Science.gov

Sample records for adjacent benzene ring

  1. Structural basis of enzymatic benzene ring reduction.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Huwiler, Simona G; Kung, Johannes W; Weidenweber, Sina; Hellwig, Petra; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Biskup, Till; Weber, Stefan; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Ermler, Ulrich; Boll, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    In chemical synthesis, the widely used Birch reduction of aromatic compounds to cyclic dienes requires alkali metals in ammonia as extremely low-potential electron donors. An analogous reaction is catalyzed by benzoyl-coenzyme A reductases (BCRs) that have a key role in the globally important bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds at anoxic sites. Because of the lack of structural information, the catalytic mechanism of enzymatic benzene ring reduction remained obscure. Here, we present the structural characterization of a dearomatizing BCR containing an unprecedented tungsten cofactor that transfers electrons to the benzene ring in an aprotic cavity. Substrate binding induces proton transfer from the bulk solvent to the active site by expelling a Zn(2+) that is crucial for active site encapsulation. Our results shed light on the structural basis of an electron transfer process at the negative redox potential limit in biology. They open the door for biological or biomimetic alternatives to a basic chemical synthetic tool.

  2. The excited state antiaromatic benzene ring: a molecular Mr Hyde?

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Ottosson, Henrik

    2015-09-21

    The antiaromatic character of benzene in its first ππ* excited triplet state (T1) was deduced more than four decades ago by Baird using perturbation molecular orbital (PMO) theory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1972, 94, 4941], and since then it has been confirmed through a range of high-level quantum chemical calculations. With focus on benzene we now first review theoretical and computational studies that examine and confirm Baird's rule on reversal in the electron count for aromaticity and antiaromaticity of annulenes in their lowest triplet states as compared to Hückel's rule for the ground state (S0). We also note that the rule according to quantum chemical calculations can be extended to the lowest singlet excited state (S1) of benzene. Importantly, Baird, as well as Aihara [Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 1978, 51, 1788], early put forth that the destabilization and excited state antiaromaticity of the benzene ring should be reflected in its photochemical reactivity, yet, today these conclusions are often overlooked. Thus, in the second part of the article we review photochemical reactions of a series of benzene derivatives that to various extents should stem from the excited state antiaromatic character of the benzene ring. We argue that benzene can be viewed as a molecular "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" with its largely unknown excited state antiaromaticity representing its "Mr Hyde" character. The recognition of the "Jekyll and Hyde" split personality feature of the benzene ring can likely be useful in a range of different areas. PMID:25960203

  3. The excited state antiaromatic benzene ring: a molecular Mr Hyde?

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Ottosson, Henrik

    2015-09-21

    The antiaromatic character of benzene in its first ππ* excited triplet state (T1) was deduced more than four decades ago by Baird using perturbation molecular orbital (PMO) theory [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1972, 94, 4941], and since then it has been confirmed through a range of high-level quantum chemical calculations. With focus on benzene we now first review theoretical and computational studies that examine and confirm Baird's rule on reversal in the electron count for aromaticity and antiaromaticity of annulenes in their lowest triplet states as compared to Hückel's rule for the ground state (S0). We also note that the rule according to quantum chemical calculations can be extended to the lowest singlet excited state (S1) of benzene. Importantly, Baird, as well as Aihara [Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 1978, 51, 1788], early put forth that the destabilization and excited state antiaromaticity of the benzene ring should be reflected in its photochemical reactivity, yet, today these conclusions are often overlooked. Thus, in the second part of the article we review photochemical reactions of a series of benzene derivatives that to various extents should stem from the excited state antiaromatic character of the benzene ring. We argue that benzene can be viewed as a molecular "Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde" with its largely unknown excited state antiaromaticity representing its "Mr Hyde" character. The recognition of the "Jekyll and Hyde" split personality feature of the benzene ring can likely be useful in a range of different areas.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of imidazole and benzene ring binding in proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, A V; Shchegolev, B F; Savvateeva-Popova, E V; Popov, A V

    2009-08-01

    Aromatic bonds of amino acid radicals play an important role in arrangement of protein primary structure. Previously, the existence of a number of preferable conformations of aromatic dimers was shown theoretically and experimentally, the best known of which are parallel-displaced and perpendicular T conformations. To reveal principles that define preference of various conformations for His-His and Phe-His dimers, non-empirical quantum-chemical calculations of diimidazole and benzene-imidazole were carried out. Calculations were performed using the 6-31G** basis with account for electronic correlations in frames of MP2 and MP4 methods of perturbation theory. Comparative analysis of energetic and geometric parameters of the systems points to the preference of stacking contact or classical hydrogen bond in diimidazole. On the contrary, T conformation is maximally advantageous for benzene-imidazole. PMID:19817694

  5. Δg: The new aromaticity index based on g-factor calculation applied for polycyclic benzene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucun, Fatih; Tokatlı, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the aromaticity of polycyclic benzene rings was evaluated by the calculation of g-factor for a hydrogen placed perpendicularly at geometrical center of related ring plane at a distance of 1.2 Å. The results have compared with the other commonly used aromatic indices, such as HOMA, NICSs, PDI, FLU, MCI, CTED and, generally been found to be in agreement with them. So, it was proposed that the calculation of the average g-factor as Δg could be applied to study the aromaticity of polycyclic benzene rings without any restriction in the number of benzene rings as a new magnetic-based aromaticity index.

  6. Benzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 02 / 001F TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BENZENE ( NONCANCER EFFECTS ) ( CAS No . 71 - 43 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) October 2002 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed

  7. TDDFT-MD Study on Dynamics in Photoinduced Ring Opening of Benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Oyama, Norihisa; Ohno, Takahisa

    2004-03-01

    Coupled dynamics of ions and electrons in the excited states of molecular and solid benzene is investigated on the femtosecond scale by the efficient simulation scheme recently developed for the time-dependent density functional theory. Within the π arrow π excitations, any out-of-plane motion of ions is not induced in the molecular system basically. In the solid, however, we found that large swing of the C-H bonds and subsequent twist of the carbon ring takes place, leading to sp^3-like bonding of carbon ions. This swing-to-twist motion presents a plausible mechanism underlying the photoinduced ring opening in solid benzene experimentally observed under pressure. This research is partially supported by ACT-JST, and also by FSIS and Special Coordination Funds of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japanese Government.

  8. Metatranscriptome of an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture reveals involvement of carboxylation in benzene ring activation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Gitiafroz, Roya; Devine, Cheryl E; Gong, Yunchen; Hug, Laura A; Raskin, Lutgarde; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-01

    The enzymes involved in the initial steps of anaerobic benzene catabolism are not known. To try to elucidate this critical step, a metatranscriptomic analysis was conducted to compare the genes transcribed during the metabolism of benzene and benzoate by an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture. RNA was extracted from the mixed culture and sequenced without prior mRNA enrichment, allowing simultaneous examination of the active community composition and the differential gene expression between the two treatments. Ribosomal and mRNA sequences attributed to a member of the family Peptococcaceae from the order Clostridiales were essentially only detected in the benzene-amended culture samples, implicating this group in the initial catabolism of benzene. Genes similar to each of two subunits of a proposed benzene-carboxylating enzyme were transcribed when the culture was amended with benzene. Anaerobic benzoate degradation genes from strict anaerobes were transcribed only when the culture was amended with benzene. Genes for other benzoate catabolic enzymes and for nitrate respiration were transcribed in both samples, with those attributed to an Azoarcus species being most abundant. These findings indicate that the mineralization of benzene starts with its activation by a strict anaerobe belonging to the Peptococcaceae, involving a carboxylation step to form benzoate. These data confirm the previously hypothesized syntrophic association between a benzene-degrading Peptococcaceae strain and a benzoate-degrading denitrifying Azoarcus strain for the complete catabolism of benzene with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor.

  9. Metatranscriptome of an Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading, Nitrate-Reducing Enrichment Culture Reveals Involvement of Carboxylation in Benzene Ring Activation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fei; Gitiafroz, Roya; Devine, Cheryl E.; Gong, Yunchen; Hug, Laura A.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the initial steps of anaerobic benzene catabolism are not known. To try to elucidate this critical step, a metatranscriptomic analysis was conducted to compare the genes transcribed during the metabolism of benzene and benzoate by an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture. RNA was extracted from the mixed culture and sequenced without prior mRNA enrichment, allowing simultaneous examination of the active community composition and the differential gene expression between the two treatments. Ribosomal and mRNA sequences attributed to a member of the family Peptococcaceae from the order Clostridiales were essentially only detected in the benzene-amended culture samples, implicating this group in the initial catabolism of benzene. Genes similar to each of two subunits of a proposed benzene-carboxylating enzyme were transcribed when the culture was amended with benzene. Anaerobic benzoate degradation genes from strict anaerobes were transcribed only when the culture was amended with benzene. Genes for other benzoate catabolic enzymes and for nitrate respiration were transcribed in both samples, with those attributed to an Azoarcus species being most abundant. These findings indicate that the mineralization of benzene starts with its activation by a strict anaerobe belonging to the Peptococcaceae, involving a carboxylation step to form benzoate. These data confirm the previously hypothesized syntrophic association between a benzene-degrading Peptococcaceae strain and a benzoate-degrading denitrifying Azoarcus strain for the complete catabolism of benzene with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. PMID:24795366

  10. Mechanistic Insights into Ring Cleavage and Contraction of Benzene over a Titanium Hydride Cluster.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaohui; Luo, Gen; Luo, Lun; Hu, Shaowei; Luo, Yi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2016-09-14

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage of benzene by transition metals is of great fundamental interest and practical importance, as this transformation is involved in the production of fuels and other important chemicals in the industrial hydrocracking of naphtha on solid catalysts. Although this transformation is thought to rely on cooperation of multiple metal sites, molecular-level information on the reaction mechanism has remained scarce to date. Here, we report the DFT studies of the ring cleavage and contraction of benzene by a molecular trinuclear titanium hydride cluster. Our studies suggest that the reaction is initiated by benzene coordination, followed by H2 release, C6H6 hydrometalation, repeated C-C and C-H bond cleavage and formation to give a MeC5H4 unit, and insertion of a Ti atom into the MeC5H4 unit with release of H2 to give a metallacycle product. The C-C bond cleavage and ring contraction of toluene can also occur in a similar fashion, though some details are different due to the presence of the methyl substituent. Obviously, the facile release of H2 from the metal hydride cluster to provide electrons and to alter the charge population at the metal centers, in combination with the flexible metal-hydride connections and dynamic redox behavior of the trimetallic framework, has enabled this unusual transformation to occur. This work has not only provided unprecedented insights into the activation and transformation of benzene over a multimetallic framework but it may also offer help in the design of new molecular catalysts for the activation and transformation of inactive aromatics. PMID:27549745

  11. Ring current effects on nuclear magnetic shielding of carbon in the benzene molecule.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, M B; Faglioni, F; Ligabue, A; Pelloni, S; Lazzeretti, P

    2005-04-01

    The differential Biot-Savart law of classical electrodynamics was applied to develop a ring current model for the magnetic shielding of the carbon nucleus in benzene. It is shown that the local effect of the pi currents, induced by a magnetic field normal to the molecular plane, on the sigmaC out-of-plane shielding tensor component vanishes. However, approximately 10% of sigmaC is due to the shielding contributions from pi current density in the region of the other carbon atoms. Magnetic shielding density maps obtained via quantum mechanical procedures confirm the predictions of the classical model.

  12. Ring current effects on nuclear magnetic shielding of carbon in the benzene molecule.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, M B; Faglioni, F; Ligabue, A; Pelloni, S; Lazzeretti, P

    2005-04-01

    The differential Biot-Savart law of classical electrodynamics was applied to develop a ring current model for the magnetic shielding of the carbon nucleus in benzene. It is shown that the local effect of the pi currents, induced by a magnetic field normal to the molecular plane, on the sigmaC out-of-plane shielding tensor component vanishes. However, approximately 10% of sigmaC is due to the shielding contributions from pi current density in the region of the other carbon atoms. Magnetic shielding density maps obtained via quantum mechanical procedures confirm the predictions of the classical model. PMID:15625723

  13. On the role of delocalization in benzene: Theoretical and experimental investigation of the effects of strained ring fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, R.

    1993-04-01

    When an important compound`s discovery dates back as far as 1825, one would imagine that every facet of its chemical and physical properties has been illuminated in the meantime. Benzene, however, has not ceased to challenge the chemist`s notion of structure and bonding since its first isolation by Michael Faraday. This report is divided into the following six chapters: 1. Aromaticity -- Criteria, manifestations, structural limitations; 2. The role of delocalization in benzene; 3. The thermochemical properties of benzocyclobutadienologs; 4. Ab initio study of benzenes fused to four-membered rings; 5. Non-planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; and 6. Experimental details and input decks. 210 Refs.

  14. Electron-electron interactions, topological phase, and optical properties of a charged artificial benzene ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozfidan, Isil; Vladisavljevic, Milos; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2015-12-01

    We present a theory of the electronic and optical properties of a charged artificial benzene ring (ABR). The ABR is described by the extended Hubbard model solved using exact diagonalization methods in both real and Fourier space as a function of the tunneling matrix element t , Hubbard on-site repulsion U , and interdot interaction V . In the strongly interacting case, we discuss exact analytical results for the spectrum of the hole in a half-filled ABR dressed by the spin excitations of the remaining electrons. The spectrum is interpreted in terms of the appearance of a topological phase associated with an effective gauge field piercing through the ring. We show that the maximally spin-polarized (S =5 /2 ) and maximally spin-depolarized (S =1 /2 ) states are the lowest energy, orbitally nondegenerate, states. We discuss the evolution of the phase diagram and level crossings as interactions are switched off and the ground state becomes spin nondegenerate but orbitally degenerate S =1 /2 . We present a theory of optical absorption spectra and show that the evolution of the ground and excited states, level crossings, and presence of artificial gauge can be detected optically.

  15. Flexible enantioselectivity of tryptophanase attributable to benzene ring in heterocyclic moiety of d-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    The invariance principle of enzyme enantioselectivity must be absolute because it is absolutely essential to the homochiral biological world. Most enzymes are strictly enantioselective, and tryptophanase is one of the enzymes with extreme absolute enantioselectivity for L-tryptophan. Contrary to conventional knowledge about the principle, tryptophanase becomes flexible to catalyze D-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Since D-amino acids are ordinarily inert or function as inhibitors even though they are bound to the active site, the inhibition behavior of D-tryptophan and several inhibitors involved in this process was examined in terms of kinetics to explain the reason for this flexible enantioselectivity in the presence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate. Diammonium hydrogenphosphate gave tryptophanase a small conformational change so that D-tryptophan could work as a substrate. As opposed to other D-amino acids, D-tryptophan is a very bulky amino acid with a benzene ring in its heterocyclic moiety, and so we suggest that this structural feature makes the catalysis of D-tryptophan degradation possible, consequently leading to the flexible enantioselectivity. The present results not only help to understand the mechanism of enzyme enantioselectivity, but also shed light on the origin of homochirality.

  16. Identification of 6-hydroxy-trans,trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid, a novel ring-opened urinary metabolite of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Kline, S A; Robertson, J F; Grotz, V L; Goldstein, B D; Witz, G

    1993-01-01

    We studied the in vivo metabolism of benzene in mice to ring-opened compounds excreted in urine. Male CD-1 mice were treated intraperitoneally with benzene (110-440 mg/kg), [14C]benzene (220 mg/kg) or trans, trans-muconaldehyde (MUC; 4 mg/kg), a microsomal, hematotoxic metabolite of benzene. Urine, collected over 24 hr, was extracted and analyzed by HPLC with a diode-array detector and by scintillation counting. In addition to trans,trans-muconic acid, previously the only known ring-opened urinary benzene metabolite, a new metabolite, 6-hydroxy-trans,trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid, was detected in urine of mice treated with either benzene or MUC. We identified the new metabolite based on coelution of metabolites and UV spectral comparison with authentic standards in unmethylated and methylated urine extracts. Results presented here are consistent with the intermediacy of MUC in the in vivo metabolism of benzene to ring-opened metabolites. Images p310-a PMID:8275987

  17. Centrohexaindane: six benzene rings mutually fixed in three dimensions - solid-state structure and six-fold nitration.

    PubMed

    Kuck, Dietmar; Linke, Jens; Teichmann, Lisa Christin; Barth, Dieter; Tellenbröker, Jörg; Gestmann, Detlef; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Bögge, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    The solid-state molecular structure of centrohexaindane (), a unique hydrocarbon comprising six benzene rings clamped to each other in three dimensions around a neopentane core, and the molecular packing in crystals of ·CHCl3 are reported. The molecular Td-symmetry and the Cartesian orientation of the six indane wings of in the solid state have been confirmed. The course and limitation of electrophilic aromatic substitution of are demonstrated for the case of nitration. Based on nitration experiments of a lower congener of , tribenzotriquinacene , the six-fold nitrofunctionalisation of has been achieved in excellent yield, giving four constitutional isomers, two nonsymmetrical ( and ) and two C3-symmetrical ones ( and ), all of which contain one single nitro group in each of the six benzene rings. The relative yields of the four isomers (∼3 : 1 : 1 : 3) point to a random electrophilic attack of the electrophiles at the twelve formally equivalent outer positions of the aromatic periphery of , suggesting electronic independence of its six aromatic π-electron systems. In turn, the pronounced conformational rigidity of the centrohexacyclic framework of enables the unequivocal structural identification of the isomeric hexanitrocentrohexaindanes by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

  18. Rings sliding on a honeycomb network: Adsorption contours, interactions, and assembly of benzene on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berland, K.; Einstein, T. L.; Hyldgaard, P.

    2009-10-01

    Using a van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)], we perform ab initio calculations for the adsorption energy of benzene (Bz) on Cu(111) as a function of lateral position and height. We find that the vdW-DF inclusion of nonlocal correlations (responsible for dispersive interactions) changes the relative stability of eight binding-position options and increases the binding energy by over an order of magnitude, achieving good agreement with experiment. The admolecules can move almost freely along a honeycomb web of “corridors” passing between fcc and hcp hollow sites via bridge sites. Our diffusion barriers (for dilute and two condensed adsorbate phases) are consistent with experimental observations. Further vdW-DF calculations suggest that the more compact (hexagonal) Bz-overlayer phase, with lattice constant a=6.74Å , is due to direct Bz-Bz vdW attraction, which extends to ˜8Å . We attribute the second, sparser hexagonal Bz phase, with a=10.24Å , to indirect electronic interactions mediated by the metallic surface state on Cu(111). To support this claim, we use a formal Harris-functional approach to evaluate nonperturbationally the asymptotic form of this indirect interaction. Thus, we can account well for benzene self-organization on Cu(111).

  19. [The non-contact effect of substances containing benzene rings and heterocycles on biological systems].

    PubMed

    Frolov, Iu P

    2001-01-01

    It was found that some substances containing benzolic rings and heterocyclic structures have a noncontact effect on biosystems. Some results of experiments dealing with the noncontact effect on enzyme molecules, cells, and uni- and multicellular organisms are presented. Factors influencing the efficiency of the noncontact effect were revealed. PMID:11605403

  20. Analyzing sites of OH radical attack (ring vs. side chain) in oxidation of substituted benzenes via dual stable isotope analysis (δ(13)C and δ(2)H).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Geronimo, Inacrist; Paneth, Piotr; Schindelka, Janine; Schaefer, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2016-01-15

    OH radicals generated by the photolysis of H2O2 can degrade aromatic contaminants by either attacking the aromatic ring to form phenolic products or oxidizing the substituent. We characterized these competing pathways by analyzing the carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation (εC and εH) of various substituted benzenes. For benzene and halobenzenes that only undergo ring addition, low values of εC (-0.7‰ to -1.0‰) were observed compared with theoretical values (-7.2‰ to -8‰), possibly owing to masking effect caused by pre-equilibrium between the substrate and OH radical preceding the rate-limiting step. In contrast, the addition of OH radicals to nitrobenzene ring showed a higher εC (-3.9‰), probably due to the lower reactivity. Xylene isomers, anisole, aniline, N,N-dimethylaniline, and benzonitrile yielded normal εH values (-2.8‰ to -29‰) indicating the occurrence of side-chain reactions, in contrast to the inverse εH (11.7‰ to 30‰) observed for ring addition due to an sp(2) to sp(3) hybridization change at the reacting carbon. Inverse εH values for toluene (14‰) and ethylbenzene (30‰) were observed despite the formation of side-chain oxidation products, suggesting that ring addition has a larger contribution to isotope fractionation. Dual element isotope slopes (∆δ(2)H/∆δ(13)C) therefore allow identification of significant degradation pathways of aromatic compounds by photochemically induced OH radicals. Issues that should be addressed in future studies include quantitative determination of the contribution of each competing pathway to the observed isotope fractionation and characterization of physical processes preceding the reaction that could affect isotope fractionation.

  1. Dynamic Kerr effect study on six-membered-ring molecular liquids: benzene, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, cyclohexene, and cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, Shohei; Shirota, Hideaki

    2015-04-01

    The intermolecular dynamics of five six-membered-ring molecular liquids having different aromaticities-benzene, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, cyclohexene, and cyclohexane-measured by femtosecond Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy have been compared in this study. The line shapes of the Fourier transform low-frequency spectra, which arise from the intermolecular vibrational dynamics, are trapezoidal for benzene and 1,3-cyclohexadiene, triangular for 1,4-cyclohexadiene and cyclohexene, and monomodal for cyclohexane. The trapezoidal shapes of the low-frequency spectra of benzene and 1,3-cyclohexadiene are due to the librational motions of their aromatic planar structures, which cause damped nuclear response features. The time integrals of the nuclear responses of the five liquids correlate to the squares of the polarizability anisotropies of the molecules calculated on the basis of density functional theory. The first moments of the low-frequency spectra roughly linearly correlate to the bulk parameters of the square roots of the surface tensions divided by the densities and the square roots of the surface tensions divided by the molecular weights, but the plots for cyclohexene deviate slightly from the correlations. The picosecond overdamped transients of the liquids are well fitted by a biexponential function. The fast time constants of all of the liquids are approximately 1.1-1.4 ps, and they do not obey the Stokes-Einstein-Debye hydrodynamic model. On the other hand, the slow time constants are roughly linearly proportional to the products of the shear viscosities and the molar volumes. The observed intramolecular vibrational modes at less than 700 cm(-1) for all of the liquids are also assigned on the basis of quantum chemistry calculations.

  2. Substituent and ring effects on enthalpies of formation: 2-methyl- and 2-ethylbenzimidazoles versus benzene- and imidazole-derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Pilar; Roux, María Victoria; Dávalos, Juan Z.; Temprado, Manuel; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel A. V.; Ribeiro da Silva, Maria Das Dores M. C.; Amaral, Luísa M. P. F.; Cabildo, Pilar; Claramunt, Rosa M.; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Elguero, José

    The enthalpies of combustion, heat capacities, enthalpies of sublimation and enthalpies of formation of 2-methylbenzimidazole (2MeBIM) and 2-ethylbenzimidazole (2EtBIM) are reported and the results compared with those of benzimidazole itself (BIM). Theoretical estimates of the enthalpies of formation were obtained through the use of atom equivalent schemes. The necessary energies were obtained in single-point calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) on B3LYP/6-31G* optimized geometries. The comparison of experimental and calculated values of benzenes, imidazoles and benzimidazoles bearing H (unsubstituted), methyl and ethyl groups shows remarkable homogeneity. The energetic group contribution transferability is not followed, but either using it or adding an empirical interaction term, it is possible to generate an enormous collection of reasonably accurate data for different substituted heterocycles (pyrazole-derivatives, pyridine-derivatives, etc.) from the large amount of values available for substituted benzenes and those of the parent (pyrazole, pyridine) heterocycles.

  3. Ring contraction of cyclooctene, 1,3-cyclooctadiene, 1,5-cyclooctadiene, and cyclooctatetraene to benzene on platinum(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, M.J.; Nuzzo, R.G.; Girolami, G.S. ); Dubois, L.H. )

    1993-03-10

    The authors report the discovery and mechanistic studies of the conversion of cyclic C[sub 8] alkenes, including cyclooctene (COE), 1,3-cyclooctadiene (1,3-COD), 1,5-cyclooctadiene (1,5-COD), and cyclooctatetraene (COT), to benzene on Pt(111) surfaces under ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions. This work has relevance not only for understanding important processes that occur on Pt surfaces during hydrocarbon reforming but also for modeling reactions that certain organoplatinum compounds undergo during chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In the studies, the reactions of C[sub 8] alkenes adsorbed on a clean (111) face of a Pt single crystal were followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and integrated desorption mass spectrometric (IDMS) techniques. 26 refs., 2 figs.

  4. The toxicology of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Witz, G; Goldstein, B D

    1993-01-01

    Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a series of phenolic and ring-opened products and their conjugates. The mechanism of benzene-induced aplastic anemia appears to involve the concerted action of several metabolites acting together on early stem and progenitor cells, as well as on early blast cells, such as pronormoblasts and normoblasts to inhibit maturation and amplification. Benzene metabolites also inhibit the function of microenvironmental stromal cells necessary to support the growth of differentiating and maturing marrow cells. The mechanism of benzene-induced leukemogenesis is less well understood. Benzene and its metabolites do not function well as mutagens but are highly clastogenic, producing chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, and micronuclei. Benzene has been shown to be a multi-organ carcinogen in animals. Epidemiological studies demonstrate that benzene is a human leukemogen. There is need to better define the lower end of the dose-response curve for benzene as a human leukemogen. The application of emerging methods in biologically based risk assessment employing pharmacokinetic and mechanistic data may help to clarify the uncertainties in low-dose risk assessment. PMID:8354177

  5. An overview of benzene metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Hedli, C C

    1996-01-01

    Benzene toxicity involves both bone marrow depression and leukemogenesis caused by damage to multiple classes of hematopoietic cells and a variety of hematopoietic cell functions. Study of the relationship between the metabolism and toxicity of benzene indicates that several metabolites of benzene play significant roles in generating benzene toxicity. Benzene is metabolized, primarily in the liver, to a variety of hydroxylated and ring-opened products that are transported to the bone marrow where subsequent secondary metabolism occurs. Two potential mechanisms by which benzene metabolites may damage cellular macromolecules to induce toxicity include the covalent binding of reactive metabolites of benzene and the capacity of benzene metabolites to induce oxidative damage. Although the relative contributions of each of these mechanisms to toxicity remains unestablished, it is clear that different mechanisms contribute to the toxicities associated with different metabolites. As a corollary, it is unlikely that benzene toxicity can be described as the result of the interaction of a single metabolite with a single biological target. Continued investigation of the metabolism of benzene and its metabolites will allow us to determine the specific combination of metabolites as well as the biological target(s) involved in toxicity and will ultimately lead to our understanding of the relationship between the production of benzene metabolites and bone marrow toxicity. PMID:9118888

  6. Identification and characterization of OSTL (RNF217) encoding a RING-IBR-RING protein adjacent to a translocation breakpoint involving ETV6 in childhood ALL

    PubMed Central

    Fontanari Krause, Luciana M.; Japp, Anna Sophia; Krause, Alexandre; Mooster, Jana; Chopra, Martin; Müschen, Markus; Bohlander, Stefan K.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic aberrations involving ETV6 on band 12p13 are amongst the most common chromosomal abnormalities in human leukemia. The translocation t(6;12)(q23;13) in a childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell line fuses ETV6 with the putative long non-coding RNA gene STL. Linking STL properties to leukemia has so far been difficult. Here, we describe a novel gene, OSTL (annotated as RNF217 in Genbank), which shares the first exon and a CpG island with STL but is transcribed in the opposite direction. Human RNF217 codes for a highly conserved RING finger protein and is mainly expressed in testis and skeletal muscle with different splice variants. RNF217 shows regulated splicing in B cell development, and is expressed in a number of human B cell leukemia cell lines, primary human chronic myeloid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype and acute T-ALL samples. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the anti-apoptotic protein HAX1 to interact with RNF217. This interaction could be mapped to the C-terminal RING finger motif of RNF217. We propose that some of the recurring aberrations involving 6q might deregulate the expression of RNF217 and result in imbalanced apoptosis signalling via HAX1, promoting leukemia development. PMID:25298122

  7. Systematical analysis for the mixed couplings of two adjacent modified split ring resonators and the application to compact microstrip bandpass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjun; Wen, Guangjun; Li, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we synthesize a new kind of modified split ring resonator (SRR) and characterize its mixed couplings between two adjacent such SRRs with all the possible arrangements on one side of a conventional dielectric substrate. Based on the analysis of the mixed couplings, the compact microstrip bandpass filters composed of the proposed modified SRRs are systematically analyzed. We found that two designs out of all the cases have quite well bandpass filter characteristics, e.g., low insert loss within the wide passband, sharp reductions and transmission zeros out of the passband, and harmonic suppression characteristics for a wide frequency range. Both experimental demonstrations and numerical simulations are performed to verify the designed filters and the results agree well with each other. Such kind of filter design can be flexibly integrated in the miniaturized radio frequency/microwave circuits.

  8. Structure-reactivity correlations in the reactions of hydrocarbons on transition metal surfaces. 1. Ring contraction of cyclooctene, 1,3-cyclooctadiene, 1,5-cyclooctadiene, and cyclooctatetraene to benzene on a platinum(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, M.J.; Nuzzo, R.G.; Girolami, G.S. ); Dubois, L.H. )

    1994-03-17

    The adsorption and subsequent reactions of the C[sub g] cyclic hydrocarbons cyclooctane (COA), cyclooctene (COE), 1,3-cyclooctadiene (1,3-COD), 1,5-cyclooctadiene (1,5-COD), and cyclooctatetraene (COT) have been studied on a platinum(111) single crystal surface. On clean Pt(111), the majority of the adsorbed COA desorbs molecularly, whereas all of the unsaturated hydrocarbons are dehydrogenated to COT and then converted to benzene. In several cases, intermediates in the dehydrogenation pathway can be identified spectroscopically; for example, COE is dehydrogenated to COT via the diene 1,3-COD. In all cases, whether added directly to the surface or formed via dehydrogenation reactions, COT is bound to the surface initially in a tub-shaped [eta]+4 fashion and is converted to a planar [eta]+3 structure at higher temperatures. The conversion of COT to benzene follows thereafter. Co-adsorption experiments with COT and COT-d[sub 8] indicate that the majority of the benzene is formed via an intramolecular rearrangement and not by complete fragmentation of COT to acetylene followed by cyclotrimerization. We propose that, at 475 K, COT undergoes ring contraction to form bicyclo[4.2.0]-octa-1,3,5-triene (BOT). The BOT is then transformed via a retro[2 +2]cyclization to benzene, which desorbs, and acetylene, which is dehydrogenated first to surface ethynyls and then to a surface carbon overlayer. 72 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Benzene poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atlanta, GA. Mirkin DB. Benzene and related aromatic hydrocarbons. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 94. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  10. Resonance-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Ring-Involved Vibrational Modes in the (1)B(2u) Absorption Band of Benzene, Including the Kekule Vibrational Modes ν(9) and ν(10).

    PubMed

    Willitsford, Adam H; Chadwick, C Todd; Kurtz, Stewart; Philbrick, C Russell; Hallen, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy provides much stronger Raman signal levels than its off-resonant counterpart and adds selectivity by excitation tuning. Raman preresonance of benzene has been well studied. On-resonance studies, especially at phonon-allowed absorptions, have received less attention. In this case, we observe resonance of many of the vibration modes associated motion of the carbons in the ring while tuning over the (1)B2u absorption, including the related ν9 (CC stretch Herzberg notation, ν14 Wilson notation) and ν10 (CH-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν15 Wilson notation) vibrational modes along with the ν2 (CC-stretch or ring-breathing Herzberg notation, ν1 Wilson notation) mode and multiples of the ν18 (CCC-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν6 Wilson notation) vibrational mode. The ring-breathing mode is found to mix with the b2u modes creating higher frequency composites. Through the use of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to tune through the (1)B2u absorption band of liquid benzene, a stiffening (increase in energy) of the vibrational modes is observed as the excitation wavelength nears the (1)B2u absorption peak of the isolated molecule (vapor) phase. The strongest resonance amplitude observed is in the 2 × ν18 (e2g) mode, with nearly twice the intensity of the ring-breathing mode, ν2. Several overtones and combination modes, especially with ν2 (a1g), are also observed to resonate. Raman resonances on phonon-allowed excitations are narrow and permit the measurement of vibrations not Raman-active in the ground state. PMID:26731431

  11. N-(4-Meth-oxy-benzo-yl)benzene-sulfon-amide.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasa, S; Nanjundaswamy, M S; Madankumar, S; Lokanath, N K; Suresha, E; Suchetan, P A

    2014-02-01

    In the title compound, C14H13NO4S, the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 69.81 (1)°; the dihedral angle between the planes defined by the S-N-C=O segment of the central chain and the sulfonyl benzene ring is 74.91 (1)°. In the crystal, the mol-ecules are linked by weak N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into C(4) chains running along [100]. The mol-ecules in adjacent chains are linked by weak C-H⋯O inter-actions, generating R 2 (2) (16) dimeric pairs. Weak C-H⋯π inter-actions connect the double chains into (001) sheets.

  12. Coprophagy by wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) in human-disturbed locations adjacent to the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Fish, Krista D; Sauther, Michelle L; Loudon, James E; Cuozzo, Frank P

    2007-06-01

    Coprophagy occurs in a number of animal species, including nonhuman primates. During the 2003-2004 dry seasons at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, we observed wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) consuming dried fecal matter from three different species. Ring-tailed lemurs consumed human feces on 12 occasions, cattle feces twice, and feral dog feces once. Coprophagy in this population may be a behavioral adaptation that provides animals access to energy and nutrients and may be an important nutritional source for older, and/or dentally impaired individuals during the dry season. PMID:17253614

  13. Coprophagy by wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) in human-disturbed locations adjacent to the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Fish, Krista D; Sauther, Michelle L; Loudon, James E; Cuozzo, Frank P

    2007-06-01

    Coprophagy occurs in a number of animal species, including nonhuman primates. During the 2003-2004 dry seasons at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, we observed wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) consuming dried fecal matter from three different species. Ring-tailed lemurs consumed human feces on 12 occasions, cattle feces twice, and feral dog feces once. Coprophagy in this population may be a behavioral adaptation that provides animals access to energy and nutrients and may be an important nutritional source for older, and/or dentally impaired individuals during the dry season.

  14. Electromers of the benzene dimer radical cation.

    PubMed

    Błoch-Mechkour, Anna; Bally, Thomas

    2015-04-28

    The well-studied benzene dimer radical cation, which is prototypical for this class of species, has been reinvestigated computationally. Thereby it turned out that both the σ-hemibonded and the half-shifted sandwich structures of the benzene dimer cation, which had been independently proposed, represent stationary points on the B2PLYP-D potential energy surfaces. However, these structures belong to distinct electronic states, both of which are associated with potential surfaces that are very flat with regard to rotation of the two benzene rings in an opposite sense relative to each other. The surfaces of these two "electromers" of the benzene dimer cation are separated by only 3-4 kcal mol(-1) and do not intersect along the rotation coordinate, which represents a rather unique electronic structure situation. When moving on either of the two surfaces the title complex is an extremely fluxional species, in spite of its being bound by over 20 kcal mol(-1).

  15. Biomarkers of human exposure to benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1993-01-01

    Three biomarkers for benzene exposure were developed. The first biomarker, muconic acid in urine, results from the ring opening of a benzene metabolite. A gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) assay was developed to measure urinary muconic acid, and the analyte in urine samples from workers occupationally exposed to benzene was determined. Workers exposed to benzene concentrations as low as 4.4 ppm over an 8-h day showed higher urinary muconic acid concentrations than did any control individual (p < .005). The second biomarker, S-phenylcysteine (SPC) in hemoglobin (Hb), results from the addition of benzene oxide to a cysteine sulfhydryl group. A GC/MS assay was developed to measure SPC in the blood of F344/N rats and B67C3F mice exposed to benzene by inhalation. The cysteine moiety on rat Hb is at a more accessible site than on Hb of mice or humans, and rats showed considerably higher levels of SPC than did mice. As yet, we have been unable to detect SPC in the globin of humans occupationally exposed to benzene. The third biomarker is SPC in albumin. In humans occupationally exposed to average concentrations of 0, 4.4, 8.4, and 23.1 ppm benzene, 8 h/d, 5 d/wk, SPC increased in the exposed groups linearly, giving a statistically significant slope (p < .001) of 0.044 [+-] 0.008 pmol/mg albumin/ppm. The assay for SPC is arduous and often imprecise; assuming these difficulties can be overcome, muconic acid in urine and SPC in albumin may be useful for accurately determining benzene exposure. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Adsorption of simple benzene derivatives on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, L. M.; Bădescu, Ş. C.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2007-04-01

    The adsorption of simple benzene derivatives composed of a benzene ring with NO2 , CH3 , or NH2 functional groups on a semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotube is studied using the density-functional theory within the local-density approximation. The effects of molecular relaxation in the adsorption process are obtained, as well as the adsorption energies and equilibrium distances for several molecular locations and orientations on the surface. We find that all of these benzene derivatives are physisorbed mainly through the interaction of the π orbitals of the benzene ring and those of the carbon nanotube. These aromatics do not change significantly the carbon nanotube’s electronic structure, and therefore only small changes in the nanotube’s properties are expected. This suggests that these benzene derivatives are suitable for noncovalent nanotube functionalization and molecule immobilization on nanotube surfaces.

  17. Biochemical toxicity of benzene.

    PubMed

    Rana, S V S; Verma, Yeshvandra

    2005-04-01

    Human exposure to benzene in work environment is a global occupational health problem. After inhalation or absorption, benzene targets organs viz. liver, kidney, lung, heart and brain etc. It is metabolized mainly in the liver by cytochrome P450 multifunctional oxygenase system. Benzene causes haematotoxicity through its phenolic metabolites that act in concert to produce DNA strand breaks, chromosomal damage, sister chromatid exchange, inhibition of topoisomerase II and damage to mitotic spindle. The carcinogenic and myelotoxic effects of benzene are associated with free radical formation either as benzene metabolites or lipid peroxidation products. Benzene oxide and phenol have been considered as proheptons. Liver microsomes play an important role in biotransformation of benzene whereas in kidney, it produces degenerative intracellular changes. Cohort studies made in different countries suggest that benzene induces multiple myeloma in petrochemical workers. Though extensive studies have been performed on its toxicity, endocrinal disruption caused by benzene remains poorly known. Transgenic cytochrome P450 IIE1 mice may help in understanding further toxic manifestations of benzene.

  18. Resonant photodissociation in substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Tim; McAcy, Collin; Foote, David; Uiterwaal, Cornelis

    2011-05-01

    Cyclic aromatic molecules are abundant in organic chemistry, with a wide variety of applications, including pharmacology, pollution studies and genetic research. Among the simplest of these molecules is benzene (C6H6) , with many relevant molecules being benzene-like with a single atomic substitution. In such a substitution, the substituent determines a characteristic perturbation of the electronic structure of the molecule. We discuss the substitution of halogens into the ring (C6H5X), and its effects on the dynamics of ionization and dissociation of the molecule without the focal volume effect. In particular, using 800-nm, 50-fs laser pulses, we present results in the dissociation of fluorobenzene, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and iodobenzene into the phenyl ring (C6H5) and the atomic halogen, and the subsequent ionization of these fragments. The impact of the ``heavy atom effect'' on a 1 (π , π*) -->3 (n , σ*) singlet-triplet intersystem crossing will be emphasized. Currently under investigation is whether such a dissociation can be treated as an effective source of the neutral substituent. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0355235.

  19. Benzene release. status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.; Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-11-04

    Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB `DEMO` formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study.

  20. Facts about Benzene

    MedlinePlus

    ... of benzene from tobacco smoke, gas stations, motor vehicle exhaust, and industrial emissions. Indoor air generally contains ... to anemia. Also, it can damage the immune system by changing blood levels of antibodies and causing ...

  1. Benzene Monitor System report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  2. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-08-24

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion. 3 figs.

  3. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion.

  4. Formation of benzene in the interstellar medium

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block—the aromatic benzene molecule—has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3-butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 → C6H6 + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadiene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium. PMID:21187430

  5. Formation of benzene in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brant M; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M; Cordiner, Martin A; Charnley, Steven B

    2011-01-11

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block--the aromatic benzene molecule--has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C(6)H(6)) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3-butadiene, C(2)H + H(2)CCHCHCH(2) → C(6)H(6) + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadiene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium.

  6. Formation of Benzene in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Brant M.; Zhang, Fangtong; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jamal, Adeel; Mebel, Alexander M.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Crim, F. Fleming (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and related species have been suggested to play a key role in the astrochemical evolution of the interstellar medium, but the formation mechanism of even their simplest building block-the aromatic benzene molecule-has remained elusive for decades. Here we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with electronic structure and statistical calculations that benzene (C6H6) can be synthesized via the barrierless, exoergic reaction of the ethynyl radical and 1,3- butadiene, C2H + H2CCHCHCH2 --> C6H6, + H, under single collision conditions. This reaction portrays the simplest representative of a reaction class in which aromatic molecules with a benzene core can be formed from acyclic precursors via barrierless reactions of ethynyl radicals with substituted 1,3-butadlene molecules. Unique gas-grain astrochemical models imply that this low-temperature route controls the synthesis of the very first aromatic ring from acyclic precursors in cold molecular clouds, such as in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Rapid, subsequent barrierless reactions of benzene with ethynyl radicals can lead to naphthalene-like structures thus effectively propagating the ethynyl-radical mediated formation of aromatic molecules in the interstellar medium.

  7. Transformation of toluene and benzene by mixed methanogenic cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Grbić-Galić, D; Vogel, T M

    1987-01-01

    The aromatic hydrocarbons toluene and benzene were anaerobically transformed by mixed methanogenic cultures derived from ferulic acid-degrading sewage sludge enrichments. In most experiments, toluene or benzene was the only semicontinuously supplied carbon and energy source in the defined mineral medium. No exogenous electron acceptors other than CO2 were present. The cultures were fed 1.5 to 30 mM unlabeled or 14C-labeled aromatic substrates (ring-labeled toluene and benzene or methyl-labeled toluene). Gas production from unlabeled substrates and 14C activity distribution in products from the labeled substrates were monitored over a period of 60 days. At least 50% of the substrates were converted to CO2 and methane (greater than 60%). A high percentage of 14CO2 was recovered from the methyl group-labeled toluene, suggesting nearly complete conversion of the methyl group to CO2 and not to methane. However, a low percentage of 14CO2 was produced from ring-labeled toluene or from benzene, indicating incomplete conversion of the ring carbon to CO2. Anaerobic transformation pathways for unlabeled toluene and benzene were studied with the help of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The intermediates detected are consistent with both toluene and benzene degradation via initial oxidation by ring hydroxylation or methyl oxidation (toluene), which would result in the production of phenol, cresols, or aromatic alcohol. Additional reactions, such as demethylation and ring reduction, are also possible. Tentative transformation sequences based upon the intermediates detected are discussed. PMID:3105454

  8. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  9. Benzene removal by PAC in jet flocculation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sobrinho, J.A.H.; Thiem, L.T.; Alkhatib, E.A.

