins of the Arctic Ocean collected during the Swedish Arctic Ocean 2001 expedition. Be is 5-10 times less particle-reactive than other previously investigated radionuclides such as Th or Pa and should therefore even at the relatively low Arctic Ocean renewal rates serve as a quasi-conservative tracer for different origins of water masses (Atlantic Ocean/Norwegian Sea, Pacific Ocean, Arctic Shelves). ^9Be and Nd isotope analyses provide complementary information to cosmogenic 10Be on the pathways of dissolved material originating from the Arctic continents. Results obtained ten years ago at similar locations as in our study indicated a uniform distribution of 10Be at low values of 500±100 atoms/g suggesting restricted input and efficient homogenisation. In contrast, our new results show that in 2001 the inflowing waters from the Atlantic are traced by 10Be concentrations of up to 1100 atoms/g. Preliminary measurements indicate relatively low ^9Be concentrations around 10 pMol/litre resulting in 10Be/^9Be ratios of ˜ 1 x 10-7 in the deep Arctic Ocean. In addition, the surface 10Be concentrations vary considerably. It will be discussed wether this is a consequence of a seasonal

  14. Persistent organic pollutants in ocean sediments from the North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuxin; Halsall, Crispin J.; Crosse, John D.; Graf, Carola; Cai, Minghong; He, Jianfeng; Gao, Guoping; Jones, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OC pesticides), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are reported in surficial sediments sampled along cruise transects from the Bering Sea to the central Arctic Ocean. OCs and PCBs all had significantly higher concentrations in the relatively shallow water (<500 m depth) of the Bering-Chukchi shelf areas (e.g., ΣPCB 286 ± 265 pg g-1 dw) compared to the deeper water regions (>500 m) of the Bering Sea and Arctic Ocean (e.g., Canada Basin ΣPCB 149 ± 102 pg g-1 dw). Concentrations were similar to, or slightly lower than, studies from the 1990s, indicating a lack of a declining trend. PBDEs (excluding BDE-209) displayed very low concentrations (e.g., range of median values, 3.5-6.6 pg/g dw). In the shelf areas, the sediments comprised similar proportions of silt and clay, whereas the deep basin sediments were dominated by clay, with a lower total organic carbon (TOC) content. While significant positive correlations were observed between persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations and TOC (Pearson correlation, r = 0.66-0.75, p <0.05), the lack of strong correlations, combined with differing chemical profiles between the sediments and technical formulations (and/or marine surface waters), indicate substantial chemical processing during transfer to the benthic environment. Marked differences in sedimentation rates between the shallow and deeper water regions are apparent (the ˜5 cm-depth grab samples collected here representing ˜100 years of accumulation for the shelf sediments and ˜1000 years for the deeper ocean regions), which may bias any comparisons. Nonetheless, the sediments of the shallower coastal arctic seas appear to serve as significant repositories for POPs deposited from surface waters.

  15. From the Arctic Lake to the Arctic Ocean: Radiogenic Isotope Signature of Transitional Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Veron, A. J.; Stevenson, R.; Carignan, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean was once an enclosed basin with fresh surface water conditions during the Paleocene and most of the Eocene epochs (e.g. Moran et al. 2004), until a readjustment in high latitude plate tectonics allowed North Atlantic marine water to flow into the Arctic basin some 36 Ma ago (Poirier and Hillaire-Marcel, 2011). This first input was sufficient to overprint the earlier osmium isotopic composition in the basin (ibid.) and deposit marine sediments on the Lomonosov Ridge between 36 Ma and present day. Here, we present Sr and Pb isotope signatures in the transitional layers of the same ACEX sequence from Lomonosov Ridge (ca. 190 to 210 mcd). Bulk sediment samples were leached prior to total dissolution in order to remove the hydrogeneous Sr fraction of the sediment. The Sr isotopic signature of the residual fraction is thought to reflect the origin of the sedimentary load that was deposited before, during, and after the transition (source tracing). Leaching was not required for the Pb isotope analyses as leached residues and bulk sediments yielded similar isotopic composition for the oxic sediments. Moreover, correction for in-situ production is needed within the anoxic lacustrine section (see below), so bulk sediments were measured. Above and below the lacustrine/marine boundary, we note relatively constant source provenances (or mixture of sources). This implies that the relative contributions from regional detrital sedimentary sources, and thus relative erosion rates over surrounding continents, did not change much on the long term scale. On the other hand, a sharp change in the isotopic compositions highlights the transition level itself, with an abrupt shift to low 87Sr/88Sr isotope compositions and by a smaller excursion in all three 204Pb-normalised lead isotopes compositions (corrected for in-situ decay of U). In the light of the recently revised age of the transitional layer (~36 Ma at the lacustrine/marine transition), this isotopic excursion

  16. Petroleum prospectivity of the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, A.; Hart, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Reconnaissance seismic reflection data indicate that Canada Basin is a >700,000 sq. km. remnant of the Amerasia Basin of the Arctic Ocean that lies south of the Alpha-Mendeleev Large Igneous Province, which was constructed across the northern part of the Amerasia Basin between about 127 and 89-83.5 Ma. Canada Basin was filled by Early Jurassic to Holocene detritus from the Beaufort-Mackenzie Deltaic System, which drains the northern third of interior North America, with sizable contributions from Alaska and Northwest Canada. The basin contains roughly 5 or 6 million cubic km of sediment. Three fourths or more of this volume generates low amplitude seismic reflections, interpreted to represent hemipelagic deposits, which contain lenses to extensive interbeds of moderate amplitude reflections interpreted to represent unconfined turbidite and amalgamated channel deposits.Extrapolation from Arctic Alaska and Northwest Canada suggests that three fourths of the section in Canada Basin is correlative with stratigraphic sequences in these areas that contain intervals of hydrocarbon source rocks. In addition, worldwide heat flow averages suggest that about two thirds of Canada Basin lies in the oil or gas windows. Structural, stratigraphic and combined structural and stratigraphic features of local to regional occurrence offer exploration targets in Canada Basin, and at least one of these contains bright spots. However, deep water (to almost 4000 m), remoteness from harbors and markets, and thick accumulations of seasonal to permanent sea ice (until its possible removal by global warming later this century) will require the discovery of very large deposits for commercial success in most parts of Canada Basin. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. What controls past and present organic carbon fluxes in the Arctic Ocean? - New insights from biomarker records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. H.; Fahl, K.; Xiao, X.; Meheust, M.; Müller, J.

    2012-12-01

    The past and present Arctic Ocean is characterized by distinct changes in sea-ice cover, sea-surface-temperature, river discharge, and oceanic circulation patterns. All these factors also influence the organic carbon (OC) input, preservation and burial in the continental margin and adjacent deep sea areas (cf., Stein and Macdonald, 2004; Stein, 2008). Thus, records of amount and composition of OC in marine surface sediments and sediment cores yield important information on the spatial and temporal variability of Arctic Ocean (paleo-)environments. Especially, biomarker data allow to distinguish between these different processes controlling/influencing OC accumulation in the Arctic Ocean. In this context, we determined concentrations of the sea-ice diatom-derived biomarker IP25 (highly-branched isoprenoid - HBI - with 25 carbon atom; Belt et al., 2007), phytoplankton-derived biomarkers (brassicasterol and dinosterol) and terrigenous biomarkers (e.g., campesterol and long-chain n-alkanes) to estimate recent sea-ice conditions and related surface-water processes in the study area. A combined phytoplankton-IP25 biomarker approach (PIP25 index) is used to reconstruct the modern sea-ice distribution more quantitatively (Müller et al., 2009, 2011; Fahl and Stein, 2012; Stein et al., 2012). Starting from distribution maps of the different biomarker proxies for terrigenous input, sea-ice and primary production and indicative for modern processes controlling OC accumulation, we continue with biomarker data obtained from selected Arctic Ocean sediment cores. The biomarker records from the sediment cores give insights into the variability in river discharge, primary productivity and sea ice as well as OC fluxes from the Last Glacial Maximum to recent times. References Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland, S.J., Poulin, M., Michel, C., LeBlanc, B., 2007. A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice: IP25. Org. Geochem. 38, 16-27. Fahl, K. and Stein, R., 2012. Modern seasonal

  18. Mercury depletion events over Antarctic and Arctic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerentorp Mastromonaco, M. G.; Gardfeldt, K.; Wangberg, I.; Jourdain, B.; Dommergue, A.; Kuronen, P.; Pirrone, N.; Jacobi, H.

    2013-12-01

    and were correlated with local measurements of ozone. The sources of the depleted air masses were examined using backward wind trajectories and BrO maps, showing that the depletion events occurred in the Arctic Ocean, 2000 km away from the Pallas-Matorova station.

  19. A land-to-ocean perspective on the magnitude, source and implication of DIC flux from major Arctic rivers to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Suzanne E.; Raymond, Peter A.; Striegl, Robert G.; McClelland, James W.; Holmes, Robert M.; Fiske, Greg J.; Peterson, Bruce J.

    2012-12-01

    A series of seasonally distributed measurements from the six largest Arctic rivers (the Ob', Yenisey, Lena, Kolyma, Yukon and Mackenzie) was used to examine the magnitude and significance of Arctic riverine DIC flux to larger scale C dynamics within the Arctic system. DIC concentration showed considerable, and synchronous, seasonal variation across these six large Arctic rivers, which have an estimated combined annual DIC flux of 30 Tg C yr-1. By examining the relationship between DIC flux and landscape variables known to regulate riverine DIC, we extrapolate to a DIC flux of 57 ± 9.9 Tg C yr-1 for the full pan-arctic basin, and show that DIC export increases with runoff, the extent of carbonate rocks and glacial coverage, but decreases with permafrost extent. This pan-arctic riverine DIC estimate represents 13-15% of the total global DIC flux. The annual flux of selected ions (HCO3-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Sr2+, and Cl-) from the six largest Arctic rivers confirms that chemical weathering is dominated by inputs from carbonate rocks in the North American watersheds, but points to a more important role for silicate rocks in Siberian watersheds. In the coastal ocean, river water-induced decreases in aragonite saturation (i.e., an ocean acidification effect) appears to be much more pronounced in Siberia than in the North American Arctic, and stronger in the winter and spring than in the late summer. Accounting for seasonal variation in the flux of DIC and other major ions gives a much clearer understanding of the importance of riverine DIC within the broader pan-arctic C cycle.

  20. Sea Ice Drift in the Arctic Ocean. Seasonal Variability and Long-Term Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V.; Pavlova, O.

    2010-12-01

    Variability in the drift of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean is an important parameter that can be used to characterise the thermodynamic processes in the Arctic. Knowledge of the features of sea ice drift in the Arctic Ocean is necessary for climate research, for an improved understanding of polar ecology and as an aid to human activity in the Arctic Ocean. Monthly mean sea ice drift velocities, computed from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), and International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) buoy data, are used to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of ice motion in the Arctic Ocean and Nordic Seas from 1979. Sea ice drift in the Arctic Ocean is characterized by strong seasonal and inter-annual variability. The results of combined statistical analysis of sea ice velocities and wind fields over the Arctic Ocean suggest that the seasonal changes of local wind are a predominant factor in the formation of the sea ice velocities annual cycle. Sea ice drift velocities mirror seasonal changes of the wind in the Arctic, reaching a maximum in December, with a minimum in June. In the central part of the Arctic Ocean and in the area near the Canadian shore the amplitude of this variation is not more than 2 cm/ sec. The maximum amplitudes are found in the Fram Strait (9-10 cm/sec), Beaufort Gyre (6-7 cm/sec) and the northern part of Barents Sea (5-6 cm/sec). Low frequency variations of sea ice drift velocities, with periods of 2.0-2.5 yrs and 5.0-6.0 yrs, are related to reorganization of the atmospheric circulation over the Arctic. There is evidence that the average sea ice velocity for the whole of the Arctic Ocean is increasing, with a positive trend for the period of last three decades. Trends of the monthly mean ice drift velocities are positive almost everywhere in the Arctic Ocean. In the Baffin Bay, Fram Strait and Barents Sea regions, sea ice velocities

  1. A tale of two basins: An integrated physical and biological perspective of the deep Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, B. A.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Carmack, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    domains have vertical stratification that constrains the transfer of nutrients to the surface layer (euphotic zone), thus leading to their oligotrophic state, particularly in the more strongly stratified Pacific Arctic where, despite high nutrient values in the inflow, convective reset of surface layer nutrients by haline convection in winter is virtually absent. First and multi-year sea ice drastically alters albedo and insulates the underlying water column from extreme winter heat loss while its mechanical properties (thickness, concentration, roughness, etc.) greatly affect the efficiency of momentum transfer from the wind to the underlying water. Biologically, sea ice algal growth in the basins is proportionally almost equal to or exceeding phytoplankton production, and is a habitat and transport platform for sympagic (ice-associated) fauna. Owing to nutrient limitation due to strong stratification and light limitation due to snow and ice cover and extreme sun angle, primary production in the two basin domains is very low compared to the adjacent shelves. Severe nutrient limitation and complete euphotic zone drawdown in the AB favors small phytoplankton, a ubiquitous deep chlorophyll maximum layer, a low f-ratio of new to recycled carbon fixation, and a low energy food web. In contrast, nutrients persist -albeit in low levels- in the western EB, even in summer, suggesting light limitation, heavy grazing or both. The higher stocks of nutrients in the EB are more conducive to marginal ice blooms than in the AB. The large-scale ocean currents (NHTC and ACBC) import substantial expatriate, not locally reproducing zooplankton biomass especially from the adjoining subarctic Atlantic (primarily Calanus finmarchicus), but also from the Pacific (e.g., Pseudocalanus spp., Neocalanus spp. and Metridia pacifica). These advective inputs serve both as source of food to resident pelagic and benthic biota within the basins, and as potential grazers exerting top down control on

  2. Arctic-HYCOS: a Large Sample observing system for estimating freshwater fluxes in the drainage basin of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroniro, Al; Korhonen, Johanna; Looser, Ulrich; Hardardóttir, Jórunn; Johnsrud, Morten; Vuglinsky, Valery; Gustafsson, David; Lins, Harry F.; Conaway, Jeffrey S.; Lammers, Richard; Stewart, Bruce; Abrate, Tommaso; Pilon, Paul; Sighomnou, Daniel; Arheimer, Berit

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic region is an important regulating component of the global climate system, and is also experiencing a considerable change during recent decades. More than 10% of world's river-runoff flows to the Arctic Ocean and there is evidence of changes in its fresh-water balance. However, about 30% of the Arctic basin is still ungauged, with differing monitoring practices and data availability from the countries in the region. A consistent system for monitoring and sharing of hydrological information throughout the Arctic region is thus of highest interest for further studies and monitoring of the freshwater flux to the Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the Arctic-HYCOS project is to allow for collection and sharing of hydrological data. Preliminary 616 stations were identified with long-term daily discharge data available, and around 250 of these already provide online available data in near real time. This large sample will be used in the following scientific analysis: 1) to evaluate freshwater flux to the Arctic Ocean and Seas, 2) to monitor changes and enhance understanding of the hydrological regime and 3) to estimate flows in ungauged regions and develop models for enhanced hydrological prediction in the Arctic region. The project is intended as a component of the WMO (World Meteorological Organization) WHYCOS (World Hydrological Cycle Observing System) initiative, covering the area of the expansive transnational Arctic basin with participation from Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russian Federation, Sweden and United States of America. The overall objective is to regularly collect, manage and share high quality data from a defined basic network of hydrological stations in the Arctic basin. The project focus on collecting data on discharge and possibly sediment transport and temperature. Data should be provisional in near-real time if available, whereas time-series of historical data should be provided once quality assurance has been completed. The

  3. Shallow methylmercury production in the marginal sea ice zone of the central Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Cossa, Daniel; Point, David; Lagane, Christelle; Laffont, Laure; Galfond, Benjamin T.; Nicolaus, Marcel; Rabe, Benjamin; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxic compound that threatens wildlife and human health across the Arctic region. Though much is known about the source and dynamics of its inorganic mercury (Hg) precursor, the exact origin of the high MeHg concentrations in Arctic biota remains uncertain. Arctic coastal sediments, coastal marine waters and surface snow are known sites for MeHg production. Observations on marine Hg dynamics, however, have been restricted to the Canadian Archipelago and the Beaufort Sea (<79°N). Here we present the first central Arctic Ocean (79–90°N) profiles for total mercury (tHg) and MeHg. We find elevated tHg and MeHg concentrations in the marginal sea ice zone (81–85°N). Similar to other open ocean basins, Arctic MeHg concentration maxima also occur in the pycnocline waters, but at much shallower depths (150–200 m). The shallow MeHg maxima just below the productive surface layer possibly result in enhanced biological uptake at the base of the Arctic marine food web and may explain the elevated MeHg concentrations in Arctic biota. We suggest that Arctic warming, through thinning sea ice, extension of the seasonal sea ice zone, intensified surface ocean stratification and shifts in plankton ecodynamics, will likely lead to higher marine MeHg production. PMID:25993348

  4. Shallow methylmercury production in the marginal sea ice zone of the central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Cossa, Daniel; Point, David; Lagane, Christelle; Laffont, Laure; Galfond, Benjamin T.; Nicolaus, Marcel; Rabe, Benjamin; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers

    2015-05-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxic compound that threatens wildlife and human health across the Arctic region. Though much is known about the source and dynamics of its inorganic mercury (Hg) precursor, the exact origin of the high MeHg concentrations in Arctic biota remains uncertain. Arctic coastal sediments, coastal marine waters and surface snow are known sites for MeHg production. Observations on marine Hg dynamics, however, have been restricted to the Canadian Archipelago and the Beaufort Sea (<79°N). Here we present the first central Arctic Ocean (79-90°N) profiles for total mercury (tHg) and MeHg. We find elevated tHg and MeHg concentrations in the marginal sea ice zone (81-85°N). Similar to other open ocean basins, Arctic MeHg concentration maxima also occur in the pycnocline waters, but at much shallower depths (150-200 m). The shallow MeHg maxima just below the productive surface layer possibly result in enhanced biological uptake at the base of the Arctic marine food web and may explain the elevated MeHg concentrations in Arctic biota. We suggest that Arctic warming, through thinning sea ice, extension of the seasonal sea ice zone, intensified surface ocean stratification and shifts in plankton ecodynamics, will likely lead to higher marine MeHg production.

  5. Shallow methylmercury production in the marginal sea ice zone of the central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Sonke, Jeroen E; Cossa, Daniel; Point, David; Lagane, Christelle; Laffont, Laure; Galfond, Benjamin T; Nicolaus, Marcel; Rabe, Benjamin; van der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers

    2015-05-20

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxic compound that threatens wildlife and human health across the Arctic region. Though much is known about the source and dynamics of its inorganic mercury (Hg) precursor, the exact origin of the high MeHg concentrations in Arctic biota remains uncertain. Arctic coastal sediments, coastal marine waters and surface snow are known sites for MeHg production. Observations on marine Hg dynamics, however, have been restricted to the Canadian Archipelago and the Beaufort Sea (<79 °N). Here we present the first central Arctic Ocean (79-90 °N) profiles for total mercury (tHg) and MeHg. We find elevated tHg and MeHg concentrations in the marginal sea ice zone (81-85 °N). Similar to other open ocean basins, Arctic MeHg concentration maxima also occur in the pycnocline waters, but at much shallower depths (150-200 m). The shallow MeHg maxima just below the productive surface layer possibly result in enhanced biological uptake at the base of the Arctic marine food web and may explain the elevated MeHg concentrations in Arctic biota. We suggest that Arctic warming, through thinning sea ice, extension of the seasonal sea ice zone, intensified surface ocean stratification and shifts in plankton ecodynamics, will likely lead to higher marine MeHg production.

  6. Distribution of natural halocarbons in marine boundary air over the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Yoko; Inoue, Jun; Toom-Sauntry, Desiree

    2013-08-01

    Ongoing environmental changes in the Arctic will affect the exchange of natural volatile organic compounds between the atmosphere and the Arctic Ocean. Among these compounds, natural halocarbons play an important role in atmospheric ozone chemistry. We measured the distribution of five major natural halocarbons (methyl iodide, bromoform, dibromomethane, methyl chloride, and methyl bromide) together with dimethyl sulfide and tetrachloroethylene in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean (from the Bering Strait to 79°N) and along the cruise path to and from Japan. Methyl iodide, bromoform, and dibromomethane were most abundant near perennial sea ice in air masses derived from coastal regions and least abundant in the northernmost Arctic, where the air masses had passed over the ice pack, whereas methyl chloride and methyl bromide showed the opposite distribution pattern. Factors controlling those distributions and future prospects for natural halocarbons in the Arctic are discussed.

  7. Ocean acidification and biologically induced seasonality of carbonate mineral saturation states in the western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Nicholas R.; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Cooper, Lee W.

    2009-11-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) mineral saturation states for aragonite (Ωaragonite) and calcite (Ωcalcite) are calculated for waters of the Chukchi Sea shelf and Canada Basin of the western Arctic Ocean during the Shelf-Basin Interactions project from 2002 to 2004. On the Chukchi Sea shelf, a strong seasonality and vertical differentiation of aragonite and calcite saturation states was observed. During the summertime sea ice retreat period, high rates of phytoplankton primary production and net community production act to increase the Ωaragonite and Ωcalcite of surface waters, while subsurface waters become undersaturated with respect to aragonite due primarily to remineralization of organic matter to CO2. This seasonal "phytoplankton-carbonate saturation state" interaction induces strong undersaturation of aragonite (Ωaragonite = <0.7-1) at ˜40-150 m depth in the northern Chukchi Sea and in the Canada Basin within upper halocline waters at ˜100-200 m depth. Patches of aragonite undersaturated surface water were also found in the Canada Basin resulting from significant sea ice melt contributions (>10%). The seasonal aragonite undersaturation of waters observed on the Chukchi Sea shelf is likely a recent phenomenon that results from the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and subsequent ocean acidification, with seasonality of saturation states superimposed by biological processes. These undersaturated waters are potentially highly corrosive to calcifying benthic fauna (e.g., bivalves and echinoderms) found on the shelf, with implications for the food sources of large benthic feeding mammals (e.g., walrus, gray whales, and bearded seals). The benthic ecosystem of the Chukchi Sea (and other Arctic Ocean shelves) is thus potentially vulnerable to future ocean acidification and suppression of CaCO3 saturation states.

  8. Gulf of California analogue for origin of Late Paleozoic ocean basins adjacent to western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Murchey, B.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Ocean crust accreted to the western margin of North America following the Late Devonian to earliest Missippian Antler orogeny is not older than Devonian. Therefore, ocean crust all along the margin of western North America may have been very young following the Antler event. This situation can be compared to the present-day margin of North America which lies adjacent to young ocean crust as a result of the subduction of the Farallon plate and arrival of the East Pacific spreading ridge. Syn- and post-Antler rifting that occurred along the North American margin may well be analogous to the formation of the Gulf of California by the propagation of the East Pacific spreading ridge. Black-arc rifting associated with the subduction of very old ocean crust seems a less likely mechanism for the early stages of ocean basin formation along the late Paleozoic margin of western North America because of the apparent absence of old ocean crust to the west of the arc terranes. The eastern Pacific basins were as long-lived as any truly oceanic basins and may have constituted, by the earliest Permian, a single wedge-shaped basin separated from the western Pacific by rifted fragments of North American arc-terranes. In the Permian, the rifted arcs were once again sites of active magmatism and the eastern Pacific basins began to close, from south (Golconda terrane) to north. Final closure of the northernmost eastern Pacific basin (Angayucham in Alaska) did not occur until the Jurassic.

  9. Developing a new synthesis of Arctic Ocean tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Tectonic models for the Mesozoic opening of the Amerasia Basin are dominated by the "windshield wiper" model, first articulated by Sam Carey in 1958. This theory was developed in the context of an expanding earth paradigm for global tectonics. While the expanding earth theory has been rejected, this zombie hypothesis for the development of the Amerasia Basin lingers on. Most models for the development of the Mesozoic Arctic Ocean work from the large scale down, assuming the overall pattern for the tectonic development of the Amerasia Basin is effectively described by a scissors-like opening, a separation of northern Alaska and Siberia from the conjugate margin of northern Canada, rotating apart around a pivot in the Mackenzie Delta. The problem for these models is how to resolve the space problems caused by the ridges that subdivide the basin. The most prominent of these being the Chukchi Borderland, a large block of extended continental crust, which projects out northward into the basin from the continental shelf north of the Bering Strait. A new approach can be based on first understanding the features in the basin and their inter-relationships, then using that knowledge to infer the larger scale basin tectonics, building a tectonic model from local observations. This approach will be discussed in the light of new results from recent studies in the Amerasia Basin and plans for future activities.

  10. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    DOE PAGES

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO₂ climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modestmore » reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO₂ induced global warming.« less

  11. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    SciTech Connect

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO₂ climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modest reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO₂ induced global warming.

  12. Philinidae, Laonidae and Philinorbidae (Gastropoda: Cephalaspidea: Philinoidea) from the northeastern Pacific Ocean and the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean).

    PubMed

    Valdés, Ángel; Cadien, Donald B; Gosliner, Terrence M

    2016-01-01

    Based on morphological data a total of nine native species of Philinidae are recognized from the northeastern Pacific including the Bering Sea and the adjacent Arctic Ocean (Beaufort Sea). Four of them have been previously described: Philine ornatissima Yokoyama, 1927, Philine bakeri Dall, 1919, Philine polystrigma (Dall, 1908), and Philine hemphilli Dall, 1919. Five of them are new and described herein: Philine mcleani sp. nov., Philine baxteri sp. nov., Philine malaquiasi sp. nov., Philine wareni sp. nov., and Philine harrisae sp. nov. These species display a substantial degree of variation in internal and external morphological traits (i.e., presence/absence of gizzard plates, different radular structure and tooth morphology, various reproductive anatomical features) and it is likely that they belong to different clades (genera). However, in the absence of a comprehensive phylogeny for Philine, they are here provisionally regarded as Philine sensu lato. In addition to the nine native species, two introduced species: Philine orientalis A. Adams, 1854 and Philine auriformis Suter, 1909 are here illustrated and compared to the native species to facilitate identification. Finally, two species previously considered members of Philinidae are examined anatomically and confirmed as members of Laonidae, Laona californica (Willett, 1944) and Philinorbidae, Philinorbis albus (Mattox, 1958), based on morphological data. PMID:27515632

  13. Philinidae, Laonidae and Philinorbidae (Gastropoda: Cephalaspidea: Philinoidea) from the northeastern Pacific Ocean and the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean).

    PubMed

    Valdés, Ángel; Cadien, Donald B; Gosliner, Terrence M

    2016-08-08

    Based on morphological data a total of nine native species of Philinidae are recognized from the northeastern Pacific including the Bering Sea and the adjacent Arctic Ocean (Beaufort Sea). Four of them have been previously described: Philine ornatissima Yokoyama, 1927, Philine bakeri Dall, 1919, Philine polystrigma (Dall, 1908), and Philine hemphilli Dall, 1919. Five of them are new and described herein: Philine mcleani sp. nov., Philine baxteri sp. nov., Philine malaquiasi sp. nov., Philine wareni sp. nov., and Philine harrisae sp. nov. These species display a substantial degree of variation in internal and external morphological traits (i.e., presence/absence of gizzard plates, different radular structure and tooth morphology, various reproductive anatomical features) and it is likely that they belong to different clades (genera). However, in the absence of a comprehensive phylogeny for Philine, they are here provisionally regarded as Philine sensu lato. In addition to the nine native species, two introduced species: Philine orientalis A. Adams, 1854 and Philine auriformis Suter, 1909 are here illustrated and compared to the native species to facilitate identification. Finally, two species previously considered members of Philinidae are examined anatomically and confirmed as members of Laonidae, Laona californica (Willett, 1944) and Philinorbidae, Philinorbis albus (Mattox, 1958), based on morphological data.

  14. Occurrence of perfluoroalkyl compounds in surface waters from the North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Cai, Minghong; Zhao, Zhen; Yin, Zhigao; Ahrens, Lutz; Huang, Peng; Cai, Minggang; Yang, Haizhen; He, Jianfeng; Sturm, Renate; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Xie, Zhiyong

    2012-01-17

    Perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) were determined in 22 surface water samples (39-76°N) and three sea ice core and snow samples (77-87°N) collected from North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean during the fourth Chinese Arctic Expedition in 2010. Geographically, the average concentration of ∑PFC in surface water samples were 560 ± 170 pg L(-1) for the Northwest Pacific Ocean, 500 ± 170 pg L(-1) for the Arctic Ocean, and 340 ± 130 pg L(-1) for the Bering Sea, respectively. The perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) were the dominant PFC class in the water samples, however, the spatial pattern of PFCs varied. The C(5), C(7) and C(8) PFCAs (i.e., perfluoropentanoate (PFPA), perfluoroheptanoate (PFHpA), and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA)) were the dominant PFCs in the Northwest Pacific Ocean while in the Bering Sea the PFPA dominated. The changing in the pattern and concentrations in Pacific Ocean indicate that the PFCs in surface water were influenced by sources from the East-Asian (such as Japan and China) and North American coast, and dilution effect during their transport to the Arctic. The presence of PFCs in the snow and ice core samples indicates an atmospheric deposition of PFCs in the Arctic. The elevated PFC concentration in the Arctic Ocean shows that the ice melting had an impact on the PFC levels and distribution. In addition, the C(4) and C(5) PFCAs (i.e., perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), PFPA) became the dominant PFCs in the Arctic Ocean indicating that PFBA is a marker for sea ice melting as the source of exposure.

  15. Recent oceanic changes in the Arctic in the context of long-term observations.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Igor V; Bhatt, Uma S; Walsh, John E; Abrahamsen, E Povl; Pnyushkov, Andrey V; Wassmann, Paul F

    2013-12-01

    This synthesis study assesses recent changes of Arctic Ocean physical parameters using a unique collection of observations from the 2000s and places them in the context of long-term climate trends and variability. Our analysis demonstrates that the 2000s were an exceptional decade with extraordinary upper Arctic Ocean freshening and intermediate Atlantic water warming. We note that the Arctic Ocean is characterized by large amplitude multi-decadal variability in addition to a long-term trend, making the link of observed changes to climate drivers problematic. However, the exceptional magnitude of recent high-latitude changes (not only oceanic, but also ice and atmospheric) strongly suggests that these recent changes signify a potentially irreversible shift of the Arctic Ocean to a new climate state. These changes have important implications for the Arctic Ocean's marine ecosystem, especially those components that are dependent on sea ice or that have temperature-dependent sensitivities or thresholds. Addressing these and other questions requires a carefully orchestrated combination of sustained multidisciplinary observations and advanced modeling.

  16. Ice shelves in the Pleistocene Arctic Ocean inferred from glaciogenic deep-sea bedforms.

    PubMed

    Polyak, L; Edwards, M H; Coakley, B J; Jakobsson, M

    2001-03-22

    It has been proposed that during Pleistocene glaciations, an ice cap of 1 kilometre or greater thickness covered the Arctic Ocean. This notion contrasts with the prevailing view that the Arctic Ocean was covered only by perennial sea ice with scattered icebergs. Detailed mapping of the ocean floor is the best means to resolve this issue. Although sea-floor imagery has been used to reconstruct the glacial history of the Antarctic shelf, little data have been collected in the Arctic Ocean because of operational constraints. The use of a geophysical mapping system during the submarine SCICEX expedition in 1999 provided the opportunity to perform such an investigation over a large portion of the Arctic Ocean. Here we analyse backscatter images and sub-bottom profiler records obtained during this expedition from depths as great as 1 kilometre. These records show multiple bedforms indicative of glacial scouring and moulding of sea floor, combined with large-scale erosion of submarine ridge crests. These distinct glaciogenic features demonstrate that immense, Antarctic-type ice shelves up to 1 kilometre thick and hundreds of kilometres long existed in the Arctic Ocean during Pleistocene glaciations.

  17. Synthesizing Bathymetry Data within a Community Dependent Basemap for Spatial Data Display in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raines, C.; Wright, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Esri Ocean Basemap program, an extension of the Esri Community Maps program, grows and develops based on the participation of the scientific and GIS communities. Not only does the Ocean Basemap evolve from the authoritative data contributions, but user needs influence the direction of the program as well. With the eyes of the scientific and maritime community shifting northerly to the Arctic, it became obvious that both the scientific and GIS communities needed a more appropriate basemap to best accommodate and share their work. The Esri Ocean Basemap team began designing a new Ocean Basemap product to support work conducted in the Arctic Ocean. The team first complied the best available data sources and applicable community contributions. By leveraging commercial-off-the-shelf capabilities in the ArcGIS platform, the team converted datasets from a range of governmental, non-governmental and private entities into compatible formats and ensured a uniform data projection for all of the datasets. In addition, the team developed and applied automatic sorting rules to create a surface model for cartographic purposes using the ArcGIS for Maritime: Bathymetry solution. After determining a tiling scheme, the Ocean Basemap team officially published the Arctic Ocean Basemap. The Arctic Ocean Basemap provides the scientific and GIS communities with a WMTS-enabled, appropriately projected basemap to support their maps and applications.

  18. Possible Factors affecting the Thermal Contrast between Middle-Latitude Asian Continent and Adjacent Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Huaqiong; Wu, Tongwen; Dong, Wenjie

    2015-04-01

    A middle-latitude Land-Sea thermal contrast Index was used in this study which has close connection to the East Asian summer precipitation. The index has two parts which are land thermal index defined as JJA 500-hPa geopotential height anomalies at a land area (75°-90° E, 40° -55°N ) and ocean thermal index defined as that at an oceanic area (140° -150°E, 35° -42.5°N). The impact of the surface heat flux and atmospheric diabatic heating over the land and the ocean on the index was studied. The results show that the surface heat flux over Eurasian inner land has little influence to the land thermal index, while the variation of the surface latent heat flux and long-wave radiation over the Pacific adjacent to Japan has highly correlation with the ocean thermal index. The changes with height of the atmospheric diabatic heating rates over the Eurasian inner land and the Pacific adjacent to Japan have different features. The variations of the middle troposphere atmospheric long-wave and short-wave radiation heating have significantly influences on land thermal index, and that of the low troposphere atmospheric long-wave radiation, short-wave radiation and deep convective heating also have impact on the yearly variation of the land thermal index. For the ocean thermal index, the variations of the surface layer atmospheric vertical diffuse heating, large-scale latent heating and long-wave radiation heating are more important, low and middle troposphere atmospheric large-scale latent heating and shallow convective heating also have impact on the yearly variation of the ocean thermal index. And then the ocean thermal index has closely connection with the low troposphere atmospheric temperature, while the land thermal index has closely connection with the middle troposphere atmospheric temperature. The Effect of the preceding global SST anomalies on the index also was analyzed. The relations of land thermal index and ocean thermal index and the global SST anomalies

  19. Observation-Based Assessment of PBDE Loads in Arctic Ocean Waters.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Joan A; Sobek, Anna; Carrizo, Daniel; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) -also known as flame retardants- in major ocean compartments, with no reports yet for the large deep-water masses of the Arctic Ocean. Here, PBDE concentrations, congener patterns and inventories are presented for the different water masses of the pan-Arctic shelf seas and the interior basin. Seawater samples were collected onboard three cross-basin oceanographic campaigns in 2001, 2005, and 2008 following strict trace-clean protocols. ∑14PBDE concentrations in the Polar Mixed Layer (PML; a surface water mass) range from 0.3 to 11.2 pg·L(-1), with higher concentrations in the pan-Arctic shelf seas and lower levels in the interior basin. BDE-209 is the dominant congener in most of the pan-Arctic areas except for the ones close to North America, where penta-BDE and tetra-BDE congeners predominate. In deep-water masses, ∑14PBDE concentrations are up to 1 order of magnitude higher than in the PML. Whereas BDE-209 decreases with depth, the less-brominated congeners, particularly BDE-47 and BDE-99, increase down through the water column. Likewise, concentrations of BDE-71 -a congener not present in any PBDE commercial mixture- increase with depth, which potentially is the result of debromination of BDE-209. The inventories in the three water masses of the Central Arctic Basin (PML, intermediate Atlantic Water Layer, and the Arctic Deep Water Layer) are 158 ± 77 kg, 6320 ± 235 kg and 30800 ± 3100 kg, respectively. The total load of PBDEs in the entire Arctic Ocean shows that only a minor fraction of PBDEs emissions are transported to the Arctic Ocean. These findings represent the first PBDE data in the deep-water compartments of an ocean.

  20. Observation-Based Assessment of PBDE Loads in Arctic Ocean Waters.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Joan A; Sobek, Anna; Carrizo, Daniel; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) -also known as flame retardants- in major ocean compartments, with no reports yet for the large deep-water masses of the Arctic Ocean. Here, PBDE concentrations, congener patterns and inventories are presented for the different water masses of the pan-Arctic shelf seas and the interior basin. Seawater samples were collected onboard three cross-basin oceanographic campaigns in 2001, 2005, and 2008 following strict trace-clean protocols. ∑14PBDE concentrations in the Polar Mixed Layer (PML; a surface water mass) range from 0.3 to 11.2 pg·L(-1), with higher concentrations in the pan-Arctic shelf seas and lower levels in the interior basin. BDE-209 is the dominant congener in most of the pan-Arctic areas except for the ones close to North America, where penta-BDE and tetra-BDE congeners predominate. In deep-water masses, ∑14PBDE concentrations are up to 1 order of magnitude higher than in the PML. Whereas BDE-209 decreases with depth, the less-brominated congeners, particularly BDE-47 and BDE-99, increase down through the water column. Likewise, concentrations of BDE-71 -a congener not present in any PBDE commercial mixture- increase with depth, which potentially is the result of debromination of BDE-209. The inventories in the three water masses of the Central Arctic Basin (PML, intermediate Atlantic Water Layer, and the Arctic Deep Water Layer) are 158 ± 77 kg, 6320 ± 235 kg and 30800 ± 3100 kg, respectively. The total load of PBDEs in the entire Arctic Ocean shows that only a minor fraction of PBDEs emissions are transported to the Arctic Ocean. These findings represent the first PBDE data in the deep-water compartments of an ocean. PMID:26840066

  1. Deciphering the Causality and Rate of Warming in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowski, W.; Clement Kinney, J.; Walczowski, W.; Beszczynska-Moeller, A.; Jost, G.; Jakacki, J.

    2008-12-01

    Recent changes in the Arctic sea ice cover provide one of the most evident examples of warming climate. However, there is an ongoing scientific debate about the causes of the ice melt and its rate. Most climate models predict up to 50% reduction of summer sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean by the end of this century, as a result of an amplified response to global warming. Though, satellite observations of ice extent and area imply much faster rate of melting ice which may result in ice-free summers in the Arctic Ocean by sometime between 2030 and 2040. Yet, when ice thickness and volume are taken into account the rate of decline of Arctic sea ice might be even faster. Hence one of the main questions to be addressed concerning the Arctic Ocean is: 'how fast is the Arctic sea ice melting and when it might be expected to disappear all together in summer'? Another equally important question is: 'can the recent negative trend in sea ice be stopped or reversed'? While the first question has to do with an improved knowledge of Arctic-wide changes in sea ice thickness and volume which is limited at present, the second question requires understanding of the causes of sea ice melt. In this talk we attempt to address the two questions posed above. First, we analyze trends of sea ice decline based on the output from a regional ice-ocean model of the pan-Arctic region forced with realistic atmospheric data in comparison with trends estimated from observations. Second, we investigate the effect, distribution, and timing of oceanic thermodynamic forcing of sea ice melt. The magnitude of oceanic forcing will be quantified, validated against available estimates from observations and compared with those derived from several global climate models participating in the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPPC-AR4). Our findings imply that sea ice might be melting faster than predicted by both climate models and estimated from satellite observations. This

  2. Mapping Arctic Ocean Coastline Change With Landsat Archive Data And Object-Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulslander, D.

    2010-12-01

    The melting of arctic permafrost is a significant effect of climate change. The combination of rising sea level, longer periods of ice-free conditions in the Arctic Ocean and melting permafrost can greatly accelerate coastline changes in general and arctic coastal erosion in particular. Anderson et al. (2009; Geology News) have measured erosion rates of 15 m per year at sites along the Alaskan Arctic Ocean coastline dominated by ice-cemented peats and silt-rich permafrost. With over 45,000 km of Arctic Ocean coastline, it is important that coastline movement and transgressive oceanic regimes be mapped and tracked with accurate data. Determining historic coastal erosion rates for this region is as important as mapping the current extent of the phenomenon to create as complete a picture as possible and locate where rapid erosion is an emergent process. The extent of the area involved combined with its inaccessibility and inhospitable conditions makes geologic remote sensing an appropriate tool for characterizing Arctic Ocean coastal erosion. Traditional weaknesses associated with using remote sensing in the geosciences have included a lack of historical data or baseline information as well as difficulties in systematization of feature mapping. Using object-based image analysis on Landsat archive data can overcome these issues and may allow for a potential multi-decadal map of Arctic Ocean coastline changes. The Landsat family of sensors (MSS 1-3 and TM/ETM 4, 5, and 7) have been providing imagery as frequently as every 16 days since July 1972. The frequent revisits maximize the chance of getting cloud-free imagery at least once per year in most study areas. Also, Landsat data are well characterized, extensively studied, and freely available from the USGS EROS Data Center Archive, making it an ideal and stable source of data for mapping the Arctic Ocean coastline. Delineating large sections of coastline from imagery by hand digitization would be impractical due to the

  3. Arctic Amplification Feedback Analysis in CMIP5 Models: Land Surfaces, Arctic Ocean and Seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, A.; Yoshimori, M.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic region is the region where surface warming associated with atmospheric green-house gas concentration increase is expected to be the greatest. This particularity is already being observed currently and is also simulated by climate models. Feedback mechanisms associated with this particularly strong warming, or Artic Amplification, are multiple. The relative role of the different feedbacks are not easy to evaluate precisely using direct model outputs. In this study, we use the "radiative kernels" method (Soden et al, 2008) to perform a multi-model intercomparison analysis. The radiative decomposition is performed at the surface instead of the top of atmosphere in order to consider surface temperature changes specifically. The kernels are derived from the MIROC3.2 model. The intercomparison includes 32 CMIP5 coupled models, whose outputs are analyzed for changes from the late 20th to the late 21st centuries following the rcp4.5 scenario. We consider results separately for land and oceanic surfaces, as the mechanisms and orders of magnitude differ substantially for these two types of surface. We also consider seasons separately as we show that seasonality in the feedback processes is determinant.

  4. Status and trends in Arctic biodiversity - Synthesis: implications for conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arctic biodiversity – the multitude of species and ecosystems in the land north of the tree line together with the Arctic Ocean and adjacent seas – is an irreplaceable cultural, aesthetic, scientific, ecological, economic and spiritual asset. For Arctic peoples, biodiversity has been the very basis ...

  5. Decadal-Scale Increases in Dissolved Carbon Flux from the Western Canadian Arctic to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, S. E.; Striegl, R. G.; McClelland, J. W.; Kokelj, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical signature of large rivers has a clear effect on the chemistry and biology of the nearshore ocean. At the same time, the flux of riverine constituents to coastal environments can be used to understand changes occurring over broad terrestrial landscapes. This is particularly relevant in the Arctic, where rivers have a disproportionate impact on nearshore ocean function. Additionally, change is playing out rapidly in Arctic regions, as permafrost thaw and changes in temperature and hydrology are exposing previously frozen soils, changing the nature of hydrological linkages between land and water, and affecting the seasonality of riverine chemistry and flux. Here, we examine a 40-year dataset of point-measurement alkalinity (largely dissolved inorganic carbon) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations near the mouth of the Mackenzie River, in addition to similar data from four of the Mackenzie's major sub-catchments. These datasets are coupled with continuous discharge records, and capture flow from the fourth largest river discharging to the Arctic Ocean. Trends near the Mackenzie mouth show that annual fluxes of both alkalinity and DOC are increasing over time, with the proportional changes in DOC (approximately 16% per decade) being much greater than those for alkalinity (approximately 4% per decade). Seasonally, this increase in total flux occurs largely in the winter and late summer, for both constituents. Sub-catchment datasets indicate that these fluxes are increasing in northern, but not southern, sub-catchment regions. These results have clear implications for nearshore ocean function in the western Canadian Arctic. Increases in DOC may fuel increased bacterial metabolism, while differences in the magnitude of change in alkalinity and DOC flux may modify coastal aragonite saturation. Overall, the changing flux of dissolved carbon near the mouth of the Mackenzie River documents broad-scale changes in the carbon cycle of this region, both on

  6. Influence of the Arctic Frontal Zone on Summer Cyclone Activity and Precipitation in the Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboureau, J. P.; Dauhut, T.; Escobar, J.; Mascart, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Cyclones are a crucial component of the Arctic climate system, acting as a key mechanism by which the atmosphere redistributes energy and moisture from lower latitudes. In the central Arctic Ocean (CAO), cyclone activity reaches its peak in summer, which has previously been related to cyclogenesis along the Eurasian continent. The seasonal presence of strong horizontal temperature gradients along the Arctic coastline (the Arctic frontal zone or AFZ) has also been suggested as a source of summer cyclones for the CAO; however, this hypothesis has always been considered as a part of larger studies and has not yet been closely examined with focused research. This study incorporates data from NASA's Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a cyclone detection and tracking algorithm to critically evaluate the relationship between the summer AFZ and cyclone activity in the CAO. By analyzing both individual cyclones and monthly fields of cyclone characteristics, we find that the AFZ is not a region of cyclogenesis, but rather cyclone intensification for systems forming on the leeward side of several Siberian mountain ranges. As they propagate into the CAO, these cyclones experience greater deepening when the horizontal temperature gradients of the AFZ are stronger. On a broader scale, we show that the intensity of the summer AFZ has a positive correlation with mid-tropospheric Eady growth rate, cyclone intensity, cyclone frequency, and total precipitation in the CAO during summer. This relationship remains even when controlling for variability in large-scale circulation (the seasonally varying Northern Annular Mode). Taken as a whole, these findings demonstrate the importance of the summer Arctic frontal zone as an intensifier of energy and moisture cycles for the Arctic Ocean.

  7. Influence of the Arctic Frontal Zone on Summer Cyclone Activity and Precipitation in the Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, A.; Serreze, M.

    2015-12-01

    Cyclones are a crucial component of the Arctic climate system, acting as a key mechanism by which the atmosphere redistributes energy and moisture from lower latitudes. In the central Arctic Ocean (CAO), cyclone activity reaches its peak in summer, which has previously been related to cyclogenesis along the Eurasian continent. The seasonal presence of strong horizontal temperature gradients along the Arctic coastline (the Arctic frontal zone or AFZ) has also been suggested as a source of summer cyclones for the CAO; however, this hypothesis has always been considered as a part of larger studies and has not yet been closely examined with focused research. This study incorporates data from NASA's Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a cyclone detection and tracking algorithm to critically evaluate the relationship between the summer AFZ and cyclone activity in the CAO. By analyzing both individual cyclones and monthly fields of cyclone characteristics, we find that the AFZ is not a region of cyclogenesis, but rather cyclone intensification for systems forming on the leeward side of several Siberian mountain ranges. As they propagate into the CAO, these cyclones experience greater deepening when the horizontal temperature gradients of the AFZ are stronger. On a broader scale, we show that the intensity of the summer AFZ has a positive correlation with mid-tropospheric Eady growth rate, cyclone intensity, cyclone frequency, and total precipitation in the CAO during summer. This relationship remains even when controlling for variability in large-scale circulation (the seasonally varying Northern Annular Mode). Taken as a whole, these findings demonstrate the importance of the summer Arctic frontal zone as an intensifier of energy and moisture cycles for the Arctic Ocean.