    1997-10-01

    A jet flocculator/powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption pilot plant was designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate a water treatment process capable of simultaneous adsorption of benzene and flocculation of PAC and silica clay particles. The jet flocculation/PAC system successfully combined, in the same reactor, flocculation of suspended solids by using jet mixing, solids retention using pall rings, and benzene removal by PAC adsorption. The advantages of this process included operational simplicity, reliability, and low energy consumption. The jet flocculator/PAC adsorption system was able to achieve suspended solids and benzene removals of approximately 80 and 95%, respectively, from an influent containing 70 mg/L of suspended solids (silica clay and PAC) and 100 {micro}g/L of benzene.

  10. Reinforcement core facilitates O-ring installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Reinforcement core holds O-ring in place within a structure while adjacent parts are being assembled. The core in the O-ring adds circumferential rigidity to the O-ring material. This inner core does not appreciably affect the sectional elasticity or gland-sealing characteristics of the O-ring.

  11. Shock-driven chemistry and reactive wave dynamics in benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Stephen; Dattelbaum, Dana; Coe, Joshua; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team

    2015-06-01

    Benzene is a stable organic chemistry molecule because of its electronic structure - aromatic stability is derived from its delocalized, π-bonded, 6-membered planar ring structure. Benzene principal shock Hugoniot states have been reported previously by several groups, at both high and low pressures. Cusps (or discontinuities) in the shock Hugoniot provide evidence that chemical reactions take place under shockwave compression of benzene at input pressure conditions above 12 GPa. In other shock-driven experiments, spectral changes have been observed near this cusp condition, indicating that the cusp is associated with shock-driven chemical reaction(s). In this work, a series of gas-gun-driven plate impact experiments were performed to measure and quantify the details associated with shock-driven reactive flow in benzene. Using embedded electromagnetic gauges (with up to 10 Lagrangian gauge positions in-material in a single experiment) multiple, evolving wave structures have been measured in benzene when the inputs were above 12 GPa, with the details changing as the input pressure was increased. Detailed insights into the volume changes associated with the chemical reaction(s), reaction rates, and estimates of the bulk moduli of reaction intermediates and products were obtained. Using this new experimental data (along with the older experimental data from others), the benzene reactant and product Hugoniot loci have been modeled by thermodynamically complete equations of state.

  12. Human Benzene Metabolism Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Stephen M.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Vermeulen, Roel; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Zhang, Luoping; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported evidence that humans metabolize benzene via two enzymes, including a hitherto unrecognized high-affinity enzyme that was responsible for an estimated 73 percent of total urinary metabolites [sum of phenol (PH), hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CA), E,E-muconic acid (MA), and S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA)] in nonsmoking females exposed to benzene at sub-saturating (ppb) air concentrations. Here, we used the same Michaelis-Menten-like kinetic models to individually analyze urinary levels of PH, HQ, CA and MA from 263 nonsmoking Chinese women (179 benzene-exposed workers and 84 control workers) with estimated benzene air concentrations ranging from less than 0.001 ppm to 299 ppm. One model depicted benzene metabolism as a single enzymatic process (1-enzyme model) and the other as two enzymatic processes which competed for access to benzene (2-enzyme model). We evaluated model fits based upon the difference in values of Akaike’s Information Criterion (ΔAIC), and we gauged the weights of evidence favoring the two models based upon the associated Akaike weights and Evidence Ratios. For each metabolite, the 2-enzyme model provided a better fit than the 1-enzyme model with ΔAIC values decreasing in the order 9.511 for MA, 7.379 for PH, 1.417 for CA, and 0.193 for HQ. The corresponding weights of evidence favoring the 2-enzyme model (Evidence Ratios) were: 116.2:1 for MA, 40.0:1 for PH, 2.0:1 for CA and 1.1:1 for HQ. These results indicate that our earlier findings from models of total metabolites were driven largely by MA, representing the ring-opening pathway, and by PH, representing the ring-hydroxylation pathway. The predicted percentage of benzene metabolized by the putative high-affinity enzyme at an air concentration of 0.001 ppm was 88% based upon urinary MA and was 80% based upon urinary PH. As benzene concentrations increased, the respective percentages of benzene metabolized to MA and PH by the high-affinity enzyme decreased successively

  13. Nature of the attractive interaction between proton acceptors and organic ring systems.

    PubMed

    Arras, Emmanuel; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V

    2012-12-14

    Systematic ab initio calculations are combined with a deconvolution of electrostatic contributions to analyze the interplay between potential hydrogen bond acceptors and organic rings with C(sp(2))-H groups (benzene, pyridine and cyclopentadiene). A distinct anisotropic interaction between the ring systems and the electron lone pairs of cyanide, water and other acceptor species is revealed that favors the in-plane orientation of the proton acceptor group. In the attractive regime this interaction carries a pronounced electrostatic signature. By decomposing the electrostatic contribution into parts attributed to different subunits of the ring systems we demonstrate that a major proportion of the interaction energy gain is originating from the non-adjacent moieties, that are not in close contact with. This behavior holds equally for homocyclic, heterocyclic and non-aromatic rings but contrasts that of the ethyne molecule, taken as reference for a weak hydrogen bond donor clearly exhibiting the expected localized character. The ring interaction requires the presence of π-electron clouds and typically results in an interaction energy gain of 40 to 80 meV. Our findings suggest the proton acceptor-ring interaction as a new category of intermolecular non-covalent interactions.

  14. Oxidative DNA damage and influence of genetic polymorphisms among urban and rural schoolchildren exposed to benzene.

    PubMed

    Buthbumrung, Nantaporn; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Navasumrit, Panida; Promvijit, Jeerawan; Hunsonti, Potchanee; Autrup, Herman; Ruchirawat, Mathuros

    2008-04-15

    Traffic related urban air pollution is a major environmental health problem in many large cities. Children living in urban areas are exposed to benzene and other toxic pollutants simultaneously on a regular basis. Assessment of benzene exposure and oxidative DNA damage in schoolchildren in Bangkok compared with the rural schoolchildren was studied through the use of biomarkers. Benzene levels in ambient air at the roadside adjacent to Bangkok schools was 3.95-fold greater than that of rural school areas. Personal exposure to benzene in Bangkok schoolchildren was 3.04-fold higher than that in the rural schoolchildren. Blood benzene, urinary benzene and urinary muconic acid (MA) levels were significantly higher in the Bangkok schoolchildren. A significantly higher level of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in leukocytes and in urine was found in Bangkok children than in the rural children. There was a significant correlation between individual benzene exposure level and blood benzene (rs=0.193, P<0.05), urinary benzene (rs=0.298, P<0.05), urinary MA (rs=0.348, P<0.01), and 8-OHdG in leukocyte (rs=0.130, P<0.05). In addition, a significant correlation between urinary MA and 8-OHdG in leukocytes (rs=0.241, P<0.05) was also found. Polymorphisms of various xenobiotic metabolizing genes responsible for susceptibility to benzene toxicity have been studied; however only the GSTM1 genotypes had a significant effect on urinary MA excretion. Our data indicates that children living in the areas of high traffic density are exposed to a higher level of benzene than those living in rural areas. Exposure to higher level of benzene in urban children may contribute to oxidative DNA damage, suggesting an increased health risk from traffic benzene emission.

  15. Benzene oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Coates, J.D.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Highly reduced sediments from San Diego Bay, Calif., that were incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions metabolized benzene within 55 days when they were exposed initially to I ??M benzene. The rate of benzene metabolism increased as benzene was added back to the benzene-adapted sediments. When a [14C]benzene tracer was included with the benzene added to benzene-adapted sediments, 92% of the added radioactivity was recovered as 14CO2. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, inhibited benzene uptake and production of 14CO2 from [14C]benzene. Benzene metabolism stopped when the sediments became sulfate depleted, and benzene uptake resumed when sulfate was added again. The stoichiometry of benzene uptake and sulfate reduction was consistent with the hypothesis that sulfate was the principal electron acceptor for benzene oxidation. Isotope trapping experiments performed with [14C]benzene revealed that there was no production of such potential extracellular intermediates of benzene oxidation as phenol, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, cyclohexane, catechol, and acetate. The results demonstrate that benzene can be oxidized in the absence of O2, with sulfate serving as the electron acceptor, and suggest that some sulfate reducers are capable of completely oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide without the production of extracellular intermediates. Although anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to chelated Fe(III) has been documented previously, the study reported here provides the first example of a natural sediment compound that can serve as an electron acceptor for anaerobic benzene oxidation.

  16. Adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Virk, Sohrab S; Niedermeier, Steven; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2014-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Understand the forces that predispose adjacent cervical segments to degeneration. 2. Understand the challenges of radiographic evaluation in the diagnosis of cervical and lumbar adjacent segment disease. 3. Describe the changes in biomechanical forces applied to adjacent segments of lumbar vertebrae with fusion. 4. Know the risk factors for adjacent segment disease in spinal fusion. Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is a broad term encompassing many complications of spinal fusion, including listhesis, instability, herniated nucleus pulposus, stenosis, hypertrophic facet arthritis, scoliosis, and vertebral compression fracture. The area of the cervical spine where most fusions occur (C3-C7) is adjacent to a highly mobile upper cervical region, and this contributes to the biomechanical stress put on the adjacent cervical segments postfusion. Studies have shown that after fusion surgery, there is increased load on adjacent segments. Definitive treatment of ASD is a topic of continuing research, but in general, treatment choices are dictated by patient age and degree of debilitation. Investigators have also studied the risk factors associated with spinal fusion that may predispose certain patients to ASD postfusion, and these data are invaluable for properly counseling patients considering spinal fusion surgery. Biomechanical studies have confirmed the added stress on adjacent segments in the cervical and lumbar spine. The diagnosis of cervical ASD is complicated given the imprecise correlation of radiographic and clinical findings. Although radiological and clinical diagnoses do not always correlate, radiographs and clinical examination dictate how a patient with prolonged pain is treated. Options for both cervical and lumbar spine ASD include fusion and/or decompression. Current studies are encouraging regarding the adoption of arthroplasty in spinal surgery, but more long

  17. BENZENE OXIDE PROTEIN ADDUCTS AS BIOMARKERS OF BENZENE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene is known to be hematotoxic and carcinogenic in animals and humans. While metabolism is required for toxicity, the identity of the ultimate carcinogen(s) remains unknown. Benzene oxide (BO) is the first and most abundant of the metabolites, but very little is known about...

  18. Crystal structure of bis­{μ-4-methyl-N′-[3-(oxido­imino)­butan-2-yl­idene]benzene­sulfono­hydrazidato}bis­[(dimethyl sulfoxide-κO)copper(II)

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Diego Pereira; Siqueira, Maria Carolina Bulhosa; Gervini, Vanessa Carratu; Bresolin, Leandro; de Oliveira, Adriano Bof

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, [Cu2(C11H13N3O3S)2(C2H6OS)2], the CuII cation is N,N′,O-chelated by a deprotonated hy­droxy­imino-tosyl­hydrazone ligand and coordinated by a dimethyl sulfoxide mol­ecule. One O atom from the adjacent hy­droxy­imino-tosyl­hydrazone ligand bridges the CuII cation, forming the centrosymmetric dimeric complex. The cation is in an overall distorted N2O3 square-pyramidal coordination environment. The methyl­benzene ring is twisted with respect to the hydrazine fragment, with a dihedral angle of 89.54 (9)° between the planes. An intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bond occurs. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯O and C—H⋯S inter­actions. Weak π–π stacking is also observed between parallel benzene rings of adjacent mol­ecules, the centroid–centroid distance being 3.9592 (17) Å. PMID:25309178

  19. Hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, M. )

    1989-07-01

    The hematotoxicity of benzene exposure has been well known for a century. Benzene causes leukocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, etc. The clinical and hematologic picture of aplastic anemia resulting from benzene exposure is not different from classical aplastic anemia; in some cases, mild bilirubinemia, changes in osmotic fragility, increase in lactic dehydrogenase and fecal urobilinogen, and occasionally some neurological abnormalities are found. Electromicroscopic findings in some cases of aplastic anemia with benzene exposure were similar to those observed by light microscopy. Benzene hepatitis-aplastic anemia syndrome was observed in a technician with benzene exposure. Ten months after occurrence of hepatitis B, a severe aplastic anemia developed. The first epidemiologic study proving the leukemogenicity of benzene was performed between 1967 and 1973 to 1974 among shoe workers in Istanbul. The incidence of leukemia was 13.59 per 100,000, which is a significant increase over that of leukemia in the general population. Following the prohibition and discontinuation of the use of benzene in Istanbul, there was a striking decrease in the number of leukemic shoe workers in Istanbul. In 23.7% of the series, consisting of 59 leukemic patients with benzene exposure, there was a preceding pancytopenic period. Furthermore, a familial connection was found in 10.2% of them. The 89.8% of the series showed the findings of acute leukemia. The possible factors that may determine the types of leukemia in benzene toxicity are discussed. The possible role of benzene exposure is presented in the development of malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and lung cancer.

  20. Benzene upgrading reformer integration

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a continuous process for providing an integrated product recovery system for a primary catalytic hydrocarbon reforming reactor and a secondary catalytic olefins oligomerization-alkylation reactor. It comprises: withdrawing reformer effluent from primary reformer reactor; separating in a primary separation zone the reformer effluent into a primary overhead stream comprising noncondensible light paraffins and a primary bottoms stream comprising C{sub 6} to C{sub 8} aromatic hydrocarbons; withdrawing oligomerization effluent from secondary oligomerization-alkylation reactor; separating in a secondary separation zone the oligomerization effluent into a secondary overhead stream; adding the primary bottoms stream and the secondary bottoms stream to the fractionation column; withdrawing from the top of the fractionation column a stream comprising C{sub 4} {minus} hydrocarbons; withdrawing from the bottom of the fractionation column a stream comprising C{sub 5} + hydrocarbons; adding the C{sub 5} + hydrocarbon stream to the reboiler unit; withdrawing from the reboiler unit a vapor stream comprising benzene and a liquid stream comprising C{sub 5} + hydrocarbons boiling in the gasoline range; adding at least a portion of the vapor stream comprising benzene to the secondary catalytic olefins oligomerization-alkylation reactor; and adding a light olefins feedstream.

  1. Validating Eaton's Hypothesis: Cubane as a Benzene Bioisostere.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Benjamin A; Xing, Hui; Houston, Sevan; Clark, Charlotte; Ghassabian, Sussan; Kuo, Andy; Cao, Benjamin; Reitsma, Andrea; Murray, Cody-Ellen P; Stok, Jeanette E; Boyle, Glen M; Pierce, Carly J; Littler, Stuart W; Winkler, David A; Bernhardt, Paul V; Pasay, Cielo; De Voss, James J; McCarthy, James; Parsons, Peter G; Walter, Gimme H; Smith, Maree T; Cooper, Helen M; Nilsson, Susan K; Tsanaktsidis, John; Savage, G Paul; Williams, Craig M

    2016-03-01

    Pharmaceutical and agrochemical discovery programs are under considerable pressure to meet increasing global demand and thus require constant innovation. Classical hydrocarbon scaffolds have long assisted in bringing new molecules to the market place, but an obvious omission is that of the Platonic solid cubane. Eaton, however, suggested that this molecule has the potential to act as a benzene bioisostere. Herein, we report the validation of Eaton's hypothesis with cubane derivatives of five molecules that are used clinically or as agrochemicals. Two cubane analogues showed increased bioactivity compared to their benzene counterparts whereas two further analogues displayed equal bioactivity, and the fifth one demonstrated only partial efficacy. Ramifications from this study are best realized by reflecting on the number of bioactive molecules that contain a benzene ring. Substitution with the cubane scaffold where possible could revitalize these systems, and thus expedite much needed lead candidate identification.

  2. Crystal structures of 4-meth-oxy-N-(4-methyl-phenyl)benzene-sulfonamide and N-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-4-meth-oxy-benzene-sulfonamide.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vinola Z; Preema, C P; Naveen, S; Lokanath, N K; Suchetan, P A

    2015-11-01

    Crystal structures of two N-(ar-yl)aryl-sulfonamides, namely, 4-meth-oxy-N-(4-methyl-phen-yl)benzene-sulfonamide, C14H15NO3S, (I), and N-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)-4-meth-oxy-benzene-sulfonamide, C13H12FNO3S, (II), were determined and analyzed. In (I), the benzene-sulfonamide ring is disordered over two orientations, in a 0.516 (7):0.484 (7) ratio, which are inclined to each other at 28.0 (1)°. In (I), the major component of the sulfonyl benzene ring and the aniline ring form a dihedral angle of 63.36 (19)°, while in (II), the planes of the two benzene rings form a dihedral angle of 44.26 (13)°. In the crystal structure of (I), N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds form infinite C(4) chains extended in [010], and inter-molecular C-H⋯πar-yl inter-actions link these chains into layers parallel to the ab plane. The crystal structure of (II) features N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming infinite one dimensional C(4) chains along [001]. Further, a pair of C-H⋯O inter-molecular inter-actions consolidate the crystal packing of (II) into a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture. PMID:26594517

  3. Fuel Dependence of Benzene Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Eddings, E; Sarofim, A; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    The relative importance of formation pathways for benzene, an important precursor to soot formation, was determined from the simulation of 22 premixed flames for a wide range of equivalence ratios (1.0 to 3.06), fuels (C{sub 1}-C{sub 12}), and pressures (20 to 760 torr). The maximum benzene concentrations in 15 out of these flames were well reproduced within 30% of the experimental data. Fuel structural properties were found to be critical for benzene production. Cyclohexanes and C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} fuels were found to be among the most productive in benzene formation; and long-chain normal paraffins produce the least amount of benzene. Other properties, such as equivalence ratio and combustion temperatures, were also found to be important in determining the amount of benzene produced in flames. Reaction pathways for benzene formation were examined critically in four premixed flames of structurally different fuels of acetylene, n-decane, butadiene, and cyclohexane. Reactions involving precursors, such as C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} species, were examined. Combination reactions of C{sub 3} species were identified to be the major benzene formation routes with the exception of the cyclohexane flame, in which benzene is formed exclusively from cascading fuel dehydrogenation via cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene intermediates. Acetylene addition makes a minor contribution to benzene formation, except in the butadiene flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced directly from the fuel, and in the n-decane flame where C{sub 4}H{sub 5} radicals are produced from large alkyl radical decomposition and H atom abstraction from the resulting large olefins.

  4. Protonated water dimer on benzene: standing Eigen or crouching Zundel?

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Agmon, Noam

    2015-02-12

    Protonated water clusters that are hydrogen-bonded to a neutral benzene molecule are a reductionist model for protons at hydrophobic surfaces, which are of fundamental importance in biological energy transduction processes. Of particular interest is the protonated water dimer ("Zundel ion") on benzene, whose gas-phase messenger IR spectrum has been previously interpreted in terms of an asymmetric binding of the protonated water dimer to the benzene ring through a single water molecule. This "standing Eigen" isomer has a hydronium core. We have found an alternative "crouching Zundel" isomer, which attaches to the benzene ring symmetrically via both of its water molecules. When Ar-tagged, it has an IR spectrum in much better agreement with experiment than the standing Eigen isomer, particularly at the lower frequencies. These conclusions are based on static harmonic (and anharmonic) normal-mode analysis using density functional theory with various (dispersion corrected) functionals and particularly on dynamic anharmonic spectra obtained from the dipole autocorrelation functions from classical ab initio molecular dynamics with the BLYP, PBE, and B3LYP functionals. Possible implications to protons on water/organic-phase interfaces are discussed.

  5. 2-Methyl-3-(2-methyl­phen­yl)-4-oxo-3,4-dihydro­quinazolin-8-yl 4-bromo­benzene-1-sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    El-Azab, Adel S.; Abdel-Aziz, Alaa A.-M.; Ng, Seik Weng; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2012-01-01

    The title mol­ecule, C22H17BrN2O4S, has a twisted U shape, the dihedral angle between the quinazolin-4-one and bromo­benzene ring systems being 46.25 (8)°. In order to avoid steric clashes with adjacent substituents on the quinazolin-4-one ring, the N-bound tolyl group occupies an orthogonal position [dihedral angle = 89.59 (8)°]. In the crystal, mol­ecules are connected into a three-dimensional architecture by C—H⋯O inter­actions, with the ketone O atom accepting two such bonds and a sulfonate O atom one. PMID:22412636

  6. Crystal structure of di­chlorido­{N 1-phenyl-N 4-[(quinolin-2-yl-κN)methylidene]benzene-1,4-diamine-κN 4}mercury(II)

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Md. Serajul Haque; Prisyazhnaya, Elena V.; Iskenderov, Turganbay S.

    2015-01-01

    In the mononuclear title complex, [HgCl2(C22H17N3)], synthesized from the quinoline-derived Schiff base N 1-phenyl-N 4-[(quinolin-2-yl)methyl­idene]benzene-1,4-di­amine (PQMBD) and HgCl2, the coordination sphere around the Hg2+ atom is distorted tetra­hedral, comprising two Cl atoms [Hg—Cl = 2.3487 (14) and 2.4490 (15) Å] and two N atom donors from the PQMBD ligand, viz. the quinolyl and the imine N atom [Hg—N = 2.270 (4) and 2.346 (4) Å, respectively]. The dihedral angle between the two benzene rings attached to the amino group is 43.7 (3)°. In the crystal, N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, as well as π–π stacking inter­actions between one phenyl ring and the pyridine ring of the quinoline moiety of an adjacent mol­ecule [centroid-to-centroid separation = 3.617 (4) Å] are observed, resulting in a three-dimensional network. PMID:25878849

  7. Thermochemistry of dihalogen-substituted benzenes: data evaluation using experimental and quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Verevkin, Sergey P; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Varfolomeev, Mikhail A; Solomonov, Boris N; Zherikova, Kseniya V; Melkhanova, Svetlana V

    2014-12-11

    Temperature dependence of vapor pressures for 12 dihalogen-substituted benzenes (halogen = F, Cl, Br, I) was studied by the transpiration method, and molar vaporization or sublimation enthalpies were derived. These data together with results available in the literature were collected and checked for internal consistency using structure-property correlations. Gas-phase enthalpies of formation of dihalogen-substituted benzenes were calculated by using quantum-chemical methods. Evaluated vaporization enthalpies in combination with gas-phase enthalpies of formation were used for estimation liquid-phase enthalpies of formation of dihalogen-substituted benzenes. Pairwise interactions of halogens on the benzene ring were derived and used for development of simple group additivity procedures for estimation of vaporization enthalpies, gas-phase, and liquid-phase enthalpies of formation of dihalogen-substituted benzenes.

  8. Law and regulation of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Feitshans, I L

    1989-01-01

    OSHA has created final benzene regulations after extensive rulemakings on two occasions, 1978 and 1987. These standards have been the subject of extensive litigation for nearly 20 years. This article examines in detail the conceptual underpinnings of the Benzene Case, (which was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1980) in light of U.S. administrative law precedents that have set limits upon administrative discretion under the test for "substantial evidence" and the "hard look doctrine." This article also addresses recent developments in the wake of the Benzene Case and their implications for benzene regulations following the "significant risk" doctrine in that case. This article briefly describes other national, regional, and international laws governing the use of benzene. This article concludes that the revisions of the benzene regulation and subsequent rulemaking provide substantial evidence of scientific underpinnings for regulatory action and that laws from other nations reflect an international consensus that occupational exposure to benzene is a proper subject of regulation. Such regulations and policies are therefore likely to withstand scrutiny and remain enforceable as widely accepted norms. PMID:2792048

  9. Revisiting Aromaticity and Chemical Bonding of Fluorinated Benzene Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Vega, Juan J; Vásquez-Espinal, Alejandro; Ruiz, Lina; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Alvarez-Thon, Luis; Merino, Gabriel; Tiznado, William

    2015-01-01

    The electron delocalization of benzene (C6H6) and hexafluorobenzene (C6F6) was analyzed in terms of the induced magnetic field, nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), and ring current strength (RCS). The computed out-of-plane component of the induced magnetic field at a distance (r) greater than or equal to 1.0 Å above the ring center correlates well (R2>0.99) with the RCS value. According to these criteria, fluorination has two effects on the C6 skeleton; concomitantly, the resonant effects diminish the π electron delocalization and the inductive effects decrease the charge density at the ring center and therefore reduce the magnitude of the paratropic current generated in this region. The equilibrium between both effects decreases aromaticity in the fluorinated benzene derivatives. These results can be extrapolated to determine the aromaticity of any derivative within the series of fluorinated benzene derivatives (C6H(6−n)Fn, where n=1–5). PMID:26246992

  10. Gas phase acidity of substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoux, Guy

    2011-04-01

    Deprotonation thermochemistry of benzene derivatives C 6H 5X (X = H, F, Cl, OH, NH 2, CN, CHO, NO 2, CH 3, C 2H 5, CHCH 2, CCH) has been examined at the G3B3 level of theory. For X = F, Cl, CN, CHO and NO 2, the most favorable deprotonation site is the ortho position of the phenyl ring. This regio-specificity is directly related to the field/inductive effect of the substituent. G3B3 gas phase acidities, Δ acidH° and Δ acidG°, compare within less than 4 kJ mol -1 with experimental data. A noticeable exception is nitrobenzene for which tabulated acidity appear to be underestimated by ca. 120 kJ mol -1.

  11. Microbial Communities Associated with Anaerobic Benzene Degradation in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Rooney-Varga, Juliette N.; Anderson, Robert T.; Fraga, Jocelyn L.; Ringelberg, David; Lovley, Derek R.

    1999-01-01

    Microbial community composition associated with benzene oxidation under in situ Fe(III)-reducing conditions in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer located in Bemidji, Minn., was investigated. Community structure associated with benzene degradation was compared to sediment communities that did not anaerobically oxidize benzene which were obtained from two adjacent Fe(III)-reducing sites and from methanogenic and uncontaminated zones. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified with bacterial or Geobacteraceae-specific primers indicated significant differences in the composition of the microbial communities at the different sites. Most notable was a selective enrichment of microorganisms in the Geobacter cluster seen in the benzene-degrading sediments. This finding was in accordance with phospholipid fatty acid analysis and most-probable-number–PCR enumeration, which indicated that members of the family Geobacteraceae were more numerous in these sediments. A benzene-oxidizing Fe(III)-reducing enrichment culture was established from benzene-degrading sediments and contained an organism closely related to the uncultivated Geobacter spp. This genus contains the only known organisms that can oxidize aromatic compounds with the reduction of Fe(III). Sequences closely related to the Fe(III) reducer Geothrix fermentans and the aerobe Variovorax paradoxus were also amplified from the benzene-degrading enrichment and were present in the benzene-degrading sediments. However, neither G. fermentans nor V. paradoxus is known to oxidize aromatic compounds with the reduction of Fe(III), and there was no apparent enrichment of these organisms in the benzene-degrading sediments. These results suggest that Geobacter spp. play an important role in the anaerobic oxidation of benzene in the Bemidji aquifer and that molecular community analysis may be a powerful tool for predicting a site’s capacity for anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:10388703

  12. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1995-12-19

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

  13. Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

  14. The making of ring currents.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Guglielmo; Zanasi, Riccardo

    2016-04-28

    Benzene, planar cyclooctatetraene, and borazine have been taken into account as archetypal aromatic, anti-aromatic, and non-aromatic systems. Then, the making of the π-electron diatropic ring current of benzene, huge paratropic ring current of planar cyclooctatetraene, and weak diatropic ring current of borazine, has been monitored by means of DFT calculations of current density maps and bond current strengths along a concerted, highly symmetric reaction pathway for the trimerization and tetramerization of acetylene to benzene and planar cyclooctatetraene and the trimerization of the simplest iminoborane (BH2N) to borazine. Besides, a simple model is presented that permits to infer the presence of a ring current only on account of the sum of homotropic local vortices. The model works satisfactorily for borazine and surely as well for benzene with a substantial difference. On the one hand, for borazine, the evolution of the current density along the formation reaction can be recast summing three virtually unchanged diatropic current loops with respect to parent iminoborane molecules. On the other hand, the benzene ring current is an emerging property that can be re-elaborated as the sum of three diatropic current loops of increased diatropicity with respect to parent acetylene molecules, i.e., the radius of the maximum current increases form 0.76 to 0.97 Å and the current strength increases from 3.6 to 6.7 nA T(-1). In these terms, the difference between the aromatic benzene and non-aromatic borazine can be understood as the attitude of the acetylene molecules to form always wider and stronger current loops as they get closer, a behavior not shared by the iminoborane molecules. For planar cyclooctatetraene, the paratropic circulation arising from the HOMO-LUMO transition makes the model inapplicable, since the initial hypothesis of homotropic circulations over the reaction coordinate is violated. In a sense, the fact that the model works only for a bit of the

  15. Planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.; Brahic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are the development history of planetary ring research, the view of planetary rings in astronomy and cosmology over the period 1600-1900, the characteristics of the ring systems of Saturn and Uranus, the ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn, dust-magnetosphere interactions, the effects of radiation forces on dust particles, the collisional interactions and physical nature of ring particles, transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms, and collision-induced transport processes in planetary rings. Also discussed are planetary ring waves, ring particle dynamics in resonances, the dynamics of narrow rings, the origin and evolution of planetary rings, the solar nebula and planetary disk, future studies of the planetary rings by space probes, ground-based observatories and earth-orbiting satellites, and unsolved problems in planetary ring dynamics.

  16. Crystal structure of 2-benzene-sulfon-amido-3-hy-droxy-propanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Nabila; Mushtaq, Misbah; Danish, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Raza, Muhammad Asam

    2015-11-01

    In the title compound, C9H11NO5S, the O=S=O plane of the sulfonyl group is twisted at a dihedral angle of 52.54 (16)° with respect to the benzene ring. The dihedral angle between the carb-oxy-lic acid group and the benzene ring is 49.91 (16)°. In the crystal, C-H⋯O, N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules into (001) sheets. PMID:26594589

  17. Phase II metabolism of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Schrenk, D; Orzechowski, A; Schwarz, L R; Snyder, R; Burchell, B; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Bock, K W

    1996-01-01

    The hepatic metabolism of benzene is thought to be a prerequisite for its bony marrow toxicity. However, the complete pattern of benzene metabolites formed in the liver and their role in bone marrow toxicity are not fully understood. Therefore, benzene metabolism was studied in isolated rodent hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes released benzene-1,2-dihydrodiol, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CT), phenol (PH), trans-trans-muconic acid, and a number of phase II metabolites such as PH sulfate and PH glucuronide. Pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) markedly increased PH glucuronide formation while PH sulfate formation was decreased. Likewise, V79 cells transfected with the 3-MC-inducible rat UGT1.6 cDNA showed a considerable rate of PH and HQ glucuronidation. In addition to inducing glucuronidation of phenols, 3-MC treatment (reported to protect rats from the myelotoxicity of benzene) resulted in a decrease of hepatic CYP2E1. In contrast, pretreatment of rats with the CYP2E1-inducer isopropanol strongly enhanced benzene metabolism and the formation of phenolic metabolites. Mouse hepatocytes formed much higher amounts of HQ than rat hepatocytes and considerable amounts of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB) sulfate and HQ sulfate. In conclusion, the protective effect of 3-MC in rats is probably due to a shift from the labile PH sulfate to the more stable PH glucuronide, and to a decrease in hepatic CYP2E1. The higher susceptibility of mice toward benzene may be related to the high rate of formation of the myelotoxic metabolite HQ and the semistable phase II metabolites HQ sulfate and THB sulfate. Images Figure 4. PMID:9118891

  18. Synthesis of 4-vinylindoles using ruthenium-catalyzed ring-closing enyne metathesis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazushi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Yanagisawa, Akira

    2013-04-01

    The selective synthesis of substituted 4-vinylindoles by the ring-closing enyne metathesis (RCEM)/dehydration sequence is reported. In contrast with many known methods in which a pyrrole ring is constructed onto a functionalized benzene precursor, this method enables the construction of a benzene ring onto a pyrrole precursor. The RCEM/tautomerization sequence for the synthesis of 7-hydroxy-4-vinylindole is also presented as an application of this method.

  19. Ring laser gyroscope anode

    SciTech Connect

    Ljung, B.H.

    1981-03-17

    An anode for a ring laser gyroscope which provides improved current stability in the glow discharge path is disclosed. The anode of this invention permits operation at lower currents thereby allowing a reduction of heat dissipation in the ring laser gyroscope. The anode of one embodiment of this invention is characterized by a thumbtack appearance with a spherical end where the normal sharp end of the thumbtack would be located. The stem of the anode extends from the outside of the gyroscope structure to the interior of the structure such that the spherical end is substantially adjacent to the laser beam.

  20. ITP Filtrate Benzene Removal Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    Existing ITP filtrate hold tanks may provide sufficient capacity and residence time to strip dissolved benzene from the incoming filtrate using nitrogen sparging in the bottom of the old tanks. This is based on equilibrium supported by late Wash test data using aged washed slurry. Theoretical considerations indicate that benzene stripping will be more difficult from the ITP unwashed high salt filtrates due to reduced mass transfer. Therefore experimental sparging data is needed to quantify the theoretical effects.Foaming limits which dictate allowable sparging rate will also have to be established. Sparging in the hold tanks will require installation of sintered metal spargers, and possibly stirrers and foam monitoring/disengagement equipment. The most critical sparging needs are at the start of the precipitation/concentration cycle, when the filtrate flux rate is the highest,and at the end of wash cycle where Henry`s equilibrium constant falls off,requiring more gas to sparge the dissolved benzene. With adequate recycle (for proper distribution) or sparging in the old tanks, the 30 inch column could be used for the complete ITP process. A courser packing would reduce back pressure while enabling benzene stripping. The Late Wash Tests indicate adequate benzene stripping even at reduced gas flow. This will require experimental verification under ITP conditions. Using the 30 in. column vs 18 in. during the wash cycle will enhance stripping without need for additional sparging provided the minimum flow requirements are met.

  1. Benzene pollution from gasoline usage.

    PubMed

    Foo, S C

    1991-04-01

    Local gasolines contain benzene ranging from 1.8 to 3.7% and their use can lead to significant exposure to benzene. Gasoline station attendants were found to be exposed to short-term exposure levels (STEL) of 0.064-179 ppm. Their 8-h time-weighted averaged (TWA) exposure ranged from 0.028 to 0.71 ppm. For motorcar service mechanics, TWA exposure levels ranged from 0.014 to 1.7 ppm. The exposure of drivers of gasoline delivery tankers ranged from 0.08 to 2.37 ppm for personal TWA exposure over the whole workshift. For local people not occupationally exposed to gasoline or other benzene-containing volatile chemicals, exposure from the ambient environment ranged from 0.0023 to 0.027 ppm. Gasoline usage also contributed to the contamination of surface water with benzene. Benzene levels in water samples taken from drains leading from gasoline stations were between 1.1 and 40.4 micrograms l-1.

  2. Benzene-1,3,5-triyl tribenzoate

    PubMed Central

    Corfield, Peter W. R.; Balija, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C27H18O6, commonly known as phloroglucinol tribenzoate, is a standard unit for the family of benzyl ether dendrimers. The central phloroglucinol residue is close to planar, with out-of-plane distances for the three oxygen atoms of up to 0.095 (3) Å, while the three attached benzoate groups are approximately planar. One benzoate group is twisted [C—C—O—C torsion angle = 98.2 (3)°] from the central plane, with its carbonyl O atom 2.226 (4) Å above that plane, while the other two benzoate groups are twisted in the opposite direction [C—C—O—C torsion angles = 24.7 (2) and 54.8 (2)°], so that their carbonyl O atoms are on the other side of, and closer to the central plane, with distances from the plane of 1.743 (4) and 1.206 (4) Å. One benzoate group is disordered between two conformers, with occupancies of 86.9 (3) and 13.1 (3)%, related by a 143 (1)° rotation about the bond to the central benzene ring. The phenyl groups of the two conformers occupy the same space. The mol­ecule packs in the crystal with two of the three benzoate phenyl rings stacked parallel to symmetry-related counterparts, with perpendicular distances of 3.715 (5) and 3.791 (5) Å. The parallel rings are slipped away from each other, however, with centroid–centroid distances of 4.122 (2) and 4.363 (2) Å, respectively. PMID:24454248

  3. Benzene derivatives adsorbed to the Ag(111) surface: Binding sites and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Daniel P.; Tymińska, Nina; Zurek, Eva; Simpson, Scott

    2015-03-14

    Dispersion corrected Density Functional Theory calculations were employed to study the adsorption of benzenes derivatized with functional groups encompassing a large region of the activated/deactivated spectrum to the Ag(111) surface. Benzenes substituted with weak activating or deactivating groups, such as methyl and fluoro, do not have a strong preference for adsorbing to a particular site on the substrate, with the corrugations in the potential energy surface being similar to those of benzene. Strong activating (N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}) and deactivating (NO{sub 2}) groups, on the other hand, possess a distinct site preference. The nitrogen in the former prefers to lie above a silver atom (top site), but in the latter a hollow hexagonal-closed-packed (H{sub hcp}) site of the Ag(111) surface is favored instead. Benzenes derivatized with classic activating groups donate electron density from their highest occupied molecular orbital to the surface, and those functionalized with deactivating groups withdraw electron density from the surface into orbitals that are unoccupied in the gas phase. For benzenes functionalized with two substituents, the groups that are strongly activating or deactivating control the site preference and the other groups assume sites that are, to a large degree, dictated by their positions on the benzene ring. The relative stabilities of the ortho, meta, and para positional isomers of disubstituted benzenes can, in some cases, be modified by adsorption to the surface.

  4. The Solubility of Phenylborate Compounds in Benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    The original goal of this scoping study was to determine if the solubility of sodium and potassium tetraphenylborates in benzene was sufficiently large to justify designing and performing kinetic studies on a benzene-phase catalytic reaction.

  5. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  6. Planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the Rings of Saturn from the Pioneer spacecraft, discovery of the Ring of Jupiter, ground based polarimetry of the Rings of Saturn and some theoretical studies may be combined to markedly advance our understanding of the Rings of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. In particular, narrow rings can be self-gravitatingly stable inside Roche's limit and outside another closer limit. They can be created from a satellite which evolves across its Roche limit either by inward tidal drift or by growth of the planet by accretion. These considerations suggest that Neptune may well be surrounded by one or more narrow rings like those of Uranus.

  7. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  8. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  9. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  10. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  11. 27 CFR 21.97 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Benzene. 21.97 Section 21... TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.97 Benzene. (a..., Standard No. D 836-77; for incorporation by reference, see § 21.6(b).) When 100 ml of benzene are...

  12. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings.

  13. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-07-20

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings. 2 figs.

  14. Influence of Benzene on the Optical Properties of Titan Haze Laboratory Analogs in the Mid-Visible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Y. Heidi; Trainer, Melissa G.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    The Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Waite, Jr., et al., 2007) and the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (Coustenis, A., et al., 2007) have detected benzene in the upper atmosphere and stratosphere of Titan. Photochemical reactions involving benzene in Titan's atmosphere may influence polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation, aerosol formation, and the radiative balance of Titan's atmosphere. We measure the effect of benzene on the optical properties of Titan analog particles in the laboratory. Using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy, we determine the real and imaginary refractive index at 532 nm of particles formed by benzene photolysis and Titan analog particles formed with ppm-levels of benzene. These studies are compared to the previous study by Hasenkopf, et a1. (2010) of Titan analog particles formed by methane photolysis.

  15. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  16. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  17. Adsorption and thermal decomposition of benzene on Ni(110) studied by chemical, spectroscopic, and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, D.R.; Jordan, S.L.; Grimm, F.A.

    1992-02-06

    The chemisorption and reactions of benzene on Ni(110) have been studied by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) including isotopic labeling, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) as a function of coverage and adsorption temperature between 100 and 300 K. At saturation, 70-80% of the benzene is irreversibly chemisorbed, and C-H bond scission commences at 320 K. For high exposures, molecular desorption competes with decomposition. A c(4x2) LEED patterns is observed at saturation coverage of chemisorbed benzene (0.2 monolayer by XPS). HREEL spectroscopy indicates that the benzene ring lies parallel to the surface. Semiempirical molecular orbital calculations have been made and predict the most likely adsorption site for benzene chemisorption to be the atop site at a height of about 1.75 {angstrom} or the short bridge site at 1.90 {angstrom}. Upon annealing above 300 K, the benzene decomposes, evolving H{sub 2} and forming a surface carbide. Additionally, a species forms which ultimately desorbs as benzene at 460 K but also undergoes H-D exchange with benzene-d{sub 6}. An unambiguous identification of this fragment has not been made, but the vibrational spectroscopy and isotopic exchange data are consistent with the assignment of a phenyl or benzyne group. The major effects of coadsorbed sulfur and oxygen are to inhibit dissociation and to weaken the interaction between the benzene and the surface. 41 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  19. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  20. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  1. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  2. 46 CFR 151.05-2 - Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. 151.05-2 Section 151.05-2 Shipping... Compliance with requirements for tank barges carrying benzene and benzene containing cargoes, or butyl acrylate cargoes. A tank barge certificated to carry benzene and benzene containing cargoes or...

  3. Crystal structures of 4-meth­oxy-N-(4-methyl­phenyl)benzene­sulfonamide and N-(4-fluoro­phenyl)-4-meth­oxy­benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Vinola Z.; Preema, C. P.; Naveen, S.; Lokanath, N. K.; Suchetan, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Crystal structures of two N-(ar­yl)aryl­sulfonamides, namely, 4-meth­oxy-N-(4-methyl­phen­yl)benzene­sulfonamide, C14H15NO3S, (I), and N-(4-fluoro­phen­yl)-4-meth­oxy­benzene­sulfonamide, C13H12FNO3S, (II), were determined and analyzed. In (I), the benzene­sulfonamide ring is disordered over two orientations, in a 0.516 (7):0.484 (7) ratio, which are inclined to each other at 28.0 (1)°. In (I), the major component of the sulfonyl benzene ring and the aniline ring form a dihedral angle of 63.36 (19)°, while in (II), the planes of the two benzene rings form a dihedral angle of 44.26 (13)°. In the crystal structure of (I), N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form infinite C(4) chains extended in [010], and inter­molecular C—H⋯πar­yl inter­actions link these chains into layers parallel to the ab plane. The crystal structure of (II) features N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming infinite one dimensional C(4) chains along [001]. Further, a pair of C—H⋯O inter­molecular inter­actions consolidate the crystal packing of (II) into a three-dimensional supra­molecular architecture. PMID:26594517

  4. Bacterial dehalorespiration with chlorinated benzenes.

    PubMed

    Adrian, L; Szewzyk, U; Wecke, J; Görisch, H

    2000-11-30

    Chlorobenzenes are toxic, highly persistent and ubiquitously distributed environmental contaminants that accumulate in the food chain. The only known microbial transformation of 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB) and higher chlorinated benzenes is the reductive dechlorination to lower chlorinated benzenes under anaerobic conditions observed with mixed bacterial cultures. The lower chlorinated benzenes can subsequently be mineralized by aerobic bacteria. Here we describe the isolation of the oxygen-sensitive strain CBDB1, a pure culture capable of reductive dechlorination of chlorobenzenes. Strain CBDB1 is a highly specialized bacterium that stoichiometrically dechlorinates 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (TCB), 1,2,4-TCB, 1,2,3,4-TeCB, 1,2,3,5-TeCB and 1,2,4,5-TeCB to dichlorobenzenes or 1,3,5-TCB. The presence of chlorobenzene as an electron acceptor and hydrogen as an electron donor is essential for growth, and indicates that strain CBDB1 meets its energy needs by a dehalorespiratory process. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain CBDB1, Dehalococcoides ethenogenes and several uncultivated bacteria form a new bacterial cluster, of which strain CBDB1 is the first, so far, to thrive on a purely synthetic medium.

  5. Bioremediation of chlorinated benzene compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, P.C.; Rhodes, S.H.; Guerin, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    In early 1994, investigations at a pharmaceutical manufacturing site revealed extensive areas of soil contaminated with chlorinated benzenes. The soil was a heavy clay and contained chlorobenzene (CB), 1,2-dichlorobenzene (referred to in this paper as DCB), and small amounts of 1,3- and 1,4-dichlorobenzene and other solvents. The soil was bioremediated in a pilot-scale treatment using an ex situ process with various inorganic and organic amendments. Approximately 90% of the DCB mass present in the soil was removed over a period of 2 to 3 weeks. Up to 100-fold increases in both total heterotrophs and specific degraders were observed. Residual concentrations of chlorinated benzenes were generally below detection limits. Adding organic matter did not appear to significantly enhance the treatment efficiency. Mass balance calculations applied to the treatment indicated that less than 5% of the chlorinated benzenes were removed by volatilization. Evidence was obtained that approximately 90% of the DCB was removed by biodegradation in these pilot-scale trials. Laboratory shake flask trials were conducted which confirmed that the soils in the pilot-scale treatment contained microorganisms capable of mineralizing CB and DCB.

  6. Determining the structure of a benzene7.2-silicalite-1 zeolite using a single-crystal X-ray method

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Natsumi; Iwama, Wataru; Kudo, Tomokazu; Nasuno, Tomomi; Fujiyama, Shinjiro; Nishi, Koji; Yokomori, Yoshinobu

    2011-01-01

    A simple method for preparing orthorhombic single crystals of benzene-silicalite-1 was developed. A silicalite-1 crystal was pressed with a weight of 2 g along the +c and −c crystallographic axes while the temperature was increased to 473 K. The temperature was then slowly reduced to 313 K, and these heating and cooling steps were repeated three times. After the orthorhombic single crystals adsorbed benzene, the crystal structure of the resulting benzene-silicalite-1 was determined. There were two kinds of benzene molecules in the asymmetric unit. One was located at the intersection of the straight channels and the sinusoidal channels with the benzene ring parallel to the ac plane. The other benzene was located in the middle of the straight channel. PMID:22101540

  7. 1,3,5-Tris{[3-(1H-benzotriazol-1-ylmeth­yl)phen­oxy]meth­yl}-2,4,6-trimethyl­benzene

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Si, Wan-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Ma, Hong-Ji; Ji, Bao-Ming

    2008-01-01

    In the title compound, C51H45N9O3, three 1-(1H-benzotriazol-1-ylmeth­yl)-3-phen­yloxy (bmph) ligands are bonded to the central benzene ring in an asymmetric arrangement, two bmph located on one side of the central benzene ring and the other bmph located on the opposite side of the central benzene ring. The dihedral angles between the central benzene ring and the three pendant phenoxy rings are 76.71 (14), 67.81 (13) and 70.67 (16)°. In the crystal structure, one bmph is disordered over two sites in a 0.611 (5):0.389 (5) ratio. Some of the methyl H atoms are equally disordered over two sets of sites. Inter­molecular C—H⋯N hydrogen bonding is present in the crystal structure. PMID:21201144

  8. Crystal structure of 1-bromo-2-(phenyl­selen­yl)benzene

    PubMed Central

    Charette, Bronte J.; Ritch, Jamie S.

    2015-01-01

    In the title compound, C12H9BrSe, the Se atom exhibits a bent geometry, with a C—Se—C bond angle of 99.19 (6)°. The ortho Se and Br atoms are slightly displaced from opposite faces of the mean plane of the benzene ring [by 0.129 (2) and 0.052 (2) Å, respectively]. The planes of the benzene and phenyl rings form a dihedral angle of 72.69 (5)°. In the crystal, π-stacking inter­actions between inversion-related phenyl rings are observed, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.630 (1) Å. PMID:25844201

  9. N-(2,3-Dichloro-phen-yl)-2-nitro-benzene-sulfonamide.

    PubMed

    Chaithanya, U; Foro, Sabine; Gowda, B Thimme

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, C12H8Cl2N2O4S, the N-C bond in the C-SO2-NH-C segment has gauche torsions with respect to the S=O bonds. Further, the N-H bond is syn to the ortho-nitro group in the sulfonyl benzene ring and also syn to both the ortho- and meta-Cl atoms in the aniline ring. The mol-ecule is twisted at the S-N bond with a torsion angle of 61.15 (18)°. The dihedral angle between the planes of the benzene rings is 68.00 (6)°. The amide H atom exhibits an intra-molecular bifurcated N-H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bond. In the crystal, pairs of N-H⋯O(S) hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules into inversion dimers with R2(2)(8) motifs. PMID:23476457

  10. 1,4-Bis(4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)benzene dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiu-Guang; Li, Jian-Hui; Ding, Bin; Du, Gui-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C10H8N6·2H2O, comprises half the organic species, the mol­ecule being completed by inversion symmetry, and one water mol­ecule. The dihedral angle between the 1,2,4-triazole ring and the central benzene ring is 32.2 (2)°. The water mol­ecules form O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds with N-atom acceptors of the triazole rings. C—H⋯N hydrogen bonds are also observed, giving a three-dimensional framework. PMID:22904851

  11. Structure of the Sevoflurane-Benzene Complex as Determined by Chirped-Pulse Ftmw Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Pate, Brooks H.; Lesarri, Alberto; Vallejo, Montserrat; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Castano, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    Following previous microwave studies on sevoflurane monomer by Suenram {et al.} and Vega-Toribio et al. we report the broadband rotational spectrum of sevoflurane clustered with benzene. The structure assigned is consistent with a C-H...π interaction between the benzene ring and the (CF_3)_2C-H hydrogen on sevoflurane. The spectrum of this species is complicated by the six-fold internal rotation of the benzene ring over the C_1 framework of sevoflurane. The six-fold tunneling falls into a high effective barrier case where there are several bound torsional levels. The tunneling spectrum has been successfully analyzed using the BELGI internal rotation program and a barrier to internal rotation of the benzene against sevoflurane of 32.5 cm-1 has been determined. Structural information about the complex has been obtained by studying the complex of sevoflurane with benzene-{d_1}. For this complex, six unique isomers are observed making it possible to determine the positions of the benzene H-atoms in the complex. Combination of these hydrogen r_s positions with the sevoflurane monomer r_s coordinates reported by Lesarri {et al.} results in a substitution structure in excellent agreement with the ab initio results. Finally, initial microwave results on two sevoflurane dimer species will also be presented. R. D. Suenram, D. J. Brugh, F. J. Lovas and C. Chu, 51st OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 1999, RB07. A. Vega-Toribio, A. Lesarri, R.D. Suenram, J. Grabow, 64th OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2009, MH07. A. Lesarri, A. Vega-Toribio, R. D. Suenram, D. J. Brugh, J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 12, 9624-9631 (2010).

  12. A paramagnetic heterobimetallic polymer: synthesis, reactivity, and ring-opening polymerization of tin-bridged homo- and heteroleptic vanadoarenophanes.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Holger; Damme, Alexander; Demeshko, Serhiy; Dück, Klaus; Kramer, Thomas; Krummenacher, Ivo; Meyer, Franc; Radacki, Krzysztof; Stellwag-Konertz, Sascha; Whittell, George R

    2015-02-01

    The synthesis of the first tin-bridged bis(benzene) vanadium and trovacene sandwich compounds and the investigation of their oxidative addition and insertion behavior are reported. The vanadoarenophanes and the corresponding platinum insertion products were fully characterized including electrochemical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. Controllable ring-opening polymerization of the heteroleptic tin-bridged [1]trovacenophane using Karstedt's catalyst yields a high molecular weight polymer (up to M(n) = 89 200 g·mol(-1)) composed of d(5)-vanadium metal centers in the main chain, making it a rare example of a spin-carrying macromolecule. Magnetic susceptibility measurements (SQUID) confirm the paramagnetic scaffold with repeating S = 1/2 centers in the main chain and suggest antiferromagnetic interactions between adjacent spin sites (Weiss constant Θ = -2.9 K). PMID:25565127

  13. Theoretical insight into the interaction between SnX2 (X = H, F, Cl, Br, I) and benzene.

    PubMed

    Matczak, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    For a series of five model complexes composed of a singlet SnX2 molecule (X = H, F, Cl, Br, I) and a benzene molecule, the first-principles calculations of their energetics and the analysis of their electron density topology have been performed. The CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energy between SnX2 and C6H6 fall into the range between -10.0 and -11.2 kcal/mol, which indicates that the complexes are rather weakly bound. The relevant role of electrostatic and dispersion contributions to the interaction energy between SnX2 and C6H6 is highlighted in the results obtained from the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). The electron density topological analysis has been carried out using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and the noncovalent interactions (NCI) visualization index. Both QTAIM and NCI prove the closed-shell, noncovalent and attractive character of the interaction. A very small charge transfer from C6H6 to SnX2 has been detected. The formation of the five complexes is accompanied by the electron density deformations that are spatially restricted mostly to the region around the Sn atom and its adjacent C atom. The results presented in this work shed some light on the nature of the interactions associated with crystalline structural motifs involving low-valent tin complexed with neutral aryl rings. PMID:27525639

  14. Benzene-Ethane Co-Crystals on the Surface of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, T. H.; Hodyss, R. P.; Cable, M. L.; Maynard-Casely, H. E.; Malaska, M. J.; Beauchamp, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Benzene is found at high abundance in Titan's atmosphere and is a likely constituent of evaporite deposits formed around the hydrocarbon lakes. This work aims to understand the composition and nature of the surface evaporites by focusing on the interaction between benzene and ethane, a principal component of the lake fluids. We have discovered a new benzene-ethane co-crystalline structure which forms under Titan-like conditions (90-150 K and 1 bar), resulting in recrystallization of the benzene lattice that can be detected via micro-Raman spectroscopy. Evidence for ethane incorporation includes two new distinctive ethane features at 2873 and 1455 cm-1 and marked red shifts of the benzene peaks in the Raman spectra. Vibrational analysis reveals a C-H…π interaction between the aromatic ring of benzene and the hydrogen atoms of ethane through a monodentate contact. The kinetics of co-crystal formation is also determined, giving a relatively mild activation energy of 10.2 kJ/mol. It is shown that the formation process would reach completion in ~18 hours, and that benzene precipitates selectively as the co-crystal from a mixture of liquid ethane and methane. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data confirms the crystalline nature of the new material. These results imply that benzene and similar organics may act as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs due to this incorporation mechanism. These novel structures represent a new class of materials for Titan's surface that may influence evaporite characteristics, such as particle size and infrared spectral properties.

  15. Superfund fact sheet: Benzene. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The fact sheet describes benzene, a chemical that can be found in a variety of products, including petroleum products (e.g. gasoline), some household cleaners, and some glues and adhesives. Explanations of how people are exposed to benzene and how benzene can enter the body and may affect human health are given. The fact sheet is one in a series providing reference information about Superfund issues and is intended for readers with no formal scientific training.

  16. Carcinogenic effects of benzene: Cesare Maltoni's contributions.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2002-12-01

    Cesare Maltoni's contributions to understanding, identifying, and characterizing widely used commercial chemicals in experimental animals are among the most important methods developed in the history of toxicology and serve to protect working men and women, the general population, and our environment from hazardous substances. Maltoni developed experimental methods that have reached the "platinum standard" for protection of public health. Benzene was among the 400 or more chemicals that Maltoni and his associates tested for carcinogenicity. In 1976, Maltoni reported that benzene is a potent experimental carcinogen. Maltoni's experiments clearly demonstrated that benzene is carcinogenic in Sprague-Dawley rats, Wistar rats, Swiss mice, and RF/J mice when administered by inhalation or ingestion. Benzene caused carcinomas of the Zymbal gland, oral cavity, nasal cavities; cancers of the skin, forestomach, mammary glands, and lungs; angiosarcomas and hepatomas of the liver; and hemolymphoreticular cancers. Thus, benzene was shown to be a multipotential carcinogen that produced cancers in several species of animals by various routes of administration. On November 2, 1977, Chemical Week reported that Maltoni provided a "bombshell" when he demonstrated the "first direct link" between benzene and cancer. In this paper, I shall summarize early experiments and human studies and reports; Maltoni's experimental contribution to understanding the carcinogenicity of benzene in humans and animals; earlier knowledge concerning benzene toxicity; and benzene standards and permissible exposure levels.

  17. Production of Phenol from Benzene via Cumene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, D. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemistry laboratory experiment involving the production of phenol from benzene with the intermediate production of isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene hydroperoxide. (SL)

  18. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  19. The harmonic frequencies of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy, Nicholas C.; Maslen, Paul E.; Amos, Roger D.; Andrews, Jamie S.; Murray, Christopher W.; Laming, Gregory J.

    1992-09-01

    We report calculations for the harmonic frequencies of C 6H 6 and C 6D 6. Our most sophisticated quantum chemistry values are obtained with the MP2 method and a TZ2P+f basis set (288 basis functions), which are the largest such calculations reported on benzene to date. Using the SCF density, we also calculate the frequencies using the exchange and correlation expressions of density functional theory. We compare our calculated harmonic frequencies with those deduced from experiment by Goodman, Ozkabak and Thakur. The density functional frequencies appear to be more reliable predictions than the MP2 frequencies and they are obtained at significantly less cost.

  20. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  1. MEASUREMENT OF BENZENE OXIDE IN THE BLOOD OF RATS FOLLOWING ADMINISTRATION OF BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although it is generally assumed that metabolism of benzene proceeds through an initial step involving oxidation to benzene oxide (BO) by CYP450 in the liver, the production of BO has never been unambiguously confirmed in animals dosed with benzene. Furthermore, prevailing hypo...

  2. Chemical of current interest--benzene.

    PubMed

    Marcus, W L

    1987-03-01

    Benzene is one of the world's major commodity chemicals. It is derived from petroleum and coal and is used both as a solvent and as a starting material in chemical syntheses. The numerous industrial uses of benzene over the last century need not be recounted here, but the most recent addition to the list of uses of benzene is as a component in a mixture of aromatic compounds added to gasoline for the purpose of replacing lead compounds as anti-knock ingredients. The best known and longest recognized toxic effect of benzene is the depression of bone marrow function seen in occupationally exposed individuals. These people have been found to display anemia, leucopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. When pancytopenia, i.e., the simultaneous depression of all three cell types, occurs and is accompanied by bone marrow necrosis, the syndrome is called aplastic anemia. In addition to observing this decrease in humans and relating it to benzene exposure, it has been possible to establish animal models which mimic the human disease. The result has been considerable scientific investigation into the mechanism of benzene toxicity. Although the association between benzene exposure and aplastic anemia has been recognized and accepted throughout most of this century, it is only recently that leukemia, particularly of the acute myelogenous type, has been related to benzene. The acceptance of benzene as an etiological agent in aplastic anemia in large measure derives from our ability to reproduce the disease in most animals treated with sufficiently high doses of benzene over the necessary time period. Unfortunately, despite extensive efforts in several laboratories, it has not been possible to establish a reproducible, reliable model for the study of benzene-induced leukemia. The recent demonstration that several animals exposed to benzene either by inhalation or in the drinking water during studies by Drs. B. Goldstein and C. Maltoni suggests that such a model may be forthcoming

  3. Systems biology of human benzene exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Li, Guilan; Ji, Zhiying; Vermeulen, Roel; Hubbard, Alan E.; Ren, Xuefeng; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; North, Matthew; Skibola, Christine F.; Yin, Songnian; Vulpe, Christopher; Chanock, Stephen J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Toxicogenomic studies, including genome-wide analyses of susceptibility genes (genomics), gene expression (transcriptomics), protein expression (proteomics), and epigenetic modifications (epigenomics), of human populations exposed to benzene are crucial to understanding gene-environment interactions, providing the ability to develop biomarkers of exposure, early effect and susceptibility. Comprehensive analysis of these toxicogenomic and epigenomic profiles by bioinformatics in the context of phenotypic endpoints, comprises systems biology, which has the potential to comprehensively define the mechanisms by which benzene causes leukemia. We have applied this approach to a molecular epidemiology study of workers exposed to benzene. Hematotoxicity, a significant decrease in almost all blood cell counts, was identified as a phenotypic effect of benzene that occurred even below 1ppm benzene exposure. We found a significant decrease in the formation of progenitor colonies arising from bone marrow stem cells with increasing benzene exposure, showing that progenitor cells are more sensitive to the effects of benzene than mature blood cells, likely leading to the observed hematotoxicity. Analysis of transcriptomics by microarray in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of exposed workers, identified genes and pathways (apoptosis, immune response, and inflammatory response) altered at high (>10ppm) and low (<1ppm) benzene levels. Serum proteomics by SELDI-TOF-MS revealed proteins consistently down-regulated in exposed workers. Preliminary epigenomics data showed effects of benzene on the DNA methylation of specific genes. Genomic screens for candidate genes involved in susceptibility to benzene toxicity are being undertaken in yeast, with subsequent confirmation by RNAi in human cells, to expand upon the findings from candidate gene analyses. Data on these and future biomarkers will be used to populate a large toxicogenomics database, to which we will apply bioinformatic

  4. Mechanistic considerations in benzene physiological model development

    SciTech Connect

    Medinsky, M.A.; Kenyon, E.M.; Seaton, M.J.; Schlosser, P.M.

    1996-12-01

    Benzene, an important industrial solvent, is also present in unleaded gasoline and cigarette smoke. The hematotoxic effects of benzene in humans are well documented and include aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, the risks of leukemia at low exposure concentrations have not been established. A combination of metabolites (hydroquinone and phenol, for example) may be necessary to duplicate the hematotoxic effect of benzene, perhaps due in part to the synergistic effect of phenol on myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of hydroquinone to the reactive metabolite benzoquinone. Because benzene and its hydroxylated metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol) are substrates for the same cytochrome P450 enzymes, competitive interactions among the metabolites are possible. In vivo data on metabolite formation by mice exposed to various benzene concentrations are consistent with competitive inhibition of phenol oxidation by benzene. In vitro studies of the metabolic oxidation of benzene, phenol, and hydroquinone are consistent with the mechanism of competitive interaction among the metabolites. The dosimetry of benzene and its metabolites in the target tissue, bone marrow, depends on the balance of activation processes such as enzymatic oxidation and deactivation processes such as conjugation and excretion. Phenol, the primary benzene metabolite, can undergo both oxidation and conjugation. Thus the potential exists for competition among various enzymes for phenol. Zonal localization of phase I and phase 11 enzymes in various regions of the liver acinus also impacts this competition. Biologically based dosimetry models that incorporate the important determinants of benzene flux, including interactions with other chemicals, will enable prediction of target tissue doses of benzene and metabolites at low exposure concentrations relevant for humans. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Microbial respiration and natural attenuation of benzene contaminated soils investigated by cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; Michalzik, Beate; Bachmann, Anne; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-05-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damage. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and are known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Innovative cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of the soil micro-flora to sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. (13)C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving (12)CO2 and O2- from the natural attenuation process of benzene degradation to ultimately form (13)CO2. The respiratory quotient (RQ) decreased from a value 0.98 to 0.46 directly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with the maximum (13)CO2 concentration rate (0.63 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), indicating the highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into (13)CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore. The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration.

  6. Major sources of benzene exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L A

    1989-01-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis. PMID:2477239

  7. Major sources of benzene exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis.

  8. Major sources of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L A

    1989-07-01

    Data from EPA's TEAM Study allow us to identify the major sources of exposure to benzene for much of the U.S. population. These sources turn out to be quite different from what had previously been considered the important sources. The most important source of exposure for 50 million smokers is the mainstream smoke from their cigarettes, which accounts for about half of the total population burden of exposure to benzene. Another 20% of nationwide exposure is contributed by various personal activities, such as driving and using attached garages. (Emissions from consumer products, building materials, paints, and adhesives may also be important, although data are largely lacking.) The traditional sources of atmospheric emissions (auto exhaust and industrial emissions) account for only about 20% of total exposure. Environmental tobacco smoke is an important source, accounting for about 5% of total nationwide exposure. A number of sources sometimes considered important, such as petroleum refining operations, petrochemical manufacturing, oil storage tanks, urban-industrial areas, service stations, certain foods, groundwater contamination, and underground gasoline leaks, appear to be unimportant on a nationwide basis.

  9. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  11. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  13. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  14. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... safety data sheet (MSDS) which addresses benzene and complies with 29 CFR 1910.1200. (ii) Employers who... the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(h) (1) and (2), and shall include specific information on benzene... and unloading operations, except for the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.1200 as incorporated into...

  19. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  20. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  1. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  2. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  4. 29 CFR 1910.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... safety data sheet (MSDS) which addresses benzene and complies with 29 CFR 1910.1200. (ii) Employers who... the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(h) (1) and (2), and shall include specific information on benzene... and unloading operations, except for the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.1200 as incorporated into...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.1028 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene. 1915.1028 Section 1915.1028 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Benzene. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  7. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  8. 46 CFR 151.50-60 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 151.50-60 Section 151.50-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-60 Benzene. The person in charge of...

  9. 46 CFR 30.25-3 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 30.25-3 Section 30.25-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commodities Regulated § 30.25-3 Benzene. The provisions contained in 46 CFR part 197, subpart C, apply to liquid cargoes containing 0.5% or more...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1128 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene. 1926.1128 Section 1926.1128 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1128 Benzene....

  11. Degradation of benzene in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, F.; Klein, W.

    1982-01-01

    A test system for measurement of benzene and other aromatic compounds using a carbon 14 label is described. The biodegradability test of ecotoxicological profile analysis is performed in a closed system, thus allowing the investigation of volatile compounds. Results show that benzene is readily biodegradable. (JMT)

  12. Biomarkers of susceptibility following benzene exposure: influence of genetic polymorphisms on benzene metabolism and health effects.

    PubMed

    Carbonari, Damiano; Chiarella, Pieranna; Mansi, Antonella; Pigini, Daniela; Iavicoli, Sergio; Tranfo, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous occupational and environmental pollutant. Improved industrial hygiene allowed airborne concentrations close to the environmental context (1-1000 µg/m(3)). Conversely, new limits for benzene levels in urban air were set (5 µg/m(3)). The biomonitoring of exposure to such low benzene concentrations are performed measuring specific and sensitive biomarkers such as S-phenylmercapturic acid, trans, trans-muconic acid and urinary benzene: many studies referred high variability in the levels of these biomarkers, suggesting the involvement of polymorphic metabolic genes in the individual susceptibility to benzene toxicity. We reviewed the influence of metabolic polymorphisms on the biomarkers levels of benzene exposure and effect, in order to understand the real impact of benzene exposure on subjects with increased susceptibility.

  13. Effect of repeated benzene inhalation exposures on benzene metabolism, binding to hemoglobin, and induction of micronuclei.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, P J; Sun, J D; MacGregor, J T; Wehr, C M; Birnbaum, L S; Lucier, G; Henderson, R F

    1990-05-01

    Metabolism of benzene is thought to be necessary to produce the toxic effects, including carcinogenicity, associated with benzene exposure. To extrapolate from the results of rodent studies to potential health risks in man, one must know how benzene metabolism is affected by species, dose, dose rate, and repeated versus single exposures. The purpose of our studies was to determine the effect of repeated inhalation exposures on the metabolism of [14C]benzene by rodents. Benzene metabolism was assessed by characterizing and quantitating urinary metabolites, and by quantitating 14C bound to hemoglobin and micronuclei induction. F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed, nose-only, to 600 ppm benzene or to air (control) for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. On the last day, both benzene-pretreated and control animals were exposed to 600 ppm, 14C-labeled benzene for 6 hr. Individual benzene metabolites in urine collected for 24 hr after the exposure were analyzed. There was a significant decrease in the respiratory rate of mice (but not rats) pretreated with benzene which resulted in lower levels of urinary [14C]benzene metabolites. The analyses indicated that the only effects of benzene pretreatment on the metabolite profile in rat or mouse urine were a slight shift from glucuronidation to sulfation in mice and a shift from sulfation to glucuronidation in rats. Benzene pretreatment also had no effect, in either species, on formation of [14C]benzene-derived hemoglobin adducts. Mice and rats had similar levels of hemoglobin adduct binding, despite the higher metabolism of benzene by mice. This indicates that hemoglobin adduct formation occurs with higher efficiency in rats. After 1 week of exposure to 600 ppm benzene, the frequency of micronucleated, polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in mice was significantly increased. Exposure to the same level of benzene for an additional 2 weeks did not further increase the frequency of micronuclei in PCEs. These results indicate

  14. Jupiter's ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    First evidence of a ring around the planet Jupiter is seen in this photograph taken by Voyager 1 on March 4, 1979. The multiple exposure of the extremely thin faint ring appears as a broad light band crossing the center of the picture. The edge of the ring is 1,212,000 km from the spacecraft and 57,000 km from the visible cloud deck of Jupiter. The background stars look like broken hair pins because of spacecraft motion during the 11 minute 12 second exposure. The wavy motion of the star trails is due to the ultra-slow natural oscillation of the spacecraft (with a period of 78 seconds). The black dots are geometric calibration points in the camera. The ring thickness is estimated to be 30 km or less. The photograph was part of a sequence planned to search for such rings in Jupiter's equatorial plane. The ring has been invisible from Earth because of its thinness and its transparency when viewed at any angle except straight on. JPL manages and controls the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  15. Total cross sections for positron scattering from benzene, cyclohexane, and aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Zecca, Antonio; Moser, Norberto; Perazzolli, Chiara; Salemi, Alessandro; Brunger, Michael J.

    2007-08-15

    We use a linear transmission technique to measure total cross sections for positron scattering from benzene, cyclohexane, and aniline. In the case of cyclohexane, the energy range of the present study is 0.1-20 eV, while for benzene and aniline it is 0.2-20 eV. With respect to benzene and cyclohexane, comparison is made to the only other existing results we know of [Makochekanwa and co-workers, Phys. Rev. A 68, 032707 (2003); 72, 042705 (2005)]. Agreement with those data is only marginal, being particularly poor at the overlap lower energies. Unlike Kimura et al. [J. Phys. B 37, 1461 (2004)], we find the low-energy dependence of the positron-benzene total cross sections to be qualitatively similar to those found in the electron channel [Gulley et al., J. Phys. B 31, 2735 (1998)]. We believe that the present positron-aniline total cross sections represent the first time such data have been measured. These cross sections are almost identical to those we found for benzene, suggesting that substitution of hydrogen by the amine group on the aromatic ring is largely irrelevant to the scattering process in the energy regimes considered.

  16. Benzene-1,3,5-triyl tris­(methane­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal, Domingo; Aguirre, Gerardo; Vargas, Berenice

    2010-01-01

    In the mol­ecule of the title compound, C9H12O9S3, the two methanesulfonate groups re located one above and one below the ring plane. The C—O—S angle range is 119.3 (2)–121.1 (2)°. This conformation is different from that of the benzene analog 1,2,5-tris­(p-toluene­sulfonate), which is a three-legged ‘table’ with all fragments of the p-toluene­sulfonate on top of the benzene ring. In the crystal, the supra­molecular aggregation is completed by the presence of C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21580584

  17. Single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy in shock-compressed benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.; Schiferl, D.; Shaner, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Single-pulse backwards stimulated Raman and reflected broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (BSRC and RBBCARS) have been used to measure the vibrational frequency shifts of the 992 cm/sup -1/ ring-stretching mode of liquid benzene shock-compressed to pressures up to 1.2 GPa. The resulting shifts of approx. 7.5 cm/sup -1//GPa in the dynamic experiments are compared to spontaneous Raman-scattering measurements of heated samples compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. RBBCARS was used to simultaneously measure the ring-stretching mode vibrational frequencies of liquid benzene/liquid perdeuterobenzene mixtures shock-compressed to pressures up to 1.53 GPa. Additional experiments that demonstrate the difficulty of using polarization-sensitive coherent Raman techniques, such as Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy (RIKES), in shock-compressed samples are described.

  18. 4-Methyl-N-(3-methyl­phen­yl)benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Nirmala, P. G.; Gowda, B. Thimme; Foro, Sabine; Fuess, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, C14H15NO2S, the conformation of the N—C bond in the C—SO2—NH—C segment has gauche torsion angles with respect to the S=O bonds. Further, the conformation of the N—H bond is anti to the 3-methyl group in the aniline benzene ring. The mol­ecule is bent at the N atom with a C—SO2—NH—C torsion angle of 56.7 (3)°. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 83.9 (1)°. In the crystal, inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds pack the mol­ecules into a supra­molecular structure. PMID:21578916

  19. Benzene in the environment: an assessment of the potential risks to the health of the population

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Davidson, R; Courage, C; Rushton, L; Levy, L

    2001-01-01

    children or adults owing to their lower body weight, resulting in a higher daily intake for infants compared with children or non-smoking adults. A worst case scenario for exposure to benzene in the general population is that of an urban smoker who works adjacent to a busy road for 8 hours/day—for example, a maintenance worker—who can receive a mean daily exposure of about 820 µg (equal to an estimated exposure of 41 µg/m3). The major health risk associated with low concentrations of exposure to benzene has been shown to be leukaemia, in particular acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia. The lowest concentration of exposure at which an increased incidence of acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia among occupationally exposed workers has been reliably detected, has been estimated to be in the range of 32-80 mg/m3. Although some studies have suggested that effects may occur at lower concentrations, clear estimates of risk have not been determined, partly because of the inadequacy of exposure data and the few cases.
CONCLUSIONS—Overall the evidence from human studies suggests that any risk of leukaemia at concentrations of exposure in the general population of 3.7-42 µg/m3—that is at concentrations three orders of magnitude less than the occupational lowest observed effect level—is likely to be exceedingly small and probably not detectable with current methods. This is also likely to be true for infants and children who may be exposed continuously to concentrations of 3.4-5.7 µg/m3. As yet there is no evidence to suggest that continuous exposures to these environmental concentrations of benzene manifest as any other adverse health effect.


Keywords: risk assessment; benzene; environment PMID:11119628

  20. Percutaneous penetration of benzene and benzene contained in solvents used in the rubber industry

    SciTech Connect

    Maibach, H.I.; Anjo, D.M.

    1981-09-01

    Penetration of benzene through the skin of the rhesus monkey was determined using /sup 14/C-benzene, and quantitating the labelled metabolites in urine. The modes of application and amounts of benzene that penetrated the skin (indicated in parentheses) are as follows: (1) a single, direct cutaneous application of liquid benzene (0.172 +/- 0.139%); (2) a single application of benzene-containing (0.36%) solvent (0.0805 +/- 0.0306%); (3) multiple washes with full-strength benzene (0.848 +/- 0.0806%); (4) multiple washes with the benzene-containing (0.35%) solvent (0.431 +/- 0.258%); (5) removal of the stratum corneum followed by application of full-strength benzene (0.09 +/- 0.627%); and (6) application of benzene to the palmar surface (0.651 +/- 0.482%). Until more complete human data becomes available, benzene penetration in the monkey may be used to estimate penetration in man, both for industrial hygiene purposes and general toxicological use.

  1. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering in benzene and nitromethane shock-compressed to 10 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaner, J.W.; Shampine, D.L.; Holt, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    The frequency shifts of the ring-stretching mode of shock-compressed liquid benzene and the CN stretching mode of nitromethane have been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Shock pressures up to 11 GPa were achieved using a two-stage light gas gun. The frequency shifted Raman signal was generated using single pulse Nd:YAG and broadband-type lasers. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Reduction of benzene toxicity by toluene.

    PubMed

    Plappert, U; Barthel, E; Seidel, H J

    1994-01-01

    BDF1 mice were exposed in inhalation chambers to benzene (900 ppm, 300 ppm) and/or toluene (500 ppm, 250 ppm) 6 hr per day, 5 days per week, for up to 8 weeks. Benzene alone induced a slight anemia after 4 and 8 weeks and a reduction of BFU-E and CFU-E numbers in the marrow. The coexposure to toluene reduced the degree of anemia. These results confirm previous studies where toluene was found to reduce benzene toxicity. This protective effect was most pronounced when DNA damage was studied in peripheral blood cells, bone marrow, and liver using the single cell gel (SCG) assay. With benzene alone, either with 300 or 900 ppm, a significant increase in DNA damage was detected in cells sampled from all three organs. Toluene alone did not induce a significant increase in DNA damage. The coexposure of benzene and toluene reduced the extent of DNA damage to about 50% of benzene alone. This result is considered a clear indication for a protective effect of toluene on the genetic toxicity of benzene.

  3. Reduction of benzene toxicity by toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Plappert, U.; Barthel, E.; Seidel, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    BDF{sub 1} mice were exposed in inhalation chambers to benzene (900 ppm, 300 ppm) and/or toluene (500 ppm, 250 ppm) 6 hr per day, 5 days per week, for up to 8 weeks. Benzene alone induced a slight anemia after 4 and 8 weeks and a reduction of BFU-E and CFU-E numbers in the marrow. The coexposure to toluene reduced the degree of anemia. These results confirm previous studies where toluene was found to reduce benzene toxicity. This protective effect was most pronounced when DNA damage was studied in peripheral blood cells, bone marrow, and liver using the single cell gel (SCG) assay. With benzene alone, either with 300 or 900 ppm, a significant increase in DNA damage was detected in cells sampled from all three organs. Toluene alone did not induce a significant increase in DNA damage. The coexposure of benzene and toluene reduced the extent of DNA damage to about 50% of benzene alone. This result is considered a clear indication for a protective effect of toluene on the genetic toxicity of benzene. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Differences in the pathways for metabolism of benzene in rats and mice simulated by a physiological model.

    PubMed

    Medinsky, M A; Sabourin, P J; Henderson, R F; Lucier, G; Birnbaum, L S

    1989-07-01

    Studies conducted by the National Toxicology Program on the chronic toxicity of benzene indicated that B6C3F1 mice were more sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of benzene than were F344 rats. A physiological model was developed to describe the uptake and metabolism of benzene in rats and mice. Our objective was to determine if differences in toxic effects could be explained by differences in pathways for benzene metabolism or by differences in total uptake of benzene. Compartments incorporated into the model included liver, fat, a poorly perfused tissue group, a richly perfused tissue group, an alveolar or lung compartment and blood. Metabolism of benzene was assumed to take place only in the liver and to proceed by four major competing pathways. These included formation of hydroquinone conjugates (HQC), formation of phenyl conjugates (PHC), ring-breakage and formation of muconic acid (MUC), and conjugation with glutathione with subsequent mercapturic acid (PMA) formation. Values for parameters such as alveolar ventilation, cardiac output, organ volumes, blood flow, partition coefficients, and metabolic rate constants were taken from the literature. Model simulations confirmed that during and after 6-hr inhalation exposures mice metabolized more benzene on a mumole per kilogram body weight basis than did rats. After oral exposure, rats metabolized more benzene than mice at doses above 50 mg/kg because of the more rapid absorption and exhalation of benzene by mice. Model simulations for PHC and PMA, generally considered to be detoxification metabolites, were similar in shape and dose-response to those for total metabolism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. 4-Chloro-N-(3,4-dimethyl­phen­yl)benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, B. Thimme; Foro, Sabine; Nirmala, P. G.; Fuess, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, C14H14ClNO2S, the angle between the sulfonyl and aniline benzene rings is 65.5 (1)°. The crystal structure features inversion dimers linked by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The dimethyl­phenyl ring is disordered over two different orientations approximately related by a 180° rotation about the C—N bond, with occupancies of 0.643 (6) and 0.357 (6). PMID:21579382

  6. Lidar Measurements of Industrial Benzene Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Gast, L. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to measure benzene concentrations was added to the RIVM mobile DIAL system. In a ten-days campaign, it was used to measure benzene emissions in the Rijnmond, a heavily industrialised area in the South-west of the Netherlands with petrochemical industry, petrochemical products storage and the port of Rotterdam. On two of the ten days, benzene emissions were found. Combined with measurements of wind speed and wind direction, the Lidar measurements indicated the possible origins of these emissions. This makes the Lidar a valuable tool, augmenting the data collected at fixed monitoring stations.

  7. Studies on the mechanism of benzene toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Dimitriadis, E; Guy, R; Hu, P; Cooper, K; Bauer, H; Witz, G; Goldstein, B D

    1989-01-01

    Using the 59Fe uptake method of Lee et al. it was shown that erythropoiesis in female mice was inhibited following IP administration of benzene, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, and muconaldehyde. Toluene protected against the effects of benzene. Coadministration of phenol plus either hydroquinone or catechol resulted in greatly increased toxicity. The combination of metabolites most effective in reducing iron uptake was hydroquinone plus muconaldehyde. We have also shown that treating animals with benzene leads to the formation of adducts of bone marrow DNA as measured by the 32P-postlabeling technique. PMID:2792049

  8. Excited state of protonated benzene and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves-López, Natalia; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe

    2015-08-21

    We present photo-fragmentation electronic spectra of the simplest protonated aromatic molecules, protonated benzene and toluene, recorded under medium resolution conditions and compared with the photo-fragmentation spectrum of protonated pyridine. Despite the resolution and cold temperature achieved in the experiment, the electronic spectra of protonated benzene and toluene are structure-less, thus intrinsically broadened. This is in agreement with the large geometrical changes and the fast dynamic toward internal conversion predicted by ab initio calculations for protonated benzene [Rode et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5865–5873 (2009)].

  9. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  10. Benzene and Haze Formation in the Polar Atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ah-San; Yung, Yuk L.; Friedson, A. James

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter has a large magnetosphere that episodically precipitates large amounts of energy into the polar atmosphere, giving rise to intense auroras [Clarke et al., 1996; Grodent et al., 2000]. An important consequence of this energy influx is the production of a dark haze [Pryor and Hord, 1991], the formation mechanism of which was hitherto poorly known. Recent observations of benzene on Jupiter [Bézard et al., 2001; Flasar, 2002] provide new clues for a chemical and aerosol model for the formation of heavy hydrocarbon aerosols. The chemistry begins with the destruction of methane by energetic particles, followed by neutral and ion reactions, ultimately leading to the formation of benzene and other complex hydrocarbons, including multi-ring compounds which subsequently condense. High temperatures and effective eddy mixing engendered by the auroras enhance the formation of heavy hydrocarbons and aerosols. This mechanism may be relevant in the atmospheres of Saturn and extrasolar giant planets, and is an example of how a planetary magnetosphere may influence the chemical composition and climate forcing of the upper atmosphere.

  11. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the benzene dimer.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Sam; Cohen, R E

    2015-09-14

    We report an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory using different van der Waals functionals. In our quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of -2.3(4) and -2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the coupled-cluster theory through perturbative triplets/complete basis set limit is -2.65(2) kcal/mol [Miliordos et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, comparable to results from the best quantum chemistry methods. PMID:26374029

  12. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the benzene dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Azadi, Sam; Cohen, R. E.

    2015-09-14

    We report an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory using different van der Waals functionals. In our quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of −2.3(4) and −2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the coupled-cluster theory through perturbative triplets/complete basis set limit is −2.65(2) kcal/mol [Miliordos et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, comparable to results from the best quantum chemistry methods.

  13. Irradiated Benzene Ice Provides Clues to Meteoritic Organic Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael Patrick; Gerakines, Perry Alexander; Martin, Mildred G.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Peeters, Zan

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons account for a significant portion of the organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, as a component of both the low molecular weight, solvent-extractable compounds and the insoluble organic macromolecular material. Previous work has suggested that the aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites may have originated in the radiation-processed icy mantles of interstellar dust grains. Here we report new studies of the organic residue made from benzene irradiated at 19 K by 0.8 MeV protons. Polyphenyls with up to four rings were unambiguously identified in the residue by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to determine molecular composition, and accurate mass measurements suggested the presence of polyphenyls, partially hydrogenated polyphenyls, and other complex aromatic compounds. The profile of low molecular weight compounds in the residue compared well with extracts from the Murchison and Orgueil meteorites. These results are consistent with the possibility that solid phase radiation chemistry of benzene produced some of the complex aromatics found in meteorites.

  14. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the benzene dimer.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Sam; Cohen, R E

    2015-09-14

    We report an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory using different van der Waals functionals. In our quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of -2.3(4) and -2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the coupled-cluster theory through perturbative triplets/complete basis set limit is -2.65(2) kcal/mol [Miliordos et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, comparable to results from the best quantum chemistry methods.

  15. Crystal structure of poly[[{μ2-1,4-bis[(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)methyl]benzene}[μ6-5-(4-carboxylatophenoxy)isophthalato]-μ3-hydroxido-dicobalt(II)] 0.25-hydrate].

    PubMed

    Li, Yaping; Sun, Dajun; Ming, Julia; Han, Liying; Su, Guanfang

    2014-11-01

    The title coordination polymer, {[Co2(C15H7O7)(OH)(C14H14N4)]·0.25H2O} n , was synthesized under hydro-thermal conditions. The asymmetric unit contains two Co(2+) ions, one L (3-) anion originating from 5-(4-carb-oxy-phen-oxy)isophthalic acid (H3 L), one OH(-) ligand, one 1,4-bis-[(1H-imidazol-l-yl)meth-yl]benzene (bix) ligand and one disordered lattice water mol-ecule (occupancy 0.25). The two Co(2+) ions have different environments. One has an octa-hedral O4N2 coordin-ation sphere, defined by four O atoms from three carboxyl-ate groups and one OH(-) ligand, and two N atoms from two symmetry-related bix ligands. The other has a trigonal-bipyramidal O5 coordination sphere resulting from three carboxyl-ate groups and two OH(-) ligands. The dihedral angles between the two benzene rings in the L (3-) ligand and between the benzene ring and the two imidazole rings in the bix ligand are 67.05 (15), 75.27 (17) and 82.05 (17)°, respectively. Four neighbouring Co(2+) ions are linked by six carboxyl-ate groups and two μ 3-OH ligands, forming a butterfly-shaped secondary building unit (SBU). These SBUs are connected by L (3-) anions into layers parallel to (1-10). Adjacent layers are cross-linked by the bix ligands, forming a three-dimensional framework that has a bimodal (3,8)-connected tfz-d topology. The disordered lattice water mol-ecule is located in the voids of the framework and has O⋯O and O⋯N contacts of 2.81 (2) and 2.95 (2) Å, suggesting medium-strength hydrogen bonds. The title compound may be a good candidate for artificial eye lenses. PMID:25484783

  16. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  17. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  18. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  19. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  20. 46 CFR 197.565 - Notifying personnel of benzene hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... appendices A and B of this subpart or a MSDS on benzene meeting the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200(g) is... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notifying personnel of benzene hazards. 197.565 Section... AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.565 Notifying personnel of benzene hazards....