  8. The response of the central Arctic Ocean stratification to freshwater perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemberton, P.; Nilsson, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a state-of-the-art coupled ice-ocean-circulation model, we perform a number of sensitivity experiments to examine how the central Arctic Ocean stratification responds to changes in river runoff and precipitation. The simulations yield marked changes in the cold halocline and the Arctic Atlantic layer. Increased precipitation yields a warming of the Atlantic layer, which primarily is an advective signal, propagated through the St. Anna Trough, reflecting air-sea heat flux changes over the Barents Sea. As the freshwater supply is increased, the anticyclonic Beaufort Gyre is weakened and a greater proportion of the Arctic Ocean freshwater is exported via the Fram Strait, with nearly compensating export decreases through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The corresponding reorganization of the freshwater pool appears to be controlled by advective processes, rather than by the local changes in the surface freshwater flux. A simple conceptual model of the Arctic Ocean, based on a geostrophically controlled discharge of the low-salinity water, is introduced and compared with the simulations. Key predictions of the conceptual model are that the halocline depth should decrease with increasing freshwater input and that the Arctic Ocean freshwater storage should increase proportionally to the square root of the freshwater input, which are in broad qualitative agreement with the sensitivity experiments. However, the model-simulated rate of increase of the freshwater storage is weaker, indicating that effects related to wind forcing and rerouting of the freshwater-transport pathways play an important role for the dynamics of the Arctic Ocean freshwater storage.

  9. T, S, and U: Arctic Ocean Change in Response to Sea Ice Loss and Other Forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is changing rapidly, partly in response to sea ice loss and partly from other forcings. Here we consider the three main parameters of physical oceanography: temperature, salinity, and momentum. With regard to temperature, the ocean is experiencing enhanced seasonal surface warming each summer as the ice pack retreats and thins. Some of this summer heat can persist through the winter below the surface mixed layer, although enhanced mixing and other processes can act against this survival. Deeper subsurface layers advected into the Arctic from the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans are also warming as these areas respond to warming trends and decadal climate variability. Arctic Ocean warming has implications for the mass balance of the sea ice pack, as well as both marine and coastal terrestrial ecosystems. With regard to salinity, the ocean has just begun to show an overall freshening signal, although with high spatial and temporal variance. This freshening is partly a result of sea ice melt, but also a response to global hydrologic and oceanographic changes. Arctic Ocean freshening enhances the surface stratification, which suppresses upward fluxes of heat and nutrients from below. It also reduces the transfer of momentum (i.e., the stress) from winds to the deep ocean. With regard to momentum, sea ice reduction has created a "looser" ice pack that allows more wind energy to enter the ocean. This effect opposes that of enhanced freshening/stratification when one considers mixing in the upper ocean; the sign and amplitude of the net result is a hot topic in the field. It should also be noted that surface stress in the summer season might actually be declining, as the rough ice pack transitions to a generally smoother sparse pack or open water. In summary, the Arctic Ocean is on the cusp of great change, largely (but not exclusively) forced by changes in the sea ice pack.

  10. Neogloboquadrina pachyderma in the modern Arctic Ocean: a potential for its morophological variation for paleoceanographic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahi, Hirofumi; Nam, Seung-Il; Son, Yeong-Ju; Mackensen, Andreas; Stein, Ruediger

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic Ocean, nearly entire planktic foraminifers are comprised of cold-water species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma sin. Its extreme dominance prevents extracting past environmental condition in the Arctic Ocean from planktic foraminiferal assemblages. Though potential usability of N. pachyderma's morphological variation for paleoceanographic reconstruction has been presented by recent studies, its application is still limited within a certain region (e.g., N. Atlantic side of the Arctic Ocean), leading requirement for further testing on the Pacific side of the Arctic Ocean. In this presentation, we will present the modern distribution of morphological variations of N. pachyderma, using 82 surface sediment samples collected in the western Arctic Ocean. Within investigated surface sediment samples, we have encountered total of seven morphological variations of N. pachyderma, compromising their description by previous study (Eynaund et al., 2010). Clear geographic distribution of "Large-sized (>250 μm)" N. pachyderma along the offshore of Northern Alaskan margin suggests its preferences in the relatively warm and low-salinity condition. Using the distribution pattern of morphological variations of N. pachyderma, we have succeeded to establish transfer functions for salinity and temperature. Application of those functions at down-core foraminiferal assemblages at the Northwind Ridge (ARA01B-MUC05: 75 °N, 160°W) showed general warming of ~0.5 °C and freshening of ~1.0 ‰ during Holocene.

  11. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  12. Hydrothermal activity at the Arctic mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Rolf B.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Nygård, Tor Eivind; Lilley, Marvin D.; Kelley, Deborah S.

    Over the last 10 years, hydrothermal activity has been shown to be abundant at the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridges (AMOR). Approximately 20 active and extinct vent sites have been located either at the seafloor, as seawater anomalies, or by dredge sampling hydrothermal deposits. Decreasing spreading rates and decreasing influence of the Icelandic hot spot toward the north along the AMOR result in a north-south change from a shallow and magmatically robust to a deep and magmatically starved ridge system. This contrast gives rise to large variability in the ridge geology and in the nature of the associated hydrothermal systems. The known vent sites at the southern part of the ridge system are either low-temperature or white smoker fields. At the deep, northern parts of the ridge system, a large black smoker field has been located, and seawater anomalies and sulfide deposits suggest that black smoker-type venting is common. Several of these fields may be peridotite-hosted. The hydrothermal activity at parts of the AMOR exceeds by a factor of 2 to 3 what would be expected by extrapolating from observations on faster spreading ridges. Higher fracture/fault area relative to the magma volume extracted seems a likely explanation for this. Many of the vent fields at the AMOR are associated with axial volcanic ridges. Strong focusing of magma toward these ridges, deep rifting of the ridges, and subsequent formation of long-lived detachment faults that are rooted below the ridges may be the major geodynamic mechanisms causing the unexpectedly high hydrothermal activity.

  13. Phylogenetic composition of bacterioplankton assemblages from the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nasreen; Hollibaugh, James T

    2002-02-01

    We analyzed the phylogenetic composition of bacterioplankton assemblages in 11 Arctic Ocean samples collected over three seasons (winter-spring 1995, summer 1996, and summer-fall 1997) by sequencing cloned fragments of 16S rRNA genes. The sequencing effort was directed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) screening of samples and the clone libraries. Sequences of 88 clones fell into seven major lineages of the domain Bacteria: alpha(36%)-, gamma(32%)-, delta(14%)-, and epsilon(1%)-Proteobacteria; Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides spp. (9%); Verrucomicrobium spp. (6%); and green nonsulfur bacteria (2%). A total of 34% of the cloned sequences (excluding clones in the SAR11 and Roseobacter groups) had sequence similarities that were <94% compared to previously reported sequences, indicating the presence of novel sequences. DGGE fingerprints of the selected samples showed that most of the bands were common to all samples in all three seasons. However, additional bands representing sequences related to Cytophaga and Polaribacter species were found in samples collected during the summer and fall. Of the clones in a library generated from one sample collected in spring of 1995, 50% were the same and were most closely affiliated (99% similarity) with Alteromonas macleodii, while 50% of the clones in another sample were most closely affiliated (90 to 96% similarity) with Oceanospirillum sp. The majority of the cloned sequences were most closely related to uncultured, environmental sequences. Prominent among these were members of the SAR11 group. Differences between mixed-layer and halocline samples were apparent in DGGE fingerprints and clone libraries. Sequences related to alpha-Proteobacteria (dominated by SAR11) were abundant (52%) in samples from the mixed layer, while sequences related to gamma-proteobacteria were more abundant (44%) in halocline samples. Two bands corresponding to sequences related to SAR307 (common in deep water) and the high-G+C gram

  14. Frigid air and frozen oceans: Educational outreach opportunities in Arctic ocean-ice-atmosphere research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovich, D. K.; Codispoti, L. A.; Hawkey, J.

    2003-12-01

    Arctic research provides a marvelous venue for educational outreach activities. The polar regions, with snow and ice, months-long winter nights and summer days, and marine mammals such as seals, whales, and polar bears, has an intrinsic sense of adventure and interest. This interest provides an entry point for educational outreach activities, but does not guarantee success. Arctic researchers studying ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions have used a myriad of techniques for education outreach activities: web sites, classroom visits, lectures, news articles, and e-mail correspondence from the field. One such web site, http://arcss-oaii.hpl.umces.edu/outreach.htm, has been developed as a clearinghouse for researchers to share ideas, strategies, and techniques. For K-12 outreach, developing an ongoing effort with several classroom visits over the school year, is particularly effective. Classroom visits with brief lectures, replete with pictures, followed by an experiment or activity make it relatively straightforward to convey the enthusiasm and excitement of polar research. A more difficult task, however, is to integrate outreach activities into the curriculum. Collaborating with teachers is essential to achieve this integration. In public lectures, it is productive to first capture the audience's attention by describing what it is like to work in the polar regions, then discuss the science. It is important to distill the science to one or two key concepts and present them clearly and concisely. A recurring theme was that not only were outreach activities fun and satisfying, but they also enhanced the researchers understanding of the material.

  15. Provenance analysis of central Arctic Ocean sediments: Implications for circum-Arctic ice sheet dynamics and ocean circulation during Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaparulina, Ekaterina; Strand, Kari; Lunkka, Juha Pekka

    2016-09-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical data generated from the well referred shallow core 96/12-1pc on the Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean was used to evaluate ice transport from the circum-Arctic sources and variability in sediment drainage and provenance changes. In this study heavy minerals in central Arctic sediments were used to determine those most prominent provenance areas and their changes related to the Late Pleistocene history of glaciations in the Arctic. Provenance changes were then used to infer variations in the paleoceanographic environment of the central Arctic Ocean, such as variations in the distribution of sea ice, icebergs controlled by the Arctic Ocean circulation. Four critical end-members including Victoria and Banks Islands, the Putorana Plateau, the Anabar Shield, and the Verkhoyansk Fold Belt were identified from the Amerasian and Eurasian source areas, and their proportional contributions were estimated in relation to Late Pleistocene ice sheet dynamics and ocean circulation. The results show changes in transport pathways and source areas within two examined transitions MIS6-5 and MIS4-3. The main source for material during MIS6-5 transition was Amerasian margin due to the high dolomite content in the studied section of sediments inferring strong Beaufort Gyre (BG) and Transpolar Drift (TPD) transport for this material. IRD material during late the MIS6 to 5 deglacial event was from terrigenous input through from the MacKenzie route Banks/Victoria Islands then transported as far as the Lomonosov Ridge area. The transition, MIS4-3 in comparison with MIS6-5, shows a clear shift in source areas, reflected in a different mineralogical composition of sediments, supplied from the Eurasian margin, such as the Anabar Shield, the Putorana Plateau and the Verkhoyansk Fold Belt during active decay of the Barents-Kara Ice Sheet presumable associated with an ice-dammed lake outburst then triggered by a strong TPD over the central Arctic. These two

  16. A 2006-2007 Update on Oceanographic Conditions in the Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morison, J. H.; Steele, M.; Wahr, J.; Alkire, M.; Peralta-Ferriz, C.; Kwok, R.; Kikuchi, T.

    2007-12-01

    Trends in central Arctic Ocean conditions are updated with recently gathered data. In the late 1980s and through the 1990s we saw major shifts in the Arctic Ocean. The influence of Atlantic Water in the Arctic Ocean became more widespread and intense and the pattern of water circulation and ice drift shifted, resulting in a more cyclonic circulation. These changes became manifest in the central Arctic near the North Pole as increases in upper ocean salinity and Atlantic Water temperature. They occurred in concert with a decrease in surface atmospheric pressure. With the aim of helping to track such changes, the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) has been maintained since 2000. Along with an automated drifting station and a deep ocean mooring near the Pole; NPEO conducts airborne hydrographic surveys that track changes along key sections radiating from the Pole. In a related project, several of us have undertaken in situ ocean bottom pressure measurements and the analysis of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data to track changes in the distribution of ocean mass. Hydrographic measurements made by the NPEO show that between 2000 and 2005, oceanographic condition relaxed toward the pre-1990 state. Morison et al [2006] describe these changes and relate them to a decline in the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index. On the basis of in situ and GRACE bottom pressure trends, Morison et al. [2007] argue that shift back to pre-1990s circulation extended over the whole Arctic Ocean. The Spring 2007 NPEO hydrographic surveys and the 2006-2007 bottom pressure data suggest the trend towards pre-1990s conditions has now, once again, reversed. The new observations show greater salinities and bottom pressure near the Pole, indicative of increased Atlantic water presence. Temperatures have increased in the Atlantic Water core along the Eurasian flank of the Lomonosov Ridge. We will explore these most recent changes and their relation to changes in the ice cover and

  17. Development and testing of Polar Weather Research and Forecasting model: 2. Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromwich, David H.; Hines, Keith M.; Bai, Le-Sheng

    2009-04-01

    A version of the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) has been developed for polar applications. The model known as "Polar WRF" is tested over the Arctic Ocean with a western Arctic grid using 25-km resolution. The model is based upon WRF version 2.2, with improvements to the Noah land surface model and the snowpack treatment. The ocean surface treatment is modified to include fractional sea ice. Simulations consist of a series of 48-h integrations initialized daily at 0000 UTC. The initial 24 h are taken as model spin-up time for the atmospheric hydrology and boundary layer processes. Arctic conditions are simulated for the selected months: January 1998, June 1998, and August 1998 representing midwinter, early summer, and late summer conditions, respectively, from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) study. The albedo of sea ice is specified as a function of time and latitude for June and as a function of time for August. Simulation results are compared with observations of the drifting ice station SHEBA in the Arctic ice pack. Polar WRF simulations show good agreement with observations for all three months. Some differences between the simulations and observation occur owing to apparent errors in the synoptic forecasts and the representation of clouds. Nevertheless, the biases in the simulated fields appear to be small, and Polar WRF appears to be a very good tool for studies of Arctic Ocean meteorology.

  18. Impact of mesoscale ocean currents on sea ice in high-resolution Arctic ice and ocean simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Semtner, Albert J.

    1999-08-01

    A high-resolution sea ice model is designed for simulating the Arctic. The grid resolution is ˜18 km, and the domain contains the main Arctic Ocean, Nordic Seas, Canadian Archipelago, and the subpolar North Atlantic. The model is based on a widely used dynamic and thermodynamic model with more efficient numerics. The oceanic forcing is from an Arctic Ocean model with the same horizontal resolution as the ice model and 30 levels. The atmospheric forcing is from 3-day average 1990-1994 European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational data. Results from the ice model are compared against satellite passive-microwave observations and drifting buoys. The model realistically simulates ice tongues and eddies in the Greenland Sea. The mesoscale ocean eddies along the East Greenland Current (EGC) are demonstrated to be responsible for the presence of ice eddies and tongues out of the Greenland Sea ice edge. Large shear and divergence associated with the mesoscale ice eddies and strong ice drift, such as the one above the EGC, result in thinner and less compact ice. The mesoscale ocean eddies along the Alaskan Chukchi shelf break, the Northwind Ridge, and the Alpha-Mendeleyev Ridge are major contributors to mesoscale reduction of ice concentration, in addition to atmospheric storms which usually lead to a broad-scale reduction of ice concentration. The existence of mesoscale ocean eddies greatly increases nonuniformity of ice motion, which means stronger ice deformation and more open water. An eddy-resolving coupled ice-ocean model is highly recommended to adequately simulate the small but important percentage of open water in the Arctic pack ice, which can significantly change the heat fluxes from ocean to atmosphere and affect the global climate.

  19. Investigating Arctic Boundary Layer Ozone Depletions: Sodar, Lidar and Microwave Profiler Measurements on the Frozen Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, R. M.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Seabrook, J.; Whiteway, J.; Asplin, M.; Barber, D.; Poehler, D.; Friess, U.

    2008-12-01

    Even though it has been more than 20 years since the discovery of the episodic depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic during springtime, our understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved is still incomplete. Next to the difficulty of measuring the minute concentrations of the relevant halogen compounds, the main reason for this deficiency is the inaccessibility of the Arctic Ocean, which has meant that with minor exceptions the only data available thus far have been from coastal stations. The Circumpolar Flaw Lead (CFL) study in 2008 provided a unique platform for sophisticated measurements directly on the frozen ocean. For the first time, a combination of ground-level ozone sensors, a DIAL ozone lidar, a microwave temperature and humidity profiler, a sodar, and a MAX-DOAS was employed to characterize the Arctic boundary layer over the ocean. It is shown that depletions always grew from the ground up, and were eroded from aloft. The onset of depletions was generally associated with a drop in wind speeds, allowing the formation of a stable surface inversion with colder and drier air near the surface. Depletions were terminated by higher wind speeds eroding this stable surface layer. The depth of the depleted air mass was typically 300 - 600 m. BrO shows a strong diurnal pattern with daytime levels up to 30 ppt in ozone depleted air. In cases where local depletion mechanisms dominated over advection, the depletion rate was typically -3 ppb/hr.

  20. A geodynamic model of the evolution of the Arctic basin and adjacent territories in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic and the outer limit of the Russian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverov, N. P.; Lobkovsky, L. I.; Kononov, M. V.; Dobretsov, N. L.; Vernikovsky, V. A.; Sokolov, S. D.; Shipilov, E. V.

    2013-01-01

    The tectonic evolution of the Arctic Region in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic is considered with allowance for the Paleozoic stage of evolution of the ancient Arctida continent. A new geodynamic model of the evolution of the Arctic is based on the idea of the development of upper mantle convection beneath the continent caused by subduction of the Pacific lithosphere under the Eurasian and North American lithospheric plates. The structure of the Amerasia and Eurasia basins of the Arctic is shown to have formed progressively due to destruction of the ancient Arctida continent, a retained fragment of which comprises the structural units of the central segment of the Arctic Ocean, including the Lomonosov Ridge, the Alpha-Mendeleev Rise, and the Podvodnikov and Makarov basins. The proposed model is considered to be a scientific substantiation of the updated Russian territorial claim to the UN Commission on the determination of the Limits of the Continental Shelf in the Arctic Region.

  1. Enabling Technology for the Exploration of the Arctic Ocean - Multi Channel Seismic Reflection data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, B.; Anderson, R.; Chayes, D. N.; Goemmer, S.; Oursler, M.

    2009-12-01

    Great advances in mapping the Arctic Ocean have recently been made through the relatively routine acquisition of multibeam data from icebreakers operating on various cruise. The USCGC Healy, the German icebreaker Polarstern, the Canadian icebreaker Amundsen and the Swedish icebreaker Oden all routinely collect multibeam data, even while in heavy ice pack. This increase in data has substantially improved our knowledge of the form of the Arctic Ocean seafloor. Unfortunately, it is not possible to routinely collect Multi Channel Seismic Reflection (MCS) data while underway in the ice pack. Our inability to simply collect these data restricts how we understand many of the features that segment the basin by depriving us of the historical information that can be obtained by imaging the stratigraphy. Without these data, scientific ocean drilling, the ultimate ground truth for Marine Geology, cannot be done. The technology and expertise to collect MCS must be adapted for the particular circumstances of the Arctic Ocean. While MCS data have been collected in the Arctic Ocean, the procedures have relied on icebreakers towing equipment. Since icebreakers follow the path of least resistance through the pack, data are acquired in locations that are not scientifically optimal and rarely in the relatively straight lines necessary for optimal processing. Towing in the ice pack is also difficult, inefficient and puts this equipment at substantial risk of crushing or loss. While icebreakers are one means to collect these data, it is time to conduct a systematic evaluation of the costs and benefits of different platforms for MCS data acquisition. This evaluation should enable collection of high-quality data set at selected locations to solve scientific problems. Substantial uncertainties exist about the relative capabilities, costs and limitations for acquisition of MCS data from various platforms in the Arctic Ocean. For example; - Is it possible to collect multi-channel seismic

  2. Wind-driven mixing at intermediate depths in an ice-free Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, Ben J.; Rippeth, Tom P.; Lenn, Yueng-Djern; Timmermans, Mary Louise; Williams, William J.; Bacon, Sheldon

    2016-09-01

    Recent seasonal Arctic Ocean sea ice retreat is a major indicator of polar climate change. The Arctic Ocean is generally quiescent with the interior basins characterized by low levels of turbulent mixing at intermediate depths. In contrast, under conditions of reduced sea ice cover, there is evidence of energetic internal waves that have been attributed to increased momentum transfer from the atmosphere to the ocean. New measurements made in the Canada Basin during the unusually ice-free and stormy summer of 2012 show previously observed enhancement of internal wave energy associated with ice-free conditions. However, there is no enhancement of mixing at intermediate depths away from significant topography. This implies that contrary to expectations of increased wind-induced mixing under declining Arctic sea ice cover, the stratification in the central Canada Basin continues to suppress turbulent mixing at intermediate depths and to effectively isolate the large Atlantic and Pacific heat reservoirs from the sea surface.

  3. Phylogenetic composition of Arctic Ocean archaeal assemblages and comparison with Antarctic assemblages.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nasreen; Ruffin, Shomari; Ransom, Briana; Hollibaugh, James T

    2004-02-01

    Archaea assemblages from the Arctic Ocean and Antarctic waters were compared by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S rRNA genes amplified using the Archaea-specific primers 344f and 517r. Inspection of the DGGE fingerprints of 33 samples from the Arctic Ocean (from SCICEX submarine cruises in 1995, 1996, and 1997) and 7 Antarctic samples from Gerlache Strait and Dallman Bay revealed that the richness of Archaea assemblages was greater in samples from deep water than in those from the upper water column in both polar oceans. DGGE banding patterns suggested that most of the Archaea ribotypes were common to both the Arctic Ocean and the Antarctic Ocean. However, some of the Euryarchaeota ribotypes were unique to each system. Cluster analysis of DGGE fingerprints revealed no seasonal variation but supported depth-related differences in the composition of the Arctic Ocean Archaea assemblage. The phylogenetic composition of the Archaea assemblage was determined by cloning and then sequencing amplicons obtained from the Archaea-specific primers 21f and 958r. Sequences of 198 clones from nine samples covering three seasons and all depths grouped with marine group I Crenarchaeota (111 clones), marine group II Euryarchaeota (86 clones), and group IV Euryarchaeota (1 clone). A sequence obtained only from a DGGE band was similar to those of the marine group III Euryarchaeota: PMID:14766555

  4. Empirical and modeled synoptic cloud climatology of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Crane, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    A daily climatology of the atmospheric circulation of the Arctic and the associated cloud conditions were determined. These are used for comparisons with the variability of general circulation model, generated circulation, and cloud cover for the same region.

  5. Late Pleistocene and Holocene meltwater events in the western Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, R.Z.; Osterman, L.; Curry, W.B.; Phillips, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometer 14C dated stable isotope data from Neogloboquadrina pachyerma in cores raised from the Mendeleyev Ridge and slope provide evidence for significant influx of meltwater to the western Arctic Ocean during the early part of marine oxygen isotope stage 1 (OIS 1) and during several intervals within OIS 3. The strongest OIS 3 meltwater event occurred before ca. 45 ka (conventional radiocarbon age) and was probably related to the deglaciation at the beginning of OIS 3. Major meltwater input to the western Arctic Ocean during the last deglaciation coincides closely with the maximum rate of global sea-level rise as determined from the Barbados sea-level record, demonstrating a strong link between the global record and changes in the central Arctic Ocean. OIS 2, which includes the last glacial maximum, is very condensed or absent in the cores. Abundance and ??13C values for N. pachyderma in the middle part of OIS 3 are similar to modern values, indicating high productivity and seasonal ice-free areas along the Arctic margin at that time. These records indicate that the Arctic Ocean was a source of heat and moisture to the northern polar atmosphere during parts of OIS 3.

  6. Ostracode Mg/Ca Ratios from Quaternary Sediments of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, G. S.; Caverly, E. K.; Cronin, T. M.; Polyak, L. V.; DeNinno, L.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) ratios from adult, calcitic shells of the deep-sea ostracode Krithe from the Northwind and Mendeleev Ridges, Arctic Ocean, to reconstruct orbital-scale Quaternary bottom-water temperature history. Results show an early Pleistocene (~1.5 Ma to 500 ka) Mg/CaKrithe pattern with low-amplitude, possibly orbitally controlled, oscillations between 10.5 and 12.5 mmol/mol followed by a progressive trend towards higher ratios (> 17 mmol/mol) during the last 500 ka. This shift coincides with the mid-Pleistocene Transition and mid-Brunhes Event (~ 300-500 ka) recognized in microfaunal proxy records in the Arctic Ocean. Analyses of Mg/CaKrithe from intervals representing marine isotope stage 11 (MIS 11) in 5 cores from water depths from 700 to 1470 m show Mg/Ca ratios ranging from 10.5 to 14 mmol/mol. A 2 mmol/mol excursion in Mg/CaKrithe within MIS 11 seen in all cores likely corresponds to a brief stadial event recognized also in planktic and benthic microfaunas. We will discuss the implications of Mg/Ca paleothermometry for deep Arctic Ocean circulation and the evolution of Arctic sea ice during major Quaternary climatic transitions as well as possible factors other than water temperature that may influence Mg/Ca ratios in Krithe shells from Quaternary sediments from the Arctic Ocean.

  7. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Sanz-Martín, M.; Mesa, E.; Arrieta, J. M.; Chierici, M.; Hendriks, I. E.; García-Corral, L. S.; Regaudie-de-Gioux, A.; Delgado, A.; Reigstad, M.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145-2,099 μatm however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  8. Biogeochemical drivers of the fate of riverine mercury discharged to the global and Arctic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxu; Jacob, Daniel J.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Amos, Helen M.; Long, Michael S.; Sunderland, Elsie M.

    2015-06-01

    Rivers discharge 28 ± 13 Mmol yr-1 of mercury (Hg) to ocean margins, an amount comparable to atmospheric deposition to the global oceans. Most of the Hg discharged by rivers is sequestered by burial of benthic sediment in estuaries or the coastal zone, but some is evaded to the atmosphere and some is exported to the open ocean. We investigate the fate of riverine Hg by developing a new global 3-D simulation for Hg in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ocean general circulation model. The model includes plankton dynamics and carbon respiration (DARWIN project model) coupled to inorganic Hg chemistry. Results are consistent with observed spatial patterns and magnitudes of surface ocean Hg concentrations. We use observational constraints on seawater Hg concentrations and evasion to infer that most Hg from rivers is sorbed to refractory organic carbon and preferentially buried. Only 6% of Hg discharged by rivers (1.8 Mmol yr-1) is transported to the open ocean on a global basis. This fraction varies from a low of 2.6% in East Asia due to the barrier imposed by the Korean Peninsula and Japanese archipelago, up to 25% in eastern North America facilitated by the Gulf Stream. In the Arctic Ocean, low tributary particle loads and efficient degradation of particulate organic carbon by deltaic microbial communities favor a more labile riverine Hg pool. Evasion of Hg to the Arctic atmosphere is indirectly enhanced by heat transport during spring freshet that accelerates sea ice melt and ice rafting. Discharges of 0.23 Mmol Hg yr-1 from Arctic rivers can explain the observed summer maximum in the Arctic atmosphere, and this magnitude of releases is consistent with recent observations. Our work indicates that rivers are major contributors to Hg loads in the Arctic Ocean.

  9. Early Tertiary marine fossils from northern Alaska: implications for Arctic Ocean paleogeography and faunal evolution.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marincovich, L.; Brouwers, E.M.; Carter, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Marine mollusks and ostracodes indicate a post-Danian Paleocene to early Eocene (Thanetian to Ypresian) age for a fauna from the Prince Creek Formation at Ocean Point, northern Alaska, that also contains genera characteristic of the Cretaceous and Neogene-Quaternary. The life-assocation of heterochronous taxa at Ocean Point resulted from an unusual paleogeographic setting, the nearly complete isolation of the Arctic Ocean from about the end of the Cretaceous until sometime in the Eocene, in which relict Cretaceous taxa survived into Tertiary time while endemic taxa evolved in situ; these later migrated to the northern mid- latitudes. Paleobiogeographic affinities of the Ocean Point assocation with mild temperate faunas of the London Basin (England), Denmark, and northern Germany indicate that a shallow, intermittent Paleocene seaway extended through the Norwegian-Greenland Sea to the North Sea Basin. Early Tertiary Arctic Ocean paleogeography deduced from faunal evidence agrees with that inferred from plate-tectonic reconstructions.-Authors

  10. Observing the Arctic Ocean under melting ice - the UNDER-ICE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Hanne; Ullgren, Jenny; Geyer, Florian; Bergh, Jon; Hamre, Torill; Sandven, Stein; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Falck, Eva; Gammelsrød, Tor; Worcester, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean is gradually diminishing in area and thickness. The variability of the ice cover is determined by heat exchange with both the atmosphere and the ocean. A cold water layer with a strong salinity gradient insulates the sea ice from below, preventing direct contact with the underlying warm Atlantic water. Changes in water column stratification might therefore lead to faster erosion of the ice. As the ice recedes, larger areas of surface water are open to wind mixing; the effect this might have on the water column structure is not yet clear. The heat content in the Arctic strongly depends on heat transport from other oceans. The Fram Strait is a crucial pathway for the exchange between the Arctic and the Atlantic Ocean. Two processes of importance for the Arctic heat and freshwater budget and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation take place here: poleward heat transport by the West Spitzbergen Current and freshwater export by the East Greenland Current. A new project, Arctic Ocean under Melting Ice (UNDER-ICE), aims to improve our understanding of the ocean circulation, water mass distribution, fluxes, and mixing processes, sea ice processes, and net community primary production in ice-covered areas and the marginal ice zone in the Fram Strait and northward towards the Gakkel Ridge. The interdisciplinary project brings together ocean acoustics, physical oceanography, marine biology, and sea ice research. A new programme of observations, integrated with satellite data and state-of-the-art numerical models, will be started in order to improve the estimates of heat, mass, and freshwater transport between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. On this poster we present the UNDER-ICE project, funded by the Research Council of Norway and GDF Suez E&P Norge AS for the years 2014-2017, and place it in context of the legacy of earlier projects in the area, such as ACOBAR. A mooring array for acoustic tomography combined with

  11. The Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS): overview and experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjernström, M.; Leck, C.; Birch, C. E.; Brooks, B. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Bäcklin, L.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Granath, E.; Graus, M.; Hansel, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Held, A.; Hind, A.; de la Rosa, S.; Johnston, P.; Knulst, J.; de Leeuw, G.; Di Liberto, L.; Martin, M.; Matrai, P. A.; Mauritsen, T.; Müller, M.; Norris, S. J.; Orellana, M. V.; Orsini, D. A.; Paatero, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Gao, Q.; Rauschenberg, C.; Ristovski, Z.; Sedlar, J.; Shupe, M. D.; Sierau, B.; Sirevaag, A.; Sjogren, S.; Stetzer, O.; Swietlicki, E.; Szczodrak, M.; Vaattovaara, P.; Wahlberg, N.; Westberg, M.; Wheeler, C. R.

    2013-05-01

    The climate in the Arctic is changing faster than anywhere else on Earth. Poorly understood feedback processes relating to Arctic clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions contribute to a poor understanding of the present changes in the Arctic climate system, and also to a large spread in projections of future climate in the Arctic. The problem is exacerbated by the paucity of research-quality observations in the central Arctic. Improved formulations in climate models require such observations, which can only come from measurements in-situ in this difficult to reach region with logistically demanding environmental conditions. The Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) was the most extensive central Arctic Ocean expedition with an atmospheric focus during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. ASCOS focused on the study of the formation and life cycle of low-level Arctic clouds. ASCOS departed from Longyearbyen on Svalbard on 2 August and returned on 9 September 2008. In transit into and out of the pack ice, four short research stations were undertaken in the Fram Strait; two in open water and two in the marginal ice zone. After traversing the pack-ice northward an ice camp was set up on 12 August at 87°21' N 01°29' W and remained in operation through 1 September, drifting with the ice. During this time extensive measurements were taken of atmospheric gas and particle chemistry and physics, mesoscale and boundary-layer meteorology, marine biology and chemistry, and upper ocean physics. ASCOS provides a unique interdisciplinary data set for development and testing of new hypotheses on cloud processes, their interactions with the sea ice and ocean and associated physical, chemical, and biological processes and interactions. For example, the first ever quantitative observation of bubbles in Arctic leads, combined with the unique discovery of marine organic material, polymer gels with an origin in the ocean, inside cloud droplets suggest the possibility of primary

  12. The contribution of Alaskan, Siberian, and Canadian coastal polynas to the cold halocline layer of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, Donald J.; Martin, Seelye

    1994-01-01

    Numerous Arctic Ocean circulation and geochemical studies suggest that ice growth in polynyas over the Alaskan, Siberian, and Canadian continental shelves is a source of cold, saline water which contributes to the maintenance of the Arctic Ocean halocline. The purpose of this study is to estimate for the 1978-1987 winters the contributions of Arctic coastal polynyas to the cold halocline layer of the Arctic Ocean. The study uses a combination of satellite, oceanographic, and weather data to calculate the brine fluxes from the polynyas; then an oceanic box model is used to calculate their contributions to the cold halocline layer of the Arctic Ocean. This study complements and corrects a previous study of dense water production by coastal polynyas in the Barents, Kara, and Laptev Seas.

  13. Sensitivity of the Regional Arctic System Model surface climate to ice-ocean state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A.; Maslowski, W.; Osinski, R.; Cassano, J. J.; Craig, A.; Duvivier, A.; Fisel, B. J.; Gutowski, W. J.; Higgins, M.; Hughes, M. R.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Nijssen, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) is a high-resolution Earth System model extending across the Arctic Ocean, its marginal seas, the Arctic drainage basin, and including the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) Arctic domain. RASM uses the flux coupler (CPL7) within the Community Earth System Model framework to couple regional configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), Parallel Ocean Program (POP), Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE), and Variable Infiltration Capacity land hydrology model (VIC). Work is also underway to incorporate the Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM) as well as glacier, ice cap and dynamic vegetation models. As part of RASM development, coupled simulations are being prepared for the CORDEX Arctic domain, which is unique among CORDEX regions by being centered over the ocean. Up to this point, there has been uncertainty over how much initial and surface conditions in the ice-ocean boundary layer influence the surface climate of the Arctic in RASM, relative to regional atmospheric model constraints, such as spectral nudging and boundary conditions. We present results that suggest there is a significant dependency on the initial sea ice conditions on decadal timescales within RASM. This has important implications for (i) how results from different regional artic models may be combined and compared in CORDEX and (ii) appropriate methods for ensemble generation in regional polar models. We will also present results illustrating the influence of sub-hourly sea ice deformation on decadal climate in RASM, highlighting an important reason why fully coupled and high-resolution regional models are essential for regional Arctic downscaling.

  14. "Recent" macrofossil remains from the Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duc, Cynthia; de Vernal, Anne; Archambault, Philippe; Brice, Camille; Roberge, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    years as suggested by the radiocarbon dating of the upper centimeter of the sediment in PS87/030-2 (7792 ± 59 14C years BP), PS87/055-1 (3897 ± 41 14C years BP), and PS87/099-4 (1421 ± 66 14C years BP). Reference Stein, R. (Ed.), 2015. The Expedition PS87 of the Research Vessel Polarstern to the Arctic Ocean in 2014, Reports on Polar and Marine Research 688, Bremerhaven, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, 273 pp (http://epic.awi.de/37728/1/BzPM_0688_2015.pdf).

  15. Wrench faulting in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, D. R.; Jackson, H. R.; Shimeld, J.; Houseknecht, D. W.; Chian, D.; Li, Q.; Saltus, R. W.; Oakey, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of seismic velocity, potential field, and geologic data from within the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean and its surrounding margins suggests that a northeast-trending structural fabric has influenced the origin, evolution, and current tectonics of the basin. This fabric is defined by a diverse set of observations, including (1) a magnetic lineament extending from offshore Prince Patrick Island to the bend in the Canada Basin Gravity Low that separates higher magnetic amplitudes to the northwest from a region of more subdued anomalies to the southeast; (2) the orientation of the 600-km long Northwind Escarpment along the edge of the Canada Basin; (3) a large, linear, positive magnetic anomaly that parallels Northwind Escarpment; (4) negative flower structures along the base of the Northwind Escarpment identified in seismic reflection profiles; (5) the edges of a linear, 150-km-long by 20-km-wide by 2000-m deep, basin in the Chukchi Plateau; (6) the sub-parallel ridges of Sever Spur along the Canadian margin north of Prince Patrick Island; (7) an oblong gravity low interpreted to indicate thick sediments beneath an inferred rift basin at 78oN in ~3600 m water depth; (8) the offshore extensions of the Canning sinistral and Richardson dextral fault zones; (9) the offshore extension of the D3 magnetic terrain of Saltus et al. (2011); and (10) the association of dredged rocks of the Chukchi Borderland with the Pearya terrane ~2000 km northeast of its present location (Brumley et al., 2015). Ongoing deformation of the Beaufort margin by impingement of the Brooks Range tectonic front is recorded by modern seismicity along the Canning and Richardson fault zones, which imply that deformation is accommodated by slip along the northeast-trending fabric. Together, these features are interpreted to indicate long-lived northeast-southwest oriented tectonic fabric in the development of the Canada Basin from initial rifting to modern deformation of the Beaufort margin

  16. Seismic Tomography of the Arctic: Continental Cratons, Ancient Orogens, Oceanic Lithosphere and Convecting Mantle Beneath (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; Schaeffer, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Lateral variations in seismic velocities in the upper mantle, mapped by seismic tomography, reflect primarily the variations in the temperature of the rock at depth. Seismic tomography thus reveals lateral changes in the temperature and thickness of the lithosphere; it maps deep boundaries between tectonic blocks with different properties and with different age of the lithosphere. Our new global, shear-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle and the crust is constrained by an unprecedentedly large number of broadband waveform fits (nearly one million seismograms, with both surface and S waves included) and provides improved resolution of the lithosphere across the whole of the Arctic region, compared to other available models. The most prominent high-velocity anomalies, seen down to 150-200 km depths, indicate the cold, thick, stable mantle lithosphere beneath Precambrian cratons. The northern boundaries of the Canadian Shield's and Greenland's cratonic lithosphere closely follow the coastlines, with the Greenland and North American cratons clearly separated from each other. In Eurasia, in contrast, cratonic lithosphere extends hundreds of kilometres north of the coast of the continent, beneath the Barents and eastern Kara Seas. The boundaries of the Archean cratons mapped by tomography indicate the likely offshore extensions of major Phanerozoic sutures in northern Eurasia. The old oceanic lithosphere of the Canada Basin is much colder and thicker than the younger lithosphere beneath the adjacent Amundsen Basin, north of the Gakkel Ridge. Beneath the slow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, we detect the expected low-velocity anomaly associated with partial melting in the uppermost mantle; the anomaly is weaker, however, than beneath faster-spreading ridges globally. South of the ridge, the Nansen Basin shows higher seismic velocities in the upper mantle beneath it, compared to the Amundsen Basin. At 150-250 km depth, most of the oceanic portions of the central Arctic (the

  17. Potential radiocarbon chronology tool using archaeal tetraether lipids for the western Arctic Ocean sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, M.; Kondo, M.; Utsumi, M.; Shibata, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean plays a major role in global climate changes by changing global energy balance through ice-albedo feedback and by affecting the oceanic thermohaline circulation through the water exchange with the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. For future prediction of those changes in Arctic Ocean it is necessary to reconstruct details of past climate history with accurate age model. However, it is not easy to make age model of sediment cores covering late Pleistocene-Holocene transition including global abrupt climate change because preservation of carbonate fossil such as planktonic foraminifera is very limited. In the glacial time, foraminifera is almost barren. Thus, so far climate history in the Arctic Ocean environment is poorly understood. For these reasons, we are looking for alternative chronological target instead of foraminifera. In this study, radiocarbon contents of archaeal glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs) from Arctic surface sediments, which is also used for paleothermometry, were measured and compared with those of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of sea water, planktonic and benthic foraminifera, shell, and bulk organic matter in the same horizons. We will discuss potential as chronology using the GDGTs and carbon sources of these compounds.

  18. Modeling seasonality of ice and ocean carbon production in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, M.; Deal, C. M.; Ji, R.

    2011-12-01

    In the Arctic Ocean, both phytoplankton and sea ice algae are important contributors to the primary production and the arctic food web. Copepod in the arctic regions have developed their feeding habit depending on the timing between the ice algal bloom and the subsequent phytoplankton bloom. A mismatch of the timing due to climate changes could have dramatic consequences on the food web as shown by some regional observations. In this study, a global coupled ice-ocean-ecosystem model was used to assess the seasonality of the ice algal and phytoplankton blooms in the arctic. The ice-ocean ecosystem modules are fully coupled in the physical model POP-CICE (Parallel Ocean Program- Los Alamos Sea Ice Model). The model results are compared with various observations. The modeled ice and ocean carbon production were analyzed by regions and their linkage to the physical environment changes (such as changes of ice concentration and water temperature, and light intensity etc.) between low- and high-ice years.

  19. The role of sustained observations and data co-management in Arctic Ocean governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eicken, H.; Lee, O. A.; Rupp, S. T.; Trainor, S.; Walsh, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid environmental change, a rise in maritime activities and resource development, and increasing engagement by non-Arctic nations are key to major shifts underway in Arctic social-environmental systems (SES). These shifts are triggering responses by policy makers, regulators and a range of other actors in the Arctic Ocean region. Arctic science can play an important role in informing such responses, in particular by (i) providing data from sustained observations to serve as indicators of change and major transitions and to inform regulatory and policy response; (ii) identifying linkages across subsystems of Arctic SES and across regions; (iii) providing predictions or scenarios of future states of Arctic SES; and (iv) informing adaptation action in response to rapid change. Policy responses to a changing Arctic are taking a multi-faceted approach by advancing international agreements through the Arctic Council (e.g., Search and Rescue Agreement), global forums (e.g., IMO Polar Code) or private sector instruments (e.g., ISO code for offshore structures). At the regional level, co-management of marine living resources involving local, indigenous stakeholders has proven effective. All of these approaches rely on scientific data and information for planning and decision-making. Examples from the Pacific Arctic sector illustrate how such relevant data is currently collected through a multitude of different government agencies, universities, and private entities. Its effective use in informing policy, planning and emergency response requires coordinated, sustained acquisition, common standards or best practices, and data sharing agreements - best achieved through data co-management approaches. For projections and scenarios of future states of Arctic SES, knowledge co-production that involves all relevant stakeholders and specifically addresses major sources of uncertainty is of particular relevance in an international context.

  20. Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Thickness, Bathymetry, and Water Properties from Submarine Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windnagel, A. K.; Fetterer, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Submarine Arctic Science Program, SCICEX, is a federal interagency collaboration that began in 1993 among the operational Navy, research agencies, and the marine research community to use nuclear-powered submarines for scientific studies of the Arctic Ocean. Unlike surface ships and satellites, submarines have the unique ability to operate and take measurements regardless of sea ice cover, weather conditions, and time of year. This allows for a broad and comprehensive investigation of an entire ocean basin. The goal of the program is to acquire comprehensive data about Arctic sea ice thickness; biological, chemical, and hydrographic water properties; and bathymetry to improve our understanding of the Arctic Ocean basin and its role in the Earth's climate system. Ice draft is measured with upward looking sonars mounted on the submarine's hull. The work of collaborators on the SCICEX project compared recent ice draft from the submarines with draft from the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS) and with ice thickness estimates from ice age and have shown that SCICEX ice draft are consistent with these models. Bathymetry is measured with a bottom sounder. SCICEX bathymetry data from 1993 to 1999 are included in the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO). Collaborators have compared more recent bathymetry data collected through the SCICEX project with other IBCAO data, and they agree well. Water properties are measured with two different types of conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensors: one mounted on the submarine's hull and expendable versions that are deployed through the submarines torpedo tubes. Data from the two different CTD sensors validate one another. The breadth of instrumentation available from submarines along with their ability to be unencumbered by sea ice, weather, and season makes the data they have collected extremely valuable. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) manages this data

  1. Ice-tethered measurement platforms in the Arctic Ocean: a contribution by the FRAM infrastructure program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Nicolaus, Marcel; Rabe, Benjamin; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Katlein, Christian; Scholz, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean has been in the focus of many studies during recent years, investigating the state, the causes and the implications of the observed rapid transition towards a thinner and younger sea-ice cover. However, consistent observational datasets of sea ice, ocean and atmosphere are still sparse due to the limited accessibility and harsh environmental conditions. One important tool to fill this gap has become more and more feasible during recent years: autonomous, ice-tethered measurement platforms (buoys). These drifting instruments independently transmit their data via satellites, and enable observations over larger areas and over longer time periods than manned expeditions, even throughout the winter. One aim of the newly established FRAM (FRontiers in Arctic marine Monitoring) infrastructure program at the Alfred-Wegener-Institute is to realize and maintain an interdisciplinary network of buoys in the Arctic Ocean, contributing to an integrated, Arctic-wide observatory. The additional buoy infrastructure, ship-time, and developments provided by FRAM are critical elements in the ongoing international effort to fill the large data gaps in a rapidly changing Arctic Ocean. Our focus is the particularly underrepresented Eurasian Basin. Types of instruments range from snow depth beacons and ice mass balance buoys for monitoring ice growth and snow accumulation, over radiation and weather stations for energy budget estimates, to ice-tethered profiling systems for upper ocean monitoring. Further, development of new bio-optical and biogeochemical buoys is expected to enhance our understanding of bio-physical processes associated with Arctic sea ice. The first set of FRAM buoys was deployed in September 2015 from RV Polarstern. All datasets are publicly available on dedicated web portals. Near real time data are reported into international initiatives, such as the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) and the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP). The

  2. Integrated lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and paleoceanography of Quaternary sediments from the intermediate and deep Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T. M.; DeNinno, L.; Poore, R. Z.; Polyak, L. V.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; Marzen, R.; Caverly, E. K.; Brenner, A.

    2013-12-01

    We conducted an integrated litho- and biostratigraphic study of Arctic Ocean Quaternary sediments collected in water depths from ~700 to 2500 m on the Northwind, Mendeleev, and Lomonosov Ridges to improve paleoceanographic reconstructions of sea-ice, ocean temperature, and circulation. Results show a progressive faunal turnover in ostracodes and benthic foraminifera during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT, ~1.3 to 0.6 Ma) and the Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE, ~0.4 Ma). These indicate increased interglacial sea-ice cover, decreased deep-water formation and changes in surface productivity. The MPT shift is characterized by the extinction in the Arctic of species that today inhabit the sea-ice free subpolar North Atlantic and seasonally sea-ice free Nordic Seas and the stratigraphic appearance of polar species characteristic of near perennial Arctic sea-ice cover during interglacial and interstadial periods. Following a warm interglacial during Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 11, changes in lithology, calcareous microfaunal density, and benthic species assemblages during the last 400 ka reflect orbital and suborbital control of Arctic Ocean environments. We will discuss several distinct microfaunal events that can be used as biostratigraphic markers of sediment deposited in the western Arctic during MIS 11 and MIS 5.

  3. Empirical and modeled synoptic cloud climatology of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Newell, J. P.; Schweiger, A.; Crane, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    A set of cloud cover data were developed for the Arctic during the climatically important spring/early summer transition months. Parallel with the determination of mean monthly cloud conditions, data for different synoptic pressure patterns were also composited as a means of evaluating the role of synoptic variability on Arctic cloud regimes. In order to carry out this analysis, a synoptic classification scheme was developed for the Arctic using an objective typing procedure. A second major objective was to analyze model output of pressure fields and cloud parameters from a control run of the Goddard Institue for Space Studies climate model for the same area and to intercompare the synoptic climatatology of the model with that based on the observational data.

  4. Studying the impact of changes in the Arctic outflow by using a coupled ice-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha Karami, Mehdi; Myers, Paul G.; Tremblay, Bruno; de Vernal, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The export of cold and fresh water from the Arctic Ocean into the North Atlantic Ocean happens mainly through the Fram Strait and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA). The magnitude of the Arctic outflow and its distribution between the Fram Strait and CAA has been suggested to change in the future. Such changes might affect the Arctic sea ice, and possibly alter the location and the intensity of dense water formation and, therefore, the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). One factor controlling the Arctic outflow is the wind forcing. Another factor is the Atlantic inflow to the Arctic, which also depends on the wind forcing and is linked to the intermediate circulation within the Arctic. There is also synergy between all the Arctic gateways. Here we explore the changes in CAA and Fram outflows accompanying the Arctic dipole mode as a plausible climatic state in future, and their corresponding impacts on the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. For this purpose, a regional configuration of the coupled ice-ocean model, NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean model) version 3.4 is used for a set of sensitivity experiments. For the surface boundary condition, composites of atmospheric variables associated with the two phases of Arctic dipole mode were calculated from the COREII data. To better understand what controls the distribution of Arctic outflow between the Fram Strait and CAA and to exclude their synergism, we launch similar experiments with a closed CAA. This will allow us to better understand the impacts caused by the modulation of the wind forcing versus changes in the gateway flows. Our results will also have implications for the paleo-studies of the Arctic.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of circulation in Hooghly Estuary and its adjacent coastal oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shashank Kr.; Nayak, Gourav; Nayak, R. K.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    Hooghly is one of the major estuaries in Ganges, the largest and longest river in the Indian subcontinent. The Hooghly estuary is a coastal plain estuary lying approximately between 21°-23° N and 87°-89° E. We used a terrain following ocean model to study tide driven residual circulations, seasonal mean flow patterns and its energetics in the Hooghly estuary and adjacent coastal oceans on the north eastern continental shelf of India. The model is driven by tidal levels at open ocean end and winds at the air-sea interface. The sources of forcing fields for tides were from FES2012, winds from ECMWF. Harmonic analysis is carried out to compute the tidal and non-tidal components of currents and sea level from the model solutions. The de-tidal components were averaged for the entire period of simulation to describe residual and mean-seasonal circulations in the regions. We used tide-gauge, SARAL-ALTIKA along track sea level measurements to evaluate model solutions. Satellite measure Chla were used along with simulated currents to describe important features of the circulations in the region.

  6. Freshwater and its role in the Arctic Marine System: Sources, disposition, storage, export, and physical and biogeochemical consequences in the Arctic and global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, E. C.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.; Haine, T. W. N.; Bacon, S.; Bluhm, B. A.; Lique, C.; Melling, H.; Polyakov, I. V.; Straneo, F.; Timmermans, M.-L.; Williams, W. J.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean is a fundamental node in the global hydrological cycle and the ocean's thermohaline circulation. We here assess the system's key functions and processes: (1) the delivery of fresh and low-salinity waters to the Arctic Ocean by river inflow, net precipitation, distillation during the freeze/thaw cycle, and Pacific Ocean inflows; (2) the disposition (e.g., sources, pathways, and storage) of freshwater components within the Arctic Ocean; and (3) the release and export of freshwater components into the bordering convective domains of the North Atlantic. We then examine physical, chemical, or biological processes which are influenced or constrained by the local quantities and geochemical qualities of freshwater; these include stratification and vertical mixing, ocean heat flux, nutrient supply, primary production, ocean acidification, and biogeochemical cycling. Internal to the Arctic the joint effects of sea ice decline and hydrological cycle intensification have strengthened coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere (e.g., wind and ice drift stresses, solar radiation, and heat and moisture exchange), the bordering drainage basins (e.g., river discharge, sediment transport, and erosion), and terrestrial ecosystems (e.g., Arctic greening, dissolved and particulate carbon loading, and altered phenology of biotic components). External to the Arctic freshwater export acts as both a constraint to and a necessary ingredient for deep convection in the bordering subarctic gyres and thus affects the global thermohaline circulation. Geochemical fingerprints attained within the Arctic Ocean are likewise exported into the neighboring subarctic systems and beyond. Finally, we discuss observed and modeled functions and changes in this system on seasonal, annual, and decadal time scales and discuss mechanisms that link the marine system to atmospheric, terrestrial, and cryospheric systems.

  7. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data and seasonal pattern analysis for the Arctic Ocean ecoregions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. In particular, the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish, is in question. This poses an intriguing problem for future research of Arctic environments - one that will require examination of long-term SST records. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use Arctic SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on habitats and/or processes in the Arctic Ocean. The data cover the Arctic ecoregions as defined by the "Marine Ecoregions of the World" (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy as well as the region to the north from approximately 46°N to about 88°N (constrained by the season and data coverage). The data span a 29-year period from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements that had been compiled into monthly means at 4-kilometer grid cell spatial resolution. The processed data files are available in ArcGIS geospatial datasets (raster and point shapefiles) and also are provided in text (.csv) format. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying latitude/longitude coordinates, and realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema. A seasonal analysis of these Arctic ecoregions reveals a wide range of SSTs experienced throughout the Arctic, both over the course of an annual cycle and within each month of that cycle. Sea ice distribution plays a major role in SST regulation in all Arctic ecoregions.

  8. Wave heights in the 21st century Arctic Ocean simulated with a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khon, V. C.; Mokhov, I. I.; Pogarskiy, F. A.; Babanin, A.; Dethloff, K.; Rinke, A.; Matthes, H.

    2014-04-01

    While wave heights globally have been growing over recent decades, observations of their regional trends vary. Simulations of future wave climate can be achieved by coupling wave and climate models. At present, wave heights and their future trends in the Arctic Ocean remain unknown. We use the third-generation wave forecast model WAVEWATCH-III forced by winds and sea ice concentration produced within the regional model HIRHAM, under the anthropogenic scenario SRES-A1B. We find that significant wave height and its extremes will increase over different inner Arctic areas due to reduction of sea ice cover and regional wind intensification in the 21st century. The opposite tendency, with a slight reduction in wave height appears for the Atlantic sector and the Barents Sea. Our results demonstrate the complex wave response in the Arctic Ocean to a combined effect of wind and sea ice forcings in a climate-change scenario during the 21st century.

  9. Rock Magnetic Studies of Rock Bottom Material from the Mendeleev Rise, Arctic Ocean: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkina, D.; Piskarev, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nature and origin of submarine highs in the Arctic are considered to be one of the main issues of the evolution of the Artic Ocean. Rock bottom material were dredged on 4 sites in the area of the Mendeleev Rise during the Arctic-2012 expedition [Morozov et al., 2013]. Rock magnetic studies of the samples, which are mostly presented by igneous rocks, have been performed in order to find out any connection to their continental or oceanic origin. These first results have been partially correlated with paleomagnetic pattern of sedimentary cores from the same sites and region. A. Morozov, O. Petrov, S. Shokalsky, S. Kashubin, A. Kremenetsky, M. Y. Shkatov, V. Kaminsky, E. Gusev, G. Grikurov, P. Rekant, et al., "New geological data confirming the continental nature of the Central Arctic uplifts area," Regional Geology and Metallogeny, vol. 53, pp. 34-56, 2013.

  10. Proxy representation of Arctic ocean bottom pressure variability: Bridging gaps in GRACE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Morison, James H.; Wallace, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Using time-varying ocean bottom pressure (OBP) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), a 9 year in situ OBP record at the North Pole, and wind reanalysis products, we perform a linear regression analysis to identify primary predictor time series that enable us to create a proxy representation of the Arctic time-varying OBP that explains the largest fraction of the observed Arctic OBP variability. After cross validation, two predictors—North Pole OBP record and wind-OBP coupling from maximum covariance analysis—explain 50% of the total variance of the Arctic OBP. This work provides a means for bridging existing short gaps in GRACE measurements and potentially longer future gaps that may result if GRACE and its follow-on mission do not overlap. The technique may be applicable to bridge gaps in GRACE measurements in other oceanic regions.

  11. Arctic geodynamics: Continental shelf and deep ocean geophysics. ERS-1 satellite altimetry: A first look

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Sandwell, David T.; Marquart, Gabriele; Scherneck, Hans-Georg

    1993-01-01

    An overall review of the Arctic Geodynamics project is presented. A composite gravity field model of the region based upon altimetry data from ERS-1, Geosat, and Seasat is made. ERS-1 altimetry covers unique Arctic and Antarctic latitudes above 72 deg. Both areas contain large continental shelf areas, passive margins, as well as recently formed deep ocean areas. Until ERS-1 it was not possible to study these areas with satellite altimetry. Gravity field solutions for the Barents sea, portions of the Arctic ocean, and the Norwegian sea north of Iceland are shown. The gravity anomalies around Svalbard (Spitsbergen) and Bear island are particularly large, indicating large isostatic anomalies which remain from the recent breakup of Greenland from Scandinavian. Recently released gravity data from the Armed Forces Topographic Service of Russia cover a portion of the Barents and Kara seas. A comparison of this data with the ERS-1 produced gravity field is shown.

  12. Quaternary paleoceanography of the central Arctic based on Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Arctic Coring Expedition 302 foraminiferal assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Smith, S.A.; Eynaud, F.; O'Regan, M.; King, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) Hole 4C from the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean recovered a continuous 18 in record of Quaternary foraminifera yielding evidence for seasonally ice-free interglacials during the Matuyama, progressive development of large glacials during the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT) ???1.2-0.9 Ma, and the onset of high-amplitude 100-ka orbital cycles ???500 ka. Foraminiferal preservation in sediments from the Arctic is influenced by primary (sea ice, organic input, and other environmental conditions) and secondary factors (syndepositional, long-term pore water dissolution). Taking these into account, the ACEX 4C record shows distinct maxima in agglutinated foraminiferal abundance corresponding to several interglacials and deglacials between marine isotope stages (MIS) 13-37, and although less precise dating is available for older sediments, these trends appear to continue through the Matuyama. The MPT is characterized by nearly barren intervals during major glacials (MIS 12, 16, and 22-24) and faunal turnover (MIS 12-24). Abundant calcareous planktonic (mainly Neogloboquadrina pachyderma sin.) and benthic foraminifers occur mainly in interglacial intervals during the Brunhes and very rarely in the Matuyama. A distinct faunal transition from calcareous to agglutinated foraminifers 200-300 ka in ACEX 4C is comparable to that found in Arctic sediments from the Lomonosov, Alpha, and Northwind ridges and the Morris Jesup Rise. Down-core disappearance of calcareous taxa is probably related to either reduced sea ice cover prior to the last few 100-ka cycles, pore water dissolution, or both. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Extensive under-ice turbulence microstructure measurements in the central Arctic Ocean in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, Benjamin; Janout, Markus; Graupner, Rainer; Hoelemann, Jens; Hampe, Hendrik; Hoppmann, Mario; Horn, Myriel; Juhls, Bennet; Korhonen, Meri; Nikolopoulos, Anna; Pisarev, Sergey; Randelhoff, Achim; Savy, John-Philippe; Villacieros, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is a strongly stratified low-energy environment, where tides are weak and the upper ocean is protected by an ice cover during much of the year. Interior mixing processes are dominated by double diffusion. The upper Arctic Ocean features a cold surface mixed layer, which, separated by a sharp halocline, protects the sea ice from the warmer underlying Atlantic- and Pacific-derived water masses. These water masses carry nutrients that are important for the Arctic ecosystem. Hence vertical fluxes of heat, salt, and nutrients are crucial components in understanding the Arctic ecosystem. Yet, direct flux measurements are difficult to obtain and hence sparse. In 2015, two multidisciplinary R/V Polarstern expeditions to the Arctic Ocean resulted in a series of under-ice turbulence microstructure measurements. These cover different locations across the Eurasian and Makarov Basins, during the melt season in spring and early summer as well as during freeze-up in late summer. Sampling was carried out from ice floes with repeated profiles resulting in 4-24 hour-long time series. 2015 featured anomalously warm atmospheric conditions during summer followed by unusually low temperatures in September. Our measurements show elevated dissipation rates at the base of the mixed layer throughout all stations, with significantly higher levels above the Eurasian continental slope when compared with the Arctic Basin. Additional peaks were found between the mixed layer and the halocline, in particular at stations where Pacific Summer water was present. This contribution provides first flux estimates and presents first conclusions regarding the impact of atmospheric and sea ice conditions on vertical mixing in 2015.

  14. Future change in ocean productivity: Is the Arctic the new Atlantic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yool, A.; Popova, E. E.; Coward, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most characteristic features in ocean productivity is the North Atlantic spring bloom. Responding to seasonal increases in irradiance and stratification, surface phytopopulations rise significantly, a pattern that visibly tracks poleward into summer. While blooms also occur in the Arctic Ocean, they are constrained by the sea-ice and strong vertical stratification that characterize this region. However, Arctic sea-ice is currently declining, and forecasts suggest this may lead to completely ice-free summers by the mid-21st century. Such change may open the Arctic up to Atlantic-style spring blooms, and do so at the same time as Atlantic productivity is threatened by climate change-driven ocean stratification. Here we use low and high-resolution instances of a coupled ocean-biogeochemistry model, NEMO-MEDUSA, to investigate productivity. Drivers of present-day patterns are identified, and changes in these across a climate change scenario (IPCC RCP 8.5) are analyzed. We find a globally significant decline in North Atlantic productivity (> -20%) by 2100, and a correspondingly significant rise in the Arctic (> +50%). However, rather than the future Arctic coming to resemble the current Atlantic, both regions are instead transitioning to a common, low nutrient regime. The North Pacific provides a counterexample where nutrients remain high and productivity increases with elevated temperature. These responses to climate change in the Atlantic and Arctic are common between model resolutions, suggesting an independence from resolution for key impacts. However, some responses, such as those in the North Pacific, differ between the simulations, suggesting the reverse and supporting the drive to more fine-scale resolutions. This article was corrected on 5 JAN 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  15. Response of Arctic Ocean stratification to changing river runoff in a column model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nummelin, Aleksi; Li, Camille; Smedsrud, Lars H.

    2015-04-01

    A one-dimensional model of the atmosphere-ice-ocean column is used to study the effects of changing river runoff to the Arctic Ocean. River runoff is the largest contributor of freshwater to the Arctic and is expected to increase as the hydrological cycle accelerates due to global warming. The column model simulates the stratification of the Arctic Ocean reasonably well, capturing important features such as the fresh surface layer, the salty cold halocline, and the temperature maximum within the Atlantic Water layer. The model is run for 500 years with prescribed boundary conditions to reach steady state solutions. Increasing river runoff is found to strengthen the stratification and to produce a fresher and shallower surface mixed layer with warming (up to ˜1°C for a doubling of present-day runoff) in the Atlantic Water layer below. An important consequence is that the effect of the larger vertical temperature gradient is able to balance that of the stronger stratification and yield a close to constant vertical heat flux toward the surface. As a result, the sea ice response is small, showing only slight increase (up to ˜15 cm for a doubling of present-day runoff) in annual mean ice thickness. Limitations of the study include the idealized nature of the column model and uncertainties in the background vertical mixing within the Arctic Ocean.

  16. A tale of two basins: An integrated physical and biological perspective of the deep Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, B. A.; Kosobokova, K. N.; Carmack, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    domains have vertical stratification that constrains the transfer of nutrients to the surface layer (euphotic zone), thus leading to their oligotrophic state, particularly in the more strongly stratified Pacific Arctic where, despite high nutrient values in the inflow, convective reset of surface layer nutrients by haline convection in winter is virtually absent. First and multi-year sea ice drastically alters albedo and insulates the underlying water column from extreme winter heat loss while its mechanical properties (thickness, concentration, roughness, etc.) greatly affect the efficiency of momentum transfer from the wind to the underlying water. Biologically, sea ice algal growth in the basins is proportionally almost equal to or exceeding phytoplankton production, and is a habitat and transport platform for sympagic (ice-associated) fauna. Owing to nutrient limitation due to strong stratification and light limitation due to snow and ice cover and extreme sun angle, primary production in the two basin domains is very low compared to the adjacent shelves. Severe nutrient limitation and complete euphotic zone drawdown in the AB favors small phytoplankton, a ubiquitous deep chlorophyll maximum layer, a low f-ratio of new to recycled carbon fixation, and a low energy food web. In contrast, nutrients persist -albeit in low levels- in the western EB, even in summer, suggesting light limitation, heavy grazing or both. The higher stocks of nutrients in the EB are more conducive to marginal ice blooms than in the AB. The large-scale ocean currents (NHTC and ACBC) import substantial expatriate, not locally reproducing zooplankton biomass especially from the adjoining subarctic Atlantic (primarily Calanus finmarchicus), but also from the Pacific (e.g., Pseudocalanus spp., Neocalanus spp. and Metridia pacifica). These advective inputs serve both as source of food to resident pelagic and benthic biota within the basins, and as potential grazers exerting top down control on

  17. Rolling the dice on the ice; New modes for underway data acquisition in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, B.; Dove, D.

    2012-12-01

    Exploration of the Arctic Ocean has always depended on the sea ice. It has been a platform supporting drifting ice stations and an obstacle to be over come by force (icebreakers) or finesse (US Navy fast attack submarines). Reduced seasonal sea ice cover has made it possible to work more freely in the peripheral Arctic Ocean, opening relatively unknown regions to scientific exploration and study. In September 2011, the RV Marcus G. Langseth set sail from Dutch Harbor, Alaska bound through Bering Strait for the Arctic Ocean. This was the first Arctic Ocean trip for MGG data acquisition by a US academic research vessel since 1994, when the RV Maurice Ewing collected a 2-D MCS profile across the Bering Shelf, through the Strait and along the Beaufort Shelf, stopping near Barrow, Alaska. RV Langseth arrived on the mid-Chukchi shelf and streamed gear just south of the "Crackerjack" well, drilled by Shell Exploration in the late eighties. The ship sailed north, crossing the "Popcorn" well and then set a course to the NW, setting the baseline for the survey parallel to the Beaufort Shelf edge. Sailing through almost entirely ice-free waters, approximately 5300 km of multi-channel seismic reflection data were acquired on a NW-SE oriented grid, which straddled the transition from Chukchi Shelf to the Chukchi Borderland. It would not have been possible for Langseth, which is not ice reinforced, to acquire these data prior to 2007. The dramatic expansion of late Summer open water in the western Arctic Ocean made it possible to use this ship effectively across a broad swath of the shelf and the periphery of the deep central basin. While the survey region was almost entirely ice free during this cruise, which straddled the ice minimum for 2011, it was not possible to predict this a priori, despite expectations set by the previous five years of ice edge retreat. For this reason, the Canadian Ice Service was engaged to provide interpreted ice imagery, multiple times per day

  18. ASCOS - the "Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjernström, M.; Leck, C.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the effects of clouds on climate still constitute one of the largest challenges and this is perhaps more true in the Arctic than elsewhere. Clouds have the single largest impact on the surface energy budget and thus control a significant fraction of the melting and freezing of sea ice. At the same time, we know less of about cloud formation in the Arctic than elsewhere; this fact is also reflected in modeling results for the Arctic. ASCOS is an interdisciplinary experimental program, with its field phase in the central Arctic onboard the Swedish icebreaker Oden during August and early September 2008; the timing was chosen to bee during the late summer melt and into the intial surface freeze. Within ASCOS seventeen research groups from eleven countries, with fourteen nationalities, came together to attempt understanding the formation of Arctic summer clouds, their impact on summer melt and initiation of the surface freeze up. ASCOS is among the broadest projects in IPY. ASCOS brings marine biology and chemistry, physical oceanography, meteorology, atmospheric gas phase and particulate chemistry and physics into the same experiment to observe aerosols, cloud condensation and ice nuclei formation, cloud formation, interaction between clouds and surface energy balance and with larger scale weather. Observations were performed on board the ice breaker and on the ice during a three week ice drift, by in situ or remote sensing instruments. ASCOS is an IPY program under the umbrella of AICI-IPY, and is affiliated with several other IPY project, and is also a part of DAMOCLESA. The presentation will provide a brief overview of ASCOS and show examples of the benefits of the interdisciplinary and international approach of ASCOS.

  19. Arctic and N Atlantic Crustal Thickness and Oceanic Lithosphere Distribution from Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, Nick; Alvey, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The ocean basins of the Arctic and N. Atlantic formed during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic as a series of distinct ocean basins, both small and large, leading to a complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust and rifted continental margins. The plate tectonic framework of this region was demonstrated by the pioneering work of Peter Ziegler in AAPG Memoir 43 " Evolution of the Arctic-North Atlantic and the Western Tethys" published in 1988. The spatial evolution of Arctic Ocean and N Atlantic ocean basin geometry and bathymetry are critical not only for hydrocarbon exploration but also for understanding regional palaeo-oceanography and ocean gateway connectivity, and its influence on global climate. Mapping crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution represents a substantial challenge for the Polar Regions. Using gravity anomaly inversion we have produced comprehensive maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for the Arctic and N Atlantic region, We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir 2008). Gravity anomaly and bathymetry data used in the gravity inversion are from the NGA (U) Arctic Gravity Project and IBCAO respectively; sediment thickness is from a new regional compilation. The resulting maps of crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor are used to determine continent-ocean boundary location and the distribution of oceanic lithosphere. Crustal cross-sections using Moho depth from the gravity inversion allow continent-ocean transition structure to be determined and magmatic type (magma poor, "normal" or magma rich). Our gravity inversion predicts thin crust and high continental lithosphere thinning factors in the Eurasia, Canada, Makarov, Podvodnikov and Baffin Basins

  20. Quantitative considerations of dissolved barium as a tracer in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John Ryan; Falkner, Kelly Kenison; Schauer, Ursula; Meredith, Mike

    2003-12-01

    Dissolved barium (Ba) was measured along transects across Fram and Denmark Straits as part of the 1998 ARK-XIV/2 Polarstern expedition. Results are combined with other available tracer observations to analyze water mass composition at Fram Strait. A combination of Pacific water and Eurasian river runoff dominated (>80% and >10% of the total mass, respectively) the upper East Greenland Current (EGC), while the remainder of the section was dominated by North Atlantic water. A much smaller contribution of Pacific water to the EGC (≈50%) at Fram Strait in 1987 suggests that this component can be quite variable in time. North American river water was not detectable at Fram Strait in 1998. Presumably, the Eurasian river water we observed at Fram Strait transited eastward along shelf within the Arctic, mixed with Pacific water in the vicinity of the East Siberian Sea, and was borne by the transpolar drift across the Arctic Ocean. In the absence of significant net ice formation along the way such a pathway can be expected to produce more pronounced freshening of the EGC than when Eurasian river water mixes more directly off shelf into salty Atlantic waters and Pacific water is diverted largely through the Canadian archipelago. Existing measurements at the main Arctic gateways were used to construct a Ba budget for the Arctic Ocean under conditions of simultaneous mass, heat, and salt conservation. This preliminary budget is statistically consistent with the steady state hypothesis. On the Arctic basin scale, Ba appears to be conservative.

  1. Arctic Ocean: is it a sink or a source of atmospheric mercury?

    PubMed

    Dastoor, Ashu P; Durnford, Dorothy A

    2014-01-01

    High levels of mercury in marine mammals threaten the health of Arctic inhabitants. Whether the Arctic Ocean (AO) is a sink or a source of atmospheric mercury is unknown. Given the paucity of observations in the Arctic, models are useful in addressing this question. GEOS-Chem and GRAHM, two complex numerical mercury models, present contrasting pictures of atmospheric mercury input to AO at 45 and 108 Mg yr(-1), respectively, and ocean evasion at 90 and 33 Mg yr(-1), respectively. We provide a comprehensive evaluation of GRAHM simulated atmospheric mercury input to AO using mercury observations in air, precipitation and snowpacks, and an analysis of the discrepancy between the two modeling estimates using observations. We discover two peaks in high-latitude summertime concentrations of atmospheric mercury. We show that the first is caused mainly by snowmelt revolatilization and the second by AO evasion of mercury. Riverine mercury export to AO is estimated at 50 Mg yr(-1) based on measured DOC export and at 15.5-31 Mg yr(-1) based on simulated mercury in meltwater. The range of simulated mercury fluxes to and from AO reflects uncertainties in modeling mercury in the Arctic; comprehensive observations in all compartments of the Arctic ecosystem are needed to close the gap.

  2. New wave systems in the "ice-free" future of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Mikhail; Murawski, Jens; Pohlmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Near "ice-free" future of the Arctic Ocean offers new possibilities for maritime activities. Retreat of the sea ice projected in the climate change scenarios in the coming decades will open new ship routes, which potentially can be much more efficient compared to the present days. Nevertheless, it is currently unknown what kind of wave systems will develop under new ice conditions. We investigate the near future of the Arctic wave climate using new projections of wind and ice conditions from the CMIP5 set of experiments. We use the output (wind and ice data) of an Earth system model (EC-Earth) to force a high-resolution Arctic setup of the wave model WAM. The grid of the WAM was rotated ensuring a free propagation of waves over the North Pole. Model results from the historical (spanning the years 1850-2010) and future projections (for the period of 2010-2100) of Earth's climate will be presented. We investigate the changes in the wave systems of the Arctic Ocean under future sea ice conditions. We show that the region will develop new patterns in wave regimes including the generation of the Arctic swell and the new surfing zones along the coastal line.

  3. Highlights from a decade of Ice-Tethered Profiler measurements of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, M. L. E.; Toole, J. M.; Krishfield, R. A.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.; Cole, S. T.; Laney, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Intensive sampling from drifting autonomous Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) systems since 2004 has brought new understanding to Arctic Ocean structure and dynamics, ocean heat and mixing processes, circulation and eddies, and seasonal characteristics of under-ice biological activity. This talk will review highlights of ITP studies, and demonstrate the value of the year-round water-column measurements extending from beneath the sea ice to 750 m depth across the major Arctic basins. ITP profiles show the detailed distribution of upper-ocean freshwater and heat content over the past decade, including the changing influence of Pacific and Atlantic-origin layers. ITPs allow for assessment of vertical fluxes of deep-ocean heat in context with the strong upper-ocean density stratification, while in the surface ocean ITPs equipped with velocity sensors provide turbulent ocean-to-ice fluxes. All upper-ocean layers exhibit a rich mesoscale eddy field, and ITP measurements also reveal an active surface-layer submesoscale flow field, with scales of a few kilometers or less. ITPs equipped with bio-optical sensors have returned the first year-round measurements under sea ice of biomass related to phytoplankton and sea-ice algae in the upper-water column, establishing important regional differences in the seasonal cycle and relationships to temperature and salinity variability.

  4. Optical characterization of dissolved organic matter in the Amazon River Plume and the adjacent deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F.; Medeiros, P. M.; Miller, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Amazon River is the largest river in the world and a major source of terrestrially-derived organic matter to the Atlantic Ocean, accounting for ~ 20% of the global freshwater discharge. To document the quantity and quality of the colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Amazon River Plume (ARP), the optical properties (absorption and fluorescence intensity) of the CDOM were investigated in water samples collected during two cruises conducted at periods of low (Sep/2011) and high (Jul/2012) river discharge. Excitation emission matrix fluoresces combined with parallel factor analysis (EEMS-PARAFAC) was used to determine the composition of the CDOM, and four components were identified: two terrestrial humic-like components (C1 and C4), one marine humic-like component (C3), and one autochthonous tryptophan-like component (C2). This agrees with results of mass spectrometry analysis that showed a distinction among DOM composition found in river, plume, and open ocean water. Correlation analysis between the fluorescence components and salinity in the ARP suggests that humic-like fluorescent components can be used to trace DOM mixing behavior in the ARP and adjacent waters.

  5. Ecosystem model intercomparison of under-ice and total primary production in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Meibing; Popova, Ekaterina E.; Zhang, Jinlun; Ji, Rubao; Pendleton, Daniel; Varpe, Øystein; Yool, Andrew; Lee, Younjoo J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous observational studies have found increasing primary production (PP) in response to declining sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean. In this study, under-ice PP was assessed based on three coupled ice-ocean-ecosystem models participating in the Forum for Arctic Modeling and Observational Synthesis (FAMOS) project. All models showed good agreement with under-ice measurements of surface chlorophyll-a concentration and vertically integrated PP rates during the main under-ice production period, from mid-May to September. Further, modeled 30-year (1980-2009) mean values and spatial patterns of sea ice concentration compared well with remote sensing data. Under-ice PP was higher in the Arctic shelf seas than in the Arctic Basin, but ratios of under-ice PP over total PP were spatially correlated with annual mean sea ice concentration, with higher ratios in higher ice concentration regions. Decreases in sea ice from 1980 to 2009 were correlated significantly with increases in total PP and decreases in the under-ice PP/total PP ratio for most of the Arctic, but nonsignificantly related to under-ice PP, especially in marginal ice zones. Total PP within the Arctic Circle increased at an annual rate of between 3.2 and 8.0 Tg C/yr from 1980 to 2009. This increase in total PP was due mainly to a PP increase in open water, including increases in both open water area and PP rate per unit area, and therefore much stronger than the changes in under-ice PP. All models suggested that, on a pan-Arctic scale, the fraction of under-ice PP declined with declining sea ice cover over the last three decades.

  6. Multimodel simulations of Arctic Ocean sea surface height variability in the period 1970-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldunov, Nikolay V.; Serra, Nuno; Köhl, Armin; Stammer, Detlef; Henry, Olivier; Cazenave, Anny; Prandi, Pierre; Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Gao, Yongqi; Johannessen, Johnny

    2014-12-01

    The performance of several numerical ocean models is assessed with respect to their simulation of sea surface height (SSH) in the Arctic Ocean, and the main patterns of SSH variability and their causes over the past 40 years (1970-2009) are analyzed. In comparison to observations, all tested models broadly reproduce the mean SSH in the Arctic and reveal a good correlation with both tide gauge data and SSH anomalies derived from satellite observations. Although the models do not represent the positive Arctic SSH trend observed over the last two decades, their interannual-to-decadal SSH variability is in reasonable agreement with available measurements. Focusing on results from one of the models for a detailed analysis, it is shown that the decadal-scale SSH variability over shelf areas and deep parts of the Arctic Ocean have pronounced differences that are determined mostly by salinity variations. A further analysis of the three time periods 1987-1992, 1993-2002, and 2003-2009, corresponding to the transition times between cyclonic and anticyclonic regimes of the atmospheric circulation over the Arctic, revealed an unusual increase of SSH in the Amerasian basin during 2003-2009. Results from this model support the recent finding that the increase is caused mainly by changes in freshwater content brought about by the freshwater export through the Canadian Arctic Archiplago and increased Ekman pumping in the Amerasian basin and partly by lateral freshwater transport changes, leading to a redistribution of low-salinity shelf water. Overall, we show that present-day models can be used for investigating the reasons for low-frequency SSH variability in the region.

  7. Global variability of chromium isotopes in seawater demonstrated by Pacific, Atlantic, and Arctic Ocean samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiderich, Kathleen; Amini, Marghaleray; Holmden, Chris; Francois, Roger

    2015-08-01

    Seawater chromium (Cr) isotope and concentration data are presented from multiple sites in the Arctic Ocean, and three locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. A 2400-m profile illustrates the heterogeneity of δ53Cr in the Arctic Ocean with depth and water-mass source (Pacific vs. Atlantic). The highest δ53Cr values occur in Pacific-sourced waters, which also have the lowest Cr concentration. Chromium concentration and δ53Cr data from these locations, in conjunction with published data for the South Atlantic Ocean, yield a simple logarithmic function, as predicted by Rayleigh fractionation in a closed system. The observed Cr isotope signature is hypothesized to arise from fractionation during the reduction of Cr(VI) in surface waters and oxygen minimum zones, scavenging of isotopically light Cr(III) to deeper water and sediment, and subsequent release of this seawater-derived Cr(III) back into seawater, either as organic complexes with Cr(III) or after oxidation to Cr(VI). The isotopic fractionation factor (ε) associated with Cr cycling in seawater is estimated to be - 0.80 ± 0.03 ‰ (2 σ). Samples from the sea-ice affected Surface Mixed Layer of the Arctic Ocean (∼10 m depth) deviate from the general trend, and samples proximal to rivers illustrate geographic variation in δ53Cr values for continental runoff, but prompt loss of this signature away from the source.

  8. Composition of Eocene Ice-Rafted Debris, Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstad, C.; St. John, K.

    2007-12-01

    IODP Expedition 302 drilled a 400-m sediment record which contains physical evidence of ice-rafting in the Eocene and Neogene in the Arctic (Backman et al., 2006; Moran et al., 2006, St. John, in press). An increase in the terrigenous sand abundance occurs above 246 mcd (~46 Ma), with a flux similar to that in the Neogene. Higher resolution sampling in an interval of good recovery from 246-236 mcd shows evidence of cyclic input of IRD and biogenic components that fits with Milankovitch forcing at the obliquity period (Sangiorgi et al., in press). The question remains - what areas of the Arctic were ice-covered at this early stage in the Cenozoic? To address this provenance issue the composition of the terrigenous sands (250 micron fraction) in cores 55-56X is being quantified. Grains in 75 samples are being point-counted and their compositions categorized. Quartz grains are the dominant component (greater than 10,000 grains per gram), with some being hematite-stained, and there are lesser amounts of mafic minerals. No carbonate grains are identified so far in this study. Possible sources areas for Eocene IRD are the Eastern European and Russian Arctic margins. Tracking compositional variations of the IRD over the interval of cyclic deposition, should indicate whether the cyclic IRD deposition was consistently derived from one source region or multiple regions during this time.

  9. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-07-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L‑1 were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and 234Th/238U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of 234Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on 234Th/238U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was ‑0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m‑3 d‑1 (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m‑3 d‑1. Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC.

  10. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L(-1) were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and (234)Th/(238)U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of (234)Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on (234)Th/(238)U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was -0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m(-3) d(-1) (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m(-3) d(-1). Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC. PMID:27417410

  11. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-07-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L-1 were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and 234Th/238U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of 234Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on 234Th/238U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was -0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m-3 d-1 (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m-3 d-1. Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC.

  12. Two regimes of the Arctic's circulation from ocean models with ice and contaminants.

    PubMed

    Proshutinsky, A Y; Johnson, M

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional barotropic, coupled, ocean-ice model with a space resolution of 55.5 km and driven by atmospheric forces, river run-off, and sea-level slope between the Pacific and the Arctic Oceans, has been used to simulate the vertically averaged currents and ice drift in the Arctic Ocean. Results from 43 years of numerical simulations of water and ice motions demonstrate that two wind-driven circulation regimes are possible in the Arctic, a cyclonic and an anti-cyclonic circulation. These two regimes appear to alternate at 5-7 year intervals with the 10-15 year period. It is important to pollution studies to understand which circulation regime prevails at any time. It is anticipated that 1995 is a year with a cyclonic regime, and during this cyclonic phase and possibly during past cyclonic regimes as well, pollutants may reach the Alaskan shelf. The regime shifts demonstrated in this paper are fundamentally important to understanding the Arctic's general circulation and particularly important for estimating pollution transport. PMID:11601534

  13. Abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ziming; Yang, Weifeng; Chen, Min; Zheng, Minfang; Hu, Wangjiang

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and sinking of particulate black carbon (PBC) were examined for the first time in the western Arctic and Subarctic Oceans. In the central Arctic Ocean, high PBC concentrations with a mean of 0.021 ± 0.016 μmol L−1 were observed in the marginal ice zone (MIZ). A number of parameters, including temperature, salinity and 234Th/238U ratios, indicated that both the rapid release of atmospherically deposited PBC on sea ice and a slow sinking rate were responsible for the comparable PBC concentrations between the MIZ and mid-latitudinal Pacific Ocean (ML). On the Chukchi and Bering Shelves (CBS), PBC concentrations were also comparable to those obtained in the ML. Further, significant deficits of 234Th revealed the rapid sinking of PBC on the CBS. These results implied additional source terms for PBC in addition to atmospheric deposition and fluvial discharge on the western Arctic shelves. Based on 234Th/238U disequilibria, the net sinking rate of PBC out of the surface water was −0.8 ± 2.5 μmol m−3 d−1 (mean ± s.d.) in the MIZ. In contrast, on the shelves, the average sinking rate of PBC was 6.1 ± 4.6 μmol m−3 d−1. Thus, the western Arctic Shelf was probably an effective location for burying PBC. PMID:27417410

  14. High variability of atmospheric mercury in the summertime boundary layer through the central Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Juan; Xie, Zhouqing; Kang, Hui; Li, Zheng; Sun, Chen; Bian, Lingen; Zhang, Pengfei

    2014-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of mercury in the Arctic springtime have been intensively investigated due to mercury being rapidly removed from the atmosphere. However, the behavior of mercury in the Arctic summertime is still poorly understood. Here we report the characteristics of total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations through the central Arctic Ocean from July to September, 2012. The TGM concentrations varied considerably (from 0.15 ng/m3 to 4.58 ng/m3), and displayed a normal distribution with an average of 1.23 ± 0.61 ng/m3. The highest frequency range was 1.0–1.5 ng/m3, lower than previously reported background values in the Northern Hemisphere. Inhomogeneous distributions were observed over the Arctic Ocean due to the effect of sea ice melt and/or runoff. A lower level of TGM was found in July than in September, potentially because ocean emission was outweighed by chemical loss. PMID:25125264

  15. Arctic contribution to upper-ocean variability in the North Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, John E.; Chapman, William L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential climatic leverage of salinity and temperature anomalies in the high-latitude North Atlantic is large. Substantial variations of sea ice have accompanied North Atlantic salinity and temperature anomalies. Atmospheric pressure data are used here to show that the local forcing of high-latitude North Atlantic Ocean fluctuations is augmented by antecedent atmospheric circulation anomalies over the central Arctic. These circulation anomalies are consistent with enhanced wind-forcing of thicker older ice into the Transpolar Drift Stream and an enhanced export of sea ice (fresh water) from the Arctic into the Greenland Sea prior to major episodes of ice severity in the Greenland and Iceland seas.

  16. TOPAZ4: an ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic and Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakov, P.; Counillon, F.; Bertino, L.; Lisæter, K. A.; Oke, P. R.; Korablev, A.

    2012-08-01

    We present a detailed description of TOPAZ4, the latest version of TOPAZ - a coupled ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic Ocean and Arctic. It is the only operational, large-scale ocean data assimilation system that uses the ensemble Kalman filter. This means that TOPAZ features a time-evolving, state-dependent estimate of the state error covariance. Based on results from the pilot MyOcean reanalysis for 2003-2008, we demonstrate that TOPAZ4 produces a realistic estimate of the ocean circulation in the North Atlantic and the sea-ice variability in the Arctic. We find that the ensemble spread for temperature and sea-level remains fairly constant throughout the reanalysis demonstrating that the data assimilation system is robust to ensemble collapse. Moreover, the ensemble spread for ice concentration is well correlated with the actual errors. This indicates that the ensemble statistics provide reliable state-dependent error estimates - a feature that is unique to ensemble-based data assimilation systems. We demonstrate that the quality of the reanalysis changes when different sea surface temperature products are assimilated, or when in-situ profiles below the ice in the Arctic Ocean are assimilated. We find that data assimilation improves the match to independent observations compared to a free model. Improvements are particularly noticeable for ice thickness, salinity in the Arctic, and temperature in the Fram Strait, but not for transport estimates or underwater temperature. At the same time, the pilot reanalysis has revealed several flaws in the system that have degraded its performance. Finally, we show that a simple bias estimation scheme can effectively detect the seasonal or constant bias in temperature and sea-level.

  17. The Eurasian and Makarov Basins target changes in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, I.; Padman, L.; Pnyushkov, A.; Rember, R.; Ivanov, V.; Lenn, Y. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean interior is warming, and there is no indication that the rate of warming will decrease in the near future. The relative role of the interior ocean's warmth in setting net energy flux to, and the mass balance of, Arctic sea ice, however, is still under debate. Thus, quantifying this flux and understanding mechanisms for redistributing heat in the ocean interior are of particular importance. Warm (>0°C) intermediate-depth (150-900m) water of Atlantic origin (the so-called Atlantic Water, AW) is the major source of heat for the ocean interior. Ice thickness along the continental slope east of Svalbard is much less than that expected of first-year ice, suggesting that AW has a direct impact on sea ice just after entering the Arctic. However, in the Canadian Basin, far away from Fram Strait, overlying fresher and colder stable layers effectively insulate the upper mixed layer and ice from impacts of the AW heat. Even though the eastern Eurasian Basin (EEB) is separated from Fram Strait by hundreds of kilometers, the AW heat finds its ways for reaching the ice base in this part of the Arctic Ocean. A distinct process, double diffusion convection, plays an important role in vertical redistribution of AW heat in this region. Double diffusion convection is typically identified as a vertical sequence of almost-homogeneous convective layers separated by high-gradient interfaces, forming a double diffusive "staircase". The staircase structure is a consequence of the differing molecular diffusivities of heat and salt; surprisingly, even though molecular properties drive the instability, resulting net fluxes can be very large, up to several W/m2. The interaction of shear and diffusive layering can significantly alter the heat (and momentum) flux through a staircase. The existing data set are limited and further detailed process studies in the EEB targeting the unique mechanisms of oceanic heat exchange in the interior of the EEB are required.

  18. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in the Arctic Ocean and Antarctic coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Kalanetra, Karen M; Bano, Nasreen; Hollibaugh, James T

    2009-09-01

    We compared abundance, distributions and phylogenetic composition of Crenarchaeota and ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) in samples collected from coastal waters west of the Antarctic Peninsula during the summers of 2005 and 2006, with samples from the central Arctic Ocean collected during the summer of 1997. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Crenarchaeota abundances were estimated from quantitative PCR measurements of amoA and 16S rRNA gene abundances. Crenarchaeota and AOA were approximately fivefold more abundant at comparable depths in the Antarctic versus the Arctic Ocean. Crenarchaeota and AOA were essentially absent from the Antarctic Summer Surface Water (SSW) water mass (0-45 m depth). The ratio of Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA to archaeal amoA gene abundance in the Winter Water (WW) water mass (45-105 m depth) of the Southern Ocean was much lower (0.15) than expected and in sharp contrast to the ratio (2.0) in the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) water mass (105-3500 m depth) immediately below it. We did not observe comparable segregation of this ratio by depth or water mass in Arctic Ocean samples. A ubiquitous, abundant and polar-specific crenarchaeote was the dominant ribotype in the WW and important in the upper halocline of the Arctic Ocean. Our data suggest that this organism does not contain an ammonia monooxygenase gene. In contrast to other studies where Crenarchaeota populations apparently lacking amoA genes are found in bathypelagic waters, this organism appears to dominate in well-defined, ammonium-rich, near-surface water masses in polar oceans. PMID:19601959

  19. Distribution of benthic foraminifers (>125 um) in the surface sediments of the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Poore, Richard Z.; Foley, Kevin M.

    1999-01-01

    Census data on benthic foraminifers (>125 ?m) in surface sediment samples from 49 box cores are used to define four depth-controlled biofacies, which will aid in the paleoceanographic reconstruction of the Arctic Ocean. The shelf biofacies contains a mix of shallow-water calcareous and agglutinated species from the continental shelves of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas and reflects the variable sedimentologic and oceanic conditions of the Arctic shelves. The intermediate-depth calcareous biofacies, found between 500 and 1,100 meters water depth (mwd), contains abundant Cassidulina teretis , presumably indicating the influence of Atlantic-derived water at this depth. In water depths between 1,100 and 3,500 m, a deepwater calcareous biofacies contains abundant Oridorsalis umbonatus . Below 3,500 mwd, the deepwater mixed calcareous/agglutinated biofacies of the Canada, Makarov, and Eurasian Basins reflects a combination of low productivity, dissolution, and sediment transport. Two other benthic foraminiferal species show specific environmental preferences. Fontbotia wuellerstorfi has a depth distribution between 900 and 3,500 mwd, but maximum abundance occurs in the region of the Mendeleyev Ridge. The elevated abundance of F. wuellerstorfi may be related to increased food supply carried by a branch of Atlantic water that crosses the Lomonosov Ridge near the Russian Continental Shelf. Triloculina frigida is recognized to be a species preferring lower slope sediments commonly disturbed by turbidites and bottom currents. INTRODUCTION At present, our understanding of the Arctic Ocean lags behind our understanding of other oceans, and fundamental questions still exist about its role in and response to global climate change. The Arctic Ocean is particularly sensitive to climatic fluctuations because small changes in the amounts of sea-ice cover can alter global albedo and thermohaline circulation (Aagaard and Carmack, 1994). Numerous questions still exist regarding the nature

  20. Pathways and modification of the upper and intermediate waters of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcher, Michael J.; Oberhuber, Josef M.

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the pathways and the ventilation of source water masses of the upper and intermediate waters of the Arctic Ocean. For the Arctic and subarctic domain a coupled ice-ocean general circulation model is set up to be integrated for several decades. It is driven by a climatological seasonal cycle of monthly mean atmospheric data from 1980 to 1989 and by restored sea surface salinities. Passive tracers are used to visualize and interpret the modeled flow and to compare it with observations. The model is able to reproduce known features of the Arctic Ocean circulation like the inflow of two branches of Atlantic origin via the Fram Strait and the Barents Sea and their subsequent passage at middepths in several cyclonic circulation cells. The fate of these Atlantic source water masses, river water, and Bering Strait inflow water in the model are studied. The branch crossing the Barents Sea is subject to an intense heat loss and ice formation. As a result, water of this branch leaves the shelf toward the central part of the Arctic Ocean not only at the surface but also in denser varieties, which finally feed the central Arctic at halocline and middepths. The lightest part turns northward and finally westward joining the Transpolar Drift; the densest part (200-1000 m depth) moves eastward along the continental slope. A similar path is taken by the Atlantic water branch from the Fram Strait. The inflowing branch over the Barents Sea turns out to be the dominant source for the lower Atlantic Water layer in the Arctic Ocean in this investigation. Atlantic tracers starting in Fram Strait need 6 years to reach the northern Laptev Sea slope. Travel times to return to Fram Strait are 15-20 years along the Lomonossov Ridge and about 30 years along the continental slope of the Canadian Basin. Tracers that mark the Pacific Water or the Mackenzie River Water flow eastward and leave the Arctic mainly via the Canadian Archipelago. The Siberian

  1. Optical Characterisation of Suspended Particles in the Mackenzie River Plume (Canadian Arctic Ocean) and Implications for Ocean Colour Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxaran, D.; Ehn, J.; Belanger, S.; Matsuoka, A.; Hooker, S.; Babin, M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change significantly impacts Arctic shelf regions in terms of air temperature, ultraviolet radiation, melting of sea ice, precipitation, thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion. Direct consequences have been observed on the increasing Arctic river flow and a large amount of organic carbon sequestered in soils at high latitudes since the last glacial maximum can be expected to be delivered to the Arctic Ocean during the coming decade. Monitoring the fluxes and fate of this terrigenous organic carbon is problematic in such sparsely populated regions unless remote sensing techniques can be developed and proved to be operational. The main objective of this study is to develop an ocean colour algorithm to operationally monitor dynamics of suspended particulate matter (SPM) on the Mackenzie River continental shelf (Canadian Arctic Ocean) using satellite imagery. The water optical properties are documented across the study area and related to concentrations of SPM and particulate organic carbon (POC). Robust SPM and POC : SPM proxies are identified, such as the light backscattering and attenuation coefficients, and relationships are established between these optical and biogeochemical parameters. Following a semi-analytical approach, a regional SPM quantification relationship is obtained for the inversion of the water reflectance signal into SPM concentration. This relationship is reproduced based on independent field optical measurements. It is successfully applied to a selection of MODIS satellite data which allow estimating fluxes at the river mouth and monitoring the extension and dynamics of the Mackenzie River surface plume in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Good agreement is obtained with field observations representative of the whole water column in the river delta zone where terrigenous SPM is mainly constrained (out of short periods of maximum river outflow). Most of the seaward export of SPM is observed to occur within the west side of the river mouth. Future

  2. Optical characterisation of suspended particles in the Mackenzie River plume (Canadian Arctic Ocean) and implications for ocean colour remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxaran, D.; Ehn, J.; Bélanger, S.; Matsuoka, A.; Hooker, S.; Babin, M.