  1. EPR study of Gallium atoms in benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.A.; Joly, H.A.; Mile, B.; Sutcliffe, R. )

    1991-09-05

    An EPR study of a Ga atom matrix isolated in benzene at 77 K has revealed the presence of a paramagnetic species with the magnetic parameters {alpha}{sub zz}(69) = 256 MHz, {alpha}{sub xx}(69) = 270 MHz, {alpha}{sub yy}(69) = 284 MHz, {alpha}{sub zz}(71) = 325 MHz, {alpha}{sub xx}(71) = 343 MHz, {alpha}{sub yy}(71) = 361 Mhz, g{sub zz} = 1.9970, g{approximately}{sub xx} = 1.9750, and g{sub yy} = 1.9350. These parameters are consistent with a trapped atom or a weak Ga-benzene complex that has had the degeneracy of the Ga p orbitals lifted by interaction with the benzene matrix. This contrasts with Al in benzene which gives a mononuclear monoligand complex, Al(C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), with quite strong bonding between the metal atom and the ligand.

  2. Oxidation Mechanisms of Toluene and Benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1995-01-01

    An expanded and improved version of a previously published benzene oxidation mechanism is presented and shown to model published experimental data fairly successfully. This benzene submodel is coupled to a modified version of a toluene oxidation submodel from the recent literature. This complete mechanism is shown to successfully model published experimental toluene oxidation data for a highly mixed flow reactor and for higher temperature ignition delay times in a shock tube. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis showing the most important reactions is presented for both the benzene and toluene reacting systems. The NASA Lewis toluene mechanism's modeling capability is found to be equivalent to that of the previously published mechanism which contains a somewhat different benzene submodel.

  3. Photoionization spectrum of liquid benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Saik, V. O.; Lipsky, S. )

    1994-11-17

    The photocurrent from neat liquid benzene has been studied for excitation energies from threshold to 10.3 eV and for externally applied electric fields from 1 to 50 kV/cm. Using a power law fit to the energy dependence of the threshold current, an onset of [epsilon][sub t] = 7.65 [+-] 0.1 eV has been obtained. The field dependence was fit to an exponential radial probability density for thermalized ion-pair separation distances with an average separation distance of [r] = 23 [+-] 2 A at an excitation energy, [epsilon] of 8.86 eV (1.2 eV above threshold). Photocurrent was too weak to establish a dependence of [r] on excitation energy. The quantum yield for photocurrent at 8.86 eV was determined by comparison with the photocurrent from TMPD in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) to be 6.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]4] at zero field. From this, the intrinsic molecular ionization probability at [epsilon] = 8.86 eV was determined to be 0.6 [+-] 0.3. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Benzene-derived carbon nanothreads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.; Guthrie, Malcolm; Xu, En-Shi; Crespi, Vincent H.; Davidowski, Stephen K.; Cody, George D.; Alem, Nasim; Badding, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene and diamondoids have extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Compression-induced polymerization of aromatic molecules could provide a viable synthetic route to ordered carbon nanomaterials, but despite almost a century of study this approach has produced only amorphous products. Here we report recovery to ambient pressure of macroscopic quantities of a crystalline one- dimensional sp3 carbon nanomaterial formed by high-pressure solid-state reaction of benzene. X-ray and neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, solid-state NMR, transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations reveal close- packed bundles of subnanometre-diameter sp3-bonded carbon threads capped with hydrogen, crystalline in two dimensions and short-range ordered in the third. These nanothreads promise extraordinary properties such as strength and stiffness higher than that of sp2 carbon nanotubes or conven tional high-strength polymers. They may be the first member of a new class of ordered sp3 nanomaterials synthesized by kinetic control of high-pressure solid-state reactions.

  5. Benzene-derived carbon nanothreads.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbons, Thomas C; Guthrie, Malcolm; Xu, En-shi; Crespi, Vincent H; Davidowski, Stephen K; Cody, George D; Alem, Nasim; Badding, John V

    2015-01-01

    Low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene and diamondoids have extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Compression-induced polymerization of aromatic molecules could provide a viable synthetic route to ordered carbon nanomaterials, but despite almost a century of study this approach has produced only amorphous products. Here we report recovery to ambient pressure of macroscopic quantities of a crystalline one- dimensional sp(3) carbon nanomaterial formed by high-pressure solid-state reaction of benzene. X-ray and neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, solid-state NMR, transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations reveal close- packed bundles of subnanometre-diameter sp(3)-bonded carbon threads capped with hydrogen, crystalline in two dimensions and short-range ordered in the third. These nanothreads promise extraordinary properties such as strength and stiffness higher than that of sp(2) carbon nanotubes or conventional high-strength polymers. They may be the first member of a new class of ordered sp(3) nanomaterials synthesized by kinetic control of high-pressure solid-state reactions.

  6. Benzene and leukemia. An epidemiologic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rinsky, R.A.; Smith, A.B.; Hornung, R.; Filloon, T.G.; Young, R.J.; Okun, A.H.; Landrigan, P.J.

    1987-04-23

    To assess quantitatively the association between benzene exposure and leukemia, we examined the mortality rate of a cohort with occupational exposure to benzene. Cumulative exposure for each cohort member was estimated from historical air-sampling data and, when no sampling data existed, from interpolation on the basis of existing data. The overall standardized mortality ratio (a measure of relative risk multiplied by 100) for leukemia was 337 (95 percent confidence interval, 154 to 641), and that for multiple myeloma was 409 (95 percent confidence interval, 110 to 1047). With stratification according to levels of cumulative exposure, the standardized mortality ratios for leukemia increased from 109 to 322, 1186, and 6637 with increases in cumulative benzene exposure from less than 40 parts per million-years (ppm-years), to 40 to 199, 200 to 399, and 400 or more, respectively. A cumulative benzene exposure of 400 ppm-years is equivalent to a mean annual exposure of 10 ppm over a 40-year working lifetime; 10 ppm is the currently enforceable standard in the United States for occupational exposure to benzene. To examine the shape of the exposure-response relation, we performed a conditional logistic-regression analysis, in which 10 controls were matched to each cohort member with leukemia. From this model, it can be calculated that protection from benzene-induced leukemia would increase exponentially with any reduction in the permissible exposure limit.

  7. Determinants of indoor benzene in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. K.; Jantunen, M. J.; Künzli, N.; Kulinskaya, E.; Colvile, R.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M. J.

    This study identified the key determinants associated with the indoor benzene concentrations that were measured between 1996 and 2000 using the EXPOLIS protocol in the residences of six European cities, including Athens (Greece), Basel (Switzerland), Helsinki (Finland), Milan (Italy), Oxford (United Kingdom), and Prague (Czech Republic). Two consecutive days of home indoor and home outdoor measurements of benzene were carried out at the homes of adult participants on different dates and seasons during the sampling period. Regression models, with interactions searched by all-possible subset method, were used to assess the city effects and the determinants of home indoor benzene (adjusted R2=0.57, n=412). Outdoor benzene concentrations, outdoor temperature, wind speed, the use of anti-moth products, and indoor smoking in terms of number of cigarettes consumed per day were shown to be the key determinants of indoor benzene concentrations. The model was further used to predict the indoor benzene levels in cities. Non-linear relationships were commonly found, indicating that a unit change in the indoor concentration cannot be simply estimated by a proportional change of the determinant, and the pattern of relationships could be differed in different places. This finding is important in formulating indoor air quality guidelines as well as calculating an accurate health risk estimate based on the estimates of population's lifetime exposure levels.

  8. Meeting benzene regulations through new desalting applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schantz, S.; Garcia, J.; Mourer, J.

    1995-09-01

    In the past, the industry has studied the impact of changing desalting variables on total oil undercarry. With the advent of the NESHAP regulations, benzene measurement is performed on a scheduled basis but not observed as desalting variables are changed and optimized. Benzene is normally present in crude at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 ppm, and it is extremely soluble in water: up to 1,800 mg/l at standard temperature and pressure. The NESHAP benzene standard has created a strong interest in real-time experiments to clarify the factors that affect benzene concentrations in desalter effluent water. The work reported on in this paper attempts to answer the following questions: can the benzene concentration in desalter wastewater be determined reliably in real time so that desalter operational parameters can be tuned to minimize this concentration; how do changes in four key desalter variables--temperature, chemical dosage, wash water rate, and mix-valve pressure differential, affect benzene concentration in the effluent water?

  9. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  10. Single-Crystal X-ray Structures of conductive π-Stacking Dimers of Tetrakis(alkylthio)benzene Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Gao, Feng; Yang, Wuqin

    2016-01-01

    Salts containing radical cations of 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(isopropylthio)benzene (TPB) and 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(ethylthio) benzene (TEB) have been successfully synthesized with . These newly synthesized salts have been characterized by UV-Vis absorption, EPR spectroscopy, conductivity measurement, single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis as well as DFT calculation. This study raises the first crystal structure of conductive π-stacking radical cation with single phenyl ring and reveals their conductivity has relationship with the stack structure which affected by the substituent. PMID:27403720

  11. Single-Crystal X-ray Structures of conductive π-Stacking Dimers of Tetrakis(alkylthio)benzene Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Gao, Feng; Yang, Wuqin

    2016-07-01

    Salts containing radical cations of 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(isopropylthio)benzene (TPB) and 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(ethylthio) benzene (TEB) have been successfully synthesized with . These newly synthesized salts have been characterized by UV-Vis absorption, EPR spectroscopy, conductivity measurement, single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis as well as DFT calculation. This study raises the first crystal structure of conductive π-stacking radical cation with single phenyl ring and reveals their conductivity has relationship with the stack structure which affected by the substituent.

  12. Single-Crystal X-ray Structures of conductive π-Stacking Dimers of Tetrakis(alkylthio)benzene Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Gao, Feng; Yang, Wuqin

    2016-07-11

    Salts containing radical cations of 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(isopropylthio)benzene (TPB) and 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(ethylthio) benzene (TEB) have been successfully synthesized with . These newly synthesized salts have been characterized by UV-Vis absorption, EPR spectroscopy, conductivity measurement, single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis as well as DFT calculation. This study raises the first crystal structure of conductive π-stacking radical cation with single phenyl ring and reveals their conductivity has relationship with the stack structure which affected by the substituent.

  13. Single-Crystal X-ray Structures of conductive π-Stacking Dimers of Tetrakis(alkylthio)benzene Radical Cations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Gao, Feng; Yang, Wuqin

    2016-01-01

    Salts containing radical cations of 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(isopropylthio)benzene (TPB) and 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(ethylthio) benzene (TEB) have been successfully synthesized with . These newly synthesized salts have been characterized by UV-Vis absorption, EPR spectroscopy, conductivity measurement, single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis as well as DFT calculation. This study raises the first crystal structure of conductive π-stacking radical cation with single phenyl ring and reveals their conductivity has relationship with the stack structure which affected by the substituent. PMID:27403720

  14. Dimerization kinetics and products of. alpha. -substituted o-quinodimethanes derived from benzene and furan

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Man-kit.

    1992-07-20

    Effects of the {alpha}-substitutions on the termini of the reactive diene unit of o-quinodimethanes revealed a non-concerted mechanism for furan-based and benzene-based o-quinodimethane (o-QDM) dimerizations. In section one, the coexistence of the cisoid and transoid transition states in the diradical formation step is evidenced by the stereochemistry of the dimers. In view of the results of the furan-based o-QDM dimerizauons, it is believed that the regioselectivity in the diradical cyclization step is controlled mainly by the interaction between the active sites on the furan moieties in the diradical ring closure step, not by the intemal bond rotations of the carbon chain of the diradical intermediate. In section two, it was found that the trend of the regioselectivity. along the size of the {alpha}-substituents, of benzene-based o-QDM dimerizations is opposite to that of the Diels-Alder reactions. On the basis of the trends, it is suggested that the Diels-Alder reaction mechanism of benzene-based o-QDM's is concerted while the dimerization mechanism of benzene-based o-QDM's is stepwise. Because of their similar activation parameters, it is proposed that the parent o-xylylene and other o-xylylenes dimerize via a similar two step, diradical mechanism.

  15. Adsorptive treatment of shale-tar benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, R.V.; Kharitonova, L.K.

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the use of adsorbents to remove thiophene from benzene. A nickel-substituted type X zeolite has been developed as a thiophene-selective adsorbent. Unsaturates were removed from the benzene by using A-4M microbead adsorbent. The optimal treating conditions were selected in pilot-unit tests at a pressure p=2 MPa, using a mathematically designed experiment. The A-4M adsorbent can be used repeatedly, with a service life of 6 months. The clarified benzene was treated at room temperature, passing the benzene at a velocity of 0.3 cm/min through a bed of NiCaX, which adsorbs unsaturated hydrocarbons along with the thiophene. The final stage in the treatment is the removal of saturated hydrocarbons from the benzene on commercial CaA zeolite in the vapor phase at 100/sup 0/C with a feed velocity of 0.3 cm/min. The hydrocarbons were desorbed from the void spaces of the zeolite with n-pentane, subsequently removing the desorbent by conventional fractionation.

  16. Ammonium 4-meth­oxy­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Sebastián; Doctorovich, Fabio; Baggio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The mol­ecular structure of the title compound, NH4 +·C7H7O4S−, is featureless [the methoxy C atom deviating 0.173 (6) Å from the phenyl mean plane] with inter­atomic distances and angles in the expected ranges. The main feature of inter­est is the packing mode. Hydro­philic (SO3 and NH4) and hydro­phobic (PhOCH3) parts in the structure segregate, the former inter­acting through a dense hydrogen-bonding scheme, leading to a well connected two-dimensional structure parallel to (100) and the latter hydro­phobic groups acting as spacers for an inter­planar separation of c/2 = 10.205 (2) Å. In spite of being aligned along [110], the benzene rings stack in a far from parallel fashion [viz. consecutive ring centers determine a broken line with a 164.72 (12)° zigzag angle], thus preventing any possible π–π inter­action. PMID:22798885

  17. New adjacent Bis-tetrahydrofuran Annonaceous acetogenins from Annona muricata.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Chou, Chi-Jung; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2003-03-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation led to the isolation of two new Annonaceous acetogenins, annocatacin A ( 1). and annocatacin B ( 2). from the seeds and the leaves, respectively, of Annona muricata. Compounds 1 and 2 are the first examples where the adjacent bis-tetrahydrofuran ring system is located at C-15. The new structures were elucidated and characterized by spectral and chemical methods. Both Annonaceous acetogenins 1 and 2 showed significant in vitro cytotoxicity toward the human hepatoma cell lines, Hep G2 and 2,2,15, and were compared with the known adjacent bis-tetrahydrofuran acetogenins, neoannonin ( 3). desacetyluvaricin ( 4). bullatacin ( 5). asimicin ( 6). annoglaucin ( 7). squamocin ( 8). and rollimusin ( 9).

  18. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  19. Personal benzene vapor detection device. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glatkowski, P.; Druy, M.

    1992-07-01

    A badge was developed as a personal vapor detector to record the cumulative exposure of an individual to benzene vapor. The badge consisted of an optical fiber, small sections of which were coated with a membrane specific for the adsorption of benzene vapor. Membranes made of polyethylene and nylon, and filled with zeolite were applied to a silver halide fiber. Following exposure, the fiber was subjected to Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. The coating successfully retained the benzene vapor for several days. A concentration of 100,000 parts per million (ppm) could be detected. Concentrations of dichlorobenzene of 80,000ppm were also detected. Unique absorbance peaks were used to distinguish the two compounds. It was possible to reuse the sensor. However, the desired detectability range of 1 to 100ppm was not met.

  20. Gas phase nitrosation of substituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechamps, Noémie; Gerbaux, Pascal; Flammang, Robert; Bouchoux, Guy; Nam, Pham-Cam; Nguyen, Minh-Tho

    2004-03-01

    Using a combination of tandem mass spectrometric experiments (ion-molecule reactions, collisional activation, neutralization-reionization, MS/MS/MS) and theoretical calculations, protonated substituted benzenes are demonstrated to readily react with neutral t-butyl nitrite by the formation of stable complexes linking ionized nitric oxide to the benzene derivatives. The overall process is proposed to involve the concomitant elimination of neutral 2-methyl-2-propanol. Proton-bound dimers are proposed to intervene as the key-intermediates in these reactions, which also competitively produce protonated t-butyl nitrite. All the experiments were performed in a single hybrid tandem mass spectrometer of sector-quadrupole-sector configuration.

  1. Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions

    SciTech Connect

    G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov

    2009-05-15

    A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

  2. The pyrolysis of toluene and ethyl benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolovskaya, V. G.; Samgin, V. F.; Kalinenko, R. A.; Nametkin, N. S.

    1987-01-01

    The pyrolysis of toluene at 850 to 950 C gave mainly H2, CH4, and benzene; PhEt at 650 to 750 C gave mainly H2, CH4, styrene, benzene, and toluene. The rate constants for PhEt pyrolysis were 1000 times higher than those for toluene pyrolysis; the chain initiation rate constants differed by the same factor. The activation energy differences were 46 kJ/mole for the total reaction and 54 kJ/mole for chain initiation. The chain length was evaluated for the PhEt case (10 + or - 2).

  3. Urinary excretion of unmetabolized benzene as an indicator of benzene exposure.

    PubMed

    Ghittori, S; Fiorentino, M L; Maestri, L; Cordioli, G; Imbriani, M

    1993-03-01

    Benzene concentrations in urine samples (Cu, ng/L) from 110 workers exposed to benzene in chemical plants and gasoline pumps were determined by injecting urine supernate into a gas chromatograph. The urine was saturated with anhydrous N2SO4 to facilitate the passage of benzene in the air over the urine. The solvent was stripped from the urine surface and concentrated on an adsorbent substrate (Carbotrap tube) by means of a suction pump (flow rate 150 ml/m). Wash-up of the head space was achieved by simultaneous intake of filtered air through charcoal. Benzene was thermically desorbed and injected in a column (thermal tube disorder, Supelco; 370 degrees C thermal flash; borosilicate capillary glass column SPB-1, 60 m length, 0.75 mm ID, 1 microns film thickness; GC Dani 8580-FID). Benzene concentrations in the urine from 40 non-exposed subjects (20 smokers > 20 cigarette/d and 20 nonsmokers) were also determined [median value of 790 ng/L (10.17 nmol/L) and 131 ng/L (1.70 nmol/L), respectively]. The 8-h time-weighted exposure intensity (Cl, micrograms/m3) of individual workers was monitored by means of charcoal tubes. The median value for exposure to benzene was 736 micrograms/m3 (9.42 mumol/m3) [geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 2.99; range 64 micrograms/m3 (0.82 mumol/m3) to 13,387 micrograms/m3) (171.30 mumol/m3)]. The following linear correlation was found between benzene concentrations in urine (Cu, ng/L) and benzene concentrations in the breathing zone (Cl, micrograms/m3): log(Cu) = 0.645 x log(Cl) + 1.399 r = .559, n = 110, p < .0001 With exclusion of workers who smoked from the study, the correlation between air benzene concentration and benzene measured in urine was: log(Cu) = 0.872 x log(Cl) + 0.6 r = .763, n = 63, p < .0001 The study results indicate that the urinary level of benzene is an indicator of occupational exposure to benzene.

  4. Disodium 4,5,6-trihy­droxy­benzene-1,3-disulfonate dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Song, E.; Podschun, J.; Wilberts, H.; Beginn, U.; Reuter, H.

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, 2Na+·C6H4O9S2 2−·2H2O, the benzene rings of the 4,5,6-trihy­droxy­benzene-1,3-disulfonate ions, which are stacked parallel to each other forming rods parallel to the a axis, are slightly deformed (planarity, symmetry) mainly because of the high degree of substitution. The two sodium ions, located within pockets of the anion rods, are coordinated by six and seven O atoms, resulting in octa­hedral and penta­gonal-bipyramidal coordinations, respectively. In addition to these coordinative bonds towards sodium, an extended network of intra- and inter­molecular hydrogen bonds occurs. PMID:21587412

  5. Using 13C-labeled benzene and Raman gas spectroscopy to investigate respiration and biodegradation kinetics following soil contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, Tobias; Popp, Juergen; Frosch, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damages. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Cavity enhanced Raman gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of indigenous soil bacteria to a sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. 13C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column (sampled from Hainich National Park, Germany) in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving 12CO2 and O2 - from the microbial process of benzene degradation, which ultimately forms 13CO2.1 The respiratory quotient (RQ) of 0.98 decreased significantly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with maximum 13CO2 concentration rates (0.63 μ mol m-2 s-1), indicating highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into 13CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore.1 The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration. In summary, this study shows the potential of combining Raman gas spectroscopy and stable isotopes to follow soil microbial biodegradation dynamics while simultaneously monitoring the underlying respiration behavior. Support by the Collaborative Research Center 1076 Aqua Diva is kindly acknowledged. We thank Beate Michalzik for soil analysis and discussion. 1. T. Jochum, B. Michalzik, A. Bachmann, J. Popp and T. Frosch, Analyst, 2015, 140, 3143-3149.

  6. Personal reflections on 50 years of study of benzene toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Parke, D V

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of benzene is reviewed, and the objectives of a quantitative balance study begun in 1945 are outlined; problems of toxicology and metabolism research of some 50 years ago are considered. The quantitative metabolism of 14C-benzene in the rabbit is annotated and compared with that of unlabeled benzene quantified by nonisotopic methods. The anomalies of phenylmercapturic acid and trans-trans-muconic acid as metabolites of benzene are examined in detail by isotopic and nonisotopic methods; these compounds are true but minor metabolites of benzene. Oxygen radicals are involved in both the metabolism of benzene and its toxicity; the roles of CYP2E1, the redox cycling of quinone metabolites, glutathione oxidation, and oxidative stress in the unique radiomimetic, hematopoietic toxicity of benzene are discussed. Differences between the toxicity of benzene and the halobenzenes are related to fundamental differences in their electronic structures and to the consequent pathways of metabolic activation and detoxication. PMID:9118881

  7. Effect of carbon and hydrogen isotopic substitutions on the thermal diffusion of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal diffusion factor of the benzene/carbon 13 substituted benzene pair and of the benzene/deuterated benzene pair are reported. The results show some interesting effects of mass distribution. (AIP)

  8. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage and rearrangement of benzene by a trinuclear titanium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaowei; Shima, Takanori; Hou, Zhaomin

    2014-08-01

    The cleavage of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds by transition metals is of great interest, especially as this transformation can be used to produce fuels and other industrially important chemicals from natural resources such as petroleum and biomass. Carbon-carbon bonds are quite stable and are consequently unreactive under many reaction conditions. In the industrial naphtha hydrocracking process, the aromatic carbon skeleton of benzene can be transformed to methylcyclopentane and acyclic saturated hydrocarbons through C-C bond cleavage and rearrangement on the surfaces of solid catalysts. However, these chemical transformations usually require high temperatures and are fairly non-selective. Microorganisms can degrade aromatic compounds under ambient conditions, but the mechanistic details are not known and are difficult to mimic. Several transition metal complexes have been reported to cleave C-C bonds in a selective fashion in special circumstances, such as relief of ring strain, formation of an aromatic system, chelation-assisted cyclometallation and β-carbon elimination. However, the cleavage of benzene by a transition metal complex has not been reported. Here we report the C-C bond cleavage and rearrangement of benzene by a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex. The benzene ring is transformed sequentially to a methylcyclopentenyl and a 2-methylpentenyl species through the cleavage of the aromatic carbon skeleton at the multi-titanium sites. Our results suggest that multinuclear titanium hydrides could serve as a unique platform for the activation of aromatic molecules, and may facilitate the design of new catalysts for the transformation of inactive aromatics.

  9. Benzene derivatives produced by Fusarium graminearum - Short communication.

    PubMed

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Setshedi, Itumeleng

    2015-06-01

    Using NMR spectroscopy benzene derivatives were detected in mycelia of Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize. In previous studies F. graminearum was found to cause cancer to humans and benzene derivatives were detected in breath of cancer sufferers. Surprisingly, no study found benzene derivatives to be the cancerous agents in F. graminearum. In this study we detected benzene derivatives in F. graminearum and propose to study their role as cancer agents.

  10. Basin-ring spacing on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.; Spudis, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radial spacing between concentric rings of impact basins that lack central peaks is statistically similar and nonrandom on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars, both inside and outside the main ring. One spacing interval, (2.0 ?? 0.3)0.5D, or an integer multiple of it, dominates most basin rings. Three analytical approaches yield similar results from 296 remapped or newly mapped rings of 67 multi-ringed basins: least-squares of rank-grouped rings, least-squares of rank and ring diameter for each basin, and averaged ratios of adjacent rings. Analysis of 106 rings of 53 two-ring basins by the first and third methods yields an integer multiple (2 ??) of 2.00.5D. There are two exceptions: (1) Rings adjacent to the main ring of multi-ring basins are consistently spaced at a slightly, but significantly, larger interval, (2.1 ?? 0.3)0.5D; (2) The 88 rings of 44 protobasins (large peak-plus-inner-ring craters) are spaced at an entirely different interval (3.3 ?? 0.6)0.5D. The statistically constant and target-invariant spacing of so many rings suggests that this characteristic may constrain formational models of impact basins on the terrestrial planets. The key elements of such a constraint include: (1) ring positions may not have been located by the same process(es) that formed ring topography; (2) ring location and emplacement of ring topography need not be coeval; (3) ring location, but not necessarily the mode of ring emplacement, reflects one process that operated at the time of impact; and (4) the process yields similarly-disposed topographic features that are spatially discrete at 20.5D intervals, or some multiple, rather than continuous. These four elements suggest that some type of wave mechanism dominates the location, but not necessarily the formation, of basin rings. The waves may be standing, rather than travelling. The ring topography itself may be emplaced at impact by this and/or other mechanisms and may reflect additional, including post-impact, influences. ?? 1987

  11. Behavioral changes in mice following benzene inhalation.

    PubMed

    Evans, H L; Dempster, A M; Snyder, C A

    1981-01-01

    Although benzene is an important occupational health hazard and a carcinogen, the possibility that behavioral changes may forewarn of the later-occurring hematological changes has not been investigated. A time-sampling protocol was used to quantify the occurrence of 7 categories of behavior in the homecage following daily 6-hr exposures to two strains of adult mice (CD1 and C57BL/6J). The behavioral categories were stereotypic behavior, sleeping, resting, eating, grooming, locomotion, and fighting. The inhalation exposures were designed to reflect occupational exposure. Dynamic vapor exposure techniques in standard inhalation chambers were employed. Exposure to 300 or 900 ppm benzene increased the occurrence of eating and grooming and reduced the number of mice that were sleeping or resting. The responses to benzene of both the CD1 and the C57 strains were similar. The positive findings with benzene inhalation indicate the utility of behavioral investigations into the toxicology of inhaled organic solvents. The methods described herein illustrate an objective observation of animal behavior that is capable of documenting toxicity and of guiding detailed follow-up studies aimed at mechanism of action.

  12. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF BENZENE (NONCANCER EFFECTS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene, also known as benzol, is widely used as an industrial solvent, as an intermediate in chemical syntheses, and as a component of gasoline; hence, the potential for human exposure is great. The emphasis of this document is a discussion of the noncancer adverse healt...

  13. Electroencephalographic findings in workers exposed to benzene.

    PubMed

    Kellerová, V

    1985-01-01

    Preventive EEG examination was carried out in 40 workers significantly exposed to benzene. The EEG findings were compared with those of a control group of 48 healthy persons, a group of 110 workers significantly exposed to toluene and xylene and a group of 236 workers exposed to vinyl chloride. The individuals exposed to benzene exhibited 22.5% of abnormal and 45% threshold findings, the abnormalities being episodic, diffuse or a combination of the two. The effect of benzene entailed a frequent (32.5%) occurrence of a characteristic frequency lability. Sleep phenomena were found in a total of 60% cases (37.5% cases reached stage 1 B3 while 15% reached stage 2 according to Roth [14]). The rapid onset of deeper sleep stages (in 30% cases) is considered typical for benzene exposure. The photic driving response often had an extended frequency range (a total of 61.1%, to beta frequencies only in 30.55%, to both beta and theta frequencies also in 30.55% of cases). The different EEG features characteristic of the neurotoxic action of various types of organic solvents make possible a more efficient diagnostics of the effects of these chemicals on the CNS. PMID:4086812

  14. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  15. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  16. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  17. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  18. 46 CFR 153.1060 - Benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benzene. 153.1060 Section 153.1060 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Special Cargo Procedures § 153.1060...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  7. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1350 - Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl... Substances § 721.1350 Benzene, (1-methylethyl)(2-phenylethyl)-. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1210 - Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. 721.1210... Substances § 721.1210 Benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as benzene, (2-chloroethoxy)- (PMN P-87-1471) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1187 - Bis(imidoethylene) benzene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. 721.1187... Substances § 721.1187 Bis(imidoethylene) benzene. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance bis(imidoethylene)benzene (PMN P-93-1447) is subject to...

  19. [Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopic Analysis of Aromatics from One Ring to Four Rings].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hai-feng; Yue, Zong-yu; Chen, Bei-ling; Yao, Ming-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to distinguish small aromatics preferably, a Nd : YAG Laser was used to supply an excitation laser, which was adjusted to 0.085 J x cm(-2) at 266 nm. Benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene and chrysene were used as the representative of different rings aromatics. The fluorescence emission spectra were researched for each aromatic hydrocarbon and mixtures by Laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Results showed that the rings number determined the fluorescence emission spectra, and the structure with same rings number did not affect the emission fluorescence spectrum ranges. This was due to the fact that the absorption efficiency difference at 266 nm resulted in that the fluorescence intensities of each aromatic hydrocarbon with same rings number were different and the fluorescence intensities difference were more apparently with aromatic ring number increasing. When the absorption efficiency was similar at 266 nm and the concentrations of each aromatic hydrocarbon were same, the fluorescence intensities were increased with aromatic ring number increasing. With aromatic ring number increasing, the fluorescence spectrum and emission peak wavelength were all red-shifted from ultraviolet to visible and the fluorescence spectrum range was also wider as the absorption efficiency was similar. The fluorescence emission spectra from one to four rings could be discriminated in the following wavelengths, 275 to 320 nm, 320 to 375 nm, 375 to 425 nm, 425 to 556 nm, respectively. It can be used for distinguish the type of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as it exists in single type. As PAHs are usually exist in a variety of different rings number at the same time, the results for each aromatic hydrocarbon may not apply to the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures. For the aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures, results showed that the one- or two-ring PAHs in mixtures could not be detected by fluorescence as three- or four-ring PAHs existed in mixture

  20. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ring motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics that may

  1. 1,2-Bis[(3,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)meth­yl]benzene

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Lara C.; Guzei, Ilia A.; Segapelo, Tebogo V.; Darkwa, James

    2012-01-01

    The title compound, C38H30N4, a potentially mono- and bidentate ligand, does not seem to form palladium complexes similar to other poly(pyrazol-1-ylmeth­yl)benzenes due to the large steric size of the phenyl substituents on the pyrazole rings. The pyrazole rings have a 21.09 (5)° angle between their mean planes and exhibit a trans-like geometry in which the in-plane lone pairs of electrons on the 2-N nitrogen atoms point in opposite directions. PMID:22905009

  2. N-(2,5-Dimethoxy­phen­yl)-4-nitro­benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Yao; Qian, Shan; Li, Xiao-Cen; Wu, Yong

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, C14H14N2O6S, is an inter­mediate for the synthesis of β-3-adrenergic receptor agonists. The two meth­oxy groups are approximately coplanar with the attached benzene ring [C—O—C—C = −2.7 (4) and 9.4 (4)°]. The dihedral angle between the two aromatic rings is 67.16 (12)°. An intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into chains along the c axis by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21583621

  3. Resonance Raman enhancement of phenyl ring vibrational modes in phenyl iron complex of myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Lin, S H; Yu, N T

    1990-04-01

    Resonance Raman spectra are reported for the organometallic phenyl-FeIII complexes of horse heart myoglobin. We observed the resonance enhancement of the ring vibrational modes of the bound phenyl group. They were identified at 642, 996, 1,009, and 1,048 cm-1, which shift to 619, 961, 972, and 1,030 cm-1, respectively, upon phenyl 13C substitution. The lines at 642 and 996 cm-1 are assigned, respectively, as in-plane phenyl ring deformation mode (derived from benzene vibration No. 6a at 606 cm-1) and out-of-plane CH deformation (derived from benzene vibration No. 5 at 995 cm-1). The frequencies of the ring "breathing" modes at 1,009 and 1,048 cm-1 are higher than the corresponding ones in phenylalanine (at 1,004 and 1,033 cm-1) and benzene (at 992 and 1,010 cm-1), indicating that the ring C--C bonds are strengthened (or shortened) when coordinated to the heme iron. The excitation profiles of these phenyl ring modes and a porphyrin ring vibrational mode at 674 cm-1 exhibit peaks near its Soret absorption maximum at 431 nm. This appears to indicate that these phenyl ring modes may be enhanced via resonance with the Soret pi-pi transition. The FeIII--C bond stretching vibration has not been detected with excitation wavelengths in the 406.7-457.9-nm region.

  4. Effects of ethanol on benzene degradation under denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaoguo; Li, Yunfeng; Hui, Lin; Tan, Ying; Jin, Song

    2009-02-01

    As a popular fuel oxygenate, ethanol frequently co-occurs with petroleum hydrocarbons, including benzene, in groundwater that is contaminated by gasoline. Anaerobic pathways have been identified in benzene biodegradation. Limited reports focus on denitrifying degradation of benzene; however, the role of ethanol in this pathway is unknown. This study investigated the effects of ethanol on benzene degradation under denitrifying condition by using groundwater and sediment samples collected from locations with known history of benzene contamination. Results indicate that benzene can be biodegraded under denitrifying conditions. When concentrations of nitrate were in the range of 480-920 mg/L, there is a critical value in ethanol concentration:Ethanol at concentration less than the critical value enhanced the denitrifying degradation of benzene over a period of time; in contrast, ethanol at concentration higher than the critical value, which was degraded before benzene, demonstrated an inhibitory effect. And the critical value varied with nitrate concentration. It appears that the role of ethanol may be closely associated with its own and nitrate concentrations. Two mathematical equations were established based on the data and may be used to determine if ethanol presents an enhancing or inhibitory effect on denitrification of benzene. The roles of ethanol in COD/NO(3) (-)-N and the subsequent denitrification of benzene were also studied. An optimal COD/NO(3) (-)-N ratio of 1.32 was obtained for this testing system, in which the highest rate of benzene degradation can be achieved under denitrifying conditions.

  5. Refiners have several options for reducing gasoline benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Goelzer, A.R.; Hernandez-Robinson, A. ); Ram, S. ); Chin, A.A. ); Harandi, M.N.; Smith, C.M. )

    1993-09-13

    Although the linkage between gasoline benzene content and evaporative, running, and tailpipe emission is not yet defined, the U.S. 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate a benzene content of less than 1.0 vol% in reformulated gasolines. Likewise, the California Air Resources Board plans to restrict benzene to less than about 0.8 vol %. Mobil Research and Development Corp. and Badger Co. Inc. have developed several alternatives for reducing benzene levels in gasoline. Where benzene extraction is viable and maximum catalytic reformer hydrogen is needed, the companies' cumene and ethylbenzene processes are desirable. Mobil's benzene reduction process can be an alternative to benzene hydrosaturation. All of these processes utilize low-value offgas from the fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit.

  6. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  7. Mechanical seal having a double-tier mating ring

    DOEpatents

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Somanchi, Anoop K.

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method to enhance the overall performance of mechanical seals in one of the following ways: by reducing seal face wear, by reducing the contact surface temperature, or by increasing the life span of mechanical seals. The apparatus is a mechanical seal (e.g., single mechanical seals, double mechanical seals, tandem mechanical seals, bellows, pusher mechanical seals, and all types of rotating and reciprocating machines) comprising a rotating ring and a double-tier mating ring. In a preferred embodiment, the double-tier mating ring comprises a first and a second stationary ring that together form an agitation-inducing, guided flow channel to allow for the removal of heat generated at the seal face of the mating ring by channeling a coolant entering the mating ring to a position adjacent to and in close proximity with the interior surface area of the seal face of the mating ring.

  8. Risk analysis for worker exposure to benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, William H.; Flowers, Roxanne E.

    1992-05-01

    Cancer risk factors (characterized by route, dose, dose rate per kilogram, fraction of lifetime exposed, species, and sex) were derived for workers exposed to benzene via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure at the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) and at leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites were evaluated. At the current PEL of 1 ppm, the theoretical lifetime excess risk of cancer from benzene inhalation is ten per 1000. The theoretical lifetime excess risk for worker inhalation exposure at LUST sites ranged from 10 to 40 per 1000. These results indicate that personal protection should be required. The theoretical lifetime excess risk due to soil ingestion is five to seven orders of magnitude less than the inhalation risks.

  9. Benzene inhalation produces leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Cronkite, E P; Bullis, J; Inoue, T; Drew, R T

    1984-09-15

    Female C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 300 ppm benzene 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 16 weeks and then held for lifetime observation. Sixty-four weeks after commencement of the study, 10 of 90 exposed mice had died as opposed to only 1 of 88 controls. Of the 10 exposed mice that died, 6 had thymic lymphomas, 2 had unspecified lymphomas, 1 was killed when moribund and found leukemia-free, and 1 was undiagnosed due to autolysis and partial cannibalization. The single dead control animal did not have lymphoma or leukemia. These data provide proof of the leukemogenicity of benzene in female C57Bl/6 mice.

  10. Benzene contamination at a metal plating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, B. A.; Burston, M. R.

    2005-08-01

    A metal plating facility in central Kentucky was required to complete a RCRA Facility Investigation to address a number of Solid Waste Management Units at the site. Twenty monitoring wells were installed at the facility. Ground water from the wells was sampled for total and dissolved metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid extractable compounds, base neutral compounds, and volatile organic compounds. Unexpectedly, relatively large concentrations of benzene, up to 120 μg/l, were detected in samples from some of the wells, including wells that should have been hydraulically upgradient from the facility. As a result of the detection of benzene, the facility completed an investigation to identify the source. A nearby facility had completed a gasoline underground storage tank (UST) closure at about the time of the installation of the 20 wells. Reportedly the UST had small holes when removed. Three potential pathways of migration (a ditch, sanitary sewer, and a sink hole) from the nearby facility to the metal-plating facility and residual soils with very large concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes have been identified.

  11. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-12-31

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. They probably entered the water as leachates from chemical waste dumps and as effluents from manufacturing. Hexachlorobenzene and pentachlorobenzene are commonly present in Herring gull (Larus argentatus) eggs from the Great Lakes, and some of the isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene are occasionally detected at low concentrations. Hexachlorobenzene, which was formerly used as a fungicide, has been the most thoroughly studied chlorinated benzene, and has been detected in many species. Its use as a fungicide in the United States was canceled in 1984. Since about 1975 hexachlorobenzene has been formed mainly in the production of chlorinated solvents. It is highly persistent in the environment and some species are poisoned by hexachlorobenzene at very low chronic dietary exposures. As little as 1 ppm in the diet of mink (Mustela vison) reduced the birth weights of young, and 5 ppm in the diet of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) caused slight liver damage. This paper describes a long-term (26 wk) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to length of exposure and three 8 wk experiments relating concentration to the concentration in soil the soil organic matter content, and the degree of chlorination. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Diffusion of Benzene and Alkylbenzenes in n-Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Register, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The translational diffusion constants, D, of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes have been determined in four n-alkanes at room temperature using capillary flow techniques. The alkylbenzenes are toluene, ethylbenzene, 1-phenylpropane, 1-phenylpentane, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenylundecane, 1-phenyltetradecane, and 1-phenylheptadecane. The n-alkanes are n-nonane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane. Ratios of the solutes' D values are independent of solvent and in general agreement with the predictions of diffusion models for cylinders and lollipops. For the latter, an alkylbenzene's phenyl ring is the lollipop's candy; the alkyl chain is its handle. A model that considers the solutes to be spheres with volumes determined by the van der Waals increments of their constituent atoms is not in agreement with experiment. The diffusion constants of 1-alkene and n-alkane solutes in n-alkane solvents also are compared with the cylinder model; reasonably good agreement is found. The n-alkanes are relatively extended, and this appears to be the case for the alkyl chains of the 1-alkenes and alkylbenzenes as well. PMID:26417941

  13. Anaerobic degradation of alkylated benzenes in denitrifying laboratory aquifer columns.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, E P; Zeyer, J; Eicher, P; Schwarzenbach, R P

    1988-02-01

    Toluene and m-xylene were rapidly mineralized in an anaerobic laboratory aquifer column operated under continuous-flow conditions with nitrate as an electron acceptor. The oxidation of toluene and m-xylene was coupled with the reduction of nitrate, and mineralization was confirmed by trapping 14CO2 evolved from 14C-ring-labeled substrates. Substrate degradation also took place when nitrous oxide replaced nitrate as an electron acceptor, but decomposition was inhibited in the presence of molecular oxygen or after the substitution of nitrate by nitrite. The m-xylene-adapted microorganisms in the aquifer column degraded toluene, benzaldehyde, benzoate, m-toluylaldehyde, m-toluate, m-cresol, p-cresol, and p-hydroxybenzoate but were unable to metabolize benzene, naphthalene, methylcyclohexane, and 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane. Isotope-dilution experiments suggested benzoate as an intermediate formed during anaerobic toluene metabolism. The finding that the highly water-soluble nitrous oxide served as electron acceptor for the anaerobic mineralization of some aromatic hydrocarbons may offer attractive options for the in situ restoration of polluted aquifers.

  14. Phenol production in benzene/air plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Role of radical and ionic routes.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Daniela; Franceschi, Pietro; Guella, Graziano; Tosi, Paolo

    2006-06-29

    Benzene can be efficiently converted into phenol when it is treated by either corona or dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas operating at atmospheric pressure in air or mixtures of N(2) and O(2). Phenol produced by corona discharge in an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (APCI) has been detected as the corresponding radical cation C(6)H(5)OH(+*) at m/z 94 by an ion trap mass spectrometer. On the other hand, phenol has been observed also as neutral product by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS) after treatment in a DBD plasma. Experiments aimed at shading light on the elementary processes responsible for benzene oxidation were carried out (i) by changing the composition of the gas in the corona discharge source; (ii) by using isotopically labeled reagents; and (iii) by investigating some relevant ion-molecule reactions (i.e. C(6)H(6)(+*) + O(2), C(6)H(5)(+) + O(2)) via selected guided ion beam measurements and with the help of ab initio calculations. The results of our approach show that ionic mechanisms do not play a significant role in phenol production, which can be better explained by radical reactions resulting in oxygen addition to the benzene ring followed by 1,2 H transfer.