    2012-08-01

    Climate change significantly impacts Arctic shelf regions in terms of air temperature, ultraviolet radiation, melting of sea ice, precipitation, thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion. Direct consequences have been observed on the increasing Arctic river flow and a large amount of organic carbon sequestered in soils at high latitudes since the last glacial maximum can be expected to be delivered to the Arctic Ocean during the coming decade. Monitoring the fluxes and fate of this terrigenous organic carbon is problematic in such sparsely populated regions unless remote sensing techniques can be developed and proved to be operational. The main objective of this study is to develop an ocean colour algorithm to operationally monitor dynamics of suspended particulate matter (SPM) on the Mackenzie River continental shelf (Canadian Arctic Ocean) using satellite imagery. The water optical properties are documented across the study area and related to concentrations of SPM and particulate organic carbon (POC). Robust SPM and POC : SPM proxies are identified, such as the light backscattering and attenuation coefficients, and relationships are established between these optical and biogeochemical parameters. Following a semi-analytical approach, a regional SPM quantification relationship is obtained for the inversion of the water reflectance signal into SPM concentration. This relationship is reproduced based on independent field optical measurements. It is successfully applied to a selection of MODIS satellite data which allow estimating fluxes at the river mouth and monitoring the extension and dynamics of the Mackenzie River surface plume in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Good agreement is obtained with field observations representative of the whole water column in the river delta zone where terrigenous SPM is mainly constrained (out of short periods of maximum river outflow). Most of the seaward export of SPM is observed to occur within the west side of the river mouth. Future

  3. Influence of Sea Ice on the Thermohaline Circulation in the Arctic-North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauritzen, Cecilie; Haekkinen, Sirpa

    1997-01-01

    A fully prognostic coupled ocean-ice model is used to study the sensitivity of the overturning cell of the Arctic-North-Atlantic system to sea ice forcing. The strength of the thermohaline cell will be shown to depend on the amount of sea ice transported from the Arctic to the Greenland Sea and further to the subpolar gyre. The model produces a 2-3 Sv increase of the meridional circulation cell at 25N (at the simulation year 15) corresponding to a decrease of 800 cu km in the sea ice export from the Arctic. Previous modeling studies suggest that interannual and decadal variability in sea ice export of this magnitude is realistic, implying that sea ice induced variability in the overturning cell can reach 5-6 Sv from peak to peak.

  4. Microalgae on the arctic ocean section, 1994: species abundance and biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Beatrice C.; Horner, Rita A.

    Algal species from the ice, the water directly below the ice (the sub-ice area), and the water column from 21 stations in the Arctic Ocean were examined using epifluorescence and inverted light microscopy. Biomass of autotrophic dinoflagellates and other miscellaneous autotrophic flagellates was determined for the first time in the central Arctic basins. Together these two groups dominated phytoplankton biomass in 74% of samples from the central Arctic, with diatom biomass predominant in the remainder. Picophytoplankton at selected stations in the Canada and Makarov Basins contributed 93% to autotroph cell numbers and 36% to autotroph biomass. Diatom species achieved high biomass in ice and sub-ice samples. The centric diatom Melosira arctica dominated the sub-ice area, while pennate diatoms were major contributors to the ice samples. Despite ample silicate concentrations in the water, diatom frustules were often lightly silicified.

  5. Late Cenozoic Arctic Ocean sea ice and terrestrial paleoclimate.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.D.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Marincovich, L., Jr.; Pease, V.L.; Hillhouse, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Sea otter remains found in deposits of two marine transgressions (Bigbendian and Fishcreekian) of the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain which occurred between 2.4 and 3 Ma suggest that during these two events the southern limit of seasonal sea ice was at least 1600 km farther north than at present in Alaskan waters. Perennial sea ice must have been severely restricted or absent, and winters were warmer than at present during these two sea-level highstands. Paleomagnetic, faunal, and palynological data indicate that the later transgression (Fishcreekian) occurred during the early part of the Matuyama Reversed-Polarity Chron. -from Authors

  6. Ozone in the Boundary Layer air over the Arctic Ocean - measurements during the TARA expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J. W.; Netcheva, S.; Morin, S.; Nghiem, S. V.

    2009-03-01

    A full year of measurements of surface ozone over the Arctic Ocean far removed from land is presented (81° N - 88° N latitude). The data were obtained during the drift of the French schooner TARA between September 2006 and January 2008, while frozen in the Arctic Ocean. The data confirm that long periods of virtually total absence of ozone occur in the spring (mid March to mid June) after Polar sunrise. At other times of the year ozone concentrations are comparable to other oceanic observations with winter mole fractions of ca. 30-40 nmol mol-1 and summer minima of ca. 20 nmol mol-1. Contrary to earlier observations from ozone sonde data obtained at Arctic coastal observatories, the ambient temperature was well above -20°C during most ODEs (ozone depletion episodes). Backwards trajectory calculations suggest that during these ODEs the air had previously been in contact with the frozen ocean surface for several days and originated largely from the Siberian coast where several large open flaw leads developed in the spring of 2007.

  7. Amino acid epimerization implies rapid sedimentation rates in Arctic Ocean cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sejrup, H.P.; Miller, G.H.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Lovlie, R.; Hopkins, D.

    1984-01-01

    The palaeooceanography of the Arctic Ocean is less well known than any other ocean basin, due to difficulties in obtaining cores and in providing a secure chronological framework for those cores that have been raised. Most recent investigators have suggested that low sedimentation rates (0.05-0.1 cm kyr-1) have characterized the deep basins over the past 5 Myr (refs 1,2) despite the glacial-marine character of the sediment and proximity to major centres of shelf glaciation. These calculations have been primarily based on the down-core pattern in the inclination of magnetic minerals, supported by uranium-series, 14C and micropalaeontological evidence. Here we analyse amino acid diagnesis in foraminifera from two gravity cores raised from the floor of the Arctic Ocean, our results suggest that these cores span <200 kyr., conflicting with the earlier estimate of 3 Myr based on palaeomagnetic data. The chronology of other Arctic Ocean cores and previous palaeoenvironmental interpretations need re-evaluation. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  8. Contribution of the Greenland and Barents Seas to the deep water of the Arctic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, J.H.; Takahashi, T.; Livingston, H.D.

    1983-07-20

    The deep waters of the Artic Ocean are traditionally held to be fed by a influx of Norwegian Sea Deep Water (NSDW) via the northward flowing West Spitsbergen Current. Discrete sample and CTD observations obtained from the Greenland-Spitsbergen Passage in August 1981 during the Transient Tracers in the Ocean (TTO) North Atlantic expedition showed a roughly-equal100-m-thick layer of modified Greenland Sea Deep Water (GSDW: colder and fresher than NSDW) at 2500 m, spreading northward along the bottom of a deep, unimpeded channel, underneath the NSDW. Since the available data indicate that Arctic Ocean Deep Water (AODW) has a higher salinity than NSDW, mixing of NSDW and GSDW can not produce AODW. Therefore, other sources, such as the peripheral arctic shelf seas, must contribute dense saline water to the Arctic Ocean. Concentrations of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr observed in AODW are greater than those observed in GSDW and NSDW. The concentrations of these radionuclides on the Barents Sea shelf are sufficiently high and in the correct relative proportions to support this proposition.

  9. Variation of atmospheric carbon monoxide over the Arctic Ocean during summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keyhong; Siek Rhee, Tae; Emmons, Louisa

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) plays an important role in ozone-related chemistry in the troposphere, especially under low-NOx conditions like the open ocean. During summer 2012, we performed a continuous high-resolution (0.1Hz) shipboard measurement of atmospheric CO over the Arctic Ocean. We also simulated the observation using a 3-D global chemical transport model (the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers-4; MOZART-4) for further analysis of the observed results. In the model, tags for each sources and emission regions of CO are applied and this enables us to delineate the source composition of the observations. Along with the observed variation of CO concentration during the research cruise, we will present in detailed analysis of the variation of source components and change of regional contributions. We found large (~80ppbv) variation of CO concentration in the Arctic Ocean which is mostly influenced by the variation of biomass burning activity. The contribution of anthropogenic emission is limited over the Arctic Ocean, although the northeast Asian anthropogenic emission shows a dominant component of transported anthropogenic CO. Also, our analysis shows, near the Bering Strait, Europe is the main emission region for anthropogenic CO.

  10. An assessment of the transport of atmospheric CO sub 2 into the Arctic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.G.; Dyrssen, D. ); Jones, E.P. )

    1990-02-15

    Data on concentration of total carbonate together with calcium, total alkalinity, salinity, and temperature from the Canadian Expedition to Study the Alpha Ridge (CESAR) Ice Camp, the Ymer 80 expedition and the 1984 F.S. Polarstern Marginal Ice Zone Experiment (MIZEX 84) are used to assess the transport of CO{sub 2} into the different water masses of the Arctic Ocean. Most of this CO{sub 2} goes into the surface mixed layer and halocline waters. A small flux to the Atlantic layer is discernible. No flux to the deep water could be observed. It is possible to separate the carbon input to the Arctic Ocean into three components: carbon from the atmosphere fixed in river drainage basins (40 {plus minus} 20 {times} 10{sup 12} g C/yr), carbon from dissolved mineral calcium carbonate in river drainage basins (40 {plus minus} 20 {times} 10{sup 12} g C/yr), and carbon from the atmosphere fixed over the continental shelves (129 {plus minus} 65 {times} 10{sup 12} g C/yr). From these, the authors estimate the transport of decayed organic carbon from the tundra to the Atlantic Ocean and the new production of 45 {plus minus} 20 g C/m{sup 2}yr for biogenic carbon over the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean.

  11. Atmospheric response to Arctic sea ice loss moderated by (multi-) decadal ocean variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Screen, J.; Francis, J. A.; Osborne, J. M.; Collins, M.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that ongoing reductions of Arctic sea ice may affect various aspects of Northern Hemisphere weather and climate. Many of these linkages have been hypothesized based on statistical associations found in observations; however, it is difficult to unambiguously assign causality and to separate the influences of multiple interconnected processes in the climate system using observations alone. Modeling studies offer a way forward for understanding and isolating the physical processes underlying observed relationships. The atmospheric response to Arctic sea ice loss is often estimated through atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations with prescribed sea ice and sea surface temperature (SST) conditions. Typically, global SSTs are held to climatological-mean values. It is well known however, that (multi-) decadal ocean variability has a strong influence on the mean atmospheric state and thus, the atmospheric response to sea ice loss may be sensitive to the phase of (multi-) decadal ocean variability (i.e., be state dependent). Here we explore the atmospheric response to Arctic sea ice loss under different phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), using 8 ensembles of AGCM simulations; with extensive and reduced Arctic sea ice applied alongside PDO-, PDO+, AMO- and AMO+ SST anomalies. Preliminary analyses suggest, amongst other things: 1) an enhanced Arctic winter warming response during PDO- compared to PDO+; and 2) during AMO- sea ice loss forces a wintertime ridge-trough pattern over North America, with warmer conditions over the west and colder conditions over the east, compared to the response to identical sea ice loss during AMO+. The largest observed losses of Arctic sea ice have occurred since ~2000 during predominantly PDO- and AMO+. The possible implications of the recent switch to PDO+ in 2014, and an eventual return to AMO+ in coming decades, will be discussed.

  12. Benthic macrofaunal production for a typical shelf-slope-basin region in the western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heshan; Wang, Jianjun; Liu, Kun; He, Xuebao; Lin, Junhui; Huang, Yaqin; Zhang, Shuyi; Mou, Jianfeng; Zheng, Chengxing; Wang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    Secondary production by macrofaunal communities in the western Arctic Ocean were quantified during the 4th and 5th Chinese Arctic Scientific Expeditions. The total production and P/B ratio for each sector ranged from 3.8 (±7.9) to 615.6 (±635.5) kJ m-2 yr-1 and 0.5 (± 0.2) to 0.7 (± 0.2) yr-1, respectively. The shallow shelves in the western Arctic Ocean exhibited particularly high production (178.7-615.6 kJ m-2 yr-1), particularly in the two "hotspots" - the southern and northeastern (around Barrow Canyon) Chukchi Sea. Benthic macrofaunal production decreased sharply with depth and latitude along a shelf-slope-basin transect, with values of 17.0-269.8 kJ m-2 yr-1 in slope regions and 3.8-10.1 kJ m-2 yr-1 in basins. Redundancy analysis indicated that hydrological characteristics (depth, bottom temperature and salinity) and granulometric parameters (mean particle size, % sand and % clay) show significant positive/negative correlations with total production. These correlations revealed that the dominant factors influencing benthic production are the habitat type and food supply from the overlying water column. In the Arctic, the extreme environmental conditions and low temperature constrain macrofaunal metabolic processes, such that food and energy are primarily used to increase body mass rather than for reproduction. Hence, energy turnover is relatively low at high latitudes. These data further our understanding of benthic production processes and ecosystem dynamics in the context of rapid climate change in the western Arctic Ocean.

  13. On the Flow of Atlantic Water Towards the Arctic Ocean; a Synergy Between Altimetry and Hydrography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chafik, L.; Nilsson, J.; Skagseth, O.; Lundberg, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic climate is strongly influenced by the inflow of warm Atlantic water conveyed by the Norwegian Atlantic Slope Current (NwASC); the main heat conveyor into the Arctic Ocean. Based on sea surface height (SSH) data from altimetry, we develop a dynamical measure of the NwASC transport to diagnose its spatio-temporal variability. This supports a dynamical division of the NwASC into two flow regimes; the Svinøy Branch (SvB) in the Norwegian Sea, and the Fram Strait Branch (FSB) west of Spitsbergen. The SvB transport is well correlated with the SSH and atmospheric variability within the Nordic Seas, factors that also affect the inflow to the Barents Sea. In contrast, the FSB is regulated by regional atmospheric patterns around Svalbard and northern Barents Sea. We further relate anomalous flow events to temperature fluctuations of Atlantic water. A warm anomaly is found to propagate northwards, with a tendency to amplify enroute, after events of strong flow in the Norwegian Sea. A roughly 12-months delayed temperature signal is identified in the FSB. This suggests that hydrographic anomalies both upstream from the North Atlantic, and locally generated in the Norwegian Sea, are important for the oceanic heat and salt transport that eventually enters into the Arctic. We believe that the combination of the flow from altimetry and temperature fluctuations in the Nordic Seas can be used to qualitatively predict warm anomalies towards the Arctic Ocean, which could be a valuable addition to the forecast skill of the statistical Arctic sea-ice models.

  14. Propagation of the MIS4 Eurasian Meltwater Event in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyak, L. V.; Spielhagen, R. F.; Norgaard-Pedersen, N.; Curry, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment records from the Arctic Ocean indicate multiple Pleistocene meltwater events from Eurasian and North American ice sheets. These events may have affected both the Arctic climate and the North Atlantic deep-water formation, and are important for understanding the stability of Pleistocene ice sheets. We investigate the distribution of meltwater during the discharge of large Eurasian proglacial lakes at the end of Marine Isotope Stage 4, approximately 50-60 ka, using stable isotope records in planktic and benthic foraminifers. Studies focused on lithological and radiogenic isotope proxies suggest that this meltwater pulse affected sedimentation in the Eurasian Basin all the way to the Lomonosov Ridge and at least part of the Amerasian Basin (Mendeleev Ridge). The analysis of stable-isotope data provides further insights. The spatial distribution of planktonic oxygen-18, with the lightest values in the Mendeleev Ridge area, reveals a strong cyclonic circulation extending into the western Arctic Ocean, similar to the negative Arctic Oscillation mode. This circulation pattern differs from that inferred from lithostratigraphy and neodymium isotopes indicating a stronger effect of Eurasian discharge on the Lomonosov Ridge. We propose that this discrepancy resulted from a decoupling of surface and deep-water circulation, where deep waters had a significant contribution of brines carrying deglacial sediments (hyperpicnal flows). The propagation of proglacial brines as far as the Amerasian Basin, suggested earlier from neodymium isotope data, is confirmed by benthic stable isotope records.

  15. Assessing climate impacts and risks of ocean albedo modification in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengis, N.; Martin, T.; Keller, D. P.; Oschlies, A.

    2016-05-01

    The ice albedo feedback is one of the key factors of accelerated temperature increase in the high northern latitudes under global warming. This study assesses climate impacts and risks of idealized Arctic Ocean albedo modification (AOAM), a proposed climate engineering method, during transient climate change simulations with varying representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios. We find no potential for reversing trends in all assessed Arctic climate metrics under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. AOAM only yields an initial offset during the first years after implementation. Nevertheless, sea ice loss can be delayed by 25(60) years in the RCP8.5(RCP4.5) scenario and the delayed thawing of permafrost soils in the AOAM simulations prevents up to 40(32) Pg of carbon from being released by 2100. AOAM initially dampens the decline of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning and delays the onset of open ocean deep convection in the Nordic Seas under the RCP scenarios. Both these processes cause a subsurface warming signal in the AOAM simulations relative to the default RCP simulations with the potential to destabilize Arctic marine gas hydrates. Furthermore, in 2100, the RCP8.5 AOAM simulation diverts more from the 2005-2015 reference state in many climate metrics than the RCP4.5 simulation without AOAM. Considering the demonstrated risks, we conclude that concerning longer time scales, reductions in emissions remain the safest and most effective way to prevent severe changes in the Arctic.

  16. Remote sensing for risk analysis of oil spills in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Malin; Hassellöv, Ida-Maja; Eriksson, Leif; Lindgren, Fredrik; Berg, Anders; Carvajal, Gisela; Landquist, Hanna

    2014-05-01

    The observed decrease in sea-ice and change from multi-year ice to first-year ice in the Arctic Ocean opens up for increased maritime activities. These activities include transportation, extraction of oil and gas, fishing and tourism. The expected growth in marine shipping in the Arctic region also increases the potential threat of accidents. Within this project we aim to provide information about the potential geographical distribution of oil pollution along prospective future shipping lanes in the Arctic. Using a combination of remote sensing products and a risk analysis thought-process we develop a method that tracks a potential oil spill from release to clean-up. We use synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to provide input data about the changes in the Arctic sea ice cover, including sea ice drift, sea-ice concentration and information on the wind patterns over open water at 10 meters height. Combining this data with information about ocean currents we make estimates on the redistribution and spread of oil pollution scenarios. Furthermore, the method includes the biogeochemical impact of the spill on the environment. Different size of oil spills and spills with different type of oil will be included and we will include ecotoxicological effects of low concentrations of oil for possible future economic assessment of the environmental impact.

  17. A database for the monitoring of thermal anomalies over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C.; Mattar, Cristian; Sobrino, José A.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information technologies and accessibility to climate and satellite data in recent years have favored the development of web-based tools with user-friendly interfaces in order to facilitate the dissemination of geo/biophysical products. These products are useful for the analysis of the impact of global warming over different biomes. In particular, the study of the Amazon forest responses to drought have recently received attention by the scientific community due to the occurrence of two extreme droughts and sustained warming over the last decade. Thermal Amazoni@ is a web-based platform for the visualization and download of surface thermal anomalies products over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans using Google Earth as a baseline graphical interface (http://ipl.uv.es/thamazon/web). This platform is currently operational at the servers of the University of Valencia (Spain), and it includes both satellite (MODIS) and climatic (ERA-Interim) datasets. Thermal Amazoni@ is composed of the viewer system and the web and ftp sites with ancillary information and access to product download. PMID:26029379

  18. Taxonomic revision of deep-sea Ostracoda from the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Stepanova, Anna; Okahashi, Hisayo; Cronin, Thomas M.; Brouwers, Elisabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic revision of deep-sea Ostracoda from the Arctic Ocean was conducted to reduce taxonomic uncertainty that will improve our understanding of species ecology, biogeography and relationship to faunas from other deep-sea regions. Fifteen genera and 40 species were examined and (re-)illustrated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images, covering most of known deep-sea species in the central Arctic Ocean. Seven new species are described: Bythoceratina lomonosovensis n. sp., Cytheropteron parahamatum n. sp., Cytheropteron lanceae n. sp.,Cytheropteron irizukii n. sp., Pedicythere arctica n. sp., Cluthiawhatleyi n. sp., Krithe hunti n. sp. This study provides a robust taxonomic baseline for application to paleoceanographical reconstruction and biodiversity analyses in this climatically sensitive region.

  19. Disparate acidification and calcium carbonate desaturation of deep and shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yiming; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Mucci, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    The Arctic Ocean is acidifying from absorption of man-made CO2. Current predictive models of that acidification focus on surface waters, and their results argue that deep waters will acidify by downward penetration from the surface. Here we show, with an alternative model, the rapid, near simultaneous, acidification of both surface and deep waters, a prediction supported by current, but limited, saturation data. Whereas Arctic surface water responds directly by atmospheric CO2 uptake, deeper waters will be influenced strongly by intrusion of mid-depth, pre-acidified, Atlantic Ocean water. With unabated CO2 emissions, surface waters will become undersaturated with respect to aragonite by 2105 AD and could remain so for ~600 years. In deep waters, the aragonite saturation horizon will rise, reaching the base of the surface mixed layer by 2140 AD and likely remaining there for over a millennium. The survival of aragonite-secreting organisms is consequently threatened on long timescales.

  20. Disparate acidification and calcium carbonate desaturation of deep and shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yiming; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Mucci, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is acidifying from absorption of man-made CO2. Current predictive models of that acidification focus on surface waters, and their results argue that deep waters will acidify by downward penetration from the surface. Here we show, with an alternative model, the rapid, near simultaneous, acidification of both surface and deep waters, a prediction supported by current, but limited, saturation data. Whereas Arctic surface water responds directly by atmospheric CO2 uptake, deeper waters will be influenced strongly by intrusion of mid-depth, pre-acidified, Atlantic Ocean water. With unabated CO2 emissions, surface waters will become undersaturated with respect to aragonite by 2105 AD and could remain so for ∼600 years. In deep waters, the aragonite saturation horizon will rise, reaching the base of the surface mixed layer by 2140 AD and likely remaining there for over a millennium. The survival of aragonite-secreting organisms is consequently threatened on long timescales. PMID:27659188

  1. Deep water paleo-iceberg scouring on top of Hovgaard Ridge-Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Jan Erik; Niessen, Frank; Jokat, Wilfried; Dorschel, Boris

    2014-07-01

    In multibeam echosounder and subbottom profiler data acquired during R/V Polarstern cruise ARK-VII/3a from the Hovgaard Ridge (Fram Strait), we found evidence for very deep (>1200 m) iceberg scouring. Five elongated seafloor features have been detected that are interpreted to be iceberg scours. The scours are oriented in north-south/south-north direction and are about 15 m deep, 300 m wide, and 4 km long crossing the entire width of the ridge. They are attributed to multiple giant paleo-icebergs that most probably left the Arctic Ocean southward through Fram Strait. The huge keel depths are indicative of ice sheets extending into the Arctic Ocean being at least 1200 m thick at the calving front during glacial maxima. The deep St. Anna Trough or grounded ice observed at the East Siberian Continental Margin are likely source regions of these icebergs that delivered freshwater to the Nordic Seas.

  2. Glimpses of Arctic Ocean shelf-basin interaction from submarine-borne radium sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadko, David; Aagaard, Knut

    2009-01-01

    Evidence of shelf-water transfer from temperature, salinity, and 228Ra/ 226Ra sampling from the nuclear submarine USS L. Mendel Rivers SCICEX cruise in October, 2000 demonstrates the heterogeneity of the Arctic Ocean with respect to halocline ventilation. This likely reflects both time-dependent events on the shelves and the variety of dispersal mechanisms within the ocean, including boundary currents and eddies, at least one of which was sampled in this work. Halocline waters at the 132 m sampling depth in the interior Eurasian Basin are generally not well connected to the shelves, consonant with their ventilation within the deep basins, rather than on the shelves. In the western Arctic, steep gradients in 228Ra/ 226Ra ratio and age since shelf contact are consistent with very slow exchange between the Chukchi shelf and the interior Beaufort Gyre. These are the first radium measurements from a nuclear submarine.

  3. The Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS): overview and experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjernström, M.; Leck, C.; Birch, C. E.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Brooks, B. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Bäcklin, L.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; de Leeuw, G.; Di Liberto, L.; de la Rosa, S.; Granath, E.; Graus, M.; Hansel, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Held, A.; Hind, A.; Johnston, P.; Knulst, J.; Martin, M.; Matrai, P. A.; Mauritsen, T.; Müller, M.; Norris, S. J.; Orellana, M. V.; Orsini, D. A.; Paatero, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Gao, Q.; Rauschenberg, C.; Ristovski, Z.; Sedlar, J.; Shupe, M. D.; Sierau, B.; Sirevaag, A.; Sjogren, S.; Stetzer, O.; Swietlicki, E.; Szczodrak, M.; Vaattovaara, P.; Wahlberg, N.; Westberg, M.; Wheeler, C. R.

    2014-03-01

    The climate in the Arctic is changing faster than anywhere else on earth. Poorly understood feedback processes relating to Arctic clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions contribute to a poor understanding of the present changes in the Arctic climate system, and also to a large spread in projections of future climate in the Arctic. The problem is exacerbated by the paucity of research-quality observations in the central Arctic. Improved formulations in climate models require such observations, which can only come from measurements in situ in this difficult-to-reach region with logistically demanding environmental conditions. The Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) was the most extensive central Arctic Ocean expedition with an atmospheric focus during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. ASCOS focused on the study of the formation and life cycle of low-level Arctic clouds. ASCOS departed from Longyearbyen on Svalbard on 2 August and returned on 9 September 2008. In transit into and out of the pack ice, four short research stations were undertaken in the Fram Strait: two in open water and two in the marginal ice zone. After traversing the pack ice northward, an ice camp was set up on 12 August at 87°21' N, 01°29' W and remained in operation through 1 September, drifting with the ice. During this time, extensive measurements were taken of atmospheric gas and particle chemistry and physics, mesoscale and boundary-layer meteorology, marine biology and chemistry, and upper ocean physics. ASCOS provides a unique interdisciplinary data set for development and testing of new hypotheses on cloud processes, their interactions with the sea ice and ocean and associated physical, chemical, and biological processes and interactions. For example, the first-ever quantitative observation of bubbles in Arctic leads, combined with the unique discovery of marine organic material, polymer gels with an origin in the ocean, inside cloud droplets suggests the possibility of

  4. Phanerozoic stratigraphy of Northwind Ridge, magnetic anomalies in the Canada Basin, and the geometry and timing of rifting in the Amerasia Basin, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, A.; Clark, D.L.; Phillips, R.L.; Srivastava, S.P.; Blome, C.D.; Gray, L.-B.; Haga, H.; Mamet, B.L.; McIntyre, D.J.; McNeil, D.H.; Mickey, M.B.; Mullen, M.W.; Murchey, B.I.; Ross, C.A.; Stevens, C.H.; Silberling, Norman J.; Wall, J.H.; Willard, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Cores from Northwind Ridge, a high-standing continental fragment in the Chukchi borderland of the oceanic Amerasia basin, Arctic Ocean, contain representatives of every Phanerozoic system except the Silurian and Devonian systems. Cambrian and Ordovician shallow-water marine carbonates in Northwind Ridge are similar to basement rocks beneath the Sverdrup basin of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Upper Mississippian(?) to Permian shelf carbonate and spicularite and Triassic turbidite and shelf lutite resemble coeval strata in the Sverdrup basin and the western Arctic Alaska basin (Hanna trough). These resemblances indicate that Triassic and older strata in southern Northwind Ridge were attached to both Arctic Canada and Arctic Alaska prior to the rifting that created the Amerasia basin. Late Jurassic marine lutite in Northwind Ridge was structurally isolated from coeval strata in the Sverdrup and Arctic Alaska basins by rift shoulder and grabens, and is interpreted to be a riftogenic deposit. This lutite may be the oldest deposit in the Canada basin. A cape of late Cenomanian or Turonian rhyodacite air-fall ash that lacks terrigenous material shows that Northwind Ridge was structurally isolated from the adjacent continental margins by earliest Late Cretaceous time. Closing Amerasia basin by conjoining seafloor magnetic anomalies beneath the Canada basin or by uniting the pre-Jurassic strata of Northwind Ridge with kindred sections in the Sverdrup basin and Hanna trough yield simular tectonic reconstructions. Together with the orientation and age of rift-marine structures, these data suggest that: 1) prior to opening of the Amerasia basin, both northern Alaska and continental ridges of the Chukchi borderland were part of North America, 2) the extension that created the Amerasia basin formed rift-margin graben beginning in Early Jurassic time and new oceanic crust probably beginning in Late Jurassic or early Neocomian time. Reconstruction of the Amerasia basin on the

  5. An assessment of the Arctic Ocean in a suite of interannual CORE-II simulations: Hydrography and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilicak, Mehmet; Drange, Helge

    2016-04-01

    We compare the simulated Arctic Ocean in fifteen global ocean-sea ice models in the framework of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments, phase II (CORE-II). Most of these models are the ocean and sea-ice components of the coupled climate models used in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) experiments. We mainly focus on the hydrography of the Arctic interior, the state of Atlantic Water layer and heat and volume transports at the gateways of the Davis Strait, the Bering Strait, the Fram Strait and the Barents Sea Opening. We found that there is a large spread in temperature in the Arctic Ocean between the models, and generally large differences compared to the observed temperature at intermediate depths. Warm bias models have a strong temperature anomaly of inflow of the Atlantic Water entering the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait. Another process that is not represented accurately in the CORE-II models is the formation of cold and dense water, originating on the eastern shelves. In the cold bias models, excessive cold water forms in the Barents Sea and spreads into the Arctic Ocean through the St. Anna Through. There is a large spread in the simulated mean heat and volume transports through the Fram Strait and the Barents Sea Opening. The models agree more on the decadal variability, to a large degree dictated by the common atmospheric forcing. We conclude that the CORE-II model study helps us to understand the crucial biases in the Arctic Ocean. The current coarse resolution state-of-the-art ocean models need to be improved in accurate representation of the Atlantic Water inflow into the Arctic and density currents coming from the shelves.

  6. Changes in the Arctic Ocean CO2 sink (1996-2007): A regional model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manizza, M.; Follows, M. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Menemenlis, D.; Hill, C. N.; Key, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid recent decline of Arctic Ocean sea ice area increases the flux of solar radiation available for primary production and the area of open water for air-sea gas exchange. We use a regional physical-biogeochemical model of the Arctic Ocean, forced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research atmospheric reanalysis, to evaluate the mean present-day CO2 sink and its temporal evolution. During the 1996-2007 period, the model suggests that the Arctic average sea surface temperature warmed by 0.04°C a-1, that sea ice area decreased by ˜0.1 × 106 km2 a-1, and that the biological drawdown of dissolved inorganic carbon increased. The simulated 1996-2007 time-mean Arctic Ocean CO2 sink is 58 ± 6 Tg C a-1. The increase in ice-free ocean area and consequent carbon drawdown during this period enhances the CO2 sink by ˜1.4 Tg C a-1, consistent with estimates based on extrapolations of sparse data. A regional analysis suggests that during the 1996-2007 period, the shelf regions of the Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas experienced an increase in the efficiency of their biological pump due to decreased sea ice area, especially during the 2004-2007 period, consistent with independently published estimates of primary production. In contrast, the CO2 sink in the Barents Sea is reduced during the 2004-2007 period due to a dominant control by warming and decreasing solubility. Thus, the effect of decreasing sea ice area and increasing sea surface temperature partially cancel, though the former is dominant.

  7. TOPAZ4: an ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic and Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakov, P.; Counillon, F.; Bertino, L.; Lisæter, K. A.; Oke, P. R.; Korablev, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present a detailed description of TOPAZ4, the latest version of TOPAZ - a coupled ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic Ocean and Arctic. It is the only operational, large-scale ocean data assimilation system that uses the ensemble Kalman filter. This means that TOPAZ features a time-evolving, state-dependent estimate of the state error covariance. Based on results from the pilot MyOcean reanalysis for 2003-2008, we demonstrate that TOPAZ4 produces a realistic estimate of the ocean circulation and the sea ice. We find that the ensemble spread for temperature and sea-level remains fairly constant throughout the reanalysis demonstrating that the data assimilation system is robust to ensemble collapse. Moreover, the ensemble spread for ice concentration is well correlated with the actual errors. This indicates that the ensemble statistics provide reliable state-dependent error estimates - a feature that is unique to ensemble-based data assimilation systems. We demonstrate that the quality of the reanalysis changes when different sea surface temperature products are assimilated, or when in situ profiles below the ice in the Arctic Ocean are assimilated. We find that data assimilation improves the match to independent observations compared to a free model. Improvements are particularly noticeable for ice thickness, salinity in the Arctic, and temperature in the Fram Strait, but not for transport estimates or underwater temperature. At the same time, the pilot reanalysis has revealed several flaws in the system that have degraded its performance. Finally, we show that a simple bias estimation scheme can effectively detect the seasonal or constant bias in temperature and sea-level.

  8. A high-resolution ocean and sea-ice modelling system for the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, F.; Higginson, S.; Bourdallé-Badie, R.; Lu, Y.; Roy, F.; Smith, G. C.; Lemieux, J.-F.; Garric, G.; Davidson, F.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the CONCEPTS (Canadian Operational Network of Coupled Environmental PredicTion Systems) initiative, The Government of Canada is developing a high resolution (1/12°) ice-ocean regional model covering the North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. The objective is to provide Canada with short-term ice-ocean predictions and hazard warnings in ice infested regions. To evaluate the modelling component (as opposed to the analysis - or data-assimilation - component), a series of hindcasts for the period 2003-2009 is carried out, forced at the surface by the Canadian Global Re-Forecasts. These hindcasts test how the model represent upper ocean characteristics and ice cover. Each hindcast implements a new aspect of the modelling or the ice-ocean coupling. Notably, the coupling to the multi-category ice model CICE is tested. The hindcast solutions are then assessed using a validation package under development, including in-situ and satellite ice and ocean observations. The conclusions are: (1) the model reproduces reasonably well the time mean, variance and skewness of sea surface height. (2) The model biases in temperature and salinity show that while the mean properties follow expectations, the Pacific Water signature in the Beaufort Sea is weaker than observed. (3) However, the modelled freshwater content of the Arctic agrees well with observational estimates. (4) The distribution and volume of the sea ice is shown to be improved in the latest hindcast thanks to modifications to the drag coefficients and to some degree as well to the ice thickness distribution available in CICE. (5) On the other hand, the model overestimates the ice drift and ice thickness in the Beaufort Gyre.

  9. A high-resolution ocean and sea-ice modelling system for the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, F.; Higginson, S.; Bourdallé-Badie, R.; Lu, Y.; Roy, F.; Smith, G. C.; Lemieux, J.-F.; Garric, G.; Davidson, F.

    2015-05-01

    As part of the CONCEPTS (Canadian Operational Network of Coupled Environmental PredicTion Systems) initiative, a high-resolution (1/12°) ice-ocean regional model is developed covering the North Atlantic and the Arctic oceans. The long-term objective is to provide Canada with short-term ice-ocean predictions and hazard warnings in ice-infested regions. To evaluate the modelling component (as opposed to the analysis - or data-assimilation - component, which is not covered in this contribution), a series of hindcasts for the period 2003-2009 is carried out, forced at the surface by the Canadian GDPS reforecasts (Smith et al., 2014). These hindcasts test how the model represents upper ocean characteristics and ice cover. Each hindcast implements a new aspect of the modelling or the ice-ocean coupling. Notably, the coupling to the multi-category ice model CICE is tested. The hindcast solutions are then assessed using a verification package under development, including in situ and satellite ice and ocean observations. The conclusions are as follows: (1) the model reproduces reasonably well the time mean, variance and skewness of sea surface height; (2) the model biases in temperature and salinity show that while the mean properties follow expectations, the Pacific Water signature in the Beaufort Sea is weaker than observed; (3) the modelled freshwater content of the Arctic agrees well with observational estimates; (4) the distribution and volume of the sea ice are shown to be improved in the latest hindcast due to modifications to the drag coefficients and to some degree to the ice thickness distribution available in CICE; (5) nonetheless, the model still overestimates the ice drift and ice thickness in the Beaufort Gyre.

  10. Mid-Cenozoic tectonic and paleoenvironmental setting of the central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Matthew; Moran, Kathryn; Backman, Jan; Jakobsson, Martin; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Brinkhuis, Henk; Pockalny, Rob; Skelton, Alasdair; Stickley, Catherine; Koç, Nalan; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; Willard, Debra

    2008-03-01

    Drilling results from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) to the Lomonosov Ridge (LR) document a 26 million year hiatus that separates freshwater-influenced biosilica-rich deposits of the middle Eocene from fossil-poor glaciomarine silty clays of the early Miocene. Detailed micropaleontological and sedimentological data from sediments surrounding this mid-Cenozoic hiatus describe a shallow water setting for the LR, a finding that conflicts with predrilling seismic predictions and an initial postcruise assessment of its subsidence history that assumed smooth thermally controlled subsidence following rifting. A review of Cenozoic tectonic processes affecting the geodynamic evolution of the central Arctic Ocean highlights a prolonged phase of basin-wide compression that ended in the early Miocene. The coincidence in timing between the end of compression and the start of rapid early Miocene subsidence provides a compelling link between these observations and similarly accounts for the shallow water setting that persisted more than 30 million years after rifting ended. However, for much of the late Paleogene and early Neogene, tectonic reconstructions of the Arctic Ocean describe a landlocked basin, adding additional uncertainty to reconstructions of paleodepth estimates as the magnitude of regional sea level variations remains unknown.

  11. Bird orientation at high latitudes: flight routes between Siberia and North America across the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed

    Alerstam; Gudmundsson

    1999-12-22

    Bird migration and orientation at high latitudes are of special interest because of the difficulties associated with different compass systems in polar areas and because of the considerable differences between flight routes conforming to loxodromes (rhumblines) or orthodromes (great circle routes). Regular and widespread east-north-east migration of birds from the northern tundra of Siberia towards North America across the Arctic Ocean (without landmark influences) were recorded by ship-based tracking radar studies in July and August. Field observations indicated that waders, including species such as Phalaropusfulicarius and Calidris melanotos, dominated, but also terns and skuas may have been involved. Analysis of flight directions in relation to the wind showed that these movements are not caused by wind drift. Assuming possible orientation principles based on celestial or geomagnetic cues, different flight trajectories across the Arctic Ocean were calculated: geographical loxodromes, sun compass routes, magnetic loxodromes and magnetoclinic routes. The probabilities of these four alternatives are evaluated on the basis of both the availability of required orientation cues and the predicted flight paths. This evaluation supports orientation along sun compass routes. Because of the longitudinal time displacement sun compass routes show gradually changing compass courses in close agreement with orthodromes. It is suggested that an important migration link between Siberia and North American stopover sites 1000-2500km apart across the Arctic Ocean has evolved based on sun compass orientation along orthodrome-like routes. PMID:10693821

  12. Quantifying Methane Emissions from the Arctic Ocean Seabed to the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Stephen; Pisso, Ignacio; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Hermansen, Ove; Silyakova, Anna; Ferré, Benedicte; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Myhre, Gunnar; Mienert, Jürgen; Stohl, Andreas; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are stored under the seafloor in the shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean. Some of this is in the form of hydrates which may be vulnerable to deomposition due to surface warming. The Methane Emissions from Arctic Ocean to Atmosphere MOCA, (http://moca.nilu.no/) project was established in collaboration with the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE, https://cage.uit.no/). In summer 2014, and summer and autumn 2015 we deployed oceanographic CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, Depth) stations and performed state-of-the-art atmospheric measurements of CH4, CO2, CO, and other meteorological parameters aboard the research vessel Helmer Hanssen west of Prins Karl's Forland, Svalbard. Air samples were collected for isotopic analysis (13C, 2H) and quantification of other hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, etc.). Atmospheric measurements are also available from the nearby Zeppelin Observatory at a mountain close to Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. We will present data from these measurements that show an upper constraint of the methane flux in measurement area in 2014 too low to influence the annual CH4 budget. This is further supported by top-down constraints (maximum release consistent with observations at the Helmer Hansen and Zeppelin Observatory) determined using FLEXPART foot print sensitivities and the OsloCTM3 model. The low flux estimates despite the presence of active seeps in the area (numerous gas flares were observed using echo sounding) were apparently due to the presence of a stable ocean pycnocline at ~50 m.

  13. Phagotrophy by the picoeukaryotic green alga Micromonas: implications for Arctic Oceans.

    PubMed

    McKie-Krisberg, Zaid M; Sanders, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPE) are recognized as major primary producers and contributors to phytoplankton biomass in oceanic and coastal environments. Molecular surveys indicate a large phylogenetic diversity in the picoeukaryotes, with members of the Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyseae tending to be more common in open ocean waters and Prasinophyceae dominating coastal and Arctic waters. In addition to their role as primary producers, PPE have been identified in several studies as mixotrophic and major predators of prokaryotes. Mixotrophy, the combination of photosynthesis and phagotrophy in a single organism, is well established for most photosynthetic lineages. However, green algae, including prasinophytes, were widely considered as a purely photosynthetic group. The prasinophyte Micromonas is perhaps the most common picoeukaryote in coastal and Arctic waters and is one of the relatively few cultured representatives of the picoeukaryotes available for physiological investigations. In this study, we demonstrate phagotrophy by a strain of Micromonas (CCMP2099) isolated from Arctic waters and show that environmental factors (light and nutrient concentration) affect ingestion rates in this mixotroph. In addition, we show size-selective feeding with a preference for smaller particles, and determine P vs I (photosynthesis vs irradiance) responses in different nutrient conditions. If other strains have mixotrophic abilities similar to Micromonas CCMP2099, the widespread distribution and frequently high abundances of Micromonas suggest that these green algae may have significant impact on prokaryote populations in several oceanic regimes. PMID:24553471

  14. Mid-Cenozoic tectonic and paleoenvironmental setting of the central Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Regan, M.; Moran, K.; Backman, J.; Jakobsson, M.; Sangiorgi, F.; Brinkhuis, Henk; Pockalny, Rob; Skelton, Alasdair; Stickley, Catherine E.; Koc, N.; Brumsack, Hans-Juergen; Willard, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    Drilling results from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) to the Lomonosov Ridge (LR) document a 26 million year hiatus that separates freshwater-influenced biosilica-rich deposits of the middle Eocene from fossil-poor glaciomarine silty clays of the early Miocene. Detailed micropaleontological and sedimentological data from sediments surrounding this mid-Cenozoic hiatus describe a shallow water setting for the LR, a finding that conflicts with predrilling seismic predictions and an initial postcruise assessment of its subsidence history that assumed smooth thermally controlled subsidence following rifting. A review of Cenozoic tectonic processes affecting the geodynamic evolution of the central Arctic Ocean highlights a prolonged phase of basin-wide compression that ended in the early Miocene. The coincidence in timing between the end of compression and the start of rapid early Miocene subsidence provides a compelling link between these observations and similarly accounts for the shallow water setting that persisted more than 30 million years after rifting ended. However, for much of the late Paleogene and early Neogene, tectonic reconstructions of the Arctic Ocean describe a landlocked basin, adding additional uncertainty to reconstructions of paleodepth estimates as the magnitude of regional sea level variations remains unknown.

  15. Modeling the seasonal variability of a coupled Arctic ice-ocean system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Mellor, George L.

    1992-01-01

    The seasonal variability of the ice-ocean system in the Arctic Basin and the Norwegian, Greenland, and Barents Seas was modeled using a three-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model developed at Princeton University. The snow-ice model uses a three-level thermodynamic scheme similar to Semtner's (1976), but is extended to include the effect of leads. It is shown that simulations using the climatological monthly forcing fields produce a realistic seasonal variability of the ice cover. The ice thickness had a considerable sensitivity to the choice of the long-wave back radiation scheme, but these effects can be reduced through dynamical factors.

  16. Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Water and Salt Budgets of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James R.; Russell, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The annual flux of freshwater into the Arctic Ocean by the atmosphere and rivers is balanced by the export of sea ice and oceanic freshwater. Two 150-year simulations of a global climate model are used to examine how this balance might change if atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) increase. Relative to the control, the last 50-year period of the GHG experiment indicates that the total inflow of water from the atmosphere and rivers increases by 10% primarily due to an increase in river discharge, the annual sea-ice export decreases by about half, the oceanic liquid water export increases, salinity decreases, sea-ice cover decreases, and the total mass and sea-surface height of the Arctic Ocean increase. The closed, compact, and multi-phased nature of the hydrologic cycle in the Arctic Ocean makes it an ideal test of water budgets that could be included in model intercomparisons.

  17. Quaternary paleoceanography of the deep Arctic Ocean based on quantitative analysis of Ostracoda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Holtz, T.R.; Whatley, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Ostracodes were studied from deep Arctic Ocean cores obtained during the Arctic 91 expedition of the Polarstern to the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov Basins, the Lomonosov Ridge, Morris Jesup Rise and Yermak Plateau, in order to investigate their distribution in Arctic Ocean deep water (AODW) and apply these data to paleoceanographic reconstruction of bottom water masses during the Quaternary. Analyses of coretop assemblages from Arctic 91 boxcores indicate the following: ostracodes are common at all depths between 1000 and 4500 m, and species distribution is strongly influenced by water mass characteristics and bathymetry; quantitative analyses comparing Eurasian and Canada Basin assemblages indicate that distinct assemblages inhabit regions east and west of the Lomonosov Ridge, a barrier especially important to species living in lower AODW; deep Eurasian Basin assemblages are more similar to those living in Greenland Sea deep water (GSDW) than those in Canada Basin deep water; two upper AODW assemblages were recognized throughout the Arctic Ocean, one living between 1000 and 1500 m, and the other, having high species diversity, at 1500-3000 m. Downcore quantitative analyses of species' abundances and the squared chord distance coefficient of similarity reveals a distinct series of abundance peaks in key indicator taxa interpreted to signify the following late Quaternary deep water history of the Eurasian Basin. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), a GSDW/AODW assemblage, characteristic of cold, well oxygenated deep water > 3000 m today, inhabited the Lomonosov Ridge to depths as shallow as 1000 m, perhaps indicating the influence of GSDW at mid-depths in the central Arctic Ocean. During Termination 1, a period of high organic productivity associated with a strong inflowing warm North Atlantic layer occurred. During the mid-Holocene, several key faunal events indicate a period of warming and/or enhanced flow between the Canada and Eurasian Basins. A long

  18. Persistent export of 231Pa from the deep central Arctic Ocean over the past 35,000 years.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sharon S; McManus, Jerry F; Curry, William B; Brown-Leger, L Susan

    2013-05-30

    The Arctic Ocean has an important role in Earth's climate, both through surface processes such as sea-ice formation and transport, and through the production and export of waters at depth that contribute to the global thermohaline circulation. Deciphering the deep Arctic Ocean's palaeo-oceanographic history is a crucial part of understanding its role in climatic change. Here we show that sedimentary ratios of the radionuclides thorium-230 ((230)Th) and protactinium-231 ((231)Pa), which are produced in sea water and removed by particle scavenging on timescales of decades to centuries, respectively, record consistent evidence for the export of (231)Pa from the deep Arctic and may indicate continuous deep-water exchange between the Arctic and Atlantic oceans throughout the past 35,000 years. Seven well-dated box-core records provide a comprehensive overview of (231)Pa and (230)Th burial in Arctic sediments during glacial, deglacial and interglacial conditions. Sedimentary (231)Pa/(230)Th ratios decrease nearly linearly with increasing water depth above the core sites, indicating efficient particle scavenging in the upper water column and greater influence of removal by lateral transport at depth. Although the measured (230)Th burial is in balance with its production in Arctic sea water, integrated depth profiles for all time intervals reveal a deficit in (231)Pa burial that can be balanced only by lateral export in the water column. Because no enhanced sink for (231)Pa has yet been found in the Arctic, our records suggest that deep-water exchange through the Fram strait may export (231)Pa. Such export may have continued for the past 35,000 years, suggesting a century-scale replacement time for deep waters in the Arctic Ocean since the most recent glaciation and a persistent contribution of Arctic waters to the global ocean circulation.

  19. Persistent export of 231Pa from the deep central Arctic Ocean over the past 35,000 years.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sharon S; McManus, Jerry F; Curry, William B; Brown-Leger, L Susan

    2013-05-30

    The Arctic Ocean has an important role in Earth's climate, both through surface processes such as sea-ice formation and transport, and through the production and export of waters at depth that contribute to the global thermohaline circulation. Deciphering the deep Arctic Ocean's palaeo-oceanographic history is a crucial part of understanding its role in climatic change. Here we show that sedimentary ratios of the radionuclides thorium-230 ((230)Th) and protactinium-231 ((231)Pa), which are produced in sea water and removed by particle scavenging on timescales of decades to centuries, respectively, record consistent evidence for the export of (231)Pa from the deep Arctic and may indicate continuous deep-water exchange between the Arctic and Atlantic oceans throughout the past 35,000 years. Seven well-dated box-core records provide a comprehensive overview of (231)Pa and (230)Th burial in Arctic sediments during glacial, deglacial and interglacial conditions. Sedimentary (231)Pa/(230)Th ratios decrease nearly linearly with increasing water depth above the core sites, indicating efficient particle scavenging in the upper water column and greater influence of removal by lateral transport at depth. Although the measured (230)Th burial is in balance with its production in Arctic sea water, integrated depth profiles for all time intervals reveal a deficit in (231)Pa burial that can be balanced only by lateral export in the water column. Because no enhanced sink for (231)Pa has yet been found in the Arctic, our records suggest that deep-water exchange through the Fram strait may export (231)Pa. Such export may have continued for the past 35,000 years, suggesting a century-scale replacement time for deep waters in the Arctic Ocean since the most recent glaciation and a persistent contribution of Arctic waters to the global ocean circulation. PMID:23719461

  20. Secondary organic aerosols over oceans via oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes from Arctic to Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qi-Hou; Xie, Zhou-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ming; Kang, Hui; He, Quan-Fu; Zhang, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Isoprene and monoterpenes are important precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in continents. However, their contributions to aerosols over oceans are still inconclusive. Here we analyzed SOA tracers from isoprene and monoterpenes in aerosol samples collected over oceans during the Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Research Expeditions. Combined with literature reports elsewhere, we found that the dominant tracers are the oxidation products of isoprene. The concentrations of tracers varied considerably. The mean average values were approximately one order of magnitude higher in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. High values were generally observed in coastal regions. This phenomenon was ascribed to the outflow influence from continental sources. High levels of isoprene could emit from oceans and consequently have a significant impact on marine SOA as inferred from isoprene SOA during phytoplankton blooms, which may abruptly increase up to 95 ng/m3 in the boundary layer over remote oceans. PMID:23880782

  1. Water Mass Distribution and Particle Flux in the Arctic Ocean From Dissolved 10Be and 9Be Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Porcelli, D.; Andersson, P.; Halliday, A. N.; Kubik, P. W.; Hattendorf, B.; Guenther, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean basin is confined by landmasses similar to the Mediterranean. There is only little deep water formed seasonally on the shelves of the Arctic Ocean despite the low temperatures. This is due to a freshwater lid at the surface which originates from the Arctic rivers. The deeper Arctic Ocean water masses can thus only be renewed at comparatively low rates through the only deep connection to the Atlantic Ocean, the Fram Strait. At the same time the biogenic particulate fluxes in the central Arctic Ocean are very low due to perennial sea ice cover and the organic matter produced in the surface waters is remineralised efficiently. Detrital particle fluxes from either eolian or riverine sources are also very low. We will present the first combined dissolved 10Be (cosmogenic) and 9Be (continental sources) depth profiles from water samples of the major deep basins of the Arctic Ocean collected during the Swedish Arctic Ocean 2001 expedition. Be is 5-10 times less particle-reactive than other previously investigated radionuclides such as Th or Pa and should therefore even at the relatively low Arctic Ocean renewal rates serve as a quasi-conservative tracer for different origins of water masses (Atlantic Ocean/Norwegian Sea, Pacific Ocean, Arctic Shelves). 9Be and Nd isotope analyses provide complementary information on the pathways of dissolved material originating from the Arctic continents. Results obtained ten years ago at similar locations as in our study indicated a uniform distribution of 10Be at low values of 500 +/- 100 atoms/g suggesting restricted input and efficient homogenisation. In contrast, our new results show that in 2001 the inflowing waters from the Atlantic are traced by 10Be concentrations of up to 1100 atoms/g. In addition, the surface concentrations vary considerably. It will be discussed wether this is a consequence of a seasonal/decadal variability in the distribution of surface water masses, which has been deduced from oceanographic

  2. Ship-borne Observations of Atmospheric Black Carbon Aerosol Particles over the Arctic Ocean, Bering Sea, and North Pacific Ocean during September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Miyakawa, T.; Takashima, H.; Komazaki, Y.; Kanaya, Y.; PAN, X.; Inoue, J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of refractory black carbon (rBC) aerosol particles using a highly sensitive online single particle soot photometer were performed on-board the R/V Mirai during a cruise across the Arctic Ocean, Bering Sea, and the North Pacific Ocean (31 August-9 October 2014). The measured rBC mass concentrations over the Arctic Ocean in the latitudinal region > 70°N were in the range 0-66 ng/m3 for 1-min averages, with an overall mean value of 1.0 ± 1.2 ng/m3. Single-particle-based observations enabled the measurement of such low rBC mass concentrations. The effects of long-range transport from continents to the Arctic Ocean were limited during the observed period, suggesting that such low rBC concentration levels would prevail over the Arctic Ocean. An analysis of rBC mixing states showed that particles with a non-shell/core structure made a significant contribution to the rBC particles detected over the Arctic Ocean.

  3. Arctic Crustal Thickness and Oceanic Lithosphere Distribution from Gravity Inversion: Constraining Plate Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusznir, N. J.; Alvey, A.; Roberts, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping crustal thickness, continental lithosphere thinning and oceanic lithosphere distribution represents a substantial challenge for the Polar Regions. Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for the Arctic. The Arctic region formed as a series of small distinct ocean basins leading to a complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust, possible micro-continents and rifted continental margins. Mapping of continental lithosphere thinning factor and crustal thickness from gravity inversion provide predictions of ocean-continent transition structure and magmatic type and continent ocean boundary location independent of magnetic isochrons. Restoration of crustal thickness and continent-ocean boundary location from gravity inversion may be used to test plate tectonic reconstructions. Using crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor maps with superimposed shaded-relief free-air gravity anomaly, we improve the determination of pre-breakup rifted margin conjugacy and sea-floor spreading trajectory within the Arctic basins. By restoring crustal thickness & continental lithosphere thinning maps of the Eurasia Basin & NE Atlantic to their initial post-breakup configuration we show the geometry and segmentation of the rifted continental margins at their time of breakup, together with the location of highly-stretched failed breakup basins and rifted micro-continents. Our gravity inversion predicts thin crust and high continental lithosphere thinning factors in the Makarov, Podvodnikov, Nautilus and Canada Basins consistent with these basins being underlain by oceanic or highly thinned continental crust. Larger crustal thicknesses, in the range 20 - 30 km, are predicted for the Lomonosov, Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges. Moho depths predicted compare well with seismic estimates. Predicted very thin continental or oceanic crust under the North Chuchki

  4. Characterizing horizontal variability and energy spectra in the Arctic Ocean halocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinko, Charlotte L. J.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2015-01-01

    transfer from the atmosphere into the upper Arctic Ocean is expected to become more efficient as summer sea-ice coverage decreases and multiyear ice thins due to recent atmospheric warming. However, relatively little is known about how energy is transferred within the ocean by turbulent processes from large to small scales in the presence of ice and how these pathways might change in future. This study characterizes horizontal variability in several regions of the Eurasian Arctic Ocean under differing sea-ice conditions. Historic along track CTD data collected by a Royal Navy submarine during summer 1996 allow a unique examination of horizontal variability and associated wavenumber spectra within the Arctic Ocean halocline. Spectral analysis indicates that potential energy variance under perennial sea-ice in the Amundsen Basin is O(100) less than within the marginal ice zone (MIZ) of Fram Strait. Spectra from all regions show a transition in scaling at wavelengths of approximately 5-7 km. At scales greater than the transition wavelength to 50 km, energy spectra are consistent with a k-3 scaling (where k is a wavenumber) and interior quasigeostrophic dynamics. The scaling of spectra at these scales is extremely similar between regions suggesting similar dynamics and energy exchange pathways. The k-3 scaling is steeper than typically found in regions of midlatitude open ocean. At scales below the transition wavelength to 300 m, spectra are close to a k-5/3 scaling or flatter, indicating a change in dynamics, which is potentially due to internal waves dominating variability at small scales.

  5. Geochemistry of clathrate-derived methane in Arctic Ocean waters

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

    2010-03-15

    Alterations to the composition of seawater are estimated for microbial oxidation of methane from large polar clathrate destabilizations, which may arise in the coming century. Gas fluxes are taken from porous flow models of warming Arctic sediment. Plume spread parameters are then used to bracket the volume of dilution. Consumption stoichiometries for the marine methanotrophs are based on growth efficiency and elemental/enzyme composition data. The nutritional demand implied by extra CH{sub 4} removal is compared with supply in various high latitude water masses. For emissions sized to fit the shelf break, reaction potential begins at one hundred micromolar and falls to order ten a thousand kilometers downstream. Oxygen loss and carbon dioxide production are sufficient respectively to hypoxify and acidify poorly ventilated basins. Nitrogen and the monooxygenase transition metals may be depleted in some locations as well. Deprivation is implied relative to existing ecosystems, along with dispersal of the excess dissolved gas. Physical uncertainties are inherent in the clathrate abundance, patch size, outflow buoyancy and mixing rate. Microbial ecology is even less defined but may involve nutrient recycling and anaerobic oxidizers.

  6. Remote Sensing of Ocean Color in the High Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cota, G. F.; Platt, T.; Harrison, W. G.

    1997-01-01

    With four years of NASA SeaWiFS funding I established a completely new capability and expertise for in-water optical measurements nearly from scratch and with very little optical background. My first-year budget included only capital for a profiling spectral radiometer. Over the next 30 months we conducted six cruises and collected almost 300 optical profiles in challenging environments; many were collected from 21' launches. I also changed institutions during this period: it is very disruptive to move, set up a new lab, and hire and train new people, etc. We also did not have access to NASA funds for almost a year during the move because of difficulties in subcontracting and/or transferring funds. Nevertheless, we delivered data sets from six bio-optical cruises from three high latitude regions, although only two or three cruises from two areas were promised for our SeaWiFS research. The three Canadian Arctic field programs comprise the most comprehensive high latitude bio-optical and biogeochemical data sets in existence. Optical and pigment data from all six cruises have been submitted to NASA and are being included in the algorithm development test set. Additional data are still being submitted.

  7. Large Freshwater Anomalies in the Arctic Ocean: Results from the 2008 IPY/NPEO Hydrographic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, M.; Morison, J.; Proshutinsky, A.; Steele, M.

    2008-12-01

    Based on an aerial hydrographic survey conducted in March and April, 2008, supplemented by unmanned drifting ice-tethered profilers (ITPs), we report that the precipitous decrease in minimum Arctic ice extent observed in the past few years has been accompanied by significant changes in upper ocean salinity, especially over the Canada Basin, where the anticyclonic Beaufort Gyre has traditionally maintained one of the major freshwater reservoirs of the world ocean. Our winter measurements corroborate and extend observations of increased summer freshwater content (FWC) first detected during the joint WHOI-IOS- JAMSTEC expedition in 2003 and monitored since. The survey comprised operations in the western Arctic that included 15 ice-landing stations and 8 airdropped expendable probes, plus 20 ice-landing stations in the eastern Arctic staged from ice station Barneo near the North Pole. We found that in the southeast quadrant of the Canada Basin, anomalous FWC (i.e., the change relative to PHC 3.0 winter [March-April-May] climatology based predominantly on conditions in the 1970s) has increased by as much as 11 m. Positive anomalies were found at all stations in the Pacific sector, including ITP profiles, but their magnitudes decreased to the west and north. In the eastern Arctic we found negative FWC anomalies on the Eurasian side of the Lomonosov Ridge, reaching values as low as -5 m. Smaller positive anomalies characterized water in the Makarov Basin. Freshening of the upper ocean over the Canada Basin has also substantially changed steric levels. A west- to-east line of stations extending about 800 km across the Basin, centered near 75°N, 150°W, nearly bisected the traditional Beaufort Gyre. In contrast to the domed climatological dynamic topography typical of the Gyre, the 2008 survey showed a monotonic rise in dynamic height as far east as 135°W, indicating a northward surface geostrophic flow component across the entire section, with large impact on freshwater

  8. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentation patterns in the western Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polyak, L.; Bischof, J.; Ortiz, J.D.; Darby, D.A.; Channell, J.E.T.; Xuan, C.; Kaufman, D.S.; Lovlie, R.; Schneider, D.A.; Eberl, D.D.; Adler, R.E.; Council, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean obtained on the 2005 HOTRAX and some earlier expeditions have been analyzed to develop a stratigraphic correlation from the Alaskan Chukchi margin to the Northwind and Mendeleev-Alpha ridges. The correlation was primarily based on terrigenous sediment composition that is not affected by diagenetic processes as strongly as the biogenic component, and paleomagnetic inclination records. Chronostratigraphic control was provided by 14C dating and amino-acid racemization ages, as well as correlation to earlier established Arctic Ocean stratigraphies. Distribution of sedimentary units across the western Arctic indicates that sedimentation rates decrease from tens of centimeters per kyr on the Alaskan margin to a few centimeters on the southern ends of Northwind and Mendeleev ridges and just a few millimeters on the ridges in the interior of the Amerasia basin. This sedimentation pattern suggests that Late Quaternary sediment transport and deposition, except for turbidites at the basin bottom, were generally controlled by ice concentration (and thus melt-out rate) and transportation distance from sources, with local variances related to subsurface currents. In the long term, most sediment was probably delivered to the core sites by icebergs during glacial periods, with a significant contribution from sea ice. During glacial maxima very fine-grained sediment was deposited with sedimentation rates greatly reduced away from the margins to a hiatus of several kyr duration as shown for the Last Glacial Maximum. This sedimentary environment was possibly related to a very solid ice cover and reduced melt-out over a large part of the western Arctic Ocean.

  9. Bacterial production and microbial food web structure in a large arctic river and the coastal Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallières, Catherine; Retamal, Leira; Ramlal, Patricia; Osburn, Christopher L.; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2008-12-01

    Globally significant quantities of organic carbon are stored in northern permafrost soils, but little is known about how this carbon is processed by microbial communities once it enters rivers and is transported to the coastal Arctic Ocean. As part of the Arctic River-Delta Experiment (ARDEX), we measured environmental and microbiological variables along a 300 km transect in the Mackenzie River and coastal Beaufort Sea, in July-August 2004. Surface bacterial concentrations averaged 6.7 × 10 5 cells mL - 1 with no significant differences between sampling zones. Picocyanobacteria were abundant in the river, and mostly observed as cell colonies. Their concentrations in the surface waters decreased across the salinity gradient, dropping from 51,000 (river) to 30 (sea) cells mL - 1 . There were accompanying shifts in protist community structure, from diatoms, cryptophytes, heterotrophic protists and chrysophytes in the river, to dinoflagellates, prymnesiophytes, chrysophytes, prasinophytes, diatoms and heterotrophic protists in the Beaufort Sea. Size-fractionated bacterial production, as measured by 3H-leucine uptake, varied from 76 to 416 ng C L - 1 h - 1 . The contribution of particle-attached bacteria (> 3 µm fraction) to total bacterial production decreased from > 90% at the Mackenzie River stations to < 20% at an offshore marine site, and the relative importance of this particle-based fraction was inversely correlated with salinity and positively correlated with particulate organic carbon concentrations. Glucose enrichment experiments indicated that bacterial metabolism was carbon limited in the Mackenzie River but not in the coastal ocean. Prior exposure of water samples to full sunlight increased the biolability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the Mackenzie River but decreased it in the Beaufort Sea. Estimated depth-integrated bacterial respiration rates in the Mackenzie River were higher than depth-integrated primary production rates, while at the marine

  10. Vulnerability of polar oceans to anthropogenic acidification: comparison of arctic and antarctic seasonal cycles.

    PubMed

    Shadwick, E H; Trull, T W; Thomas, H; Gibson, J A E

    2013-01-01

    Polar oceans are chemically sensitive to anthropogenic acidification due to their relatively low alkalinity and correspondingly weak carbonate buffering capacity. Here, we compare unique CO2 system observations covering complete annual cycles at an Arctic (Amundsen Gulf) and Antarctic site (Prydz Bay). The Arctic site experiences greater seasonal warming (10 vs 3°C), and freshening (3 vs 2), has lower alkalinity (2220 vs 2320 μmol/kg), and lower summer pH (8.15 vs 8.5), than the Antarctic site. Despite a larger uptake of inorganic carbon by summer photosynthesis, the Arctic carbon system exhibits smaller seasonal changes than the more alkaline Antarctic system. In addition, the excess surface nutrients in the Antarctic may allow mitigation of acidification, via CO2 removal by enhanced summer production driven by iron inputs from glacial and sea-ice melting. These differences suggest that the Arctic system is more vulnerable to anthropogenic change due to lower alkalinity, enhanced warming, and nutrient limitation.

  11. Fate of terrestrial colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Arctic Ocean: exported or removed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granskog, M. A.; Stedmon, C. A.; Dodd, P. A.; Amon, R. M. W.; Pavlov, A. K.; de Steur, L.; Hansen, E.

    2012-04-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) was measured with hydrographic parameters (salinity, d18O and inorganic nutrients) across Fram Strait. East Greenland Current (EGC) surface waters showed a pronounced CDOM absorption maximum between 30 and 120 m depth associated with both river and sea ice brine-enriched water, characteristic of polar mixed layer water and upper halocline water. Lowest CDOM was found in the Atlantic inflow within the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). Although applied elsewhere in the Arctic, we show that the salinity-CDOM relationship not suitable for evaluating the mixing behavior of CDOM (conservative vs. non-conservative) in Fram Strait. The strong correlation between meteoric water and optical properties of CDOM are indicative of the terrigenous origin of CDOM in the EGC and marine origin in WSC. Based on CDOM absorption in Polar Water and comparison with an Arctic river discharge weighted mean, we estimate that a 68% integrated loss of CDOM absorption across 250-600 nm has occurred, with a preferential removal of absorption at longer wavelengths reflecting the loss of high molecular weight material. Budget calculations of CDOM exports through Fram Strait using modeled volume transports indicate that the net southward export of CDOM in Fram Strait equals to 8 to 14% of the total riverine CDOM inputs to the Arctic Ocean, thus physical export is not a major sink of CDOM. We propose that CDOM can aid in discriminating glacial melt waters from Arctic riverine freshwater on the east Greenland shelf.

  12. October Cloud Increases Over the Arctic Ocean as Observed by MISR and CALIPSO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Lee, Jae N.

    2011-01-01

    The Beaufort and East Siberian Sea (BESS) shows a large increase in surface air temperature (SAT) in the recent decade for months of Sep-Nov, and NASA's Terra satellite have provided valuable measurements for this important decade of the intensified Arctic warming. In particular, MISR data since 2000 and CALIPSO cloud measurements since 2006 reveal a significant increase of low cloud cover in October, which is largest in the daylight Arctic months (March-October). Causes of the warming remain unclear; but increased absorption of summer solar radiation and autumn low cloud formation have been suggested as a positive ice-temperature-cloud feedback in the Arctic. The observed increase of low cloud cover supports the theorized positive ice-temperature-cloud feedback, whereby more open water in the Arctic Ocean increases summer absorption of solar radiation, and subsequent evaporation, which leads to more low clouds in autumn. Trapping longwave radiation, these clouds effectively lengthen the melt season and reduce perennial ice pack formation, making sea ice more vulnerable to the next melt season

  13. Continuous Arctic Ocean Water Vapor Isotope Ratio (δ18O and δ2H) Measurements During a Summer Icebreaker Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, E. S.; Welker, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Warming in the Arctic is reducing sea ice, which may result in changes to the water cycle through increased atmospheric humidity. Here we present the first continuous record of water vapor isotope ratio (δ18O, δ2H, d-excess) measurements from the sub-Arctic and Arctic Ocean during ship transit through both open water and sea ice. As water vapor isotopes were collected across a spectrum of sea ice conditions, the influence of sea ice and availability of open water moisture sources on Arctic Ocean water vapor isotope values (particularly d-excess) is examined. Isotope values reveal characteristics about water availability at vapor sources, as influenced by presence of sea ice (e.g., ice covered arid or open water humid sources), and air parcel trajectory. Higher d-excess values were generally associated with more northern Arctic, ice covered, and arid vapor sources. Conversely, lower d-excess values were related to more southern, open water, and humid vapor sources. Additionally, water vapor isotopes while sea ice was present were generally characterized by more depleted δ18O and δ2H and higher d-excess values, relative to open water values. These water vapor isotope values also present information about potential shifts in moisture sources in an increasingly ice free Arctic Ocean. Understanding these shifts is important to learning about both modern and past patterns of Arctic atmospheric water movement and distribution.

  14. On the Relative Importance of Freshwater Fluxes and Variability From the Arctic Ocean into the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowski, W.; Clement Kinney, J. L.; Jakacki, J.

    2007-12-01

    We use a high resolution coupled ice-ocean model of the Pan-Arctic region forced with realistic atmospheric data to investigate the variability of freshwater content within the Arctic Ocean as well as sea ice and liquid freshwater fluxes into the North Atlantic during 1979-2004. Modeled fluxes are validated against recently published estimates. Results are analyzed to compare the relative contribution of the total combined liquid and solid freshwater flux through the two main pathways: Fram-Denmark Strait (FDS) and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago- Davis-Hudson Strait (CAADHS). Our results suggest the relative importance of the freshwater flux through CAADHS into the Labrador Sea. This implies the need for ocean models to adequately represent mass and property fluxes through the narrow and shallow passages of the Canadian Archipelago and Davis and Hudson Straits. We argue that this requirement must be satisfied to advance studies of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and especially its variability. Given the recent record sea ice melt in the Arctic Ocean, it is critical that global ocean and climate models improve their skill in simulating and predicting effects of changing exports from the Arctic Ocean into the North Atlantic.

  15. Validation of atmospheric reanalyses over the central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobson, Erko; Vihma, Timo; Palo, Timo; Jakobson, Liisi; Keernik, Hannes; Jaagus, Jaak

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric reanalyses were validated against tethersonde sounding data on air temperature, air humidity and wind speed, collected during the drifting ice station Tara in the central Arctic in April-August 2007. The data were not assimilated into the reanalyses, providing a rare possibility for their independent validation, which was here made for the lowermost 890 m layer. The following reanalyses were included in the study: the European ERA-Interim, the Japanese JCDAS, and the U.S. NCEP-CFSR, NCEP-DOE, and NASA-MERRA. All reanalyses included large errors. ERA-Interim was ranked first; it outperformed the other reanalyses in the bias and root-mean-square-error (RMSE) for air temperature as well as in the bias, RMSE, and correlation coefficient for the wind speed. ERA-Interim suffered, however, from a warm bias of up to 2°C in the lowermost 400 m layer and a moist bias of 0.3 to 0.5 g kg-1 throughout the 890 m layer. The NCEP-CFSR, NCEP-DOE, and NASA-MERRA reanalyses outperformed the other reanalyses with respect to 2-m air temperature and specific humidity and 10-m wind speed, which makes them, especially NCEP-CSFR, better in providing turbulent flux forcing for sea ice models. Considering the whole vertical profile, however, the older NCEP-DOE got the second highest overall ranking, being better than the new NCEP-CFSR. Considering the whole group of reanalyses, the largest air temperature errors surprisingly occurred during higher-than-average wind speeds. The observed biases in temperature, humidity, and wind speed were in many cases comparable or even larger than the climatological trends during the latest decades.

  16. Pacific water transport in the Arctic Ocean in a variable GM diffusivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, E.; Hasumi, H.

    2008-12-01

    One of the crucial problems in the present Arctic Ocean modeling is a significant high-salinity bias in the central Canada Basin. Improvement of such an ocean structure in simulation by using sophisticated numerical models is necessary in order to clarify mechanisms of recent drastic change of Arctic sea ice extent, which is suggested to be induced by changes in not only wind stress and atmospheric warming but also ocean heat transport. It is indicated that one of possible reasons for the salinity bias is insufficient transport of the Pacific water from the Chukchi shelf to the basin by mesoscale eddies. In this study, the Pacific water transport and corresponding salinity distribution in the Arctic Ocean in a coupled sea ice-ocean model, which incorporates a modified Gent and McWilliams diffusion scheme, are investigated. Three experiments are conducted as follows. First, a coefficient of isopycnal layer thickness diffusion is uniformly fixed to a lower value. Second, the coefficient is set to a higher value. Third, the coefficient temporarily and spatially varies depending on local baroclinicity. In the lower diffusivity case, a high-salinity bias arises in the Canada Basin and a low-salinity bias appears in the Eurasian Basin. In this simulation, a large amount of the fresh Pacific water is improperly transported westward over the Siberian shelves, whereas it is scarcely involved into the Canada Basin. This pathway is inconsistent with the observational estimates by using chemical properties. Therefore, insufficient transport of the Pacific water across the Beaufort shelfbreak is specified as one of crucial factors for the salinity bias. In the variable diffusivity case, the parameterized eddy-induced transport of the Pacific water into the Canada Basin is locally promoted by reflecting the strong baroclinicity along the shelfbreak. The excessive intrusion of the Pacific water into the Eurasian Basin significantly decreases. This improvement remarkably reduces

  17. Large-Scale Patterns of Waves in Partial Ice Cover in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Thomson, J. M.; Rogers, W.

    2014-12-01

    Surface waves are becoming a central feature of the emerging Arctic Ocean; however, few direct measurements of waves have been made. We present multi-year time series of wave height and ice draft from moorings at two locations in the Beaufort Sea, as well as wavelength and direction estimated from high-resolution satellite imagery. In situ wave and ice data are used to examine large-scale spatial and temporal patterns of waves in the previously ice-covered Arctic Ocean. In particular, we investigate the dependence of waves on ice-controlled fetch, and wave physics in partial ice cover in the Beaufort Sea. These results are compared with WaveWatch III hindcasts to evaluate the model's accuracy in the marginal ice zone. We will expand on the approach of Thomson and Rogers (2014), who found that the energy of waves in the Arctic is directly correlated with open water distances. Incorporating new (2014) data collected throughout the marginal ice zone, we will examine adjustments to conventional fetch scaling laws in the presence of partial ice cover.

  18. Pliocene cooling enhanced by flow of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Keiji; Martin, Ellen E.; Basak, Chandranath; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Seki, Osamu; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Ikehara, Minoru; Sakai, Saburo; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    Warming of high northern latitudes in the Pliocene (5.33–2.58 Myr ago) has been linked to the closure of the Central American Seaway and intensification of North Atlantic Deep Water. Subsequent cooling in the late Pliocene may be related to the effects of freshwater input from the Arctic Ocean via the Bering Strait, disrupting North Atlantic Deep Water formation and enhancing sea ice formation. However, the timing of Arctic freshening has not been defined. Here we present neodymium and lead isotope records of detrital sediment from the Bering Sea for the past 4.3 million years. Isotopic data suggest the presence of Alaskan glaciers as far back as 4.2 Myr ago, while diatom and C37:4 alkenone records show a long-term trend towards colder and fresher water in the Bering Sea beginning with the M2 glaciation (3.3 Myr ago). We argue that the introduction of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean by 3.3 Myr ago preconditioned the climate system for global cooling. PMID:26119338

  19. Orbital-Scale Cyclostratigraphy and Ice Volume Fluctuations from Arctic Ocean Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T. M.; Marzen, R.; DeNinno, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea foraminiferal oxygen isotope curves (δ18Of) are excellent paleoclimate records but are limited as proxies of global ice volume history during orbital glacial-interglacial cycles (GIC) due to the influence of deep-sea bottom water temperature, regional hydrography, ocean circulation and other factors affecting δ18Of. A more direct source of northern hemisphere [NH] ice history comes from central Arctic Ocean (CAO) submarine ridges (Northwind, Mendeleev, Lomonosov) where, at orbital timescales, sedimentation is controlled by the growth and decay of ice sheets, ice shelves, and sea ice. Calcareous microfossil density in CAO sediments is one of many proxies, such as manganese concentrations, grain size, bulk density, color, mineral content, organic geochemistry, and foraminiferal δ18O, that reveal GIC changes in ice cover, biological productivity, and primary and post-depositional sediment processes. In order to better understand NH ice history, we constructed 600-kyr-long stacked records of Arctic foraminiferal and ostracode density (AFD, AOD) from 19 CAO sediment cores following stacking and astronomical tuning procedures used for deep-sea δ18Of curves. Results show discrepancies between the Arctic AFD and AOD curves, the LR04 δ18Of stack (Lisiecki and Raymo 2005, Paleoceanography), the Red Sea and Mediterranean δ18Of sea level curves (Rohling et al. 2014 Nature), and modeled Antarctic Ice Sheet volume, suggesting asynchronous polar ice sheet behavior in the two hemispheres, notably during MIS 3, 5a, 5c, 7d, and 11.

  20. Surface heat flow measurements from the East Siberian continental slope and southern Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Matt; Preto, Pedro; Stranne, Christian; Jakobsson, Martin; Koshurnikov, Andrey

    2016-05-01

    Surface heat flow data in the Arctic Ocean are needed to assess hydrocarbon and methane hydrate distributions, and provide constraints into the tectonic origins and nature of underlying crust. However, across broad areas of the Arctic, few published measurements exist. This is true for the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea, and the adjoining deep water ridges and basins. Here we present 21 new surface heat flow measurements from this region of the Arctic Ocean. On the Southern Lomonosov Ridge, the average measured heat flow, uncorrected for effects of sedimentation and topography, is 57 ± 4 mW/m2 (n = 4). On the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea (ESS), the average is 57 ± 10 mW/m2 (n = 16). An anomalously high heat flow of 203 ± 28 mW/m2 was measured at a single station in the Herald Canyon. With the exception of this high heat flow, the new data from the ESS are consistent with predictions for thermally equilibrated lithosphere of continental origin that was last affected by thermotectonic processes in the Cretaceous to early Cenozoic. Variability within the data likely arises from differences in radiogenic heat production within the continental crust and overlying sediments. This can be further explored by comparing the data with geophysical constraints on sediment and crustal thicknesses.

  1. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sluijs, A.; Schouten, S.; Pagani, M.; Woltering, M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Damste, J.S.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Huber, M.; Reichart, G.-J.; Stein, R.; Matthiessen, J.; Lourens, L.J.; Pedentchouk, N.; Backman, J.; Moran, K.; Clemens, S.; Cronin, T.; Eynaud, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Jakobsson, M.; Jordan, R.; Kaminski, M.; King, J.; Koc, N.; Martinez, N.C.; McInroy, D.; Moore, T.C.; O'Regan, M.; Onodera, J.; Palike, H.; Rea, B.; Rio, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, D.C.; St John, K.E.K.; Suto, I.; Suzuki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, M. E.; Yamamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, ???55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from ???18??C to over 23??C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10??C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms-perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing-to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  2. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark; Woltering, Martijn; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Dickens, Gerald R; Huber, Matthew; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Stein, Ruediger; Matthiessen, Jens; Lourens, Lucas J; Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Backman, Jan; Moran, Kathryn

    2006-06-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, approximately 55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from 18 degrees C to over 23 degrees C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10 degrees C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms--perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing--to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures.

  3. Pliocene cooling enhanced by flow of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Keiji; Martin, Ellen E; Basak, Chandranath; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Seki, Osamu; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Ikehara, Minoru; Sakai, Saburo; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    Warming of high northern latitudes in the Pliocene (5.33-2.58 Myr ago) has been linked to the closure of the Central American Seaway and intensification of North Atlantic Deep Water. Subsequent cooling in the late Pliocene may be related to the effects of freshwater input from the Arctic Ocean via the Bering Strait, disrupting North Atlantic Deep Water formation and enhancing sea ice formation. However, the timing of Arctic freshening has not been defined. Here we present neodymium and lead isotope records of detrital sediment from the Bering Sea for the past 4.3 million years. Isotopic data suggest the presence of Alaskan glaciers as far back as 4.2 Myr ago, while diatom and C37:4 alkenone records show a long-term trend towards colder and fresher water in the Bering Sea beginning with the M2 glaciation (3.3 Myr ago). We argue that the introduction of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean by 3.3 Myr ago preconditioned the climate system for global cooling. PMID:26119338

  4. Pliocene cooling enhanced by flow of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Keiji; Martin, Ellen E.; Basak, Chandranath; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Seki, Osamu; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Ikehara, Minoru; Sakai, Saburo; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2015-06-01

    Warming of high northern latitudes in the Pliocene (5.33-2.58 Myr ago) has been linked to the closure of the Central American Seaway and intensification of North Atlantic Deep Water. Subsequent cooling in the late Pliocene may be related to the effects of freshwater input from the Arctic Ocean via the Bering Strait, disrupting North Atlantic Deep Water formation and enhancing sea ice formation. However, the timing of Arctic freshening has not been defined. Here we present neodymium and lead isotope records of detrital sediment from the Bering Sea for the past 4.3 million years. Isotopic data suggest the presence of Alaskan glaciers as far back as 4.2 Myr ago, while diatom and C37:4 alkenone records show a long-term trend towards colder and fresher water in the Bering Sea beginning with the M2 glaciation (3.3 Myr ago). We argue that the introduction of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean by 3.3 Myr ago preconditioned the climate system for global cooling.

  5. OASIS-CANADA: observations of boundary layer ozone and mercury depletion from the Arctic Ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J. W.; Netcheva, S.; Staebler, R.; Steffen, A.

    2009-04-01

    Dramatic depletion of ozone (O3) and gaseous elementary mercury (GEM) from the marine boundary layer during the spring in Polar Regions is known to be driven by bromine atoms originating from activation of seasalt bromide. Almost all surface based measurements have been made at coastal observatories, but much of the active processing of the air is believed to occur near or at the surface of the Arctic Ocean itself. A major objective of the OASIS (Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice and Snow) program during the International Polar Year (IPY) was therefore to make observations directly over the frozen Arctic Ocean. In the context of the OASIS-CANADA program, sponsored by the Canadian Federal Program Office of the IPY, several ocean bound campaigns were joined including the French TARA expedition (2006-2008), the CFL campaign on the Canadian ice breaker CCGS Amundsen (February-April 2008), the COBRA campaign over the Hudson Bay near Kuujjuaraapik/Whapmagoostui, Quebec (February-March 2008), the ASCOS campaign on the Swedish polar class ice breaker Oden to the North Pole (August-September 2008), and the OASIS-09 campaign at Barrow Alaska (February-March 2009). In this presentation I will summarize the observations and explore what has been learned regarding the drivers for the depletion process, such as the influence of the ambient temperature, the nature of the underlying surface, and the atmospheric stability. An important question is whether depletion in progress was observed, rather than the arrival of previously depleted air, as is generally the case at Arctic coastal observatories.

  6. Identification of Younger Dryas outburst flood path from Lake Agassiz to the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Murton, Julian B; Bateman, Mark D; Dallimore, Scott R; Teller, James T; Yang, Zhirong

    2010-04-01

    The melting Laurentide Ice Sheet discharged thousands of cubic kilometres of fresh water each year into surrounding oceans, at times suppressing the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and triggering abrupt climate change. Understanding the physical mechanisms leading to events such as the Younger Dryas cold interval requires identification of the paths and timing of the freshwater discharges. Although Broecker et al. hypothesized in 1989 that an outburst from glacial Lake Agassiz triggered the Younger Dryas, specific evidence has so far proved elusive, leading Broecker to conclude in 2006 that "our inability to identify the path taken by the flood is disconcerting". Here we identify the missing flood path-evident from gravels and a regional erosion surface-running through the Mackenzie River system in the Canadian Arctic Coastal Plain. Our modelling of the isostatically adjusted surface in the upstream Fort McMurray region, and a slight revision of the ice margin at this time, allows Lake Agassiz to spill into the Mackenzie drainage basin. From optically stimulated luminescence dating we have determined the approximate age of this Mackenzie River flood into the Arctic Ocean to be shortly after 13,000 years ago, near the start of the Younger Dryas. We attribute to this flood a boulder terrace near Fort McMurray with calibrated radiocarbon dates of over 11,500 years ago. A large flood into the Arctic Ocean at the start of the Younger Dryas leads us to reject the widespread view that Agassiz overflow at this time was solely eastward into the North Atlantic Ocean.

  7. Deep-sea ostracode shell chemistry (Mg:Ca ratios) and late Quaternary Arctic Ocean history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Baker, P.A.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; Briggs, W.M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The magnesium:calcium (Mg:Ca) and strontium:calcium (Sr:Ca) ratios were investigated in shells of the benthic ostracode genus Krithe obtained from 64 core-tops from water depths of 73 to 4411 m in the Arctic Ocean and Nordic seas to determine the potential of ostracode shell chemistry for paleoceanographic study. Shells from the abyssal plain and ridges of the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov basins and the Norwegian and Greenland seas had a wide scatter of Mg:Ca ratios ranging from 0.007 to 0.012 that may signify post-mortem chemical alteration of the shells from Arctic deep-sea environments below about 1000 m water depth. There is a positive correlation (r2=0.59) between Mg:Ca ratios and bottom-water temperature in Krithe shells from water depths <900 m.

  8. The Arctic Ocean in summer: A quasi-synoptic inverse estimate of boundary fluxes and water mass transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, T.; Bacon, S.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.; Aksenov, Y.; Laxon, S. W.; Fahrbach, E.; Beszczynska-MöLler, A.; Hansen, E.; Lee, C. M.; Ingvaldsen, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The first quasi-synoptic estimates of Arctic Ocean and sea ice net fluxes of volume, heat and freshwater are calculated by application of an inverse model to data around the ocean boundary. Hydrographic measurements from four gateways to the Arctic (Bering, Davis, and Fram Straits and the Barents Sea Opening) completely enclose the ocean, and were made within the same 32-day period in summer 2005. The inverse model is formulated as a set of full-depth and density-layer-specific volume and salinity transport conservation equations, with conservation constraints also applied to temperature, but only in non-outcropping layers. The model includes representations of Fram Strait sea ice export and of interior Arctic Ocean diapycnal fluxes. The results show that in summer 2005 the transport-weighted mean properties are, for water entering the Arctic: potential temperature 4.49°C, salinity 34.50 and potential density (σ0) 27.34 kg m-3; and for water leaving the Arctic, including sea ice: 0.25°C, 33.81, and 27.13 kg m-3, respectively. The net effect of the Arctic in summer is to freshen and cool the inflows by 0.69 in salinity and 4.23°C, respectively, and to decrease density by 0.21 kg m-3. The volume transport into the Arctic of waters above ˜1000 m depth is 9.2 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), and the export (similarly) is 9.3 Sv. The net oceanic and sea ice freshwater flux is 187 ± 48 mSv. The net heat flux (including sea ice) is 189 ± 37 TW, representing loss from the ocean to the atmosphere.

  9. Arctic Ocean Watermasses: Volumes, Locations and Variabilities Derived from Models, Climatologies and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacsek, S.; Posey, P.; Smedstad, L.; McClean, J.; Hebert, D.; Allard, R.

    2012-04-01

    A water mass census has been carried out for the Arctic Ocean Basin, including its marginal seas but not the GIN Sea. Data examined included output from 3 ocean models, 3 climatologies, and observations archived in the NODC WOD09 data base. The focus of the studies were mainly the Atlantic water (AW), and the deep waters, especially those of the Canadian and Eurasian basins (CBDW and EBDW, respectively). The comparisons included volumetric statistics, geographic extent with depth ranges, and seasonal and interannual variabilities. The models used were HYCOM [Bleck, Ocean Modelling 37, 2002; Chassignet et al, Oceanography 22, 2009], NCOM [Barron et al, Ocean Modelling 11, 2006, p.347; Kara et al, ibid, p.376] and POP [Maltrud and McClean, Ocean Modelling 8, 2005]. The respective resolutions were 0.083, 0.125, and 0.100 degrees The overall period of the model simulations was from 1994 to 2011, with HYCOM and NCOM output analyzed for 2011, and POP output for 2003. The principal climatology examined and compared with the models was the WOA09 of NOAA/NODC. In the summer of 2011, waters with temperature T > 0 deg C (referred to often as Atlantic Water AW) were found to "circumnavigate" the Arctic in the latitude range 82N-89N for all three models and the WOA09 climatology. This layer lies in the depth range 150-1100m in the Eurasian Basin for HYCOM and 175-800m for NCOM, with the warmest layers centered on depth levels of ~400m and ~300m, respectively. In the Canadian Basin, the corresponding depth ranges were 350-1000m and 250-850m for the two models, with the warmest layers centered on 600m and 500m, respectively. For POP in the summer of 2003, the layer depth ranges are 125m-1100m and 200m-1100m in the two basins, with the warmest layers centered on depths of ~400m and ~500m, respectively. For the WOA09 climatology, the depth ranges were 150-800m and 250-900m in the two basins, with the warmest waters centered on the 300m and 400m depth levels, respectively. NCOM and

  10. Biased thermohaline exchanges with the Arctic across the Iceland-Faroe Ridge in ocean climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, S. M.; Hansen, B.; Østerhus, S.; Quadfasel, D.; Valdimarsson, H.

    2016-04-01

    The northern limb of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation and its transport of heat and salt towards the Arctic strongly modulate the climate of the Northern Hemisphere. The presence of warm surface waters prevents ice formation in parts of the Arctic Mediterranean, and ocean heat is directly available for sea-ice melt, while salt transport may be critical for the stability of the exchanges. Through these mechanisms, ocean heat and salt transports play a disproportionally strong role in the climate system, and realistic simulation is a requisite for reliable climate projections. Across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge (GSR) this occurs in three well-defined branches where anomalies in the warm and saline Atlantic inflow across the shallow Iceland-Faroe Ridge (IFR) have been shown to be particularly difficult to simulate in global ocean models. This branch (IF-inflow) carries about 40 % of the total ocean heat transport into the Arctic Mediterranean and is well constrained by observation during the last 2 decades but associated with significant inter-annual fluctuations. The inconsistency between model results and observational data is here explained by the inability of coarse-resolution models to simulate the overflow across the IFR (IF-overflow), which feeds back onto the simulated IF-inflow. In effect, this is reduced in the model to reflect only the net exchange across the IFR. Observational evidence is presented for a substantial and persistent IF-overflow and mechanisms that qualitatively control its intensity. Through this, we explain the main discrepancies between observed and simulated exchange. Our findings rebuild confidence in modelled net exchange across the IFR, but reveal that compensation of model deficiencies here through other exchange branches is not effective. This implies that simulated ocean heat transport to the Arctic is biased low by more than 10 % and associated with a reduced level of variability, while the quality of the simulated salt

  11. Millenial Scale Variability of the Arctic Ocean and Northern North Atlantic during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vernal, A.; Van Nieuwenhove, N.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2014-12-01

    In the Arctic and northern North Atlantic, the relationships between ocean and climate are complex as sea-surface temperatures (SST) are intimately related to salinity, water mass stratification and sea-ice cover. From this viewpoint, the assemblages of dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts), whose distribution is dependent upon all the above mention parameters, yield proxies of sea-surface conditions and reveal particularly useful for the reconstruction of past ocean conditions in such environments. Analysis of dinocyst assemblages and application of the modern analogue technique in more than 30 sediment cores were used to document the surface ocean changes in the northern North Atlantic and Arctic oceans during the Holocene. Among salient features, we note little variations in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago Channels. In contrast, relatively large amplitude variations in the Chukchi Sea and the Barents Sea are recorded and suggest millennial type oscillations with amplitude exceeding long-term trends (e.g., up to 4°C in summer SST). Data also indicate an almost opposite pacing between the western and eastern Arctic. Another important feature is the major SST-increase and sea-ice cover reduction in eastern Baffin Bay and along the south-east Greenland margins at about 7.5 ka ago, linked to the penetration of warmer and more saline North Atlantic water. This led to production of the Labrador Sea Water through winter cooling and convection and was followed by a reorganisation of water masses in the Nordic seas around 7.0 ka. The ~ 7.5-7.0 ka transition thus marks the actual onset of "interglacial" conditions in the subpolar North Atlantic. Whereas a more or less diachronic "thermal optimum" might be recorded at some sites during the early-mid Holocene, a strong regionalism in trends and millennial-scale instabilities persisted throughout the postglacial. Finally, one should mention that last decade variations of ocean conditions in these basins exceed those of the mid

  12. NABOS-II Observational Program in the Arctic Ocean: New Perspectives and new Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir; Polyakov, Igor; Ashik, Igor; Pnyushkov, Andrey; Alkire, Matthew; Repina, Irina; Alexeev, Vladimir; Waddington, Ian; Kanzow, Torsten; Rember, Robert; Artamonov, Alexander; Goszczko, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    NABOS-II observational program was launched in 2013 on the basis of new knowledge obtained during NABOS (=Nansen and Amundsen Basins Observations System) project back in 2000s. Up to now two large scale expeditions in the Eurasian sector of the Arctic Ocean were carried out in framework of NABOS-II: in 2013 and in 2015. These field studies were conducted by International Arctic Research Center (IARC) University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA in partnership with Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI) St.Petersburg Russia. The main goal of the NABOS-II project is to provide quantitative assessment of circulation and water mass transformation along the principal pathways transporting water from the Nordic Seas to the Arctic Basin under conditions of substantially reduced summer ice cover. Reduced sea ice causes changes in the water column and in the overlying atmosphere. Documenting of these changes was the main target of the NABOS-II cruises. The scope of this goal and the opportunities of extended scientific research in the Arctic, provided during NABOS expeditions, encouraged scientific institutions from the USA, Europe and Asia to raise funds, contribute to the cruise program and to send their personnel to expeditions, thus giving them a true multidisciplinary status. The ambitious mission of collecting a two year long time series of hydrographic data at 6 moorings along 126E meridian from the upper slope (250 m depth) to the deep basin (3900 m depth) in the Laptev Sea was successfully accomplished in 2015. The collected data are truly unique, since they shed new light on the structure and spatio-temporal variability of water properties and transports in the Lapev Sea, which is the key region for understanding of interaction between Atlantic water branches. This presentation describes preliminary results of performed analysis.