  15. QM/MM modeling of benzene hydroxylation in human cytochrome P450 2C9.

    PubMed

    Bathelt, Christine M; Mulholland, Adrian J; Harvey, Jeremy N

    2008-12-18

    The mechanism of benzene hydroxylation was investigated in the realistic enzyme environment of the human CYP 2C9 by using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations of the whole reaction profile using the B3LYP method to describe the QM region. The calculated QM/MM barriers for addition of the active species Compound I to benzene are consistent with experimental rate constants for benzene metabolism in CYP 2E1. In contrast to gas-phase model calculations, our results suggest that competing side-on and face-on geometries of arene addition may both occur in the case of aromatic ring oxidation in cytochrome P450s. QM/MM profiles for three different rearrangement pathways of the initially formed sigma-adduct, leading to formation of epoxide, ketone, and an N-protonated porphyrin species, were calculated. Our results suggest that epoxide and ketone products form with comparable ease in the face-on pathway, whereas epoxide formation is preferred in the side-on pathway. Additionally, rearrangement to the N-protonated porphyrin species was found to be competitive with side-on epoxide formation. This suggests that overall, the competition between formation of epoxide and phenol final products in P450 oxidation of aromatic substrates is quite finely balanced. PMID:18754597

  16. Multidirectional Angular Electronic Flux during Adiabatic Attosecond Charge Migration in Excited Benzene.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gunter; Liu, ChunMei; Manz, Jörn; Paulus, Beate; Pérez-Torres, Jhon Fredy; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-07-14

    Recently, adiabatic attosecond charge migration (AACM) has been monitored and simulated for the first time, with application to the oriented iodoacetylene cation where AACM starts from the initial superposition of the ground state (φ0) and an electronic excited state (φ1). Here, we develop the theory for electronic fluxes during AACM in ring-shaped molecules, with application to oriented benzene prepared in the superposition of the ground and first excited singlet states. The initial state and its time evolution are analogous to coherent tunneling where φ0 and φ1 have different meanings; however, they denote the wave functions of the lowest tunneling doublet. This analogy suggests to transfer the theory of electronic fluxes during coherent tunneling to AACM, with suitable modifications which account for (i) the different time scales and (ii) the different electronic states, and which make use of (iii) the preparation of the initial state for AACM by a linearly polarized laser pulse. Application to benzene yields the multidirectional angular electronic flux with a pincer-motion type pattern during AACM: this unequivocal result confirms a previous working hypothesis. Moreover, the theory of AACM allows quantification of the electronic flux; that is, the maximum number of electrons (out of 42) which flow concertedly during AACM in benzene is 6 × 0.08 = 0.48.

  17. Does borazine-water behave like benzene-water? A matrix isolation infrared and ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Verma, K.; Bawari, D.; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2016-06-01

    Borazine is isoelectronic with benzene and is popularly referred to as inorganic benzene. The study of non-covalent interactions with borazine and comparison with its organic counterpart promises to show interesting similarities and differences. The motivation of the present study of the borazine-water interaction, for the first time, stems from such interesting possibilities. Hydrogen-bonded complexes of borazine and water were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Computations were performed at M06-2X and MP2 levels of theory using 6-311++G(d,p) and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. At both the levels of theory, the complex involving an N-H⋯O interaction, where the N-H of borazine serves as the proton donor to the oxygen of water was found to be the global minimum, in contrast to the benzene-water system, which showed an H-π interaction. The experimentally observed infrared spectra of the complexes corroborated well with our computations for the complex corresponding to the global minimum. In addition to the global minimum, our computations also located two local minima on the borazine-water potential energy surface. Of the two local minima, one corresponded to a structure where the water was the proton donor to the nitrogen of borazine, approaching the borazine ring from above the plane of the ring; a structure that resembled the global minimum in the benzene-water H-π complex. The second local minimum corresponded to an interaction of the oxygen of water with the boron of borazine, which can be termed as the boron bond. Clearly the borazine-water system presents a richer landscape than the benzene-water system.

  18. Saturn's Ring Images/Dynamics by Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.; Tiscareno, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    Since its orbit insertion in mid-2004, the Cassini spacecraft has been able to view Saturn's magnificent rings at various phase and elevation angles, with resolutions ranging from ~200 m on orbit insertion, through a km or two during typical closest approaches, up to many tens of km at distant apoapses. Significant changes have occurred in isolated regions of the rings between the Voyager encounters a quarter century ago and the continuing observations over the last eighteen months. This talk will focus on observations and understandings of the past year. As time permits, we will discuss bending and density wave structures (emphasizing the changes in those caused by the switching orbits of Janus and Epimetheus); features that are temporally variable over short times (F ring, Encke ringlets, ring edges) and longer (D and G rings); odd patterns (short streaks, "straw", "knots" and "turbulence"); and interactions with adjacent satellites, especially those embedded in the Encke and Keeler gaps. Since the spacecraft will spend most of Fall 2005 near the ring plane, we anticipate few discoveries during this period; this should allow us time to do a better job at interpreting those data currently in hand. As J. C. Maxwell wrote in 1857, we are "still grinding at Saturn's rings."

  19. PTEN methylation involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zuo, Xin; Bai, Wenlin; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that benzene is a hematotoxic carcinogen. PTEN promoter methylation is a representative example of transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. However, the effect of PTEN methylation on benzene-induced hematotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, the animal model of benzene hematotoxicity was successfully established. WBC significantly decreased in experimental groups (P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, the weight of rats increased slowly and even declined with increasing doses of benzene in the benzene-treated groups. An increase in the level of PTEN methylation was observed in the low dose group, and PTEN methylation level increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, it was interesting that PTEN mRNA expression increased in the low dose group, but declined with increasing doses of benzene. The decrease of tumor suppressor function caused by PTEN methylation may be an important mechanism of benzene hematotoxicity. Furthermore, lymphoblast cell line F32 was incubated by benzene and then treated with 5-aza and TSA, alone or in combination. A dramatic decrease in the PTEN mRNA expression and a significant increase of PTEN methylation level in benzene-treated cells were also shown. PTEN mRNA expression was up regulated and PTEN methylation level was reduced by the epigenetic inhibitors, 5-aza and TSA. In conclusion, PTEN methylation is involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity through suppressing PTEN mRNA expression.

  20. Chromosome damage and aneuploidy detected by interphase multicolour FISH in benzene-exposed shale oil workers.

    PubMed

    Marcon, F; Zijno, A; Crebelli, R; Carere, A; Veidebaum, T; Peltonen, K; Parks, R; Schuler, M; Eastmond, D

    1999-09-30

    A multicolour tandem-labelling fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure was used to detect chromosome alterations in peripheral blood cells of a group of Estonian petrochemistry workers. Twelve workers employed in benzene production and five cokery workers, together with eight unexposed rural controls, were enrolled in the study. The methodology employed, based on the in situ hybridization of adjacent centromeric and pericentromeric regions, allowed the simultaneous detection of both chromosome breakage, involving damage-prone pericentromeric regions, and hyperploidy in interphase cells. Blood smears from all subjects were hybridized with chromosome 1 specific probes, in order to detect genotoxic damage in circulating lymphocytes and granulocytes. Moreover, lymphocyte cultures were established, harvested 48 h following mitogen stimulation and hybridized with the tandem chromosomes 1 and 9 probes. No significant difference in the incidence of breakage was detected in the nucleated cells of blood smears of exposed vs. control subjects. In contrast, modest but significantly increased frequencies of breakage affecting both chromosomes 1 and 9 were observed in the cultured lymphocytes of the benzene-exposed workers compared to the unexposed controls, suggesting an expression of premutagenic lesions during the S-phase in vitro. Across the entire study group, the frequencies of breakage affecting chromosomes 1 and 9 in the stimulated lymphocytes were highly intercorrelated (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found in the incidence of hyperploidy among the study groups, although a tendency to higher values was observed in benzene-exposed workers. Although the relatively small size of the study groups does not allow firm conclusions on the role of occupational exposure, the observed patterns are suggestive of effects in the benzene-exposed workers. This work also shows that tandem labelling FISH can be usefully applied in human biomonitoring, allowing the

  1. Attenuation of aqueous benzene in soils under saturated flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J; Yun, S-T

    2006-01-01

    The fate of aqueous benzene in subsurface was investigated in this study, focusing on the role of sorption and biodegradation on the benzene attenuation under dynamic flow conditions. Two sets of column tests were conducted in Plexiglass flow cells packed uniformly with sandy aquifer materials. The first set of the experiment was conducted with a step-type injection of benzene with different powder activated carbon (PAC) contents: (1) PAC = 0 %; (2) PAC = 0.5 %; (3) PAC = 2.0%. The second set was performed as a pulse-type with different test conditions: (4) benzene; (5) benzene and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa); (6) benzene and bacteria (P. aeruginosa) with hydrogen peroxide. In addition, numerical experiments were performed to examine the role of sorption processes on the benzene attenuation. In the step mode experiments, the KCl breakthrough curves (BTCs) reached the input concentration while the benzene BTCs were considerably lower than those of KCl with slight retardation for all cases, indicating that both reversible/retardation and irreversible sorption occurred. The pulse type tests showed that attenuation of benzene increased in the presence of bacteria due to biodegradation. The benzene attenuation by microbial degradation increased furthermore in the presence of hydrogen peroxide owing to sufficient supply of dissolved oxygen in soil column. Numerical experiments demonstrated that retardation could not contribute to the attenuation of benzene in soils but could only extend its breakthrough time. Experimental results indicated that aqueous benzene could be attenuated by irreversible sorption and biodegradation during transport through the subsurface. Additionally, the attenuation of aqueous benzene is closely related to organic carbon content and oxygen level existing in contaminated aquifers.

  2. 1-Nitro-4-(4-nitro-phen-oxy)benzene: a second monoclinic polymorph.

    PubMed

    Naz, Mehwish; Akhter, Zareen; McKee, Vickie; Nadeem, Arif

    2013-11-01

    In the title compound, C12H8N2O5, the aromatic rings are inclined to one another by 56.14 (7)°. The nitro groups are inclined by to the benzene rings to which they are attached by 3.86 (17) and 9.65 (15)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional structure. The title compound is a new monoclinic polymorph, crystallizing in space group P21/c. The first polymorph crystallized in space group C2/c and the mol-ecule possesses twofold rotation symmetry. Two low-temperature structures of this polymorph (150 K and 100 K, respectively) have been reported [Meciarova et al. (2004). Private Communication (refcode IXOGAD). CCDC, Cambridge, England, and Dey & Desiraju (2005). Chem. Commun. pp. 2486-2488].

  3. Crystal structure of phenyl 2,4,5-tri­chloro­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Sean; Staples, Richard J.; Biros, Shannon M.; Ngassa, Felix N.

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, C12H7Cl3O3S, was synthesized via a nucleophilic substitution reaction between phenol and 2,4,5-tri­chloro­benzene­sulfonyl chloride. The two aryl rings are oriented gauche to one another around the sulfonate S—O bond, with a C—S—O—C torsion angle of −70.68 (16)°, and the two rings are inclined to one another by 72.40 (7)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked via various C—Cl⋯π inter­actions, forming ribbons propagating along [100]. Neighboring ribbons are linked by a weak C—Cl⋯π inter­action, forming layers parallel to (010). PMID:27308043

  4. 1-Nitro-4-(4-nitro-phen-oxy)benzene: a second monoclinic polymorph.

    PubMed

    Naz, Mehwish; Akhter, Zareen; McKee, Vickie; Nadeem, Arif

    2013-11-01

    In the title compound, C12H8N2O5, the aromatic rings are inclined to one another by 56.14 (7)°. The nitro groups are inclined by to the benzene rings to which they are attached by 3.86 (17) and 9.65 (15)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional structure. The title compound is a new monoclinic polymorph, crystallizing in space group P21/c. The first polymorph crystallized in space group C2/c and the mol-ecule possesses twofold rotation symmetry. Two low-temperature structures of this polymorph (150 K and 100 K, respectively) have been reported [Meciarova et al. (2004). Private Communication (refcode IXOGAD). CCDC, Cambridge, England, and Dey & Desiraju (2005). Chem. Commun. pp. 2486-2488]. PMID:24454202

  5. At-line benzene monitor for measuring benzene in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, W.J.

    1992-10-14

    A highly accurate and repeatable at-line benzene monitor (ALBM) has been developed to measure the benzene concentration in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) in the DWPF. This analyzer was conceived and jointly developed within SRTC by the Analytical Development and the Defense Waste Process Technology Sections with extensive support from the Applied Statistics Group and the TNX Operations Section. It is recommended that an ALBM specifically adapted to DWPF analytical requirements be used to measure benzene in PHA; calibrations be performed using a 10% methanol solution matrix (for standard stability); and based on experience gained in development at TNX, the services of ADS and ASG be employed to both adapt the ALBM to DWPF requirements and develop statistical control procedures.

  6. Benzene-RISc: The development and performance of an immunoassay to detect benzene in water

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.B.; Withers, T.; Almond, R.; Stewart, T.; Allen, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Immunoassay methods have become available for environmental applications. Their simplicity, reliability, and ability to provide information rapidly and on-site is enhancing the efficiency of many field and laboratory programs. Immunoassay methods rely upon antibody molecules to provide the sensitivity and specificity characteristics they exhibit, but many molecules are either insufficiently immunogenic or structurally unremarkable to induce an appropriate antibody response. Such compounds are usually considered to be incompatible with the development of an immunoassay method. An immunoassay method for the detection of benzene in water would have utility in detecting contamination from spills and leaking underground storage tanks. Benzene, however, is frequently considered to be in the class of compounds considered to be incompatible with antibody, and therefore immunoassay, development. The authors have developed an immunoassay for the detection of benzene in water by developing both sample processing and immunochemical procedures and reagents that overcome the technical limitations frequently encountered.

  7. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  8. Actin Rings of Power.

    PubMed

    Schwayer, Cornelia; Sikora, Mateusz; Slováková, Jana; Kardos, Roland; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2016-06-20

    Circular or ring-like actin structures play important roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Commonly, these rings are composed of actin filaments and myosin motors (actomyosin) that, upon activation, trigger ring constriction. Actomyosin ring constriction, in turn, has been implicated in key cellular processes ranging from cytokinesis to wound closure. Non-constricting actin ring-like structures also form at cell-cell contacts, where they exert a stabilizing function. Here, we review recent studies on the formation and function of actin ring-like structures in various morphogenetic processes, shedding light on how those different rings have been adapted to fulfill their specific roles. PMID:27326928

  9. The rings of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development of theories concerning the rings of Saturn. Particular attention is given to ring structure, noting its thinness, the separations between rings, and observed variations in brightness. Data gathered via infrared, radio and radar techniques are described in terms of ring particle composition and size. Hypotheses about ring origin and evolution are outlined, including the tidal disruption model, calculations of Saturn's gravitational contraction history, grazing, and meteoroid bombardment. Prospects for future observations of Saturn's rings are reviewed, such as the variation in their radar reflectivity as a function of the tilt of the ring plane.

  10. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  11. Sub-Doppler electronic spectra of the benzene-(He)n complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masato; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    Excitation spectra of the benzene-(He)n (n = 1 and 2) van der Waals complexes in the vicinity of the S1 ← S0601 vibronic transition of the monomer were recorded by utilizing mass-selectivetwo-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Pulsed expansion with the stagnation pressure of 80 bar was incorporated for efficient formation of the most weakly bound aromatic complexes and extensive adiabatic cooling with the rotational temperature of <0.5 K. Sub-Doppler resolution yielding the line width of 250 MHz was realized in the collimated molecular beam by employing near Fourier-transform-limited ultraviolet pulses for the S1 ← S0 excitation. The observed transition frequencies were fitted to the conventional symmetric-top Hamiltonian with a standard deviation of <30 MHz, to derive the molecular constants with accuracy improved by a factor of 50 than those reported previously. The determined rotational constants set the distance of the He atom from the benzene ring to be: 3.602 ± 0.009 Å in the S0 state of the complex with n = 1. The distance is even larger than those of the analogous systems, i.e., benzene-Ne and -Ar, and this apparent anomaly is discussed with the recent theoretical results based on high-level quantum mechanical calculation coupled with the numerical solution of the 3D eigenvalue problem. The electronic excitation induces the increase by 0.063 ± 0.012 Å, as opposed to the contraction of other benzene-rare gas complexes. The distance and the change for n = 2 are almost the same (3.596 ± 0.006 Å and 0.067 ± 0.009 Å) as those for n = 1. We also recorded the excitation spectrum of the n = 1 complex with the mono 13C-substituted benzene molecule. The asymmetric substitution lifts the degeneracy of the S1 61 state in the benzene molecule, and two vibronic bands located nearby to each other were observed for the complex.

  12. catena-Poly[[[bis-(thio-cyanato-κN)zinc(II)]-μ-1,2-bis-{[2-(2-pyrid-yl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl]meth-yl}benzene] 0.28-hydrate].

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Shi, Haochen; Gao, Yunfeng; Ma, Hongjun

    2010-07-17

    The title one-dimensional coordination polymer, {[Zn(NCS)(2)(C(24)H(20)N(6))(2)]·0.28H(2)O}(n), was obtained by the reaction of Zn(OAc)(2)·2H(2)O, KSCN and 1,2-bis-{[2-(2-pyrid-yl)-1H-imid-azol-1-yl]meth-yl}benzene (hereafter L). The Zn(II) ion shows a distorted octa-hedral coordination geometry and is coordin-ated by two N atoms from two SCN(-) anions and four N atoms from two organic ligands. The L ligands act as bridging bis-chelating ligands with cis coordination modes at the Zn(II) ion. One-dimensional coordination polymers are arranged into layers by π-π stacking inter-actions between the imidazole rings of adjacent chains, with an inter-planar distance of 3.46 (1) Å and centroid-centroid distances of 3.8775 (16) Å. One of the thio-cyanate ligands is disordered over two positions with an occupancy factor of 0.564 (3) for the major component. The partially occupied water mol-ecule forms an O-H⋯S hydrogen bond with the disordered thio-cyanate group.

  13. Observation of Trans-Ethanol and Gauche-Ethanol Complexes with Benzene Using Matrix Isolation Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicangelo, Jay; Silbaugh, Matthew J.

    2016-06-01

    Ethanol can exist in two conformers, one in which the OH group is trans to the methyl group (trans-ethanol) and the other in which the OH group is gauche to the methyl group (gauche-ethanol). Matrix isolation infrared spectra of ethanol deposited in 20 K argon matrices display distinct infrared peaks that can be assigned to the trans-ethanol and gauche-ethanol conformers, particularly with the O-H stretching vibrations. Given this, matrix isolation experiments were performed in which ethanol (C_2H_5OH) and benzene (C_6H_6) were co-deposited in argon matrices at 20 K in order to determine if conformer specific ethanol complexes with benzene could be observed in the infrared spectra. New infrared peaks that can be attributed to the trans-ethanol and gauche-ethanol complexes with benzene have been observed near the O-H stretching vibrations of ethanol. The initial identification of the new infrared peaks as being due to the ethanol-benzene complexes was established by performing a concentration study (1:200 to 1:1600 S/M ratios), by comparing the co-deposition spectra with the spectra of the individual monomers, by matrix annealing experiments (35 K), and by performing experiments using isotopically labeled ethanol (C_2D_5OD) and benzene (C_6D_6). Quantum chemical calculations were also performed for the C_2H_5OH-C_6H_6 complexes using density functional theory (B3LYP) and ab initio (MP2) methods. Stable minima were found for the both the trans-ethanol and gauche-ethanol complexes with benzene at both levels of theory and were predicted to have similar interaction energies. Both complexes can be characterized as H-π complexes, in which the ethanol is above the benzene ring with the hydroxyl hydrogen interacting with the π cloud of the ring. The theoretical O-H stretching frequencies for the complexes were predicted to be shifted from the monomer frequencies and from each other and these results were used to make the conformer specific infrared peak assignments

  14. Crystal structures of N-(3-fluoro­benzo­yl)benzene­sulfonamide and N-(3-fluoro­benzo­yl)-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Suchetan, P. A.; Naveen, S.; Lokanath, N. K.; Lakshmikantha, H. N.; Srivishnu, K. S.; Supriya, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of two N-(aryl­sulfon­yl)aryl­amides, namely N-(3-fluoro­benzo­yl)benzene­sulfonamide, C13H10FNO3S, (I), and N-(3-fluoro­benzo­yl)-4-methyl­benzene­sulfonamide, C14H12FNO3S, (II), are described and compared with related structures. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 82.73 (10)° in (I) compared to 72.60 (12)° in (II). In the crystal of (I), the mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O and C—H⋯π inter­actions, resulting in a three-dimensional grid-like architecture, while C—H⋯O inter­actions lead to one-dimensional ribbons in (II). The crystals of both (I) and (II) feature strong but non-structure-directing N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with R 2 2(8) ring motifs. The structure of (I) also features π–π stacking inter­actions. PMID:27375856

  15. Biofiltration control of VOC emissions: Butane and benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    Laboratory studies were conducted on the biological elimination of n-butane and benzene from air streams using activated sludge-treated compost biofilters. Four types of experimental biofilter systems were developed: a bench scale packed tower system used primarily for kinetic studies; a small scale column system used to study the effects of different filter media on n-butane removal; a three stage system used to study benzene elimination; and a static batch biofilter system used to study the effects of temperature, compost water content, compost pH, and initial benzene concentrations on benzene elimination. Removal efficiencies greater than 90% were obtained for n-butane. Removal followed first order kinetics at inlet concentrations less than 25 ppM n-butane and zero order kinetics above 100 ppM n-butane. Removal of benzene followed fractional order kinetics for inlet concentrations from 15 to 200 ppM benzene. Thus, the removal of benzene is both mass transfer and bioreaction limited for the concentration range studied. The removal efficiency of benzene was found to be highly dependent on compost water content, compost pH, and temperature. Compost showed a low capacity for benzene removal, which suggested that degradation of these hydrocarbons required different species of microorganisms.

  16. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of... not include the volume and benzene content of the oxygenate in any compliance calculations or...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1230 - What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the gasoline benzene... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1230 What are the gasoline benzene requirements for refiners and importers? (a) Annual average benzene standard. (1) Except as specified in paragraph (c) of...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1238 - How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... average benzene concentration determined? 80.1238 Section 80.1238 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1238 How is a refinery's or importer's average benzene concentration determined? (a) The average benzene concentration of gasoline produced at a refinery or...

  7. Accumulation of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Chlorinated benzenes are widespread in the environment. Hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene and all isomers of dichlorobenzenes, trichlorobenzenes, and tetrachlorobenzenes, have been detected in fish, water, and sediments from the Great Lakes. This paper describes a long-term (26 week) experiment relating the concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 1) the length of exposure, and it describes three 8-week experiments relating concentrations of chlorinated benzenes in earthworms to 2) their concentration in soil 3) the soil organic matter content and, 4) the degree of chlorination. In the 26-week experiment, the concentration of 1,2,4 - trichlorobenzene in earthworms fluctuated only slightly about a mean of 0.63 ppm (Fig. 1). Although a statistically significant decrease can be demonstrated over the test (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = -0.62 p < 0.05), the decrease was minor. Hexachlorobenzene in earthworms showed a cyclical trend that coincided with replacement of the media, and a slight but statistically significant tendency to increase from about 2 to 3 ppm over the 26 weeks (r = 0.55, p < 0.05). Concentrations of both trichlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene in earthworms increased as the concentrations in the soil increased (Fig. 2), but leveled off at the highest soil concentrations. The most surprising result of this study was the relatively low concentrations in earthworms compared to those in soils. The average concentration of each of the six isomers of trichlorobenzene and tetrachlorobenzene in earthworms was only about 1 ppm (Table 2); the isomeric structure did not affect accumulation. The concentration of organic matter in soil had a prominent effect on hexachlorobenzene concentrations in earthworms (Fig. 3). Hexachlorobenzene concentrations decreased steadily from 9.3 ppm in earthworms kept in soil without any peat moss added to about 1 ppm in soil containing 16 or 32% organic matter.

  8. Hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity of inhaled benzene.

    PubMed

    Cronkite, E P; Drew, R T; Inoue, T; Hirabayashi, Y; Bullis, J E

    1989-07-01

    CBA/Ca male mice have been exposed to benzene in air at 10, 25, 100, 300, 400, and 3000 ppm for variable intervals 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for up to 16 weeks. Two weeks of inhaling 10 ppm produced no hematologic effects; 25 ppm induced a significant lymphopenia. Inhalation of 100, 300, and 400 ppm produced dose-dependent decreases in blood lymphocytes, bone marrow cellularity, marrow content of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and an increased fraction of CFU-S in DNA synthesis. Exposure of mice to 300 ppm for 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks produced severe lymphopenia and decrease in marrow CFU-S. Recovery was rapid and complete after 2 and 4 weeks of exposure. After 8 and 16 weeks of exposure, recovery of lymphocytes was complete within 8 weeks. It took 16 weeks for the CFU-S to recover to that of the age-matched controls after 8 weeks of exposure and 25 weeks to recover to age-matched after 16 weeks of exposure. Inhalation of 3000 ppm for 8 days was less damaging than inhalation of 300 ppm for 80 days (same integral amount of benzene inhaled). The inhalation of 3000 ppm has not increased the incidence of leukemia or shortened its latency for development. Inhalation of 300 ppm 6 hr/day for 16 weeks significantly increases the incidence of myelogenous neoplasms in male CBA/Ca mice. Inhalation of 100 ppm for same interval does not influence incidence of myelogenous neoplasms but does increase incidence of solid neoplasms particularly in female CBA/Ca mice. Benzene is a potent carcinogen in CBA/Ca mice.

  9. Graphene Layer Growth: Collision of Migrating Five-MemberRings

    SciTech Connect

    Whitesides, Russell; Kollias, Alexander C.; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

    2005-12-02

    A reaction pathway is explored in which two cyclopenta groups combine on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. The process is initiated by H addition to a five-membered ring, followed by opening of that ring and the formation of a six-membered ring adjacent to another five-membered ring. The elementary steps of the migration pathway are analyzed using density functional theory to examine the region of the potential energy surface associated with the pathway. The calculations are performed on a substrate modeled by the zigzag edge of tetracene. Based on the obtained energetics, the dynamics of the system are analyzed by solving the energy transfer master equations. The results indicate energetic and reaction-rate similarity between the cyclopenta combination and migration reactions. Also examined in the present study are desorption rates of migrating cyclopenta rings which are found to be comparable to cyclopenta ring migration.

  10. Evidence of Accretion in Saturn's F Ring (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnor, C. B.; Buerle, K.; Murray, C. D.; Evans, M. W.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G. W.

    2010-12-01

    Lying slightly outside the classical Roche radius and being strongly perturbed by the adjacent moons Prometheus and Pandora, Saturn's F ring represents a unique astrophysical laboratory for examining the processes of mass accretion and moonlet formation. Recent images from the Cassini spacecraft reveal optically thick clumps, capable of casting shadows, and associated structures in regions of the F ring following close passage by Prometheus. Here we examine the accretion environment of the F ring and Prometheus' role in moonlet formation and evolution. Using the observed structures adjacent to these clumps and dynamical arguments we estimate the masses of these clumps and find them comparable to that of ~10-20-km contiguous moonlets. Further, we show that Prometheus' perturbations on the F ring create regions of enhanced density and low relative velocity that may accelerate the accretion of clumps and moonlets.

  11. The electronic structure and molecular symmetry of pure benzene and benzene coadsorbed with CO on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, W.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Pache, T.; Menzel, D.

    1989-07-01

    Benzene adsorption on Ni(111) was studied by ARUPS using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation at various benzene coverages and for benzene coadsorbed with CO. Overall the electronic structure of chemisorbed benzene is found to be very similar for the different benzene coverages and in the presence of coadsorbed CO: only small shifts in the electronic binding energies are observed which are attributed to electrostatic initial state changes. Using dipole selection rules the orientation of the adsorbed benzene molecules is determined to be parallel to the surface for all layers investigated. The molecular symmetry is reduced to C 3v in all cases. The photon energy dependence of the photoionization cross section shows a pronounced resonance of the 2e 1u level at a photon energy of 25 eV ( Ekin ≈ 13 eV); the corresponding electron emission is centered along the surface normal. This resonance is attributed to a shape resonance into an a 1 final state.

  12. Optimizing Thomson's jumping ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjossem, Paul J. H.; Brost, Elizabeth C.

    2011-04-01

    The height to which rings will jump in a Thomson jumping ring apparatus is the central question posed by this popular lecture demonstration. We develop a simple time-averaged inductive-phase-lag model for the dependence of the jump height on the ring material, its mass, and temperature and apply it to measurements of the jump height for a set of rings made by slicing copper and aluminum alloy pipe into varying lengths. The data confirm a peak jump height that grows, narrows, and shifts to smaller optimal mass when the rings are cooled to 77 K. The model explains the ratio of the cooled/warm jump heights for a given ring, the reduction in optimal mass as the ring is cooled, and the shape of the mass resonance. The ring that jumps the highest is found to have a characteristic resistance equal to the inductive reactance of the set of rings.

  13. Enhancement of a Lewis acid-base interaction via solvation: ammonia molecules and the benzene radical cation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-Tung; Freindorf, Marek; Furlani, Thomas; DeLeon, Robert L; Richard, John P; Garvey, James F

    2007-07-12

    The interaction between ammonia and the benzene radical cation has been investigated by gas-phase studies of mass selected ion clusters {C(6)H(6)-(NH(3))(n=0-8)}(+) via tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry and through calculations. Experiments show a special stability for the cluster ion that contains four ammonias: {C(6)H(6)(NH(3))(4)}(+). Calculations provide evidence that the first ammonia forms a weak dative bond to the cyclohexadienyl radical cation, {C(6)H(6)-NH(3)}(+), where there is a transfer of electrons from ammonia to benzene. Additional solvating ammonia molecules form stabilizing hydrogen bonds to the ring-bound ammonia {C(6)H(6)-NH(3)}(+).(NH(3))(n), which cause cooperative changes in the structure of the cluster complex. Free ammonia is a weak hydrogen bond donor, but electron transfer from NH(3) to the benzene ring that strengthens the dative bond will increase the hydrogen acidity and the strength of the cluster hydrogen bonds to the added ammonia. A progressive "tightening" of this dative bond is observed upon addition of the first, second, and third ammonia to give a cluster stabilized by three N-(+)H x N hydrogen bonds. This shows that the energetic cost of tightening the dative bond is recovered with dividends in the formation of stable cluster hydrogen bonds.

  14. N,N′-Bis(phenyl­carbamo­thio­yl)benzene-1,3-dicarboxamide

    PubMed Central

    Ngaini, Zainab; Mohd Ariff, Maya Asyikin; Wan Zullkiplee, Wan Sharifatun Handayani; Hussain, Hasnain; Rosli, Mohd Mustaqim

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C22H18N4O2S2, contains two mol­ecules. In one of them, the dihedral angles between the central benzene ring and the phenyl rings are 16.97 (8) and 20.97 (8)°, while the phenyl rings make a dihedral angle of 37.87 (8)°. In the other mol­ecule, the corresponding values are 34.92 (7), 53.90 (7) and 60.68 (8)°, respectively. In each mol­ecule, two intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds generate S(6) rings and a short C—H⋯S contact also occurs. In the crystal, N—H⋯S, N—H⋯O, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯S inter­actions link the mol­ecules into a three-dimensional network. PMID:24427019

  15. Compounds for neutron radiation detectors and systems thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Zaitseva, Natalia P; Cherepy, Nerine J; Carman, M. Leslie

    2014-05-27

    A material according to one embodiment exhibits an optical response signature for neutrons that is different than an optical response signature for gamma rays, said material exhibiting performance comparable to or superior to stilbene in terms of distinguishing neutrons from gamma rays, wherein the material is not stilbene, the material comprising a molecule selected from a group consisting of: two or more benzene rings, one or more benzene rings with a carboxylic acid group, one or more benzene rings with at least one double bound adjacent to said benzene ring, and one or more benzene rings for which at least one atom in the benzene ring is not carbon.

  16. Pnictogen-Silicon Analogues of Benzene.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Andreas E; Eckhardt, Maria; Erlebach, Andreas; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Sierka, Marek; Scheer, Manfred

    2016-08-24

    Since the discovery of the first "inorganic benzene" (borazine, B3N3H6), the synthesis of other noncarbon derivatives is an ongoing challenge in Inorganic Chemistry. Here we report on the synthesis of the first pnictogen-silicon congeners of benzene, the triarsa- and the triphospha-trisilabenzene [(PhC(NtBu)2)3Si3E3] (E = P (1a), As (1b)) by a simple metathesis reaction. These compounds are formed by the reaction of [Cp″2Zr(η(1:1)-E4)] (E = P, As; Cp″ = C5H3tBu2) with [PhC(NtBu)2SiCl] in toluene at room temperature along with the silicon pnictogen congeners of the cyclobutadiene, [(PhC(NtBu)2)2Si2E2] (E = P (2a), As (2b)), which is unprecedented for the arsenic system 2b. All compounds were comprehensively characterized, and density functional theory calculations were performed to verify the stability and the aromatic character of the triarsa- and the triphospha-trisilabenzene. PMID:27513314

  17. Atomic-phase interference devices based on ring-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates: Two-ring case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. P.; Dholakia, K.; Wright, E. M.

    2003-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the ground-state properties and quantum dynamics of a pair of adjacent ring-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates that are coupled via tunneling. This device, which is the analog of a symmetric superconducting quantum interference device, is the simplest version of what we term an atomic-phase interference device (APHID). The two-ring APHID is shown to be sensitive to rotation.

  18. Vascular ring (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ring is a term used to describe a number of abnormal formations of the aorta, the large artery ... the pulmonary artery. The abnormal vessel(s) forms a ring, which encircles and may press down on the ...

  19. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-01

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings. PMID:16601188

  20. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-01

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  1. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Salviano Dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1-10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food. PMID:26904662

  2. Acute high dose exposure to benzene in shipyard workers

    SciTech Connect

    Midzenski, M.A.; McDiarmid, M.A.; Rothman, N.; Kolodner, K. )

    1992-01-01

    Fifteen degassers were acutely exposed over several days to high concentrations (> 60 ppm) of benzene during removal of residual fuel (degassing) from shipboard fuel tanks. Medical surveillance evaluation mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Benzene Standard initially revealed 11 workers (73%) reporting neurotoxic symptoms while degassing. Workers with more than 2 days (16 hours) of acute exposure were significantly more likely to report dizziness and nausea than those with 2 or fewer days of acute exposure. Repeated laboratory analyses performed over a 4-month period after the acute exposure revealed at least one hematologic abnormality consistent with benzene exposure in 9 (60%) of these degassers. One year later, 6 workers (40%) had persistent abnormalities; an additional worker with normal hematologic parameters at the time of our initial evaluation subsequently developed an abnormality consistent with benzene exposure. Numerous large granular lymphocytes were observed on 6 (40%) of the peripheral blood smears. Despite these laboratory findings, there were no significant associations between the presence of hematologic abnormalities and either the number of hours of acute benzene exposure or the duration of employment as a degasser. Volatilization of benzene from the residual fuel was the suspected source of benzene in the headspace of tanks. Confined space exposure to petroleum products may be exposing workers to benzene at levels above the OSHA Short-Term Exposure Limit (STEL). This situation warrants further study.

  3. Mobil-Badger technologies for benzene reduction in gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Goelzer, A.R.; Ram, S.; Hernandez, A. ); Chin, A.A.; Harandi, M.N.; Smith, C.M. Mobil Research and Development Corp., Paulsboro, NJ )

    1993-01-01

    Many refiners will need to reduce the barrels per day of benzene entering the motor gasoline pool. Mobil and Badger have developed and now jointly license three potential refinery alternatives to conventional benzene hydrosaturation to achieve this: Mobil Benzene Reduction, Ethylbenzene and Cumene. The Mobil Benzene Reduction Process (MBR) uses dilute olefins in FCC offgas to extensively alkylate dilute benzene as found in light reformate, light FCC gasoline, or cyclic C[sub 6] naphtha. MBR raises octanes and lowers C[sub 5]+ olefins. MBR does not involve costly hydrogen addition. The refinery-based Mobil/Badger Ethylbenzene Process reacts chemical-grade benzene extracted from light reformate with dilute ethylene found in treated FCC offgas to make high-purity ethylbenzene. EB is the principal feedstock for the production of styrene. The Mobil/Badger Cumene Process alkylates FCC-derived dilute propylene and extracted benzene to selectively yield isopropyl benzene (cumene). Cumene is the principal feedstock for the production of phenol. All three processes use Mobil developed catalysts.

  4. REACTION OF BENZENE OXIDE WITH THIOLS INCLUDING GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accounts for the observations that the metabolism of benzene is dominated by the formation of phenol. As demonstrated here, the pathway leading to S-phenylmercapturic acid is necessarily minor on account of the low efficiency of benzene oxide capture by glutathione at ...

  5. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods

    PubMed Central

    Salviano dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1–10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food. PMID:26904662

  6. Benzene as a Chemical Hazard in Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Salviano Dos Santos, Vânia Paula; Medeiros Salgado, Andréa; Guedes Torres, Alexandre; Signori Pereira, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on benzene in foods, including toxicological aspects, occurrence, formation mechanisms, and mitigation measures and analyzes data reporting benzene levels in foods. Benzene is recognized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) as carcinogenic to humans, and its presence in foods has been attributed to various potential sources: packaging, storage environment, contaminated drinking water, cooking processes, irradiation processes, and degradation of food preservatives such as benzoates. Since there are no specific limits for benzene levels in beverages and food in general studies have adopted references for drinking water in a range from 1-10 ppb. The presence of benzene has been reported in various food/beverage substances with soft drinks often reported in the literature. Although the analyses reported low levels of benzene in most of the samples studied, some exceeded permissible limits. The available data on dietary exposure to benzene is minimal from the viewpoint of public health. Often benzene levels were low as to be considered negligible and not a consumer health risk, but there is still a need of more studies for a better understanding of their effects on human health through the ingestion of contaminated food.

  7. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  8. catena-Poly[[bis-(4-methyl-benzene-thiol-ato)cadium(II)]-μ-1,3-di-4-pyridylpropane].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Yan; Han, Lei

    2009-03-28

    In the title compound, [Cd(C(7)H(7)S)(2)(C(13)H(14)N(2))](n), the unique Cd(II) ion, located on a twofold rotation axis, is coordinated by two S atoms and two N atoms in a slightly distorted tetra-hedral environment. Symmetry-related Cd(II) ions are linked via bridging 1,3-di-4-pyridylpropane ligands, forming a zig-zag chain-structure parallel to [001]. In the crystal structure, there are weak intra-chain π-π stacking inter-actions between benzene rings, with a centroid-centroid distance of 3.825 (7) Å, and pairs of chains are inter-digitated with respect to the 4-methyl-benzene-thiol-ate groups.

  9. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  10. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  11. Benzene-Water (BZWn (n = 1 - 10)) Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, M.; Samy, K. Gopal; Subramanian, V.

    2009-11-01

    The gas-phase geometries, binding energies (BEs), infrared spectra and electron density parameters of benzene (BZ)-water (W) clusters (BZWn, where n = 1-10) have been calculated using Truhlar's meta hybrid functional, M05-2X, employing 6-31+G** basis set. Both basis set superposition error (BSSE) and zero point energy corrected BEs are in close agreement with the previously reported high level ab initio and experimental values. Among all of the BZWn clusters, the same with inverted book conformer of water hexamer has the highest BE when compared to all other water clusters. The Bader's theory of atoms in molecule (AIM) provides evidence for the presence of O-H···π interactions in all of these clusters. In addition, the roles of C-H···O and lone pair···π (lp···π) interactions in the stabilization of BZWn clusters are also evident from the AIM analysis. The trend in the electron density at the hydrogen bond critical points varies as O-H···π < lp···π < C-H···O. Spectral signatures of these clusters further reinforce the existence of weak H-bond between BZ and Wn clusters. The red shift in all of these clusters ranges from 13 to 95 cm-1. The results clearly show that the presence of π-cloud does not affect the H-bonded network of water clusters except in the case of W6 ring.

  12. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  13. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  14. Different aggregation dynamics of benzene-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cen-Feng; Tian, Shan Xi

    2014-10-28

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations for benzene-water mixtures are performed, aiming to explore the relationship between the microscopic structures and the thermodynamic properties, in particular, the transformation dynamics from the mutually soluble state to the phase-separated state. We find that the molecular aggregation of benzene in the water-rich mixture is distinctly different from that of water in the benzene-rich mixture. This aggregation difference is attributed to the different intermolecular interactions: the clustering of benzene molecules in the water-rich mixture is primarily driven by weak short-distance π-π interactions; while the formation of water clusters in the benzene-rich solution is triggered by long-range dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions. Moreover, the molecular aggregations show double-scaled features: firstly assembling in a quasi-plane at a low concentration, then bulking in three dimensions with an increase in concentration.

  15. Oxidation of Benzene by Persulfate in the Presence of Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-Containing Oxides: Stoichiometric Efficiency and Transformation Products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Bruton, Thomas A; Li, Wei; Buren, Jean Van; Prasse, Carsten; Doyle, Fiona M; Sedlak, David L

    2016-01-19

    Sulfate radical (SO4(•-)) is a strong, short-lived oxidant that is produced when persulfate (S2O8(2-)) reacts with transition metal oxides during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of contaminated groundwater. Although engineers are aware of the ability of transition metal oxides to activate persulfate, the operation of ISCO remediation systems is hampered by an inadequate understanding of the factors that control SO4(•-) production and the overall efficiency of the process. To address these shortcomings, we assessed the stoichiometric efficiency and products of transition metal-catalyzed persulfate oxidation of benzene with pure iron- and manganese-containing minerals, clays, and aquifer solids. For most metal-containing solids, the stoichiometric efficiency, as determined by the loss of benzene relative to the loss of persulfate, approached the theoretical maximum. Rates of production of SO4(•-) or hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) generated from radical chain reactions were affected by the concentration of benzene, with rates of S2O8(2-) decomposition increasing as the benzene concentration increased. Under conditions selected to minimize the loss of initial transformation products through reaction with radicals, the production of phenol only accounted for 30%-60% of the benzene lost in the presence of O2. The remaining products included a ring-cleavage product that appeared to contain an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde functional group. In the absence of O2, the concentration of the ring-cleavage product increased relative to phenol. The formation of the ring-cleavage product warrants further studies of its toxicity and persistence in the subsurface.