  13. Igneous rocks of Arctic Ocean deep sea ridges: new data on petrology, geochemistry and geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Oleg; Morozov, Andrey; Shokalsky, Sergey; Sobolev, Nikolay; Kashubin, Sergey; Shevchenko, Sergey; Sergeev, Sergey; Belyatsky, Boris; Shatov, Vitaly; Petrov, Eugeny

    2015-04-01

    The aggregate results of studies of igneous rocks, collected from the central part of the Arctic Ocean during scientific marine expeditions «Arctic-2000, 2005, 2007 and 2012» are presented and discussed in the frame of modern understanding of High Polar Arctic tectonic constraint. Petrological, geochemical and isotope-geochronological studies of more than 500 samples have shown that the sedimentary rocks are of dominated population among the rock fragments dredged from deep-sea bottom, and represented by metamorphosed dolomite and quartz sandstone, limestone, sometimes with the Devonian - Permian fauna. Igneous rocks are 10-15% only (Archean and Paleoproterozoic gneissouse granites and gabbro, Neoproterozoic dolerite) and metamorphic rocks (green shales, metabasites, gneisses). Apparently, these rocks are part of the acoustic basement underlying the Late Mesozoic - Cenozoic layered loose sediments. In addition to the dredged fragments of the ancient mafic rocks, some samples were taken as a core during deep-water drilling in the northern and southern slopes of the Mendeleev Ridge and represented by trachybasalts, marking the border of Late-Cenozoic deposit cover and acoustic basement and quite similar in composition to those of Early-Late Cretaceous basalts form northward of the Chukchi Plateau seamounts, Alpha Ridge, Franz Josef Land, De Long islands and other parts of the large igneous province of the High Arctic (HALIP). Video-filming of Mendeleev Ridge escarps proofs the existing of rock outcrops and supports local origin of most of the rock fragments found in the sampling areas. Thus the continental type of the earth's crust of the Central Arctic Ridges basement is based on all obtained results of our study of sea-bottom excavated rock material.

  14. Detrital zircons of deep-sea sediments of the Arctic ocean - key to the understanding of High Polar Arctic tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokalsky, S.; Morozov, A.; Petrov, O.; Belyatsky, B.; Rekant, P.; Shevchenko, S.; Sergeev, S.

    2012-04-01

    appreciably different for Polar sample (200-450 Ma) and Geophysicists Spur (200, 300, 400-600 Ma). It is known, that formation of modern deep-sea sediments takes place mainly due to fluvial discharge (ca 90%), erosion of oceanic bedrocks and coastal beaches. Wind-borne component and extraterraneous dust are not significant (<1%). Transportation of continental material by icebergs (ice-rafted debris) is added to these sources in polar areas. Well-known Permian-Triassic sandstones of Arctic coast (including polar islands) are defined by the presence of Grenvillian age zircons - Canadian Arctic, Alaska, Greenland (Miller et al., 2006), while Jurassic-Cretaceous sandstones of the South Anjui Zone, Chukotka and New Siberian Islands of Russian Arctic (Miller et al., 2008) have clastic zircon with ages very similar to the obtained by us for deep-sea sediments. We suppose that modern deep-sea sediments were formed either due to ablation of these sandstones with distal transportation of detritus (highly unlikely), or due to weathering of similar rock of oceanic highs of Lomonosov Ridge. The last is more realistic because the similarity of the Lomonosov Ridge and north-east continental Arctic is proved by geophysical data (Jokat et al., 1992).

  15. Decadal predictability of extreme fresh water export events from the Arctic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and subpolar North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmith, Torben; Olsen, Steffen M.; Ringgaard, Ida M.; May, Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    Abrupt fresh water releases originating in the Arctic Ocean have been documented to affect ocean circulation and climate in the North Atlantic area. Therefore, in this study, we investigate prospects for predicting such events up to one decade ahead. This is done in a perfect model setup by a combination of analyzing a 500 year control experiment and dedicated ensemble experiment aimed at predicting selected 10 year long segments of the control experiment. The selected segments are characterized by a large positive or negative trend in the total fresh water content in the Arctic Ocean. The analysis of the components (liquid fresh water and sea ice) reveals that they develop in a near random walk manner. From this we conclude that the main mechanism is integration of fresh water in the Beaufort Gyre through Ekman pumping from the randomly varying atmosphere. Therefore, the predictions from the ensemble experiments are on average not better than a damped persistence predictions. By running two different families of ensemble predictions, one starting from the 'observed' ocean globally, and one starting from climatology in the Arctic Ocean and from the observed ocean elsewhere, we conclude that the former outperforms the latter for the first few years as regards liquid fresh water and for the first year as regards sea ice. Analysis of the model experiments in terms of the fresh water export from the Arctic Ocean into Nordic seas and the subpolar North Atlantic reveals a very modest potential for predictability.

  16. Regional patterns in current and future export production in the central Arctic Ocean quantified from nitrate fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randelhoff, Achim; Guthrie, John D.

    2016-08-01

    Due to severe nutrient and light limitation, the central Arctic Ocean has been characterized as a region of low primary productivity, with high retention of carbon in the surface waters. Using an in-depth analysis of published and new measurements of turbulent microstructure and high-resolution profiles of nitrate concentration, we reassess the vertical supply of nitrate to the Polar Mixed Layer and the associated export of particulate organic matter across the nitracline. We estimate annual export production to be approximately 1.5-3 g C m-2, but regional differences in both current and future potential of export production are large, with the eastern Arctic being least constrained by vertical nutrient supply and the western Arctic the most. Future changes in export production are assessed using a 1-D budget model; increases in the Atlantic sector are possibly compensated by decreases in the rest of the central Arctic Ocean such that the net change might be insignificant.

  17. Physical and biogeochemical controls on the variability in surface pH and calcium carbonate saturation states in the Atlantic sectors of the Arctic and Southern Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, Eithne; Clarke, Jennifer S.; Humphreys, Matthew P.; Ribas-Ribas, Mariana; Esposito, Mario; Rérolle, Victoire M. C.; Schlosser, C.; Thorpe, Sally E.; Tyrrell, Toby; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2016-05-01

    Polar oceans are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification due to their low temperatures and reduced buffering capacity, and are expected to experience extensive low pH conditions and reduced carbonate mineral saturations states (Ω) in the near future. However, the impact of anthropogenic CO2 on pH and Ω will vary regionally between and across the Arctic and Southern Oceans. Here we investigate the carbonate chemistry in the Atlantic sector of two polar oceans, the Nordic Seas and Barents Sea in the Arctic Ocean, and the Scotia and Weddell Seas in the Southern Ocean, to determine the physical and biogeochemical processes that control surface pH and Ω. High-resolution observations showed large gradients in surface pH (0.10-0.30) and aragonite saturation state (Ωar) (0.2-1.0) over small spatial scales, and these were particularly strong in sea-ice covered areas (up to 0.45 in pH and 2.0 in Ωar). In the Arctic, sea-ice melt facilitated bloom initiation in light-limited and iron replete (dFe>0.2 nM) regions, such as the Fram Strait, resulting in high pH (8.45) and Ωar (3.0) along the sea-ice edge. In contrast, accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon derived from organic carbon mineralisation under the ice resulted in low pH (8.05) and Ωar (1.1) in areas where thick ice persisted. In the Southern Ocean, sea-ice retreat resulted in bloom formation only where terrestrial inputs supplied sufficient iron (dFe>0.2 nM), such as in the vicinity of the South Sandwich Islands where enhanced pH (8.3) and Ωar (2.3) were primarily due to biological production. In contrast, in the adjacent Weddell Sea, weak biological uptake of CO2 due to low iron concentrations (dFe<0.2 nM) resulted in low pH (8.1) and Ωar (1.6). The large spatial variability in both polar oceans highlights the need for spatially resolved surface data of carbonate chemistry variables but also nutrients (including iron) in order to accurately elucidate the large gradients experienced by marine

  18. Evaluating central Arctic summer conditions in the Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR) and ERA-Interim using Arctic-Summer Cloud-Ocean-Study (ASCOS) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesslén, Cecilia; Tjernström, Michael; Bromwich, David; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Bai, Le-Sheng; de Boer, Gijs; Ekman, Annica

    2013-04-01

    The Arctic has experienced large climate changes over recent decades, the largest for any region on Earth. The warming has been more than twice as large as the global average, and substantial changes in, for example, sea-ice cover, thickness and permafrost have been observed. To understand the underlying reasons for this apparent climate sensitivity, reanalysis is an invaluable tool. The Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR) is a regional reanalysis using the polar version of the Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) atmospheric model that, by the virtue of being regional, can be affordably run at higher resolution. The ASR is forced at the lateral boundaries by the ECMWF ERA-Interim global reanalysis; ERA-Interim is the latest global reanalysis from ECMWF. The ASR reanalysis products need to be evaluated preferably using independent data; this is a problem in the Arctic where data are sparse and as much as possible of the available data is assimilated in the reanalysis. In this study we evaluate the performance of an experimental version of ASR, with a nominal resolution of ~30 km, for the central Arctic, using data from the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) from August and early September 2008.. The ASCOS field experiment was deployed on the Swedish icebreaker Oden north of 87°N in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic; data was collected both during the transits to and from Longyearbyen on Svalbard and during a three-week ice drift with the Oden moored to a drifting multi-year ice floe, when intensive measurements were taken on the ice and onboard. These observations have the advantages of being independent of ASR, i.e., they were not assimilated into the reanalysis, and being detailed enough to evaluate the process descriptions in the ASR. In addition to the ASR, the ERA-Interim reanalysis was also included in the evaluation. In the version of ASR evaluated here, lateral boundaries were forced by ERA-Interim and therefore this makes it possible to evaluate the added

  19. Estimation of heat content and variability in the upper Arctic Ocean from the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) and available observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMaggio, D.; Maslowski, W.; Roberts, A.; Osinski, R.; Clement Kinney, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    The observed rate of sea ice cover decline in the Arctic for the past decades is faster than those projected by the latest suite of models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). We hypothesize that a critical source of energy in the Arctic Ocean, heat content accumulating below the surface mixed layer and above the halocline, has been increasing in magnitude and area and may be contributing to the recent decline in the ice cover. To address this hypothesis we analyze model output from a subset of the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), where the atmospheric and land components are replaced with prescribed realistic atmospheric reanalysis data. First, mixed layer and halocline depths are estimated from RASM and compared with available observational estimates. Next, monthly heat content is calculated for the upper Arctic Ocean layer (UAOL), defined by these two hydrographic boundaries, for the period of 1948-2009. Consistent with observations from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's network of Ice-Tethered Profilers (ITP), model results indicate that heat has been stored in UAOL and that it has increased recently. Analyses of ITP data and RASM show that the total amount and rate of increase of heat content has been largest in the western Arctic and there might be a causal relationship between the accumulation of heat content and the reduction of sea ice volume.

  20. Collection of Arctic Ocean Data from US Navy Submarines on the New SCICEX Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethie, W. M.; Sambrotto, R.; Boyd, T.; Richter-Menge, J.; Corbett, J.

    2011-12-01

    The SCICEX submarine Arctic science program originated in the 1990s when six dedicated science cruises were conducted in the Arctic Ocean aboard US Navy Sturgeon class submarines. After the cold war era Sturgeon class submarines were retired, several Science Accommodation cruises, for which a few days for scientific measurements were added to planned submarine transits through the Arctic Ocean, were carried out when opportunities arose. Renewed interest in conducting further Science Accommodation cruises on a regular basis to better document and understand how the Arctic Ocean responds to climate change resulted in publication of a scientific plan in 2010 (http://www.arctic.gov/publications/scicex_plan.pdf). In the spring of 2011 testing of data collection and water sampling methods aboard newer Virginia and Seawolf class submarines on transit from a Navy ice camp in the Beaufort Sea, was conducted in order to develop protocols and evaluate techniques. Ice draft measurements were also taken in the vicinity of the ice camp and near the North Pole to evaluate new data collection systems. This evaluation will include a comparison of the ice draft data with a comprehensive set of in situ ice thickness measurements taken near the ice camp. Under-ice submarine-launched eXpendable Condutivity Temperature Depth (XCTD) probes were deployed from the USS Connecticut (SSN-22), a Seawolf class submarine, and the resulting profiles compared to CTD casts from the APLIS ice station and historical profiles. Water samples were collected through the hull for measurements of tritium, helium isotopes, oxygen isotopes, chlorofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, bacterioplankton, phytoplankton and particulates levels. These samples were returned to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and were in the process of being measured at the time this abstract was written. Measurements completed at this time indicate good samples can be collected for CFC-12

  1. Late Quaternary sediment deposition of core MA01 in the Mendeleev Ridge, the western Arctic Ocean: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwang-Kyu; Kim, Sunghan; Khim, Boo-Keun; Xiao, Wenshen; Wang, Rujian

    2014-05-01

    Late Quaternary deep marine sediments in the Arctic Ocean are characterized by brown layers intercalated with yellowish to olive gray layers (Poore et al., 1999; Polyak et al., 2004). Previous studies reported that the brown and gray layers were deposited during interglacial (or interstadial) and glacial (or stadial) periods, respectively. A 5.5-m long gravity core MA01 was obtained from the Mendeleev Ridge in the western Arctic Ocean by R/V Xue Long during scientific cruise CHINARE-V. Age (~450 ka) of core MA01 was tentatively estimated by correlation of brown layers with an adjacent core HLY0503-8JPC (Adler et al., 2009). A total of 22 brown layers characterized by low L* and b*, high Mn concentration, and abundant foraminifera were identified. Corresponding gray layers are characterized by high L* and b*, low Mn concentration, and few foraminiferal tests. Foraminifera abundance peaks are not well correlated to CaCO3 peaks which occurred with the coarse-grained (>0.063 mm) fractions (i.e., IRD) both in brown and gray layers. IRDs are transported presumably by sea ice for the deposition of brown layers and by iceberg for the deposition of gray layers (Polyak et al., 2004). A strong correlation coefficient (r2=0.89) between TOC content and C/N ratio indicates that the major source of organic matter is terrestrial. The good correlations of CaCO3 content to TOC (r2=0.56) and C/N ratio (r2=0.69) imply that IRDs contain detrital CaCO3 which mainly originated from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. In addition, high kaolinite/chlorite (K/C) ratios mostly correspond to CaCO3 peaks, which suggests that the fine-grained particles in the Mendeleev Ridge are transported from the north coast Alaska and Canada where Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata are widely distributed. Thus, the Beaufort Gyre, the predominant surface current in the western Arctic Ocean, played an important role in the sediment delivery to the Mendeleev Ridge. It is worthy of note that the TOC and CaCO3 peaks are

  2. Sources of Arctic Ocean upper halocline and changes in its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. G.; Andersson, P. S.; Bjvrk, G. M.; Jutterstrom, S.; Wahlstrom, I.

    2011-12-01

    The upper halocline of the Arctic Ocean has a distinct chemical signature by its high nutrient and partial pressure of carbon dioxide as well as low oxygen and pH values. This signature is formed along the bottoms of the Siberian shelf seas, primarily the Chukchi and East Siberian Seas, by a combination of mineralization of organic matter and release of the decay products to the sea ice brine enriched bottom water. In this contribution we use salinity and total alkalinity data to show that the fraction of sea ice brine in the nutrient enriched upper halocline water in the central Arctic Ocean is up to 4%. This water of low pH, and thus also low in calcium carbonate solubility, is found between about 100 and 200 m depth and is thus close to the productive surface water in a future central Arctic Ocean of less summer sea ice cover. In the East Siberian Sea the bottom waters with exceptional high nutrient concentration and low pH have typically between 5 and 10% of sea ice brine as computed form salinity and oxygen-18 vales. On the continental slope, over bottom depths of 15-200 m, the brine contribution was 6% at the nutrient maximum depth (50-100 m). At the same location as well as over deeper waters the silicate maximum was found over a wider salinity range than traditionally, in agreement with observations of Nishino et al (J. Oceanogr, Vol. 65, pp. 871 to 883, 2009) in the area of the deep Arctic Ocean east of the Chukchi Plateau. However, the water with lowest salinity (~32.5) in the silicate maximum had maximum in nitrate deficit expressed as N** (= [NO3] - 16[PO4] + 2.9) and the waters with highest salinity (~34.5) had the lowest oxygen concentration. This pattern is not obvious and point to at least two different biochemical environments within the East Siberian Sea that has not been observed before and could be a sign of a changing marine climate in the East Siberian Sea. One cause could be more open water in the summer season followed by more sea ice

  3. Yearlong, Daily Assessments of Bio-Optical Distributions under Perennial Ice Cover in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laney, S. R.; Toole, J. M.; Krishfield, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past three years eight Ice-Tethered Profilers have been outfitted with a new bio-optical sensor suite and have been deployed under perennial ice cover in the Arctic Ocean. This sensor suite enables the measurement of chlorophyll (a proxy for algal biomass), colored dissolved organic matter concentration, and particular backscatter intensities throughout the entire upper 750 m of the under-ice water column. An irradiance sensor additionally provides concurrent measurements of the light field underneath ice cover during times of the year that receive insolation. Two of these profilers have operated for a full year, returning multiple daily profiles of these basic biogeochemical optical properties with sub-meter vertical resolution. These observations provide unprecedented insight into the basic optical seasonality of the pelagic ocean environment under perennial ice cover, including the timing of important biogeochemical events in the Arctic such as periods of high under-ice productivity and the subsequent export of organic matter to the deep ocean.

  4. Mercury export to the Arctic Ocean from the Mackenzie River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Emmerton, Craig A; Graydon, Jennifer A; Gareis, Jolie A L; St Louis, Vincent L; Lesack, Lance F W; Banack, Janelle K A; Hicks, Faye; Nafziger, Jennifer

    2013-07-16

    Circumpolar rivers, including the Mackenzie River in Canada, are sources of the contaminant mercury (Hg) to the Arctic Ocean, but few Hg export studies exist for these rivers. During the 2007-2010 freshet and open water seasons, we collected river water upstream and downstream of the Mackenzie River delta to quantify total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations and export. Upstream of the delta, flow-weighted mean concentrations of bulk THg and MeHg were 14.6 ± 6.2 ng L(-1) and 0.081 ± 0.045 ng L(-1), respectively. Only 11-13% and 44-51% of bulk THg and MeHg export was in the dissolved form. Using concentration-discharge relationships, we calculated bulk THg and MeHg export into the delta of 2300-4200 kg yr(-1) and 15-23 kg yr(-1) over the course of the study. Discharge is not presently known in channels exiting the delta, so we assessed differences in river Hg concentrations upstream and downstream of the delta to estimate its influence on Hg export to the ocean. Bulk THg and MeHg concentrations decreased 19% and 11% through the delta, likely because of particle settling and other processes in the floodplain. These results suggest that northern deltas may be important accumulators of river Hg in their floodplains before export to the Arctic Ocean.

  5. Sea surface retracking and classification of CryoSat-2 altimetry observations in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenseng, L.; Piccioni, G.; Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present the retracking and classification methods for CryoSat-2 SAR waveforms, developed for the determination of sea surface heights in the Arctic Ocean. The obtained sea surface heights (SSH) are used to decrease the gap in satellite observations from 82 degrees North to 88 degrees North in the DTU15 mean sea surface (MSS) and mean dynamic topography (MDT).Radar altimetry satellites has observed the sea surface for more than 25 years and thereby obtain data to determine accurate MSSs and estimate sea level trends related to climate changes. In combination with the improvements of global geoids it has furthermore provided an opportunity to improve the MDT related to ocean currents.After the launch of CryoSat-2 in 2010 the coverage was increased dramatically while the introduction of the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and SAR interferometry (SARin) mode increased the amount of useful echoes in the Arctic Ocean. The new types of radar observation modes have been investigated and methods to retrack and classify the waveforms have been implemented in LARS the advanced retracking system (LARS). Finally the SSH observations obtained from CryoSat-2 with LARS is merged with previous satellite radar altimetry data to derive the DTU15 MSS.

  6. Comparison of Hygroscopicity, Volatility, and Mixing State of Submicrometer Particles between Cruises over the Arctic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gibaek; Cho, Hee-Joo; Seo, Arom; Kim, Dohyung; Gim, Yeontae; Lee, Bang Yong; Yoon, Young Jun; Park, Kihong

    2015-10-20

    Ship-borne measurements of ambient aerosols were conducted during an 11 937 km cruise over the Arctic Ocean (cruise 1) and the Pacific Ocean (cruise 2). A frequent nucleation event was observed during cruise 1 under marine influence, and the abundant organic matter resulting from the strong biological activity in the ocean could contribute to the formation of new particles and their growth to a detectable size. Concentrations of particle mass and black carbon increased with increasing continental influence from polluted areas. During cruise 1, multiple peaks of hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of 1.1-1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 were found, and higher amounts of volatile organic species existed in the particles compared to that during cruise 2, which is consistent with the greater availability of volatile organic species caused by the strong oceanic biological activity (cruise 1). Internal mixtures of volatile and nonhygroscopic organic species, nonvolatile and less-hygroscopic organic species, and nonvolatile and hygroscopic nss-sulfate with varying fractions can be assumed to constitute the submicrometer particles. On the basis of elemental composition and morphology, the submicrometer particles were classified into C-rich mixture, S-rich mixture, C/S-rich mixture, Na-rich mixture, C/P-rich mixture, and mineral-rich mixture. Consistently, the fraction of biological particles (i.e., P-containing particles) increased when the ship traveled along a strongly biologically active area. PMID:26389581

  7. Comparison of Hygroscopicity, Volatility, and Mixing State of Submicrometer Particles between Cruises over the Arctic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gibaek; Cho, Hee-Joo; Seo, Arom; Kim, Dohyung; Gim, Yeontae; Lee, Bang Yong; Yoon, Young Jun; Park, Kihong

    2015-10-20

    Ship-borne measurements of ambient aerosols were conducted during an 11 937 km cruise over the Arctic Ocean (cruise 1) and the Pacific Ocean (cruise 2). A frequent nucleation event was observed during cruise 1 under marine influence, and the abundant organic matter resulting from the strong biological activity in the ocean could contribute to the formation of new particles and their growth to a detectable size. Concentrations of particle mass and black carbon increased with increasing continental influence from polluted areas. During cruise 1, multiple peaks of hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of 1.1-1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 were found, and higher amounts of volatile organic species existed in the particles compared to that during cruise 2, which is consistent with the greater availability of volatile organic species caused by the strong oceanic biological activity (cruise 1). Internal mixtures of volatile and nonhygroscopic organic species, nonvolatile and less-hygroscopic organic species, and nonvolatile and hygroscopic nss-sulfate with varying fractions can be assumed to constitute the submicrometer particles. On the basis of elemental composition and morphology, the submicrometer particles were classified into C-rich mixture, S-rich mixture, C/S-rich mixture, Na-rich mixture, C/P-rich mixture, and mineral-rich mixture. Consistently, the fraction of biological particles (i.e., P-containing particles) increased when the ship traveled along a strongly biologically active area.

  8. Modelling subglacial discharge and its influence on ocean heat transport in Arctic fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Mortensen, John; Rysgaard, Søren

    2015-11-01

    Tidewater outlet glaciers are directly connected to the ocean via ice walls or floating shelves. Melting and freezing of ice, runoff, englacial, and subglacial discharge of freshwater and ocean heat transport are therefore potential feedback processes between glacial ice flow and ocean circulation. Subglacial discharge occurs at the base of tidewater glacier outlets where out-flowing freshwater forms a convective buoyant plume ascending close to the glacier face and, due to entrainment, transports relatively warm and saline ambient bottom water up towards the surface. Plume dynamics, typically occurring at sub-grid scales in regional ocean models, therefore has to be parameterized in areas where ice-ocean interactions occur, as for example in Arctic fjords. Here, we develop and analyze a new simple boundary condition of subglacial discharge where entrainment-induced transport between the subsurface and surface layer is described. A sensitivity study showed that subglacial discharge increased ocean heat transport near the glacier whereas the impact from plume-entrainment became relatively small further from the glacier. Subglacial discharge was shown to have a significant influence on surface concentrations. The impact from subglacial discharge was demonstrated in a regional model of Godthåbsfjord (64°N), located at the west coast of Greenland, where surface concentrations near the glacier were shown to be sensitive to subglacial discharge in accordance with observations.

  9. Reconstruction of paleoceanographic changes in the western Arctic Ocean duing the late Quaternary: Results from RV Araon and RV Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, S.; Kim, S.; Schreck, M.; Lee, B.; Niessen, F.; Stein, R. H.; Matthiessen, J. J.; Mackensen, A.

    2013-12-01

    The recent warming Arctic has fundamental effects on various scales as global (albedo, sea level, thermohaline circulation), hemispheric (mid-latitude weather/climate), and local (sedimentary, hydrographic, and cryospheric conditions). The extent and thickness of Arctic sea ice have dramatically reduced due to the amplified response of the Arctic Ocean to rapid global warming. The rapid melting of Arctic sea ice allowed us to enhance the research activities in the western Arctic using ice-breaking research vessels to unravel the present and past climate and oceanographic changes in seasonally ice-free open water conditions. Paleoclimate/paleoceanographic records estimated from the western Arctic sediments are crucial factors to understand the past and present oceanographic and environmental changes and thus it could be used as the base data sets for a reliable prediction of future climate changes on global scales. Within this context, KOPRI recently initiated a new research program (K-Polar) for understanding recent environmental changes and reconstructing glacial history and paleoceanographic changes in the western Arctic using ice-breaker ';R.V. ARAON'. The Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean is particularly pronounced area with rapid and large extent reduction of the Arctic sea ice and relatively low SSS (comparing to Atlantic sector) due to sea-ice melting along with continental runoff. K-Polar program aims to: acquire shallow seismic data and retrieve long undisturbed sediment cores from the Chukchi Borderland-the Mendeleev Ridge-East Siberian continental margin using the ';R.V. ARAON', and establish a reliable stratigraphy of key sediment cores; then to reconstruct glacial history and high-resolution paleoceanographic changes in the western Arctic during the Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles based on precise stratigraphic data and climate-driven multiple proxies. In summary, we will introduce current preliminary results estimated from sediment cores taken

  10. Arctic sea ice circulation and drift speed: Decadal trends and ocean currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, R.; Spreen, G.; Pang, S.

    2013-05-01

    We examine the basinwide trends in sea ice circulation and drift speed and highlight the changes between 1982 and 2009 in connection to regional winds, multiyear sea ice coverage, ice export, and the thinning of the ice cover. The polarity of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) is used as a backdrop for summarizing the variance and shifts in decadal drift patterns. The 28-year circulation fields show a net strengthening of the Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift, especially during the last decade. The imprint of the arctic dipole anomaly on the mean summer circulation is evident (2001-2009) and enhances summer ice area export at the Fram Strait. Between 2001 and 2009, the large spatially averaged trends in drift speeds (winter: +23.6%/decade, summer: +17.7%/decade) are not explained by the much smaller trends in wind speeds (winter: 1.46%/decade, summer: -3.42%/decade). Notably, positive trends in drift speed are found in regions with reduced multiyear sea ice coverage. Over 90% of the Arctic Ocean has positive trends in drift speed and negative trends in multiyear sea ice coverage. The increased responsiveness of ice drift to geostrophic wind is consistent with a thinner and weaker seasonal ice cover and suggests large-scale changes in the air-ice-ocean momentum balance. The retrieved mean ocean current field from decadal-scale average ice motion captures a steady drift from Siberia to the Fram Strait, an inflow north of the Bering Strait, and a westward drift along coastal Alaska. This mean current is comparable to geostrophic currents from satellite-derived dynamic topography.

  11. Rare gases in lavas from the ultraslow spreading Lena Trough, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauret, F.; Moreira, M.; Snow, J. E.

    2010-06-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) from the Arctic Ocean have been much less studied than those from the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific due to the difficulty of access related to ice cover. In 2001 and 2004 the Arctic ridges (Gakkel Ridge and Lena Trough) were intensively sampled. In this study we present the first helium, neon, and argon concentrations and isotopic ratios in a suite of samples from the ultraslow spreading Lena Trough (˜0.75 cm/yr effective full rate). Central Lena Trough (CLT) lavas display 4He/3He between 89,710 and 97,530 (R/Ra between 7.4 and 8.1), similar to the mean MORB ratio of 90,000 ± 10,000 (R/Ra = 8 ± 1). In a three neon isotope diagram, the samples fall on the MORB line, without showing any excess of nucleogenic 21Ne. The 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from 349 to 6964. CLT samples have a typical MORB He and Ne isotopic composition. Rare gases do not indicate any mantle heterogeneities or contribution of subcontinental lithospheric mantle, although this has been suggested previously on the basis of the Sr-Nd and Pb isotopic systems. Based on noble gas systematics, a DUPAL-like anomaly is not observed in the Arctic Ocean. We propose two possible models which reconcile the rare gases with these previous studies. The first is that the Lena Trough mantle has a marble cake structure with small-scale heterogeneities (<1 km), allowing rapid diffusion and homogenization of rare gases compared to elements such as Sr, Nd, and Pb. The second model proposes that the recycled component identified by other isotopic systems was fully degassed at a recent date. It would therefore have a negligible mass budget of rare gases compared to other isotopic systems. This would suggest that the mantle enrichment beneath Lena Trough was generated by rift-forming processes and not by recycling.

  12. Storm-driven Mixing and Potential Impact on the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jiayan; Comiso, Josefino; Walsh, David; Krishfield, Richard; Honjo, Susumu; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations of the ocean, atmosphere, and ice made by Ice-Ocean Environmental Buoys (IOEBs) indicate that mixing events reaching the depth of the halocline have occurred in various regions in the Arctic Ocean. Our analysis suggests that these mixing events were mechanically forced by intense storms moving across the buoy sites. In this study, we analyzed these mixing events in the context of storm developments that occurred in the Beaufort Sea and in the general area just north of Fram Strait, two areas with quite different hydrographic structures. The Beaufort Sea is strongly influenced by inflow of Pacific water through Bering Strait, while the area north of Fram Strait is directly affected by the inflow of warm and salty North Atlantic water. Our analyses of the basin-wide evolution of the surface pressure and geostrophic wind fields indicate that the characteristics of the storms could be very different. The buoy-observed mixing occurred only in the spring and winter seasons when the stratification was relatively weak. This indicates the importance of stratification, although the mixing itself was mechanically driven. We also analyze the distribution of storms, both the long-term climatology as well as the patterns for each year in the last two decades. The frequency of storms is also shown to be correlated- (but not strongly) to Arctic Oscillation indices. This study indicates that the formation of new ice that leads to brine rejection is unlikely the mechanism that results in the type of mixing that could overturn the halocline. On the other hand, synoptic-scale storms can force mixing deep enough to the halocline and thermocline layer. Despite a very stable stratification associated with the Arctic halocline, the warm subsurface thermocline water is not always insulated from the mixed layer.

  13. Contrasting glacial/interglacial regimes in the western Arctic Ocean as exemplified by a sedimentary record from the Mendeleev Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polyak, L.; Curry, W.B.; Darby, D.A.; Bischof, J.; Cronin, T. M.

    2004-01-01

    Distinct cyclicity in lithology and microfaunal distribution in sediment cores from the Mendeleev Ridge in the western Arctic Ocean (water depths ca. 1. 5 km) reflects contrasting glacial/interglacial sedimentary patterns. We conclude that during major glaciations extremely thick pack ice or ice shelves covered the western Arctic Ocean and its circulation was restricted in comparison with interglacial, modern-type conditions. Glacier collapse events are marked in sediment cores by increased contents of ice-rafted debris, notably by spikes of detrital carbonates and iron oxide grains from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Composition of foraminiferal calcite ?? 18O and ??13C also shows strong cyclicity indicating changes in freshwater balance and/or ventilation rates of the Arctic Ocean. Light stable isotopic spikes characterize deglacial events such as the last deglaciation at ca. 12 14C kyr BP. The prolonged period with low ??18O and ??13C values and elevated contents of iron oxide grains from the Canadian Archipelago in the lower part of the Mendeleev Ridge record is interpreted to signify the pooling of freshwater in the Amerasia Basin, possibly in relation to an extended glaciation in arctic North America. Unique benthic foraminiferal events provide a means for an independent stratigraphic correlation of sedimentary records from the Mendeleev Ridge and other mid-depth locations throughout the Arctic Ocean such as the Northwind and Lomonosov Ridges. This correlation demonstrates the disparity of existing age models and underscores the need to establish a definitive chronostratigraphy for Arctic Ocean sediments. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Weekly cycle of lightning and associated patterns of rainfall, cloud, and aerosols over Korea and adjacent oceans during boreal summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, K.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we analyze the weekly cycle of lightning over Korea and adjacent oceans and associated variations of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and atmospheric circulations, using aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the NASA Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), cloud properties from MODIS, precipitation and storm height from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, and lightning data from the Korean Lightning Detection Network (KLDN) during 9-year from 2002 to 2010. Lightning data was divided into three approximately equal areas, land area of Korea, and two adjacent oceans, Yellow Sea and South Sea. Preliminary results show that the number of lightning increases during the middle of the week over land area. AOD data also shows moderately significant midweek increase at about the same time as lightning peaks. These results are consistent with the recent studies showing the invigoration of storms with more ice hydrometeors by aerosols, and subsequently wash out of aerosols by rainfall. Frequency of lightning strokes tend to peak at weekend in coastal area and over South Sea, indicating local weekly anomalous circulation between land and adjacent ocean. On the other hand, lightning frequency over Yellow Sea appears to have very strong weekly cycle with midweek peak on around Wednesday. It is speculated that the midweek peak of lightning over Yellow Sea was related with aerosol transport from adjacent land area. AOD data also suggests midweek peak over Yellow Sea, however, the weekly cycle of AOD was not statistically significant. Changes in weekly cycle of lightning from pre-monsoon to monsoon season, as well as associated clouds and circulation patterns are also discussed.

  15. Weekly Cycle of Lightning and Associated Patterns of Rainfall, Cloud, and Aerosols over Korea and Adjacent Oceans during Boreal Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Ji-In; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the weekly cycle of lightning over Korea and adjacent oceans and associated variations of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and atmospheric circulations, using aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the NASA Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), cloud properties from MODIS, precipitation and storm height from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, and lightning data from the Korean Lightning Detection Network (KLDN) during 9-year from 2002 to 2010. Lightning data was divided into three approximately equal areas, land area of Korea, and two adjacent oceans, Yellow Sea and South Sea. Preliminary results show that the number of lightning increases during the middle of the week over Yellow Sea. AOD data also shows moderately significant midweek increase at about the same time as lightning peaks. These results are consistent with the recent studies showing the invigoration of storms with more ice hydrometeors by aerosols, and subsequently wash out of aerosols by rainfall. Frequency of lightning strokes tend to peak at weekend in land area and over South Sea, indicating local weekly anomalous circulation between land and adjacent ocean. On the other hand, lightning frequency over Yellow Sea appears to have very strong weekly cycle with midweek peak on around Wednesday. It is speculated that the midweek peak of lightning over Yellow Sea was related with aerosol transport from adjacent land area. AOD data also suggests midweek peak over Yellow Sea, however, the weekly cycle of AOD was not statistically significant. Changes in weekly cycle of lightning from pre-monsoon to monsoon season, as well as associated clouds and circulation patterns are also discussed.

  16. Planktic foraminifer census data from Northwind Ridge Core 5, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Kevin M.; Poore, Richard Z.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey recovered 9 piston cores from the Northwind Ridge in the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean from a cruise of the USCGC Polar Star during 1988. Preliminary analysis of the cores suggests sediments deposited on Northwind Ridge preserve a detailed record of glacial and interglacial cycles for the last few hundred-thousand to one million years. This report includes quantitative data on foraminifers and selected sediment size-fraction data in samples from Northwind Ridge core PI-88AR P5.

  17. Relevance of dissolved organic nutrients for the Arctic Ocean nutrient budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Valdés, Sinhué; Tsubouchi, Takamasa; Davey, Emily; Yashayaev, Igor; Bacon, Sheldon

    2016-06-01

    We ask whether dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and phosphorus (DOP) could account for previously identified Arctic Ocean (AO) inorganic nutrient budget imbalances. We assess transports to/from the AO by calculating indicative budgets. Marked DON:DOP ratio differences between the Amerasian and Eurasian AO reflect different physical and biogeochemical pathways. DON and DOP are exported to the North Atlantic via Davis Strait potentially being enhanced in transit from Bering Strait. Fram Strait transports are balanced. Barents Sea Opening transports may provide an additional nutrient source to the Barents Sea or may be locked within the wider AO Atlantic Water circulation. Gaps in our knowledge are identified and discussed.

  18. Remote sensing the dynamics of suspended particles in the Mackenzie River plume (Canadian Arctic Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxaran, D.; Ehn, J.; Bélanger, S.; Matsuoka, A.; Hooker, S.; Babin, M.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change significantly impacts Arctic shelf regions in terms of air temperature, ultraviolet radiation, melting of sea ice, precipitation, thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion. A direct consequence is an increase in Arctic river discharge with an expectation of increased delivery of organic carbon sequestered in high-latitute soils since the last glacial maximum. Monitoring the fluxes and fate of this terrigenous organic carbon is problematic in such sparsely populated regions unless remote sensing techniques can be developed to an operational stage. The main objective of this study is to develop an ocean colour algorithm to operationally monitor dynamics of suspended particulate matter (SPM) on the Mackenzie River continental shelf (Canadian Arctic Ocean) using satellite imagery. The water optical properties are documented across the study area and related to concentrations of SPM and particulate organic carbon (POC). Robust SPM and POC:SPM proxies are identified, such as the light backscattering and attenuation coefficients, and relationships are established between these optical and biogeochemical parameters. Following a semi-analytical approach, a regional SPM quantification relationship is obtained for the inversion of the water reflectance signal into SPM concentration. This relationship is validated based on independent field optical measurements. It is successfully applied to a selection of MODIS satellite data which allow estimating fluxes at the river mouth and monitoring the extension and dynamics of the Mackenzie River surface plume in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Good agreement is obtained with field observations representative of the whole water column in the river delta zone within which terrigenous SPM is mainly constrained (out of short periods of maximum river outflow). Most of the seaward export of SPM is observed to occur within the west side of the river mouth. Future work require the validation of the developed SPM regional algorithm based

  19. Trapped Heat and Cooling Processes in the Arctic Ocean Surface Mixed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. C.; Palo, S. E.; Steele, M.

    2015-12-01

    With the changing Arctic climate, sea ice is disintegrating earlier and there is an increasing length of time during which the ocean is exposed to solar radiation. The surface mixed layer of the Arctic Ocean is reaching unprecedentedly warm temperatures. This study examines the cooling processes in the summer mixed layer of the upper ocean between the warm late-summer and the onset of ice growth. In situ measurements of upper ocean temperatures from UpTempO buoys and a number of CTD profiles in the Beaufort and Chukchi regions indicate that as expected, most of the heat in the upper ocean is lost to the atmosphere at the surface. Cooling to the atmosphere occurs predominantly through sudden cooling events associated with passing weather systems, with cooling rates greater than 0.2 °C/hour. However, a not-insubstantial amount of heat gets trapped in the summer halocline forming temperature features like the Near Surface Temperature Maximum isolated from the cooling associated with passing storms. These are clearly visible in the included figure. They come and go over the course of the cooling season, but typically persist through freeze-up. Heat stored in this layer will, on erosion of the summer halocline with wintertime ice growth, be mixed into the surface mixed layer and slow the growth of sea ice. This presentation quantifies the relative balance between heat loss to the atmosphere, temporary and seasonal heat storage in the summer halocline, and the relationship to fall season storminess in the region.

  20. The transport of beta-hexachlorocyclohexane to the western Arctic Ocean: a contrast to alpha-HCH.

    PubMed

    Li, Y F; Macdonald, R W; Jantunen, L M M; Harner, T; Bidleman, T F; Strachan, W M J

    2002-05-27

    A large database for alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH), together with multimedia models, shows this chemical to have exhibited classical 'cold condensation' behavior. The surface water of the Arctic Ocean became loaded between 1950 and 1990 because atmospheric transport of alpha-HCH from source regions to the Arctic was rapid and because alpha-HCH partitioned strongly into cold water there. Following emission reductions during the 1980s, alpha-HCH remained trapped under the permanent ice pack, with the result that the highest oceanic concentrations in the early 1990s were to be found in surface waters of the Canada Basin. Despite a much stronger partitioning into water than for alpha-HCH, beta-HCH did not accumulate under the pack ice of the Arctic Ocean, as might be expected from the similar emission histories for the two chemicals. Beta-HCH appears to have loaded only weakly into the high Arctic through the atmosphere because it was rained out or partitioned into North Pacific surface water. However, beta-HCH has subsequently entered the western Arctic in ocean currents passing through Bering Strait. Beta-HCH provides an important lesson that environmental pathways must be comprehensively understood before attempting to predict the behavior of one chemical by extrapolation from a seemingly similar chemical. PMID:12150440

  1. Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises of the Eastern North Pacific and Adjacent Arctic Waters: A Guide to Their Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leatherwood, Stephen; And Others

    This field guide is designed to permit observers to identify the cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) they see in the waters of the eastern North Pacific, including the Gulf of California, Hawaii, and the western Arctic of North America. The animals described are grouped not by scientific relationships but by similarities in appearance in…

  2. Distribution, abundance, and predation effects of epipelagic ctenophores and jellyfish in the western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Jennifer E.; Hopcroft, Russell R.; Kosobokova, Ksenia N.; Whitledge, Terry E.

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is undergoing changes at an unprecedented rate because of global climate change. Especially poorly-studied in arctic waters are the gelatinous zooplankton, which are difficult to study using traditional oceanographic methods. A distinct zooplanktivore community was characterized in the surface 100 m by use of a Remotely Operated Vehicle, net collections, and SCUBA diving. The large scyphomedusa, Chrysaora melanaster, was associated with the warm Pacific water at ˜35-75 m depth. A diverse ctenophore community lived mainly above the C. melanaster layer, including Dryodora glandula, a specialized predator of larvaceans, Beroe cucumis, a predator of other ctenophores, and the extremely fragile Bolinopsis infundibulum, which was the most abundant species. Gut content analyses showed that Mertensia ovum selectively consumed the largest copepods ( Calanus spp.) and amphipods ( Parathemisto libellula); B. infundibulum consumed smaller copepods and pteropods ( Limacina helicina). Large copepods were digested by M. ovum in ˜12 h at -1.5 to 0 °C, but by B. infundibulum in only ˜4 h. We estimated that M. ovum consumed an average of ˜2% d -1 of the Calanus spp. copepods and that B. infundibulum consumed ˜4% d -1 of copepods <3 mm prosome length. These are significant consumption rates given that Calanus spp. have life-cycles of 2 or more years and are eaten by vertebrates including bowhead whales and arctic cod.

  3. Low-level jet characteristics over the Arctic Ocean in spring and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobson, L.; Vihma, T.; Jakobson, E.; Palo, T.; Männik, A.; Jaagus, J.

    2013-11-01

    Low-level jets (LLJ) are important for turbulence in the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, but their occurrence, properties, and generation mechanisms in the Arctic are not well known. We analysed LLJs over the central Arctic Ocean in spring and summer 2007 on the basis of data collected in the drifting ice station Tara. Instead of traditional radiosonde soundings, data from tethersonde soundings with a high vertical resolution were used. The Tara results showed a lower occurrence of LLJs (46 ± 8%) than many previous studies over polar sea ice. Strong jet core winds contributed to growth of the turbulent layer. Complex relationships between the jet core height and the temperature inversion top height were detected: substantial correlation (r = 0.72; p < 0.01) occurred when the jet core was above the turbulent layer, but when inside the turbulent layer there was no correlation. The most important forcing mechanism for LLJs was baroclinicity, which was responsible for the generation of strong and warm LLJs, which on average occurred at lower altitudes than other jets. Baroclinic jets were mostly associated with transient cyclones instead of the climatological air temperature gradients. Besides baroclinicity, cases related to inertial oscillations and gusts were detected. As many as 49% of the LLJs observed were associated with a frontal passage, which provides favourable conditions for baroclinicity, inertial oscillations, and gusts. Further research needs on LLJs in the Arctic include investigation of low-level jet streams and their effects on the sea ice drift and atmospheric moisture transport.

  4. Annual cycle of radiation fluxes over the Arctic ocean: Sensitivity to cloud optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A. ); Ebert, E.E. )

    1992-11-01

    The relationship between cloud optical properties and the radiative fluxes over the Arctic Ocean is explored by conducting a series of modeling experiments. The annual cycle of arctic cloud optical properties that are required to reproduce both the outgoing radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere as determined from satellite observations and the available determinations of surface radiative fluxes are derived. Existing data on cloud fraction and cloud microphysical properties are utilized. Four types of cloud are considered: low stratus clouds, midlevel clouds, citrus clouds, and wintertime ice crystal precipitation. Internally consistent annual cycles of surface temperature, surface albedo, cloud fraction and cloud optical properties, components of surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes, and cloud radiative forcing are presented. The modeled total cloud optical depth (weighted by cloud fraction) ranges from a low value in winter of 2 to a high summertime value of 8. Infrared emmissivities for liquid water clouds are shown to be substantially less than unity during the cold half of the year. Values of modeled surface cloud radiative forcing are positive except for two weeks in midsummer; over the course of the year clouds have a net warming effect on the surface in the Arctic. Total cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere is determined to be positive only briefly in early autumn. Surface longwave fluxes are shown to be very sensitive to the presence of lower-tropospheric ice crystal precipitation during the cold half of the year.

  5. Revision of the NW Laurentide Ice Sheet: implications for paleoclimate, the northeast extremity of Beringia, and Arctic Ocean sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, John H.; Furze, Mark F. A.; Doupé, Jonathan P.