  16. On the time-course of adjacent and non-adjacent transposed-letter priming

    PubMed Central

    Ktori, Maria; Kingma, Brechtsje; Hannagan, Thomas; Holcomb, Phillip J.; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We compared effects of adjacent (e.g., atricle-ARTICLE) and non-adjacent (e.g., actirle-ARTICLE) transposed-letter (TL) primes in an ERP study using the sandwich priming technique. TL priming was measured relative to the standard double-substitution condition. We found significantly stronger priming effects for adjacent transpositions than non-adjacent transpositions (with 2 intervening letters) in behavioral responses (lexical decision latencies), and the adjacent priming effects emerged earlier in the ERP signal, at around 200 ms post-target onset. Non-adjacent priming effects emerged about 50 ms later and were short-lived, being significant only in the 250-300 ms time-window. Adjacent transpositions on the other hand continued to produce priming in the N400 time-window (300-500 ms post-target onset). This qualitatively different pattern of priming effects for adjacent and non-adjacent transpositions is discussed in the light of different accounts of letter transposition effects, and the utility of drawing a distinction between positional flexibility and positional noise. PMID:25364497

  17. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by marine sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Florin; Wilkes, Heinz; Musat, Niculina; Kuypers, Marcel; Widdel, Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    Benzene, the archetypal aromatic hydrocarbon is a common constituent of crude oil and oil-refined products. As such, it can enter the biosphere through natural oil seeps or as a consequence of exploitation of fossil fuel reservoirs. Benzene is chemically very stable, due to the stabilizing aromatic electron system and to the lack of functional groups. Although the anaerobic degradation of benzene has been reported under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions, the microorganisms involved and the initial biochemical steps of degradation remain insufficiently understood. Using marine sediment from a Mediterranean lagoon a sulfate-reducing enrichment culture with benzene as the sole organic substrate was obtained. Application of 16S rRNA gene-based methods showed that the enrichment was dominated (more than 85% of total cells) by a distinct phylotype affiliated with a clade of Deltaproteobacteria that include degraders of other aromatic hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene. Using benzoate as a soluble substrate in agar dilution series, several pure cultures closely related to Desulfotignum spp. and Desulfosarcina spp. were isolated. None of these strains was able to utilize benzene as a substrate and hybridizations with specific oligonucleotide probes showed that they accounted for as much as 6% of the total cells. Incubations with 13C-labeled benzene followed by Halogen in situ Hybridization - Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (HISH-SIMS) analysis showed that cells of the dominant phylotype were highly enriched in 13C, while the accompanying bacteria had little or no 13C incorporation. These results demonstrate that the dominant phylotype was indeed the apparent benzene degrader. Dense-cell suspensions of the enrichment culture did not show metabolic activity toward added phenol or toluene, suggesting that benzene degradation did not proceed through anaerobic hydroxylation or methylation. Instead, benzoate was identified in

  18. Competitive Nitration of Benzene-Fluorobenzene and Benzene-Toluene Mixtures: Orientation and Reactivity Studies Using HPLC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankespoor, Ronald L.; Hogendoorn, Stephanie; Pearson, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The reactivity and orientation effects of a substituent are analyzed by using HPLC to determine the competitive nitration of the benzene-toluene and benzene-fluorobenzene mixtures. The results have shown that HPLC is an excellent instrumental method to use in analyzing these mixtures.

  19. Prolonged ethanol ingestion enhances benzene myelotoxicity and lowers urinary concentrations of benzene metabolite levels in CD-1 male mice.

    PubMed

    Marrubini, Giorgio; Castoldi, Anna F; Coccini, Teresa; Manzo, Luigi

    2003-09-01

    Benzene toxicity is attributed to its metabolism, which is primarily mediated by the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450 2E1 isoform (CYP2E1). The present study investigated the myelotoxicity and urinary concentrations of major benzene metabolites in adult CD-1 male mice treated with low levels of benzene vapors, ethanol, or a combination of the two. Groups of ethanol-treated (5% in a Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet, 3 weeks) or pair-fed control mice were exposed to 10 ppm benzene, 6 h per day, 5 days per week for 2 weeks, starting from the second week of ethanol administration. On the last day of treatment, the number of early and late erythroid progenitors (BFU-E and CFU-E) was reduced by 55%, while the number of granulocyte/macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM) was reduced by 36% in benzene-treated mice. Ethanol lowered the CFU-E, BFU-E, and CFU-GM colony formation by 33, 28, and 12%, respectively. In animals coexposed to benzene and ethanol, the CFU-E colony counts were decreased by 70%, the BFU-E by 80%, and the CFU-GM by 45%. Phenol (Ph), hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (Cat), and trans,trans-muconic acid (MA) were measured by HPLC-UV in urine samples collected weekly during the last 6-h benzene/air exposure session. In benzene-exposed mice urinary metabolite levels peaked at the end of the first week of treatment (microg/kg body weight (bw): Ph: 4931 +/- 1055; Cat: 109 +/- 17; HQ: 784 +/- 137; MA: 534 +/- 92) and significantly decreased at the end of the second week (microg/kg bw: Ph: 3909 +/- 984; Cat: 82 +/- 24; HQ: 337 +/- 72; MA: 235 +/- 55). In mice given benzene and ethanol, the urinary levels of Ph, Cat, HQ, and MA were significantly lower than those measured in the group given benzene alone. The urinary levels of Ph and Cat showed a decreasing trend, again, from the first to the second week of benzene exposure. These data indicate that chronic ethanol ingestion exacerbates benzene myelotoxicity and, in addition, reduces the urinary excretion of benzene metabolites in

  20. Methyl tunnelling in trihalogeno-trimethyl-benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinnel, J.; Häusler, W.; Mani, M.; Tazi, M.; Nusimovici, M.; Sanquer, M.; Wyncke, B.; Heidemann, A.; Carlile, C. J.; Tomkinson, J.; Hennion, B.

    1992-06-01

    Results of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) from 1,3,5-trihalogeno-2,4,6-trimethyl-benzenes are reported for the chloro-, the bromo- and the iodo-case. For the whole family the spectra show numerous similarities, in the μeV as well as in the meV range. We observe three tunnelling lines of equal intensity corresponding to three crystallographically inequivalent methyl rotors. The observed librational peaks are at much lower energies than expected from a pure threefold potential. Within the halogen family a systematic reduction of the barrier height is found with larger halogen sizes. The temperature dependence of the tunnelling energies shows the most pronounced difference between TBM and TIM, where the corresponding tunnelling lines even shift in opposite directions.

  1. Toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Yu, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Li-Jun; Sun, Han-Zhang

    1997-12-01

    Growth of Chlorella marine, Nannochloropsis oculata, Pyramidomonas sp., Platymonas subcordiformis and Phaeodactylum tricornutum exposed to monochlorobenzene (MCB), 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCB), 1, 2, 3, 4-tetrachlorobenzene (1, 2, 3, 4-TeCB) and pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) was tested. Tests of 72 h- EC 50 values showed that the toxicity ranged in the order: MCB<1,2-DCB<1,2,3,4-TeCBbenzene (CB) alone to marine algae was almost in the order: Pyramidomonas sp. < Platymonas subcordiformis < Nannochloropsis oculata < Chlorella marine < Phaeodactylum tricomutum. Study of the QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) between K OW and toxicity of CBs to marine algae showed good relationships between -log EC 50 and log K OW.

  2. Detailed mechanism for oxidation of benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the oxidation of benzene is presented and used to compute experimentally obtained concentration profiles and ignition delay times over a wide range of equivalence ratio and temperature. The computed results agree qualitatively with all the experimental trends. Quantitative agreement is obtained with several of the composition profiles and for the temperature dependence of the ignition delay times. There are indications, however, that some important reactions are as yet undiscovered in this mechanism. Recent literature expressions have been used for the rate coefficients of most important reactions, except for some involving phenol. The discrepancy between the phenol pyrolysis rate coefficient used in this work and a recent literature expression remains to be explained.

  3. Electroanalytical approaches to understanding benzene metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lunte, S M; Lunte, C E

    1990-01-01

    Electrochemical techniques are ideally suited to the study of the metabolism of aromatic xenobiotics because the metabolites are frequently easier to oxidize than the parent compounds. In many cases, the trace metabolites have the lowest oxidation potentials and hence electrochemical methods have the greatest selectivity for these compounds. The sensitivity of dual-electrode liquid chromatography-electrochemistry for the detection and identification of trace metabolites was demonstrated by the detection of the secondary metabolite, hydroquinone, in a microsomal incubation containing benzene and ascorbic acid. The use of an electrochemical detector in a series configuration provides increased selectivity for chemically reversible metabolites such as hydroquinone. Electrochemical methods can also be used to generate metabolites. The products of the electrochemical oxidation of phenol and biphenol are compared with those generated in a peroxidase incubation.

  4. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  5. N,N′-Bis(2-amino­benz­yl)ethane-1,2-diaminium bis­(4-methyl­benzene­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Garza Rodríguez, Luis Ángel; Bernès, Sylvain; Elizondo Martínez, Perla; Nájera Martínez, Blanca; Rodríguez de Luna, Sara L.

    2011-01-01

    The title salt, C16H24N4 2+·2C7H7O3S−, crystallizes with the dication situated on an inversion center and the anion in a general position. The cation contains two ammonium and two free amine groups, and the observed conformation for the chain linking the benzene rings is different from that found in the free tetra­amine and in the fully protonated tetra­amine. All amine and ammonium H atoms of the cation form hydrogen bonds with eight symmetry-related anions, using the sulfonate O atoms as acceptors. This arrangement for the ions precludes any π–π contacts between benzene rings in the crystal. PMID:22199748

  6. Single Benzene Green Fluorophore: Solid-State Emissive, Water-Soluble, and Solvent- and pH-Independent Fluorescence with Large Stokes Shifts.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Teruo; Tomiguchi, Kosuke; Masuhara, Akito; Pu, Yong-Jin; Katagiri, Hiroshi

    2015-06-15

    Benzene is the simplest aromatic hydrocarbon with a six-membered ring. It is one of the most basic structural units for the construction of π conjugated systems, which are widely used as fluorescent dyes and other luminescent materials for imaging applications and displays because of their enhanced spectroscopic signal. Presented herein is 2,5-bis(methylsulfonyl)-1,4-diaminobenzene as a novel architecture for green fluorophores, established based on an effective push-pull system supported by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. This compound demonstrates high fluorescence emission and photostability and is solid-state emissive, water-soluble, and solvent- and pH-independent with quantum yields of Φ=0.67 and Stokes shift of 140 nm (in water). This architecture is a significant departure from conventional extended π-conjugated systems based on a flat and rigid molecular design and provides a minimum requirement for green fluorophores comprising a single benzene ring.

  7. Benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emissions of 4-stroke motorbikes: Benefits and risks of the current TWC technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxer, Christian J.; Forss, Anna-Maria; Rüdy, Claudio; Heeb, Norbert V.

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been applied to determine benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emission rates of 4-stroke motorbikes. Extra emissions and duration of the cold start were deduced from the legislative urban driving cycle. The Common Artemis driving cycle was investigated to study the emission characteristics at transient driving from 0 to 135 km h -1. In addition, the benefits and risks of the currently available 3-way catalyst technology (TWC) are explored. Benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene cold start emissions of 230-290, 920-980 and 950-1270 mg start -1 were obtained for the TWC motorbikes, exceeding those without catalyst by more than a factor of 3. At hot engine/catalyst, benzene, toluene and C 2-benzene emission factors in the range of 10-140, 10-160 and 10-170 mg km -1 were found for the TWC motorbikes. Without catalyst, the corresponding emission factors were higher, varying from 40 to 260, 100 to 500 and 110 to 480 mg km -1, respectively. A comparison with the latest passenger car technology, with reported aromatic hydrocarbon (HC) emission factors of 0.2-3.0 mg km -1, revealed that the investigated 4-stroke motorbikes, indeed, are an important source of air pollution. Furthermore, cold start duration, driving distance under cold start influence and velocity dependence of aromatic HC emissions were deduced from time-resolved data. In addition, variations of aromatic HC mixing ratios were studied. Narrow and unimodal distributions of, e.g. benzene/C 2-benzene mixing ratios with median values of 0.46-0.73 were found for all motorbikes but one. This motorcycle, equipped with a TWC, showed a broad and bimodal distribution with a median mixing ratio of 1.47. Catalyst-induced formation of benzene from alkylbenzenes is the assumed process, leading to increased benzene/alkylbenzene mixing ratios.

  8. SC correction coils and magnets for the HERA proton ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, C.; Geerinck, J.; Moeller, H.; Heller, R.; Schmueser, P.; Bracke, P.

    1986-05-01

    The design, manufacture and performance of correction elements of the HERA proton ring is described. The quadrupole and sextupole correction coils are mounted on the cold beam pipe inside the main dipole magnets. Superferric dipole magnets for orbit correction are located adjacent to the main quadrupole magnets in a common cryostat which also contains the beam monitor.

  9. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  10. Benzene exposure: An overview of monitoring methods and their findings

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Clifford P.

    2014-01-01

    Benzene has been measured throughout the environment and is commonly emitted in several industrial and transportation settings leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposures. Inhalation is the most common exposure route but benzene rapidly penetrates the skin and can contaminant water and food resulting in dermal and ingestion exposures. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it still is a component of petroleum products, including gasoline, and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued sub to low ppm occupational exposures, though higher exposures exist in small, uncontrolled workshops in developing countries. Emissions from gasoline/petrochemical industry are its main sources to the ambient air, but a person’s total inhalation exposure can be elevated from emissions from cigarettes, consumer products and gasoline powered engines/tools stored in garages attached to homes. Air samples are collected in canisters or on adsorbent with subsequent quantification by gas chromatography. Ambient air concentrations vary from sub-ppb range, low ppb, and tens of ppb in rural/suburban, urban, and source impacted areas, respectively. Short-term environmental exposures of ppm occur during vehicle fueling. Indoor air concentrations of tens of ppb occur in microenvironments containing indoor sources. Occupational and environmental exposures have declined where regulations limit benzene in gasoline (<1%) and cigarette smoking has been banned from public and work places. Similar controls should be implemented worldwide to reduce benzene exposure. Biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk include: benzene in breath, blood and urine; its urinary metabolites: phenol, t,t-muconic acid (t,tMA) and S-phenylmercapturic acid (sPMA); and blood protein adducts. The biomarker studies suggest benzene environmental exposures are in the sub to low ppb range though non-benzene sources for urinary metabolites

  11. The contribution of benzene to smoking-induced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Korte, J E; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Schulz, M R; Ball, L M; Duell, E J

    2000-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of leukemia; benzene, an established leukemogen, is present in cigarette smoke. By combining epidemiologic data on the health effects of smoking with risk assessment techniques for low-dose extrapolation, we assessed the proportion of smoking-induced total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) attributable to the benzene in cigarette smoke. We fit both linear and quadratic models to data from two benzene-exposed occupational cohorts to estimate the leukemogenic potency of benzene. Using multiple-decrement life tables, we calculated lifetime risks of total leukemia and AML deaths for never, light, and heavy smokers. We repeated these calculations, removing the effect of benzene in cigarettes based on the estimated potencies. From these life tables we determined smoking-attributable risks and benzene-attributable risks. The ratio of the latter to the former constitutes the proportion of smoking-induced cases attributable to benzene. Based on linear potency models, the benzene in cigarette smoke contributed from 8 to 48% of smoking-induced total leukemia deaths [95% upper confidence limit (UCL), 20-66%], and from 12 to 58% of smoking-induced AML deaths (95% UCL, 19-121%). The inclusion of a quadratic term yielded results that were comparable; however, potency models with only quadratic terms resulted in much lower attributable fractions--all < 1%. Thus, benzene is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-tenth to one-half of smoking-induced total leukemia mortality and up to three-fifths of smoking-related AML mortality. In contrast to theoretical arguments that linear models substantially overestimate low-dose risk, linear extrapolations from empirical data over a dose range of 10- to 100-fold resulted in plausible predictions. PMID:10753092

  12. The contribution of benzene to smoking-induced leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Korte, J E; Hertz-Picciotto, I; Schulz, M R; Ball, L M; Duell, E J

    2000-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of leukemia; benzene, an established leukemogen, is present in cigarette smoke. By combining epidemiologic data on the health effects of smoking with risk assessment techniques for low-dose extrapolation, we assessed the proportion of smoking-induced total leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) attributable to the benzene in cigarette smoke. We fit both linear and quadratic models to data from two benzene-exposed occupational cohorts to estimate the leukemogenic potency of benzene. Using multiple-decrement life tables, we calculated lifetime risks of total leukemia and AML deaths for never, light, and heavy smokers. We repeated these calculations, removing the effect of benzene in cigarettes based on the estimated potencies. From these life tables we determined smoking-attributable risks and benzene-attributable risks. The ratio of the latter to the former constitutes the proportion of smoking-induced cases attributable to benzene. Based on linear potency models, the benzene in cigarette smoke contributed from 8 to 48% of smoking-induced total leukemia deaths [95% upper confidence limit (UCL), 20-66%], and from 12 to 58% of smoking-induced AML deaths (95% UCL, 19-121%). The inclusion of a quadratic term yielded results that were comparable; however, potency models with only quadratic terms resulted in much lower attributable fractions--all < 1%. Thus, benzene is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-tenth to one-half of smoking-induced total leukemia mortality and up to three-fifths of smoking-related AML mortality. In contrast to theoretical arguments that linear models substantially overestimate low-dose risk, linear extrapolations from empirical data over a dose range of 10- to 100-fold resulted in plausible predictions. PMID:10753092

  13. MINARETS WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, N. King; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Minarets Wilderness and adjacent areas in the central Sierra Nevada, California was conducted. The results of the survey indicate that the study area has a substantiated resource potential for small deposits of copper, silver, zinc, lead, and iron, and a probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum. No energy-resource potential was identified in the study.

  14. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  15. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  16. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  17. 46 CFR 148.445 - Adjacent spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES CARRIAGE OF BULK SOLID MATERIALS... transporting a material that Table 148.10 of this part associates with a reference to this section, the following requirements must be met: (a) Each space adjacent to a cargo hold must be ventilated by...

  18. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Byung-Il; Hirabayashi, Yoko; Kawasaki, Yasushi; Kodama, Yukio; Kaneko, Toyozo; Kanno, Jun; Kim, Dae-Yong; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Tohru

    2002-11-01

    Benzene can induce hematotoxicity and leukemia in humans and mice. Since a review of the literature shows that the CYP2E1 knockout mouse is not known to possess any benzene toxicity, the metabolism of benzene by CYP2E1 in the liver is regarded to be prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, although the mechanism is not fully understood yet. Because it was found some years ago that benzene was also a substrate for CYP1A1, we investigated the involvement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in benzene hematotoxicity using AhR wild-type (AhR(+/+)), heterozygous (AhR(+/-)), and homozygous (AhR(-/-)) male mice. Interestingly, following a 2-week inhalation of 300 ppm benzene (a potent dose for leukemogenicity), no hematotoxicity was induced in AhR(-/-) mice. Further, there were no changes in cellularity of peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM), nor in levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units in BM. This lack of hematotoxicity was associated with the lack of p21 overexpression, which was regularly seen in the wild-type mice following benzene inhalation. Combined treatment with two major benzene metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, induced hemopoietic toxicity, although it was not known whether this happened due to a surprising lack of expression of CYP2E1 by AhR knockout, or due to a lack of other AhR-mediated CYP enzymes, including 1A1 (i.e., a possible alternative pathway of benzene metabolism). The former possibility, evaluated in the present study, failed to show a significant relationship between AhR and the expression of CYP2E1. Furthermore, a subsequent evaluation of AhR expression after benzene inhalation tended to show higher but less significant expression in the liver, and none in the BM, compared with sham control. Although this study failed to identify the more likely of the above-mentioned two possibilities, the study using AhR knockout mice on benzene inhalation presents the unique possibility that the benzene toxicity may be

  19. 2-[(E)-2-(4-Eth­oxy­phen­yl)ethen­yl]-1-methyl­quinolinium 4-fluoro­benzene­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Kobkeatthawin, Thawanrat; Ruanwas, Pumsak; Quah, Ching Kheng; Chantrapromma, Suchada

    2014-01-01

    In the structure of the title salt, C20H20NO+·C6H4FO3S−, the 4-(eth­oxy­phen­yl)ethenyl unit is disordered over two positions with a refined site-occupancy ratio of 0.610 (6):0.390 (6). The cation is nearly planar, the dihedral angle between the quinolinium and benzene rings being 6.7 (4) and 1.7 (7)° for the major and minor components, respectively. The eth­oxy group is essentially coplanar with the benzene ring [C—O—C—Cmethy = 177.1 (8) and 177.8 (12)° for the major and minor components, respectively]. In the crystal, cations and anions are linked into chains along the b-axis direction by C—H⋯Osulfon­yl weak inter­actions. These chains are further connected into sheets parallel to (001) by C—H⋯Osulfon­yl weak inter­actions. The chains are also stacked along the a axis through π–π inter­actions involving the quinolinium and benzene rings [centroid–centroid distances = 3.636 (5) Å for the major component and 3.800 (9) Å for the minor component]. C—H⋯π inter­actions are also present. PMID:24526963

  20. Persistent organic pollutants in ringed seals from the Russian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Savinov, Vladimir; Muir, Derek C G; Svetochev, Vladislav; Svetocheva, Olga; Belikov, Stanislav; Boltunov, Andrey; Alekseeva, Ludmila; Reiersen, Lars-Otto; Savinova, Tatiana

    2011-06-15

    Organochlorine compounds total DDT (ΣDDT), total HCH isomers (ΣHCH), toxaphenes (sum of Parlar 26, 50, 62), mirex, endrin, methoxychlor, total chlorinated benzenes (ΣCBz), total chlordane compounds (ΣCHL), polychlorinated biphenyls (total of 56 congeners; ΣPCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (sum of 7 tri- to hepta congeners; ΣPBDEs) were analysed in the blubber of adult ringed seals from the four areas of the Russian Arctic (White Sea, Barents Sea, Kara Sea and Chukchi Sea) collected in 2001-2005. Ringed seals from the south-western part of the Kara Sea (Dikson Island - Yenisei estuary) were the most contaminated with ΣDDTs, ΣPCBs, ΣCHL, and mirex as compared with those found in the other three areas of Russian Arctic, while the highest mean concentrations of ΣHCHs and PCDD/Fs were found in the blubber of ringed seals from the Chukchi Sea and the White Sea, respectively. Among all organochlorine compounds measured in ringed seals from the European part of the Russian Arctic, concentrations of ΣDDT and ΣPCBs only were higher as compared with the other Arctic regions. Levels of all other organochlorine compounds were similar or lower than in seals from Svalbard, Alaska, the Canadian Arctic and Greenland. ΣPBDEs were found in all ringed seal samples analysed. There were no significant differences between ΣPBDE concentrations found in the blubber of ringed seals from the three studied areas of the European part of the Russian Arctic, while PBDE contamination level in ringed seals from the Chukchi Sea was 30-50 times lower. ΣPBDE levels in the blubber of seals from the European part of the Russian Arctic are slightly higher than in ringed seals from the Canadian Arctic, Alaska, and western Greenland but lower compared to ringed seals from Svalbard and eastern Greenland.

  1. Crystal structure of 1,3-bis-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl-meth-yl)benzene.

    PubMed

    Macías, Mario A; Nuñez-Dallos, Nelson; Hurtado, John; Suescun, Leopoldo

    2016-06-01

    The mol-ecular structure of the title compound, C20H16N6, contains two benzotriazole units bonded to a benzene nucleus in a meta configuration, forming dihedral angles of 88.74 (11) and 85.83 (10)° with the central aromatic ring and 57.08 (9)° with each other. The three-dimensional structure is controlled mainly by weak C-H⋯N and C-H⋯π inter-actions. The mol-ecules are connected in inversion-related pairs, forming the slabs of infinite chains that run along the [-110] and [110] directions. PMID:27308049

  2. Crystal structure of 1-bromo-4-methane­sulfonyl-2,3-di­methyl­benzene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shangwei; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C9H11BrO2S, is an important inter­mediate in the synthesis of the herbicide Topramezone. In the crystal, there are weak inter­molecular Br⋯O inter­actions of 3.286 (4) Å. The dihedral angle between the plane of the benzene ring and that defined by the O—S—O atoms of the methane­sulfonyl group is 49.06 (3)°. PMID:26870557

  3. A Porous Aromatic Framework Constructed from Benzene Rings Has a High Adsorption Capacity for Perfluorooctane Sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qin; Zhao, Changwei; Liu, Guixia; Ren, Hao

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost and easily constructed porous aromatic framework (PAF-45) was successfully prepared using the Scholl reaction. PAF-45 was, for the first time, used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Systematic experiments were performed to determine the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS and to characterize the kinetics of the adsorption process. The adsorption of PFOS onto PAF-45 reached equilibrium in 30 min, and the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS was excellent (5847 mg g−1 at pH 3). The amount of PFOS adsorbed by PAF-45 increased significantly as the cation (Na+, Mg2+, or Fe3+) concentration increased, which probably occurred because the cations enhanced the interactions between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and the positively charged PAF-45 surface. The cations Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+ were found to form complexes with PFOS anions in solution. Density functional theory was used to identify the interactions between PFOS and Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+. We expect that materials of the same type as PAF-45 could be useful adsorbents for removing organic pollutants from industrial wastewater and contaminated surface water. PMID:26843015

  4. A Porous Aromatic Framework Constructed from Benzene Rings Has a High Adsorption Capacity for Perfluorooctane Sulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qin; Zhao, Changwei; Liu, Guixia; Ren, Hao

    2016-02-01

    A low-cost and easily constructed porous aromatic framework (PAF-45) was successfully prepared using the Scholl reaction. PAF-45 was, for the first time, used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Systematic experiments were performed to determine the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS and to characterize the kinetics of the adsorption process. The adsorption of PFOS onto PAF-45 reached equilibrium in 30 min, and the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS was excellent (5847 mg g‑1 at pH 3). The amount of PFOS adsorbed by PAF-45 increased significantly as the cation (Na+, Mg2+, or Fe3+) concentration increased, which probably occurred because the cations enhanced the interactions between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and the positively charged PAF-45 surface. The cations Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+ were found to form complexes with PFOS anions in solution. Density functional theory was used to identify the interactions between PFOS and Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+. We expect that materials of the same type as PAF-45 could be useful adsorbents for removing organic pollutants from industrial wastewater and contaminated surface water.

  5. Peroxidase-dependent metabolism of benzene's phenolic metabolites and its potential role in benzene toxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M T; Yager, J W; Steinmetz, K L; Eastmond, D A

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of two of benzene's phenolic metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, by peroxidase enzymes has been studied in detail. Studies employing horseradish peroxidase and human myeloperoxidase have shown that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide phenol is converted to 4,4'-diphenoquinone and other covalent binding metabolites, whereas hydroquinone is converted solely to 1,4-benzoquinone. Surprisingly, phenol stimulates the latter conversion rather than inhibiting it, an effect that may play a role in the in vivo myelotoxicity of benzene. Indeed, repeated coadministration of phenol and hydroquinone to B6C3F1 mice results in a dramatic and significant decrease in bone marrow cellularity similar to that observed following benzene exposure. A mechanism of benzene-induced myelotoxicity is therefore proposed in which the accumulation and interaction of phenol and hydroquinone in the bone marrow and the peroxidase-dependent formation of 1,4-benzoquinone are important components. This mechanism may also be responsible, at least in part, for benzene's genotoxic effects, as 1,4-benzoquinone has been shown to damage DNA and is shown here to induce multiple micronuclei in human lymphocytes. Secondary activation of benzene's phenol metabolites in the bone marrow may therefore play an important role in benzene's myelotoxic and carcinogenic effects. PMID:2551665

  6. On multiple Einstein rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M. C.; An, J.; Evans, N. W.

    2008-12-01

    A number of recent surveys for gravitational lenses have found examples of double Einstein rings. Here, we analytically investigate the occurrence of multiple Einstein rings. We prove, under very general assumptions, that at the most one Einstein ring can arise from a mass distribution in a single plane lensing a single background source. Two or more Einstein rings can therefore only occur in multiplane lensing. Surprisingly, we show that it is possible for a single source to produce more than one Einstein ring. If two point masses, or two isothermal spheres, in different planes are aligned with observer and source on the optical axis, we show that there are up to three Einstein rings. We also discuss the image morphologies for these two models if axisymmetry is broken, and give the first instances of magnification invariants in the case of two-lens planes.

  7. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ring motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings

  8. All-benzene carbon nanocages: size-selective synthesis, photophysical properties, and crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Katsuma; Segawa, Yasutomo; Itami, Kenichiro

    2014-11-19

    The design and synthesis of a series of carbon nanocages consisting solely of benzene rings are described. Carbon nanocages are appealing molecules not only because they represent junction unit structures of branched carbon nanotubes, but also because of their potential utilities as unique optoelectronic π-conjugated materials and guest-encapsulating hosts. Three sizes of strained, conjugated [n.n.n]carbon nanocages (1, n = 4; 2, n = 5; 3, n = 6) were synthesized with perfect size-selectivity. Cyclohexane-containing units and 1,3,5-trisubstituted benzene-containing units were assembled to yield the minimally strained bicyclic precursors, which were successfully converted into the corresponding carbon nanocages via acid-mediated aromatization. X-ray crystallography of 1 confirmed the cage-shaped structure with an approximately spherical void inside the cage molecule. The present studies revealed the unique properties of carbon nanocages, including strain energies, size-dependent absorption and fluorescence, as well as unique size-dependency for the electronic features of 1-3. PMID:25361385

  9. Experimental confirmation of the dicarbonyl route in the photo-oxidation of toluene and benzene.

    PubMed

    Gómez Alvarez, E; Viidanoja, J; Muñoz, A; Wirtz, K; Hjorth, J

    2007-12-15

    The methodology of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with O-(2,3,4,5,6)-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) on-fiber derivatization for the determination of carbonyls has been applied to the photo-oxidation of benzene and toluene carried out in the EUPHORE chambers. This work focuses on the results obtained for a number of highly reactive carbonyls, crucial in the determination of branching ratios and confirmation of the carbonylic route. The observed yields and kinetic behavior were compared to simulations with the Master Chemical Mechanism model, version 3.1 (MCMv3.1). The following yields were measured in the toluene system: glyoxal, (37 +/- 2)%; methylglyoxal, (37 +/- 2)%; 4-oxo-2-pentenal, > (13.8 +/- 1.5)%; and total butenedial, (13 +/- 7)% (cis-butenedial, (6 +/- 3)%; trans-butenedial, (7 +/- 4)%]. For benzene, the experimental glyoxal yields were (42 +/- 3) and (36 +/- 2)% for the two successive experiments (September 24 and 25, 2003), (17 +/- 9)% for total butenedial [(8 +/- 4)% cis-butenedial and (9 +/- 5)% trans-butenedial (September 24, 2003)] and (15 +/- 6)% total butenedial (September 25, 2003) [(7 +/- 3) and (7 +/- 3)% for the cis and trans isomers, respectively]. PTR-MS estimations for butenedial also allowed the two isomers of butenedial to be distinguished, but the measurements showed signs of interference from other products. The results presented confirm the fast ring cleavage and provide further experimental confirmation of the dicarbonylic route.

  10. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  11. Deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy: A resonance-absorption trade-off illustrated by diluted liquid benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, C. T.; Willitsford, A. H.; Philbrick, C. R.; Hallen, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    The magnitude of resonance Raman intensity, in terms of the real signal level measured on-resonance compared to the signal level measured off-resonance for the same sample, is investigated using a tunable laser source. Resonance Raman enhancements, occurring as the excitation energy is tuned through ultraviolet absorption lines, are used to examine the 1332 cm-1 vibrational mode of diamond and the 992 cm-1 ring-breathing mode of benzene. Competition between the wavelength dependent optical absorption and the magnitude of the resonance enhancement is studied using measured signal levels as a function of wavelength. Two system applications are identified where the resonance Raman significantly increases the real signal levels despite the presence of strong absorption: characterization of trace species in laser remote sensing and spectroscopy of the few molecules in the tiny working volumes of near-field optical microscopy.

  12. (E)-4-[4-(Diethyl-amino)-benzyl-idene-ammonio]-benzene-sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Ruanwas, Pumsak; Chantrapromma, Suchada; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2012-07-01

    The title compound, C(17)H(20)N(2)O(3)S, synthesised from sulfanilic acid and 4-diethyl-amino-benzaldehyde, crystallized out as a zwitterion with the central N atom protonated. The zwitterion exists in an E conformation with respect to the C=N double bond. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 37.57 (5)°. In the crystal, the zwitterions are linked into a tape along the a axis by N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The crystal structure is further stabilized by weak C-H⋯O inter-actions and π-π inter-actions with a centroid-centroid distance of 3.8541 (6) Å. An O⋯O [2.8498 (11) Å] short contact is present.

  13. Imaging the Bonds of Dehalogenated Benzene Radicals on Cu(111) and Au(111).

    PubMed

    Simic-Milosevic, Violeta; Mehlhorn, Michael; Morgenstern, Karina

    2016-09-01

    Dissociative adsorption of doubly substituted benzene molecules leads to formation of benzyne radicals. In this study, co-adsorbed hydrogen molecules are used in scanning tunneling hydrogen microscopy to enhance the contrast of the meta- and the para-isomers of these radicals on Cu(111) and Au(111). Up to three hydrogen molecules are attached to one radical. One hydrogen molecule reveals the orientation of the carbon ring and its adsorption site, allowing discrimination between the two radicals. Two hydrogen molecules reflect the bond picture of the carbon skeleton and reveals that adsorption on Cu(111) distorts the meta- isomer differently from its gas-phase distortion. Three hydrogen molecules allow us to determine the bond picture of a minor species.

  14. Temperatures of Saturn's rings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The 20-micron brightness temperatures of the rings were determined using the 224-cm telescope of the Mauna Kea Observatory, and the standard University of Hawaii radiometer with a 17- to 25-micron filter. The observations were made on the nights of Aug. 20 and 21, and Sept. 26 and 27, 1972. The brightness temperatures of the A, B, and C rings are, respectively, 89 plus or minus 3 K, 94 plus or minus 2 K, and 89 plus or minus 4 K. A possible explanation of the relatively high temperature of the C ring is that Saturn has radiation belts and the inner ring is heated by particle bombardment.

  15. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  16. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  17. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  2. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  3. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  4. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  5. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  7. 40 CFR 80.1235 - What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements of this subpart? 80.1235 Section 80.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Gasoline Benzene Requirements § 80.1235 What gasoline is subject to the benzene requirements...

  8. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  9. 40 CFR 80.1285 - How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a benzene... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Benzene Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program § 80.1285 How does a refiner apply for a benzene baseline? (a) A benzene...

  10. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  11. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  12. 40 CFR 80.1356 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline benzene compliance? 80.1356 Section 80.1356 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene Attest Engagements § 80.1356 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline benzene... that contain gasoline benzene and gasoline volume information. (2) Agree the yearly volumes of...

  13. 40 CFR 80.1220 - What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the gasoline benzene program? 80.1220 Section 80.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Benzene General Information § 80.1220 What are the implementation dates for the gasoline benzene program? (a) Benzene standard. (1) For the annual averaging period beginning January 1, 2011, and for...

  14. Probing the stability of the M2(Benzene)3 M = Fe, Co, and Ni structures upon electron attachment (deletion) and solvated iron clusters by benzene molecules: Fe2(Benzene)4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Raul; Cortes, Hector F.; Castro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Rice-ball (RB) and multiple decker sandwich (MDS) structures of clusters containing transition metal atoms and benzene (Bz) molecules, [M2Bz3]±1 M = Fe, Co, and Ni were studied by means of density functional theory all-electron calculations including dispersion correction as in the BPW91-D2 method. A RB geometry was identified for the ground state (GS) of neutral Fe2Bz3. However, consistent with reported experimental results, RB and MDS structures may occur for the Fe2Bz3- ion. The RB and MDS isomers of Co2Bz3 are degenerate; they have comparable ionization energies; this finding is in agreement with the experimental results, where two isomers were identified also. Experiment and theory suggest that the Co2Bz3- ion has similar geometry, MDS, as the neutral parent. RB and MDS motifs are degenerate for both Ni2Bz3 and Ni2Bz3+ . A RB form is predicted for Ni2Bz3- . In the GS of Fe2Bz4 one benzene molecule was found in the outer region of the RB Fe2Bz3 subcluster; it presents a binding energy (D0) of 4.6 kcal/mol, being originated from weak van der Waals forces. Thus, bridging the internal ligands, the fourth molecule has solvent behavior in the singlet Fe2Bz4 GS. Likewise, 3 + 1 MDS isomers of Fe2Bz4 were found at higher energies, ≈ 13.1 kcal/mol, from the GS. In Fe2Bz4-, the RB motif yields the GS with a D0 of 6.7 kcal/mol for the solvent unit. Having a D0 of 9.0 kcal/mol for such moiety the MDS Fe2Bz4- ion is near in energy (3.6 kcal/mol) to the Fe2Bz4- GS. The GS has an electron affinity (EA) of 0.40 eV. Notably, the MDS isomer has a larger EA (0.83 eV). The outer molecule in the 3 + 1 RB GS is stabilized by a network of dipole Cδ--Hδ+-Cδ- interactions, formed between the external (internal) hydrogen atoms and the π-electrons of the internal (external) benzene rings. Dipole C-Hintδ+-Cextδ- interactions predominate in the 3 + 1 MDS isomers.

  15. Volatilization of benzene and eight alkyl-substituted benzene compounds from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Predicting the fate of organic compounds in streams and rivers often requires knowledge of the volatilization characteristics of the compounds. The reference-substance concept, involving laboratory-determined ratios of the liquid-film coefficients for volatilization of the organic compounds to the liquid-film coefficient for oxygen absorption, is used to predict liquid-film coefficients for streams and rivers. In the absence of experimental data, two procedures have been used for estimating these liquid-film coefficient ratios. These procedures, based on the molecular-diffusion coefficient and on the molecular weight, have been widely used but never extensively evaluated. Liquid-film coefficients for the volatilization of benzene and eight alkyl-substituted benzene compounds (toluene through n-octylbenzene) from water were measured in a constant-temperature, stirred water bath. Liquid-film coefficients for oxygen absorption were measured simultaneously. A range of water mixing conditions was used with a water temperature of 298.2 K. The ratios of the liquid-film coefficients for volatilization to the liquid-film coefficient for oxygen absorption for all of the organic compounds were independent of mixing conditions in the water. Experimental ratios ranged from 0.606 for benzene to 0.357 for n-octylbenzene. The molecular-diffusion-coefficient procedure accurately predicted the ratios for ethylbenzene through n-pentylbenzene with a power dependence of 0.566 on the molecular-diffusion coefficient, in agreement with published values. Predicted ratios for benzene and toluene were slightly larger than the experimental ratios. These differences were attributed to possible interactions between the molecules of these compounds and the water molecules and to benzene-benzene interactions that form dimers. Because these interactions also are likely to occur in natural waters, it was concluded that the experimental ratios are more correct than the predicted ratios for

  16. Transfer of electronic energy from cyclohexane to benzene to tetramethylphenylenediamine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.B.; Lipsky, S. )

    1991-03-07

    The absorption of 160-nm light by cyclohexane in mixtures of cyclohexane, benzene, and tetraphenylmethylenediamine results in an emission spectrum consisting of the simultaneous fluorescence from all three components. A mechanism for the development of this spectrum and its dependence on benzene concentration is constructed and shown to be quantitatively consistent with the results of independent measurements on the separate components. In the absence of tetraphenylmethylenediamine, the quenching of cyclohexane fluorescence by benzene is found to be well represented by the standard diffusion model but with important contributions from transient terms. However, the concomitant sensitization of benzene fluorescence via energy transfer from cyclohexane is found to occur with an efficiency factor of only 0.26 {plus minus} 0.02 per encounter.

  17. Chemisorption of benzene and STM dehydrogenation products on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N.; Hedouin, M. F.; Palmer, R. E.; Persson, M.

    2003-10-01

    Modification of individual chemisorbed benzene molecules on Cu(100) has recently been performed in atomic manipulation experiments [J. Phys. Chem. A. 104, 2463 (2000); Surf. Sci 451, 219 (2000)]. Benzene dissociates under controlled voltage pulses in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) junction. The reaction is characterized as a dehydrogenation process and the fragments are identified as benzyne, C6H4. Here we present a density functional theory investigation of the chemisorption of benzene on the Cu(100) surface, the nature of the bonding and its effect on the STM images. The fragments phenyl and benzyne formed after one-fold and two-fold dehydrogenation of chemisorbed benzene are studied in the same manner. The stability of the fragments is explored via their chemisorption energy, their electronic structure on the surface and their affinity for hydrogen. Benzyne fragments seem to be the most stable, in agreement with the conclusion of the aforementioned STM experiments.

  18. Which ornamental plant species effectively remove benzene from indoor air?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan-Ju; Mu, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ding, Hui; Crystal Arens, Nan

    Phytoremediation—using plants to remove toxins—is an attractive and cost effective way to improve indoor air quality. This study screened ornamental plants for their ability to remove volatile organic compounds from air by fumigating 73 plant species with 150 ppb benzene, an important indoor air pollutant that poses a risk to human health. The 10 species found to be most effective at removing benzene from air were fumigated for two more days (8 h per day) to quantify their benzene removal capacity. Crassula portulacea, Hydrangea macrophylla, Cymbidium Golden Elf., Ficus microcarpa var. fuyuensis, Dendranthema morifolium, Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis, Dieffenbachia amoena cv. Tropic Snow; Spathiphyllum Supreme; Nephrolepis exaltata cv. Bostoniensis; Dracaena deremensis cv. Variegata emerged as the species with the greatest capacity to remove benzene from indoor air.

  19. A PROBABILISTIC MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is modifying their probabilistic Stochastic Human Exposure Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model to assess aggregate exposures to air toxics. Air toxics include urban Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPS) such as benzene from mobile sources, part...

  20. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  1. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  2. Benzene dosimetry in experimental animals: relevance for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Henderson, R F; Sabourin, P J; Medinsky, M A; Birnbaum, L S; Lucier, G L

    1992-01-01

    The findings of the studies summarized in this report provide some understanding of the possible role of dosimetry in the different response of the rats and mice to benzene in the long-term bioassay studies. The more sensitive species, the mice, definitely has a higher capacity to metabolize benzene and to metabolize it to more of the putative toxic metabolites than do rats. A major finding of these studies is that in three different animal species, from mice to monkeys, the metabolic pathways leading to production of the putative toxic metabolites appear to be low-capacity, high-affinity pathways that are saturated at relatively low-exposure concentrations. This does not prove, but suggests, that the same may be true in humans. If the total formation of the putative toxic metabolites is predictive of the toxicity of benzene, then the animal studies suggest that calculations of the risk associated with low dose exposures based on the results of animal studies conducted at high doses would underestimate the toxicity of benzene. The current report concerns only dosimetry. Another problem in assessing the risk to humans from benzene exposure is the fact that the animal models do not respond to benzene in the same way as humans. The major concern for humans exposed to benzene, based on epidemiology studies, is the risk of developing acute myelogenous leukemia (Rinksy, 1987). The cancers developed by the rodents on the long-term bioassay studies were at other sites (liver, lung, Zymbal's gland, lymph tissue, ovaries, and mammary gland). There is as yet no good animal model for benzene-induced leukemia. However, it has been suggested that benzene may also increase the incidence of Hodgkin's disease, malignant lymphoma, multiple myeloma and lung cancer in humans, although a statistical basis for this is lacking (Askoy, 1985). It is not unreasonable to assume that whatever form of cancer is induced, the induction is most likely through the reactive metabolites produced

  3. Dissociative Ionization of Benzene by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred; Dateo, Christopher; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of benzene from the low-lying ionization channels. Our approach makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and DI is treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in an ion with the same nuclear geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the nuclei relax from the initial geometry and undergo unimolecular dissociation. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For the unimolecular dissociation step, we study the steepest descent reaction path to the minimum of the ion potential energy surface. The path is used to analyze the probability of unimolecular dissociation and to determine the product distributions. Our analysis of the dissociation products and the thresholds of the productions are compared with the result dissociative photoionization measurements of Feng et al. The partial oscillator strengths from Feng et al. are then used in the iBED cross section calculations.