    2009-08-01

    For the past half-century, reconstructions of North American ice cover during the Last Glacial Maximum have shown ice-free land distal to the Laurentide Ice Sheet, primarily on Melville and Banks islands in the western Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Both islands reputedly preserve at the surface multiple Laurentide till sheets, together with associated marine and lacustrine deposits, recording as many as three pre-Late Wisconsinan glaciations. The northwest corner of Banks Island was purportedly never glaciated and is trimmed by the oldest and most extensive glaciation (Banks Glaciation) considered to be of Matuyama age (>780 ka BP). Inside the limit of Banks Glaciation, younger till sheets are ascribed to the Thomsen Glaciation (pre-Sangamonian) and the Amundsen Glaciation (Early Wisconsinan Stade). The view that the western Canadian Arctic Archipelago remained largely ice-free during the Late Wisconsinan is reinforced by a recent report of two woolly mammoth fragments collected on Banks and Melville islands, both dated to ˜22 ka BP. These dates imply that these islands constitute the northeast extremity of Beringia. A fundamental revision of this model is now warranted based on widespread fieldwork across the adjacent coastlines of Banks and Melville islands, including new dating of glacial and marine landforms and sediments. On Dundas Peninsula, southern Melville Island, AMS 14C dates on ice-transported marine molluscs within the most extensive Laurentide till yield ages of 25-49 ka BP. These dates require that Late Wisconsinan ice advanced northwestward from Visount Melville Sound, excavating fauna spanning Marine Isotope Stage 3. Laurentide ice that crossed Dundas Peninsula (300 m asl) coalesced with Melville Island ice occupying Liddon Gulf. Coalescent Laurentide and Melville ice continued to advance westward through M'Clure Strait depositing granite erratics at ≥235 m asl that require grounded ice in M'Clure Strait, as do streamlined bedforms on the channel

  6. Geophysical evidence for reduced melt production on the Arctic ultraslow Gakkel mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Jokat, W; Ritzmann, O; Schmidt-Aursch, M C; Drachev, S; Gauger, S; Snow, J

    2003-06-26

    Most models of melt generation beneath mid-ocean ridges predict significant reduction of melt production at ultraslow spreading rates (full spreading rates &<20 mm x yr(-1)) and consequently they predict thinned oceanic crust. The 1,800-km-long Arctic Gakkel mid-ocean ridge is an ideal location to test such models, as it is by far the slowest portion of the global mid-ocean-ridge spreading system, with a full spreading rate ranging from 6 to 13 mm x yr(-1) (refs 4, 5). Furthermore, in contrast to some other ridge systems, the spreading direction on the Gakkel ridge is not oblique and the rift valley is not offset by major transform faults. Here we present seismic evidence for the presence of exceptionally thin crust along the Gakkel ridge rift valley with crustal thicknesses varying between 1.9 and 3.3 km (compared to the more usual value of 7 km found on medium- to fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges). Almost 8,300 km of closely spaced aeromagnetic profiles across the rift valley show the presence of discrete volcanic centres along the ridge, which we interpret as evidence for strongly focused, three-dimensional magma supply. The traces of these eruptive centres can be followed to crustal ages of approximately 25 Myr off-axis, implying that these magma production and transport systems have been stable over this timescale. PMID:12827194

  7. Geophysical evidence for reduced melt production on the Arctic ultraslow Gakkel mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Jokat, W; Ritzmann, O; Schmidt-Aursch, M C; Drachev, S; Gauger, S; Snow, J

    2003-06-26

    Most models of melt generation beneath mid-ocean ridges predict significant reduction of melt production at ultraslow spreading rates (full spreading rates &<20 mm x yr(-1)) and consequently they predict thinned oceanic crust. The 1,800-km-long Arctic Gakkel mid-ocean ridge is an ideal location to test such models, as it is by far the slowest portion of the global mid-ocean-ridge spreading system, with a full spreading rate ranging from 6 to 13 mm x yr(-1) (refs 4, 5). Furthermore, in contrast to some other ridge systems, the spreading direction on the Gakkel ridge is not oblique and the rift valley is not offset by major transform faults. Here we present seismic evidence for the presence of exceptionally thin crust along the Gakkel ridge rift valley with crustal thicknesses varying between 1.9 and 3.3 km (compared to the more usual value of 7 km found on medium- to fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges). Almost 8,300 km of closely spaced aeromagnetic profiles across the rift valley show the presence of discrete volcanic centres along the ridge, which we interpret as evidence for strongly focused, three-dimensional magma supply. The traces of these eruptive centres can be followed to crustal ages of approximately 25 Myr off-axis, implying that these magma production and transport systems have been stable over this timescale.

  8. Seasonal heat and freshwater cycles in the Arctic Ocean in CMIP5 coupled models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yanni; Carton, James A.; Chepurin, Gennady A.; Steele, Michael; Hakkinen, Sirpa

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the processes governing the seasonal response of the Arctic Ocean and sea ice to surface forcings as they appear in historical simulations of 14 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 coupled climate models. In both models and observations, the seasonal heat budget is dominated by a local balance between net surface heating and storage in the heat content of the ocean and in melting/freezing of sea ice. Observations suggest ocean heat storage is more important than sea ice melt, while in most of these models, sea ice melt dominates. Seasonal horizontal heat flux divergence driven by the seasonal cycle of volume transport is only important locally. In models and observations, the dominant terms in the basin-average seasonal freshwater budget are the storages of freshwater between the ocean and sea ice, and the exchange between the two. The largest external source term is continental discharge in early summer, which is an order of magnitude smaller. The appearance of sea ice (extent and volume) and also ocean stratification in both the heat and freshwater budgets provides two links between the budgets and provides two mechanisms for feedback. One consequence of such an interaction is the fact that models with strong/weak seasonal surface heating also have strong/weak seasonal haline and temperature stratification.

  9. Monitoring and assessment of ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean-A scoping paper

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Yates, Kimberly K.; Feely, Richard; Fabry, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere is absorbed at the ocean surface by reacting with seawater to form a weak, naturally occurring acid called carbonic acid. As atmospheric carbon dioxide increases, the concentration of carbonic acid in seawater also increases, causing a decrease in ocean pH and carbonate mineral saturation states, a process known as ocean acidification. The oceans have absorbed approximately 525 billion tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or about one-quarter to one-third of the anthropogenic carbon emissions released since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Global surveys of ocean chemistry have revealed that seawater pH has decreased by about 0.1 units (from a pH of 8.2 to 8.1) since the 1700s due to absorption of carbon dioxide (Raven and others, 2005). Modeling studies, based on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) CO2 emission scenarios, predict that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels could reach more than 500 parts per million (ppm) by the middle of this century and 800 ppm by the year 2100, causing an additional decrease in surface water pH of 0.3 pH units. Ocean acidification is a global threat and is already having profound and deleterious effects on the geology, biology, chemistry, and socioeconomic resources of coastal and marine habitats. The polar and sub-polar seas have been identified as the bellwethers for global ocean acidification.

  10. The Impact of Multidecadal NAO Variations on Atlantic Ocean Heat Transport and Rapid Changes in Arctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, F. J.; Delworth, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic and North Atlantic have experienced pronounced changes over the 20th and early 21st centuries, including a rapid loss of Arctic sea ice over the last several decades and prominent multidecadal variability in both ocean temperatures and sea ice. Here we use suites of climate model simulations to probe some of the factors responsible for the multidecadal variability in the Atlantic/Arctic system. We show that multidecadal fluctuations of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) induce multidecadal fluctuations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). A positive phase of the NAO is associated with strengthened westerly winds over the North Atlantic. These winds extract more heat than normal from the subpolar ocean, thereby increasing upper ocean density, deepwater formation, and the strength of the AMOC and associated poleward ocean heat transport. In model simulations the observed negative phase of the NAO in the 1960s and 1970s led to a weaker than normal AMOC, reduced poleward ocean heat transport, a cold North Atlantic, and an increase in Arctic sea ice extent in both winter and summer. The NAO strengthened from the 1970s to the mid 1990s, leading to an increase of the AMOC and a warming of the North Atlantic. The increased heat transport extended throughout the North Atlantic, into the Barents Sea, and finally into the Arctic, contributing to a rapid reduction of sea ice in the 1990s through the 2000s. Feedbacks involving shortwave radiation are an important component of the overall changes. In these model simulations as much as 1/3 of the recent reduction of Arctic sea ice is associated with the NAO-induced AMOC and heat transport increase. Since the mid 1990s the NAO has changed from a strong positive phase to a more neutral phase. In our model simulations this weakens the AMOC and poleward ocean heat transport, and diminishes the contribution of ocean heat transport to the reduction of Arctic sea ice extent. Considered in isolation

  11. Validation of satellite data with IASOA observatories and shipboard measurements in Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy; Mazilkina, Alexandra; Valiullin, Denis; Stanichny, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    The paper shows the possibility of using surface observation data at high latitudes for the validation of different satellite products. We use data from International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) observatories and data from Nansen and Amundsen basins observation system (NABOS) project. The NABOS field experiment was carried out in the central part of the Arctic and in the eastern Arctic seas during summer and fall period of 2004-2009, 2013 and 2015. Newly improved satellite products and surface observations provide an opportunity to revisit remote-sensing capabilities for estimating shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes, as well as turbulent fluxes at high latitudes. Estimates of SW fluxes from the MODIS and LW fluxes from the NOAA satellites are evaluated against land observations from IASOA observatories, and unique shipboard measurements. Results show that the satellite products are in better agreement with observations than those from numerical models. Therefore, the large scale satellite based estimates should be useful for model evaluation and for providing information in formulating energy budgets at high latitudes. Visible and near-infrared albedos over snow and ice surfaces are retrieved from AVHRR. Comparison with surface measurements of albedo in arctic observatories and Arctic ocean shows very good agreement. Meteorological and micrometeorological observations were used to validate the surface temperature and surface heat fluxes in the satellite data. Compared data arrays are independent and sufficiently detailed to perform trustworthy evaluations. The spatial and temporal patterns of the resulting flux fields are investigated and compared with those derived from satellite observations such as HOAPS, from blended data such as AOFLUX (in the open water cases). A computation of the sensible heat flux at the surface is formulated on the basis of spatial variations of the surface temperature estimated from satellite data. Based on

  12. Effects of tides on Riverine and Glacial freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luneva, Maria; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Harle, James; Holt, Jason

    2016-04-01

    In this study we use a novel pan-Arctic sea NENO-shelf ice-ocean coupled model, to examine the effects of tides, river runoff and vertical mixing schemes on sea ice and the mixing of water masses. Several 20-year long (1990-2010) simulations were performed: with explicitly resolved tides and without any tidal dynamics, with climatology river runoff, Dai et al. ,2009 database and freshwater source from melting Greenland glaciers. We examine also three different turbulent closures structural functions, based on the k-epsilon version of the Generic Length Scale Model: by Canuto group (2001) and two by Kantha and Clayson (1994, 2004). The results have been compared with sea ice volume and concentration trends and temperature and salinity profiles from World Ocean Database . We compared the following characteristics: potential energy anomalies, depth of halocline, mixed layer depth , salinity at the subsurface layer.

  13. Characteristics of phytoplankton physiology inferred from chlorophyll fluorescence in the western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisoo; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.; Ko, Eunho; Cho, Kyoung-Ho; Yang, Eun Jin; Jung, Jinyoung; Kang, Sung Ho

    2016-04-01

    A recent Arctic survey in the Chukchi and East Siberian Sea using icebreaker R/V Araon revealed some interesting feature of vertical distribution of phytoplankton physiology in 2015 summer. A custom-built Fluorescence Induction and Relaxation (FIRe) system was used for measuring photochemical parameters such as maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) and functional absorption cross section in near-surface ocean. These parameters provide an express diagnostic of the effects of environmental factors, including nutrient limitation and light acclimation on phytoplankton assemblages. Time-series of satellite ocean colour data were also used for observing large scaled spatial distribution of phytoplankton and its seasonality related with sea ice distributions. Possible implications of these results will be discussed.

  14. Meltwater and precipitation runoff to the North Atlantic, Arctic, and Gulf of Mexico from the Laurentide Ice Sheet and adjacent regions during the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, James T.

    1990-12-01

    Runoff from North America may have played a significant role in ocean circulation and climate change during the last deglaciation. Because the driving force behind such changes may have been related to salinity of the north flowing Atlantic Ocean conveyor circulation, it is critical to know the volume, timing, and location of fresh water entering the North Atlantic from the melting Laurentide Ice Sheet. During the Younger Dryas cold episode, 11,000-10,000 years B.P., there was a two-fold increase in the volume of meltwater plus precipitation runoff, to more than 1700 km³ yr-1, flowing through the St. Lawrence valley to the North Atlantic, mainly because retreating ice allowed the glacial Lake Agassiz basin to drain eastward into the Great Lakes at this time. There was a corresponding decline in discharge from Lake Agassiz through the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico. Runoff to the Arctic Ocean also increased at about the beginning of the Younger Dryas, from 740 to 900 km³ yr-1, because of the capture of what is now the headwater region of the Mackenzie River watershed. This, in combination with rising sea level and warming climate, may have increased the amount of pack ice reaching the North Atlantic through the Norwegian Sea from the Arctic Ocean. At 10,000 years B.P., eastward overflow from the western interior of North America was blocked by advancing ice, again forcing overflow to the Gulf of Mexico and, possibly, to the northwest into the Arctic Ocean. Although total runoff to the oceans from all regions draining from the Laurentide Ice Sheet did not vary substantially between 12,000 and 9000 years B.P., if discharge to the Gulf of Mexico is excluded, fresh water reaching the North Atlantic averaged 4000 km³ yr-1 during the Younger Dryas, in contrast to 2870 km³ yr-1 just before this cold episode and 3440 km³ yr-1 just after it.

  15. Composition, buoyancy regulation and fate of ice algal aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L; Glud, Ronnie N; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8-35 and 9-40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m(-2), maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4-40 mg C m(-2) d(-1), and accounted for 3-80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities. PMID:25208058

  16. Sea ice phenology and timing of primary production pulses in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rubao; Jin, Meibing; Varpe, Øystein

    2013-03-01

    Arctic organisms are adapted to the strong seasonality of environmental forcing. A small timing mismatch between biological processes and the environment could potentially have significant consequences for the entire food web. Climate warming causes shrinking ice coverage and earlier ice retreat in the Arctic, which is likely to change the timing of primary production. In this study, we test predictions on the interactions among sea ice phenology and production timing of ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton. We do so using the following (1) a synthesis of available satellite observation data; and (2) the application of a coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model. The data and model results suggest that, over a large portion of the Arctic marginal seas, the timing variability in ice retreat at a specific location has a strong impact on the timing variability in pelagic phytoplankton peaks, but weak or no impact on the timing of ice-algae peaks in those regions. The model predicts latitudinal and regional differences in the timing of ice algae biomass peak (varying from April to May) and the time lags between ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton peaks (varying from 45 to 90 days). The correlation between the time lag and ice retreat is significant in areas where ice retreat has no significant impact on ice-algae peak timing, suggesting that changes in pelagic phytoplankton peak timing control the variability in time lags. Phenological variability in primary production is likely to have consequences for higher trophic levels, particularly for the zooplankton grazers, whose main food source is composed of the dually pulsed algae production of the Arctic.

  17. Composition, buoyancy regulation and fate of ice algal aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L; Glud, Ronnie N; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8-35 and 9-40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m(-2), maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4-40 mg C m(-2) d(-1), and accounted for 3-80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities.

  18. Composition, Buoyancy Regulation and Fate of Ice Algal Aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8–35 and 9–40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m−2, maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4–40 mg C m−2 d−1, and accounted for 3–80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities. PMID:25208058

  19. Contrasted climatic trends in the Atlantic vs. Pacific gateways of the Arctic Ocean during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vernal, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Rochon, A.

    2013-12-01

    The reconstruction of sea-surface conditions including sea ice cover was undertaken based on about 20 marine sediment cores collected in the Arctic Ocean and subarctic seas. The approach has been standardized and mostly relies on the modern analogue technique applied to dinoflagellate cyst assemblages, which permit simultaneous estimates of sea ice cover, summer sea-surface temperature and salinity. The results show some regionalism in both trends, amplitude and overall variability. In general, changes of small amplitude are recorded in the Canadian Arctic whereas a slight cooling trend with an increasing sea ice cover characterizes the Northern Baffin Bay and Fram Strait areas from mid to late Holocene. In contrast, the Chukchi Sea records show large amplitude variations with millennial pacing making difficult to define any trend. The Chukchi Sea data indicate reduced sea ice and warmer conditions during the mid-Holocene, notably around 6.5 and 3.5 ka, and also point to important variations during the last millennium. The overall results suggest a higher variability thus sensitivity to climate change, in the Chukchi Sea area than in the Eastern parts of the Arctic and subarctic regions, which are largely influenced by northern branches of the North Atlantic Drift. The climate sensitivity of the Chukchi Sea area may be related to the proximity of the Pacific gateway. Strong linkages between sea-surface conditions, sea ice cover and export rate seem tightly linked there with large scale atmospheric synopses in the North Pacific and possibly the tropical Pacific. The apparent consistency of the Mount Logan record (Fisher et al., the Holocene 2008) with those of the Chukchi Sea (de Vernal et al., Quat. Sci. Rev. 2013) tends to support the hypothesis of a strong influence of North Pacific atmospheric teleconnections on sea-surface conditions in the Western Arctic.

  20. More than just "brown layers": Manganese enrichments in Quaternary Arctic Ocean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, C.; Stratmann, A.; Matthiessen, J.; Poulton, S. W.; Meinhardt, A.-K.; Eckert, S.; Schnetger, B.; Vogt, C.; Stein, R.; Brumsack, H.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Brown manganese-rich layers are well-known and widespread features in Quaternary deposits in the central Arctic Ocean, but despite their use as stratigraphic marker horizons, the processes leading to their formation are debated. Both glacial-interglacial climatic variations (e.g., increased river runoff, decreased bottom water ventilation) and early diagenetic processes have been suggested to explain the sedimentary Mn distributions. In an attempt to solve this conundrum, we applied inorganic geochemical analyses to pore waters and sediments of two sediment cores from the western Arctic Ocean (Mendeleev Ridge, RV Polarstern Expedition ARK-XXIII/3) that showed marked brown to gray-yellowish colour variations (März et al., 2011). Our results show that most brown layers are associated with detrital (ice-rafted) and biogenic carbonate enrichments, as indicated by peaks in Ca/Al, Mg/Al, Sr/Al and Sr/Mg ratios. In addition, all Mn-rich layers are also enriched in Fe (oxyhydr)oxides, and in the trace metals Co, Cu, Mo and Ni that were most probably scavenged by Mn/Fe (oxyhydr)oxides. Independent from the geochemical patterns, distinct bioturbation patterns (specifically well-defined brown burrows into the underlying sediments) suggest these metal enrichments formed close to the sediment-water interface. We thus infer that these metal- and carbonate-rich layers indeed formed under warmer (interglacial/interstadial) climate conditions with an intensified continental hydrological cycle and only seasonal sea ice cover. Under these conditions, trace metals were delivered to the Arctic Ocean by rivers, sea ice and coastal erosion, while under enhanced seasonal productivity more reactive organic matter was exported to the sea floor. The coeval deposition of organic matter, Mn/Fe (oxyhydr)oxides and trace metals triggered an intense diagenetic Mn and Fe cycling at the sediment-water interface. In combination, these climate-induced primary and secondary processes resulted in the

  1. The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinlun; Ashjian, Carin; Campbell, Robert; Hill, Victoria; Spitz, Yvette H.; Steele, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A coupled biophysical model is used to examine the impact of the great Arctic cyclone of early August 2012 on the marine planktonic ecosystem in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean (PSA). Model results indicate that the cyclone influences the marine planktonic ecosystem by enhancing productivity on the shelves of the Chukchi, East Siberian, and Laptev seas during the storm. Although the cyclone's passage in the PSA lasted only a few days, the simulated biological effects on the shelves last 1 month or longer. At some locations on the shelves, primary productivity (PP) increases by up to 90% and phytoplankton biomass by up to 40% in the wake of the cyclone. The increase in zooplankton biomass is up to 18% on 31 August and remains 10% on 15 September, more than 1 month after the storm. In the central PSA, however, model simulations indicate a decrease in PP and plankton biomass. The biological gain on the shelves and loss in the central PSA are linked to two factors. (1) The cyclone enhances mixing in the upper ocean, which increases nutrient availability in the surface waters of the shelves; enhanced mixing in the central PSA does not increase productivity because nutrients there are mostly depleted through summer draw down by the time of the cyclone's passage. (2) The cyclone also induces divergence, resulting from the cyclone's low-pressure system that drives cyclonic sea ice and upper ocean circulation, which transports more plankton biomass onto the shelves from the central PSA. The simulated biological gain on the shelves is greater than the loss in the central PSA, and therefore, the production on average over the entire PSA is increased by the cyclone. Because the gain on the shelves is offset by the loss in the central PSA, the average increase over the entire PSA is moderate and lasts only about 10 days. The generally positive impact of cyclones on the marine ecosystem in the Arctic, particularly on the shelves, is likely to grow with increasing summer

  2. Synthesis of integrated primary production in the Arctic Ocean: II. In situ and remotely sensed estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Victoria J.; Matrai, Patricia A.; Olson, Elise; Suttles, S.; Steele, Mike; Codispoti, L. A.; Zimmerman, Richard C.

    2013-03-01

    Recent warming of surface waters, accompanied by reduced ice thickness and extent may have significant consequences for climate-driven changes of primary production (PP) in the Arctic Ocean (AO). However, it has been difficult to obtain a robust benchmark estimate of pan-Arctic PP necessary for evaluating change. This paper provides an estimate of pan-Arctic PP prior to significant warming from a synthetic analysis of the ARCSS-PP database of in situ measurements collected from 1954 to 2007 and estimates derived from satellite-based observations from 1998 to 2007. Vertical profiles of in situ chlorophyll a (Chl a) and PP revealed persistent subsurface peaks in biomass and PP throughout the AO during most of the summer period. This was contradictory with the commonly assumed exponential decrease in PP with depth on which prior satellite-derived estimates were based. As remotely sensed Chl a was not a good predictor of integrated water column Chl a, accurate satellite-based modeling of vertically integrated primary production (IPPsat), requires knowledge of the subsurface distribution of phytoplankton, coincident with the remotely sensed ocean color measurements. We developed an alternative approach to modeling PP from satellite observations by incorporating climatological information on the depths of the euphotic zone and the mixed layer that control the distribution of phytoplankton that significantly improved the fidelity of satellite derived PP to in situ observations. The annual IPP of the Arctic Ocean combining both in situ and satellite based estimates was calculated here to be a minimum of 466 ± 94 Tg C yr-1 and a maximum of 993 ± 94 Tg C yr-1, when corrected for subsurface production. Inflow shelf seas account for 75% of annual IPP, while the central basin and Beaufort northern sea were the regions with the lowest annual integrated productivity, due to persistently stratified, oligotrophic and ice-covered conditions. Although the expansion of summertime

  3. The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinlun; Ashjian, Carin; Campbell, Robert; Hill, Victoria; Spitz, Yvette H; Steele, Michael

    2014-01-01

    [1] A coupled biophysical model is used to examine the impact of the great Arctic cyclone of early August 2012 on the marine planktonic ecosystem in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean (PSA). Model results indicate that the cyclone influences the marine planktonic ecosystem by enhancing productivity on the shelves of the Chukchi, East Siberian, and Laptev seas during the storm. Although the cyclone's passage in the PSA lasted only a few days, the simulated biological effects on the shelves last 1 month or longer. At some locations on the shelves, primary productivity (PP) increases by up to 90% and phytoplankton biomass by up to 40% in the wake of the cyclone. The increase in zooplankton biomass is up to 18% on 31 August and remains 10% on 15 September, more than 1 month after the storm. In the central PSA, however, model simulations indicate a decrease in PP and plankton biomass. The biological gain on the shelves and loss in the central PSA are linked to two factors. (1) The cyclone enhances mixing in the upper ocean, which increases nutrient availability in the surface waters of the shelves; enhanced mixing in the central PSA does not increase productivity because nutrients there are mostly depleted through summer draw down by the time of the cyclone's passage. (2) The cyclone also induces divergence, resulting from the cyclone's low-pressure system that drives cyclonic sea ice and upper ocean circulation, which transports more plankton biomass onto the shelves from the central PSA. The simulated biological gain on the shelves is greater than the loss in the central PSA, and therefore, the production on average over the entire PSA is increased by the cyclone. Because the gain on the shelves is offset by the loss in the central PSA, the average increase over the entire PSA is moderate and lasts only about 10 days. The generally positive impact of cyclones on the marine ecosystem in the Arctic, particularly on the shelves, is likely to grow with increasing

  4. New Aerogeophysical Results from the Arctic Ocean, north of Greenland: Implications for Late Cretaceous rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, Arne; Hopper, John; Olesen, Arne; Halpenny, John

    2013-04-01

    The tectonic history of the Arctic Ocean remains poorly resolved and highly controversial. While there is general agreement on the basic evolution of the Eurasian Basin, details regarding breakup of Lomonosov Ridge (LR) from the Barents Sea Margin and the establishment of seafloor spreading are unresolved. More importantly, the history and evolution of the Amerasia and Canada Basins is essentially unknown. Competing models do not agree on fundamental parameters such as crustal type, age of crust, and spreading directions of probable oceanic crust. The Arctic Ocean North of Greenland is at critical juncture that formed at the locus of a Mesozoic three-plate setting between LR, Greenland, and North America. In addition, the area is close to the European plate, resulting in complicated interactions between all these areas that are difficult to resolve. In 2009, the 550.000 km2 LOMGRAV aero-geophysical survey produced the first collocated gravity and magnetic measurements over the area significantly increasing the data coverage. We present a joint interpretation of new gravity and magnetic compilations that show a distinct and regionally consistent structural grain across the LR, Ellesmere - Lincoln Sea margins and Alpha Ridge. Based on correlation with Upper Cretaceous NNW-trending dykes in North Greenland and parallel Labrador Sea - Baffin Bay spreading centers, we interpret the structural grain as evidence of Late Cretaceous - early Paleocene regional extension in response to opening of the North Atlantic/Labrador Sea. Evidence is also shown of continuous Upper Cretaceous lineaments from the LR to the Ellesmere Shelf indicating that they moved as one plate during the Late Cretaceous. In contrast, a distinct fault zone, reactivated during the Eurekan Orogeny, separates this plate from the Lincoln Sea margin and Greenland. We suggest that these plates were brought to their present position during the Eurekan Orogeny, which can explain the raised plateau of the LR

  5. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, A.; Terrado, R.; Thaler, M.; Comeau, A. M.; Medrinal, E.; Lovejoy, C.

    2013-02-01

    The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL) in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8-20 μm cell diameter), mostly phagotrophic protists in the pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) layer. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL across a wide region, and down the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada), targeting the surface, the SCM and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1) to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly implied that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Upper Arctic Ocean water masses harbor distinct communities of heterotrophic flagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, A.; Terrado, R.; Thaler, M.; Comeau, A.; Medrinal, E.; Lovejoy, C.

    2013-06-01

    The ubiquity of heterotrophic flagellates (HFL) in marine waters has been recognized for several decades, but the phylogenetic diversity of these small (ca. 0.8-20 μm cell diameter), mostly phagotrophic protists in the upper pelagic zone of the ocean is underappreciated. Community composition of microbes, including HFL, is the result of past and current environmental selection, and different taxa may be indicative of food webs that cycle carbon and energy very differently. While all oceanic water columns can be density stratified due to the temperature and salinity characteristics of different water masses, the Arctic Ocean is particularly well stratified, with nutrients often limiting in surface waters and most photosynthetic biomass confined to a subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer, where light and nutrients are both available. This physically well-characterized system provided an opportunity to explore the community diversity of HFL from different water masses within the water column. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques as a rapid means of surveying the diversity of HFL communities in the southern Beaufort Sea (Canada), targeting the surface, the subsurface chlorophyll maximum layer (SCM) and just below the SCM. In addition to identifying major clades and their distribution, we explored the micro-diversity within the globally significant but uncultivated clade of marine stramenopiles (MAST-1) to examine the possibility of niche differentiation within the stratified water column. Our results strongly suggested that HFL community composition was determined by water mass rather than geographical location across the Beaufort Sea. Future work should focus on the biogeochemical and ecological repercussions of different HFL communities in the face of climate-driven changes to the physical structure of the Arctic Ocean.

  7. Numerical study of sea ice and ocean circulation in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Semtner, A.J. Jr.

    1987-08-01

    A sea-ice model based on bulk-viscous plastic dynamics and 3-layer thermodynamics is coupled to a multilevel primitive equation model of the Arctic Ocean and Greenland Sea. The combined model is forced by inflow through the Faeroe--Shetland Channel and Bering Strait and by observed monthly atmospheric forcing and river runoff. A long-term integration produces a realistic seasonal cycle of ice cover, whose extent is strongly influenced by ocean heat transport. The wintertime maximum is controlled by northward heat transport of 0.4 petawatts in the Greenland Sea and by southward transport of ice and water through the Fram Strait. The summertime minimum extent of sea ice is influenced by subsurface flow through the Fram Strait of warm Atlantic water, which rises in winter and thins the ice lying over the Eurasian continental shelf and along the Alaskan and Siberian coasts. The oceanic circulation in the Canadian Basin is anticyclonic at all depths, but changes to cyclonic in the Eurasian Basin below 200 meters. Offshore ice transport in the Barents Sea promotes oceanic convection on the continental shelf through enhanced brine rejection, whereas surface heat loss in the ice-free Greenland Sea produces intermediate water sources similar in T--S characteristics to observed water masses of the region. Two short additional integrations of the coupled model show that the Arctic sea ice is vulnerable to the environmental effects of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increase, but relatively insensitive to the maximum proposed amount of Soviet river diversions.

  8. Freshwater composition of the waters off southeast Greenland and their link to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, David A.; Pickart, Robert S.; Peter Jones, E.; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Jane Eert, A.; Ã`Lafsson, Jón

    2009-05-01

    The freshwater composition of waters on the southeast Greenland shelf and slope are described using a set of high-resolution transects occupied in summer 2004, which included hydrographic, velocity, nutrient, and chemical tracer measurements. The nutrient and tracer data are used to quantify the fractions of Pacific Water, sea ice melt, and meteoric water present in the upper layers of the East Greenland Current (EGC) and East Greenland Coastal Current (EGCC). The EGC/EGCC system dominates the circulation of this region and strongly influences the observed distribution of the three freshwater types. Sea ice melt and meteoric water fractions are surface intensified, reflecting their sources, and generally increase southward from Denmark Strait to Cape Farewell, as well as shoreward. Significant fractions of Pacific Water are found in the subsurface layers of the EGCC, supporting the idea that this inner shelf branch is directly linked to the EGC and thus to the Arctic Ocean. A set of historical sections is examined to investigate the variability of Pacific Water content in the EGC and EGCC from 1984 to 2004 in the vicinity of Denmark Strait. The fraction of Pacific Water increased substantially in the late 1990s and subsequently declined to low levels in 2002 and 2004, mirroring the reduction in Pacific Water content reported previously at Fram Strait. This variability is found to correlate significantly with the Arctic Oscillation index, lagged by 9 years, suggesting that the Arctic Ocean circulation patterns bring varying amounts of Pacific Water to the North Atlantic via the EGC/EGCC.

  9. Annual cycles of multiyear sea ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean: 1999-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, R.

    2004-11-01

    For the years 1999-2003, we estimate the time-varying perennial ice zone (PIZ) coverage and construct the annual cycles of multiyear (MY, including second year) ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean using QuikSCAT backscatter, MY fractions from RADARSAT, and the record of ice export from satellite passive microwave observations. An area balance approach extends the winter MY coverage from QuikSCAT to the remainder of the year. From these estimates, the coverage of MY ice at the beginning of each year is 3774 × 103 km2 (2000), 3896 × 103 km2 (2001), 4475 × 103 km2 (2002), and 4122 × 103 km2 (2003). Uncertainties in coverage are ˜150 × 103 km2. In the mean, on 1 January, MY ice covers ˜60% of the Arctic Ocean. Ice export reduces this coverage to ˜55% by 1 May. From the multiple annual cycles, the area of first-year (FY) ice that survives the intervening summers are 1192 × 103 km2 (2000), 1509 × 103 km2 (2001), and 582 × 103 km2 (2002). In order for the MY coverage to remain constant from year to year, these replenishment areas must balance the overall area export and melt during the summer. The effect of the record minimum in Arctic sea ice area during the summer of 2002 is seen in the lowest area of surviving FY ice of the three summers. In addition to the spatial coverage, the location of the PIZ is important. One consequence of the unusual location of the PIZ at the end of the summer of 2002 is the preconditioning for enhanced export of MY ice into the Barents and Kara seas. Differences between the minimums in summer sea ice coverage from our estimates and passive microwave observations are discussed.

  10. Carbon export efficiency and phytoplankton community composition in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Poulton, Alex J.; Henson, Stephanie A.; Daniels, Chris J.; Fragoso, Glaucia M.; Mitchell, Elaine; Richier, Sophie; Russell, Benjamin C.; Smith, Helen E. K.; Tarling, Geraint A.; Young, Jeremy R.; Zubkov, Mike

    2015-06-01

    Arctic primary production is sensitive to reductions in sea ice cover, and will likely increase into the future. Whether this increased primary production (PP) will translate into increased export of particulate organic carbon (POC) is currently unclear. Here we report on the POC export efficiency during summer 2012 in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic Ocean. We coupled 234-thorium based estimates of the export flux of POC to onboard incubation-based estimates of PP. Export efficiency (defined as the fraction of PP that is exported below 100 m depth: ThE-ratio) showed large variability (0.09 ± 0.19-1.3 ± 0.3). The highest ThE-ratio (1.3 ± 0.3) was recorded in a mono-specific bloom of Phaeocystis pouchetii located in the ice edge. Blooming diatom dominated areas also had high ThE-ratios (0.1 ± 0.1-0.5 ± 0.2), while mixed and/or prebloom communities showed lower ThE-ratios (0.10 ± 0.03-0.19 ± 0.05). Furthermore, using oxygen saturation, bacterial abundance, bacterial production, and zooplankton oxygen demand, we also investigated spatial variability in the degree to which this sinking material may be remineralized in the upper mesopelagic (<300 m). Our results suggest that blooming diatoms and P. pouchetii can export a significant fraction of their biomass below the surface layer (100 m) in the open Arctic Ocean. Also, we show evidence that the material sinking from a P. pouchetii bloom may be remineralized (>100 m) at a similar rate as the material sinking from diatom blooms in the upper mesopelagic, contrary to previous findings.

  11. Annual Cycles of Multiyear Sea Ice Coverage of the Arctic Ocean: 1999-2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.

    2004-01-01

    For the years 1999-2003, we estimate the time-varying perennial ice zone (PIZ) coverage and construct the annual cycles of multiyear (MY, including second year) ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean using QuikSCAT backscatter, MY fractions from RADARSAT, and the record of ice export from satellite passive microwave observations. An area balance approach extends the winter MY coverage from QuikSCAT to the remainder of the year. From these estimates, the coverage of MY ice at the beginning of each year is 3774 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2000), 3896 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2001), 4475 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2002), and 4122 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2003). Uncertainties in coverage are approx.150 x 10(exp 3) sq km. In the mean, on 1 January, MY ice covers approx.60% of the Arctic Ocean. Ice export reduces this coverage to approx.55% by 1 May. From the multiple annual cycles, the area of first-year (FY) ice that survives the intervening summers are 1192 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2000), 1509 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2001), and 582 x 10(exp 3) sq km (2002). In order for the MY coverage to remain constant from year to year, these replenishment areas must balance the overall area export and melt during the summer. The effect of the record minimum in Arctic sea ice area during the summer of 2002 is seen in the lowest area of surviving FY ice of the three summers. In addition to the spatial coverage, the location of the PIZ is important. One consequence of the unusual location of the PIZ at the end of the summer of 2002 is the preconditioning for enhanced export of MY ice into the Barents and Kara seas. Differences between the minimums in summer sea ice coverage from our estimates and passive microwave observations are discussed.

  12. Observational validation of the diffusive convection flux laws in the Amundsen Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, John D.; Fer, Ilker; Morison, James

    2015-12-01

    The low levels of mechanically driven mixing in many regions of the Arctic Ocean make double diffusive convection virtually the only mechanism for moving heat up from the core of Atlantic Water towards the surface. In an attempt to quantify double diffusive heat fluxes in the Arctic Ocean, a temperature microstructure experiment was performed as a part of the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) 2013 field season from the drifting ice station Barneo located in the Amundsen Basin near the Lomonosov Ridge (89.5°N, 75°W). A diffusive convective thermohaline staircase was present between 150 and 250 m in nearly all of the profiles. Typical vertical heat fluxes across the high-gradient interfaces were consistently small, O(10-1) W m-2. Our experiment was designed to resolve the staircase and differed from earlier Arctic studies that utilized inadequate instrumentation or sampling. Our measured fluxes from temperature microstructure agree well with the laboratory derived flux laws compared to previous studies, which could find agreement only to within a factor of two to four. Correlations between measured and parameterized heat fluxes are slightly higher when using the more recent Flanagan et al. [2013] laboratory derivation than the more commonly used derivation presented in Kelley [1990]. Nusselt versus Rayleigh number scaling reveals the convective exponent, η, to be closer to 0.29 as predicted by recent numerical simulations of single-component convection rather than the canonical 1/3 assumed for double diffusion. However, the exponent appears to be sensitive to how convective layer height is defined.

  13. Mesoscale eddies over the Laptev Sea continental slope in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnyushkov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Nguyen, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale eddies are an important component in Arctic Ocean dynamics and can play a role in vertical redistribution of ocean heat from the intermediate layer of warm Atlantic Water (AW). We analyze mooring data collected along the continental slope of the Laptev Sea in 2007-11 to improve the characterization of Arctic mesoscale eddies in this region of the Eurasian Basin (EB).Wavelet analyses suggest that ~20% of the mooring record is occupied by mesoscale eddies, whose vertical scales can be large, often >600 m. Based on similarity between temperature/salinity profiles measured inside eddies and modern climatology for the 2000s, we found two distinct sources of eddy formation in the EB; one in the vicinity of Fram Strait and the other at the continental slope of the Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago. Both sources of eddies are on the route of AW propagation along the EB margins, so that the Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC) can carry these eddies along the continental slope.The lateral advection of waters isolated inside the eddy cores by ACBC affect the heat and salt balance of the eastern EB. The average temperature anomaly inside Fram Strait eddies in the layer above the AW temperature core (i.e., above 350 m depth level) was ~0.1º C with the strongest temperature anomaly in this layer exceeding 0.5ºC. In contrast to Fram Strait eddies, Severnaya Zemlya eddies carry anomalously cold and fresh water, and likely contribute to ventilation of the AW core. In addition, we found increased vertical shears of the horizontal velocities inside eddies that result in enhanced mixing. Our estimates made using the Pacanowski and Philander (1981) relationship suggest that, on average, vertical diffusivity coefficients inside eddies are four times larger than those in the surrounding waters. We will use the high resolution ECCO model to investigate the relative contributions of along and across slope transports induced by eddies along the ACBC path.

  14. Quaternary ostracode and foraminiferal biostratigraphy and paleoceanography in the western Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Thomas M.; DeNinno, Lauren H.; Polyak, L.V.; Caverly, Emma K.; Poore, Richard; Brenner, Alec R.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; Marzen, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    The stratigraphic distributions of ostracodes and selected calcareous benthic and planktic foraminiferal species were studied in sediment cores from ~ 700 to 2700 m water depth on the Northwind, Mendeleev, and Lomonosov Ridges in the western Arctic Ocean. Microfaunal records in most cores cover mid- to late Quaternary sediments deposited in the last ~ 600 ka, with one record covering the last ~ 1.5 Ma. Results show a progressive faunal turnover during the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT, ~ 1.2 to 0.7 Ma) and around the mid-Brunhes event (MBE, ~ 0.4 Ma) reflecting major changes in Arctic Ocean temperature, circulation and sea-ice cover. The observed MPT shift is characterized by the extinction of species that today inhabit the sea-ice free subpolar North Atlantic and/or seasonally sea-ice free Nordic Seas (Echinocythereis sp., Rockalliacf. enigmatica, Krithe cf. aquilonia, Pterygocythereis vannieuwenhuisei). After a very warm interglacial during marine isotope stage (MIS) 11 dominated by the temperate planktic foraminifer Turborotalita egelida, the MBE experienced a shift to polar assemblages characteristic of predominantly perennial Arctic sea-ice cover during the interglacial and interstadial periods of the last 300 ka. These include the planktic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, the sea-ice dwelling ostracodeAcetabulastoma arcticum and associated benthic taxa Pseudocythere caudata,Pedicythere neofluitans, and Polycope spp. Several species can be used as biostratigraphic markers of specific intervals such as ostracodes Rabilimis mirabilis — MIS 5 and P. vannieuwenhuisei extinction after MIS 11, and foraminiferal abundance zones Bulimina aculeata — late MIS 5 and Bolivina arctica — MIS 5-11.

  15. Increasing carbon inventory of the intermediate layers of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, Ylva; Ulfsbo, Adam; van Heuven, Steven; Kattner, Gerhard; Anderson, Leif G.

    2014-04-01

    Concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), nutrients, and oxygen in subsurface waters of the central Arctic Ocean have been investigated for conceivable time trends over the last two decades. Data from six cruises (1991-2011) that cover the Nansen, Amundsen, and Makarov Basins were included in this analysis. In waters deeper than 2000 m, no statistically significant trend could be observed for DIC, TA, phosphate, or nitrate, but a small rate of increase in apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) was noticeable. For the individual stations, differences in concentration of each property were computed between the mean concentrations in the Arctic Atlantic Water (AAW) or the upper Polar Deep Water (uPDW), i.e., between about 150 and 1400 m depth, and in the deep water (assumed invariable over time). In these shallower water layers, we observe significant above-zero time trends for DIC, in the range of 0.6-0.9 μmol kg-1 yr-1 (for AAW) and 0.4-0.6 µmol kg-1 yr-1 (for uPDW). No time trend in nutrients could be observed, indicating no change in the rate of organic matter mineralization within this depth range. Consequently, the buildup of DIC is attributed to increasing concentrations of anthropogenic carbon in the waters flowing into these depth layers of the Arctic Ocean. The resulting rate of increase of the column inventory of anthropogenic CO2 is estimated to be between 0.6 and 0.9 mol C m-2 yr-1, with distinct differences between basins.

  16. Central Arctic Ocean freshwater during a period of anomalous melt and advection in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, Benjamin; Korhonen, Meri; Hoppmann, Mario; Ricker, Robert; Hendricks, Stefan; Krumpen, Thomas; Beckers, Justin; Schauer, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    During the recent decade the Arctic Ocean has shown several years of very low sea-ice extent and an increase in liquid freshwater. Yet, the processes underlying the interannual variability are still not fully understood. Hydrographic observations by ship campaigns and autonomous platforms reveal that summer 2015 showed above average liquid freshwater in the upper ocean of the central Arctic. Surface temperatures and sea level pressure were also higher than the average of the preceeding two decades. From hydrographic observations and atmospheric reanalysis data we show that this liquid freshwater anomaly is associated with above average sea-ice melt and intensified northward Ekman transport. We, further, found significant amounts of Pacific Water in the upper water column, from the mixed-layer to the upper halocline. Our results suggest that the freshening was due to both advection of low-salinity water from the direction of the Siberian shelves, the Beaufort Gyre and the Bering Strait, and enhance sea-ice melt.

  17. Tectonic and sedimentary structures in the northern Chukchi region, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegewald, Anne; Jokat, Wilfried

    2013-07-01

    interpretation of tectonic and sedimentary structures in the northern Chukchi region, Arctic Ocean, is important to enhance our understanding of the tectonic evolution of this region. Therefore, multichannel seismic lines as well as seismic wide-angle reflection and refraction data were acquired in the northern Chukchi region during the RV Polarstern ARK-XXIII/3 summer expedition in 2008. These data have been processed and interpreted for the three main geological provinces (Chukchi Plateau, Chukchi Abyssal Plain, and Mendeleev Ridge) to describe the sedimentary and basement structures of the northern Chukchi region. Furthermore, using the age control of five exploration wells drilled near the coast of Alaska in combination with additional seismic reflection lines located on the Chukchi Shelf, we were able to date sediment horizons within the research area. In total, six sediment horizons with ages between Barremian/Hauterivian and the Top Miocene were identified. Especially, the Top Oligocene horizon forms a pronounce unconformity on the Chukchi Plateau and on the Mendeleev Ridge flanks. The origin of this unconformity can be associated with the opening of the Fram Strait indicating a significant change in the Arctic Ocean current system.

  18. An examination of double-diffusive processes in a mesoscale eddy in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebieva, Yana; Timmermans, Mary-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity measurements of an Atlantic Water mesoscale eddy in the Arctic Ocean's Canada Basin are analyzed to understand the effects of velocity shear on a range of double-diffusive processes. Double-diffusive structures in and around the eddy are examined through the transition from low shear (outside the eddy and within its solid body core) to high geostrophic shear zones at the eddy flanks. The geostrophic Richardson number takes large values where a double-diffusive staircase is observed and lowest values at the eddy flanks where geostrophic velocity is largest and a well-formed staircase is not present. A Thorpe scale analysis is used to estimate turbulent diffusivities in the flank regions. Double-diffusive and turbulent heat, salt, and buoyancy fluxes from the eddy are computed, and used to infer that the eddy decays on time scales of around 4-9 years. Fluxes highlight that Atlantic Water heat within the eddy can be fluxed downward into deeper water layers by means of both double-diffusive and turbulent mixing. Estimated lateral variations in vertical fluxes across the eddy allow for speculation that double diffusion speeds up the eddy decay, having important implications for the transfer of Atlantic Water heat in the Arctic Ocean.

  19. An early to mid-Pleistocene deep Arctic Ocean ostracode fauna with North Atlantic affinities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeNinno, Lauren H.; Cronin, Thomas M.; Rodriquez-Lazaro, J.; Brenner, Alec R.

    2015-01-01

    An early to middle Pleistocene ostracode fauna was discovered in sediment core P1-93-AR-23 (P23, 76.95°N, 155.07°W) from 951 meter water depth from the Northwind Ridge, western Arctic Ocean. Piston core P23 yielded more than 30,000 specimens and a total of about 30 species. Several early to mid-Pleistocene species in the genera Krithe,Echinocythereis, Pterygocythereis, and Arcacythere are now extinct in the Arctic and show taxonomic affinities to North Atlantic Ocean species. Our results suggest that there was a major ostracode faunal turnover during the global climate transitions known as the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT, ~ 1.2 to 0.7 Ma) and the Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE, ~ 400 ka) reflecting the development of perennial sea ice during interglacial periods and large ice shelves during glacial periods over the last 400,000 years.

  20. Sea-ice freeboard heights in the Arctic Ocean from ICESat and airborne lidar - a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourup, H.; Forsberg, R.

    2005-12-01

    Two near-coincident tracks of ICESat/GLAS and airborne scanning airborne lidar data were acquired on May 25, 2004, in the Arctic Ocean north of Greenland, in an area of thick perennial sea-ice with few open leads and numerous large ridges. The airborne lidar data, having a relative accuracy of few cm and 1 m spatial resolution, provide an excellent quantification of the ability of ICESat to detect and model sea-ice features such as leads and ridges, as well as gaining insight into the expected ICESat waveforms over heavily deformed sea-ice. In the paper we outline the underflight experiment and hardware, as well as show examples of the good fit between ICESat and filtered airborne data, matching the ICESat footprint. We also compare the observed ICESat waveforms to the airborne data, as well as quantify the biases induced by "lowest-level" filtering techniques in this particular area. We conclude by showing examples of Arctic Ocean-wide freeboard heights derived from ICESat by an improved "lowest-level" technique, showing good overall correlation to Quikscat multi-year ice distribution and expected seasonal changes.

  1. Evidence for ice-free summers in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Schreck, Michael; Knorr, Gregor; Niessen, Frank; Forwick, Matthias; Gebhardt, Catalina; Jensen, Laura; Kaminski, Michael; Kopf, Achim; Matthiessen, Jens; Jokat, Wilfried; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Although the permanently to seasonally ice-covered Arctic Ocean is a unique and sensitive component in the Earth's climate system, the knowledge of its long-term climate history remains very limited due to the restricted number of pre-Quaternary sedimentary records. During Polarstern Expedition PS87/2014, we discovered multiple submarine landslides along Lomonosov Ridge. Removal of younger sediments from steep headwalls has led to exhumation of Miocene sediments close to the seafloor. Here we document the presence of IP25 as a proxy for spring sea-ice cover and alkenone-based summer sea-surface temperatures >4 °C that support a seasonal sea-ice cover with an ice-free summer season being predominant during the late Miocene in the central Arctic Ocean. A comparison of our proxy data with Miocene climate simulations seems to favour either relatively high late Miocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations and/or a weak sensitivity of the model to simulate the magnitude of high-latitude warming in a warmer than modern climate.