  4. Complex formation between benzene carboxylic acids and β-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakova, L. A.; Lyashenko, D. Yu.

    2008-05-01

    Complex formation between benzene carboxylic acids and β-cyclodextrin in aqueous solutions at 290 300 K was studied using UV spectroscopy. The formation of 1:1 supramolecular inclusion compounds β-cyclodextrin-benzene and β-cyclodextrin-salicylic acid was found. Stability constants (Ks) of the complexes and thermodynamic parameters for formation of the inclusion compounds (ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) were calculated.

  5. Alice, Benzene, and Coffee: The ABCs of Ecopharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2015-12-01

    The sesquicentennial celebrations of the publication of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and the structure of benzene offer a unique opportunity to develop a contemporary interpretation of aspects of Alice's adventures, illuminate the symbolism of benzene, and contextualize both with the globalization of coffee, transitioning to how the philosophy and sustainable practices of ecopharmacognosy may be applied to modulating approaches to the quality, safety, efficacy, and consistency (QSEC) of traditional medicines and dietary supplements through technology integration, thereby improving patient-centered health care.

  6. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  7. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  8. Sub-Doppler Electronic Spectrum of the BENZENE-D2 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masato; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Excitation spectrum of the benzene-D2 van der Waals (vdW) complex in the vicinity of the S1 ← S0 601 vibronic transition of the monomer was recorded by utilizing mass-selective two-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization. Extensive adiabatic cooling with the rotational temperature of ěrb|<| 0.5 K was conducted by the high-pressure pulsed expansion, and sub-Doppler resolution yielding the line width of 250 MHz was realized in a collimated molecular beam by employing Fourier-transform-limited ultraviolet pulses for the excitation. In contrast to our previous study on the benzene-H2 complex, weaker binding ortho nuclear-spin isomer, correlating to the j = 0 state of a freely rotating D2, was observed in addition to the stronger binding para isomer (with j = 1), by using a gas sample of normal D2. Three and two vibronic bands involving vdW-mode excitation were observed for the para and ortho isomers, respectively. By comparing the present results with those of the benzene-H2 complex, we made unambiguous assignments on the vdW modes involved in each observed band, and obtained complete sets of vibrational frequencies of all the three vdW modes for the both H2 and D2 isotopomers in the S1 61 manifold. One of the vdW frequency correlates to the splitting between the m = 0 and ± 1 sublevels in the j = 1 state of a freely rotating H2/D2 molecule, and the potential barrier for the hindered internal rotation has been evaluated to be ca. 60 cm-1 from the values. Ratio of the vdW frequencies between the H2 and D2 species deviate significantly from the value for the harmonic vibration (i.e., √{2} ≈ 1.4), indicating substantial anharmonic character of the vdW modes in the complex. M. Hayashi and Y. Ohshima, Chem. Phys. 419, 131-137 (2013). M. Hayashi and Y. Ohshima, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 9819-9830 (2013).

  9. Ring Around a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Space Telescope Science Institute astronomers are giving the public chances to decide where to aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Guided by 8,000 Internet voters, Hubble has already been used to take a close-up, multi-color picture of the most popular object from a list of candidates, the extraordinary 'polar-ring' galaxy NGC 4650A. Located about 130 million light-years away, NGC 4650A is one of only 100 known polar-ring galaxies. Their unusual disk-ring structure is not yet understood fully. One possibility is that polar rings are the remnants of colossal collisions between two galaxies sometime in the distant past, probably at least 1 billion years ago. What is left of one galaxy has become the rotating inner disk of old red stars in the center. Meanwhile, another smaller galaxy which ventured too close was probably severely damaged or destroyed. The bright bluish clumps, which are especially prominent in the outer parts of the ring, are regions containing luminous young stars, examples of stellar rebirth from the remnants of an ancient galactic disaster. The polar ring appears to be highly distorted. No regular spiral pattern stands out in the main part of the ring, and the presence of young stars below the main ring on one side and above on the other shows that the ring is warped and does not lie in one plane. Determining the typical ages of the stars in the polar ring is an initial goal of our Polar Ring Science Team that can provide a clue to the evolution of this unusual galaxy. The HST exposures were acquired by the Hubble Heritage Team, consisting of Keith Noll, Howard Bond, Carol Christian, Jayanne English, Lisa Frattare, Forrest Hamilton, Anne Kinney and Zolt Levay, and guest collaborators Jay Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Lynn Matthews (National Radio Astronomy Observatory-Charlottesville), and Linda Sparke (University of Wisconsin-Madison).

  10. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  11. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  12. Consistent assignment of the vibrations of monosubstituted benzenes.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Adrian M; Wright, Timothy G

    2011-09-21

    We investigate the consistency of the labeling and assignments of the vibrations of the monosubstituted benzenes in the electronic ground state. In doing so, we also identify some inconsistencies in the labeling of the benzene modes. We commence by investigating the behavior of the benzene vibrations as one hydrogen is replaced by an artificial atomic substituent of increasing mass via quantum chemical calculations; the wavenumber variations with mass give insight into the assignments. We also examine how well the monohalobenzene vibrations can be described in terms of the benzene ones: consistent with some recent studies, we conclude that this is futile in a significant number of cases. We then show that "isotopic wavenumbers" obtained by artificially changing the mass of the fluorine atom in fluorobenzene are in very good agreement with the wavenumbers obtained via explicit calculation for the relevant monohalobenzene (chlorobenzene, bromobenzene, and iodobenzene) vibrations. As a consequence, we propose that the vibrations of monofluorobenzene be used as the basis for labelling the vibrational assignments of monosubstituted benzenes. As well as the four monohalobenzenes, we also apply this approach to the vibrations of aniline, toluene, benzonitrile, phenylacetylene, phenylphosphine, and nitrobenzene. This has allowed a much more consistent picture of the vibrational assignments to be obtained across ten monosubstituted benzenes. PMID:21950860

  13. Consistent assignment of the vibrations of monosubstituted benzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the consistency of the labeling and assignments of the vibrations of the monosubstituted benzenes in the electronic ground state. In doing so, we also identify some inconsistencies in the labeling of the benzene modes. We commence by investigating the behavior of the benzene vibrations as one hydrogen is replaced by an artificial atomic substituent of increasing mass via quantum chemical calculations; the wavenumber variations with mass give insight into the assignments. We also examine how well the monohalobenzene vibrations can be described in terms of the benzene ones: consistent with some recent studies, we conclude that this is futile in a significant number of cases. We then show that "isotopic wavenumbers" obtained by artificially changing the mass of the fluorine atom in fluorobenzene are in very good agreement with the wavenumbers obtained via explicit calculation for the relevant monohalobenzene (chlorobenzene, bromobenzene, and iodobenzene) vibrations. As a consequence, we propose that the vibrations of monofluorobenzene be used as the basis for labelling the vibrational assignments of monosubstituted benzenes. As well as the four monohalobenzenes, we also apply this approach to the vibrations of aniline, toluene, benzonitrile, phenylacetylene, phenylphosphine, and nitrobenzene. This has allowed a much more consistent picture of the vibrational assignments to be obtained across ten monosubstituted benzenes.

  14. Cultivating microbial dark matter in benzene-degrading methanogenic consortia.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Devine, Cheryl E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    The microbes responsible for anaerobic benzene biodegradation remain poorly characterized. In this study, we identified and quantified microbial populations in a series of 16 distinct methanogenic, benzene-degrading enrichment cultures using a combination of traditional 16S rRNA clone libraries (four cultures), pyrotag 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing (11 cultures), metagenome sequencing (1 culture) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR; 12 cultures). An operational taxonomic unit (OTU) from the Deltaproteobacteria designated ORM2 that is only 84% to 86% similar to Syntrophus or Desulfobacterium spp. was consistently identified in all enrichment cultures, and typically comprised more than half of the bacterial sequences. In addition to ORM2, a sequence belonging to Parcubacteria (candidate division OD1) identified from the metagenome data was the only other OTU common to all the cultures surveyed. Culture transfers (1% and 0.1%) were made in the presence and absence of benzene, and the abundance of ORM2, OD1 and other OTUs was tracked over 415 days using qPCR. ORM2 sequence abundance increased only when benzene was present, while the abundance of OD1 and other OTUs increased even in the absence of benzene. Deltaproteobacterium ORM2 is unequivocally the benzene-metabolizing population. This study also hints at laboratory cultivation conditions for a member of the widely distributed yet uncultivated Parcubacteria (OD1).

  15. Cultivating microbial dark matter in benzene-degrading methanogenic consortia.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Devine, Cheryl E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    The microbes responsible for anaerobic benzene biodegradation remain poorly characterized. In this study, we identified and quantified microbial populations in a series of 16 distinct methanogenic, benzene-degrading enrichment cultures using a combination of traditional 16S rRNA clone libraries (four cultures), pyrotag 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing (11 cultures), metagenome sequencing (1 culture) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR; 12 cultures). An operational taxonomic unit (OTU) from the Deltaproteobacteria designated ORM2 that is only 84% to 86% similar to Syntrophus or Desulfobacterium spp. was consistently identified in all enrichment cultures, and typically comprised more than half of the bacterial sequences. In addition to ORM2, a sequence belonging to Parcubacteria (candidate division OD1) identified from the metagenome data was the only other OTU common to all the cultures surveyed. Culture transfers (1% and 0.1%) were made in the presence and absence of benzene, and the abundance of ORM2, OD1 and other OTUs was tracked over 415 days using qPCR. ORM2 sequence abundance increased only when benzene was present, while the abundance of OD1 and other OTUs increased even in the absence of benzene. Deltaproteobacterium ORM2 is unequivocally the benzene-metabolizing population. This study also hints at laboratory cultivation conditions for a member of the widely distributed yet uncultivated Parcubacteria (OD1). PMID:26549712

  16. Hairy cell leukaemia and occupational exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, J; Conso, F; Limasset, J C; Mandereau, L; Roche, P; Flandrin, G; Hémon, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The role of occupational exposures in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) was investigated through a multicentre, hospital based, case-control study. This paper analyses the role of exposure to benzene in HCL. METHODS: A population of 226 male cases of HCL and 425 matched controls were included in the study. Benzene exposure was evaluated by expert review of the detailed data on occupational exposures generated by case-control interviews. RESULTS: No association was found between HCL and employment in a job exposed to benzene (odds ratio (OR) 0.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.6-1.3)). The sample included 125 subjects, 34 cases (15%), and 91 controls (21%) who had been exposed to benzene, as individually assessed by the experts, for at least one hour a month during one of their jobs. Benzene exposure was not associated with a risk of HCL (OR 0.8 (0.5-1.2)). No trend towards an increase in OR was detected for increasing exposures, the percentage of work time involving exposure to > 1 ppm, or the duration of exposure. No findings suggested a particular risk period, when the OR associated with the time since first or last exposure, or since the end of exposure, were examined. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, with the low exposures prevalent in the sample, the study did not show any association between benzene exposure and HCL. PMID:8983464

  17. Iron piston having selectively hardened ring groove

    SciTech Connect

    Brann, D.E.; Lindsay, J.E.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a long-lasting cast iron piston body for an internal combustion engine, the piston body comprising a generally cylindrical sidewall and having an annular groove in the wall encircling the body for receiving a piston ring. The groove is defined by opposed faces that intersect the wall, the piston body being composed predominantly of gray iron characterized by an as-cast pearlitic microstructure, the groove face comprising an integrally cast, selectively hardened iron band adjacent the piston sidewall and encircling the piston body. The band is characterized by a martensitic microstructure substantially harder than the pearlitic microstructure and is effective to reduce wear resulting from a piston ring seated within the groove.

  18. Ring Opening of Naphthenic Molecules Over Metal Containing Mesoporous Y Zeolite Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Eun Sang; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Lee, Chang-Ha; Jeong, Soon-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Mesoporous Y zeolite (Meso-Y) with a uniform mesopore was synthesized via pseudomorphic syn- thesis. The Meso-Y supported Ni-W catalyst (NiW/Meso-Y) was introduced as a catalyst for the selective ring opening of naphthenic rings. The catalytic test for the ring opening of naphthalene as a model compound of multi-ring aromatics was performed using a batch-type reaction system with both sulfided 20 wt% NiW/Meso-Y and NiW/Y catalysts under different reaction conditions. The catalytic results reveal that the Meso-Y supported NiW catalyst experiences a naphthalene conversion similar to the NiW/Y catalyst, but the NiW/Meso-Y catalyst has higher product yields for BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene) and the middle distillate than those of the NiW/Y catalyst at a low reaction temperature. These results suggest that the mesoporosity of the NiW/Meso-Y catalyst is more advantageous for the ring opening reaction of multi-ring aromatics due to the easier access for the bulky molecules compared to the NiW/Y catalyst.

  19. The Phylogenetic Signature Underlying ATP Synthase c-Ring Compliance

    DOE PAGES

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Taylor, Willie R.; Junge, Wolfgang; Khan, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    The proton-driven ATP synthase (FOF1) is comprised of two rotary, stepping motors (FO and F1) coupled by an elastic power transmission. The elastic compliance resides in the rotor module that includes the membrane-embedded FO c-ring. Proton transport by FO is firmly coupled to the rotation of the c-ring relative to other FO subunits (ab2). It drives ATP synthesis. We used a computational method to investigate the contribution of the c-ring to the total elastic compliance. We performed principal component analysis of conformational ensembles built using distance constraints from the bovine mitochondrial c-ring x-ray structure. Angular rotary twist, the dominant ringmore » motion, was estimated to show that the c-ring accounted in part for the measured compliance. Ring rotation was entrained to rotation of the external helix within each hairpin-shaped c-subunit in the ring. Ensembles of monomer and dimers extracted from complete c-rings showed that the coupling between collective ring and the individual subunit motions was independent of the size of the c-ring, which varies between organisms. Molecular determinants were identified by covariance analysis of residue coevolution and structural-alphabet-based local dynamics correlations. The residue coevolution gave a readout of subunit architecture. The dynamic couplings revealed that the hinge for both ring and subunit helix rotations was constructed from the proton-binding site and the adjacent glycine motif (IB-GGGG) in the midmembrane plane. IB-GGGG motifs were linked by long-range couplings across the ring, while intrasubunit couplings connected the motif to the conserved cytoplasmic loop and adjacent segments. The correlation with principal collective motions shows that the couplings underlie both ring rotary and bending motions. Noncontact couplings between IB-GGGG motifs matched the coevolution signal as well as contact couplings. The residue coevolution reflects the physiological importance of the dynamics

  20. Delivery of benzene to Alcaligenes xylosoxidans by solid polymers in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Daugulis, Andrew J; Amsden, Brian G; Bochanysz, Justina; Kayssi, Ahmed

    2003-07-01

    Toxic levels of benzene were decreased to sub-inhibitory levels in a bioreactor via absorption by polymer beads or cylinders (poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) or poly(styrene-co-butadiene)). After inoculation with Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, the remaining benzene in the aqueous phase as well as the benzene taken up by the polymers was degraded to completion. The capacity of these polymers for benzene, and benzene diffusivity within the polymers were also determined.

  1. [The advance of model of action in low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Zhang, Zhengbao; Chen, Liping; Chen, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Benzene is classified as Group 1 carcinogen by IARC. It has been found that benzene induces hematotoxicity even in low dose exposure. The identification of key events during benzene induced hematotoxicty leads to adjustment of occupational exposure limits of benzene. In this review, we focus on the exposure, metabolism, target organs, key epigenetic changes, toxicty effects and end points of low-dose chronic benzene exposure induced hematotoxicity and finally discuss the perspectives on the future study of this area.

  2. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  3. Lower esophageal ring (Schatzki)

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrowed area to stretch the ring. Sometimes, a balloon is placed in the area and inflated, to help widen the ring. Outlook (Prognosis) Swallowing problems may return. You may need repeat treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you ...

  4. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  5. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  6. Smoke Ring Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampère's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features.

  7. Crystal structure of piperazine-1,4-diium bis­(4-amino­benzene­sulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Sathesh; Ranjith, S.; Sudhakar, S.; Srinivasan, P.; Ponnuswamy, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C4H12N2 2+·2C6H6NO3S−, consists of half a piperazindiium dication, located about an inversion centre, and a 4-amino­benzene­sulfonate anion. The piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, the cations and anions are linked via N—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional framework. Within the framework there are C—H⋯π inter­actions and the N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds result in the formation of R 4 4(22) and R 3 4(13) ring motifs. PMID:26870510

  8. C-glycoside clustering on calix[4]arene, adamantane, and benzene scaffolds through 1,2,3-triazole linkers.

    PubMed

    Dondoni, Alessandro; Marra, Alberto

    2006-09-29

    A route has been paved toward the preparation of triazole glycocluster libraries via the copper(I)-catalyzed modern version of the classical Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides to alkynes. Up to four 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole rings bearing carbon-linked glycosyl fragments were constructed on various scaffolds via multiple cycloadditions of suitably polyfunctionalized calix[4]arene, adamantane, and benzene derivatives with ethynyl and azidomethyl C-glycosides. Each cycloaddition occurred with high regioselectivity to give exclusively the 1,4-disubstituted triazole ring in very high yield up to an average value of 98%. The high degree of efficiency of this approach and its wide scope constitute a simple and practical means for the attachment of various sugar units to polyfunctionalized substrates.

  9. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  10. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  11. Proteogenomic elucidation of the initial steps in the benzene degradation pathway of a novel halophile, Arhodomonas sp. strain Rozel, isolated from a hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Sonal; Azetsu, Sei; Patrauchan, Marianna A; Aktas, Deniz F; Fathepure, Babu Z

    2012-10-01

    Lately, there has been a special interest in understanding the role of halophilic and halotolerant organisms for their ability to degrade hydrocarbons. The focus of this study was to investigate the genes and enzymes involved in the initial steps of the benzene degradation pathway in halophiles. The extremely halophilic bacteria Arhodomonas sp. strain Seminole and Arhodomonas sp. strain Rozel, which degrade benzene and toluene as the sole carbon source at high salinity (0.5 to 4 M NaCl), were isolated from enrichments developed from contaminated hypersaline environments. To obtain insights into the physiology of this novel group of organisms, a draft genome sequence of the Seminole strain was obtained. A cluster of 13 genes predicted to be functional in the hydrocarbon degradation pathway was identified from the sequence. Two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to corroborate the role of the predicted open reading frames (ORFs). ORFs 1080 and 1082 were identified as components of a multicomponent phenol hydroxylase complex, and ORF 1086 was identified as catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (2,3-CAT). Based on this analysis, it was hypothesized that benzene is converted to phenol and then to catechol by phenol hydroxylase components. The resulting catechol undergoes ring cleavage via the meta pathway by 2,3-CAT to form 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which enters the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To substantiate these findings, the Rozel strain was grown on deuterated benzene, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected deuterated phenol as the initial intermediate of benzene degradation. These studies establish the initial steps of the benzene degradation pathway in halophiles.

  12. STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEEL TRUSS TENSION RING SUPPORTING DOME ROOF. TENSION RING COVERED BY ARCHITECTURAL FINISH. TENSION RING ROLLER SUPPORT AT COLUMN OBSCURED BY COLUMN COVERINGS. - Houston Astrodome, 8400 Kirby Drive, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. Contribution of tobacco smoke to environmental benzene exposure in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.; Ruppert, T.; Daube, H.

    1995-12-31

    The concentrations of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) constituents including benzene were measured in the living rooms of 10 nonsmoking households and 20 households with at least one smoker situated in the city and suburbs of Munich. In the city, the median benzene levels during the evening, when all household members were at home, were 8.1 and 10.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in nonsmoking and smoking homes, respectively. The corresponding levels of 3.5 and 4.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} were considerably lower in the suburbs. Median time-integrated 1-week benzene concentrations in the city were 10.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in nonsmoking homes and 13.1 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in smoking homes. In the suburbs, the corresponding values were 3.2 and 5.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. No difference was found between smoking and nonsmoking households located either in the city or in the suburbs. There was no statistically significant difference between benzene exposure of non-smokers in smoking and nonsmoking homes. Nonsmokers living in nonsmoking households in the city had significantly higher exposure to benzene compared to their counterparts living in the suburban. Nonsmokers from all households with smokers were significantly more exposed to benzene than nonsmokers living in the nonsmoking households (personal samplers: 13.2 vs. 7.0 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, p < 0.05; benzene in exhalate: 2.6 vs. 1.8 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, p < 0.01; trans-muconic acid excretion in urine: 73 vs. 62 {mu}g/g creatinine), but the contribution of ETS to the total benzene exposure was relatively low compared to that from other sources. Analysis of variance showed that at most 15% of the benzene exposure of nonsmokers living in smoking homes was attributable to ETS. For nonsmokers living in nonsmoking households benzene exposure from ETS was insignificant.

  14. Analysis of the magnetically induced current density of molecules consisting of annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon rings.

    PubMed

    Sundholm, Dage; Berger, Raphael J F; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-06-21

    Magnetically induced current susceptibilities and current pathways have been calculated for molecules consisting of two pentalene groups annelated with a benzene (1) or naphthalene (2) moiety. Current strength susceptibilities have been obtained by numerically integrating separately the diatropic and paratropic contributions to the current flow passing planes through chosen bonds of the molecules. The current density calculations provide novel and unambiguous current pathways for the unusual molecules with annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon moieties. The calculations show that the benzene and naphthalene moieties annelated with two pentalene units as in molecules 1 and 2, respectively, are unexpectedly antiaromatic sustaining only a local paratropic ring current around the ring, whereas a weak diatropic current flows around the C-H moiety of the benzene ring. For 1 and 2, the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are antiaromatic and a slightly weaker semilocal paratropic current flows around the two pentalene rings. Molecules 1 and 2 do not sustain any net global ring current. The naphthalene moiety of the molecule consisting of a naphthalene annelated with two pentalene units (3) does not sustain any strong ring current that is typical for naphthalene. Instead, half of the diatropic current passing the naphthalene moiety forms a zig-zag pattern along the C-C bonds of the naphthalene moiety that are not shared with the pentalene moieties and one third of the current continues around the whole molecule partially cancelling the very strong paratropic semilocal ring current of the pentalenes. For molecule 3, the pentalene moieties and the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are more antiaromatic than for 1 and 2. The calculated current patterns elucidate why the compounds with formally [4n + 2] π-electrons have unusual aromatic properties violating the Hückel π-electron count rule. The current density calculations also provide

  15. Structure of the Benzene - by Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Melanie; Erlekam, Undine; Von Helden, Gert; Meijer, Gerard; Bunker, Philip R.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Van Der Avoird, Ad

    2013-06-01

    The benzene dimer is the prototype system for Van der Waals interactions between aromatic molecules. Here, we report a joint experimental and theoretical study regarding normal (C_6H_6)_2 and the partially deuterated (C_6D_6)(C_6H_6) isotopologue. Interestingly, although its tilted T-shaped equilibrium structure corresponds to an asymmetric rotor, both isotopologues exhibit the rotational spectrum of a symmetric rotor, with a characteristic quartet splitting pattern due to internal tunneling motions: each transition exhibits a -2 : -1 : +1 : +2 splitting ratio with respect to its center. We unravel these splittings with the aid of the unrivalled resolution of the supersonic-jet FT-microwave experiment which provides accurate split-patterns, by means of a reduced-dimensionality model for the internal dynamics of the (rotating) dimer that reproduces them. They turn out to originate from a concerted tunneling mechanism involving both the hindered rotation of the stem in the T-shaped dimer around its sixfold axis and tilt tunneling. We also show that the observed intensities of the tunneling components are not solely determined by nuclear spin statistical weights. Rather, taking small differences in the dissociation energies of different dimer nuclear spin species into account, the kinetics of the dimer formation and equilibration can bias the populations of the tunneling symmetry species. Using Stark shift measurements, we determine the dipole moment of (C_6H_6)_2 to be μ = 0.580(51) D, in agreement with the value of 0.63 D calculated with the assumption that the dipole moment is mainly determined by the dipoles induced in both monomers by the electric field of the quadrupole of the other monomer. M. Schnell, U. Erlekam, P. R. Bunker, G. v. Helden, J.-U. Grabow, G. Meijer, A. van der Avoird, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., DOI: 10.1002/anie.201300653 and 10.1002/ange.201300653

  16. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  17. Collision dynamics of polyatomic molecules containing carbon rings at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhiying; Heller, Eric J.; Krems, Roman V.

    2014-09-14

    We explore the collision dynamics of complex hydrocarbon molecules (benzene, coronene, adamantane, and anthracene) containing carbon rings in a cold buffer gas of {sup 3}He. For benzene, we present a comparative analysis of the fully classical and fully quantum calculations of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at collision energies between 1 and 10 cm{sup −1}. The quantum calculations are performed using the time-independent coupled channel approach and the coupled-states approximation. We show that the coupled-states approximation is accurate at collision energies between 1 and 20 cm{sup −1}. For the classical dynamics calculations, we develop an approach exploiting the rigidity of the carbon rings and including low-energy vibrational modes without holonomic constraints. Our results illustrate the effect of the molecular shape and the vibrational degrees of freedom on the formation of long-lived resonance states that lead to low-temperature clustering.

  18. catena-Poly[[[bis­(thio­cyanato-κN)zinc(II)]-μ-1,2-bis­{[2-(2-pyrid­yl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl]meth­yl}benzene] 0.28-hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Shi, Haochen; Gao, Yunfeng; Ma, Hongjun

    2010-01-01

    The title one-dimensional coordination polymer, {[Zn(NCS)2(C24H20N6)2]·0.28H2O}n, was obtained by the reaction of Zn(OAc)2·2H2O, KSCN and 1,2-bis­{[2-(2-pyrid­yl)-1H-imid­azol-1-yl]meth­yl}benzene (hereafter L). The ZnII ion shows a distorted octa­hedral coordination geometry and is coordin­ated by two N atoms from two SCN− anions and four N atoms from two organic ligands. The L ligands act as bridging bis-chelating ligands with cis coordination modes at the ZnII ion. One-dimensional coordination polymers are arranged into layers by π–π stacking inter­actions between the imidazole rings of adjacent chains, with an inter­planar distance of 3.46 (1) Å and centroid–centroid distances of 3.8775 (16) Å. One of the thio­cyanate ligands is disordered over two positions with an occupancy factor of 0.564 (3) for the major component. The partially occupied water mol­ecule forms an O—H⋯S hydrogen bond with the disordered thio­cyanate group. PMID:21588174

  19. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  20. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi.

    PubMed

    Karst, Nathaniel; Dralle, David; Thompson, Sally

    2016-01-01

    A broad class of soil fungi form the annular patterns known as 'fairy rings' and provide one of the only means to observe spatio-temporal dynamics of otherwise cryptic fungal growth processes in natural environments. We present observations of novel spiral and rotor patterns produced by fairy ring fungi and explain these behaviors mathematically by first showing that a well known model of fairy ring fungal growth and the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model are mathematically equivalent. We then use bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations to identify the conditions under which spiral waves and rotors can arise. We demonstrate that the region of dimensionless parameter space supporting these more complex dynamics is adjacent to that which produces the more familiar fairy rings, and identify experimental manipulations to test the transitions between these spatial modes. These same manipulations could also feasibly induce fungal colonies to transition from rotor/spiral formation to a set of richer, as yet unobserved, spatial patterns.

  1. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-12-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  2. Dynamics of narrow rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The ring models described here were developed to account for the dynamical problems posed by the narrow rings of Uranus. Some of these rings are now known to be eccentric, inclined, nonuniform in width, optically thick, and narrow, with very sharp edges. The eccentric rings have common pericenters and large, positive eccentricity gradients. The theory of shepherding satellites successfully accounts for most of these features and can also account for some features of the narrow Saturnian rings, in particular, waves, kinks, and periodic variations in brightness. Outstanding problems include the putative relation between eccentricity and inclination displayed by eight of the nine Uranian rings, and the magnitudes of the tidal torques acting on the shepherding satellites. The horseshoe-orbit model, although viable, probably has more application to the narrow rings from which the Saturnian coorbital satellites formed. The angular momentum flow rate due to particle collisions is a minimum at the Lagrangian equilibrium points L(4) and L(5), and one can expect accretion to be rapid at these points.

  3. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  4. Transferable potentials for phase equilibria. 10. Explicit-hydrogen description of substituted benzenes and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rai, Neeraj; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2013-01-10

    The explicit-hydrogen version of the transferable potentials for phase equilibria (TraPPE-EH) force field is extended to various substituted benzenes through the parametrization of the exocyclic groups -F, -Cl, -Br, -C≡N, and -OH and to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the parametrization of the aromatic linker carbon atom for multiple rings. The linker carbon together with the TraPPE-EH parameters for aromatic heterocycles constitutes a force field for fused-ring heterocycles. Configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations in the Gibbs ensemble were carried out to compute vapor-liquid coexistence curves for fluorobenzene; chlorobenzene; bromobenzene; di-, tri-, and hexachlorobenzene isomers; 2-chlorofuran; 2-chlorothiophene; benzonitrile; phenol; dihydroxybenzene isomers; 1,4-benzoquinone; naphthalene; naphthalene-2-carbonitrile; naphthalen-2-ol; quinoline; benzo[b]thiophene; benzo[c]thiophene; benzoxazole; benzisoxazole; benzimidazole; benzothiazole; indole; isoindole; indazole; purine; anthracene; and phenanthrene. The agreement with the limited experimental data is very satisfactory, with saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures reproduced to within 1.5% and 15%, respectively. The mean unsigned percentage errors in the normal boiling points, critical temperatures, and critical densities are 0.9%, 1.2%, and 1.4%, respectively. Additional simulations were carried out for binary systems of benzene/benzonitrile, benzene/phenol, and naphthalene/methanol to illustrate the transferability of the developed potentials to binary systems containing compounds of different polarity and hydrogen-bonding ability. A detailed analysis of the liquid-phase structures is provided for selected neat systems and binary mixtures. PMID:23205778

  5. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  6. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  7. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  8. Soot precursor measurements in benzene and hexane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Furuhata, T.; Amagai, K.; Arai, M.

    2008-08-15

    To clarify the mechanism of soot formation in diffusion flames of liquid fuels, measurements of soot and its precursors were carried out. Sooting diffusion flames formed by a small pool combustion equipment system were used for this purpose. Benzene and hexane were used as typical aromatic and paraffin fuels. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method was used to obtain spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are considered as soot particles. Spatial distributions of soot in test flames were measured by a laser-induced incandescence (LII) method. Soot diameter was estimated from the temporal change of LII intensity. A region of transition from PAHs to soot was defined from the results of LIF and LII. Flame temperatures, PAH species, and soot diameters in this transition region were investigated for both benzene and hexane flames. The results show that though the flame structures of benzene and hexane were different, the temperature in the PAHs-soot transition region of the benzene flame was similar to that of the hexane flame. Furthermore, the relationship between the PAH concentrations measured by gas chromatography in both flames and the PAH distributions obtained from LIF are discussed. It was found that PAHs with smaller molecular mass, such as benzene and toluene, remained in both the PAHs-soot transition and sooting regions, and it is thought that molecules heavier than pyrene are the leading candidates for soot precursor formation. (author)

  9. Activation of bone marrow phagocytes following benzene treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, D L; MacEachern, L; Snyder, R

    1989-01-01

    Techniques in flow cytometry/cell sorting were used to characterize the effects of benzene and its metabolites on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. Treatment of male Balb/c mice with benzene (880 mg/kg) or a combination of its metabolites, hydroquinone and phenol (50 mg/kg), resulted in a 30 to 40% decrease in bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed two subpopulations of bone marrow cells that could be distinguished by their size and density or granularity. The larger, more dense subpopulation was found to consist predominantly of macrophages and granulocytes as determined by monoclonal antibody binding and by cell sorting. Benzene treatment had no selective cytotoxic effects on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. To determine if benzene treatment activated bone marrow phagocytes, we quantified production of hydrogen peroxide by these cells using the fluorescent indicator dye, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. We found that macrophages and granulocytes from bone marrow of treated mice produced 50% more hydrogen peroxide in response to the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate than did cells from control animals. It is hypothesized that phagocyte activation and production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates may contribute to hematotoxicity induced by benzene. PMID:2676504

  10. Products of the Benzene + O(3P) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Trevitt, Adam J.; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.; Sirjean, Baptiste; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Hai

    2009-12-21

    The gas-phase reaction of benzene with O(3P) is of considerable interest for modeling of aromatic oxidation, and also because there exist fundamental questions concerning the prominence of intersystem crossing in the reaction. While its overall rate constant has been studied extensively, there are still significant uncertainties in the product distribution. The reaction proceeds mainly through the addition of the O atom to benzene, forming an initial triplet diradical adduct, which can either dissociate to form the phenoxy radical and H atom, or undergo intersystem crossing onto a singlet surface, followed by a multiplicity of internal isomerizations, leading to several possible reaction products. In this work, we examined the product branching ratios of the reaction between benzene and O(3P) over the temperature range of 300 to 1000 K and pressure range of 1 to 10 Torr. The reactions were initiated by pulsed-laser photolysis of NO2 in the presence of benzene and helium buffer in a slow-flow reactor, and reaction products were identified by using the multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Phenol and phenoxy radical were detected and quantified. Cyclopentadiene and cyclopentadienyl radical were directly identified for the first time. Finally, ab initio calculations and master equation/RRKM modeling were used to reproduce the experimental branching ratios, yielding pressure-dependent rate expressions for the reaction channels, including phenoxy + H, phenol, cyclopentadiene + CO, which are proposed for kinetic modeling of benzene oxidation.

  11. [Study on catalytic oxidation of benzene by microwave heating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-cai; Bo, Long-li; Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Hai-nan; Zhang, Hao

    2012-08-01

    The performance in catalytic oxidation of benzene was investigated in two different heating modes, microwave heating and conventional electric furnace heating. The effects of copper (Cu)-manganese (Mn) mass ratio, doping dose of cerium (Ce) and calcination temperature on the catalytic activity of Cu-Mn-Ce/molecular sieve catalyst were also checked in catalytic oxidation of benzene with microwave heating, and the catalysts were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the catalyst had better catalytic activity for the oxidation of benzene under microwave heating than electric furnace heating, and high oxidation efficiency for benzene was reached due to the "local hot spots" and dipole polarization effect of microwave and stable bed reaction temperature. Under the conditions of Cu, Mn and Ce mass ratio 1:1:0.33 and calcination temperature 500 degrees C, the catalyst had the optimal catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, and its light-off temperature and complete combustion temperature were 165 degrees C and 230 degrees C, respectively. It was indicated by characteristics of XRD and SEM that the presence of copper and manganese oxides and Cu1.5Mn1.5O4 with spinel crystal improved the catalytic activity of the catalyst, and the doping of Ce promoted the dispersion and regularization of active components. High calcination temperature led to the sintering of the catalyst surface and agglomeration of active components, which decreased the catalytic activity of the catalyst in the catalytic oxidation

  12. Effects of benzene on erythropoiesis in the fetal mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Mizens, M.

    1981-01-01

    Benzene toxicity in humans and adult animals appears as a functional disturbance of hematopoiesis. The work presented here examined the effects of benzene on the fetal mouse and its blood forming organ, the liver. The study includes the effects on macromolecular synthesis in the fetal liver erythropoietic cells and the general effects of benzene on the development of the fetus. Although biochemical changes were noted in the liver of the fetus when the female was exposed to benzene, no histopathologic changes were found. The effects on DNA and heme synthesis in the fetal liver cell population suggest disturbances in the proliferation and maturation phases of the developing red blood cell. The biochemical perturbations observed in the erythropoietic activity of the fetal mouse liver appeared to have no long term effects on the fetus. It is suggested that the temporary effect on the fetus may be the result of inteplay between an increase in the females' rate of metabolism of benzene and the ability of the fetal liver to recover rapidly from disturbances in the erythropoietic cell cycle. Only when the dosing period was extended from day 11 of gestation to term, and the maternal health appeared to be deteriorating, was the viability of the litter affected.

  13. Is benzene a precursor for secondary organic aerosol?

    PubMed

    Martín-Reviejo, Montserrat; Wirtz, Klaus

    2005-02-15

    It is currently assumed that benzene contributes only negligibly to secondary organic aerosol formation in the atmosphere. Our understanding of the capacity of benzene to generate secondary aerosols is based on the work of Izumi and Fukuyama (Atmos. Environ. 1990, 24A, 1433) in which two photosmog experiments with benzene in the presence of NOx were performed and no particle formation was observed. In contrast to the observations of Izumi and Fukuyama, experiments performed in the EUPHORE large outdoor simulation chamber have clearly shown aerosol formation during the photochemical oxidation of benzene in various NOx regimes. The maximum aerosol yields of 8-25% on a mass basis are comparable to yields obtained during the photochemical oxidation of other aromatic compounds under similar conditions. In addition, a density of 1.35+/-0.04 g/cm3 for the secondary organic aerosol from the benzene photochemical oxidation in the presence of NOx has been determined through the simultaneous measurement of aerosol volume and aerosol mass using two independent measurement techniques. Comparing the results in the present work with previous findings underscores the strong influence that the NOx content in the system has on aerosol formation during the photochemical oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons and the importance of performing experiments with NOx concentrations relevant to the atmosphere.

  14. Benzene toxicokinetics in humans: exposure of bone marrow to metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, K H; Bois, F Y; Daisey, J M; Auslander, D M; Spear, R C

    1994-01-01

    A three compartment physiologically based toxicokinetic model was fitted to human data on benzene disposition. Two separate groups of model parameter derivations were obtained, depending on which data sets were being fitted. The model was then used to simulate five environmental or occupational exposures. Predicted values of the total bone marrow exposure to benzene and cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow were generated for each scenario. The relation between cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow and continuous benzene exposure was also investigated in detail for simulated inhalation exposure concentrations ranging from 0.0039 ppm to 150 ppm. At the level of environmental exposures, no dose rate effect was found for either model. The occupational exposures led to only slight dose rate effects. A 32 ppm exposure for 15 minutes predicted consistently higher values than a 1 ppm exposure for eight hours for the total exposure of bone marrow to benzene and the cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow. The general relation between the cumulative quantity of metabolites produced by the bone marrow and the inhalation concentration of benzene is not linear. An inflection point exists in some cases leading to a slightly S shaped curve. At environmental levels (0.0039-10 ppm) the curve bends upward, and it saturates at high experimental exposures (greater than 100 ppm). PMID:8044234

  15. Storage Ring EDM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Dedicated storage ring electric dipole moment (EDM) methods show great promise advancing the sensitivity level by a couple orders of magnitude over currently planned hadronic EDM experiments. We describe the present status and recent updates of the field.

  16. Highlights in planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, Carolyn C.

    1995-07-01

    There is a rich phenomenology within the planetary rings surrounding the giant planets, most of it discovered by the Voyagers during their historic tours of t he outer solar system in the 1980s. In the last decade, there have been two detailed IUGG reviews of planetary rings. Cuzzi [1983] covered the time period from 1979-1983 which included the Pioneer 11 encounter with Saturn (1979), the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters with Jupiter (1979) and with Saturn (1980 and 1981). Nicholson and Dones [1991] reviewed the developments in the field between 1984 and 1991, a period of time which included the Voyager 2 Uranus (1986) and Neptune (1989) encounters. (References t o additional reviews of planetary rings and related fields can be found in Nicholson and Dones [1991].) Rather than being comprehensive in nature, this review will concentrate on only those areas of ring research in which particularly promising developments have occurred in the last half decade.

  17. Heating Saturn's Clumpy Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Neal J.; Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda J.

    2015-11-01

    We model Cassini CIRS data using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer -- thermal balance technique first developed for protostellar disks, with the goals of:1. Exploring whether the A- and B-ring temperatures' variation with viewing angle is consistent with the wake structures suggested by the observed azimuthal asymmetry in optical depth, by analytic arguments, and by numerical N-body modeling.2. Better constraining the shape, size, spacing and optical depths of substructure in the A-ring, using the unexpectedly high temperatures observed at equinox. If the wake features have high enough contrast, Saturn-shine may penetrate the gaps between the wakes and heat thering particles both top and bottom.3. Determining how much of the heating of the A- and B-rings' unlit sides is due to radiative transport and how much is due to particle motions, especially vertical motions. This will help in constraining the rings' surface densities and masses.

  18. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interior and Interfacial Aqueous Solvation of Benzene Dicarboxylate Dianions and Their Methylated Analogues: A Combined Molecular Dynamics and Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Minofar, Babak; Vrbka, Lubos; Mucha, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Yang, Xin; Wang, Xue B.; Fu, Youjun; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-06-16

    Aqueous solvation of benzene dicarboxylate dianions (BCD2-) was studied by means of photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Photoelectron spectra of hydrated ortho-, and para-BCD2- with up to 25 water molecules were obtained. An even-odd effect was observed for the p-BCD2- system as a result of the alternate solvation of the two negative charges. However, the high polarizability of the benzene ring makes the two carboxylate groups interact with each other in p-BCD2-, suppressing the strength of this even-odd effect compared with the linear dicarboxylate dianions linked by an aliphatic chain. No even-odd effect was observed for the o-BCD2- system, because each solvent molecule can interact with the two carboxylate groups at the same time due to their proximity. For large solvated clusters, the spectral features of the solute decreased while the solvent features became dominant, suggesting that both o- and p-BCD2- are situated in the center of the solvated clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations with both non-polarizable and polarizable force fields confirmed that all three isomers (o-, m-, and p-BCD2-) solvate in the aqueous bulk. However, upon methylation the hydrophobic forces overwhelm electrostatic interactions and, as a result, the calculations predict that the tetra-methyl o-BCD2- is located at the water surface with the carboxylate groups anchored in the liquid and the methylated benzene ring tilted away from the aqueous phase.

  20. Ultrasonic Newton's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K. ); Dayal, V. )

    1992-03-09

    Interference fringes due to bondline thickness variation were observed in ultrasonic scans of the reflected echo amplitude from the bondline of adhesively joined aluminum skins. To demonstrate that full-field interference patterns are observable in point-by-point ultrasonic scans, an optical setup for Newton's rings was scanned ultrasonically in a water immersion tank. The ultrasonic scan showed distinct Newton's rings whose radii were in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  1. Genotoxicity of intermittent co-exposure to benzene and toluene in male CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Barbara A; Struve, Melanie F; Gao, Pu; Sharma, Sheela; Allison, Neil; Roberts, Kay C; Letinski, Daniel J; Nicolich, Mark J; Bird, Michael G; Dorman, David C

    2008-06-17

    Benzene is an important industrial chemical. At certain levels, benzene has been found to produce aplastic anemia, pancytopenia, myeloblastic anemia and genotoxic effects in humans. Metabolism by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and myeloperoxidase to hydroquinone, phenol, and other metabolites contributes to benzene toxicity. Other xenobiotic substrates for cytochrome P450 can alter benzene metabolism. At high concentrations, toluene has been shown to inhibit benzene metabolism and benzene-induced toxicities. The present study investigated the genotoxicity of exposure to benzene and toluene at lower and intermittent co-exposures. Mice were exposed via whole-body inhalation for 6h/day for 8 days (over a 15-day time period) to air, 50 ppm benzene, 100 ppm toluene, 50 ppm benzene and 50 ppm toluene, or 50 ppm benzene and 100 ppm toluene. Mice exposed to 50 ppm benzene exhibited an increased frequency (2.4-fold) of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) and increased levels of urinary metabolites (t,t-muconic acid, hydroquinone, and s-phenylmercapturic acid) vs. air-exposed controls. Benzene co-exposure with 100 ppm toluene resulted in similar urinary metabolite levels but a 3.7-fold increase in frequency of micronucleated PCE. Benzene co-exposure with 50 ppm toluene resulted in a similar elevation of micronuclei frequency as with 100 ppm toluene which did not differ significantly from 50 ppm benzene exposure alone. Both co-exposures - 50 ppm benzene with 50 or 100 ppm toluene - resulted in significantly elevated CYP2E1 activities that did not occur following benzene or toluene exposure alone. Whole blood glutathione (GSH) levels were similarly decreased following exposure to 50 ppm benzene and/or 100 ppm toluene, while co-exposure to 50 ppm benzene and 100 ppm toluene significantly decreased GSSG levels and increased the GSH/GSSG ratio. The higher frequency of micronucleated PCE following benzene and toluene co-exposure when compared with mice exposed to

  2. Nardo Ring, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Nardo Ring is a striking visual feature from space, and astronauts have photographed it several times. The Ring is a race car test track; it is 12.5 kilometers long and steeply banked to reduce the amount of active steering needed by drivers. The Nardo Ring lies in a remote area on the heel of Italy's 'boot,' 50 kilometers east of the naval port of Taranto. The Ring encompasses a number of active (green) and fallow (brown to dark brown) agricultural fields. In this zone of intensive agriculture, farmers gain access to their fields through the Ring via a series of underpasses. Winding features within the southern section of the Ring appear to be smaller, unused race tracks.

    The image covers an area of 18.8 x 16.4 km, was acquired on August 17. 2007, and is located at 49.3 degrees north latitude, 17.8 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  3. Collisional simulations of particles in a narrow planetary ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolvoord, Robert A.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    A model is used to investigate how particle-particle collisions might modify some consequences of satellite perturbations relevant to short-term features of narrow planetary rings. A Monte Carlo-like simulation ring-model particle velocity alteration allows the simulation of collisions while individual particles are tracked. Periodic features visible in Voyager images are reproduced in a 2D numerical model which incorporates the collisional simulation as well as the perturbations of adjacent satellites. Collisions are noted to wash out periodic features within one collisional relaxation time.

  4. 4-[(1-Benzyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)meth-oxy]benzene-1,2-dicarbo-nitrile: crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and energy-minimization calculations.

    PubMed

    Shamsudin, Norzianah; Tan, Ai Ling; Young, David J; Jotani, Mukesh M; Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-04-01

    In the solid state, the title compound, C18H13N5O, adopts a conformation whereby the phenyl ring and meth-oxy-benzene-1,2-dicarbo-nitrile residue (r.m.s. deviation of the 12 non-H atoms = 0.041 Å) lie to opposite sides of the central triazolyl ring, forming dihedral angles of 79.30 (13) and 64.59 (10)°, respectively; the dihedral angle between the outer rings is 14.88 (9)°. This conformation is nearly 7 kcal mol(-1) higher in energy than the energy-minimized structure which has a syn disposition of the outer rings, enabling intra-molecular π-π inter-actions. In the crystal, methyl-ene-C-H⋯N(triazol-yl) and carbo-nitrile-N⋯π(benzene) inter-actions lead to supra-molecular chains along the a axis. Supra-molecular layers in the ab plane arise as the chains are connected by benzene-C-H⋯N(carbo-nitrile) inter-actions; layers stack with no directional inter-actions between them. The specified inter-molecular contacts along with other, weaker contributions to the supra-molecular stabilization are analysed in a Hirshfeld surface analysis. PMID:27375890

  5. 4-[(1-Benzyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)meth­oxy]benzene-1,2-dicarbo­nitrile: crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and energy-minimization calculations

    PubMed Central

    Shamsudin, Norzianah; Tan, Ai Ling; Young, David J.; Jotani, Mukesh M.; Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2016-01-01

    In the solid state, the title compound, C18H13N5O, adopts a conformation whereby the phenyl ring and meth­oxy–benzene-1,2-dicarbo­nitrile residue (r.m.s. deviation of the 12 non-H atoms = 0.041 Å) lie to opposite sides of the central triazolyl ring, forming dihedral angles of 79.30 (13) and 64.59 (10)°, respectively; the dihedral angle between the outer rings is 14.88 (9)°. This conformation is nearly 7 kcal mol−1 higher in energy than the energy-minimized structure which has a syn disposition of the outer rings, enabling intra­molecular π–π inter­actions. In the crystal, methyl­ene-C—H⋯N(triazol­yl) and carbo­nitrile-N⋯π(benzene) inter­actions lead to supra­molecular chains along the a axis. Supra­molecular layers in the ab plane arise as the chains are connected by benzene-C—H⋯N(carbo­nitrile) inter­actions; layers stack with no directional inter­actions between them. The specified inter­molecular contacts along with other, weaker contributions to the supra­molecular stabilization are analysed in a Hirshfeld surface analysis. PMID:27375890

  6. Mortality among chemical workers exposed to benzene and other agents

    SciTech Connect

    Decoufle, P.; Blattner, W.A.; Blair, A.

    1983-02-01

    A historical cohort mortality study was conducted of 259 male employees of a chemical plant where benzene has been used in large quantites. The study group included all persons who were employed by the Company any time between January 1, 1947 and December 31, 1960. The cohort was followed through December 31, 1977 at which time 58 known deaths were identified. The only unusual findings was four deaths from lymphoreticular cancers when 1.1 would have been expected on the basis of national mortality rates. Three of the deaths were due to leukemia and one was caused by multiple myeloma. In addition, one of the leukemia deaths had multiple myeloma listed on the death certificate. The findings are consistent with previous reports of leukemia following occupational exposure to benzene and raise the possibility that multiple myeloma could be linked to benzene, also.

  7. Hydrogen bonding in the benzene-ammonia dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodham, David A.; Suzuki, Sakae; Suenram, Richard D.; Lovas, Frank J.; Dasgupta, Siddharth; Goddard, William A., III; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution optical and microwave spectra of the gas-phase benzene-ammonia dimer were obtained, showing that the ammonia molecule resides above the benzene plane and undergoes free, or nearly free, internal rotation. To estimate the binding energy (De) and other global properties of the intermolecular potential, theoretical calculations were performed for the benzene-ammonia dimer, using the Gaussian 92 (Fritsch, 1992) program at the MP2/6-31G** level. The predicted De was found to be at the lowest end of the range commonly accepted for hydrogen bonding and considerably below that of C6H6-H2O, consistent with the gas-phase acidities of ammonia and water. The observed geometry greatly resembles the amino-aromatic interaction found naturally in proteins.

  8. Production of aromatics-rich gasoline with low benzene content

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-12-04

    This patent describes a fixed bed process for the alkylation of reformate comprising C{sub 6{minus}} hydrocarbons to produce high octane gasoline. It comprises: separating a naphtha feedstream by fractionation into a lower boiling fraction comprising iso-C{sub 6} aliphatic hydrocarbon components and a reformer feedstock fraction comprising higher boiling C{sub 6+} aliphatic hydrocarbon components; reforming the reformer feedstock fraction comprising the higher boiling C{sub 6+} aliphatic components in contact with reforming catalyst and under reforming conditions to produce a reformate containing benzene and C{sub 7+} hydrocarbons; separating the reformate into a C{sub 6{minus}}hydrocarbon stream containing benzene and paraffins and a C{sub 7+} hydrocarbon stream; introducing the C{sub 6 {minus}} hydrocarbon stream and alkylating agent into an alkylating zone in contract with acidic metallosilicate catalyst under alkylating condition whereby benzene is alkylate to produce high octane gasoline containing C{sub 7+} aromatic hydrocarbons.

  9. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  10. Long non-coding RNA NR_045623 and NR_028291 involved in benzene hematotoxicity in occupationally benzene-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenlin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Gengxia; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    Benzene is an established human hematotoxicant and leukemogen. New insights into the pathogenesis of benzene hematotoxicity are urgently needed. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) widely participate in various physiological and pathological processes. It has been shown that lncRNA plays an important role in hematologic malignancy tumorigenesis. However, the expression and biological function of lncRNA during benzene hematotoxicity progress remain largely unknown. An integrated analysis of differentially expressed lncRNA and mRNA was performed to identify genes which were likely to be critical for benzene hematotoxicity through Microarray analysis. Dynamic gene network analysis of the differentially expressed lncRNA and mRNA was constructed and two main lncRNA (NR_045623 and NR_028291) were discovered and two key lncRNA subnets were involved in immune responses, hematopoiesis, B cell receptor signaling pathway and chronic myeloid leukemia. These findings suggested that NR_045623 and NR_028291 might be the key genes associated with benzene hematotoxicity.

  11. Elevated Atmospheric Levels of Benzene and Benzene-Related Compounds from Unconventional Shale Extraction and Processing: Human Health Concern for Residential Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Alisa L.; Orimoloye, Helen T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The advancement of natural gas (NG) extraction across the United States (U.S.) raises concern for potential exposure to hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). Benzene, a HAP and a primary chemical of concern due to its classification as a known human carcinogen, is present in petroleum-rich geologic formations and is formed during the combustion of bypass NG. It is a component in solvents, paraffin breakers, and fuels used in NG extraction and processing (E&P). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study are to confirm the presence of benzene and benzene-related compounds (benzene[s]) in residential areas, where unconventional shale E&P is occurring, and to determine if benzene[s] exists in elevated atmospheric concentrations when compared to national background levels. METHODS Ambient air sampling was conducted in six counties in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex with passive samples collected in evacuated 6-L Summa canisters. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, with sampling performed at variable distances from the facility fence line. RESULTS Elevated concentrations of benzene[s] in the atmosphere were identified when compared to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program. The 24-hour benzene concentrations ranged from 0.6 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 592 ppbv, with 1-hour concentrations from 2.94 ppbv to 2,900.20 ppbv. CONCLUSION Benzene is a known human carcinogen capable of multisystem health effects. Exposure to benzene is correlated with bone marrow and blood-forming organ damage and immune system depression. Sensitive populations (children, pregnant women, elderly, immunocompromised) and occupational workers are at increased risk for adverse health effects from elevated atmospheric levels of benzene[s] in residential areas with unconventional shale E&P. PMID:27199565

  12. 3,3'-(1-Oxopropane-1,3-di-yl)bis-(1,3-thia-zolidine-2-thione) chloro-benzene hemisolvate.

    PubMed

    Franzel, Christine; Purdy, Andrew; Butcher, Ray J

    2013-03-01

    The title compound, C9H12N2OS4·0.5C6H5Cl, which contains two 1,3-thia-zolidine-2-thione rings, is a by-product of the synthesis of 3-acryloyl-1,3-thia-zolidine-2-thione. The dihedral angle between these rings is 79.95 (9)°, with both rings displaying a twisted conformation. The twist angle of the amide group is 5.6 (1)°. In the crystal, the molecules are linked into [001] chains by C-H⋯O interactions. The chloro-benzene solvent mol-ecule was found to show unresolvable disorder about a centre of inversion and its contribution to the scattering was removed with the SQUEEZE option in PLATON [Spek (2009 ▶). Acta Cryst. D65, 148-155]. PMID:23476562

  13. The interaction of benzene and ethylene under Titan surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, Patricia; Vu, Tuan H.; Cable, Morgan L.; Hodyss, Robert P.; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    Previously, we have reported the discovery and characterization of a new co-crystal formed from benzene and ethane (Vu et al. 2014 J. Phys Chem. A 118, 4087; Cable et al. 2014 GRL 41, doi:10.1002/2014GL060531). This co-crystal would be thermodynamically stable on Titan’s surface, and forms easily from the interaction of liquid ethane and solid benzene, as well as from the evaporation of benzene saturated solutions of ethane. These results imply that the benzene-ethane co-crystal may be an important component of Titan’s evaporate deposits. The formation of these kinds of organic co-crystals may influence evaporite characteristics, such as particle size and infrared spectral properties.Here, we report our most recent experiments exploring the interaction between benzene and ethylene. Ethylene has been detected in Titan’s atmosphere, and some photochemical models predict a significant flux to the surface. We performed experiments examining the interaction of liquid ethylene with solid benzene under Titan-like conditions (90-150 K and 1 bar N2), using micro-Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy. We will present Raman spectra and vibrational analyses of the interaction, and implications for Titan’s surface chemistry and evolution.This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Copyright 2014, California Institute of Technology. Support by the NASA Astrobiology Institute (Titan as a Prebiotic Chemical System), the NASA Outer Planets Research Program and government sponsorship are gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Aberrant miRNA profiles associated with chronic benzene poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Yang, Jing; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    Chronic occupational benzene exposure is associated with an increased risk of hematological malignancies. To gain an insight into the new biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of chronic benzene poisoning, miRNA profiles and mRNA expression pattern from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronic benzene poisoning patients and health controls matched age and gender without benzene exposure were performed using the Exiqon miRNA PCR ARRAY and Gene Chip Human Gene 2.0ST Arrays, respectively. Totally, 6 up-regulated miRNAs (miR-34a, miR-205, miR-10b, let-7d, miR-185 and miR-423-5p-2) and 7 down-regulated miRNAs (miR-133a, miR-543, hsa-miR-130a, miR-27b,miR-223, miR-142-5p and miR-320b) were found in chronic benzene poisoning group compared to health controls (P ≤ 0.05). By integrating miRNA and mRNA expression data, these differential miRNAs were mainly involved in regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, axon guidance, regulation of transcription, DNA-dependent, nervous system development, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Further, pathway analysis indicated that SMAD4, PLCB1, NFAT5, GNAI2, PTEN, VEGFA, BCL2, CTNNB1 and CCND1 were key target genes of differential miRNAs which were implicated in Adherens junction, TGF-beta signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, tight junction and Pathways in cancer. In conclusion, the aberrant miRNAs might be a potential biomarker of chronic benzene poisoning.

  15. Development of an immunoassay to detect benzene adducts in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Grassman, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an immunoassay to detect the adducts formed in hemoglobin after exposure to benzene, which is known to cause bone marrow degeneration and acute myelogenous leukemia. The use of benzene-adduct detection as a biological monitoring method would permit measurement of low exposures and exposures sustained weeks earlier. The reactivity of hydroquinone, an important benzene metabolite, with blood proteins and amino acids was investigated in order to decide which antigens and analytes were likely to be suitable for immunoassay development. The second section determined the combination of benzene-metabolite and antigen need to produce an immunoassay with the requisite low detection limit and specificity. The immunoassays with the best performance were tested on hemoglobin from benzene-exposed mice. In vitro studies showed that hydroquinone efficiently formed adducts with erythrocyte membranes and hemoglobin but not with albumin. Adduction efficiency was greater in incubations using purified hemoglobin than whole blood. Cysteine accounted for 15 to 27% of the adducts formed by hydroquinone. The site of the other adducts were not identified although there was evidence that the hemoglobin heme was adducted. Adducts were found on only 1 of the 2 globin chains. Tryptic digestion of the globin failed to associate the adducts with a specific peptide. Antigens made from hydroquinone-adducted hemoglobin but not hydroquinone-adducted cysteines coupled to carrier proteins effectively elicited adduct-specific antibodies. Interference due to reactivity to hemoglobin was controlled by using uniform quantities of hemoglobin in all wells. The mid-range of the best assays were approximately 12 pmoles HQ per well. Antibodies directed toward hemoglobin adducted with the benzene metabolites phenol, catechol and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were also made. The performance of the anti-1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene were suitable for quantitative immunoassays.

  16. Exchange coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, H.; Csaba, G.; Bernstein, G. H.; Porod, W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate exchange-coupling between laterally adjacent nanomagnets. Our results show that two neighboring nanomagnets that are each antiferromagnetically exchange-coupled to a common ferromagnetic bottom layer can be brought into strong ferromagnetic interaction. Simulations show that interlayer exchange coupling effectively promotes ferromagnetic alignment between the two nanomagnets, as opposed to antiferromagnetic alignment due to dipole-coupling. In order to experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme, we fabricated arrays of pairs of elongated, single-domain nanomagnets. Magnetic force microscopy measurements show that most of the pairs are ferromagnetically ordered. The results are in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. The presented scheme can achieve coupling strengths that are significantly stronger than dipole coupling, potentially enabling far-reaching applications in Nanomagnet Logic, spin-wave devices and three-dimensional storage and computing.

  17. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  18. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  3. Molecular Origin of Thermal Diffusion in Benzene+Cyclohexane Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Debuschewitz, C.; Koehler, W.

    2001-07-30

    The isotope effect in thermal diffusion (Soret effect) of benzene+cyclohexane mixtures has been investigated by a holographic grating technique. The Soret coefficient can be split into additive contributions. One contribution, the isotope effect, stems from the differences of both mass and moment of inertia, and is independent of composition. An additional ''chemical'' contribution depends on concentration and even changes its sign at a benzene mole fraction x{sub benz}{approx}0.7 . The mass effect is in agreement with molecular dynamics calculations: the heavier component migrates to the cold side.

  4. Alice, Benzene, and Coffee: The ABCs of Ecopharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2015-12-01

    The sesquicentennial celebrations of the publication of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and the structure of benzene offer a unique opportunity to develop a contemporary interpretation of aspects of Alice's adventures, illuminate the symbolism of benzene, and contextualize both with the globalization of coffee, transitioning to how the philosophy and sustainable practices of ecopharmacognosy may be applied to modulating approaches to the quality, safety, efficacy, and consistency (QSEC) of traditional medicines and dietary supplements through technology integration, thereby improving patient-centered health care. PMID:26882696

  5. ATSDR evaluation of potential for human exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, S; Wohlers, D; Paikoff, S; Keith, L S; Faroon, O

    2008-01-01

    As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals found at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) sites that have the greatest public health impact. These profiles comprehensively summarize toxicological and environmental information. This article constitutes the release of portions of the toxicological profile for benzene. The primary purpose of this article is to provide interested individuals with environmental information on benzene that includes production data, environmental fate, potential for human exposure, analytical methods, and a listing of regulations and advisories. PMID:19022881

  6. Stratospheric benzene and hydrocarbon aerosols in Saturn's auroral regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Vinatier, S.; Simon, A. A.; Dartois, E.; Spiga, A.

    2015-10-01

    Saturn's polar upper atmosphere exhibits significant auroral activity, however, its impact on stratospheric chemistry (i.e.the production of benzene and heavier hydrocarbons) and thermal structure is poorly documented. Here we report on the first measurement of benzene column abundance in Saturn's polar stratosphere, together with the first detection of spectral sig- natures of the polar haze in the thermal infrared, based on limb measurements from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on board Cassini. We then evaluate the radiative impact of the polar haze.

  7. Benzene/nitrous oxide flammability in the precipitate hydrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R A

    1989-09-18

    The HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process for destruction of nitrite in precipitate hydrolysis produces nitrous oxide (N2O) gas as one of the products. N2O can form flammable mixtures with benzene which is also present due to radiolysis and hydrolysis of tetraphenylborate. Extensive flame modeling and explosion testing was undertaken to define the minimum oxidant for combustion of N2O/benzene using both nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The attached memorandum interprets and documents the results of the studies.

  8. Retaining-Ring Installation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, S.

    1983-01-01

    New tool eliminates damage to ring through improper tool use. Tool installs spiral-wound retaining rings quickly, reliably, and safely. Tool inserts rings in splined or irregularly shaped bores, bores at bottom of deep ring and slides it along bore until it nests in groove. Pistons are moved by variety of linkages.

  9. Unimolecular thermal fragmentation of ortho-benzene.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Maccarone, A. T.; Nimlos, M. R.; Kato, S.; Bierbaum, V. M.; Ellison, G. B.; Ruscic, B.; Simmonett, A. C.; Allen, W. D.; Schaefer, H. F.; Chemistry; Univ. of Colorado; NREL; Univ. of Georgia

    2007-01-01

    thermochemistry for the high temperature fragmentation of benzene is presented: C{sub 6}H{sub 6} {yields} H+[C{sub 6}H{sub 5}] {yields} H+[o-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}] {yields} HC {triple_bond} CH-HC {triple_bond} C-C {triple_bond} CH. Benzyne may be an important intermediate in the thermal decomposition of many alkylbenzenes (arenes). High engine temperatures above 1500 K may crack these alkylbenzenes to a mixture of alkyl radicals and phenyl radicals. The phenyl radicals will then dissociate first to benzyne and then to acetylene and diacetylene.

  10. catena-Poly[[bis­(4-methyl­benzene­thiol­ato)cadium(II)]-μ-1,3-di-4-pyridylpropane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Yan; Han, Lei

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, [Cd(C7H7S)2(C13H14N2)]n, the unique CdII ion, located on a twofold rotation axis, is coordinated by two S atoms and two N atoms in a slightly distorted tetra­hedral environment. Symmetry-related CdII ions are linked via bridging 1,3-di-4-pyridylpropane ligands, forming a zig-zag chain-structure parallel to [001]. In the crystal structure, there are weak intra­chain π–π stacking inter­actions between benzene rings, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.825 (7) Å, and pairs of chains are inter­digitated with respect to the 4-methyl­benzene­thiol­ate groups. PMID:21582384

  11. Thermodynamic black di-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi

    2010-10-15

    Previously the five dimensional S{sup 1}-rotating black rings have been superposed in a concentric way by some solitonic methods, and regular systems of two S{sup 1}-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions 'black di-rings'). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings is shown, in which both isothermality and isorotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

  12. Crystal structure of (Z)-N′-[1-(3-methyl-5-oxo-1-phenyl-1,5-di­hydro-4H-pyrazol-4-yl­idene)prop­yl]benzene­sulfono­hydrazide

    PubMed Central

    He, Chuan-Chuan; Xu, Guan-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C19H20N4O3S, was synthesized by refluxing equimolar amounts of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-propionylpyrazol-5-one and benzene­sulfonyl hydrazide in ethanol. The compound crystallizes in the keto form and the carbonyl O atom forms an intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond with the neighbouring NH group. There is also C—H⋯O short contact involving the neighbouring phenyl ring. Probably as a result of this, the phenyl ring is inclined to the pyrazolone ring by only 7.58 (12)°. The dihedral angle between the phenyl ring and the benzene­sulfonyl ring is 22.78 (11)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 2(14) ring motif. The dimers are linked via pairs of C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming chains propagating along [100]. PMID:25995862

  13. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~<500m in size) have been indirectly identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring. In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We show evidence that B ring seems to harbor two distinct populations of propellers: "big" propellers covering tens of degrees in azimuth situated in the densest part of B ring, and "small" propellers in less dense inner B ring that are similar in size and shape to known A ring propellers. The population of "big" propellers is exemplified with a single object which is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe this feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at r=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B

  14. Mapping Ring Particle Cooling across Saturn's Rings with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L. J.; Edgington, S. G.; Pilorz, S. H.; Deau, E.

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the rings' thermal inertia, a measure of their response to changes in the thermal environment, varies from ring to ring. Thermal inertia can provide insight into the physical structure of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths. Low thermal inertia and quick temperature responses are suggestive of ring particles that have more porous or fluffy regoliths or that are riddled with cracks. Solid, coherent particles can be expected to have higher thermal inertias (Ferrari et al. 2005). Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded millions of spectra of Saturn's rings since its arrival at Saturn in 2004 (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation between 10 and 600 cm-1 (16.7 and 1000 µm) at focal plane 1 (FP1), which has a field of view of 3.9 mrad. Thermal emission from Saturn's rings peaks in this wavelength range. FP1 spectra can be used to infer ring temperatures. By tracking how ring temperatures vary, we can determine the thermal inertia of the rings. In this work we focus on CIRS observations of the shadowed portion of Saturn's rings. The thermal budget of the rings is dominated by the solar radiation absorbed by its constituent particles. When ring particles enter Saturn's shadow this source of energy is abruptly cut off. As a result, ring particles cool as they traverse Saturn's shadow. From these shadow observations we can create cooling curves at specific locations across the rings. We will show that the rings' cooling curves and thus their thermal inertia vary not only from ring to ring, but by location within the individual rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2010 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  15. Saturn's Other Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's main rings orbit the planet within an atmosphere and ionosphere of water, oxygen and hydrogen, produced by meteoritic impacts on and ultraviolet photodesorbtion of the ring particles [Johnson et al., 2006; Luhmann et al., 2006; Tseng et al., 2010]. The neutral atmosphere itself has only been tentatively detected through ultraviolet fluorescents of OH [Hall et al., 1996] while the ionosphere was observed in situ by the Cassini spacecraft shortly after orbital insertion [Coates et al.,2005; Tokar et al. 2005, Waite et al. 2005]. Although the plasma flow velocity of this ionosphere is not well-constrained, but the close association with the rings suggests that its speed would be couppled to the keplarian velocity of the rings themselves. As a result, the motion of the plasma through Saturn's magnetic field would produce an induced voltage, oriented away from the planet outside synchronous orbit and towards the planet inside synchronous orbit. Such a potential could result in currents flowing across the ring plane and closeing along magnetic field lines and through Saturn's ionosphere at latitudes between 36o and 48o. Cassini observations of whistler-mode plasma wave emissions [Xin et al.,2006] centered on synchronous orbit (1.76 Rs, mapping to 41o latitude) have been interpreted as a product of field-aligned electron beams associated with such a current. This presentation will investigate the magnitude of these currents and the resulting Joule heating of the ionosphere. An important constraint is that no auroral ultraviolet emissions have been observed at the relevant latitudes. In contrast, Joule heating could affect infrared emissions from H3+. Variations in H3+ emission associated with Saturn's rings have been reported by O'Donoghue et al., 2013, and interpreted as a result of ring "rain", i.e. precipitating water group species from the rings which alter ionosphereic chemistry and H3+ densities. As noted by O'Donoghue et al., this interpretation may be

  16. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  17. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  18. Two F Ring Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    These views, taken two hours apart, demonstrate the dramatic variability in the structure of Saturn's intriguing F ring.

    In the image at the left, ringlets in the F ring and Encke Gap display distinctive kinks, and there is a bright patch of material on the F ring's inner edge. Saturn's moon Janus (181 kilometers, or 113 miles across) is shown here, partly illuminated by reflected light from the planet.

    At the right, Prometheus (102 kilometers, or 63 miles across) orbits ahead of the radial striations in the F ring, called 'drapes' by scientists. The drapes appear to be caused by successive passes of Prometheus as it reaches the greatest distance (apoapse) in its orbit of Saturn. Also in this image, the outermost ringlet visible in the Encke Gap displays distinctive bright patches.

    These views were obtained from about three degrees below the ring plane.

    The images were taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 29, 2005, when Cassini was about 1.5 million kilometers (900,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is about 9 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel.

  19. Steam turbine with improved blade ring and cylinder interface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.P.

    1992-10-06

    This patent describes a steam turbine having a cylinder with a plurality of steam inlets which feed a plurality of nozzle blocks and a curtis stage blade ring disposed adjacent the nozzle blocks. This patent describes improvement in a kerf extending from each port through an inner circumferential margin of the tongue to reduce heat induced stresses between the ports and inner circumferential margin of the tongue and prevent cracking thereof.

  20. Interpretation of Urinary and Blood Benzene biomarkers of Exposure for Non-Occupationally Exposed Individuals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-occupational exposure to benzene occurs primarily through inhalation ofair impacted by motor vehicle exhaust, fuel sources, and cigarette smoke. This study relates published measurements ofbenzene biomarkers to air exposure concentrations. Benzene has three reliable biomar...

  1. Benzene solubility in ionic liquids: working toward an understanding of liquid clathrate formation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jorge F B; Flores, Luis A; Wang, Hui; Rogers, Robin D

    2014-11-17

    The solubility of benzene in 15 imidazolium, pyrrolidinium, pyridinium, and piperidinium ionic liquids has been determined; the resulting, benzene-saturated ionic liquid solutions, also known as liquid clathrates, were examined with (1) H and (19) F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to try and understand the molecular interactions that control liquid clathrate formation. The results suggest that benzene interacts primarily with the cation of the ionic liquid, and that liquid clathrate formation (and benzene solubility) is controlled by the strength of the cation-anion interactions, that is, the stronger the cation-anion interaction, the lower the benzene solubility. Other factors that were determined to be important in the final amount of benzene in any given liquid clathrate phase included attractive interactions between the anion and benzene (when significant), and larger steric or free volume demands of the ions, both of which lead to greater benzene solubility.

  2. [Factors affecting benzene diffusion from contaminated soils to the atmosphere and flux characteristics].

    PubMed

    Du, Ping; Wang, Shi-Jie; Zhao, Huan-Huan; Wu, Bin; Han, Chun-Mei; Fang, Ji-Dun; Li, Hui-Ying; Hosomi, Masaaki; Li, Fa-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    The influencing factors of benzene diffusion fluxes from sand and black soil to atmosphere were investigated using a flux chamber (30.0 cm x 17.5 cm x 29.0 cm). In this study, the benzene diffusion fluxes were estimated by measuring the benzene concentrations both in the headspace of the chamber and in the soils of different layers. The results indicated that the soil water content played an important role in benzene diffusion fluxes. The diffusion flux showed positive correlation with the initial benzene concentration and the benzene dissolution concentration for both soil types. The changes of air flow rate from 300 to 900 mL x min(-1) and temperature from 20 degrees C to 40 degrees C resulted in increases of the benzene diffusion flux. Our study of benzene diffusion fluxes from contaminated soils will be beneficial for the predicting model, and emergency management and precautions.

  3. Novel Cholesteric Glassy Liquid Crystals Comprising Benzene Functionalized with Hybrid Chiral-Nematic Mesogens

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C; Marshall, K L; Wallace, J U; Ou, J J; Chen, S H

    2010-03-12

    With 4-cyanobiphenyl-4-yl benzoate nematogens chemically bonded to a benzene core via enantiomeric 2-methylpropyl spacers, a new series of cholesteric glassy liquid crystals has been synthesized for an investigation of structure-property relationships. Glass-forming ability, phase-transition temperatures, and stability against crystallization are affected by both the number and the position of substituent groups on the benzene ring with 1,3,5-trisubstituted system possessing the most favorable set of properties, Tg at 73 °C and Tc at 295 °C. With (S)-3-bromo-2-methylpropanol as the chiral precursor, left-handed helical stacking was observed for all the cholesteric GLCs reported herein. Films of the 1,3,5-trisubstituted and meta-disubstituted systems show a selective reflection wavelength, λR, at 413 and 422 nm, respectively, whereas that of the ortho-isomer exhibits a λR at 860 nm. Replacing one of the hybrid chiral-nematic mesogen in the 1,3,5-trisubstituted system by a nematogen loosens the helical pitch to yield a λR at 630 nm, still shorter than that of the ortho-isomer despite the dilution by a nematogen. This observation suggests the importance of regioisomerism to helical twisting. The difference in λR was interpreted in terms of molecular packing involving chiral spacers through computational chemistry. The susceptibility of cholesteric GLCs to photoalignment was tested using the ortho-isomer. The degree of photoalignment improves with an increasing rotational mobility of pendant coumarin monomers to an extent comparable to mechanical alignment on conventional rubbed polyimide films.

  4. Thermodynamic Features of Benzene-1,2-Diphosphonic Acid Complexes with Several Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Syouhei Nishihama; Ryan P. Witty; Leigh R Martin; Kenneth L. Nash

    2013-08-01

    Among his many contributions to the advancement of f-element chemistry and separation science, Professor Gregory R. Choppin’s research group completed numerous investigations featuring the application of distribution techniques to the determination of metal complexation equilibrium quotients. Most of these studies focused on the chemistry of lanthanide and actinide complexes. In keeping with that tradition, this report discusses the complex formation equilibrium constants for complexes of trivalent europium (Eu3+) with benzene-1,2-diphosphonic acid (H4BzDP) determined using solvent extraction distribution experiments in 0.2 M (Na,H)ClO4 media in the temperature range of 5 – 45 degrees C. Protonation constants for HnBzDP4-n and stoichiometry and stability of BzDP4- complexes with Zn2+, Ni2+, and Cu2+ have also been determined using potentiometric titration (at I = 0.1 M) and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Heats of protonation of HnBzDPn-4 species have been determined by titration calorimetry. From the temperature dependence of the complex Eu3+-HnBzDPn-4 equilibrium constant, a composite enthalpy (?H = -15.1 (+/-1.0) kJ mol-1) of complexation has been computed. Comparing these thermodynamic parameters with literature reports on other diphosphonic acids and structurally similar carboxylic acids indicates that exothermic heats of complexation are unique to the Eu-BzDP system. Comparisons with thermodynamic data from the literature indicate that the fixed geometry imposed by the benzene ring enhances complex stability.

  5. The past suppression of industry knowledge of the toxicity of benzene to humans and potential bias in future benzene research.

    PubMed

    Infante, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Petrochemical industry representatives often withhold information and misinterpret positive evidence of toxicity of benzene, even from their own research, also discouraging or delaying disclosure of findings of adverse effects to the public. They now appear to be attempting to influence study results in industry's favor by offering predetermined conclusions about study results as part of an effort to draw financial support for the studies. The American Petroleum Institute is currently raising funds for benzene research being conducted in China for which it has already announced the intended conclusions. PMID:16967835

  6. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  7. Two-dimensional Zn(II) and one-dimensional Co(II) coordination polymers based on benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate and pyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Juan; Han, Chang-Bao; Wang, Yu-Ling

    2016-02-01

    Coordination polymers constructed from metal ions and organic ligands have attracted considerable attention owing to their diverse structural topologies and potential applications. Ligands containing carboxylate groups are among the most extensively studied because of their versatile coordination modes. Reactions of benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid (H2BDC) and pyridine (py) with Zn(II) or Co(II) yielded two new coordination polymers, namely, poly[(μ4-benzene-1,4-dicarboxylato-κ(4)O:O':O'':O''')(pyridine-κN)zinc(II)], [Zn(C8H4O2)(C5H5N)]n, (I), and catena-poly[aqua(μ3-benzene-1,4-dicarboxylato-κ(3)O:O':O'')bis(pyridine-κN)cobalt(II)], [Co(C8H4O2)(C5H5N)2(H2O)]n, (II). In compound (I), the Zn(II) cation is five-coordinated by four carboxylate O atoms from four BDC(2-) ligands and one pyridine N atom in a distorted square-pyramidal coordination geometry. Four carboxylate groups bridge two Zn(II) ions to form centrosymmetric paddle-wheel-like Zn2(μ2-COO)4 units, which are linked by the benzene rings of the BDC(2-) ligands to generate a two-dimensional layered structure. The two-dimensional layer is extended into a three-dimensional supramolecular structure with the help of π-π stacking interactions between the aromatic rings. Compound (II) has a one-dimensional double-chain structure based on Co2(μ2-COO)2 units. The Co(II) cations are bridged by BDC(2-) ligands and are octahedrally coordinated by three carboxylate O atoms from three BDC(2-) ligands, one water O atom and two pyridine N atoms. Interchain O-H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions link these chains to form a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. PMID:26846498

  8. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  9. Biodegradation of benzene by halophilic and halotolerant bacteria under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Carla A; Fathepure, Babu Z

    2004-02-01

    A highly enriched halophilic culture was established with benzene as the sole carbon source by using a brine soil obtained from an oil production facility in Oklahoma. The enrichment completely degraded benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes within 1 to 2 weeks. Also, [14C]benzene was converted to 14CO2, suggesting the culture's ability to mineralize benzene. Community structure analysis revealed that Marinobacter spp. were the dominant members of the enrichment.

  10. Theoretical study of the solvent effect on the aromaticity of benzene: a NICS analysis.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Georgia M A; Dos Santos, Hélio F

    2014-03-01

    Nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) quantities for benzene-benzene and benzene-water species were obtained and are discussed in gas phase and in solution. Besides standard polarizable continuum model (PCM) calculations, sequential Monte Carlo/quantum mechanics (S-MC/QM) were also performed. Benzene was shown to be slightly more aromatic in condensate phase when we considered the average solvent configuration (ASEC) approach with explicit molecules.

  11. Double Ring Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A faint double ring crater is seen at upper right in this picture of Mercury (FDS 166601) taken one hour and 40 minutes before Mariner 10's second rendezvous with the planet September 21. Located 35 degrees S. Lat. The outer ring is 170 kilometers (10 miles) across. Double ring craters are common features on Mercury. This particular feature and the bright rayed crater to its left were seen from a different viewing angle in pictures taken by Mariner 10 during its first Mercury flyby last March 29.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  12. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  13. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5-7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp-Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e- waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (˜107 s-1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ˜1-2 nm).

  14. Oligomeric ferrocene rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkpen, Michael S.; Scheerer, Stefan; Linseis, Michael; White, Andrew J. P.; Winter, Rainer F.; Albrecht, Tim; Long, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    Cyclic oligomers comprising strongly interacting redox-active monomer units represent an unknown, yet highly desirable class of nanoscale materials. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of the first family of molecules belonging to this compound category—differently sized rings comprising only 1,1‧-disubstituted ferrocene units (cyclo[n], n = 5–7, 9). Due to the close proximity and connectivity of centres (covalent Cp–Cp linkages; Cp = cyclopentadienyl) solution voltammograms exhibit well-resolved, separated 1e– waves. Theoretical interrogations into correlations based on ring size and charge state are facilitated using values of the equilibrium potentials of these transitions, as well as their relative spacing. As the interaction free energies between the redox centres scale linearly with overall ring charge and in conjunction with fast intramolecular electron transfer (∼107 s‑1), these molecules can be considered as uniformly charged nanorings (diameter ∼1–2 nm).

  15. Child sex rings.

    PubMed

    Wild, N J; Wynne, J M

    1986-07-19

    Details of 11 child sex rings identified in one working class community were obtained by interviewing investigating police officers and examining health and social services records. The rings contained 14 adult male perpetrators and 175 children aged 6-15 years. Most perpetrators used child ringleaders to recruit victims; others became a "family friend" or obtained a position of authority over children. Secrecy was encouraged and bribery, threats, and peer pressure used to induce participation in sexual activities. Offences reported included fondling, masturbation, pornography, and oral, vaginal, and anal intercourse. Eleven perpetrators were successfully prosecuted; all but one received a sentence of three years or less. Behavioural problems were common among those children who had participated for a long time. Child sex rings are difficult to detect and may be common. Many children are seriously abused as a consequence of them. PMID:3730803

  16. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  17. Low occupational exposure to benzene in a petrochemical plant: modulating effect of genetic polymorphisms and smoking habit on the urinary t,t-MA/SPMA ratio.

    PubMed

    Mansi, Antonella; Bruni, Roberta; Capone, Pasquale; Paci, Enrico; Pigini, Daniela; Simeoni, Carla; Gnerre, Rossella; Papacchini, Maddalena; Tranfo, Giovanna

    2012-08-13

    The identification of reliable biomarkers is critical for the assessment of occupational exposure of benzene: S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA) and trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) are the most currently used. t,t-MA is an open-ring metabolite, but it is also a metabolite of the food preservative sorbic acid, while SPMA is formed by conjugation with glutathione, and several studies suggested that the genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferases modulates its production. This study compared the ability of these metabolites to assess the benzene exposure in a big group of petrochemical workers. Furthermore, investigated how genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase theta 1 (GSTT1), glutathione S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1), glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1) and smoking habits, may influence their excretion. Results showed that occupational exposure to benzene was negligible compared to that from smoking and confirmed the modulating effect of the genetic polymorphism of GSTT1 on the urinary excretion of SPMA, but not of t, t-MA, even at very low levels of benzene exposure. The same effect was found for GSTM1, but only for smokers. The t,t-MA/SPMA ratio was not a constant value and resulted to be higher than the corresponding Biological Exposure Index (BEI) ratio, which is currently equal to 20. Higher values of metabolite have been associated with the GSTT1 or GSTM1 null genotype and these are responsible for increase health risk. We suggest that this ratio could be used as a marker of individual susceptibility for subjects with benzene exposure.

  18. Sliding-Ring Catenanes.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Isurika R; Frasconi, Marco; Wu, Yilei; Liu, Wei-Guang; Wasielewski, Michael R; Goddard, William A; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-08-17

    Template-directed protocols provide a routine approach to the synthesis of mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), in which the mechanical bonds are stabilized by a wide variety of weak interactions. In this Article, we describe a strategy for the preparation of neutral [2]catenanes with sliding interlocked electron-rich rings, starting from two degenerate donor-acceptor [2]catenanes, consisting of a tetracationic cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) cyclophane (CBPQT(4+)) and crown ethers containing either (i) hydroquinone (HQ) or (ii) 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) recognition units and carrying out four-electron reductions of the cyclophane components to their neutral forms. The donor-acceptor interactions between the CBPQT(4+) ring and both HQ and DNP units present in the crown ethers that stabilize the [2]catenanes are weakened upon reduction of the cyclophane components to their radical cationic states and are all but absent in their fully reduced states. Characterization in solution performed by UV-vis, EPR, and NMR spectroscopic probes reveals that changes in the redox properties of the [2]catenanes result in a substantial decrease of the energy barriers for the circumrotation and pirouetting motions of the interlocked rings, which glide freely through one another in the neutral states. The solid-state structures of the fully reduced catenanes reveal profound changes in the relative dispositions of the interlocked rings, with the glycol chains of the crown ethers residing in the cavities of the neutral CBPQT(0) rings. Quantum mechanical investigations of the energy levels associated with the four different oxidation states of the catenanes support this interpretation. Catenanes and rotaxanes with sliding rings are expected to display unique properties. PMID:27398609

  19. EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON THE NATURAL ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol is commonly used as a fuel oxygenate. A concern has been raised that the presence of ethanol from a spill of gasoline may inhibit the natural biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons, including benzene. Ethanol is miscible in water, and ethanol is readily metabolized by micr...

  20. Absorption of lindane (gamma benzene hexachloride) in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, C M; Lowry, W; Reisch, J S

    1977-12-01

    Concentrations of lindane (gamma benzene hexachloride) were measured in blood from children who had received treatment with 1% lindane lotion. Lindane was present in the blood of all patients from two of 48 hours following application. Concentrations were inversely related to weight, surface area, and were independent of the quantity of lindane applied.