  2. Evidence for ice-free summers in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Schreck, Michael; Knorr, Gregor; Niessen, Frank; Forwick, Matthias; Gebhardt, Catalina; Jensen, Laura; Kaminski, Michael; Kopf, Achim; Matthiessen, Jens; Jokat, Wilfried; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Although the permanently to seasonally ice-covered Arctic Ocean is a unique and sensitive component in the Earth's climate system, the knowledge of its long-term climate history remains very limited due to the restricted number of pre-Quaternary sedimentary records. During Polarstern Expedition PS87/2014, we discovered multiple submarine landslides along Lomonosov Ridge. Removal of younger sediments from steep headwalls has led to exhumation of Miocene sediments close to the seafloor. Here we document the presence of IP25 as a proxy for spring sea-ice cover and alkenone-based summer sea-surface temperatures >4 °C that support a seasonal sea-ice cover with an ice-free summer season being predominant during the late Miocene in the central Arctic Ocean. A comparison of our proxy data with Miocene climate simulations seems to favour either relatively high late Miocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations and/or a weak sensitivity of the model to simulate the magnitude of high-latitude warming in a warmer than modern climate. PMID:27041737

  3. Levoglucosan indicates high levels of biomass burning aerosols over oceans from the Arctic to Antarctic

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qi-Hou; Xie, Zhou-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ming; Kang, Hui; Zhang, Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    Biomass burning is known to affect air quality, global carbon cycle, and climate. However, the extent to which biomass burning gases/aerosols are present on a global scale, especially in the marine atmosphere, is poorly understood. Here we report the molecular tracer levoglucosan concentrations in marine air from the Arctic Ocean through the North and South Pacific Ocean to Antarctica during burning season. Levoglucosan was found to be present in all regions at ng/m3 levels with the highest atmospheric loadings present in the mid-latitudes (30°–60° N and S), intermediate loadings in the Arctic, and lowest loadings in the Antarctic and equatorial latitudes. As a whole, levoglucosan concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere were comparable to those in the Northern Hemisphere. Biomass burning has a significant impact on atmospheric Hg and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) from pole-to-pole, with more contribution to WSOC in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. PMID:24176935

  4. Evidence for ice-free summers in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Schreck, Michael; Knorr, Gregor; Niessen, Frank; Forwick, Matthias; Gebhardt, Catalina; Jensen, Laura; Kaminski, Michael; Kopf, Achim; Matthiessen, Jens; Jokat, Wilfried; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Although the permanently to seasonally ice-covered Arctic Ocean is a unique and sensitive component in the Earth's climate system, the knowledge of its long-term climate history remains very limited due to the restricted number of pre-Quaternary sedimentary records. During Polarstern Expedition PS87/2014, we discovered multiple submarine landslides along Lomonosov Ridge. Removal of younger sediments from steep headwalls has led to exhumation of Miocene sediments close to the seafloor. Here we document the presence of IP25 as a proxy for spring sea-ice cover and alkenone-based summer sea-surface temperatures >4 °C that support a seasonal sea-ice cover with an ice-free summer season being predominant during the late Miocene in the central Arctic Ocean. A comparison of our proxy data with Miocene climate simulations seems to favour either relatively high late Miocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations and/or a weak sensitivity of the model to simulate the magnitude of high-latitude warming in a warmer than modern climate. PMID:27041737

  5. Late summer net community production in the central Arctic Ocean using multiple approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulfsbo, Adam; Cassar, Nicolas; Korhonen, Meri; Heuven, Steven; Hoppema, Mario; Kattner, Gerhard; Anderson, Leif G.

    2014-10-01

    Large-scale patterns of net community production (NCP) were estimated during the late summer cruise ARK-XXVI/3 (TransArc, August/September 2011) to the central Arctic Ocean. Several approaches were used based on the following: (i) continuous measurements of surface water oxygen to argon ratios (O2/Ar), (ii) underway measurements of surface partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), (iii) discrete samples of dissolved inorganic carbon, and (iv) dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate. The NCP estimates agreed well within the uncertainties associated with each approach. The highest late summer NCP (up to 6 mol C m-2) was observed in the marginal sea ice zone region. Low values (<1 mol C m-2) were found in the sea ice-covered deep basins with a strong spatial variability. Lowest values were found in the Amundsen Basin and moderate values in the Nansen and Makarov Basins with slightly higher estimates over the Mendeleev Ridge. Our findings support a coupling of NCP to sea ice coverage and nutrient supply and thus stress a potential change in spatial and temporal distribution of NCP in a future Arctic Ocean. To follow the evolution of NCP in space and time, it is suggested to apply one or several of these approaches in shipboard investigations with a time interval of 3 to 5 years.

  6. δ(13)C-CH4 reveals CH4 variations over oceans from mid-latitudes to the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juan; Xie, Zhouqing; Sun, Liguang; Kang, Hui; He, Pengzhen; Xing, Guangxi

    2015-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of CH4 over oceans are poorly understood, especially over the Arctic Ocean. Here we report atmospheric CH4 levels together with δ(13)C-CH4 from offshore China (31°N) to the central Arctic Ocean (up to 87°N) from July to September 2012. CH4 concentrations and δ(13)C-CH4 displayed temporal and spatial variation ranging from 1.65 to 2.63 ppm, and from -50.34% to -44.94% (mean value: -48.55 ± 0.84%), respectively. Changes in CH4 with latitude were linked to the decreasing input of enriched δ(13)C and chemical oxidation by both OH and Cl radicals as indicated by variation of δ(13)C. There were complex mixing sources outside and inside the Arctic Ocean. A keeling plot showed the dominant influence by hydrate gas in the Nordic Sea region, while the long range transport of wetland emissions were one of potentially important sources in the central Arctic Ocean. Experiments comparing sunlight and darkness indicate that microbes may also play an important role in regional variations. PMID:26323236

  7. δ13C-CH4 reveals CH4 variations over oceans from mid-latitudes to the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Juan; Xie, Zhouqing; Sun, Liguang; Kang, Hui; He, Pengzhen; Xing, Guangxi

    2015-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of CH4 over oceans are poorly understood, especially over the Arctic Ocean. Here we report atmospheric CH4 levels together with δ13C-CH4 from offshore China (31°N) to the central Arctic Ocean (up to 87°N) from July to September 2012. CH4 concentrations and δ13C-CH4 displayed temporal and spatial variation ranging from 1.65 to 2.63 ppm, and from −50.34% to −44.94% (mean value: −48.55 ± 0.84%), respectively. Changes in CH4 with latitude were linked to the decreasing input of enriched δ13C and chemical oxidation by both OH and Cl radicals as indicated by variation of δ13C. There were complex mixing sources outside and inside the Arctic Ocean. A keeling plot showed the dominant influence by hydrate gas in the Nordic Sea region, while the long range transport of wetland emissions were one of potentially important sources in the central Arctic Ocean. Experiments comparing sunlight and darkness indicate that microbes may also play an important role in regional variations. PMID:26323236

  8. Dissolved organic carbon distribution and origin in the Nordic Seas: Exchanges with the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, Rainer M. W.; BudéUs, Gereon; Meon, Benedikt

    2003-07-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and in situ fluorescence were measured along with hydrographic parameters in the Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian Seas (Nordic Seas). Surface (<100 m) concentrations of DOC ranged from 60 to 118 μM with elevated values in the East Greenland Current (EGC) which transports water from the Arctic Ocean to the North Atlantic. EGC surface waters also showed a pronounced fluorescence maximum between 30 and 120 m depth in all EGC sections indicating the abundance of Arctic river derived DOC in this current. Based on fluorescence we estimated that 20-50% of the annual river discharge to the Arctic Ocean was exported in the EGC. The fluorescence maximum was typically associated with salinity around 33 and temperatures below -1°C which are characteristic of surface and upper halocline water in the Arctic Ocean. The elevated fluorescence in this water mass suggests a strong Eurasian shelf component and also suggests that in situ fluorescence could be used to trace Eurasian shelf water in the central Arctic Ocean. DOC concentrations in the Nordic Sea basins (>1000 m) were relatively high (˜50 μM DOC) compared with other ocean basins indicating active vertical transport of DOC in this region on decadal timescales. Based on existing vertical transport estimates and 15 μM of semilabile DOC we calculated an annual vertical net DOC export of 3.5 Tg C yr-1 in the Greenland Sea and about 36 Tg C yr-1 for the entire Arctic Mediterranean Sea (AMS) including the Greenland-Scotland Ridge overflow. It appears that physical processes play a determining role for the distribution of DOC in the AMS.

  9. Glacial freshwater discharge events recorded by authigenic neodymium isotopes in sediments from the Mendeleev Ridge, western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kwangchul; Han, Yeongcheol; Huh, Youngsook; Nam, Seung-Il; Stein, Ruediger; Mackensen, Andreas; Matthiessen, Jens

    2013-05-01

    The freshwater budget of the Arctic Ocean is a key component governing the deep water formation in the North Atlantic and the global climate system. We analyzed the isotopic composition of neodymium (ɛNd) in authigenic phases of marine sediments on the Mendeleev Ridge in the western Arctic Ocean spanning an estimated time interval from present to about 75 ka BP. This continuous record was used to reconstruct the ɛNd of the polar deep water (PDW) and changes in freshwater sources to the PDW through time. Three deviations in ɛNd from a long term average of -10.2 were identified at estimated 46-51, 35-39 and 13-21 ka BP. The estimated 46-51 ka BP event can be traced to bursting of ice-dammed lakes accompanying the collapse of the Barents-Kara Ice Sheet, which would have released radiogenic Nd to the eastern Arctic Ocean. The cyclonic surface circulation in the eastern Arctic Ocean must have been stronger than at present for the event to be recorded on the Mendeleev Ridge. For the 35-39 and 13-21 ka BP events, it is likely that the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) supplied the unradiogenic freshwater. The configuration of the anticyclonic circulation in the western Arctic was probably similar to today or expanded eastward. Our simple mass balance calculations suggest that large amounts of freshwater were released but due to significant deep water formation within the Arctic Ocean, the effect on the formation of NADW was probably minor.

  10. Modeling the impact of riverine DON removal by marine bacterioplankton on primary production in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fouest, V.; Manizza, M.; Tremblay, B.; Babin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The planktonic and biogeochemical dynamics of the Arctic shelves exhibit a strong variability in response to Arctic warming. In this study, in order to elucidate on the processes regulating the production of phytoplankton (PP) and bacterioplankton (BP) and their interactions, we employ a biogeochemical model coupled to a pan-Arctic ocean-sea ice model (MITgcm) to explicitly simulate and quantify the contribution of usable dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) drained by the major circum-Arctic rivers on PP and BP in a scenario of melting sea ice (1998-2011). Model simulations suggest that on average between 1998 and 2011, the removal of usable RDON by bacterioplankton is responsible of a ~26% increase of the annual BP for the whole Arctic Ocean. With respect to total PP, the model simulates an increase of ~8% on an annual basis and of ~18% in summer. Recycled ammonium is responsible for the PP increase. The recycling of RDON by bacterioplankton promotes higher BP and PP but there is no significant temporal trend in the BP : PP ratio within the ice-free shelves over the 1998-2011 period. This suggests no significant evolution in the balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy in the last decade with a constant annual flux of RDON into the coastal ocean although changes in RDON supply and further reduction in sea ice cover could potentially alter this delicate balance.

  11. Modelling the impact of riverine DON removal by marine bacterioplankton on primary production in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fouest, V.; Manizza, M.; Tremblay, B.; Babin, M.

    2015-06-01

    The planktonic and biogeochemical dynamics of the Arctic shelves exhibit a strong variability in response to Arctic warming. In this study, we employ a biogeochemical model coupled to a pan-Arctic ocean-sea ice model (MITgcm) to elucidate the processes regulating the primary production (PP) of phytoplankton, bacterioplankton (BP), and their interactions. The model explicitly simulates and quantifies the contribution of usable dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) drained by the major circum-Arctic rivers to PP and BP in a scenario of melting sea ice (1998-2011). Model simulations suggest that, on average between 1998 and 2011, the removal of usable riverine dissolved organic nitrogen (RDON) by bacterioplankton is responsible for a ~ 26% increase in the annual BP for the whole Arctic Ocean. With respect to total PP, the model simulates an increase of ~ 8% on an annual basis and of ~ 18% in summer. Recycled ammonium is responsible for the PP increase. The recycling of RDON by bacterioplankton promotes higher BP and PP, but there is no significant temporal trend in the BP : PP ratio within the ice-free shelves over the 1998-2011 period. This suggests no significant evolution in the balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy in the last decade, with a constant annual flux of RDON into the coastal ocean, although changes in RDON supply and further reduction in sea-ice cover could potentially alter this delicate balance.

  12. Ocean Properties and Submarine Melt of Ice Shelves in a High-Arctic Fiord (Milne Fiord)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, A.; Mueller, D.; Laval, B.

    2014-12-01

    The role of ambient stratification, the vertical distribution of heat, and fiord circulation on submarine melt rates in glacial fiords in the Canadian Arctic are largely unknown despite recent widespread collapse of ice shelves in this region. A 3-year field study was conducted to investigate ocean influence on ice loss from an ice shelf and glacier tongue in Milne Fiord (82oN), Ellesmere Island. Direct ocean observations of the sub-ice cavities from through-ice profiles showed a vertically stratified water column consisting of a perennial fresh ice-dammed epishelf lake at the surface, above cold relatively fresh Polar Water, and warm saline waters from the upper halocline of the Atlantic layer at depth. The broad continental shelf and a topographic sill prevented the warmest waters of the Atlantic layer from entering the 450 m deep fiord. Meltwater concentrations were highest near the glacier grounding line, with meltwater exported at depth due to the strong ambient stratification. There was little evidence of increased buoyancy-driven melt in summer from subglacial discharge as observed in sub-Arctic fiords (e.g. southern Greenland), suggesting that circulation in high-latitude fiords is largely melt-driven convection with less pronounced seasonality. Basal melt rates estimated using three methods, meltwater flux, divergence of ice flux, and an ocean thermodynamic model, were broadly consistent. Average melt rates of 0.75 ± 0.46 m a-1 and 1.14 ± 0.83 m a-1 were found for the Milne Ice Shelf and Milne Glacier Tongue, respectively, although showed high spatial variability. The highest melt rates (~4 m a-1) were found near the glacier grounding line and were driven by warm upper halocline waters. Similar melt rates occurred in near-surface waters driven by solar heating of the epishelf lake, enhancing melt along the margins of the glacier tongue and the landward edge of the ice shelf. The Milne Ice Shelf and Milne Glacier Tongue are in a state of negative mass

  13. Loki's Castle: A sediment-influenced hydrothermal vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, T.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Lilley, M. D.; Moeller, K.

    2010-12-01

    The chemical composition as well as the stable and radiogenic isotope signatures of hydrothermal fluids from the Loki’s Castle vent field, located at the Mohns-Knipovich bend in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea (73°N), are substantially different from sediment-starved mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Geochemical studies of the hydrothermal vent fluids and the adjacent rift valley sediments provide insights into the influence of sediments on the hydrothermal fluid composition and provide constraints on acting redox conditions. Additionally, they reflect the degree of fluid-rock-sediment interaction at this arctic hydrothermal vent field. Here we present an overview of the geochemical characteristics of the hydrothermal and sedimentary components at Loki’s Castle, obtained during expeditions in 2008, 2009 and 2010, with emphasis on the stable and radiogenic isotope signatures. We compare these data with other sediment-influenced and sediment-starved mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. The hydrothermal vent fluids are characterized by a pH of ˜ 5.5 and by elevated concentrations of methane, hydrogen and ammonia, which reflect a sedimentary contribution. δ13CDIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) are depleted relative to mantle carbon values, consistent with an organic carbon input. The δ18OH2O values of the vents fluids are enriched compared to background bottom seawater, whereas the δD values are not. 87Sr/86Sr ratios are more radiogenic than those characteristic of un-sedimented mid-ocean ridge vent fluids. S-isotope data reflect mixing of a MORB source with sulphide derived from reduced seawater sulphate. To document the background sediment input of the ridge system, short gravity cores and up to 18 m long piston cores were recovered from various localities in the rift valley. The pore-fluid isotope chemistries of the sediments show vertical gradients that primarily reflect diagenesis and degradation of organic matter. The vertical gradient is locally enhanced

  14. The profile of the rare earth elements in the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jon; Haley, Brian

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the dissolved rare earth element (REE) content of three water column profiles (two shelf sites and one deep basin site) in the Canada Basin in order to better constrain the behavior of REEs in the Arctic Ocean. Dissolved concentrations of the REEs in the surface are 1.3-1.9 times higher than deep water (>500 m) concentrations, which are constant with depth (La: 19-23 pM, Nd: 14-17 pM, Yb: 4.0-4.3 pM). The dominant source of REEs to the surface waters of the Canada Basin is most likely Pacific water flowing through the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea and/or the Mackenzie River. Dissolved REEs in the intermediate and deep waters are constant and appear to behave conservatively, allowing us to investigate this aspect of REE behavior in the oceans. Calculated deep ocean residence times of the REEs in the Canada Basin range from 450 to 700 years and match the age of these waters. We postulate that these values are likely applicable to global deep ocean reservoirs and that observed deviations from this conservative value can help to constrain nonconservative processes acting on the REEs.

  15. Automated Mapping of Rapid Arctic Ocean Coastal Change Over Large Spans of Time and Geography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulslander, D.

    2012-12-01

    While climate change is global in scope, its impacts vary greatly from region to region. The dynamic Arctic Ocean coastline often shows greater sensitivity to climate change and more obvious impacts. Current longer ice-free conditions, rising sea level, thawing permafrost, and melting of larger ice bodies combine to produce extremely rapid coastal change and erosion. Anderson et al. (2009; Geology News) have measured erosion rates at sites along the Alaskan Arctic Ocean coast of 15 m per year and greater. Completely understanding coastal change in the Arctic requires mapping both current erosional regimes as well as changes in erosional rates over several decades. Studying coastal change and trends in the Arctic, however, presents several significant difficulties. The study area is enormous, with over 45,000 km of coastline; it is also one of the most remote, inaccessible, and hostile environments on Earth. Moreover, the region has little to no historical data from which to start. Thus, any study of the area must be able to construct its own baseline. Remote sensing offers the best solution given these difficulties. Spaceborne platforms allow for regular global coverage at temporal and spatial scales sufficient for mapping coastal erosion and deposition. The Landsat family of instruments (MSS, TM, and ETM) has data available as frequently as every 16 days and starting as early as 1972. The data are freely available from the USGS through earthexplorer.usgs.gov and are well calibrated both geometrically and spectrally, eliminating expensive pre-processing steps and making them analysis-ready. Finally, because manual coastline delineation of the quantity of data involved would be prohibitive in both budget and labor, an automated processing chain must be used. ENVI Feature Extraction can provide results in line with those generated by expert analysts (Hulslander, et al., 2008; GEOBIA 2008 Proceedings). Previous studies near Drew Point, Alaska have shown that feature

  16. Multiyear ice decline in the Arctic Ocean: the role of density stratification in leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Pavel; Ivanov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    An unprecedented degradation of the multiyear sea ice is observed in the Arctic Ocean since the latest decade of the 20th century. Comparison of ice observations at Russian manned drifting station North Pole-31 (NP-31, 1991) with observations at the international SHEBA drifting station (1998) allowed to assume that rapid decrease of multiyear ice volume (area and thickness) in the central Arctic Ocean commenced in early 1990s. Increase of sea surface air temperature in the Arctic and continuous outflow of ice through Fram strait provided the major external forcing, which shaped the present ice conditions. We investigate the hypothesis that besides these external impacts an important contribution to accelerated decrease of ice volume was provided by internal factors. We introduce the term "stratification effect" (SE) to characterise this internal factors action. SE emerges as a result of fresh melt water entrapping within a thin (1-3 m) surface layer of lead by extremely strong density gradient below. SE provides additional heating of the fresh water layer (FWL) during summer ice and snow melt. Melt water create FWL in the leads between the multiyear ice fields. Strong halo-pycnoclyne isolates FWL from cold and salty mixed layer underneath, leading to additional accumulation of incoming short wave solar radiation and preservation of heat inside FWL, because of supressed turbulent mixing at its lower boundary. Local stratification, which develops within the FWL during weak wind conditions, additionally contributes to FWL heating. According to observations at NP-31 surplus SE-caused heating may reach several degrees. The heat, accumulated in the lead is able to increase efficiency of bottom and lateral ice melting. SE increases the positive feedback between ice melt and open water area. Small albedo of sea water provides more intensive absorption of short wave radiation, which is in turn consumed on extra ice melt from the bottom and side walls. If the near

  17. Holocene palynomorph records since the last deglaciation from the Chukchi Sea shelf sediments, western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So-Young; Nam, Seung-Il; Polyak, Leonid; Delusina, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Organic-walled microscopic organisms in marine sediments such as dinoflagellate cysts, pollen, spores and freshwater algae from the Chukchi Sea shelf sediment document spatial and temporal variations in the paleoenvironmental history in relation to regional climatic changes during the Holocene. The records presented here are derived from a sediment core from the shallow shelf of the Chukchi Sea in the western Arctic (core ARA02B/01A-GC), a site which allows us to assess the timing of the Bering Strait opening and its influence over the regional environmental system during the last post glacial interval. The sediment core contains a rich concentration of terrestrially derived pollen and spores, indicating considerable changes in vegetation over the catchment area including the territories of both North America (Alaska and Northern Canadian Arctic) and Northern Siberia (Chukotka peninsula and Northern East-Siberian coast) during the last 10 kyr BP. We speculate that the palynomorphs were predominantly supplied from eroded shelf sediments during intervals of extensive sea-ice coverage, while they were carried to the shelves by large rivers (Yukon, Mackenzie and Siberian rivers) and then transferred by oceanic currents during low sea-ice coverage intervals. In particular, the percentage ratio between tree-herb pollen and spores, and the algae Pediastrum in the palynomorph assemblages represent significant changes in the western Arctic vegetation associated with freshwater inputs, including increased forest vegetation between ~8 and 4 kyr BP, a climatic optimum at ~5 kyr BP and a termination of the low sea-ice interval at ~3 kyr BP. In parallel, marine palynomorphs (dinoflagellate cysts) document significant changes in the marine environments, typically for a prominent increase in dinoflagellate cyst concentrations as well as total organic carbon and nitrogen contents since ca. 8 kyr BP suggesting increased nutrient inputs and marine productivity in the study area. Our

  18. Diversity of cultured photosynthetic flagellates in the northeast Pacific and Arctic Oceans in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzano, S.; Gourvil, P.; Siano, R.; Chanoine, M.; Marie, D.; Lessard, S.; Sarno, D.; Vaulot, D.

    2012-11-01

    During the MALINA cruise (summer 2009), an extensive effort was undertaken to isolate phytoplankton strains from the northeast (NE) Pacific Ocean, the Bering Strait, the Chukchi Sea, and the Beaufort Sea. In order to characterise the main photosynthetic microorganisms occurring in the Arctic during the summer season, strains were isolated by flow cytometry sorting (FCS) and single cell pipetting before or after phytoplankton enrichment of seawater samples. Strains were isolated both onboard and back in the laboratory and cultured at 4 °C under light/dark conditions. Overall, we isolated and characterised by light microscopy and 18 S rRNA gene sequencing 104 strains of photosynthetic flagellates which grouped into 21 genotypes (defined by 99.5% 18 S rRNA gene sequence similarity), mainly affiliated to Chlorophyta and Heterokontophyta. The taxon most frequently isolated was an Arctic ecotype of the green algal genus Micromonas (Arctic Micromonas), which was nearly the only phytoplankter recovered within the picoplankton (< 2 μm) size range. Strains of Arctic Micromonas as well as other strains from the same class (Mamiellophyceae) were identified in further detail by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA operon. The MALINA Micromonas strains share identical 18 S rRNA and ITS sequences suggesting high genetic homogeneity within Arctic Micromonas. Three other Mamiellophyceae strains likely belong to a new genus. Other green algae from the genera Nephroselmis, Chlamydomonas, and Pyramimonas were also isolated, whereas Heterokontophyta included some unidentified Pelagophyceae, Dictyochophyceae (Pedinellales), and Chrysophyceae (Dinobryon faculiferum). Moreover, we isolated some Cryptophyceae (Rhodomonas sp.) as well as a few Prymnesiophyceae and dinoflagellates. We identified the dinoflagellate Woloszynskia cincta by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 28 S rRNA gene sequencing. Our morphological analyses show that this species possess

  19. Seasonality of Spectral Albedo and Transmission of Sea Ice in the Transpolar Drift, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, M.; Gerland, S.; Hudson, S.; Haapala, J.; Hanson, S.; Palo, T.; Perovich, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    The physical and optical properties of snow and sea ice in the Polar regions control the amount of solar short-wave radiation, reflected at the surface, scattered and absorbed within snow and ice, and transmitted into the ocean beneath. Albedo and transmissivity of snow and sea ice strongly influence heat fluxes within the coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean system, and by that the evolution of the sea ice. Spectral optical properties are crucial for primary production and evolution of sea ice related microorganisms and various bio-chemical processes. Furthermore, the increasing importance of remote sensors when studying snow and sea ice, raises the need for ground truth data of spectral optical and other physical properties of snow and sea ice. Spectral albedo and transmission were measured continuously within high spectral and temporal resolution during the transpolar drift of the drifting schooner "Tara" through the Arctic Basin between 30 April and 05 September 2007. Simultaneous in-situ measurements of snow and sea ice properties as well as a comprehensive meteorological program complement the dataset and allow common analysis and an integrated dataset. Results show significant seasonal changes and highlight key events during the transitions from spring to summer and summer to autumn; including formation, evolution, and freeze up of melt ponds. We were able to derive absolute values of energy transfer through snow and ice and into the upper ocean. The timing of changes in surface energy balance can be determined and characterized by including results from detailed snow and sea ice studies as temperature and density profiles, snow stratigraphy, and sea ice texture. Among others, they show that the melting period lasted 80 days which was about 20 days longer than on average. Interestingly, the observation period coincides with the time prior to the Arctic sea ice extent minimum in autumn 2007. Consequently, the findings might assist to understand and explain processes

  20. Provenance discrimination in surface sediments of the Amerasian Basin (Arctic Ocean) constrained by quantitative mineralogical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenova, E.; Zou, H.; Vogt, C.; Stein, R.; Matthiessen, J.

    2012-04-01

    This study focuses on the determination of potential source areas for the terrigenous material derived from Eurasia and North America to reconstruct the sedimentary environments in the Amerasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean. When compared to the potential source areas in the Arctic Ocean hinterland, spatial variations in bulk mineralogy of surface sediments may provide important information on the trajectories of sea-ice drift and oceanic currents. Investigations are carried out on surface samples recovered from the Mendeleev Ridge and shelves of the East Siberian and the Chukchi seas. Mineralogical analysis was performed on bulk sediments by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. Dry powder samples were mixed together with corundum for further quantification of mineral contents. Raw XRD data were processed using the RockJock (Eberl, 2003) and QUAX (Emmermann & Lauterjung, 1990; Vogt, 1997) software to test the consistency of both methods. Additionally, composition of artificial mixtures was determined to test the accuracy of mineral standards. Obtained results are used to identify mineralogical provinces in the surface sediments of the Amerasian Basin. This geographical distribution is also compared to the previously published studies, including the numerous research activities carried out in the Siberian shelf seas in the middle of the 20th century. Bulk mineral composition of surface sediments will be further used for unmixing of the downcore mineralogical records for sediment cores recovered along two transects across the Mendeleev Ridge during the ARK-XXIII/3 Expedition of RV "Polarstern" (for details see Stein et al., 2010). Trends in mineralogical composition will be also compared to the grain-size distribution in order to attribute the provenance changes to different transportation mechanisms in variable sedimentary environments.

  1. Modeling ocean and sea ice dynamics of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago: Aspects of forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wekerle, Claudia; Wang, Qiang; Danilov, Sergey; Myers, Paul G.; Jung, Thomas; Schröter, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) is one of the main pathways for freshwater exiting the Arctic Ocean. Freshwater exported to the North Atlantic may influence the deep water formation in the Labrador Sea, and thus the meridional overturning circulation. Modeling ocean and sea ice conditions of the CAA is difficult because of narrow straits and complex coastlines. The Finite-Element Sea-ice Ocean circulation Model (FESOM) configured on a global mesh is applied to assess the volume, freshwater and sea ice transports through the CAA. With a mesh resolution of 5 km in the CAA we are able to accurately resolve complex coastlines. Outside the CAA the mesh is refined to 24 km north of 55°N with a global background resolution of 1.5°. In this study, first, it is shown that the transports modeled with FESOM correlate well with the available observational data. Second, the model is used to learn about the impact of different atmospheric forcing datasets differing in spatial and temporal resolution (CORE 2 and the Reforecast dataset from Environment Canada). The CORE 2 dataset is on the T62 grid, which is coarse compared to the Reforecast dataset with grid resolution of 0.45° longitude and 0.3° latitude. The temporal resolution of the Reforecast dataset is higher than the CORE 2 dataset (one hourly and 6-hourly data, respectively, for wind, surface temperature and specific humidity fields). The representation of sea ice in the CAA can be improved by using the high resolution atmospheric forcing.

  2. Explosive volcanism on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge, Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Robert A; Willis, Claire; Humphris, Susan; Shank, Timothy M; Singh, Hanumant; Edmonds, Henrietta N; Kunz, Clayton; Hedman, Ulf; Helmke, Elisabeth; Jakuba, Michael; Liljebladh, Bengt; Linder, Julia; Murphy, Christopher; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Sato, Taichi; Schlindwein, Vera; Stranne, Christian; Tausenfreund, Maria; Upchurch, Lucia; Winsor, Peter; Jakobsson, Martin; Soule, Adam

    2008-06-26

    Roughly 60% of the Earth's outer surface is composed of oceanic crust formed by volcanic processes at mid-ocean ridges. Although only a small fraction of this vast volcanic terrain has been visually surveyed or sampled, the available evidence suggests that explosive eruptions are rare on mid-ocean ridges, particularly at depths below the critical point for seawater (3,000 m). A pyroclastic deposit has never been observed on the sea floor below 3,000 m, presumably because the volatile content of mid-ocean-ridge basalts is generally too low to produce the gas fractions required for fragmenting a magma at such high hydrostatic pressure. We employed new deep submergence technologies during an International Polar Year expedition to the Gakkel ridge in the Arctic Basin at 85 degrees E, to acquire photographic and video images of 'zero-age' volcanic terrain on this remote, ice-covered ridge. Here we present images revealing that the axial valley at 4,000 m water depth is blanketed with unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits, including bubble wall fragments (limu o Pele), covering a large (>10 km(2)) area. At least 13.5 wt% CO(2) is necessary to fragment magma at these depths, which is about tenfold the highest values previously measured in a mid-ocean-ridge basalt. These observations raise important questions about the accumulation and discharge of magmatic volatiles at ultraslow spreading rates on the Gakkel ridge and demonstrate that large-scale pyroclastic activity is possible along even the deepest portions of the global mid-ocean ridge volcanic system.

  3. Regional variations in provenance and abundance of ice-rafted clasts in Arctic Ocean sediments: Implications for the configuration of late Quaternary oceanic and atmospheric circulation in the Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.L.; Grantz, A.

    2001-01-01

    The composition and distribution of ice-rafted glacial erratics in late Quaternary sediments define the major current systems of the Arctic Ocean and identify two distinct continental sources for the erratics. In the southern Amerasia basin up to 70% of the erratics are dolostones and limestones (the Amerasia suite) that originated in the carbonate-rich Paleozoic terranes of the Canadian Arctic Islands. These clasts reached the Arctic Ocean in glaciers and were ice-rafted to the core sites in the clockwise Beaufort Gyre. The concentration of erratics decreases northward by 98% along the trend of the gyre from southeastern Canada basin to Makarov basin. The concentration of erratics then triples across the Makarov basin flank of Lomonosov Ridge and siltstone, sandstone and siliceous clasts become dominant in cores from the ridge and the Eurasia basin (the Eurasia suite). The bedrock source for the siltstone and sandstone clasts is uncertain, but bedrock distribution and the distribution of glaciation in northern Eurasia suggest the Taymyr Peninsula-Kara Sea regions. The pattern of clast distribution in the Arctic Ocean sediments and the sharp northward decrease in concentration of clasts of Canadian Arctic Island provenance in the Amerasia basin support the conclusion that the modem circulation pattern of the Arctic Ocean, with the Beaufort Gyre dominant in the Amerasia basin and the Transpolar drift dominant in the Eurasia basin, has controlled both sea-ice and glacial iceberg drift in the Arctic Ocean during interglacial intervals since at least the late Pleistocene. The abruptness of the change in both clast composition and concentration on the Makarov basin flank of Lomonosov Ridge also suggests that the boundary between the Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift has been relatively stable during interglacials since that time. Because the Beaufort Gyre is wind-driven our data, in conjunction with the westerly directed orientation of sand dunes that formed during

  4. Autumn-time response of the ocean-atmospheric system to interannual changes in Arctic sea-ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini, Y. J.; Senan, R.; Benestad, R. E.; Melsom, A.; Balmaseda, M. A.

    2010-09-01

    Sea-ice has a memory of several months and influences the atmosphere by modifying exchange of heat, moisture and momentum at the ocean-atmosphere interface, and by changing the albedo in summer. Thus, being a slowly evolving component of the Earth's climate, sea-ice could be very important for seasonal weather forecasting, especially in the polar regions. Arctic sea-ice extent reaches a minimum in September and sea-ice variability is highest during this period. Here we use a set of simulations from a state-of-the-art coupled ocean-atmosphere model to study the response of the northern hemispheric mid- to high-latitude ocean-atmospheric system to interannual changes in Arctic sea-ice extent during boreal Autumn-early winter. The model set-up consists of 5-member 5-month long simulations, with atmospheric and ocean initial conditions from 1 October 2007. Sea-ice in the model is prescribed, and is derived from observed SST for the years 2000 to 2007. We focus especially on 2007 when Arctic sea-ice extent reached a record lowest and show that there might be improved prediction skill associated with the low sea-ice conditions. Further, implications for seasonal weather predictability over western Europe and the Arctic region will be assessed.

  5. 77 FR 2513 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... the Notice of Availability (76 FR 82275, December 30, 2011). Public Meetings Comments will be accepted... in the Notice of Availability Federal Register document (76 FR 82275, December 30, 2011)) will be... Effects of Oil and Gas Activities in the Arctic Ocean AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...

  6. Observations of Recent Arctic Sea Ice Volume Loss and Its Impact on Ocean-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Ice Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Markus, T.; Farrell, S. L.; Worthen, D. L.; Boisvert, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques we estimate snow and sea ice thickness distributions for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and a snow depth model. These data are used with meteorological data and a thermodynamic sea ice model to calculate ocean-atmosphere heat exchange and ice volume production during the 2003-2008 fall and winter seasons. The calculated heat fluxes and ice growth rates are in agreement with previous observations over multiyear ice. In this study, we calculate heat fluxes and ice growth rates for the full distribution of ice thicknesses covering the Arctic basin and determine the impact of ice thickness change on the calculated values. Thinning of the sea ice is observed which greatly increases the 2005-2007 fall period ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes compared to those observed in 2003. Although there was also a decline in sea ice thickness for the winter periods, the winter time heat flux was found to be less impacted by the observed changes in ice thickness. A large increase in the net Arctic ocean-atmosphere heat output is also observed in the fall periods due to changes in the areal coverage of sea ice. The anomalously low sea ice coverage in 2007 led to a net ocean-atmosphere heat output approximately 3 times greater than was observed in previous years and suggests that sea ice losses are now playing a role in increasing surface air temperatures in the Arctic.

  7. Sailing the Open Polar Sea...Again: What Are You Teaching Your Children about the Arctic Ocean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockard, James W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Relates how a blunder about the Arctic Ocean and the polar ice cap made by the author in his first year of teaching led to a successful learning experience. Lists five important discussion topics that social studies teachers should use to teach about this remote, but strategic, part of the world. (LS)

  8. Glacial lake drainage in Patagonia (13-8 kyr) and response of the adjacent Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Neil F.; Jansson, Krister N.; Duller, Geoffrey A. T.; Singarayer, Joy; Holloway, Max; Harrison, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Large freshwater lakes formed in North America and Europe during deglaciation following the Last Glacial Maximum. Rapid drainage of these lakes into the Oceans resulted in abrupt perturbations in climate, including the Younger Dryas and 8.2 kyr cooling events. In the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere major glacial lakes also formed and drained during deglaciation but little is known about the magnitude, organization and timing of these drainage events and their effect on regional climate. We use 16 new single-grain optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates to define three stages of rapid glacial lake drainage in the Lago General Carrera/Lago Buenos Aires and Lago Cohrane/Pueyrredón basins of Patagonia and provide the first assessment of the effects of lake drainage on the Pacific Ocean. Lake drainage occurred between 13 and 8 kyr ago and was initially gradual eastward into the Atlantic, then subsequently reorganized westward into the Pacific as new drainage routes opened up during Patagonian Ice Sheet deglaciation. Coupled ocean-atmosphere model experiments using HadCM3 with an imposed freshwater surface “hosing” to simulate glacial lake drainage suggest that a negative salinity anomaly was advected south around Cape Horn, resulting in brief but significant impacts on coastal ocean vertical mixing and regional climate. PMID:26869235

  9. Glacial lake drainage in Patagonia (13-8 kyr) and response of the adjacent Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Neil F; Jansson, Krister N; Duller, Geoffrey A T; Singarayer, Joy; Holloway, Max; Harrison, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Large freshwater lakes formed in North America and Europe during deglaciation following the Last Glacial Maximum. Rapid drainage of these lakes into the Oceans resulted in abrupt perturbations in climate, including the Younger Dryas and 8.2 kyr cooling events. In the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere major glacial lakes also formed and drained during deglaciation but little is known about the magnitude, organization and timing of these drainage events and their effect on regional climate. We use 16 new single-grain optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates to define three stages of rapid glacial lake drainage in the Lago General Carrera/Lago Buenos Aires and Lago Cohrane/Pueyrredón basins of Patagonia and provide the first assessment of the effects of lake drainage on the Pacific Ocean. Lake drainage occurred between 13 and 8 kyr ago and was initially gradual eastward into the Atlantic, then subsequently reorganized westward into the Pacific as new drainage routes opened up during Patagonian Ice Sheet deglaciation. Coupled ocean-atmosphere model experiments using HadCM3 with an imposed freshwater surface "hosing" to simulate glacial lake drainage suggest that a negative salinity anomaly was advected south around Cape Horn, resulting in brief but significant impacts on coastal ocean vertical mixing and regional climate. PMID:26869235

  10. Glacial lake drainage in Patagonia (13-8 kyr) and response of the adjacent Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Neil F; Jansson, Krister N; Duller, Geoffrey A T; Singarayer, Joy; Holloway, Max; Harrison, Stephan

    2016-02-12

    Large freshwater lakes formed in North America and Europe during deglaciation following the Last Glacial Maximum. Rapid drainage of these lakes into the Oceans resulted in abrupt perturbations in climate, including the Younger Dryas and 8.2 kyr cooling events. In the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere major glacial lakes also formed and drained during deglaciation but little is known about the magnitude, organization and timing of these drainage events and their effect on regional climate. We use 16 new single-grain optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates to define three stages of rapid glacial lake drainage in the Lago General Carrera/Lago Buenos Aires and Lago Cohrane/Pueyrredón basins of Patagonia and provide the first assessment of the effects of lake drainage on the Pacific Ocean. Lake drainage occurred between 13 and 8 kyr ago and was initially gradual eastward into the Atlantic, then subsequently reorganized westward into the Pacific as new drainage routes opened up during Patagonian Ice Sheet deglaciation. Coupled ocean-atmosphere model experiments using HadCM3 with an imposed freshwater surface "hosing" to simulate glacial lake drainage suggest that a negative salinity anomaly was advected south around Cape Horn, resulting in brief but significant impacts on coastal ocean vertical mixing and regional climate.

  11. Diagenetic regimes in Arctic Ocean sediments: Implications for sediment geochemistry and core correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhardt, A.-K.; März, C.; Schuth, S.; Lettmann, K. A.; Schnetger, B.; Wolff, J.-O.; Brumsack, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    Dark brown sediment layers are a potential stratigraphic tool in Quaternary Arctic Ocean sediments. They are rich in Mn, Fe, and trace metals scavenged from the water column and were most likely deposited during interglacial intervals. In this study, we combine sediment and pore water data from sediment cores taken in different parts of the Arctic Ocean to investigate the influence of early diagenetic processes on sediment geochemistry. In most studied cores, Mn, Co, and Mo are released into the pore waters from Mn oxide dissolution in deeper (>1.5 m) sediment layers. The relationship between sedimentary Mn, Co, and Mo contents in excess of the lithogenic background (elementxs) shows that Coxs/Moxs values are a diagnostic tool to distinguish between layers with diagenetic metal addition from the pore waters (Coxs/Moxs < 1), layers affected by Mn oxide dissolution and metal release (Coxs/Moxs > 10), and unaffected layers (Coxs/Moxs from 1 to 10). Steady-state calculations based on current pore water profiles reveal that in the studied cores, the diagenetic addition of these metals from the pore water pool alone is not sufficient to produce the sedimentary metal enrichments. However, it seems evident that dissolution of Mn oxides in the Mn reduction zone can permanently alter the primary geochemical signature of the dark brown layers. Therefore, pore water data and Coxs/Moxs values should be considered before core correlation when this correlation is solely based on Mn contents and dark sediment color. In contrast to the mostly non-lithogenic origin of Mn in the dark brown layers, sedimentary Fe consists of a large lithogenic (80%) and a small non-lithogenic fraction (20%). Our pore water data show that diagenetic Fe remobilization is not currently occurring in the sediment. The dominant Fe sources are coastal erosion and river input. Budget calculations show that Fe seems to be trapped in the modern Arctic Ocean and accumulates in shelf and basin sediments. The Fe

  12. 33 CFR 334.1050 - Oakland Outer Harbor adjacent to the Military Ocean Terminal, Bay Area, Pier No. 8 (Port of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Military Ocean Terminal, Bay Area, Pier No. 8 (Port of Oakland Berth No. 10); restricted area. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1050 Oakland Outer Harbor adjacent to the Military Ocean Terminal, Bay Area, Pier No. 8 (Port of Oakland Berth No. 10); restricted area....

  13. 33 CFR 334.1050 - Oakland Outer Harbor adjacent to the Military Ocean Terminal, Bay Area, Pier No. 8 (Port of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Military Ocean Terminal, Bay Area, Pier No. 8 (Port of Oakland Berth No. 10); restricted area. 334..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1050 Oakland Outer Harbor adjacent to the Military Ocean Terminal, Bay Area, Pier No. 8 (Port of Oakland Berth No. 10); restricted area....

  14. Arctic Ocean circulation, processes and water masses: A description of observations and ideas with focus on the period prior to the International Polar Year 2007-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudels, Bert

    2015-03-01

    The evolving knowledge of the Arctic Ocean, its hydrography and its water masses and their transformations and circulation is reviewed starting with the observations made on Fram 1893-1896 and extending to the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2009. The expeditions and observations after Fram to the mid 20th century as well as the more extensive and systematic studies of water masses and circulation made from ice stations and airborne expeditions from the late 1940s to the late 1970s are briefly described. The early concepts of the connections and exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the world ocean are also discussed. In the 1980s scientific icebreakers were beginning to enter the inner parts of the Arctic Ocean and large international programmes were launched, culminating in the IPY. The changes in the Arctic Ocean, first noted in the Atlantic layer in 1990 and shortly after in the upper layers, are described. The exchanges between the Arctic Ocean and the surrounding seas through the four main openings, Fram Strait, Barents Sea, Bering Strait and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago as well the volume and freshwater balances of the Arctic Ocean are examined.

  15. Ozone in the Boundary Layer air over the Arctic Ocean: Measurements During the TARA Expedition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenheim, J. W.; Netcheva, S.; Morin, S.; Gascard, J.; Weber, M.; de Marliave, C.; Trouble, R.

    2007-12-01

    It is now well established that after sunrise in polar regions, the atmospheric boundary layer experiences episodes where dramatic loss of ozone can be observed. Virtually all measurements in this respect have been made at coastal observatories on land, but there is strong evidence to surmise that such episodes originate over the frozen ocean. Satellite measurements (GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI) invariably indicate large areas over the ocean with increased concentrations of BrO which can be interpreted as a smoking gun for ozone depletion processes, but no systematic in-situ measurements of ozone do exist to corroborate the satellite data. The TARA expedition (www.taraexpeditions.org) (IPY project # 238) has enabled us for the first time to make long term ozone measurements in the surface air over the Arctic Ocean, and we report here the first results. As expected ozone was found to be stable at approx. 35 ± 5 nmol~mol-1 during the winter, but shortly after local sunrise in mid March, large depletions of ozone were observed which lasted until well into June. A particularly long episode (> 15 days) of virtually no ozone (mole fraction below or near 1 nmol~mol-1) was experienced during late April. 10-day back trajectories were calculated in an attempt to obtain more insight into the potential origin of the depletion episodes. To place the TARA ozone data into context we will compare the data with land based and satellite observations in 2007 when they become available, as well as the limited record of previous observations made from ice islands. Taking all evidence together it is plausible to speculate that large areas over the Arctic Ocean are devoid of ozone in the atmospheric boundary layer in the first months after polar sunrise, and that if anything, this will increase in the coming years. We speculate what the implications might be. This work is a contribution to IPY project #038 (OASIS, Ocean Atmosphere Sea-Ice and Snow interactions in polar regions), sponsored by

  16. Low-level jet characteristics over the Arctic Ocean in spring and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobson, L.; Vihma, T.; Jakobson, E.; Palo, T.; Männik, A.; Jaagus, J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-level jets (LLJ) are important for turbulence in the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, but their occurrence, properties, and generation mechanisms in the Arctic are not well known. We analysed LLJs over the central Arctic Ocean in spring and summer 2007 on the bases of data collected in the drifting ice station Tara. Instead of traditional radiosonde soundings, data from tethersonde soundings with a high vertical resolution were used. The Tara results showed a lower occurrence of LLJs (46%) than many previous studies over polar sea ice. Strong jet core winds contributed to growth of the turbulent layer. Complex relationship between the jet core height and the temperature inversion top height were detected: substantial correlation (r = 0.72; p < 0.01) occurred when the jet core was above the turbulent layer, but inside the turbulent layer there was no correlation. The most important forcing mechanism for LLJs was baroclinicity, which was responsible for generation of strong and warm LLJs, which on average occurred at lower altitudes than other jets. Baroclinic jets were mostly associated to transient cyclones instead of the climatological air temperature gradients. Besides baroclinicity, cases related to inertial oscillations, gusts, and fronts were detected. In approximately 50% of the observed LLJs the generation mechanism remained unclear, but in most of these cases the wind speed was strong in the whole vertical profile, the jet core representing only a weak maximum. Further research needs on LLJs in the Arctic include investigation of low-level jet streams and their effects on the sea ice drift and atmospheric moisture transport.

  17. Baseline monitoring of the western Arctic Ocean estimates 20% of Canadian basin surface waters are undersaturated with respect to aragonite.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Lisa L; Wynn, Jonathan G; Lisle, John T; Yates, Kimberly K; Knorr, Paul O; Byrne, Robert H; Liu, Xuewu; Patsavas, Mark C; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Taka